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Sample records for maitotoxin-induced liver cell

  1. Role of liver functions on liver cell mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takata,Tameyuki

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The control mechanism of mitosis in the regenerating rat liver was studied in relation to the cell functions. Partial hepatec· tomy induces a series of changes prior to the initiation of mitosis, i. e. decrease in serum glucose and albumin levels, loss of glycogen from liver cells, and increased lipid mobilization to liver cells. Massive supplies of glucose and fructose suppressed significantly hepatocellu. lar mitosis with suppression of lipid accumulation and preservation of glycogen in the liver cells and of blood sugar level. Homologous serum administration also suppressed the rate of liver cell mitosis after hepatectomy preventing the decrease in serum albumin level, but did not suppress the lipid accumulation in the liver. Starvation, which would relieve the liver cell from the work of detoxication of intesti. nal toxic products, did not show any suppressive effect on the mitotic rate of liver cells after partial hepatectomy in single animals. But starvation induced severe hypoglycemia, moderate hypoalbuminemia and loss of glycogen content in the liver. These changes in metabo. lism by starvation and partial hepatectomy were suppressed by con· jugating the animals with nonhepatectomized fed.partners by aortic anastomosis, and mitosis was suppressed in the residual liver of the fasting animals in this parabiosis. The results indicate that all the major functions of parenchymal live cells tested, sugar metabolism, serum albumin production, and detoxication, are closely related to the control of liver cell mitosis. Accumulation of lipids in the liver remnant after partial hepatectomy is thought to be for the compensa. tion of reduced glycogen storage and not concerned directly with the liver cell mitosis. Discussion was made briefly on the humoral factor and portal blood factor in relation to excess load of functions on resi. dual liver cells.

  2. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  3. Experimental study of bioartificial liver with cultured human liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To establish an extracorporeal bioartificial liver support system (EBLSS) using cultured human liver cells and to study its support effect for fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS The liver support experiment of EBLSS consisting of aggregates cultured human liver cells, hollow fiber bioreactor, and circulation unit was carried out in dizhepatic dogs.RESULTS The viability of isolated hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells reached 96%. These cells were successfully cultured as multicellular spheroids with synthetic technique. The typical morphological appearance was retained up to the end of the artificial liver experiment. Compared with the control dogs treated with EBLSS without liver cells, the survival time of artificial liver support dogs was significantly prolonged. The changes of blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were slow. Both serum ammonia and lactate levels were significantly lowered at the 3rd h and 5th h. In addition, a good viability of human liver cells was noted after 5 h experiment.CONCLUSION EBLSS playing a metabolic role of cultured human hepatocytes, is capable of compensating the function of the liver, and could provide effective artificial liver support and therapy for patients with FHF.

  4. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Bo; Xu; Chao; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells(liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future.

  5. Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

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    Wong, Adelaine; Ortiz-Neira, Clara L.; Abou Reslan, Walid; Kaura, Deepak [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Sharon, Raphael; Anderson, Ronald [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Oncology, Calgary, AB (Canada); Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-10-15

    Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) typically presents with hepatomegaly and other signs of liver dysfunction. We present an 11-month-old child having only minimally elevated liver enzymes as an indication of liver involvement. Using sonography as the initial diagnostic tool followed by MRI, LCH of the liver was revealed. A review of sonographic, CT, MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in liver LCH is presented. We recommend that physicians consider sonography and MRI screening for liver involvement in patients with newly diagnosed LCH, as periportal involvement may be present with little or no liver function abnormality present, as in this patient. (orig.)

  6. DNA Ploidy and Liver Cell Dysplasia in Liver Biopsies from Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

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    Sayed S El-Sayed

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy among pathologists when assessing the presence or absence of liver cell dysplasia in liver biopsies taken from cirrhotic patients. The objective of the present study was to determine the DNA ploidy pattern of hepatocytes of patients with liver cirrhosis and its relationship to liver cell dysplasia. A total of 48 male patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis based on clinical, laboratory and histopathological criteria were included in the study. A liver biopsy was taken from each patient; one part of the biopsy was subjected to histopathology, and the other to flow cytometry. The histopathological examination revealed liver cell dysplasia in 60% of patients with liver cirrhosis (62% of them had large cell dysplasia [LCD] and 38% had small cell dysplasia [SCD]. Abnormal DNA content (aneuploidy was found in 81.5% of positive liver cell dysplasia specimens and found only in 11.1% of negative liver cell dysplasia specimens, with a statistically significant difference (P0.05 in comparison with SCD. In conclusion, SCD (similar to LCD is also associated with aneuploidy and elevated DNA index, and may carry the same risk for progression to hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Nucleoside transporters and liver cell growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valdés, Raquel; Mata, João F; Del Santo, Belén; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Felipe, Antonio; Casado, F Javier

    1998-01-01

    .... This review summarizes work performed in our laboratory on these transport systems, particularly nucleoside transporters, which are up-regulated in physiological situations associated with liver cell growth...

  8. Liver stem cells - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The brief and concise preface written by prof. Takahiro Ochiya is particularly well addressed to scholars belonging to different scientific fields: cellular and molecular biology, liver and cancer biology, tissue engineering and stem cell therapy. By a few lines prof Ochiya is telling us that we are getting exciting results, at the lab and the preclinical level, in treating liver injuries thanks to the unprecedented advances in our knowledge on liver stem cells biology....

  9. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within

  10. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within week

  11. Natural Killer cells and liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eFasbender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 40 years since the discovery of Natural Killer (NK cells it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects.

  12. Liver stem cells: from preface to advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Kanwal; Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Zahra, Nureen; Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Liver is a major metabolic organ of the body and is known to comprise of two epithelial cell lineages, namely, hepatocytes and cholangiocytes which are known to originate from hepatoblasts during fetal developing stages. Upon acute injury, the hepatocytes and cholangiocytes undergo cellular division to compensate the loss, however, chronic damage may suppress this proliferative ability and as a consequence hepatic and extra-hepatic stem cells may contribute for liver regeneration. Facultative liver stem cells (oval cells) may emerge, proliferate and contribute in replacing damaged hepatic cells. Similarly, bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells are also known for contributing in liver regeneration having their ability of self renewal and differentiation. However, a closer look is still required to bridge the existing knowledge gaps between functionality and limitations. Thereby, we have discussed the detailed mechanistic insights of both hepatic and extra-hepatic stem cells including, stem/progenitor cells, adult/fetal hepatocytes, oval cells, bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells. We have also focused on few in vitro and in vivo studies elucidating therapeutic applications and challenges related to the liver stem cells. We believe that such conversations may provide invaluable contribution for realistic advancement in the state of therapeutic stem-cell transplantation.

  13. Natural killer cells in liver disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tian, Zhigang; Chen, Yongyan; Gao, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are enriched in lymphocytes within the liver and have unique phenotypic features and functional properties, including tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis‐inducing ligand...

  14. Liver-specific gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is induced by liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Lange; Philipp Bassler; Michael V. Lioznov; Helge Bruns; Dietrich Kluth; Axel R. Zander; Henning C. Fiegel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The origin of putative liver cells from distinct bone marrow stem cells, e.g. hematopoietic stem cells or multipotent adult progenitor cells was found in recent in vitro studies. Cell culture experiments revealed a key role of growth factors for the induction of liver-specific genes in stem cell cultures. We investigated the potential of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow to differentiate into hepatocytic cells in vitro. Furthermore,we assessed the influence of cocultured liver cells on induction of liver-specific gene expression.METHODS: Mesenchymal stem cells were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) by retroviral gene transduction. Clonal marked MSC were either cultured under liver stimulating conditions using fibronectin-coated culture dishes and medium supplemented with SCF, HGF,EGF, and FGF-4 alone, or in presence of freshly isolated rat liver cells. Cells in cocultures were harvested and GFP+ or GFP- cells were separated using fluorescence activated cell sorting. RT-PCR analysis for the stem cell marker Thy1 and the hepatocytic markers CK-18, albumin, CK-19,and AFP was performed in the different cell populations.RESULTS: Under the specified culture conditions, rat MSC cocultured with liver cells expressed albumin-, CK-18,CK-19, and AFP-RNA over 3 weeks, whereas MSC cultured alone did not show liver specific gene expression.CONCLUSION: The results indicate that (1) rat MSC from bone marrow can differentiate towards hepatocytic lineage in vitro, and (2) that the microenvironment plays a decisive role for the induction of hepatic differentiation of rMSC.

  15. Adult liver stem cells in hepatic regeneration and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak

    2015-01-01

    An alternative source of livers for transplantation in patients with (genetic) liver diseases and liver failure is needed because liver donors are scarce. HPC-derived hepatocyte-like cells could be one of the options. Because dogs and humans share liver-pathologies and disease-pathways, the dog is c

  16. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  17. LIVER AND BONE MARROW STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS AS REGULATORS OF REPARATIVE REGENERATION OF DAMAGED LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Lundup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review the modern information about effectiveness of liver insufficiency treatment by stem/ progenitor cells of liver (oval cells and bone marrow (hemopoietic cells and mesenchymal cells was presented. It is shown that medical action of these cells is referred on normalization of liver cell interaction and reorganization of processes of a reparative regeneration in damaged liver. It is believed that application of mesenchymal stromal cells from an autological bone marrow is the most perspective strategy. However, for definitive judgement about regenerative possibilities of the autological bone marrow cells it is necessary to carry out large-scale double blind clinical researches. 

  18. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarygin, Konstantin N.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable. PMID:28210629

  19. Transplantation of fetal liver epithelial progenitor cells ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Fang Zheng; Li-Jian Liang; Chang-Xiong Wu; Jin-Song Chen; Zhen-Sheng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of transplanted fetal liver epithelial progenitor (FLEP) cells on liver fibrosis in mice.METHODS: FLEP cells were isolated from embryonal day (ED) 14 BALB/c mice and transplanted into female syngenic BALB/c mice (n = 60). After partial hepatectomy (PH), diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was administered to induce liver fibrosis. Controls received FLEP cells and non-supplemented drinking water, the model group received DEN-spiked water, and the experimental group received FLEP cells and DEN.Mice were killed after 1, 2, and 3 mo, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) in serum,and hydroxyproline (Hyp) content in liver were assessed.Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) of liver was tested by immunohistochemistry. Transplanted male mice FLEP cells were identified by immunocytochemistry for sry (sex determination region for Y chromosome) protein.RESULTS: Serum ALT, AST, HA, and LN were markedly reduced by transplanted FLEP cells. Liver Hyp content and α-SMA staining in mice receiving FLEP cells were lower than that of the model group, which was consistent with altered liver pathology. Transplanted cells proliferated and differentiated into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with 30%-50% repopulation in the liver fibrosis induced by DEN after 3 mo.CONCLUSION: Transplanted FLEP cells proliferate and differentiate into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with high repopulation capacity in the fiberized liver induced by DEN, which restores liver function and reduces liver fibrosis.

  20. Donor liver natural killer cells alleviate liver allograft acute rejection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Dong Yu; Tian-Zhu Long; Guo-Lin Li; Li-Hong Lv; Hao-Ming Lin; Yong-Heng Huang; Ya-Jin Chen; Yun-Le Wan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver enriched natural killer (NK) cells are of high immune activity. However, the function of donor liver NK cells in allogeneic liver transplantation (LTx) remains unclear. METHODS: Ten Gy of whole body gamma-irradiation (WBI) from a 60Co source at 0.6 Gy/min was used for depleting donor-derived leukocytes, and transfusion of purified liver NK cells isolated from the same type rat as donor (donor type liver NK cells, dtlNKs) through portal vein was performed immediately after grafting the irradiated liver. Post-transplant survival observation on recipients and histopathological detection of liver grafts were adoptive to evaluate the biological impact of donor liver NK cells on recipients' survival in rat LTx. RESULTS: Transfusion of dtlNKs did not shorten the survival time among the recipients of spontaneous tolerance model (BN to LEW rat) after rat LTx, but prolonged the liver graft survival among the recipients depleted of donor-derived leukocytes in the acute rejection model (LEW to BN rat). Compared to the recipients in the groups which received the graft depleted of donor-derived leukocytes, better survival and less damage in the allografts were also found among the recipients in the two different strain combinations of liver allograft due to transfusion of dtlNKs. CONCLUSIONS: Donor liver NK cells alone do not exacerbate liver allograft acute rejection. Conversely, they can alleviate it, and improve the recipients' survival.

  1. Signal molecule-mediated hepatic cell communication during liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Yu Zheng; Shun-Yan Weng; Yan Yu

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration is a complex and well-orchestrated process, during which hepatic cells are activated to produce large signal molecules in response to liver injury or mass reduction. These signal molecules, in turn, set up the connections and cross-talk among liver cells to promote hepatic recovery. In this review, we endeavor to summarize the network of signal molecules that mediates hepatic cell communication in the regulation of liver regeneration.

  2. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  3. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nurlina Wan Yahya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  4. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  5. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation.

  6. Role of Th17 cells in common liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Linlin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been found that T helper type 17 (Th17 cells are a new subset of CD4+ Th cells. Th17 cells play an important role in the onset and development of many liver diseases and have become the research focus in immunology. This paper summarizes the studies on the relationship between Th17 cells and various liver diseases in order to provide a new idea for the study and treatment of liver diseases.

  7. Memory NK cells: why do they reside in the liver?

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yonglin; Peng, Hui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Immune memory is the hallmark of adaptive immunity. However, recent studies have shown that natural killer (NK) cells, key components of the innate immune system, also mediate memory responses in mice and humans. Strikingly, memory NK cells were liver-resident in some models, raising the question as to whether the liver is a special organ for the acquisition of NK cell memory. Here, we review the characteristics of NK cell memory by summarizing recent progress and discuss how the liver may ge...

  8. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. F. Chang; J. Y. Fan; F. C. Zhang; J. Ma; C. S. Xu

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  9. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C F; Fan, J Y; Zhang, F C; Ma, J; Xu, C S

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  10. Establishment and characterization of feeder-cell-dependent bovine fetal liver cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment and initial characterization of bovine fetal liver cell lines is described. Bovine fetal hepatocytes were cultured from the liver of a 34-day bovine fetus by physical disruption of the liver tissue. Released liver cells and clumps of cells were plated on STO feeder layers and wer...

  11. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  12. Role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kolios; Vassilis Valatas; Elias Kouroumalis

    2006-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages have long been considered as mostly scavenger cells responsible for removing particulate material from the portal circulation. However, evidence derived mostly from animal models, indicates that Kupffer cells may be implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases including viral hepatitis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, intrahepatic cholostasis, activation or rejection of the liver during liver transplantation and liver fibrosis. There is accumulating evidence, reviewed in this paper, suggesting that Kupffer cells may act both as effector cells in the destruction of hepatocytes by producing harmful soluble mediators as well as antigen presenting cells during viral infections of the liver. Moreover they may represent a significant source of chemoattractant molecules for cytotoxic CD8 and regulatory T cells. Their role in fibrosis is well established as they are one of the main sources of TGFβ1 production, which leads to the transformation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts. Whether all these variable functions in the liver are mediated by different Kupffer cell subpopulations remains to be evaluated. In this review we propose a model that demonstrates the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  13. Bimodal role of Kupffer cells during colorectal cancer liver metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are resident liver macrophages that play a crucial role in liver homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Evidence suggests KCs have both stimulatory and inhibitory functions during tumor development but the extent of these functions remains to be defined. Using KC depletion studies in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases we demonstrated the bimodal role of KCs in determining tumor growth. KC depletion with gadolinium chloride...

  14. Methods of Liver Stem Cell Therapy in Rodents as Models of Human Liver Regeneration in Hepatic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Goradel, Nasser; Darabi, Masoud; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Zahedi, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Cell therapy is a promising intervention for treating liver diseases and liver failure. Different animal models of human liver cell therapy have been developed in recent years. Rats and mice are the most commonly used liver failure models. In fact, rodent models of hepatic failure have shown significant improvement in liver function after cell infusion. With the advent of stem-cell technologies, it is now possible to re-programme adult somatic cells such as skin or hair-follicle cells from individual patients to stem-like cells and differentiate them into liver cells. Such regenerative stem cells are highly promising in the personalization of cell therapy. The present review article will summarize current approaches to liver stem cell therapy with rodent models. In addition, we discuss common cell tracking techniques and how tracking data help to direct liver cell therapy research in animal models of hepatic failure.

  15. Stem cell-derived hepatocytes for functional liver replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eChrist

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternate cell source to substitute for primary hepatocytes in hepatocyte transplantation because of their multiple differentiation potential and nearly unlimited availability. They may differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and maintain specific hepatocyte functions also after transplantation into the regenerating livers of mice or rats both under injury and non-injury conditions. Depending on the underlying liver disease their mode of action is either to replace the diseased liver tissue or to support liver regeneration through their anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic as well as their pro-proliferative action.

  16. SECs (Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells), Liver Microenvironment, and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Harris, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to chronic liver injury such as alcoholic/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis with no FDA-approved treatments. Liver fibrosis results in a continual accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and paves the way for replacement of parenchyma with nonfunctional scar tissue. The fibrotic condition results in drastic changes in the local mechanical, chemical, and biological microenvironment of the tissue. Liver parenchyma is supported by an efficient network of vasculature lined by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). These nonparenchymal cells are highly specialized resident endothelial cell type with characteristic morphological and functional features. Alterations in LSECs phenotype including lack of LSEC fenestration, capillarization, and formation of an organized basement membrane have been shown to precede fibrosis and promote hepatic stellate cell activation. Here, we review the interplay of LSECs with the dynamic changes in the fibrotic liver microenvironment such as matrix rigidity, altered ECM protein profile, and cell-cell interactions to provide insight into the pivotal changes in LSEC physiology and the extent to which it mediates the progression of liver fibrosis. Establishing the molecular aspects of LSECs in the light of fibrotic microenvironment is valuable towards development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets of liver fibrosis. PMID:28293634

  17. Stem cells in liver regeneration and their potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosos, Ioannis; Kolios, George

    2013-10-01

    Stem cells constitute a population of "primitive cells" with the ability to divide indefinitely and give rise to specialized cells under special conditions. Because of these two characteristics they have received particular attention in recent decades. These cells are the primarily responsible factors for the regeneration of tissues and organs and for the healing of lesions, a feature that makes them a central key in the development of cell-based medicine, called Regenerative Medicine. The idea of wound and organ repair and body regeneration is as old as the mankind, reflecting the human desire for inhibiting aging and immortality and it is first described in the ancient Greek myth of Prometheus. It is of interest that the myth refers to liver, an organ with remarkable regenerative ability after loss of mass and function caused by liver injury or surgical resection. Over the last decade there has been an important progress in understanding liver physiology and the mechanisms underlying hepatic development and regeneration. As liver transplantation, despite its difficulties, remains the only effective therapy for advanced liver disease so far, scientific interest has nowadays been orientated towards Regenerative Medicine and the use of stem cells to repair damaged liver. This review is focused on the available literature concerning the role of stem cells in liver regeneration. It summarizes the results of studies concerning endogenous liver regeneration and stem cell experimental protocols. Moreover, this review discusses the clinical studies that have been conducted in humans so far.

  18. Pitavastatin suppressed liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, He-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Xie, Xue-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Jiang, Fei-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Pitavastatin classically functions as a blood cholesterol-lowering drug. Previously, it was discovered with antiglioma stem cell properties through drug screening. However, whether it can be used for liver cancer cell therapy has never been reported. In this study, the cell viability and colony formation assay were utilized to analyze the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin on liver cancer cells. The cell cycle alteration was checked after pitavastatin treatment. Apoptosis-related protein expression and the effect of caspase inhibitor were also checked. The in vivo inhibitory effect of pitavastatin on the growth of liver tumor was also tested. It was found that pitavastatin inhibited growth and colony formation of liver cancer Huh-7 cells and SMMC7721 cells. It induced arrest of liver cancer cells at the G1 phase. Increased proportion of sub-G1 cells was observed after pitavastatin treatment. Pitavastatin promoted caspase-9 cleavage and caspase-3 cleavage in liver cancer cells. Caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK reversed the cleavage of cytotoxic effect of pitavastatin. Moreover, pitavastatin decreased the tumor growth and improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study suggested the antiliver cancer effect of the old drug pitavastatin. It may be developed as a drug for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27621652

  19. In Vitro transformation of LW13 Rat liver epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHICAN; KARLFETNANSKY; 等

    1992-01-01

    A rat liver epithelial cell line designated LW 13 was established using a sequential sedimentation method.The cell line retained many normal proerties of liver epithelial cells and showed some structural and functional features resembling those of liver parenchymal cells,LW13 cells became malignant after the intrduction of exogenous transforming EJ Ha ras gene,Tumors produced by inoculation of the transformed cells into baby rats contained areas of poorly differentialted hepatocellular carcinoma,In situ hybridization analysis confirmed the random rather than specific integration of exogenous ras gene into host chromosomes.Furthermore,an at least tenfold increase in the expression of the endogenous c mys gene was detected among transformed cell lines,suggesting the involvement of the c myc proto oncogene in the in vitro transformation of rat liver epithelial cells by EJ Ha ras oncogene.

  20. Macrophages and dendritic cells in the development of liver injury leading to liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananiev, J; Penkova, M; Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Philipov, S; Tana, C; Gulubova, M; Wollina, U

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure (LF) continues to be a serious problem due to different underlying disorders. Not only hepatocytes but Kupffer cells (KCs) and dendritic cells (DCs) are of importance in this instance. We wanted to investigate the possible role of KCs and liver DCs in the development of liver injury in patients with liver failure. Liver specimens from 23 patients who died after liver failure were examined for the presence and distribution of CD68-positive KCs and CD83-positive DCs by immunohistochemistry. The distribution of the CD83-positive DC in the sinusoidal and the periportal spaces was not even. While 39.1% of patients had a high sinusoidal density of CD83-positive cells, 60.9% demonstrated a high density of CD83-positive cells in the periportal tract. The number of CD83-positive DCs in periportal tracts in patients with advanced liver fibrosis (n=5) were high, while those with mild liver fibrosis (n=18) had low numbers of mature dendritic cells (χ2=4.107; p=0.043). In addition, all patients with intensive fibrosis had low counts of CD68-positive KC’s in portal tracts vs patients with mild fibrosis of which 67% had high counts (χ2=6.97; p=0.008). In seven of the patients with moderate steatosis (87.5%) low numbers of CD68-positive KCs were found in sinusoids, in contrast to those with severe steatosis, where 12 patients (80%) had high KC counts (χ2=13.4; p less than 0.001). The distribution and number of CD68-positive KC and CD83-positive DC reflect the progression of liver fibrosis leading to liver failure.

  1. Primary culture of adult rat liver cells. I. Preparation of isolated cells from trypsin-perfused liver of adult rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazaki,Masahiro

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated hepatic cells from adult rats were prepared by perfusing the livers with trypsin. The highest yield of viable cells was obtained by perfusing the liver with 0.1% trypsin, pH 7.0, at 37 degrees C for 30 min. Following this treatment about 70% of cells excluded trypan blue. The isolated cells contained many binucleate cells. Between 60 and 70% of DNA present originally in the liver was recovered from the isolated hepatic cells, which had higher glucose 6-phosphatase activity than the liver. Thus the resulting cell population seems to be rich in hepatocytes. The isolated hepatic cells, however, lost some of their cellular proteins such as alanine and tyrosine amino-transferases. It was suggested that the membranes of isolated hepatic cells might be damaged by both enzymatic digestion and mechanical destruction.

  2. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ursula; M; Gehling; Marc; Willems; Kathleen; Schlagner; Ralf; A; Benndorf; Maura; Dandri; Jrg; Petersen; Martina; Sterneck; Joerg-Matthias; Pollok; Dieter; K; Hossfeld; Xavier; Rogiers

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To test the hypothesis that liver cirrhosis is associated with mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. METHODS:Peripheral blood samples from 72 patients with liver cirrhosis of varying etiology were analyzed by flow cytometry.Identified progenitor cell subsets were immunoselected and used for functional assays in vitro. Plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1(SDF-1) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS:Progenitor cells with a CD133 + /CD45 + CD14 + phenotype we...

  3. A Transcriptomic Signature of Mouse Liver Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Passman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver progenitor cells (LPCs can proliferate extensively, are able to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and contribute to liver regeneration. The presence of LPCs, however, often accompanies liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, indicating that they may be a cancer stem cell. Understanding LPC biology and establishing a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method to detect their presence in the liver will assist diagnosis and facilitate monitoring of treatment outcomes in patients with liver pathologies. A transcriptomic meta-analysis of over 400 microarrays was undertaken to compare LPC lines against datasets of muscle and embryonic stem cell lines, embryonic and developed liver (DL, and HCC. Three gene clusters distinguishing LPCs from other liver cell types were identified. Pathways overrepresented in these clusters denote the proliferative nature of LPCs and their association with HCC. Our analysis also revealed 26 novel markers, LPC markers, including Mcm2 and Ltbp3, and eight known LPC markers, including M2pk and Ncam. These markers specified the presence of LPCs in pathological liver tissue by qPCR and correlated with LPC abundance determined using immunohistochemistry. These results showcase the value of global transcript profiling to identify pathways and markers that may be used to detect LPCs in injured or diseased liver.

  4. EMP-1 is a junctional protein in a liver stem cell line and in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Sherley, James L; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chiu, Chien-Chang; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Liang, Ja-Der; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Sheu, Jin-Chuan

    2005-09-09

    In an attempt to discover cell markers for liver stem cells, a cDNA microarray analysis was carried out to compare the gene expression profiles between an adult liver stem cell line, Lig-8, and mature hepatocytes. Several genes in the categories of extracellular matrix, cell membrane, cell adhesion, transcription factor, signal molecule, transporter, and metabolic enzyme were shown to be differentially expressed in Lig-8 cells. Among them, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 has been previously implicated with stem cell phenotypes. Antiserum to EMP-1 was produced to localize its expression. On monolayers of Lig-8 cells, EMP-1 was expressed along the intercellular border. In the liver harboring proliferating oval cells, the liver progenitors, EMP-1 was localized as ribbon bands, a staining pattern for epithelial junctions, all the way through bile duct epithelia, oval cell ductules, and into peri-hepatocytic regions. These peri-hepatocytic regions were proved to be bile canaliculi by co-localization of EMP-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase IV, an enzyme located on bile canaliculi. This report is the first to indicate EMP-1 to be a junctional protein in the liver.

  5. Cell therapy for liver diseases: current medicine and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandra, Meza-Ríos; Juan, Armendáriz-Borunda; Ana, Sandoval-Rodríguez

    2015-06-01

    Liver diseases are a major health problem worldwide since they usually represent the main causes of death in most countries, causing excessive costs to public health systems. Nowadays, there are no efficient current therapies for most hepatic diseases and liver transplant is infrequent due to the availability of organs, cost and risk of transplant rejection. Therefore, alternative therapies for liver diseases have been developed, including cell-based therapies. Stem cells (SCs) are characterized by their self-renewing capacity, unlimited proliferation and differentiation under certain conditions into tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. Cell-based therapies for liver diseases have been successful in experimental models, showing anti-inflammatory, antifibrogenic and regenerative effects. Nowadays, clinical trials using SCs for liver pathologies are increasing in number, and those that have reached publication have achieved favorable effects, encouraging us to think that SCs will have a potential clinical use in a short time.

  6. Methylglyoxal Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the p...

  7. Epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Taghdouini, Adil; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver injury to hepatocytes or cholangiocytes, when left unmanaged, leads to the development of liver fibrosis, a condition characterized by the excessive intrahepatic deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Activated hepatic stellate cells constitute the predominant source of extracellular matrix in fibrotic livers and their transition from a quiescent state during fibrogenesis is associated with important alterations in their transcriptional and epigenetic landscape. Areas covered: We briefly describe the processes involved in hepatic stellate cell activation and discuss our current understanding of alterations in the epigenetic landscape, i.e DNA methylation, histone modifications and the functional role of non-coding RNAs that accompany this key event in the development of chronic liver disease. Expert commentary: Although great progress has been made, our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation is limited and, thus far, insufficient to allow the development of epigenetic drugs that can selectively interrupt liver fibrosis.

  8. Interaction of low density lipoproteins with rat liver cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Harkes (Leendert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe most marked conclusion is the establishment of the important role of non-parenchymal cells in the catabolism of the low density lipoproteins by the rat liver. Because the liver is responsible for 70-80% of the removal of LDL from blood this conclusion can be extended to total LDL tur

  9. SURVIVAL OF LIVER CELLS, IMMOBILIZED ON 3D-MATRIXES, IN LIVER FAILURE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Shagidulin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was examined a new method for correction of hepatic failure by transplantation of liver support biounit (liver cells, immobilized on biocompatible and biodegradable 3D-matrixes ElastoPOB® into small intestine mesentery. It was determined that after modeling of acute hepatic failure on dogs by 65–70% liver resection and transplantation liver support biounit the restoration of disturbed biochemical indecies (such as total protein, lactate, cytolytic ensymes-ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, fibrinogen, protrombine index and others took place more rapidly on 9–14th day instead of 18th day in control. It was made a preposition about efficiency of the suggested method for correction both acute hepatic failure because even 90 days after transplantation of liver support biounit alive hepatocytes and neogenic plethoric vessels, growing through matrix were revealed. 

  10. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-02-26

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat.

  11. Structural and functional aspects of the liver and liver sinusoidal cells in relation to colon carcinoma metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrien Vekemans; Filip Braet

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, liver metastasis remains difficult to cure. When tumor cells escape and arrive in the liver sinusoids, they encounter the local defense mechanism specific to the liver. The sinusoidal cells have been widely described in physiologic conditions and in relation to metastasis during the past 30 years. This paper provides an "overview" of how these cells function in health and in diseases such as liver metastasis.

  12. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver cells as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-hui; Li, Ren; Dou, Ke-feng

    2011-03-01

    Although the stem cells are commonly isolated by FACS or MACS, they are very expensive and these is no specific marker for liver stem/progentior cells (LSPCs). This paper applied a convenient and efficient method to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation (PDGC) from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence (DTDA). Flow cytometric analysis revealed more than half of the purified FLCs expressed alternative markers of LSPCs (CD117, c-Met, Sca-1, CD90, CD49f and CD133). In other words, the purified FLCs were heterogeneous. Therefore, they were sequentially layered into six fractions by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation (PCGC). Both CD133 and CD49f expressed decreasingly from fraction 1 to 6. In fraction 1 and 2, about 85% FLCs expressed CD133, which were revealed to be LSPCs by high expressions of AFP and CK-19, low expressions of G-6-P and ALB. To conclude, the purity of CD133(+) LSPCs enriched by combination of PDGC, DTDA and PCGC is close to that obtained by MACS. This study will greatly contribute to two important biological aspects: liver stem cells isolation and liver cell therapy.

  13. Signals and Cells Involved in Regulating Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I. Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is a complex phenomenon aimed at maintaining a constant liver mass in the event of injury resulting in loss of hepatic parenchyma. Partial hepatectomy is followed by a series of events involving multiple signaling pathways controlled by mitogenic growth factors (HGF, EGF and their receptors (MET and EGFR. In addition multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules contribute to the orchestration of a signal which drives hepatocytes into DNA synthesis. The other cell types of the liver receive and transmit to hepatocytes complex signals so that, in the end of the regenerative process, complete hepatic tissue is assembled and regeneration is terminated at the proper time and at the right liver size. If hepatocytes fail to participate in this process, the biliary compartment is mobilized to generate populations of progenitor cells which transdifferentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver size.

  14. [Correction of cronic liver failure by transplantation of liver cells suspension and cell-engineering designs (experimental investigation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Got'e, S V; Shagidulin, M Iu; Onishchenko, N A; Krasheninnikov, M E; Il'inskiĭ, I M; Mozheĭko, N P; Liundup, A V; Volkova, E A; Petrakov, K I; Avramov, P V; Perova, N V; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2013-01-01

    On an experimental model of chronic fibrotic liver damage (male rats Wistar (n-60), damage of CCl4, the duration of the experiment 90 days) it was studied the effectiveness of cell therapy for the correction of chronic liver failure. These rats were divided into 3 experimental groups: in the Ist-group (control, n=10) isotonic saline (650 mkl.) was injected; in the IInd-group (n=20) suspension of liver cells was applicated in a dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) cells; in the IIIrd-group (n=30) suspension of liver cells and bone marrow cells (mesenchymal stromal cells) in ratio 5:1 were used as cell associates on microparticles intjectable heterogeneous biopolymer hydrogel "SpheroGEL" (cell-engineering design) in common dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) It was ascertained that in the 2nd and in the 3rd groups the accelerated normalization of disturbed liver functional indices (ALT, AST, ALP) took place - to 30 days, but in the control group only to 90 days. The reliable differences in rats ofnormalization offunctional indices were absent between the IInd and the IIIrd groups. But in 90 days by using special histological dyeing it was found out that defibrotic processes in liver tissue were more expressed in the IIIrd group in comparison with the IIIrd group. Received results were consequence of prolonged vital activity of cells (liver cells and mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells) into cell-engineering designs, which were transplanted in the IIIrd group. The obtained effect can be explained by that the developed cell-engineering designs provide adequate conditions for prolonged vital activity of the transplanted cells.

  15. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  16. Hepatic stellate cells and innate immunity in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang-Gun Suh; Won-Il Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Constant alcohol consumption is a major cause of chronic liver disease, and there has been a growing concern regarding the increased mortality rates worldwide. Alcoholic liver diseases (ALDs) range from mild to more severe conditions, such as steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The liver is enriched with innate immune cells (e.g. natural killer cells and Kupffer cells) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and interestingly, emerging evidence suggests that innate immunity contributes to the development of ALDs (e.g. steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis). Indeed, HSCs play a crucial role in alcoholic steatosis via production of endocannabinoid and retinol metabolites. This review describes the roles of the innate immunity and HSCs in the pathogenesis of ALDs, and suggests therapeutic targets and strategies to assist in the reduction of ALD.

  17. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihui; You, Nan; Dou, Kefeng

    2012-01-01

    Although stem cells are commonly isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or magnetic affinity cell sorting, they are very expensive, and they need known markers. However, there is no specific marker for liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs). Here, we describe a convenient and efficient method (three-step method) to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence. Finally, fetal liver stem/progenitor cells (FLSPCs) were enriched from purified FLCs by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation. Flow cytometric analysis combining with marker CD133 was used to detect the purity of FLSPCs and evaluate the isolating effects of the three-step method.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells support hepatocyte function in engineered liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshie; Yagi, Hiroshi; Inomata, Kenta; Matsubara, Kentaro; Hibi, Taizo; Abe, Yuta; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that organ decellularization is a promising approach to facilitate the clinical application of regenerative therapy by providing a platform for organ engineering. This unique strategy uses native matrices to act as a reservoir for the functional cells which may show therapeutic potential when implanted into the body. Appropriate cell sources for artificial livers have been debated for some time. The desired cell type in artificial livers is primary hepatocytes, but in addition, other supportive cells may facilitate this stem cell technology. In this context, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is an option meeting the criteria for therapeutic organ engineering. Ideally, supportive cells are required to (1) reduce the hepatic cell mass needed in an engineered liver by enhancing hepatocyte function, (2) modulate hepatic regeneration in a paracrine fashion or by direct contact, and (3) enhance the preservability of parenchymal cells during storage. Here, we describe enhanced hepatic function achieved using a strategy of sequential infusion of cells and illustrate the advantages of co-cultivating bone marrow-derived MSCs with primary hepatocytes in the engineered whole-liver scaffold. These co-recellularized liver scaffolds colonized by MSCs and hepatocytes were transplanted into live animals. After blood flow was established, we show that expression of adhesion molecules and proangiogenic factors was upregulated in the graft.

  19. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  20. Liver cancer stem cell markers: Progression and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Hui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Song, Guan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation in cancer, have been proposed to be cancer-initiating cells, and have been shown to be responsible for chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. The identification of CSC subpopulations inside a tumor presents a new understanding of cancer development because it implies that tumors can only be eradicated by targeting CSCs. Although advances in liver cancer detection and treatment have increased the possibility of curing the disease at early stages, unfortunately, most patients will relapse and succumb to their disease. Strategies aimed at efficiently targeting liver CSCs are becoming important for monitoring the progress of liver cancer therapy and for evaluating new therapeutic approaches. Herein, we provide a critical discussion of biological markers described in the literature regarding liver cancer stem cells and the potential of these markers to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:27053846

  1. Role of stem cells during diabetic liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ying; Garner, Jessica; Wu, Nan; Phillip, Levine; Han, Yuyan; McDaniel, Kelly; Annable, Tami; Zhou, Tianhao; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Huang, Qiaobing; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most severe endocrine metabolic disorders in the world that has serious medical consequences with substantial impacts on the quality of life. Type 2 diabetes is one of the main causes of diabetic liver diseases with the most common being non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Several factors that may explain the mechanisms related to pathological and functional changes of diabetic liver injury include: insulin resistance, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The realization that these factors are important in hepatocyte damage and lack of donor livers has led to studies concentrating on the role of stem cells (SCs) in the prevention and treatment of liver injury. Possible avenues that the application of SCs may improve liver injury include but are not limited to: the ability to differentiate into pancreatic β-cells (insulin producing cells), the contribution for hepatocyte regeneration, regulation of lipogenesis, glucogenesis and anti-inflammatory actions. Once further studies are performed to explore the underlying protective mechanisms of SCs and the advantages and disadvantages of its application, there will be a greater understand of the mechanism and therapeutic potential. In this review, we summarize the findings regarding the role of SCs in diabetic liver diseases.

  2. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells improve liver function and ascites in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Hu; Shi, Ming; Xu, Ruonan; Fu, Junliang; Lv, Jiyun; Chen, Liming; Lv, Sa; Li, Yuanyuan; Yu, Shuangjie; Geng, Hua; Jin, Lei; Lau, George K K; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC), a life-threatening complication of chronic liver disease, is one of the major indications for liver transplantation. Recently, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transfusion has been shown to lead to the regression of liver fibrosis in mice and humans. This study examined the safety and efficacy of umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) in patients with decompensated LC. A total of 45 chronic hepatitis B patients with decompensated LC, including 30 patients receiving UC-MSC transfusion, and 15 patients receiving saline as the control, were recruited; clinical parameters were detected during a 1-year follow-up period. No significant side-effects and complications were observed in either group. There was a significant reduction in the volume of ascites in patients treated with UC-MSC transfusion compared with controls (P decompensated LC. UC-MSC transfusion, therefore, might present a novel therapeutic approach for patients with decompensated LC.

  3. Differential Proteomics in Malignant and Normal Liver Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-jun; WANG Bin; YAN Zhi-yong; QIAN Dong-meng; SONG Xu-xia; Ding Shou-yi; BAI Zhi-qiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To detect differential protein expression in malignant and normal liver cell lines in vitro using the SELDI ProteinChip platform, for investigating the pathogenesis of liver cancer. Methods: Two cell lines, human normal liver cell line L02 and hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 were cultured routinely, harvested in good condition and lysed. After quantification, the supernatant of the lysate was tested by IMAC3 (Immobilized Mental Affinity Capture) and WCX2 (Weak Cation Exchange) chips on the SELDI-TOF-MS ProteinChip reader. Results: Protein expression differed between the malignant and normal liver cell lines. A total of 20 differentially expressed proteins were found, among which, 7 were captured by the IMAC3 chip and 14 by the WCX2 chip. Peaks at 5,419, 7,979 and 11,265 Da were higher and at 8,103, 8,492, 10,160 and 11,304 Da lower in SMMC-7721 cells by the IMAC3 chip; peaks at 7,517, 7,945 and 7,979 Da were higher and at 5,061, 5,551, 5,818, 7,439, 9,401,10,100, 10,312, 11,621, 11,662, 11,830 and 12,772 Da lower in SMMC-7721 cells by the WCX2 chip. Interestingly, both chips captured the 7,979 Da peak. In addition, the 11,081 Da peak corresponded precisely with the molecular mass of the calcium binding protein S100A10, which may participate in the formation of liver cancer in association with p36. Conclusion: Detecting differential protein expression in malignant and normal liver cell lines using the SELDI ProteinChip platform was simple, sensitive and repeatable. The results we obtained can serve as a basis for investigating the pathogenesis of liver cancer and aid the discovery of new therapeutic targets.

  4. Hepato-biliary profile of potential candidate liver progenitor cells from healthy rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Céric Maerckx; Isabelle Scheers; Tatiana Tondreau; David Campard; Omar Nyabi; Mustapha Najimi; Etienne Sokal

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the presence of progenitor cells in healthy adult rat liver displaying the equivalent advanced hepatogenic profile as that obtained in humans.METHODS:Rat fibroblastic-like liver derived cells (rFLDC) were obtained from collagenase-isolated liver cell suspensions and characterized and their phenotype profile determined using flow cytometry,immunocyto-chemistry,reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and functional assays.RESULTS:rFLDC exhibit fibroblastoid morphology,express mesenchymal (CD73,CD90,vimentin,α-smooth muscle actin),hepatocyte (UGT1A1,CK8) and biliary (CK19) markers.Moreover,these cells are able to store glycogen,and have glucose 6 phosphatase activity,but not UGT1A1 activity.Under the hepatogenic differentiation protocol,rFLDC display an up-regulation of hepatocyte markers expression (albumin,tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase,G6Pase) correlated to a down-regulation of the expression of the biliary marker CK19.CONCLUSION:Advanced hepatic features observed in human liver progenitor cells could not be demonstrated in rFLDC.However,we demonstrated the presence of an original rodent hepato-biliary cell type.

  5. Hepatocytes Polyploidization and Cell Cycle Control in Liver Physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Gentric

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of “diploid-polyploid conversion” during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels, oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.. Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  6. A selective tropism of transfused oval cells for liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Zhi Chen; Hai Hong; Jin Xiang; Ling Xue; Guo-Qiang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the biological behaviors of hepatic oval cells after transfused into the circulation of experimental animals.METHODS: Oval cells from male SD rat were transfused into the circulation of a female rat which were treated by a 2-AAF/CCl4 program, through caudal vein. Sex-determining gene sry which located on Y chromosome was examined by PCR and in situ hybridization technique in liver, kidney and spleen of the experimental animals, respectively.RESULTS: The results of the cell-transplant experiment showed that the srygene was detectable only in the liver but not in spleen and kidney of the experimental rats, and no signals could be detected in the control animals. It can be also morphologically proved that some exogenous cells had migrated into the parenchyma of the liver and settled there.CONCLUSION: The result means that there are exogenous cells located in the liver of the experimental animal and the localization is specific to the liver. This indicates that some "signal molecules" must exist in the circulation of the rats treated by 2-AAF/CCl4. These "signal molecules" might play an important role in specific localization and differentiation of transfused oval cells.

  7. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong [Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Zhou, Zhigang [Shanghai 1st People Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli [Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Sun, Hanying, E-mail: shanhum@163.com [Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China)

    2009-09-25

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  8. MBD3 inhibits formation of liver cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruizhi; He, Qihua; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Mingzhi; Liu, Jinwen; Su, Ming; Wei, Shiruo; Wang, Xuan; Shen, Li

    2017-01-01

    Liver cancer cells can be reprogrammed into induced cancer stem cells (iCSCs) by exogenous expression of the reprogramming transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (OSKM). The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex is essential for reprogramming somatic cells. In this study, we investigated the function of NuRD in the induction of liver CSCs. We showed that suppression of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 3 (MBD3), a core subunit of the NuRD repressor complex, together with OSKM transduction, induces conversion of liver cancer cells into stem-like cells. Expression of the transcription factor c-JUN is increased in MBD3-depleted iCSCs, and c-JUN activates endogenous pluripotent genes and regulates iCSC-related genes. These results indicate that MBD3/NuRD inhibits the induction of iCSCs, while c-JUN facilitates the generation of CSC-like properties. The iCSC reprogramming approach devised here provides a novel platform for dissection of the disordered signaling in liver CSCs. In addition, our results indicate that c-JUN may serve as a potential target for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27894081

  9. Mathematical modelling of cell aggregation in liver tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Green, John Edward E.

    2006-01-01

    A promising method for growing functional liver tissue in vitro involves culturing hepatocytes as spheroidal cell aggregates. In this thesis, we develop mathematical models of cell aggregation, and use them to determine how hepatocytes' interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) on which they are seeded, and with stellate cells, affect the process. Chapters 2-4 focus on the effect that cell-ECM coupling has on the aggregation process. We use a novel formulation that couples a mechani...

  10. Alcohol-induced steatosis in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol-induced fatty liver (steatosis) was believed to result from excessive generation of reducing equivalents from ethanol metabolism, thereby enhancing fat accumulation. Recent findings have revealed a more complex picture in which ethanol oxidation is still required,but specific transcription as well as humoral factors also have important roles. Transcription factors involved include the sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1)which is activated to induce genes that regulate lipid biosynthesis. Conversely, ethanol consumption causes a general down-regulation of lipid (fatty acid) oxidation, a reflection of inactivation of the peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) that regulates genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. A third transcription factor is the early growth response-1 (Egr-1), which is strongly induced prior to the onset of steatosis. The activities of all these factors are governed by that of the principal regulatory enzyme, AMP kinase. Important humoral factors, including adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), also regulate alcohol-induced steatosis. Their levels are affected by alcohol consumption and by each other. This review will summarize the actions of these proteins in ethanol-elicited fatty liver. Because steatosis is now regarded as a significant risk factor for advanced liver pathology, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms in its etiology is essential for development of effective therapies.

  11. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald; Gretz, Norbert; Dooley, Steven; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expression of IDE in subjects with T2DM. HepG2 cells were treated with 10 nM insulin for 24 h with or without inhibition of IDE activity using IDE RNAi, and cell transcriptome and proliferation rate were analyzed. Human liver samples (n = 22) were used for the gene expression profiling by microarrays. In HepG2 cells, IDE knockdown changed expression of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Proliferation rate was lower in IDE knockdown cells than in controls. Microarray analysis revealed the decrease of hepatic IDE expression in subjects with T2DM accompanied by the downregulation of the p53-dependent genes FAS and CCNG2, but not by the upregulation of proliferation markers MKI67, MCM2 and PCNA. Similar results were found in the liver microarray dataset from GEO Profiles database. In conclusion, IDE expression is decreased in liver of subjects with T2DM which is accompanied by the dysregulation of p53 pathway. Prolonged use of IDE inhibitors for T2DM treatment should be carefully tested in animal studies regarding its potential effect on hepatic tumorigenesis.

  12. Endothelial cell promotion of early liver and pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Deborah A; Kashima, Yasushige; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    Different steps of embryonic pancreas and liver development require inductive signals from endothelial cells. During liver development, interactions between newly specified hepatic endoderm cells and nascent endothelial cells are crucial for the endoderm's subsequent growth and morphogenesis into a liver bud. Reconstitution of endothelial cell stimulation of hepatic cell growth with embryonic tissue explants demonstrated that endothelial signalling occurs independent of the blood supply. During pancreas development, midgut endoderm interactions with aortic endothelial cells induce Ptf1a, a crucial pancreatic determinant. Endothelial cells also have a later effect on pancreas development, by promoting survival of the dorsal mesenchyme, which in turn produces factors supporting pancreatic endoderm. A major goal of our laboratory is to determine the endothelial-derived molecules involved in these inductive events. Our data show that cultured endothelial cells induce Ptf1a in dorsal endoderm explants lacking an endogenous vasculature. We are purifying endothelial cell line product(s) responsible for this effect. We are also identifying endothelial-responsive regulatory elements in genes such as Ptf1a by genetic mapping and chromatin-based assays. These latter approaches will allow us to track endothelial-responsive signal pathways from DNA targets within progenitor cells. The diversity of organogenic steps dependent upon endothelial cell signalling suggests that cross-regulation of tissue development with its vasculature is a general phenomenon.

  13. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract on liver starch and liver cell morphous of sports fatigue rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; LI Rui; JI Chen-feng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To inspect the effect of Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract to the swimming time and content of liver starch and liver cells morphous of sports fatigue rat. Methods Using weight loading swimming to determine swimming time, using kits to determine liver starch, using transmission electron microscope to observe the diversify of rat liver ceils morphous and construction. Results To compare with negative control group, the Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract can obviously extend survival time of swimming rat, increase the content of liver starch. Conclusions Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract can raise the staying power of sports fatigue rat, strengthen sport ability and play a part in antifatigue by increasing the content of liver starch and protecting liver cells of sports fatigue rat.

  15. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailer, Reiner K W; Gisterå, Anton; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2017-05-26

    The liver is the central organ that responds to dietary cholesterol intake and facilitates the release and clearance of lipoprotein particles. Persistent hypercholesterolemia leads to immune responses against lipoprotein particles that drive atherosclerosis. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on hepatic T-cell differentiation remains unknown. To investigate hepatic T-cell subsets upon hypercholesterolemia. We observed that hypercholesterolemia elevated the intrahepatic regulatory T (Treg) cell population and increased the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that intrahepatically differentiated Treg cells relocated to the inflamed aorta in atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia induced the differentiation of intrahepatic, but not intrasplenic, Th17 cells in wild-type mice, whereas the disrupted liver homeostasis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-) mice led to intrahepatic Th1 cell differentiation and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) leukocyte accumulation. Our results elucidate a new mechanism that controls intrahepatic T-cell differentiation during atherosclerosis development and indicates that intrahepatically differentiated T cells contribute to the CD4(+) T-cell pool in the atherosclerotic aorta. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Liver cell adenoma with malignant transformation: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro Ito; Makoto Sasaki; Chun-Yang Wen; Masahiro Nakashima; Toshihito Ueki; Hiromi Ishibashi; Michitami Yano; Masayoshi Kage; Masamichi Kojiro

    2003-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of a liver mass detected by computed tomography. She had taken oral contraceptives for only one month at the age of thirty. Physical examination revealed no abnormalities, and laboratory data, including hepatic function tests, were within the normal range, with the exception of elevated levels of those serum proteins induced by the absence of vitamin K or by raised levels of the antagonist (PIVKA)-Ⅱ (3 502 AU/ml).Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a hyperechoic mass measuring 10x10 cm in the left posterior segment of the liver. Because hepatocellular carcinoma could not be completely excluded, this mass was resected. The tumor consisted of sheets of uniform cells with clear cytoplasm,perinuclear eosinophilic granules and round nuclei. These histological findings were consistent with liver cell adenoma.Background hepatic tissue appeared normal. After resection of the tumor, serum PIVKA-Ⅱ fell to within the normal range.An area of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a midtrabecular pattern was immunohistochemically found, which was positive for PIVKA-Ⅱ. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were CD34-positive, containing scattered PIVKA-Ⅱ positive cells.This tumor was therefore finally diagnosed as liver cell adenoma with focal malignant transformation to HCC.

  17. Liver involvement of Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaoping; Han, Tong; Zai, Hongyan; Long, Xueying; Wang, Xiaoyi; Li, Wenzheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Liver involvement is relatively frequent in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Its features remain poorly defined. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 14 hepatic LCH children in our hospital. The Clinicopathological and radiological features of this disease was discussed. Results: The rate of liver involvement in children LCH patients is 51.9%. Majority of the patients were disseminated cases. Hepatomegaly was clinically confirmed in 11 cases (78.6%). Liver function dysfunction was seen in nine (64.3%) children. The association of multi-modal imaging significantly yielded more diagnostic information. There are some imaging characteristics of this disease, CT and MRI could help to assess the staging, extent of the hepatic lesions. We found that liver involvement had a significant impact on survival. Patients treated with systemic chemotherapy earlier from time of diagnosis had a relatively better outcome. Conclusions: The rate of liver involvement in children LCH patients maybe much higher than that of expected. We suggest that clinical and biological liver evaluation and abdominal imaging must be performed regularly onwards to screen every LCH children patient from the time of the initial diagnosis. Patient should be treated with systemic chemotherapy earlier. PMID:26221247

  18. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) Regulates Liver Cells Proteome and Methylproteome: Implications in Liver Biology and Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigaud, Emilie; Corrales, Fernando J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), a key enzyme in the adenine and methionine salvage pathways, catalyzes the hydrolysis of methylthioadenosine (MTA), a compound suggested to affect pivotal cellular processes in part through the regulation of protein methylation. MTAP is expressed in a wide range of cell types and tissues, and its deletion is common to cancer cells and in liver injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteome and methyl proteome alterations triggered by MTAP deficiency in liver cells to define novel regulatory mechanisms that may explain the pathogenic processes of liver diseases. iTRAQ analysis resulted in the identification of 216 differential proteins (p MTA levels in SK-Hep1+ cells parallels the specific methylation of 56 proteins, including KRT8, TGF, and CTF8A, which provides a novel regulatory mechanism of their activity with potential implications in carcinogenesis. Inhibition of RNA-binding proteins methylation is especially relevant upon accumulation of MTA. As an example, methylation of quaking protein in Arg242 and Arg256 in SK-Hep1+ cells may play a pivotal role in the regulation of its activity as indicated by the up-regulation of its target protein p27kip1. The phenotype associated with a MTAP deficiency was further verified in the liver of MTAP± mice. Our data support that MTAP deficiency leads to MTA accumulation and deregulation of central cellular pathways, increasing proliferation and decreasing the susceptibility to chemotherapeutic drugs, which involves differential protein methylation. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002957 (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002957). PMID:26819315

  19. Liver stem cell-derived β-cell surrogates for treatment of type 1 diabetes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with the common embryonic origin of liver and pancreas as well the similar glucose-sensing systems in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, it should not be surprising that liver stem cells/hepatocytes can transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under high-glucose culture conditions or by genetic reprogramming. Persistent expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx1) transcription factor or its super-active form Pdx1-VP16 fusion protein in hepatic cells reprograms these cells into pancreatic β-cell precursors. In vitro culture at elevated glucose concentrations or in vivo exposure to a hyperglycemia are required for further differentiation and maturation of liver-derived pancreatic β-cell precursor into functional insulin-producing pancreatic β-like cells. Under appropriate conditions, multiple pancreatic transcription factors can work in concert to reprogram liver stem/adult liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. If such autologous liver-derived insulin-producing cells can be made to escape the type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity, they may serve as a valuable cell source for future cell replacement therapy without the need for life-long immunosuppression. PMID:16890895

  20. The Role of NK Cell in T Cell Recruitment in Murine Liver Infected with Adenovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游上游; 艾洪武; 黄巍; 张楚瑜

    2003-01-01

    To study the role of natural killer (NK) cells in T cell recruitment in murine liver infected with virus, mice wereintravenously injected daily with anti-NK1.1+ antibody to deplete NK cells. Lymphocytes in the liver tissue of mice infectedwith type 5 adenovirus depleted in the E1 and E3 regions were assessed by fluorometric activated cell sorting (FACS). Ex-pression of chemokine IP-10 and its receptor CXCR3 mRNA in the liver, hepatic lymphocytes and spleen tissue were examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serum almfine aminotransferase (ALT) was measured asan indicator of liver injury. It was found that infection of adenovims and anfi-Fas monoclonal antibody (mAb) into mice caused liver injury and high expression of interfemn-γ inducible protein-10 (IP-10) mRNA in the liver. Anfi-NK1.1+ mAb, which was intraperitoneally injected into the mice infected with adenovirus, suppresses T cell recruitment and expression of IP-10 mRNA in the hver. Slighter hver injury was also observed. After vires infection, expression of CXCR3 mRNAin spleen and hver tissue was observed at different time. The results suggested that T cell recruitment was initiated by NKcell dependent chemokine IP-10, which induced activated T cells priming in the spleen to the hver of the mouse. NK cells played a key role in T cell recruitment in the liver of mouse infected with adenovims.

  1. Regenerative medicine using dental pulp stem cells for liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkoshi, Shogo; Hara, Hajime; Hirono, Haruka; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a refractory disease and its prognosis, if not treated using liver transplantation, is extremely poor. It is a good candidate for regenerative medicine, where stem cell-based therapies play a central role. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to differentiate into multiple cell lineages including hepatocytes. Autologous cell transplant without any foreign gene induction is feasible using MSCs, thereby avoiding possible risks of tumorigenesis and immune rejection. Dental pulp also contains an MSC population that differentiates into hepatocytes. A point worthy of special mention is that dental pulp can be obtained from deciduous teeth during childhood and can be subsequently harvested when necessary after deposition in a tooth bank. MSCs have not only a regenerative capacity but also act in an anti-inflammatory manner via paracrine mechanisms. Promising efficacies and difficulties with the use of MSC derived from teeth are summarized in this review. PMID:28217369

  2. Laminin and Fibronectin in Cell Adhesion: Enhanced Adhesion of Cells from Regenerating Liver to Laminin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Roland; Engvall, Eva; Freeman, Aaron; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1981-04-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein isolated from cultures of mouse endodermal cells and rat yolk sac carcinoma cells, promoted the attachment of liver cells obtained from regenerating mouse liver. Cells from normal mouse liver attached readily to dishes coated with fibronectin but attached poorly to surfaces coated with laminin. Both proteins efficiently promoted the attachment of cells from livers undergoing regeneration. After regeneration, the attachment to laminin returned to the low levels found in animals not subjected to partial hepatectomy but attachment to fibronectin remained high. Immunofluorescent staining of sections of normal liver with antilaminin revealed the presence of laminin in or adjacent to the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels. After induction of regeneration by partial hepatectomy, increased amounts of laminin appeared in the sinusoidal areas. After carbon tetrachloride poisoning, staining for laminin was especially pronounced in the necrotic and postnecrotic areas around the central veins. This additional expression of laminin was transient. It reached a maximum around 5-6 days after the injury and then gradually disappeared. These findings show that laminin is an adhesive protein. The increase of laminin in regenerating liver and the adhesiveness of cells from such livers to laminin suggest a role for laminin in the maintenance of a proper tissue organization during liver regeneration.

  3. Congenital hepatic fibrosis, liver cell carcinoma and adult polycystic kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, J L; Kissane, J M; Valdes, A J

    1977-06-01

    In reviewing the literature, we found no liver cell carcinoma (LCC) or well-documented adult polycystic kidneys (APK) associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We report a 69-year-old man with CHF, LCC, APK, duplication cyst of distal portion of stomach, two calcified splenic artery aneurysms, myocardial fibrosis and muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. The LCC was grossly predunculated and microscopically showed prominent fibrosis and hyaline intracytoplasmic inclusions in the tumor cells.

  4. Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Recent Advances on the Path to New Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Rountree, C. Bart; Mishra, Lopa; Willenbring, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have potential for therapy of liver diseases, but may also be involved in the formation of liver cancer. Recently, the AASLD Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single Topic Conference “Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Discovery and Promise” brought together a diverse group of investigators to define the status of research on stem cells and cancer stem cells in the liver and identify problems and solutions on the path to clinical translation. This report summarizes...

  5. Role of stellate cells in alcoholic liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Plewka

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Many different diseases and toxins can cause liver damage, which is diffi cult to treat and often leads to the development of liver fi brosis or even cirrhosis. The key event in this process is the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs. During such activation, HSCs undergo a dramatic transformation in morphology and behavior, changing from a neuronal-like to a fi broblast-like morphology. After activation, HSCs increase their proliferation rate and extracellular matrix (ECM production. Overproduction of ECM, which contains mainly collagen type I, is a direct cause of liver disruption. HSCs also produce substances which inhibit protease activities, such as TIMPs, which enhance ECM deposition in the liver. On the molecular level, HSCs are activated by cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress, which are abundant in affl icted liver. These factors induce intracellular signals transmitted by many kinases, the most important of which are JNK, ERK1/2, p38, TAK-1, PKC, FAK, and P3IK. Signals transmitted via these pathways change the activities of transcription factors such as Smad, AP-1, and NF-κβ. This in turn causes changes In gene transcription and ultimately alters the whole cell’s behavior and morphology. The cell begins the production collagen type I, TIMP-1, and aSMA. Activated HSCs can sustain their own activation by producing growth factors such as PDGF and TGF-β. Despite the vast knowledge about the mechanisms causing liver fi brosis and cirrhosis, there is still no effective cure. Further studies are therefore needed to solve this problem.

  6. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  7. Effects of leptin on glucose oxidation and glucokinase gene expression in cultured liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹筱佩

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of leptin on glucose oxidation and glueokinase gene expression in rat liver cells. Methods: Rat liver cells were incubated with leptin of different doses (ranging from 10μg/L to 200μg/L). Control liver cells were

  8. Long live the liver: immunohistochemical and stereological study of hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells of male and female rats throughout ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Ricardo; Correia-Gomes, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Male/female differences in enzyme activity and gene expression in the liver are known to be attenuated with ageing. Nevertheless, the effect of ageing on liver structure and quantitative cell morphology remains unknown. Male and female Wistar rats aged 2, 6, 12 and 18 months were examined by means of stereological techniques and immunohistochemical tagging of hepatocytes (HEP), liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC), Kupffer cells (KC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in order to assess the total number and number per gram of these cells throughout life. The mean cell volume of HEP and HSC, the lobular position and the collagen content of the liver were also evaluated with stereological techniques. The number per gram of HSC was similar for both genders and was maintained throughout ageing. The mean volume of HSC was also conserved but differences in the cell body and lobular location were observed. Statistically significant gender differences in HEP were noted in young rats (females had smaller and more binucleated HEP) but were attenuated with ageing. The same occurred for KC and LSEC, since the higher number per gram in young females disappeared in older animals. Liver collagen increased with ageing but only in males. Thus, the numbers of these four cell types are related throughout ageing, with well-defined cell ratios. The shape and lobular position of HSC change with ageing in both males and females. Gender dimorphism in HEP, KC and LSEC of young rat liver disappears with ageing.

  9. CELL-ENGINEERING DESIGNS TRANSPLANTED INTO LIVER PROVIDE WITH PROLONGED SUPPORT OF RECOVERY PROCESSES IN DAMAGED LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Shagidulin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim is to develop a method for a prolonged support of recovery processes in damaged liver. Materials and me- thods. It was carried out 3 groups of experiments on Wistar rats with the modeling of chronic fibrotic liver injury (n = 70: I group control (n = 20; in the II group (n = 20 a suspension of liver cells was transplanted into liver; in the III group (n = 30 cell-engineering designs (CED, which contained liver cells and BM MMSC, enclosed in a heterogeneous biodegradable gel “Sphero®GEL-long” were transplanted into damaged liver. The activity of recovery processes was evaluated by using biochemical and morphological methods in dynamics on 30, 60, 90 and 180 days. Results. It was shown that in the II and III gr. significantly accelerated the recovery processes in damaged livers compared with the I gr. The normalization of biochemical parameters took place in II and III du- ring 30 days instead of 90 days in the I group. However, the normalization of morphological signs of hepatocytes theirs viability and a degree of defibrotic changes in liver were more pronounced and prolonged in the III group. A study showed integration of CED by liver structures with formation of new bile ducts after 90 and 180 days. Conclusion. Higher levels and prolonged periods of recovery processes in damaged liver after CED transplanta- tion were due to the creation of biologically appropriate conditions for prolonged cell activity, included in their structure (donor liver cells and BM MMSC. 

  10. Resistance of activated stellate cells to cell death in liver fibrosis : mechanisms and targets for intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunning, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    In the normal liver, the hepatic stellate cell has a quiescent (i.e. non-proliferating) phenotype. It is the main storage site for vitamin A (retinoids) and it produces the appropriate quality and quantity of extracellular matrix. In chronic liver injury, a sustained wound healing response takes

  11. Liver grafts contain a unique subset of natural killer cells that are transferred into the recipient after liver transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moroso, V.; Metselaar, H.J.; Mancham, S.; Tilanus, H.W.; Eissens, D.N.; Meer, A. van der; Laan, L.J. van der; Kuipers, E.J.; Joosten, I.; Kwekkeboom, J.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to other solid organ transplantations, liver grafts have tolerogenic properties. Animal models indicate that donor leukocytes transferred into the recipient after liver transplantation (LTX) play a relevant role in this tolerogenic phenomenon. However, the specific donor cell types invol

  12. Macrophages and dendritic cells emerge in the liver during intestinal inflammation and predispose the liver to inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Mikami

    Full Text Available The liver is a physiological site of immune tolerance, the breakdown of which induces immunity. Liver antigen-presenting cells may be involved in both immune tolerance and activation. Although inflammatory diseases of the liver are frequently associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, the underlying immunological mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here we report two murine models of inflammatory bowel disease: RAG-2(-/- mice adoptively transferred with CD4(+CD45RB(high T cells; and IL-10(-/- mice, accompanied by the infiltration of mononuclear cells in the liver. Notably, CD11b(-CD11c(lowPDCA-1(+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs abundantly residing in the liver of normal wild-type mice disappeared in colitic CD4(+CD45RB(high T cell-transferred RAG-2(-/- mice and IL-10(-/- mice in parallel with the emergence of macrophages (Mφs and conventional DCs (cDCs. Furthermore, liver Mφ/cDCs emerging during intestinal inflammation not only promote the proliferation of naïve CD4(+ T cells, but also instruct them to differentiate into IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells in vitro. The emergence of pathological Mφ/cDCs in the liver also occurred in a model of acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis under specific pathogen-free conditions, but was canceled in germ-free conditions. Last, the Mφ/cDCs that emerged in acute DSS colitis significantly exacerbated Fas-mediated hepatitis. Collectively, intestinal inflammation skews the composition of antigen-presenting cells in the liver through signaling from commensal bacteria and predisposes the liver to inflammation.

  13. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  14. Immature hematopoietic stem cells undergo maturation in the fetal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieusseian, Aurelie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are defined by their capacity to reconstitute adult conventional mice, are first found in the dorsal aorta after 10.5 days post coitus (dpc) and in the fetal liver at 11 dpc. However, lympho-myeloid hematopoietic progenitors are detected in the dorsal aorta from 9 dpc, raising the issue of their role in establishing adult hematopoiesis. Here, we show that these progenitors are endowed with long-term reconstitution capacity, but only engraft natural killer (NK)-deficient Rag2γc(-/-) mice. This novel population, called here immature HSCs, evolves in culture with thrombopoietin and stromal cells, into HSCs, defined by acquisition of CD45 and MHC-1 expression and by the capacity to reconstitute NK-competent mice. This evolution occurs during ontogeny, as early colonization of fetal liver by immature HSCs precedes that of HSCs. Moreover, organ culture experiments show that immature HSCs acquire, in this environment, the features of HSCs.

  15. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  16. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  17. Hepatic progenitor cells in human liver tumor development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louis Libbrecht

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the results of several studies suggest that human liver tumors can be derived from hepatic progenitor cells rather than from mature cell types.The available data indeed strongly suggest that most combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinomas arise from hepatic progenitor cells that retained their potential to differentiate into the hepatocytic and biliary lineages.Hepatic progenitor cells could also be the basis for some hepatocellular carcinomas and hepatocellular adenomas, although it is very difficult to determine the origin of an individual hepatocellular carcinoma. There is currently not enough data to make statements regarding a hepatic progenitor cell origin of cholangiocarcinoma.The presence of hepatic progenitor cell markers and the presence and extent of the cholangiocellular component are factors that are related to the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinomas and combined hepatocellularcholangiocarcinomas, respectively.

  18. Phenotypic changes of human cells in human-rat liver during partial hepatectomy-induced regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Hong-An Li; Jin-Fang Jiang; Qing Li; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Xi-Gu Chen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components in rat liver and the phenotypic changes of human cells in liver of human-rat chimera (HRC) generated by in utero transplantation of human cells during partial hepatectomy (PHx)-induced liver regeneration. METHODS: Human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components and phenotypic changes of human cells during liver regeneration were examined by flow cytometry, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: ISH analysis demonstrated human Alupositive cells in hepatic parenchyma and stroma of recipient liver. Functional human hepatocytes generated in this model potentially constituted human hepatic functional units with the presence of donor-derived human endothelial and biliary duct cells in host liver. Alpha fetoprotein (AFP)+, CD34+ and CD45+ cells were observed in the chimeric liver on day 10 after PHxinduced liver regeneration and then disappeared in PHx group, but not in non-PHx group, suggesting that dynamic phenotypic changes of human cells expressing AFP, CD34 and CD45 cells may occur during the chimeric liver regeneration. Additionally, immunostaining for human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) showed that the number of PCNA-positive cells in the chimeric liver of PHx group was markedly increased, as compared to that of control group, indicating that donor-derived human cells are actively proliferated during PHx-induced regeneration of HRC liver.

  19. Liver grafts contain a unique subset of natural killer cells that are transferred into the recipient after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroso, Viviana; Metselaar, Herold J; Mancham, Shanta; Tilanus, Hugo W; Eissens, Diana; van der Meer, Arnold; van der Laan, Luc J W; Kuipers, Ernst J; Joosten, Irma; Kwekkeboom, Jaap

    2010-07-01

    In contrast to other solid organ transplantations, liver grafts have tolerogenic properties. Animal models indicate that donor leukocytes transferred into the recipient after liver transplantation (LTX) play a relevant role in this tolerogenic phenomenon. However, the specific donor cell types involved in modulation of the recipient alloresponse are not yet defined. We hypothesized that this unique property of liver grafts may be related to their high content of organ-specific natural killer (NK) and CD56(+) T cells. Here, we show that a high proportion of hepatic NK cells that detach from human liver grafts during pretransplant perfusion belong to the CD56bright subset, and are in an activated state (CD69(+)). Liver NK cells contained perforin and granzymes, exerted stronger cytotoxicity against K562 target cells when compared with blood NK cells, and secreted interferon-gamma, but no interleukin-10 or T helper 2 cytokines, upon stimulation with monokines. Interestingly, whereas the CD56bright subset is classically considered as noncytolytic, liver CD56bright NK cells showed a high content of cytolytic molecules and degranulated in response to K562 cells. After LTX, but not after renal transplantation, significant numbers of donor CD56dim NK and CD56(+) T cells were detected in the recipient circulation for approximately 2 weeks. In conclusion, during clinical LTX, activated and highly cytotoxic NK cells of donor origin are transferred into the recipient, and a subset of them mixes with the recirculating recipient NK cell pool. The unique properties of the transferred hepatic NK cells may enable them to play a role in regulating the immunological response of the recipient against the graft and therefore contribute to liver tolerogenicity.

  20. Liver-Resident Memory CD8(+) T Cells Form a Front-Line Defense against Malaria Liver-Stage Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Ng, Wei Yi; Holz, Lauren E; Ma, Joel Z; Zaid, Ali; Wong, Yik Chun; Lau, Lei Shong; Mollard, Vanessa; Cozijnsen, Anton; Collins, Nicholas; Li, Jessica; Davey, Gayle M; Kato, Yu; Devi, Sapna; Skandari, Roghieh; Pauley, Michael; Manton, Jonathan H; Godfrey, Dale I; Braun, Asolina; Tay, Szun Szun; Tan, Peck Szee; Bowen, David G; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Rissiek, Björn; Carbone, Francis R; Crabb, Brendan S; Lahoud, Mireille; Cockburn, Ian A; Mueller, Scott N; Bertolino, Patrick; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Caminschi, Irina; Heath, William R

    2016-10-18

    In recent years, various intervention strategies have reduced malaria morbidity and mortality, but further improvements probably depend upon development of a broadly protective vaccine. To better understand immune requirement for protection, we examined liver-stage immunity after vaccination with irradiated sporozoites, an effective though logistically difficult vaccine. We identified a population of memory CD8(+) T cells that expressed the gene signature of tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells and remained permanently within the liver, where they patrolled the sinusoids. Exploring the requirements for liver Trm cell induction, we showed that by combining dendritic cell-targeted priming with liver inflammation and antigen recognition on hepatocytes, high frequencies of Trm cells could be induced and these cells were essential for protection against malaria sporozoite challenge. Our study highlights the immune potential of liver Trm cells and provides approaches for their selective transfer, expansion, or depletion, which may be harnessed to control liver infections or autoimmunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatic differentiation of embryonic stem cells by murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Ikai, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine. However, it has been technically difficult to differentiate ESCs into mature hepatocytes because the definitive growth factors and molecular mechanisms governing hepatocyte differentiation have not yet been well defined. The CD45(-)CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(+) mesenchymal cells that reside in murine fetal livers induce hepatic progenitor cells to differentiate into mature hepatocytes by direct cell-cell contact. Utilizing these cells, we employ a two-step procedure for hepatic maturation of ESCs: first, ESCs are differentiated into endodermal cells or hepatic progenitor cells, and second, ESC-derived endodermal cells are matured into functional hepatocytes by coculture with murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells. The ESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells possess hepatic functions, including ammonia removal activity, albumin secretion ability, glycogen synthesis and storage, and cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity.

  2. The Role of Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Liver Injury and Tumor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatics and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) possess multiple immunological functions besides affecting immune cell migration, such as inhibiting T cell proliferation and antigen presentation by dendritic cells. Moreover, they control the trans-endothelial transport of multiple molecules and antigens. Emerging evidence suggest their active involvements in immunregulation, tumor, and metastases formation. In the liver, increased lymphangiogenesis, specifically at the portal area has been associated with multiple liver diseases in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, and liver malignancies. Nevertheless, the exact role and contribution of LECs to liver diseases are poorly understood. The review summarizes the current understanding of LECs in liver diseases. PMID:27965673

  3. The role of lymphatic endothelial cells in liver injury and tumor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Lukacs-Kornek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatics and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs possess multiple immunological functions besides affecting immune cell migration such as inhibiting T cell proliferation and antigen presentation by dendritic cells. Moreover, they control the trans-endothelial transport of multiple molecules and antigens. Emerging evidence suggests their active involvements in immunoregulation, tumor and metastases formation. In the liver, increased lymphangiogenesis, specifically at the portal area has been associated with multiple liver diseases in particular primary biliary cirrhosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, and liver malignancies. Nevertheless, the exact role and contribution of LECs to liver diseases are poorly understood. The review summarizes the current understanding of LECs in liver diseases.

  4. Structural changes in the cytoskeleton in regenerating mouse liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleiberman, A.S.; Bannikov, G.A.; Troyanovskii, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    After CCl/sub 4/ poisoning induced in rats poisoning centrilobular necroses formed in the liver during the next 24 h. Single a-feto protein-containing cells appeared onnthe second day of regeneration. By the end of the 2nd day a perinecrotic layer of cells containing AFP was formed. There is a definite correlation between loss of biliary capillary antigen, the appearance of bundles of prekeratin and actin, and expression of AFP synthesis. It is possible to include all these features in a single marker ocmplex of ''embronalization'' of the hepatocyte.

  5. A child with pulmonary and liver Langerhans'-cell histiocytosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-li; SHEN Kun-ling; WANG Bin

    2012-01-01

    Clinical categories of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) include single and multi-system disease.Pulmonary LCH is rare,which is an unusual interstitial lung disease with the characteristics of monoclonal proliferation and infiltration of Langerhans' cells to organs.We report our experience of a rare LCH case of multiple organs such as pulmonary and liver as the main clinical manifestation.The patient was treated with chemotherapy which included prednisone,vinblastine,methotrexate and 6-mercaptopurine for 52 weeks and follow up all along.The patient has a favorable clinical outcome.

  6. Transcription Profiles of Marker Genes Predict The Transdifferentiation Relationship between Eight Types of Liver Cell during Rat Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaguang Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the transdifferentiation relationship between eight types of liver cell during rat liver regeneration (LR. Materials and Methods: 114 healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were used in this experimental study. Eight types of liver cell were isolated and purified with percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagentic bead methods. Marker genes for eight types of cell were obtained by retrieving the relevant references and databases. Expression changes of markers for each cell of the eight cell types were measured using microarray. The relationships between the expression profiles of marker genes and transdifferentiation among liver cells were analyzed using bioinformatics. Liver cell transdifferentiation was predicted by comparing expression profiles of marker genes in different liver cells. Results: During LR hepatocytes (HCs not only express hepatic oval cells (HOC markers (including PROM1, KRT14 and LY6E, but also express biliary epithelial cell (BEC markers (including KRT7 and KRT19; BECs express both HOC markers (including GABRP, PCNA and THY1 and HC markers such as CPS1, TAT, KRT8 and KRT18; both HC markers (KRT18, KRT8 and WT1 and BEC markers (KRT7 and KRT19 were detected in HOCs. Additionally, some HC markers were also significantly upregulated in hepatic stellate cells ( HSCs, sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs , Kupffer cells (KCs and dendritic cells (DCs, mainly at 6-72 hours post partial hepatectomy (PH. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that there is a mutual transdifferentiation relationship between HC, BEC and HOC during LR, and a tendency for HSCs, SECs, KCs and DCs to transdifferentiate into HCs.

  7. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiao-Ping Chen; Wan-Guang Zhang; Feng Zhang; Shuai Xiang; Han-Hua Dong; Lei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between nonparenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover.CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions.

  8. Free Fatty Acids Differentially Downregulate Chemokines in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: Insights into Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Rachel H; Porsche, Cara E; Edwards, Michael G; Rosen, Hugo R

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent problem throughout the western world. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) have been shown to play important roles in liver injury and repair, but their role in the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease remains undefined. Here, we evaluated the effects of steatosis on LSEC gene expression in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an immortalized LSEC line. Using microarray we identified distinct gene expression profiles following exposure to free fatty acids. Gene pathway analysis showed a number of differentially expressed genes including those involved in lipid metabolism and signaling and inflammation. Interestingly, in contrast to hepatocytes, fatty acids led to decreased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines including CCL2 (MCP-1), CXCL10 and CXCL16 in both primary and LSEC cell lines. Chemokine downregulation translated into a significant inhibition of monocyte migration and LSECs isolated from steatotic livers demonstrated a similar shift towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Overall, these pathways may represent a compensatory mechanism to reverse the liver damage associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  9. Free Fatty Acids Differentially Downregulate Chemokines in Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: Insights into Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel H McMahan

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent problem throughout the western world. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC have been shown to play important roles in liver injury and repair, but their role in the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease remains undefined. Here, we evaluated the effects of steatosis on LSEC gene expression in a murine model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and an immortalized LSEC line. Using microarray we identified distinct gene expression profiles following exposure to free fatty acids. Gene pathway analysis showed a number of differentially expressed genes including those involved in lipid metabolism and signaling and inflammation. Interestingly, in contrast to hepatocytes, fatty acids led to decreased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines including CCL2 (MCP-1, CXCL10 and CXCL16 in both primary and LSEC cell lines. Chemokine downregulation translated into a significant inhibition of monocyte migration and LSECs isolated from steatotic livers demonstrated a similar shift towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Overall, these pathways may represent a compensatory mechanism to reverse the liver damage associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  10. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  11. Human Liver Cells Expressing Albumin and Mesenchymal Characteristics Give Rise to Insulin-Producing Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Meivar-Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the pancreatic lineage in the liver has been suggested as a potential autologous cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients. Transcription factors-induced liver-to-pancreas reprogramming has been demonstrated in numerous species both in vivo and in vitro. However, human-derived liver cells capable of acquiring the alternate pancreatic repertoire have never been characterized. It is yet unknown whether hepatic-like stem cells or rather adult liver cells give rise to insulin-producing cells. Using an in vitro experimental system, we demonstrate that proliferating adherent human liver cells acquire mesenchymal-like characteristics and a considerable level of cellular plasticity. However, using a lineage-tracing approach, we demonstrate that insulin-producing cells are primarily generated in cells enriched for adult hepatic markers that coexpress both albumin and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, our data suggest that adult human hepatic tissue retains a substantial level of developmental plasticity, which could be exploited in regenerative medicine approaches.

  12. Hepatic Stellate Cells Support Hematopoiesis and are Liver-Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Kordes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hematopoiesis can occur in the liver, when the bone marrow fails to provide an adequate environment for hematopoietic stem cells. Hepatic stellate cells possess characteristics of stem/progenitor cells, but their contribution to hematopoiesis is not known thus far. Methods: Isolated hepatic stellate cells from rats were characterized with respect to molecular markers of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and treated with adipocyte or osteocyte differentiation media. Stellate cells of rats were further co-cultured with murine stem cell antigen-1+ hematopoietic stem cells selected by magnetic cell sorting. The expression of murine hematopoietic stem cell markers was analyzed by mouse specific quantitative PCR during co-culture. Hepatic stellate cells from eGFP+ rats were transplanted into lethally irradiated wild type rats. Results: Desmin-expressing stellate cells were associated with hematopoietic sites in the fetal rat liver. Hepatic stellate cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. Stellate cells supported hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during co-culture similar to bone marrow MSC, but failed to differentiate into blood cell lineages after transplantation. Conclusion: Hepatic stellate cells are liver-resident MSC and can fulfill typical functions of bone marrow MSC such as the differentiation into adipocytes or osteocytes and support of hematopoiesis.

  13. The Roles of Innate Immune Cells in Liver Injury and Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongjun Dong; Haiming Wei; Rui Sun; Zhigang Tian

    2007-01-01

    For predominant abundance with liver-specific Kupffer cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and natural killer T (NKT)cells and their rapid responses to several stimuli, the liver is considered as an organ with innate immune features.In contrast to their roles in the defense of many infectious agents like hepatitis viruses and parasites, hepatic innate immune cells are also involved in the immunopathogenesis of human clinical liver diseases and several murine hepatitis models such as concanavalin A (Con A), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C)-induced liver injury. In this review, the destructive roles of NK cells, NKT cells and Kupffer cells in the processes of immune-mediated liver injury and regeneration will be discussed, and some putative mechanisms involving the impairment of liver regeneration caused by activated hepatic innate immune cells are also proposed.

  14. Participation of liver progenitor cells in liver regeneration: lack of evidence in the AAF/PH rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusabineza, Ange-Clarisse; Van Hul, Noémi K; Abarca-Quinones, Jorge; Starkel, Peter; Najimi, Mustapha; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2012-01-01

    When hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver progenitor cells (LPC) are activated to participate in liver regeneration. We used the 2-acetaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (AAF/PH) model to evaluate the contribution of LPC to liver cell replacement and function restoration. Fischer rats subjected to AAF/PH (or PH alone) were investigated 7, 10 and 14 days post-hepatectomy. Liver mass recovery (LMR) was estimated, and the liver mass to body weight ratio calculated. We used serum albumin and bilirubin levels, and liver albumin mRNA levels to assess the liver function. LPC expansion was analyzed by cytokeratin 19 (CK19), glutathione S-transferase protein (GSTp) immunohistochemistry and by CK19, CD133, transforming growth factor-β1 and hepatocyte growth factor mRNA expression in livers. Cell proliferation was evaluated by Ki67 and BrdU immunostaining. Compared with PH alone where LMR was ∼100% 14 days post-PH, LMR was defective in AAF/PH rats (64.1±15.5%, P=0.0004). LPC expansion was scarce in PH livers (0.5±0.4% of CK19(+) area), but significant in AAF/PH livers (8.5±7.2% of CK19(+)), and inversely correlated to LMR (r(2)=0.63, PPH animals presented liver failure (low serum albumin and high serum bilirubin) 14 days post-PH. Compared with animals with preserved function, this was associated with a lower LMR (50±6.8 vs 74.6±9.4%, P=0.0005), a decreased liver to body weight ratio (2±0.3 vs 3.5±0.6%, P=0.001), and a larger LPC expansion such as proliferating Ki67(+) LPC covered 17.4±4.2% of the liver parenchyma vs 3.1±1.5%, (Plivers with preserved function. These observations suggest that, in this model, the efficient recovery of the liver function was ensured rather by the proliferation of mature hepatocytes than by the LPC expansion and differentiation into hepatocytes.

  15. Diagnosis and significance of liver metastases in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulshine, J.L.; Makuch, R.W.; Johnston-Early, A.; Matthews, M.J.; Carney, D.N.; Ihde, D.C.; Cohen, M.H.; Bates, H.R.; Dunnick, N.R.; Minna, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    One hundred fifty-seven consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer seen at the National Cancer Institute over a four-year period underwent a series of pretherapy liver staging procedures to determine optimal means of detection and prognostic implications of hepatic metastases. Liver evaluation included physical examination, liver function tests, and liver scan (radionuclide or computerized tomography (CT)), as well as percutaneous and/or peritoneoscopy-directed liver biopsy when possible (74%). Liver metastases were detected in 26% of patients. Peritoneoscopy was the most sensitive method of liver evaluation and increased the detection of liver metastases when done in a sequential fashion after percutaneous liver biopsy from 18 to a total of 27 patients. Of the noninvasive procedures, radionuclide and CT liver scan were the most accurate concurring with liver biopsy in 87% of patients but permitting correct discrimination of stage in excess of 96% of patients. The accuracy of this noninvasive procedure was enhanced by an algorithm combining the results of radionuclide liver scan with liver function tests to detect patients with high or low likelihood of liver involvement. The survival and response of patients with liver metastases was significantly worse than those without such metastases with no three-year disease-free survivors among patients with liver metastases.

  16. What Is Liver Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research? Liver Cancer About Liver Cancer What Is Liver Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... structure and function of the liver. About the liver The liver is the largest internal organ. It ...

  17. AFM imaging of fenestrated liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braet, F; Wisse, E

    2012-12-01

    Each microscope with its dedicated sample preparation technique provides the investigator with a specific set of data giving an instrument-determined (or restricted) insight into the structure and function of a tissue, a cell or parts thereof. Stepwise improvements in existing techniques, both instrumental and preparative, can sometimes cross barriers in resolution and image quality. Of course, investigators get really excited when completely new principles of microscopy and imaging are offered in promising new instruments, such as the AFM. The present paper summarizes a first phase of studies on the thin endothelial cells of the liver. It describes the preparation-dependent differences in AFM imaging of these cells after isolation. Special point of interest concerned the dynamics of the fenestrae, thought to filter lipid-carrying particles during their transport from the blood to the liver cells. It also describes the attempts to image the details of these cells when alive in cell cultures. It explains what physical conditions, mainly contributed to the scanning stylus, are thought to play a part in the limitations in imaging these cells. The AFM also offers promising specifications to those interested in cell surface details, such as membrane-associated structures, receptors, coated pits, cellular junctions and molecular aggregations or domains. The AFM also offers nano-manipulation possibilities, strengths and elasticity measurements, force interactions, affinity measurements, stiffness and other physical aspects of membranes and cytoskeleton. The potential for molecular approaches is there. New developments in cantilever construction and computer software promise to bring real time video imaging to the AFM. Home made accessories for the first generation of AFM are now commodities in commercial instruments and make the life of the AFM microscopist easier. Also, the combination of different microscopies, such as AFM and TEM, or AFM and SEM find their way to the

  18. Liver sinusoidal endothelial and biliary cell repopulation following irradiation and partial hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petra; Krause; Margret; Rave-Frank; Hendrik; Andreas; Wolff; Heinz; Becker; Hans; Christiansen; Sarah; Koenig

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether irradiation (IR) and partial hepatectomy (PH) may prepare the host liver for nonparenchymal cell (NPC) transplantation.METHODS: Livers of dipeptidyl peptidase(DPP)-deficient rats were pre-conditioned with external beam IR (25 Gy) delivered to two-thirds of the right liver lobules followed by a one-third PH of the untreated lob-ule. DPP-positive liver cells (NPC preparations enriched for liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatocytes) were transplanted via the spleen i...

  19. Hepatic tissue engineering: from transplantation to customized cell-based liver directed therapies from the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, Henning C; Kaufmann, Peter M; Bruns, Helge; Kluth, Dietrich; Horch, Raymund E; Vacanti, Joseph P; Kneser, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Today, liver transplantation is still the only curative treatment for liver failure due to end-stages liver diseases. Donor organ shortage, high cost and the need of immunosuppressive medications are still the major limitations in the field of liver transplantation. Thus, alternative innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, are under investigation with the aim, that in future an artificial liver tissue could be created and be used for the replacement of the liver function in patients. Using cells instead of organs in this setting should permit (i) expansion of cells in an in vitro phase, (ii) genetic or immunological manipulation of cells for transplantation, (iii) tissue typing and cryopreservation in a cell bank, and (iv) the ex vivo genetic modification of patient's own cells prior re-implantation. Function and differentiation of liver cells are influenced by the three-dimensional organ architecture. The use of polymeric matrices permits the three dimensional formation of a neo-tissue and specific stimulation by adequate modification of the matrix-surface which might be essential for appropriate differentiation of transplanted cells. Additionally, culturing hepatocytes on three dimensional matrices permits culture in a flow bioreactor system with increased function and survival of the cultured cells. Based on bioreactor technology, bioartificial liver devices (BAL) are developed for extracorporeal liver support. Although BALs improved clinical and metabolic conditions, increased patient survival rates have not been proven yet. For intra-corporeal liver replacement, a concept which combines Tissue Engineering using three-dimensional, highly porous matrices with cell transplantation could be useful. In such a concept, whole liver mass transplantation, long term engraftment and function as well as correction of a metabolic defect in animal models could be achieved with a principally reversible procedure. Future studies have to

  20. Porcine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Stem Cell Characteristics and Cell Activities While Enhancing the Expression of Liver-Specific Genes after Acute Liver Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxia Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure (ALF is a kind of complicated syndrome. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs can serve as a useful cell resource for autotransplantation due to their abundance and micro-invasive accessability. However, it is unknown how ALF will influence the characteristics of ADMSCs and whether ADMSCs from patients suffering from end-stage liver diseases are potential candidates for autotransplantation. This study was designed to compare various properties of ALF-derived ADMSCs with normal ADMSCs in pig models, with regard to their cellular morphology, cell proliferative ability, cell apoptosis, expression of surface antigens, mitochondrial and lysosomal activities, multilineage potency, and expression of liver-specific genes. Our results showed that ALF does not influence the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs. Intriguingly, the expression levels of several liver-specific genes in ALF-derived ADMSCs are higher than in normal ADMSCs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the stem cell characteristics and cell activities of ADMSCs were not altered by ALF and these cells can serve as a new source for regenerative medicine.

  1. Effects of Kupffer cell inactivation on graft survival and liver regeneration after partial liver transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hang-Yu Luo; Shan-Fang Ma; Ji-Fu Qu; De-Hu Tian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) selectively in-activates Kupffer cells and protects against ischemia/reperfu-sion and endotoxin injury. However, the effect of Kupffer cell inactivation on liver regeneration after partial liver transplan-tation (PLTx) is not clear. This study was to investigate the role of GdCl3 pretreatment in graft function after PLTx, and to explore the potential mechanism involved in this process. METHODS: PLTx (30% partial liver transplantation) was per-formed using Kamada's cuff technique, without hepatic artery reconstruction. Rats were randomly divided into the control low-dose (5 mg/kg) and high-dose (10 mg/kg) GdCl3 groups. Liver injury was determined by the plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, liver regen-eration by PCNA staining and BrdU uptake, apoptosis by TU-NEL assay. IL-6 and p-STAT3 levels were measured by ELISA and Western blotting. RESULTS: GdCl3 depleted Kupffer cells and decreased animal survival rates, but did not significantly affect alanine amino-transferase and aspartate aminotransferase (P>0.05). GdCl3 pretreatment induced apoptosis and inhibited IL-6 overex-pression and STAT3 phosphorylation after PLTx in graft tissues. CONCLUSION: Kupffer cells may contribute to the liver re-generation after PLTx through inhibition of apoptosis and activation of the IL-6/p-STAT3 signal pathway.

  2. Markers of activated inflammatory cells correlate with severity of liver damage in children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Rita; Alisi, Anna; Masotti, Andrea; Ceccarelli, Sara; Panera, Nadia; Citti, Arianna; Salata, Michele; Valenti, Luca; Feldstein, Ariel E; Nobili, Valerio

    2012-07-01

    Concomitantly to the obesity epidemic, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of liver disease in children. NAFLD encompasses a spectrum of histological damage ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), with possible progression to cirrhosis. There is growing evidence that the immune system plays a pivotal role in the initiation and progression to NASH but the cellular nature of the hepatic inflammation is still unknown. The present study includes 34 children with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Liver damage was evaluated by the NAFLD activity score (NAS), and the inflammatory infiltrate was characterized by immunohistochemistry for CD45, CD3 and CD163 which are markers of leukocytes, T cells and activated Kupffer cells/macrophages, respectively. Our results have shown that CD45+ (Pchildren with severe histological activity (NAS≥5) compared to children with lower activity (NASchildren with severe histological activity. There was a significant association between the numbers of CD45+, CD3+ and CD163+ cells, regarding both the portal tract and liver lobule, and the severity of steatosis, ballooning and fibrosis (Pchildren with NAFLD. Moreover, a decrease in CD3+ cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of liver damage. Future studies should evaluate whether it can predict the progression of liver disease independently of established histological scores.

  3. Hepatocytic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in cocultures with fetal liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Lange; Helge Bruns; Dietrich Kluth; Axel R Zander; Henning C Fiegel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the hepatocytic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in co-cultures with fetal liver cells (FLC) and the possibility to expand differentiated hepatocytic cells.METHODS: MSCs were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) by retroviral gene transduction. Clonal marked MSCs were either cultured under liver stimulating conditions using fibronectin-coated culture dishes and medium supplemented with stem cell factor (SCF),hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF-4) alone, or in presence of freshly isolated FLC. Cells in co-cultures were harvested, and GFP+ or GFP- cells were separated using fluorescence activated cell sorting. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the liver specific markers cytokeratin-18 (CK-18), albumin,and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was performed in different cell populations.RESULTS: Under the specified culture conditions, rat MSCs co-cultured with FLC expressed albumin, CK-18,and AFP-RNA over two weeks. At wk 3, MSCs lost hepatooytic gene expression, probably due to overgrowth of the cocultured FLC. FLC also showed a stable liver specific gene expression in the co-cultures and a very high growth potential.CONCLUSION: The rat MSCs from bone marrow can differentiate hepatocytic cells in the presence of FLC in vitro and the presence of MSCs in co-cultures also prorides a beneficial environment for expansion and differentiation of FLC.

  4. Proapoptotic Role of Potassium Ions in Liver Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglin Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium channels are transmembrane proteins that selectively promote the infiltration of potassium ions. The significance of these channels for tumor biology has become obvious. However, the effects of potassium ions on the tumor or normal cells have seldom been studied. To address this problem, we studied the biological effects of L02 and HepG2 cells with ectogenous potassium ions. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis rate were analyzed. Our results indicated that potassium ions inhibited proliferation of L02 and HepG2 cells and promoted their apoptosis. Potassium ions induced apoptosis through regulating Bcl-2 family members and depolarized the mitochondrial membrane, especially for HepG2 cell. These biological effects were associated with channel protein HERG. By facilitating expression of channel protein HERG, potassium ions may prevent it from being shunted to procancerous pathways by inducing apoptosis. These results demonstrated that potassium ions may be a key regulator of liver cell function. Thus, our findings suggest that potassium ions could inhibit tumorigenesis through inducing apoptosis of hepatoma cells by upregulating potassium ions transport channel proteins HERG and VDAC1.

  5. TRANSPLANTATION OF CRYOPRESERVED FETAL LIVER CELLS SEEDED INTO MACROPOROUS ALGINATE-GELATIN SCAFFOLDS IN RATS WITH LIVER FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Grizay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the therapeutic potential of cryopreserved fetal liver cells seeded into macroporous alginategelatin scaffolds after implantation to omentum of rats with hepatic failure.Materials and methods.Hepatic failure was simulated by administration of 2-acetyl aminofl uorene followed partial hepatectomy. Macroporous alginate-gelatin scaffolds, seeded with allogenic cryopreserved fetal liver cells (FLCs were implanted into rat omentum. To prevent from colonization of host cells scaffolds were coated with alginate gel shell. Serum transaminase activity, levels of albumin and bilirubin as markers of hepatic function were determined during 4 weeks after failure model formation and scaffold implantation. Morphology of liver and scaffolds after implantation were examined histologically. Results. Macroporous alginate-gelatin scaffolds after implantation to healthy rats were colonized by host cells. Additional formation of alginate gel shell around scaffolds prevented the colonization. Implantation of macroporous scaffolds seeded with cryopreserved rat FLCs and additionally coated with alginate gel shell into omentum of rats with hepatic failure resulted in signifi cant improvement of hepatospecifi c parameters of the blood serum and positive changes of liver morphology. The presence of cells with their extracellular matrix within the scaffolds was confi rmed after 4 weeks post implantation.Conclusion. The data above indicate that macroporous alginate-gelatin scaffolds coated with alginate gel shell are promising cell carriers for the development of bioengineered liver equivalents.

  6. Synergistic ablation of liver tissue and liver cancer cells with high-intensity focused ultrasound and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Nguyen H; Murad, Hakm Y; Ratnayaka, Sithira H; Chen, Chong; Khismatullin, Damir B

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the combined effect of ethanol and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), first, on heating and cavitation bubble activity in tissue-mimicking phantoms and porcine liver tissues and, second, on the viability of HepG2 liver cancer cells. Phantoms or porcine tissues were injected with ethanol and then subjected to HIFU at acoustic power ranging from 1.2 to 20.5 W (HIFU levels 1-7). Cavitation events and the temperature around the focal zone were measured with a passive cavitation detector and embedded type K thermocouples, respectively. HepG2 cells were subjected to 4% ethanol solution in growth medium (v/v) just before the cells were exposed to HIFU at 2.7, 8.7 or 12.0 W for 30 s. Cell viability was measured 2, 24 and 72 h post-treatment. The results indicate that ethanol and HIFU have a synergistic effect on liver cancer ablation as manifested by greater temperature rise and lesion volume in liver tissues and reduced viability of liver cancer cells. This effect is likely caused by reduction of the cavitation threshold in the presence of ethanol and the increased rate of ethanol diffusion through the cell membrane caused by HIFU-induced streaming, sonoporation and heating.

  7. RED BLOOD CELL ABNORMALITIES IN DECOMPENSATED CHRONIC LIVER DISEASE (DCLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbazhagan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver plays an important role in normal erythropoiesis, especially in formation and destruction of RBC’s. Chronic liver diseases are frequently associated with hematological abnormalities. Anemia of diverge etiology occurs in about 75% patients with DCLD ( 36. This can ultimately culminate in grave complications. AIM OF THE STUDY: To detect various abnormalities in Red Blood Cells and to assess the type of anemia in DCLD. METHODS: The study was conducted in 50 patients of DCLD, in Meenakshi Medical College. A detailed History, clinical examination and also Ultrasound Abdomen, GI endoscopy to establish DCLD and complete Red Blood Cell assessment was done. RESULTS AND OBSERVATION : Among the 50 patients, 40 patients (80% had anemia and only 10 pts had normal h emoglobin above 13 gms%. About 15 patients (30% had severe Anemia of less than 6 gm%. Among the 40 patients, 25 patients had normocytic normochronic anemia, 10 patients had microcytic anemia, and 4 patients had macrocytosis and only one had dimorphic anem ia. CONCLUSION : Most common Red Blood Cell abnormality in DCLD is anemia (80% and most common anemia is normochronic normocytic anemia (62.5%, while microcytic anemia and macrocytosis were common among females and Alcoholics, respectively

  8. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  9. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O;

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal...

  10. Fetal liver cell transplantation : role and nature of the fetal haemopoietic stem cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractFetal liver cell transplantation deserves intensified interest because, according to previous experimental evidence, it may represent a useful approach to reduce or avoid severe Graft-versus-Host (GvH) reactions following treatment with allogeneic haemopoietic cell grafts. The applicatio

  11. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal ...

  12. Purification of fetal liver stem/progenitor cells containing all the repopulation potential for normal adult rat liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oertel, Michael; Menthena, Anuradha; Chen, Yuan-Qing

    2008-01-01

    and characteristic properties in vitro and their proliferative and differentiation potential in vivo after transplantation into normal adult rat liver. RESULTS: Rat ED14 FLSPC were purified to 95% homogeneity and exhibited cell culture and gene expression characteristics expected for hepatic stem/progenitor cells...

  13. The insecticide DDT decreases membrane potential and cell input resistance of cultured human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefczik, K; Buff, K

    1984-10-03

    The resting membrane potential, Em, and the cell input resistance, Rinp, of cultured human Chang liver cells were measured using the single electrode 'double-pulse' current clamp technique, following exposure of the cells to the insecticide DDT (20 microM). In control (unexposed) cells, the mean Em was -24 mV, and the mean Rinp was 30 M omega. Neither parameter was significantly impaired after 1 h of cell exposure to DDT. But after 7 and 48 h, the Em was depolarized by 15 and 25 mV, respectively, in parallel with a decrease of the cell input resistance. The strongly time-delayed effect of DDT on Chang liver cell membranes may indicate a mode of interaction different from excitable membranes.

  14. Kinetics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) in SIV-infected macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Gill, Amy F.; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A.; Veazey, Ronald S., E-mail: rveazey@tulane.edu

    2013-11-15

    Since the liver drains antigens from the intestinal tract, and since the intestinal tract is a major site of viral replication, we examined the dynamics of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells) throughout SIV infection. Absolute numbers of Kupffer cells increased in the livers in acute infection, and in animals with AIDS. Significantly higher percentages of proliferating (BrdU+) Kupffer cells were detected in acute infection and in AIDS with similar trends in blood monocytes. Significantly higher percentages of apoptotic (AC3+) Kupffer cells were also found in acute and AIDS stages. However, productively infected cells were not detected in liver of 41/42 animals examined, despite abundant infected cells in gut and lymph nodes of all animals. Increased rates of Kupffer cell proliferation resulting in an increase in Kupffer cells without productive infection indicate SIV infection affects Kupffer cells, but the liver does not appear to be a major site of productive viral replication. - Highlights: • Kupffer cells increase in the liver of SIV-infected macaques. • Increased proliferation and apoptosis of Kupffer cells occurs in SIV infection. • Productively infected cells are rarely detected in the liver. • The liver is not a major site for SIV replication.

  15. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is known concerning the regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells. In particular, the role of cytokines such as interleukin-1 in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells in the embryo has been largely unexplored. Recently, we observed that the adult pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 is involved in regulating aorta-gonad-mesonephros hematopoietic progenitor and hematopoietic stem cell activity. Therefore, we set out to investigate whether interleukin-1 also plays a role in regulating fetal liver progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. Design and Methods We examined the interleukin-1 ligand and receptor expression pattern in the fetal liver. The effects of interleukin-1 on hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells were studied by FACS and transplantation analyses of fetal liver explants, and in vivo effects on hematopoietic stem cell and progenitors were studied in Il1r1−/− embryos. Results We show that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells express the IL-1RI and that interleukin-1 increases fetal liver hematopoiesis, progenitor cell activity and promotes hematopoietic cell survival. Moreover, we show that in Il1r1−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell activity is impaired and myeloid progenitor activity is increased. Conclusions The IL-1 ligand and receptor are expressed in the midgestation liver and act in the physiological regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. PMID

  16. Metabolism of Mequindox in Isolated Rat Liver Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-hui; SHAN Qi; WANG Jing; LI Ya-fei; GAO Yan; ZENG Zhen-ling

    2014-01-01

    Mequindox (MEQ), 3-methyl-2-quinoxalinacetyl-1,4-dioxide, is widely used in Chinese veterinary medicine as an antimicrobial agent and feed additive. Its toxicity has been reported to be closely related to its metabolism. To understand the pathways underlying MEQ’s metabolism more clearly, we studied its metabolism in isolated rat liver cells by using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization hybrid linear trap quadrupole orbitrap (LC-LTQ-Orbitrap) mass spectrometry. The structures of MEQ metabolites and their product ions were readily and reliably characterized on the basis of accurate MS2 spectra and known structure of MEQ. Eleven metabolites were detected in isolated rat liver cells, two of which were detected for the ifrst time in vitro. The major metabolic pathways reported previously for in vitro metabolism of MEQ in rat microsomes were conifrmed in this study, including N→O group reduction, carbonyl reduction, and methyl monohydroxylation. In addition, we found that acetyl hydroxylation was an important pathway of MEQ metabolism. The results also demonstrate that cellular systems more closely simulate in vivo conditions than do other in vitro systems such as microsomes. Taken together, these data contribute to our understanding of the in vivo metabolism of MEQ.

  17. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  18. Uptake of liposomes containing phosphatidylserine by liver cells in vivo and by sinusoidal liver cells in primary culture : In vivo-in vitro differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, JAAM; Morselt, HWM; Scherphof, GL

    1999-01-01

    The interaction with liver cells of liposomes containing different mol fractions of phosphatidylserine was investigated in vivo and in vitro. Increasing the amount of liposomal phosphatidylserine from 10 to 30 mol% leads to a faster blood disappearance of the liposomes. Within the liver, which is ma

  19. Comparative analysis of regulatory roles of P38 signaling pathway in 8 types liver cell during liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianguang; Zhu, Lin; Zhao, Weiming; Shi, Yaohuang; He, Chuncui; Xu, Cunshuan

    2016-12-05

    P38MAPK signaling pathway was closely related to cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell differentiation, cell survival, cell death, and so on. However, the regulatory mechanism of P38MAPK signaling pathway in liver regeneration (LR) was unclear. In order to further reveal the roles of P38MAPK signaling pathway in rat liver regeneration, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software and related data sites were used to construct P38MAPK signaling pathway, and the pathway was confirmed by relevant documents literature. The expression changes of P38MAPK signaling pathway-related gene in eight type cells were further analyzed by Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array, and the results showed that 95 genes in P38MAPK signaling pathway had significant changes. H-cluster analysis showed that hepatocyte cell (HC), pit cell (PC), oval cell (OC) and biliary epithelial cell (BEC) are clustered together; and the same as Kupffer cell (KC), sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC), dendritic cell (DC) and hepatic stellate cell (HSC). IPA software and expression analysis systematic explorer (EASE) were applied to functional enrichment analysis, and the results showed that P38MAPK signaling pathway was mainly involved in apoptosis, cell death, cell proliferation, cell survival, cell viability, activation, cell cycle progression, necrosis, synthesis of DNA and other physical activity during LR. In conclusion, P38MAPK signaling pathway regulated various physiological activities of LR through multiple signaling pathways.

  20. Glypican-3 Targeting of Liver Cancer Cells Using Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O. Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging is essential in accurately detecting, staging, and treating primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC], one of the most prevalent and lethal malignancies. We developed a novel multifunctional nanoparticle (NP specifically targeting glypican-3 (GPC3, a proteoglycan implicated in promotion of cell growth that is overexpressed in most HCCs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the differential GPC3 expression in two human HCC cells, Hep G2 (high and HLF (negligible. These cells were treated with biotin-conjugated GPC3 monoclonal antibody (αGPC3 and subsequently targeted using superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs conjugated to streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 647. Flow cytometry demonstrated that only GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells were specifically targeted using this αGPC3-NP conjugate (fourfold mean fluorescence over nontargeted NP, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI experiments showed similar findings (threefold R2 relaxivity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy localized the αGPC3 NPs only to the cell surface of GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells. Further characterization of this construct demonstrated a negatively charged, monodisperse, 50 nm NP, ideally suited for tumor targeting. This GPC3-specific NP system, with dual-modality imaging capability, may enhance pretreatment MRI, enable refined intraoperative HCC visualization by near-infrared fluorescence, and be potentially used as a carrier for delivery of tumor-targeted therapies, improving patient outcomes.

  1. Liver dendritic cells present bacterial antigens and produce cytokines upon Salmonella encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Cecilia; Wick, Mary Jo

    2004-02-15

    The capacity of murine liver dendritic cells (DC) to present bacterial Ags and produce cytokines after encounter with Salmonella was studied. Freshly isolated, nonparenchymal liver CD11c(+) cells had heterogeneous expression of MHC class II and CD11b and a low level of CD40 and CD86 expression. Characterization of liver DC subsets revealed that CD8alpha(-)CD4(-) double negative cells constituted the majority of liver CD11c(+) ( approximately 85%) with few cells expressing CD8alpha or CD4. Flow cytometry analysis of freshly isolated CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver and cocultured with Salmonella expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that CD11c(+) MHC class II(high) cells had a greater capacity to internalize Salmonella relative to CD11c(+) MHC class II(low) cells. Moreover, both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) liver DC internalized bacteria with similar efficiency after both in vitro and in vivo infection. CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver could also process Salmonella for peptide presentation on MHC class I and class II to primary, Ag-specific T cells after internalization requiring actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. Flow cytometry analysis of liver CD11c(+) cells infected with Salmonella expressing GFP showed that both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) DC produced IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha. The majority of cytokine-positive cells did not contain bacteria (GFP(-)) whereas only a minor fraction of cytokine-positive cells were GFP(+). Furthermore, only approximately 30-50% of liver DC containing bacteria (GFP(+)) produced cytokines. Thus, liver DC can internalize and process Salmonella for peptide presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and elicit proinflammatory cytokine production upon Salmonella encounter, suggesting that DC in the liver may contribute to immunity against hepatotropic bacteria.

  2. In vivo liver regeneration potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells from diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Kim, Yonghak; Sharkis, Saul; Marchionni, Luigi; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2011-05-11

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a potential source of hepatocytes for liver transplantation to treat end-stage liver disease. In vitro differentiation of human iPSCs into hepatic cells has been achieved using a multistage differentiation protocol, but whether these cells are functional and capable of engrafting and regenerating diseased liver tissue is not clear. We show that human iPSC-derived hepatic cells at various differentiation stages can engraft the liver in a mouse transplantation model. Using the same differentiation and transplantation protocols, we also assessed the ability of human iPSCs derived from each of the three developmental germ layer tissues (that is, ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) to regenerate mouse liver. These iPSC lines, with similar but distinct global DNA methylation patterns, differentiated into multistage hepatic cells with an efficiency similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Human hepatic cells at various differentiation stages derived from iPSC lines of different origins successfully repopulated the liver tissue of mice with liver cirrhosis. They also secreted human-specific liver proteins into mouse blood at concentrations comparable to that of proteins secreted by human primary hepatocytes. Our results demonstrate the engraftment and liver regenerative capabilities of human iPSC-derived multistage hepatic cells in vivo and suggest that human iPSCs of distinct origins and regardless of their parental epigenetic memory can efficiently differentiate along the hepatic lineage.

  3. Novel protocol including liver biopsy to identify and treat CD8+ T-cell predominant acute hepatitis and liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Rebecca B; Berquist, William E; Nadeau, Kari C; Louie, Christine Y; Chen, Sharon F; Sibley, Richard K; Glader, Bertil E; Wong, Wendy B; Hofmann, Lawrence V; Esquivel, Carlos O; Cox, Kenneth L

    2014-08-01

    In the majority of children with ALF, the etiology is unknown and liver transplantation is often needed for survival. A patient case prompted us to consider that immune dysregulation may be the cause of indeterminate acute hepatitis and liver failure in children. Our study includes nine pediatric patients treated under a multidisciplinary clinical protocol to identify and treat immune-mediated acute liver injury. Patients with evidence of inflammation and no active infection on biopsy received treatment with intravenous immune globulin and methylprednisolone. Seven patients had at least one positive immune marker before or after treatment. All patients had a CD8+ T-cell predominant liver injury that completely or partially responded to immune therapy. Five of the nine patients recovered liver function and did not require liver transplantation. Three of these patients subsequently developed bone marrow failure and were treated with either immunosuppression or stem cell transplant. This series highlights the importance of this tissue-based approach to diagnosis and treatment that may improve transplant-free survival. Further research is necessary to better characterize the immune injury and to predict the subset of patients at risk for bone marrow failure who may benefit from earlier and stronger immunosuppressive therapy.

  4. A SMALL POPULATION OF LIVER ENDOTHELIAL CELLS UNDERGOES ENDOTHELIAL TO MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION IN RESPONSE TO CHRONIC LIVER INJURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Jordi; Pauta, Montse; Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Cordoba, Bernat; Bosch, Anna; Calvo, Maria; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Mira, Aurea; Jimenez, Wladimiro; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel

    2017-08-10

    Rising evidence points to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) as a significant source of the mesenchymal cell population in fibrotic diseases. In this context, we hypothesized that liver endothelial cells undergo EndMT during fibrosis progression. Cirrhosis in mice was induced by CCl4 A transgenic mouse expressing a red fluorescent protein reporter under the control of Tie2 promoter (Tie2-tdTomato) was used to trace the acquisition of EndMT. Sinusoidal vascular connectivity was evaluated by intravital microscopy and high resolution 3D confocal microscopy. A modest but significant fraction of liver endothelial cells from both cirrhotic patients and CCl4-treated Tie2-tdTomato mice acquired an EndMT phenotype characterized by the co-expression of CD31 and α-SMA, compared with non-cirrhotic livers. BMP-7 inhibited the acquisition of EndMT induced by TGF-β1 treatment in cultured MLiECs from control mice. EndMT was also reduced significantly in vivo in cirrhotic Tie2-tdTomato mice treated intraperitoneally with BMP-7 compared with untreated mice (1.9±0.2 vs. 3.8±0.3 %, respectively; p<0.05). The decrease of EndMT in cirrhotic livers correlated with a significant decrease in liver fibrosis (p<0.05) and an improvement in the vascular disorganization rate (p<0.05). We demonstrated the acquisition of the EndMT phenotype by a subpopulation of endothelial cells from cirrhotic livers in both animal models and patients. BMP-7 treatment decreases the occurrence of the EndMT phenotype and has a positive impact on the severity of disease by reducing fibrosis and sinusoidal vascular disorganization. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

  5. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX.

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    Jiehua Xu

    Full Text Available Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers.

  6. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiehua; Teng, I-Ting; Zhang, Liqin; Delgado, Stefanie; Champanhac, Carole; Cansiz, Sena; Wu, Cuichen; Shan, Hong; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers.

  7. Immunohistochemical characterization of hepatic stem cell-related cells in developing human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; HU Yong; WANG Jian; ZHOU Ji; ZHANG Taiping; YU Hongyu

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the expression characteristics of the various kinds of possible markers in hepatic stem cells(HSCs)and other HSC-related cells in human fetal liver in various developmental stages.It is significant to investigate the immunohistochemical expression for better understanding of the origin,difierentiation and migration of HSCs in the developing human liver.H-E staining and immunohistochemical methods were used to observe the expression of hepatic/cholangiocellular differentiation markers(AFF,GST-π,CK7,CK19)and hematopoietic stem cell markers(CD34 and c-kit)in several kinds of HSC-related cells in thirty cases of fetal liver samples (4-35 weeks after pregnancy).AFP expression appears in fetal hepatocytes at four weeks'gestation.It Deaks at 16-24 weeks'gestation and decreases gradually afterwards.Finally,weak signals were only found in some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells.GST-π was detected in hepatic cord cells from the sixth week and in the ductal plate cells from the eighth week.Twenty-six weeks later,only some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells show positive signals.CK19 expression peaks during the 6th-11th weeks in hepatic cord cells and decreases gradually afterwards,except for the ductal plates.CK7 expression was limited in the ductal plate cells and bile ducts cells from the 14th week.CD34 and c-kit were detected at the eighth week in some ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic cords/mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.After 21 weeks.CD34 and c-kit were found only in ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.Fetal hepatocytes at 4-16 weeks'gestation are mainly constituted by HSCs characterized with bi-potential differentiation capacity.At 16 weeks'gestation,most hepatic cord cells begin to differentiate into hepatocytes and abundant HSCs remain in ductal plate(the origin site of Hering canals).It is also indicated mat the

  8. HIBADH Plays an Important Role in the Course of Liver Cell Necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the biological function of human 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH). Methods Human 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH, 3-hydroxy-2-methyl propanoate: NAD+oxidoreductase) recombinant protein was expressed inE. coli BL21,and puriifed by Ni+ column. The special antisera was obtained from rabbits immunized by this purified antigen. On the distribution of HIBADH, it was found that HIBADH over-expressed in the injured liver cells when serious hepatitis occurred. The phenomenon was conifrmed in the animal models of SD rats with acute liver cell injury induced by CCl4, but this phenomenon did not exist in the models induced by endotoxin combined with galactosamine. Further more, HIBADH’s overexpression in liver cells will induce cell necrosis through the pathway of oxidative stress. Results When the liver cells injured by drug or other chemical materials, HIBADH will be compensationally over-expressed for the deifciency of energy, so liver cells can make enough ATP through brand-chain amino acid catabolism. However, the overexpression of HIBADH will be harmful for liver cells through the product of much more active oxygens which will induce the cell necrosis. Conclusions HIBADH over-expression is a signal of the liver cell metabolism injury, and it can aggravate the liver cell injury through oxidative stress.

  9. Activated hepatic stellate cells in liver cirrhosis. A morphologic and morphometrical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Guido; Franchitto, Antonio; Morini, Sergio; Corradini, Stefano Ginanni; Merli, Manuela; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells have been considered the most important cell-type involved in hepatic fibrogenesis. Proliferation and differentiation of hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblast-like cells has been related to the development of liver fibrosis. The alpha-actin expressed by hepatic stellate cells was considered a marker of their activation to myofibroblast-like cell. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes in morphology, distribution, percentage and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression of hepatic stellate cells in normal and cirrhotic livers, and to correlate activated hepatic stellate cells with the progression of fibrosis. Human liver biopsies (n=121) were divided in five groups: 1) normal livers (controls); 2) cirrhosis post-HCV hepatitis; 3) cirrhosis post-HBV hepatitis; 4) non viral related cirrhosis; 5) recurrent HCV hepatitis after orthotopic liver transplantation. Samples immunostained with anti alpha-smooth muscle actin antibody by immunoperoxidase method were semi-quantitatively evaluated. Liver fibrosis was quantified by computer image analysis on specimens stained with Masson's trichrome. In normal adult livers stellate cells were very rarely stained for alpha-smooth muscle actin. In cirrhotic livers, a strongly enhanced percentage of stellate cells expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin was detected in cirrhotic fragments with respect to the control group, with a significant correlation between alpha-smooth muscle actin positive stellate cells and the volume fraction of fibrosis. Moreover, liver biopsies of recurrent hepatitis revealed an increased number of activated stellate cells compared to normal livers, and intermediate volume fraction of fibrosis. These results confirmed that a direct correlation existed between activated stellate cells and the progression of fibrosis. Alpha-smooth muscle actin confirmed to be a reliable marker of hepatic stellate cells activation also in precocious stages of the disease.

  10. Intrahepatic infiltrating NK and CD8 T cells cause liver cell death in different phases of dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jui-Min; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2012-01-01

    Elevated liver enzyme level is an outstanding feature in patients with dengue. However, the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, employing a mouse model we aimed to investigate the immunopathogenic mechanism of dengue liver injury. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were infected intravenously with dengue virus strain 16681. Infected mice had transient viremia, detectable viral capsid gene and cleaved caspase 3 in the liver. In the mean time, NK cell and T cell infiltrations peaked at days 1 and 5, respectively. Neutralizing CXCL10 or depletion of Asialo GM1(+) cells reduced cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+) cells in the liver at day 1 after infection. CD8(+) T cells infiltrated into the liver at later time point and at which time intrahepatic leukocytes (IHL) exhibited cytotoxicity against DENV-infected targets. Cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+) cells were diminished in mice with TCRβ deficiency and in those depleted of CD8(+) T cells, respectively, at day 5 after infection. Moreover, intrahepatic CD8(+) T cells were like their splenic counterparts recognized DENV NS4B(99-107) peptide. Together, these results show that infiltrating NK and CD8(+) T cells cause liver cell death. While NK cells were responsible for cell death at early time point of infection, CD8(+) T cells were for later. CD8(+) T cells that recognize NS4B(99-107) constitute at least one of the major intrahepatic cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell populations.

  11. Intrahepatic infiltrating NK and CD8 T cells cause liver cell death in different phases of dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Min Sung

    Full Text Available Elevated liver enzyme level is an outstanding feature in patients with dengue. However, the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, employing a mouse model we aimed to investigate the immunopathogenic mechanism of dengue liver injury. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were infected intravenously with dengue virus strain 16681. Infected mice had transient viremia, detectable viral capsid gene and cleaved caspase 3 in the liver. In the mean time, NK cell and T cell infiltrations peaked at days 1 and 5, respectively. Neutralizing CXCL10 or depletion of Asialo GM1(+ cells reduced cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+ cells in the liver at day 1 after infection. CD8(+ T cells infiltrated into the liver at later time point and at which time intrahepatic leukocytes (IHL exhibited cytotoxicity against DENV-infected targets. Cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+ cells were diminished in mice with TCRβ deficiency and in those depleted of CD8(+ T cells, respectively, at day 5 after infection. Moreover, intrahepatic CD8(+ T cells were like their splenic counterparts recognized DENV NS4B(99-107 peptide. Together, these results show that infiltrating NK and CD8(+ T cells cause liver cell death. While NK cells were responsible for cell death at early time point of infection, CD8(+ T cells were for later. CD8(+ T cells that recognize NS4B(99-107 constitute at least one of the major intrahepatic cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell populations.

  12. Gastrointestinal stem cells. III. Emergent themes of liver stem cell biology: niche, quiescence, self-renewal, and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theise, Neil D

    2006-02-01

    This essay will address areas of liver stem/progenitor cell studies in which consensus has emerged and in which controversy still prevails over consensus, but it will also highlight important themes that inevitably should be a focus of liver stem/progenitor cell investigations in coming years. Thus concepts regarding cell plasticity, the existence of a physiological/anatomic stem cell niche, and whether intrahepatic liver stem/progenitor cells comprise true stem cells or progenitor cells (or both) will be approached in some detail.

  13. The Complex Relationship between Liver Cancer and the Cell Cycle: A Story of Multiple Regulations

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    Bisteau, Xavier [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos#3-09, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); Caldez, Matias J.; Kaldis, Philipp, E-mail: kaldis@imcb.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos#3-09, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); National University of Singapore (NUS), Department of Biochemistry, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2014-01-13

    The liver acts as a hub for metabolic reactions to keep a homeostatic balance during development and growth. The process of liver cancer development, although poorly understood, is related to different etiologic factors like toxins, alcohol, or viral infection. At the molecular level, liver cancer is characterized by a disruption of cell cycle regulation through many molecular mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the lack of regulation of the cell cycle during liver cancer, focusing mainly on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also provide a brief summary of novel therapies connected to cell cycle regulation.

  14. The Complex Relationship between Liver Cancer and the Cell Cycle: A Story of Multiple Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bisteau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver acts as a hub for metabolic reactions to keep a homeostatic balance during development and growth. The process of liver cancer development, although poorly understood, is related to different etiologic factors like toxins, alcohol, or viral infection. At the molecular level, liver cancer is characterized by a disruption of cell cycle regulation through many molecular mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the lack of regulation of the cell cycle during liver cancer, focusing mainly on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. We also provide a brief summary of novel therapies connected to cell cycle regulation.

  15. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established.

  16. Surface proteins in normal and transformed rat liver epithelial cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, G. A.; Saint Vincent, L.; Montesano, R.

    1980-01-01

    The pattern of surface proteins of different types of normal and transformed rat liver cells have been studied in culture by means of lactoperoxidase-catalysed iodination procedures, followed by SDS-gel electrophoresis. The cells examined were primary cultures of epithelial liver cells, long-term cultures of epithelial liver cells, in vitro transformed epithelial liver cell lines and liver tumour-cell lines; mesenchymal cells from liver and skin were also examined. The principal surface proteins of primary cultures of epithelial cells from adult or neonatal rats had components with mol. wts of 140,000-160,000, 100,000 and 40,000-70,000. A band that had the same position as fibronectin from mesenchymal cells was also present and this band, as well as other iodinated components, were less sensitive to trypsin than fibroblastic fibronectin. A similar pattern of iodinated proteins was seen in long-term cultures of epithelial liver cells, with a great reduction in the number and intensity of the bands in the mol. wt region below 100,000. Almost all the in vitro transformed and tumour epithelial cell lines contain a protein with a mol. wt 135,000 as one of the major iodinated bands, and in contrast to the observation in transformed fibroblasts, the fibronectin was retained by most of these transformed cell lines. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7053205

  17. Selective tropism of liver stem cells to hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the selective tropism of liver stem cells to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in an animal model and its feasibility as a vector to deliver therapeutic genes for targeted therapy of HCC.METHODS: WB-F344, a kind of rat liver stem cell,was infected with recombinant virus to establish a cell line with stable, high-level expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). An animal model of HCC in Wistar rats was established by implanting HCC cells (CBRH7919) combined with an immunosuppressive drug.EGFP labeled liver stem cells were injected into caudal veins of the animals and distribution was observed at different time points after injection. SDF-1 and c-kit expression in non-tumor liver and tumor tissue were analysed by immunohistochemistry for the relationshiop between the expression and migration of liver stem cells.Furthermore, hepatic stem cells were injected via the portal vein, hepatic artery, caudal vein, or directly into the pericancerous liver tissue, respectively, and effects on migration, localization, and proliferation of the hepatic stem cells within the tumor tissue were observed and analyzed.RESULTS: Recombinant adenovirus could deliver the EGFP gene to hepatic stem cells. A new stem cell line,named WB-EGFP, was established that stably expressed EGFP. WB-EGFP cells still showed selective tropism towards HCC and EGFP expression was stable in vivo.According to immunohistochemistry results, SDF-1 may not be related to the mechanisms of tropism of hepatic stem cells. Different application sites affected the distribution of liver stem cells. Injection via the portal vein was superior with regard to selective migration,localization, and proliferation of the hepatic stem cells within the tumor tissue.CONCLUSION: Liver stem cells have the biological behavior of selective migration to HCC in vivo and they could localize and proliferate within HCC tissue stably expressing the target gene. Liver stem cells are a potential tool for a targeted

  18. In vitro culture of isolated primary hepatocytes and stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells for liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenxia; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-08-01

    Various liver diseases result in terminal hepatic failure, and liver transplantation, cell transplantation and artificial liver support systems are emerging as effective therapies for severe hepatic disease. However, all of these treatments are limited by organ or cell resources, so developing a sufficient number of functional hepatocytes for liver regeneration is a priority. Liver regeneration is a complex process regulated by growth factors (GFs), cytokines, transcription factors (TFs), hormones, oxidative stress products, metabolic networks, and microRNA. It is well-known that the function of isolated primary hepatocytes is hard to maintain; when cultured in vitro, these cells readily undergo dedifferentiation, causing them to lose hepatocyte function. For this reason, most studies focus on inducing stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. In this review, we mainly focus on the nature of the liver regeneration process and discuss how to maintain and enhance in vitro hepatic function of isolated primary hepatocytes or stem cell-derived HLCs for liver regeneration. In this way, hepatocytes or HLCs may be applied for clinical use for the treatment of terminal liver diseases and may prolong the survival time of patients in the near future.

  19. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells induce immunosuppressive IL-10-producing Th1 cells via the Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Katrin; Rudolph, Christine; Neumann, Christian; Janke, Marko; Amsen, Derk; Scheffold, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Under homeostasis, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) shift intrahepatic T-cell responses towards tolerance. However, the role of LSECs in the regulation of T-cell-induced liver inflammation is less clear. Here, we studied the capacity of LSECs to modulate pro-inflammatory Th1-cell differentiation in mice. Using in vitro co-culture systems and subsequent cytokine analysis, we showed that LSECs induced high amounts of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in developing Th1 cells. These LSEC-stimulated Th1 cells had no pro-inflammatory capacity in vivo but instead actively suppressed an inflammatory Th1-cell-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. Blockage of IL-10 signaling in vivo inhibited immunosuppressive activity of LSEC-stimulated Th1 cells. We identified the Notch pathway as a mechanism how LSECs trigger IL-10 expression in Th1 cells. LSECs expressed high levels of the Delta-like and Jagged family of Notch ligands and induced expression of the Notch target genes hes-1 and deltex-1 in Th1 cells. Blockade of Notch signaling selectively inhibited IL-10 induction in Th1 cells by LSECs. Our findings suggest that LSEC-induced IL-10 expression in Th1 cells via the Notch pathway may contribute to the control of hepatic inflammatory immune responses by induction of a self-regulatory mechanism in pro-inflammatory Th1 cells.

  20. An Efficient Protocol for Deriving Liver Stem Cells from Neonatal Mice: Validating Its Differentiation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugapriya Dhanasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of liver regeneration depends on the availability of suitable cell types and their potential to differentiate into functional hepatocytes. To identify the stem cells which have the ability to differentiate into hepatocytes, we used neonatal liver as source. However, the current protocol for isolating stem cells from liver involves enzymes like collagenase, hyaluronidase exposed for longer duration which limits the success. This results in the keen interest to develop an easy single step enzyme digestion protocol for isolating stem cells from liver for tissue engineering approaches. Thus, the unlimited availability of cell type favors setting up the functional recovery of the damaged liver, ensuring ahead success towards treating liver diseases. We attempted to isolate liver stem derived cells (LDSCs from mouse neonatal liver using single step minimal exposure to enzyme followed by in vitro culturing. The cells isolated were characterized for stem cell markers and subjected to lineage differentiation. Further, LDSCs were induced to hepatocyte differentiation and validated with hepatocyte markers. Finally, we developed a reproducible, efficient protocol for isolation of LDSCs with functional hepatocytes differentiation potential, which further can be used as in vitro model system for assessing drug toxicity assays in various preclinical trials.

  1. Role of gamma-delta T cells in liver inflammation and fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda; Hammerich; Frank; Tacke

    2014-01-01

    Conventional adaptive T cell responses contribute to liver inflammation and fibrogenesis,especially in chronic viral infections and autoimmune hepatitis.However,the role of unconventional gamma-delta(γδ)T cells in liver diseases is less clear.In the past two decades,accumulating evidence revealed thatγδT cell numbers remarkably increase in the liver upon various inflammatory conditions in mice and humans.More recent studies demonstrated that the functional effect ofγδT cells on liver disease progression depends on the subsets involved,which can be identified by the expression of distinct T cell receptor chains and of specific cytokines.Fascinatingly,γδT cells may have protective as well as pathogenic functions in liver diseases.Interferonγ-producingγδT cells,for example,induce apoptosis in hepatocytes but also in hepatic tumor cells;while interleukin-17-expressingγδT cells can downregulate pathogenic effector functions of other immune cells and can promote apoptosis of fibrogenic stellate cells.However,the results obtained in human liver disease as well as murine models are not fully conclusive at present,and the effects ofγδT cells on the outcome of liver disease might vary dependent on etiology and stage of disease.Further definitions of theγδT cell subsets in-volved in acute and chronic liver inflammation,as well as their effector cytokines might uncover whether interference withγδT cells could be a useful target for the treatment of liver disease.

  2. Lineage tracing reveals conversion of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells into hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhaoli; Chen, Keyan; Shao, Yong; Gao, Lihua; Wang, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Jin, Yang; Hu, Xianwen; Wang, Youliang

    2016-09-01

    Although liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have long been known to contribute to liver regeneration following injury, the exact role of these cells in liver regeneration remains poorly understood. In this work, we performed lineage tracing of LSECs in mice carrying Tie2-Cre or VE-cadherin-Cre constructs to facilitate fate-mapping of LSECs in liver regeneration. Some YFP-positive LSECs were observed to convert into hepatocytes following a two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH). Furthermore, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) could be triggered to convert into cells that closely resembled hepatocytes when cultured with serum from mice that underwent an extended PH. These findings suggest that mature non-hepatocyte LSECs play an essential role in mammalian liver regeneration by converting to hepatocytes. The conversion of LSECs to hepatocyte-like (iHep) cells may provide a new approach to tissue engineering.

  3. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  4. Subnormothermic ex vivo liver perfusion reduces endothelial cell and bile duct injury after donation after cardiac death pig liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaak, Jan M; Spetzler, Vinzent N; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Boehnert, Markus U; Bazerbachi, Fateh; Louis, Kristine S; Adeyi, Oyedele A; Minkovich, Leonid; Yip, Paul M; Keshavjee, Shaf; Levy, Gary A; Grant, David R; Selzner, Nazia; Selzner, Markus

    2014-11-01

    An ischemic-type biliary stricture (ITBS) is a common feature after liver transplantation using donation after cardiac death (DCD) grafts. We compared sequential subnormothermic ex vivo liver perfusion (SNEVLP; 33°C) with cold storage (CS) for the prevention of ITBS in DCD liver grafts in pig liver transplantation (n = 5 for each group). Liver grafts were stored for 10 hours at 4°C (CS) or preserved with combined 7-hour CS and 3-hour SNEVLP. Parameters of hepatocyte [aspartate aminotransferase (AST), international normalized ratio (INR), factor V, and caspase 3 immunohistochemistry], endothelial cell (EC; CD31 immunohistochemistry and hyaluronic acid), and biliary injury and function [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, and bile lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)] were determined. Long-term survival (7 days) after transplantation was similar between the SNEVLP and CS groups (60% versus 40%, P = 0.13). No difference was observed between SNEVLP- and CS-treated animals with respect to the peak of serum INR, factor V, or AST levels within 24 hours. CD31 staining 8 hours after transplantation demonstrated intact EC lining in SNEVLP-treated livers (7.3 × 10(-4) ± 2.6 × 10(-4) cells/μm(2)) but not in CS-treated livers (3.7 × 10(-4) ± 1.3 × 10(-4) cells/μm(2) , P = 0.03). Posttransplant SNEVLP animals had decreased serum ALP and serum bilirubin levels in comparison with CS animals. In addition, LDH in bile fluid was lower in SNEVLP pigs versus CS pigs (14 ± 10 versus 60 ± 18 μmol/L, P = 0.02). Bile duct histology revealed severe bile duct necrosis in 3 of 5 animals in the CS group but none in the SNEVLP group (P = 0.03). Sequential SNEVLP preservation of DCD grafts reduces bile duct and EC injury after liver transplantation. © 2014 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  5. A Distinct Subpopulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Muse Cells, Directly Commit to the Replacement of Liver Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, H; Kushida, Y; Nojima, M; Kuroda, Y; Wakao, S; Ishida, K; Endo, F; Kume, K; Takahara, T; Nitta, H; Tsuda, H; Dezawa, M; Nishizuka, S S

    2016-02-01

    Genotyping graft livers by short tandem repeats after human living-donor liver transplantation (n = 20) revealed the presence of recipient or chimeric genotype cases in hepatocytes (6 of 17, 35.3%), sinusoidal cells (18 of 18, 100%), cholangiocytes (15 of 17, 88.2%) and cells in the periportal areas (7 of 8, 87.5%), suggesting extrahepatic cell involvement in liver regeneration. Regarding extrahepatic origin, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been suggested to contribute to liver regeneration but compose a heterogeneous population. We focused on a more specific subpopulation (1-2% of BM-MSCs), called multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, for their ability to differentiate into liver-lineage cells and repair tissue. We generated a physical partial hepatectomy model in immunodeficient mice and injected green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled human BM-MSC Muse cells intravenously (n = 20). Immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization and species-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed that they integrated into regenerating areas and expressed liver progenitor markers during the early phase and then differentiated spontaneously into major liver components, including hepatocytes (≈74.3% of GFP-positive integrated Muse cells), cholangiocytes (≈17.7%), sinusoidal endothelial cells (≈2.0%), and Kupffer cells (≈6.0%). In contrast, the remaining cells in the BM-MSCs were not detected in the liver for up to 4 weeks. These results suggest that Muse cells are the predominant population of BM-MSCs that are capable of replacing major liver components during liver regeneration.

  6. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Infusion (AMBI therapy for Chronic Liver Diseases

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    Rajkumar JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver Cirrhosis is the end stage of chronic liver disease which may happen due to alcoholism, viral infections due to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C viruses and is difficult to treat. Liver transplantation is the only available definitive treatment which is marred by lack of donors, post operative complications such as rejection and high cost. Autologous bone marrow stem cells have shown a lot of promise in earlier reported animal studies and clinical trials. We have in this study administered in 22 patients with chronic liver disease, autologous bone marrow stem cell whose results are presented herewith.

  7. Successful transplantation of human hepatic stem cells with restricted localization to liver using hyaluronan grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rachael A; Wauthier, Eliane; Lozoya, Oswaldo; McClelland, Randall; Bowsher, James E; Barbier, Claire; Prestwich, Glenn; Hsu, Edward; Gerber, David A; Reid, Lola M

    2013-02-01

    Cell therapies are potential alternatives to organ transplantation for liver failure or dysfunction but are compromised by inefficient engraftment, cell dispersal to ectopic sites, and emboli formation. Grafting strategies have been devised for transplantation of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) embedded into a mix of soluble signals and extracellular matrix biomaterials (hyaluronans, type III collagen, laminin) found in stem cell niches. The hHpSCs maintain a stable stem cell phenotype under the graft conditions. The grafts were transplanted into the livers of immunocompromised murine hosts with and without carbon tetrachloride treatment to assess the effects of quiescent versus injured liver conditions. Grafted cells remained localized to the livers, resulting in a larger bolus of engrafted cells in the host livers under quiescent conditions and with potential for more rapid expansion under injured liver conditions. By contrast, transplantation by direct injection or via a vascular route resulted in inefficient engraftment and cell dispersal to ectopic sites. Transplantation by grafting is proposed as a preferred strategy for cell therapies for solid organs such as the liver.

  8. Abnormal hepatic copper accumulation of spheroid composed of liver cells from LEC rats in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, K; Yoshizawa, M; Satoh, T; Yoneda, S; Ohmichi, M; Yamazaki, M; Mori, Y; Suzuki, K T

    1995-11-01

    The LEC rat is a mutant strain displaying hereditary hepatitis, and shows abnormal accumulation of copper (Cu) similar to that occurring in Wilson's disease. We prepared a multicellular spheroid composed of LEC rat liver cells to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu. These multicellular spheroids were prepared by detaching the monolayer on the collagen-conjugated thermo-responsive polymer coated culture dish at a temperature below the critical solution temperature and culturing on the non-adhesive substratum. Long-term cultured spheroids of LEC rat liver cells as well as SD rat liver cells were attempted. Non-parenchymal cells obtained by collagenase perfusion from the LEC liver were fewer than those from the SD liver. Cells from the LEC rat, over 11 weeks of age, did not form a cell sheet; however, a mixture of parenchymal cells from LEC rats over aged 11 weeks and non-parenchymal cells from SD rats of any age yielded intact spheroids. We examined the toxicity, the accumulation and distribution of Cu in spheroids. The accumulation of Cu in LEC spheroids was higher than that in SD spheroids. Results suggest that spheroids consisting of LEC liver cells are useful as an alternative model to in vivo tests to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu in liver.

  9. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  10. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarada Devi Ramachandran

    Full Text Available In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte® cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte® cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacity (upcyte® process. Proliferating upcyte® cells undergo a finite number of cell divisions, i.e., 20 to 40 population doublings, but upon withdrawal of proliferation stimulating factors, they regain most of the cell specific characteristics of primary cells. When a defined mixture of differentiated human upcyte® cells (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs was cultured in vitro on a thick layer of Matrigel™, they self-organized to form liver organoid-like structures within 24 hours. When further cultured for 10 days in a bioreactor, these liver organoids show typical functional characteristics of liver parenchyma including activity of cytochromes P450, CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP2C9 as well as mRNA expression of several marker genes and other enzymes. In summary, we hereby describe that 3D functional hepatic structures composed of primary human cell strains can be generated in vitro. They can be cultured for a prolonged period of time and are potentially useful ex vivo models to study liver functions.

  11. Bone marrow stem cells contribute to alcohol liver fibrosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Evangelos; Newsome, Philip N; Boyle, Shelagh; Brown, Rachael; Pryde, Anne; McCall, Shonna; Hayes, Peter C; Bickmore, Wendy A; Harrison, David J; Plevris, John N

    2010-09-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC) contribution to liver repair varies considerably and recent evidence suggests these cells may contribute to liver fibrosis. We investigated the mobilization and hepatic recruitment of bone marrow (BM) stem cells in patients with alcohol liver injury and their contribution to parenchymal/non-parenchymal liver cell lineages. Liver biopsies from alcoholic hepatitis (AH) patients and male patients, who received a female liver transplant and developed AH, were analyzed for BM stem cell content by fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunostaining. Y chromosome analysis was performed, along with co-staining for hepatocyte, biliary, myofibroblast, and Ki-67 markers. Blood CD34(+) levels were quantified in AH patients by flow cytometry. AH patients had increased CD34(+) cell counts in liver tissue (1.834% +/- 0.605%; P < 0.05) and in blood (0.195% +/- 0.063%; P < 0.05) as compared with matched controls (0.299% + 0.208% and 0.067% +/- 0.01%). A proportion of hepatic myofibroblasts were BM-derived (7.9%-26.8%) as deemed by the co-localization of Y chromosome/alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) staining. In the cross-sex liver grafts with AH, 5.025% of the myofibroblasts were co-staining for CD34, suggesting that a population of CD34(+) cells were contributing to the hepatic myofibroblast population. There was no evidence of BM contribution to hepatocyte or biliary cell differentiation, nor evidence of increased hepatocyte regeneration. Alcohol liver injury mobilizes CD34(+) stem cells into the circulation and recruits them into the liver. These BMSCs contribute to the hepatic myofibroblast population but not to parenchymal lineages and do not promote hepatocyte repair.

  12. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Fibrosis Progression in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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    Paloma Almeda-Valdes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most frequent cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD encompasses a wide range of pathologies, from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation to fibrosis. The pathogenesis of NAFLD progression has not been completely elucidated, and different liver cells could be implicated. This review focuses on the current evidence of the role of liver dendritic cells (DCs in the progression from NAFLD to fibrosis. Liver DCs are a heterogeneous population of hepatic antigen-presenting cells; their main function is to induce T-cell mediated immunity by antigen processing and presentation to T cells. During the steady state liver DCs are immature and tolerogenic. However, in an environment of chronic inflammation, DCs are transformed to potent inducers of immune responses. There is evidence about the role of DC in liver fibrosis, but it is not clearly understood. Interestingly, there might be a link between lipid metabolism and DC function, suggesting that immunogenic DCs are associated with liver lipid storage, representing a possible pathophysiological mechanism in NAFLD development. A better understanding of the interaction between inflammatory pathways and the different cell types and the effect on the progression of NAFLD is of great relevance.

  13. Label-free detection of liver cancer cells by aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejuan; Pan, Yangang; Liu, Huiqing; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Bailin

    2016-05-15

    Liver cancer is one of the most common and highly malignant cancers in the world. There are no effective therapeutic options if an early liver cancer diagnosis is not achieved. In this work, detection of HepG2 cells by label-free microcantilever array aptasensor was developed. The sensing microcantilevers were functionalized by HepG2 cells-specific aptamers. Meanwhile, to eliminate the interferences induced by the environment, the reference microcantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol self-assembled monolayers. The aptasensor exhibits high specificity over not only human liver normal cells, but also other cancer cells of breast, bladder, and cervix tumors. The linear relation ranges from 1×10(3) to 1×10(5)cells/mL, with a detection limit of 300 cells/mL (S/N=3). Our work provides a simple method for detection of liver cancer cells with advantages in terms of simplicity and stability.

  14. Mechanisms of xenogeneic baboon platelet aggregation and phagocytosis by porcine liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

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    Qiang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Baboons receiving xenogeneic livers from wild type and transgenic pigs survive less than 10 days. One of the major issues is the early development of profound thrombocytopenia that results in fatal hemorrhage. Histological examination of xenotransplanted livers has shown baboon platelet activation, phagocytosis and sequestration within the sinusoids. In order to study the mechanisms of platelet consumption in liver xenotransplantation, we have developed an in vitro system to examine the interaction between pig endothelial cells with baboon platelets and to thereby identify molecular mechanisms and therapies. METHODS: Fresh pig hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal and aortic endothelial cells were isolated by collagenase digestion of livers and processing of aortae from GTKO and Gal+ MGH-miniature swine. These primary cell cultures were then tested for the differential ability to induce baboon or pig platelet aggregation. Phagocytosis was evaluated by direct observation of CFSE labeled-platelets, which are incubated with endothelial cells under confocal light microscopy. Aurintricarboxylic acid (GpIb antagonist blocking interactions with von Willebrand factor/vWF, eptifibatide (Gp IIb/IIIa antagonist, and anti-Mac-1 Ab (anti-α(Mβ(2 integrin Ab were tested for the ability to inhibit phagocytosis. RESULTS: None of the pig cells induced aggregation or phagocytosis of porcine platelets. However, pig hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal and aortic endothelial cells (GTKO and Gal+ all induced moderate aggregation of baboon platelets. Importantly, pig liver sinusoidal endothelial cells efficiently phagocytosed baboon platelets, while pig aortic endothelial cells and hepatocytes had minimal effects on platelet numbers. Anti-MAC-1 Ab, aurintricarboxylic acid or eptifibatide, significantly decreased baboon platelet phagocytosis by pig liver endothelial cells (P<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Although pig hepatocytes and aortic endothelial cells directly caused

  15. Roles of liver innate immune cells in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disease in the United States and other developed countries and is expected to increase in the next few years. Emerging data suggest that some patients with NAFLD may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD can also promote the development and progression of disease in other organ systems, such as the cardiovascular and endocrine (i.e. diabetes) systems. Thus, understanding th...

  16. Comparative Pathogenicity of Liver Homogenate and Cell Culture Propagated Hydropericardium Syndrome Virus in Broiler Birds

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    M. D. Ahmad, S. Zaman1, M. H. Mushtaq*, A. A. Anjum1 and M. Akram1

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative pathogenicity of liver homogenate and cell culture propagated agents of hydropericardium syndrome was studied in broiler birds. In Experiment I, 25-day-old while in experiment II, broiler birds at different ages were inoculated through different routes. In Experiment I, liver homogenate caused 64% mortality through intramuscular route and 33.33% mortality through oral route. The cell culture propagated HPS virus caused 60 and 13.33% mortality in broiler birds through intramuscular and oral routes, respectively. In Experiment II, none of the day-old-chicks died when challenged with liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus through S/C and oral route. The liver homogenate and cell culture propagated HPS virus caused higher mortality in different age groups of broiler birds through s/c route compared to oral route. The values of hemoglobin (Hb and packed cell volume (PCV showed highly significant (P<0.05 reduction indicating anemia. The values of Hb and PCV of the broiler birds inoculated with infectious liver homogenate were significantly lower as compared to birds inoculated with cell culture propagated HPS virus. The results indicated that the liver homogenate is more pathogenic than cell culture propagated HPS virus. These changes may be due to adoptability of the original FAdVs (fowl adenovirus after continued passages in the culture of chicken embryo liver cells. Importance of this study in vaccine production is also discussed.

  17. Autophagy in the liver: cell's cannibalism and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Toro, Joseph A; Go, Kristina L; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2016-08-01

    Chronic liver disease and its progression to liver failure are induced by various etiologies including viral infection, alcoholic and nonalcoholic hepatosteatosis. It is anticipated that the prevalence of fatty liver disease will continue to rise due to the growing incidence of obesity and metabolic disorder. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that the onset of fatty liver disease is causatively linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal lipid accumulation. Current treatment options for this disease are limited. Autophagy is an integral catabolic pathway that maintains cellular homeostasis both selectively and nonselectively. As mitophagy and lipophagy selectively remove dysfunctional mitochondria and excess lipids, respectively, stimulation of autophagy could have therapeutic potential to ameliorate liver function in steatotic patients. This review highlights our up-to-date knowledge on mechanistic roles of autophagy in the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease and its vulnerability to surgical stress, with an emphasis on mitophagy and lipophagy.

  18. Reduced liver cell death using an alginate scaffold bandage: a novel approach for liver reconstruction after extended partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteyer, Eyal; Ben Ya'acov, Ami; Zolotaryova, Lidia; Sinai, Avital; Lichtenstein, Yoav; Pappo, Orit; Kryukov, Olga; Elkayam, Tsiona; Cohen, Smadar; Ilan, Yaron

    2014-07-01

    Extended partial hepatectomy may be needed in cases of large hepatic mass, and can lead to fulminant hepatic failure. Macroporous alginate scaffold is a biocompatible matrix which promotes the growth, differentiation and long-term hepatocellular function of primary hepatocytes in vitro. Our aim was to explore the ability of implanted macroporous alginate scaffolds to protect liver remnants from acute hepatic failure after extended partial hepatectomy. An 87% partial hepatectomy (PH) was performed on C57BL/6 mice to compare non-treated mice to mice in which alginate or collagen scaffolds were implanted after PH. Mice were scarified 3, 6, 24 and 48 h and 6 days following scaffold implantation and the extent of liver injury and repair was examined. Alginate scaffolds significantly increased animal survival to 60% vs. 10% in non-treated and collagen-treated mice (log rank=0.001). Mice with implanted alginate scaffolds manifested normal and prolonged aspartate aminotransferases and alanine aminotransferases serum levels as compared with the 2- to 20-fold increase in control groups (Palginate-scaffold-treated mice 48 h after hepatectomy. Incorporation of BrdU-positive cells was 30% higher in the alginate-scaffold-treated group, compared with non-treated mice. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly decreased 3h post PH. Biotin-alginate scaffolds were quickly well integrated within the liver tissue. Collectively, implanted alginate scaffolds support liver remnants after extended partial hepatectomy, thus eliminating liver injury and leading to enhanced animal survival after extended partial hepatectomy.

  19. B-cell clonality in the liver of hepatitis C virus-infected patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-Bin Fan; You-Fu Zhu; An-Shen Chen; Mu-Xiu Zhou; Fu-Ming Yan; Xiao-Ju Ma; Hao Zhou

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The association of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with type Ⅱ mixed cryoglobulinemia is well established, but the role of HCV in B-cell lymphoma remains controversial. In patients with HCV infection, B-cell clonal expansions have been detected in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and a high been documented. Liver biopsies in chronic HCV infection frequently show portal lymphoid infiltrates with features of B follicles, whose clonality has not yet been investigated. The object of this study was to determine the frequency of liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells in 40 patients with HCV infection. METHODS: Eight hundred and forty-eight patients were studied prospectively, including 40 HCV-positive patients and 808 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Immunohistochemical study for B- and T-cell markers was performed on the paraffin-embedded liver tissue sections. The clonality of lymphoid B-cells was tested using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach designed to identify immunoglobulin heavy chain gene ( IgH) rearrangements. RESULTS: Liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells were detected in the liver for 4 (10%) of 40 HCV-positive patients but were present in only 3 (0.37%) of 808 liver biopsy specimens with chronic HBV infection. Chi-square testing showed that the monoclonal B-cells infiltration in the liver was more frequent in the HCV-infected patients ( P = 0.000). A clonal IgH rearrangement was detected in 5 (71.4%) of 7 liver biopsy specimens with monoclonal B-cells infiltration. In 2 of 5 patients with both a clonal B-cell expansion and monoclonal B-cells infiltration in the liver, a definite B-cell malignancy was finally diagnosed. CONCLUSION: Liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells are detected in the liver of patients with chronic HCV and HBV infection. A high percentage of patients with monoclonal B-cells infiltration and B-cell clonality in the liver were finally diagnosed as having a definite B-cell malignancy.

  20. Feeder-independent continuous culture of the PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    The PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line is a bipotent cell line, i.e., capable of forming either bile ductules or hepatocyte monolayers in vitro, that was derived from the primary culture of pig embryonic stem cells. The cell line has been strictly feeder-dependent in that cell replication morphology,...

  1. Is Liver Enzyme Release Really Associated with Cell Necrosis Induced by Oxidant Stress?

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    Martha Lucinda Contreras-Zentella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic diseases are a major concern worldwide. Increased specific plasma enzyme activities are considered diagnostic features for liver diseases, since enzymes are released into the blood compartment following the deterioration of the organ. Release of liver mitochondrial enzymes is considered strong evidence for hepatic necrosis, which is associated with an increased production of ROS, often leading to greater hepatic lipid peroxidation. Lipotoxic mediators and intracellular signals activated Kupffer cells, which provides evidence strongly suggesting the participation of oxidant stress in acute liver damage, inducing the progression of liver injury to chronic liver damage. Elevated transaminase activities are considered as an index marker of hepatotoxicity, linked to oxidant stress. However, a drastic increase of serum activities of liver enzyme markers ought not necessarily to reflect liver cell death. In fact, increased serum levels of cytoplasmic enzymes have readily been observed after partial hepatectomy (PH in the regenerating liver of rats. In this regard, we are now showing that in vitro modifications of the oxidant status affect differentially the release of liver enzymes, indicating that this release is a strictly controlled event and not directly related to the onset of oxidant stress of the liver.

  2. Is Liver Enzyme Release Really Associated with Cell Necrosis Induced by Oxidant Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic diseases are a major concern worldwide. Increased specific plasma enzyme activities are considered diagnostic features for liver diseases, since enzymes are released into the blood compartment following the deterioration of the organ. Release of liver mitochondrial enzymes is considered strong evidence for hepatic necrosis, which is associated with an increased production of ROS, often leading to greater hepatic lipid peroxidation. Lipotoxic mediators and intracellular signals activated Kupffer cells, which provides evidence strongly suggesting the participation of oxidant stress in acute liver damage, inducing the progression of liver injury to chronic liver damage. Elevated transaminase activities are considered as an index marker of hepatotoxicity, linked to oxidant stress. However, a drastic increase of serum activities of liver enzyme markers ought not necessarily to reflect liver cell death. In fact, increased serum levels of cytoplasmic enzymes have readily been observed after partial hepatectomy (PH) in the regenerating liver of rats. In this regard, we are now showing that in vitro modifications of the oxidant status affect differentially the release of liver enzymes, indicating that this release is a strictly controlled event and not directly related to the onset of oxidant stress of the liver.

  3. Role of stem cells during diabetic liver injury

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Ying; Garner, Jessica; Wu, Nan; Phillip, Levine; Han, Yuyan; McDaniel, Kelly; Annable, Tami; Zhou, Tianhao; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Huang, Qiaobing; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus is one of the most severe endocrine metabolic disorders in the world that has serious medical consequences with substantial impacts on the quality of life. Type 2 diabetes is one of the main causes of diabetic liver diseases with the most common being non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease. Several factors that may explain the mechanisms related to pathological and functional changes of diabetic liver injury include: insulin resistance, oxidative stress and endoplasmic r...

  4. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

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    Silvia Affò

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+ and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+ cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  5. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affò, Silvia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  6. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26691857

  7. Glucocorticoids Have Opposing Effects on Liver Fibrosis in Hepatic Stellate and Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kang Ho; Lee, Jae Man; Zhou, Ying; Harpavat, Sanjiv; Moore, David D

    2016-08-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing process that is protective in the short term, but prolonged fibrotic responses lead to excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components that suppresses hepatocyte regeneration, resulting in permanent liver damage. Upon liver damage, nonparenchymal cells including immune cells and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have crucial roles in the progression and regression of liver fibrosis. Here, we report differential roles of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), acting in immune cells and HSCs, in liver fibrosis. In the carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxin-induced fibrosis model, both steroidal and nonsteroidal GR ligands suppressed expression of fibrotic genes and decreased extracellular matrix deposition but also inhibited immune cell infiltration and exacerbated liver injury. These counteracting effects of GR ligands were dissociated in mice with conditional GR knockout in immune cells (GR(LysM)) or HSC (GR(hGFAP)): the impacts of dexamethasone on immune cell infiltration and liver injury were totally blunted in GR(LysM) mice, whereas the suppression of fibrotic gene expression was diminished in GR(hGFAP) mice. The effect of GR activation in HSC was further confirmed in the LX-2 HSC cell line, in which antifibrotic effects were mediated by GR ligand inhibition of Sma and mad-related protein 3 (SMAD3) expression. We conclude that GR has differential roles in immune cells and HSCs to modulate liver injury and liver fibrosis. Specific activation of HSC-GR without alteration of GR activity in immune cells provides a potential therapeutic approach to treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  8. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-03-22

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis.

  9. Hepatic stellate cell-expressed endosialin balances fibrogenesis and hepatocyte proliferation during liver damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogler, Carolin; Wieland, Matthias; König, Courtney; Hu, Junhao; Runge, Anja; Korn, Claudia; Besemfelder, Eva; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Komljenovic, Dorde; Dooley, Steven; Schirmacher, Peter; Longerich, Thomas; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to injury reflecting the critical balance between liver repair and scar formation. Chronic damage leads to progressive substitution of liver parenchyma by scar tissue and ultimately results in liver cirrhosis. Stromal cells (hepatic stellate cells [HSC] and endothelial cells) have been proposed to control the balance between liver fibrosis and regeneration. Here, we show that endosialin, a C-type lectin, expressed in the liver exclusively by HSC and portal fibroblasts, is upregulated in liver fibrosis in mouse and man. Chronic chemically induced liver damage resulted in reduced fibrosis and enhanced hepatocyte proliferation in endosialin-deficient (ENKO) mice. Correspondingly, acute-liver-damage-induced hepatocyte proliferation (partial hepatectomy) was increased in ENKO mice. A candidate-based screen of known regulators of hepatocyte proliferation identified insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) as selectively endosialin-dependent hepatocyte mitogen. Collectively, the study establishes a critical role of HSC in the reciprocal regulation of fibrogenesis vs. hepatocyte proliferation and identifies endosialin as a therapeutic target in non-neoplastic settings. PMID:25680861

  10. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Finoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  11. Regulation and antimetastatic functions of liver-associated natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltrout, R H

    2000-04-01

    The liver is a complex organ composed of hepatic parenchymal cells and a variety of non-parenchymal cells that consist of endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, and several subsets of resident lymphocytes, including natural killer (NK), T, and NK1.1+/CD3+ (NK/T) cells. The regulation of these various lymphoid subpopulations and their relative contributions to antiviral, antitumor and pathogenic inflammatory responses in the liver remain topics of much interest. Studies from our laboratory have shown that various immune stimulants and cytokines can augment liver-associated NK activity at least partially through the mobilization of NK cells from the bone marrow to the liver. The mobilization process can be dependent on the induction of interferon (IFN)-gamma and/or tumor necrosis factor-alpha and on very late activation antigen-4/vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 interaction. The induction of IFN-gamma by cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-12 also rapidly triggers the induction of chemokine genes in parenchymal cells that may contribute to the localization of NK and T cells. Both IL-2 and IL-12 trigger changes in the number and functions of liver-associated leukocyte subsets, and induce antimetastatic effects that are likely mediated through several direct and indirect mechanisms. The overall goal of these studies is to understand the interactions and functions of liver-associated NK1.1+ cells in the context of innate and adaptive immune responses to neoplasia.

  12. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finoli, Anthony; Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  13. The microenvironment of visceral adipose tissue and liver alter natural killer cell viability and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Melissa J; Fitzgerald, Vivienne; Doyle, Suzanne L; Channon, Shauna; Useckaite, Zivile; Gilmartin, Niamh; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-12-01

    The role of NK cells in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver inflammation in obesity is not fully understood. This study investigated the frequency, cytokine expression, chemokine receptor, and cytotoxicity receptor profile of NK cells in the blood, omentum, and liver of patients with the obesity-associated cancer, oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The effect of chronically inflamed tissue microenvironments on NK cell viability and function was also examined. We identified significantly lower NK cell frequencies in the liver of OAC patients compared with healthy controls and within the omentum and liver of OAC patients compared with blood, whereas IL-10-producing populations were significantly higher. Interestingly, our data suggest that reduced frequencies of NK cells in omentum and liver of OAC patients are not a result of impaired NK cell chemotaxis to these tissues. In fact, our functional data revealed that secreted factors from omentum and liver of OAC patients induce significant levels of NK cell death and lead to reduced percentages of TNF-α(+) and NKP46(+) NK cells and higher frequencies of IL-10-producing NK cells. Together, these data suggest that the omental and hepatic microenvironments of OAC patients alter the NK cell phenotype to a more anti-inflammatory homeostatic role. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Regeneration and Cell Recruitment in an Improved Heterotopic Auxiliary Partial Liver Transplantation Model in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshihiro; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Angelica; Yovchev, Mladen I; Matsubara, Kentaro; Yokota, Shinichiro; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Handa, Kan; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra; Thomson, Angus W; Geller, David A; Yagi, Hiroshi; Oertel, Michael; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Auxiliary partial liver transplantation (APLT) in humans is a therapeutic modality used especially to treat liver failure in children or congenital metabolic disease. Animal models of APLT have helped to explore therapeutic options. Though many groups have suggested improvements, standardizing the surgical procedure has been challenging. Additionally, the question of whether graft livers are reconstituted by recipient-derived cells after transplantation has been controversial. The aim of this study was to improve experimental APLT in rats and to assess cell recruitment in the liver grafts. To inhibit recipient liver regeneration and to promote graft regeneration, we treated recipients with retrorsine and added arterial anastomosis. Using green fluorescence protein transgenic rats as recipients, we examined liver resident cell recruitment within graft livers by immunofluorescence costaining. In the improved APLT model, we achieved well-regenerated grafts that could maintain regeneration for at least 4 weeks. Regarding the cell recruitment, there was no evidence of recipient-derived hepatocyte, cholangiocyte, or hepatic stellate cell recruitment into the graft. Macrophages/monocytes, however, were consistently recruited into the graft and increased over time, which might be related to inflammatory responses. Very few endothelial cells showed colocalization of markers. We have successfully established an improved rat APLT model with arterial anastomosis as a standard technique. Using this model, we have characterized cell recruitment into the regenerating grafts.

  15. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  16. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    OpenAIRE

    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is know...

  17. A Case of Giant Cell Hepatitis Recurring after Liver Transplantation and Treated with Ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad Hassoun

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation for giant cell hepatitis with cirrhosis and in whom giant cell hepatitis recurred twice after orthotopic liver transplantation is reported. He was treated with ribavirin with an excellent result. The literature on this subject is reviewed. This observation clearly confirms the efficacy of ribavirin for the treatment of giant cell hepatitis, thus providing evidence for its viral origin.

  18. Deletion of Wntless in myeloid cells exacerbates liver fibrosis and the ductular reaction in chronic liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Katharine M; Clouston, Andrew D; Gadd, Victoria L; Miller, Gregory C; Wong, Weng-Yew; Melino, Michelle; Maradana, Muralidhara Rao; MacDonald, Kelli; Lang, Richard A; Sweet, Matthew J; Blumenthal, Antje; Powell, Elizabeth E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play critical roles in liver regeneration, fibrosis development and resolution. They are among the first responders to liver injury and are implicated in orchestrating the fibrogenic response via multiple mechanisms. Macrophages are also intimately associated with the activated hepatic progenitor cell (HPC) niche or ductular reaction that develops in parallel with fibrosis. Among the many macrophage-derived mediators implicated in liver disease progression, a key role for macrophage-derived Wnt proteins in driving pro-regenerative HPC activation towards a hepatocellular fate has been suggested. Wnt proteins, in general, however, have been associated with both pro- and anti-fibrogenic activities in the liver and other organs. We investigated the role of macrophage-derived Wnt proteins in fibrogenesis and HPC activation in murine models of chronic liver disease by conditionally deleting Wntless expression, which encodes a chaperone essential for Wnt protein secretion, in LysM-Cre-expressing myeloid cells (LysM-Wls mice). Fibrosis and HPC activation were exacerbated in LysM-Wls mice compared to littermate controls, in the absence of an apparent increase in myofibroblast activation or interstitial collagen mRNA expression, in both the TAA and CDE models of chronic liver disease. Increased Epcam mRNA levels paralleled the increased HPC activation and more mature ductular reactions, in LysM-Wls mice. Increased Epcam expression in LysM-Wls HPC was also observed, consistent with a more cholangiocytic phenotype. No differences in the mRNA expression levels of key pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines or the macrophage-derived HPC mitogen, Tweak, were observed. LysM-Wls mice exhibited increased expression of Timp1, encoding the key Mmp inhibitor Timp1 that blocks interstitial collagen degradation, and, in the TAA model, reduced expression of the anti-fibrotic matrix metalloproteinases, Mmp12 and Mmp13, suggesting a role for macrophage-derived Wnt proteins

  19. Evidence against a stem cell origin of new hepatocytes in a common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Johanna R; Malato, Yann; Gormond, Coralie; Willenbring, Holger

    2014-08-21

    Hepatocytes provide most liver functions, but they can also proliferate and regenerate the liver after injury. However, under some liver injury conditions, particularly chronic liver injury where hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver stem cells (LSCs) are thought to replenish lost hepatocytes. Conflicting results have been reported about the identity of LSCs and their contribution to liver regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we followed candidate LSC populations by genetic fate tracing in adult mice with chronic liver injury due to a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet. In contrast to previous studies, we failed to detect hepatocytes derived from biliary epithelial cells or mesenchymal liver cells beyond a negligible frequency. In fact, we failed to detect hepatocytes that were not derived from pre-existing hepatocytes. In conclusion, our findings argue against LSCs, or other nonhepatocyte cell types, providing a backup system for hepatocyte regeneration in this common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

  20. Evidence against a Stem Cell Origin of New Hepatocytes in a Common Mouse Model of Chronic Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna R. Schaub

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocytes provide most liver functions, but they can also proliferate and regenerate the liver after injury. However, under some liver injury conditions, particularly chronic liver injury where hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver stem cells (LSCs are thought to replenish lost hepatocytes. Conflicting results have been reported about the identity of LSCs and their contribution to liver regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we followed candidate LSC populations by genetic fate tracing in adult mice with chronic liver injury due to a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet. In contrast to previous studies, we failed to detect hepatocytes derived from biliary epithelial cells or mesenchymal liver cells beyond a negligible frequency. In fact, we failed to detect hepatocytes that were not derived from pre-existing hepatocytes. In conclusion, our findings argue against LSCs, or other nonhepatocyte cell types, providing a backup system for hepatocyte regeneration in this common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

  1. Intra-por tal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells ameliorates liver ifbrosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Fang Zheng; Li-Jian Liang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow cells can differentiate into hepatocytes in a suitable microenvironment. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on liver ifbrosis in mice. METHODS: BMSCs were harvested and cultured from male BALB/c mice, then transplanted into female syngenic BALB/c mice via the portal vein. After partial hepatectomy, diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was administered to induce liver ifbrosis. Controls received BMSCs and non-supplemented drinking water, the model group received DEN with their water, and the experimental group received BMSCs and DEN. Mice were killed after 3 months, and ALT, AST, hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) in serum and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in the liver were assessed. Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the liver was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Bone marrow-derived hepatocytes were identiifed by lfuorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in liver sections. RESULTS: BMSCs were shown to differentiate into hepatocyte-like phenotypes after hepatocyte growth factor treatment in vitro. Serum ALT, AST, HA, and LN were markedly reduced by transplanted BMSCs. Liver Hyp content andα-SMA staining in mice receiving BMSCs were lower than in the model group, consistent with altered liver pathology. FISH analysis revealed the presence of donor-derived hepatocytes in the injured liver after cross-gender mouse BMSC transplantation. After three months, about 10%of cells in the injured liver were bone marrow-derived. CONCLUSION: BMSCs transplanted via the portal vein can convert into hepatocytes to repair liver injury induced by DEN, restore liver function, and reduce liver ifbrosis.

  2. Claudin-2 promotes breast cancer liver metastasis by facilitating tumor cell interactions with hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabariès, Sébastien; Dupuy, Fanny; Dong, Zhifeng; Monast, Anie; Annis, Matthew G; Spicer, Jonathan; Ferri, Lorenzo E; Omeroglu, Atilla; Basik, Mark; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Siegel, Peter M

    2012-08-01

    We previously identified claudin-2 as a functional mediator of breast cancer liver metastasis. We now confirm that claudin-2 levels are elevated in liver metastases, but not in skin metastases, compared to levels in their matched primary tumors in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, claudin-2 is specifically expressed in liver-metastatic breast cancer cells compared to populations derived from bone or lung metastases. The increased liver tropism exhibited by claudin-2-expressing breast cancer cells requires claudin-2-mediated interactions between breast cancer cells and primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, the reduction of the claudin-2 expression level, either in cancer cells or in primary hepatocytes, diminishes these heterotypic cell-cell interactions. Finally, we demonstrate that the first claudin-2 extracellular loop is essential for mediating tumor cell-hepatocyte interactions and the ability of breast cancer cells to form liver metastases in vivo. Thus, during breast cancer liver metastasis, claudin-2 shifts from acting within tight-junctional complexes to functioning as an adhesion molecule between breast cancer cells and hepatocytes.

  3. Long-term culture of genome-stable bipotent stem cells from adult human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M A; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R G; van der Laan, Luc J W; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be

  4. Long-term culture of genome-stable bipotent stem cells from adult human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Huch (Meritxell); H. Gehart (Helmuth); R. Van Boxtel (Ruben); K. Hamer (Karien); F. Blokzijl (Francis); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); E. Ellis (Ewa); M. Van Wenum (Martien); S.A. Fuchs (Sabine A.); J. de Ligt (Joep); M. van de Wetering (M.); N. Sasaki (Nobuo); S.J. Boers (Susanne J.); H. Kemperman (Hans); J. de Jonge (Jeroen); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis (Edward); R. Hoekstra (Ruurdtje); S. Strom (Stephen); R.R.G. Vries (Robert R.G.); L.J.W. van der Laan (Luc); E. Cuppen (Edwin); H.C. Clevers (Hans)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDespite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro

  5. Long-Term Culture of Genome-Stable Bipotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A.; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J.; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R. G.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be

  6. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immune-r...

  7. Therapeutic potential of amniotic-fluid-derived stem cells on liver fibrosis model in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yu Peng

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: The possible repair mechanism from our data revealed that EGFP-mAFSCs may fuse with the recipient liver cells. Overall, EGFP-mAFSCs can ameliorate liver fibrosis in mice, thus providing insight into the future development of regenerative medicine.

  8. Gastrointestinal toxicity, systemic inflammation, and liver biochemistry in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Karina; Pontoppidan, Peter; Uhlving, Hilde Hylland

    2017-01-01

    Liver toxicity is frequently seen in relation to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but pathogenesis and the risk factors are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between liver toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and levels of immun...

  9. Organoids from adult liver and pancreas: Stem cell biology and biomedical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindley, Christopher J; Cordero-Espinoza, Lucía; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-12-15

    The liver and pancreas are critical organs maintaining whole body metabolism. Historically, the expansion of adult-derived cells from these organs in vitro has proven challenging and this in turn has hampered studies of liver and pancreas stem cell biology, as well as being a roadblock to disease modelling and cell replacement therapies for pathologies in these organs. Recently, defined culture conditions have been described which allow the in vitro culture and manipulation of adult-derived liver and pancreatic material. Here we review these systems and assess their physiological relevance, as well as their potential utility in biomedicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of Glutamic Acid-based Cluster Galactosides and Their Binding Affinities with Liver Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Xiao-Ru(张晓茹); Ll,Ying-Xia(李英霞); CHU,Shi-Dong(褚世栋); DING,Ning(丁宁); Ll,Chun-Xia(李春霞); GUAN,Hua-Shi(管华诗)

    2004-01-01

    Structurally well defined di-,tri-and tetra-valent cluster galactosides were synthesized in a convenient way.Oligo-glutamic acids were assembled as scaffolds.The presence of amine groups in these three ligands is expected to couple with drugs or genes for delivery.The binding affinities of these cluster galactoses to liver cells were determined by in vitro binding studies.Among them,the tetravalent cluster galactose (19) showed the highest affinity to liver cell.It is therefore a promising targeting device for the specific delivery of drugs or genes to parenchymal liver cells.

  11. Clinical potential of regulatory T cell therapy in liver diseases: An overview and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Claire Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes, that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg. The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients.Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases, chronic rejection and post-transplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases (GVHD and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the autoimmune liver diseases for more than three decades; thus the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients.

  12. Liver restores immune homeostasis after local inflammation despite the presence of autoreactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathie Béland

    Full Text Available The liver must keep equilibrium between immune tolerance and immunity in order to protect itself from pathogens while maintaining tolerance to food antigens. An imbalance between these two states could result in an inflammatory liver disease. The aims of this study were to identify factors responsible for a break of tolerance and characterize the subsequent restoration of liver immune homeostasis. A pro-inflammatory environment was created in the liver by the co-administration of TLR ligands CpG and Poly(I:C in presence or absence of activated liver-specific autoreactive CD8(+ T cells. Regardless of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells, mice injected with CpG and Poly(I:C showed elevated serum ALT levels and a transient liver inflammation. Both CpG/Poly(I:C and autoreactive CD8(+T cells induced expression of TLR9 and INF-γ by the liver, and an up-regulation of homing and adhesion molecules CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL16, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Transferred CFSE-labeled autoreactive CD8(+ T cells, in presence of TLR3 and 9 ligands, were recruited by the liver and spleen and proliferated. This population then contracted by apoptosis through intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Up-regulation of FasL and PD-L1 in the liver was observed. In conclusion, TLR-mediated activation of the innate immune system results in a pro-inflammatory environment that promotes the recruitment of lymphocytes resulting in bystander hepatitis. Despite this pro-inflammatory environment, the presence of autoreactive CD8(+ T cells is not sufficient to sustain an autoimmune response against the liver and immune homeostasis is rapidly restored through the apoptosis of T cells.

  13. Pathogenesis of Alcoholic Liver Disease: Interactions between parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jessica I.; Nagy, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    The development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a complex process involving both the parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells in the liver. The impact of ethanol on hepatocytes can be characterized as a condition of “organelle stress” with multi-factorial changes in hepatocellular function accumulating during ethanol exposure. These changes include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased methylation capacity, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired vesicular trafficking and altered proteosome function. Injury to hepatocytes is attributed, in part, to ethanol metabolism by the hepatocytes. Changes in the structural integrety of hepatic sinusoidal endotheial cells, as well as enhanced inflammation in the liver during ethanol exposure are also important contributors to injury. Activation of hepatic stellate cells initiates the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins characteristic of fibrosis. Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages in liver, are particularly critical to the onset of ethanol-induced liver injury. Chronic ethanol exposure sensitizes Kupffer cells to activation by lipopolysaccharide via toll-like receptor 4. This sensitization enhances production of inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and reactive oxygen species, that contribute to hepatocyte dysfunction, necrosis and apoptosis of hepatocytes and generation of extracellular matrix proteins leading to fibrosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the complex interactions between parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells in the liver during the progression of ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:21091930

  14. Characterization and Comparison of Canine Multipotent Stromal Cells Derived from Liver and Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagola, Ermanno; Teunissen, Michelle; van der Laan, Luc J.W.; Verstegen, Monique M.A.; Schotanus, Baukje A.; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Penning, Louis C.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Tryfonidou, Marianna A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver-derived multipotent stromal cells (L-MSCs) may prove preferable for treatment strategies of liver diseases, in comparison to the widely studied bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). Canines are a large animal model, in which the pathologies of liver diseases are similar to man. This study further promotes the implementation of canine models in MSC-based treatments of liver diseases. L-MSCs were characterized and compared to BM-MSCs from the same individual. Both cell types demonstrated a spindle-shaped fibroblast-like morphology, possessed the same growth potential, and demonstrated similar immunomodulation gene expression of CD274, PTGS-1, and PTGS-2. Marked differences in cell surface markers, CD105 and CD146, distinguished these two cell populations, and L-MSCs retained a liver-specific imprinting, observed by expression of CK18 and CK19. Finally, both populations differentiated toward the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage; however, L-MSCs failed to differentiate into the chondrogenic lineage. In conclusion, characterization of canine L-MSCs and BM-MSCs demonstrated that the two cell type populations are highly comparable. Although it is still unclear which cell source is preferred for clinical application in liver treatment strategies, this study provides a foundation for future controlled studies with MSC therapy in various liver diseases in dogs before their application in man. PMID:26462417

  15. Mangosteen peel extract reduces formalin-induced liver cell death in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afiana Rohmani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Formalin is a xenobiotic that is now commonly used as a preservative in the food industry. The liver is an organ that has the highest metabolic capacity as compared to other organs. Mangosteen or Garcinia mangostana Linn (GML peel contains xanthones, which are a source of natural antioxidants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mangosteen peel extract on formalin-induced liver cell mortality rate and p53 protein expression in Wistar rats. Methods Eighteen rats received formalin orally for 2 weeks, and were subsequently divided into 3 groups, consisting of the formalin-control group receiving a placebo and treatment groups 1 and 2, which were treated with mangosteen peel extract at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kgBW/day, respectively. The treatment was carried out for 1 week, and finally the rats were terminated. The differences in liver cell mortality rate and p53 protein expression were analyzed. Results One-way ANOVA analysis showed significant differences in liver cell mortality rate among the three groups (p=0.004. The liver cell mortality rate in the treatment group receiving 400 mg/kgBW/day extract was lower than that in the formalin-control group. There was no p53 expression in all groups. Conclusions Garcinia mangostana Linn peel extract reduced the mortality rate of liver cells in rats receiving oral formalin. Involvement of p53 expression in liver cell mortality in rats exposed to oral formalin is presumably negligible.

  16. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the liver: A successful surgically treated case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiang-Lin Lee; Yu-Yin Liu; Chun-Nan Yeh; Kun-Chun Chiang; Tse-Ching Chen; Yi-Yin Jan

    2006-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the liver is rare. Totally nine such cases have been reported in the literature. Primary SCC of the liver has been reported to be associated with hepatic teratoma,hepatic cyst, or hepatolithiasis. Complete remission of poorly differentiated SCC of the liver could be achieved by systemic chemotherapy followed by surgery or remarkably respond to hepatic arterial injection of low dose chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report the first case of primary SCC of the liver presenting as a solid tumor and receiving successful hepatic resection with 9-mo disease free survival.

  17. Differentiation of rat bone marrow stem cells in liver after partial hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Tao Zhan; Yu Wang; Lai Wei; Bin Liu; Hong-Song Chen; Xu Cong; Ran Fei

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differentiation of rat bone marrow stem cells in liver after partial hepatectomy.METHODS: Bone marrow cells were collected from the tibia of rat with partial hepatectomy, the medial and left hepatic lobes were excised. The bone marrow stem cells (Thy+CD3-CD45RA- cells) were enriched from the bone marrow cells by depleting red cells and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The sorted bone marrow stem cells were labeled by PKH26-GL in vitro and autotransplanted by portal vein injection. After 2wk, the transplanted bone marrow stem cells in liver were examined by the immunohistochemistry of albumin (hepatocyte-specific marker).RESULTS: The bone marrow stem cells (Thy+CD3-CD45RA- cells) accounted for 2.8% of bone marrow cells without red cells. The labeling rate of 10μM PKH26-GL on sorted bone marrow stem cells was about 95%.There were sporadic PKH26-GL-labeled cells among hepatocytes in liver tissue section, and some of the cells expressed albumin.CONCLUSION: Rat bone marrow stem cells can differentiate into hepatocytes in regenerative environment and may participate in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy.

  18. Nuclear receptor atlas of female mouse liver parenchymal, endothelial, and Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaosha; Kruijt, J Kar; van der Sluis, Ronald J; Van Berkel, Theo J C; Hoekstra, Menno

    2013-04-01

    The liver consists of different cell types that together synchronize crucial roles in liver homeostasis. Since nuclear receptors constitute an important class of drug targets that are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes, we have composed the hepatic cell type-specific expression profile of nuclear receptors to uncover the pharmacological potential of liver-enriched nuclear receptors. Parenchymal liver cells (hepatocytes) and liver endothelial and Kupffer cells were isolated from virgin female C57BL/6 wild-type mice using collagenase perfusion and counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The hepatic expression pattern of 49 nuclear receptors was generated by real-time quantitative PCR using the NUclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) program resources. Thirty-six nuclear receptors were expressed in total liver. FXR-α, EAR2, LXR-α, HNF4-α, and CAR were the most abundantly expressed nuclear receptors in liver parenchymal cells. In contrast, NUR77, COUP-TFII, LXR-α/β, FXR-α, and EAR2 were the most highly expressed nuclear receptors in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Interestingly, members of orphan receptor COUP-TF family showed a distinct expression pattern. EAR2 was highly and exclusively expressed in parenchymal cells, while COUP-TFII was moderately and exclusively expressed in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Of interest, the orphan receptor TR4 showed a similar expression pattern as the established lipid sensor PPAR-γ. In conclusion, our study provides the most complete quantitative assessment of the nuclear receptor distribution in liver reported to date. Our gene expression catalog suggests that orphan nuclear receptors such as COUP-TFII, EAR2, and TR4 may be of significant importance as novel targets for pharmaceutical interventions in liver.

  19. Isolation and characterization of liver epithelial progenitor cells from normal adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifang Jin; Shaohui Ji; Xianghui Tang; Xiangyu Guo; Yongqing Lu; Hongwei Chen; Hongkui Deng; Qi Zhou; Weizhi Ji

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Based on their ability to proliferate and the capacity to differentiate into specific cell types, hepatic progenitor/stem cells (HPCs) from adult human liver may have potential therapeutic effects on end-stage liver failure. In addition, adult HPCs have a reduced risk of teratoma formation and are not subject to the same ethical issues as fetal HPCs or embryonic stem cells [1]. The HPCs from rhesus monkeys are relevant because they may serve as a valuable preclinical model for assessment of cell therapy in humans. To date, there are no reports of HPCs or liver epithelial progenitor cells (LEPCs) isolated from normal adult rhesus monkey although a few studies in other species were reported [2, 3]. We report here for the first time the successful isolation of rhesus monkey LEPCs (mLEPCs) from normal adult livers (n=12).

  20. Progenitor cells in liver regeneration: molecular responses controlling their activation and expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Jelnes, Peter; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2005-01-01

    Although normally quiescent, the adult mammalian liver possesses a great capacity to regenerate after different types of injuries in order to restore the lost liver mass and ensure maintenance of the multiple liver functions. Major players in the regeneration process are mature residual cells...... cells, and recruited inflammatory cells as well as the variety of growth-modulating molecules produced and/or harboured by these elements. The cellular and molecular responses to different regenerative stimuli seem to depend on the injury inflicted and consequently on the molecular microenvironment...... created in the liver by a certain insult. This review will focus on molecular responses controlling activation and expansion of the hepatic progenitor cell niche, emphasizing similarities and differences in the microenvironments orchestrating regeneration by recruitment of progenitor cell populations...

  1. Preparation and Primary Culture of Liver Cells Isolated from Adult Rats by Dispase Perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahid,Syarifuddin

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available The dispase perfusion technique was used to isolate liver cells from adult rats. The optimum conditions for obtaining many isolated liver cells with high viability were an enzyme concentration of 2000 U/ml, a pH of 7.5 and a perfusion time of 20 min. The population of isolated liver cells prepared with dispase consisted of 43.6% cells with diameters less than 20 micron and 56.4% cells with diameters above 20 micron. The isolated liver cells were cultured in basal culture medium either supplemented with or without dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5M and insulin (10 micrograms/ml. The addition of hormones to the culture medium improved the attachment efficiency of the isolated liver cells and delayed the disappearance of mature hepatocytes. Epithelial-like clear cells proliferated early in primary culture even in the presence of hormones. Therefore, functioning mature hepatocytes and proliferating epithelial-like clear cells coexisted well in the hormone-containing medium. Furthermore, the number of cultured cells reached a maximal level earlier in the presence of hormones than in the absence of hormones. The level of TAT activity in primary cultured cells was higher up to 3 days after inoculation in the presence of hormones than in their absence. No difference between G6Pase activity in primary cultured cells in the presence of hormones and that in the absence of hormones was found.

  2. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-induced mice liver defatting: A novel strategy to enable transplantation of steatotic livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Kailar, Roshni; Rahman, Khalidur; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Anania, Frank A; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2016-04-01

    Moderate macrovesicular steatosis (>30%), which is present in almost 50% of livers considered for transplantation, increases the risk of primary graft dysfunction. Our previously published data showed that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is protective against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. Hence, we hypothesized that perfusion of steatotic livers with GDNF may reduce liver fat content before transplantation. Livers from 8 weeks of regular diet (RD) and of HFD-fed mice were perfused ex vivo for 4 hours with either vehicle, GDNF, or a previously described defatting cocktail. The liver's residual fat was quantified colorimetrically using a triglyceride (TG) assay kit and by Oil Red O (ORO) and Nile red/Hoechst staining. Liver tissue injury was assessed by using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. In vitro induction of lipolysis in HepG2 cells was assessed by measuring glycerol and free fatty acid release. ORO staining showed significantly more steatosis in livers from HFD-fed mice compared with RD-fed mice (P defatting compared to the defatting cocktail; however, GDNF induces less liver damage than the defatting cocktail. These observations were consistent with data obtained from assessment of liver TG content. Assessment of liver injury revealed significant hepatocyte injury in livers perfused with the control defatting cocktail but no evidence of injury in livers perfused with either GDNF or vehicle. In vitro, GDNF reduced TG accumulation in HepG2 cells and stimulated increased TG lipolysis. In conclusion, GDNF can decrease mice liver fat content to an acceptable range and could be a potential defatting agent before liver transplantation.

  3. Prevention of liver fibrosis by intrasplenic injection of high-density cultured bone marrow cells in a rat chronic liver injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lian

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs from bone marrow have proven to be functional for the prevention of liver fibrosis in chronic liver injury. However, expansion of EPCs in culture is complicated and expansive. Previously, we have established a simple method that could enrich and expand EPCs by simple seeding bone marrow cells in high density dots. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether cells derived from high-density (HD culture of rat bone marrow cells could prevent the liver fibrosis in a chronic liver injury rat model, induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cells from HD culture were enriched for EPCs, expressing high levels of EPC markers. Intrasplenic injection of HD cultured bone marrow cells in the CCl4-induced liver injury rat showed an enhanced antifibrogenic effect compared with animals treated with cells from regular-density culture. The antifibrogenic effect was demonstrated by biochemical and histological analysis 4 weeks post-transplantation. Furthermore, cells from HD culture likely worked through increasing neovascularization, stimulating liver cell proliferation, and suppressing pro-fibrogenic factor expression. HD culture, which is a simple and cost-effective procedure, could potentially be used to expand bone marrow cells for the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  4. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. II. Comparison of beta-adrenergic responsiveness of rat ascites hepatoma cells with cultured normal rat liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Takemoto, N; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1985-05-01

    The pharmacological properties of beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells were compared with those in normal rat liver cells which were cultured for 24 hr after collagenase digestion. Adenylate cyclases in the homogenates of cultured normal rat liver cells and rat ascites hepatoma cells, AH44, AH66, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974, were all activated by isoproterenol or NaF to different degrees. The enzyme in rat liver cells was activated by several beta 2-agonists but those in all hepatoma cells hardly responded. Furthermore, salbutamol, a beta 2-partial agonist, antagonized the cyclase activation by isoproterenol in AH130 cells. The Kact value of isoproterenol for the activation of adenylate cyclase in AH130 cells was smaller than that in rat liver cells. A comparison of the Ki values of beta-antagonists for the inhibition of isoproterenol-stimulated cyclase activity shows that while the Ki values of propranolol and butoxamine in AH130 cells were similar to those in rat liver cells, a significant difference was observed in the values for beta 1-selective antagonists between AH130 cells and rat liver cells. The Ki values of metoprolol and atenolol for AH130 cells were 137- and 90-fold lower, respectively, than for normal rat liver cells. From these findings, it is strongly suggested that beta-adrenoceptors in rat ascites hepatoma cells including AH130 cells have similar properties to the mammalian beta 1-receptor.

  5. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramachandran, S.D.; Schirmer, K.; Munst, B.; Heinz, S.; Ghafoory, S.; Wolfl, S.; Simon-Keller, K.; Marx, A.; Oie, C.I.; Ebert, M.P.; Walles, H.; Braspenning, J.C.; Breitkopf-Heinlein, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte(R) cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte(R) cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacit

  6. Effect of TNF gene-transfected LAK cells on the ascitic liver carcinoma-bearing mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Liang Lou; Xue Tao Cao; Bi He Min; Wei Ping Zhang; Pei Lin Meng

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate the therapeutic effect of TNF gene transfected LAK cells on ascitic liver carcinoma-bearing mice.METHODS TNF gene was transfected into murine LAK cells by retrovirus. Low dose TNF gene-transfectcdLAK cells and IL-2 were i.p. injected into murine model. Cytotoxicity of gene transfected LAK cells wasstudied in vitro growth and the survival time of murine model was observed.RESULTS TNF gene-transfected LAK cells secreted higher level of TNF than that of normal LAK cells orcontrol gene-transfected LAK ceils. The in vitro growth ability and cytotoxicity of TNF gene-transfectedLAK cells were markedly inhibited by anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies. Significant therapeutic effect onascitic liver carcinoma-bearing mice was achieved.CONCLUSION TNF gene-transfected LAK cells have therapeutic effect on ascitic liver carcinoma-bearingmice.

  7. Intravascular Immune Surveillance by CXCR6+ NKT Cells Patrolling Liver Sinusoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geissmann Frederic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the in vivo behavior of liver natural killer T cells (NKT cells by intravital fluorescence microscopic imaging of mice in which a green fluorescent protein cDNA was used to replace the gene encoding the chemokine receptor CXCR6. NKT cells, which account for most CXCR6+ cells in liver, were found to crawl within hepatic sinusoids at 10-20 µm/min and to stop upon T cell antigen receptor activation. CXCR6-deficient mice exhibited a selective and severe reduction of CD1d-reactive NKT cells in the liver and decreased susceptibility to T-cell-dependent hepatitis. CXCL16, the cell surface ligand for CXCR6, is expressed on sinusoidal endothelial cells, and CXCR6 deficiency resulted in reduced survival, but not in altered speed or pattern of patrolling of NKT cells. Thus, NKT cells patrol liver sinusoids to provide intravascular immune surveillance, and CXCR6 contributes to liver-based immune responses by regulating their abundance.

  8. Intravascular immune surveillance by CXCR6+ NKT cells patrolling liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Geissmann

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined the in vivo behavior of liver natural killer T cells (NKT cells by intravital fluorescence microscopic imaging of mice in which a green fluorescent protein cDNA was used to replace the gene encoding the chemokine receptor CXCR6. NKT cells, which account for most CXCR6(+ cells in liver, were found to crawl within hepatic sinusoids at 10-20 microm/min and to stop upon T cell antigen receptor activation. CXCR6-deficient mice exhibited a selective and severe reduction of CD1d-reactive NKT cells in the liver and decreased susceptibility to T-cell-dependent hepatitis. CXCL16, the cell surface ligand for CXCR6, is expressed on sinusoidal endothelial cells, and CXCR6 deficiency resulted in reduced survival, but not in altered speed or pattern of patrolling of NKT cells. Thus, NKT cells patrol liver sinusoids to provide intravascular immune surveillance, and CXCR6 contributes to liver-based immune responses by regulating their abundance.

  9. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization. PMID:28134251

  10. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J

    2017-01-30

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization.

  11. CCR1 antagonism attenuates T cell trafficking to omentum and liver in obesity-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Melissa J; Galvin, Karen C; Kavanagh, Maria E; Mongan, Ann Marie; Doyle, Suzanne L; Gilmartin, Niamh; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Reynolds, John V; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a global health problem presenting serious risk of disease fuelled by chronic inflammation, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, liver disease and cancer. Visceral fat, in particular the omentum and liver of obese individuals are sites of excessive inflammation. We propose that chemokine-mediated trafficking of pro-inflammatory cells to the omentum and liver contributes to local and subsequent systemic inflammation. Oesophagogastric adenocarcinoma (OAC) is an exemplar model of obesity and inflammation driven cancer. We have demonstrated that T cells actively migrate to the secreted factors from the omentum and liver of OAC patients and that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells bearing the chemokine receptor CCR5 are significantly more prevalent in these tissues compared to matched blood. The CCR5 ligand and inflammatory chemokine MIP-1α is also secreted at significantly higher concentrations in the omentum and liver of our OAC patient cohort compared to matched serum. Furthermore, we report that MIP-1α receptor antagonism can significantly reduce T cell migration to the secreted factors from OAC omentum and liver. These novel data suggest that chemokine receptor antagonism may have therapeutic potential to reduce inflammatory T cell infiltration to the omentum and liver and in doing so, may ameliorate pathological inflammation in obesity and obesity-associated cancer.

  12. Targeting naproxen to non-parenchymal liver cells protects against endotoxin induced liver damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbe, C; Reichen, J; Wartna, E.S; Sägesser, H; Poelstra, Klaas; Meijer, D.K F

    1997-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) could be of value in the treatment of liver disease; however, their use in this situation is limited by renal side effects. Therefore, we explored whether naproxen covalently bound to human serum albumin (NAP-HSA) was able to reduce toxicity in an acut

  13. Surgery-induced reactive oxygen species enhance colon carcinoma cell binding by disrupting the liver endothelial cell lining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Gul; M. Bogels; S. Grewal; A.J. van der Meer; L.B. Rojas; D.M. Fluitsma; M.P. van den Tol; K.A. Hoeben; J. van Marle; H.E. de Vries; R.H.J. Beelen; M. van Egmond

    2011-01-01

    Objective Resection of primary colorectal cancer is associated with enhanced risk of development of liver metastases. It was previously demonstrated that surgery initiated an early inflammatory response resulting in elevated tumour cell adhesion in the liver. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) ar

  14. Decellularization and Recellularization of Rat Livers With Hepatocytes and Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Huang, Yan; Guo, Yibing; Wang, Lei; Ling, Changchun; Guo, Qingsong; Wang, Yao; Zhu, Shajun; Fan, Xiangjun; Zhu, Mingyan; Huang, Hua; Lu, Yuhua; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Whole-organ decellularization has been identified as a promising choice for tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to engineer intact whole rat liver scaffolds and repopulate them with hepatocytes and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in a bioreactor. Decellularized liver scaffolds were obtained by perfusing Triton X-100 with ammonium hydroxide. The architecture and composition of the original extracellular matrix were preserved, as confirmed by morphologic, histological, and immunolabeling methods. To determine biocompatibility, the scaffold was embedded in the subcutaneous adipose layer of the back of a heterologous animal to observe the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Hepatocytes were reseeded using a parenchymal injection method and cultured by continuous perfusion. EPCs were reseeded using a portal vein infusion method. Morphologic and functional examination showed that the hepatocytes and EPCs grew well in the scaffold. The present study describes an effective method of decellularization and recellularization of rat livers, providing the foundation for liver engineering and the development of bioartificial livers.

  15. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Segkos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated liver metastasis was identified. He underwent laparoscopic microwave ablation of the liver metastasis, with dramatic decline in thyroglobulin and no structural disease identified to date. This case highlights the rare occurrence of isolated liver metastasis from HCTC and also illustrates the utility of thermoablation as an alternative to surgical resection in the treatment of small isolated liver metastases from HCTC.

  16. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segkos, Konstantinos; Schmidt, Carl; Nabhan, Fadi

    2017-01-01

    Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC) is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated liver metastasis was identified. He underwent laparoscopic microwave ablation of the liver metastasis, with dramatic decline in thyroglobulin and no structural disease identified to date. This case highlights the rare occurrence of isolated liver metastasis from HCTC and also illustrates the utility of thermoablation as an alternative to surgical resection in the treatment of small isolated liver metastases from HCTC.

  17. Three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture supports differentiation of human fetal liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Triolo, Fabio; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Reid, Lola M; Gridelli, Bruno; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2010-06-01

    The ability of human fetal liver cells to survive, expand, and form functional tissue in vitro is of high interest for the development of bioartificial extracorporeal liver support systems, liver cell transplantation therapies, and pharmacologic models. Conventional static two-dimensional culture models seem to be inadequate tools. We focus on dynamic three-dimensional perfusion technologies and developed a scaled-down bioreactor, providing decentralized mass exchange with integral oxygenation. Human fetal liver cells were embedded in a hyaluronan hydrogel within the capillary system to mimic an in vivo matrix and perfusion environment. Metabolic performance was monitored daily, including glucose consumption, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and secretion of alpha-fetoprotein and albumin. At culture termination cells were analyzed for proliferation and liver-specific lineage-dependent cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4/3A7) gene expression. Occurrence of hepatic differentiation in bioreactor cultures was demonstrated by a strong increase in CYP3A4/3A7 gene expression ratio, lower alpha-fetoprotein, and higher albumin secretion than in conventional Petri dish controls. Cells in bioreactors formed three-dimensional structures. Viability of cells was higher in bioreactors than in control cultures. In conclusion, the culture model implementing three-dimensionality, constant perfusion, and integral oxygenation in combination with a hyaluronan hydrogel provides superior conditions for liver cell survival and differentiation compared to conventional culture.

  18. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells along a hepatocyte lineage and its application in liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial liver(BAL)as alternatives to liver transplantation offer the possibility of effective treatment for many inherited and acquired hepatic disorders.Unfortunately,the limited availability of donated livers and the variability of their derived hepatocytes make it difficult to obtain enough viable human hepatocytes for the hepatocyte-based therapies.Embryonic stem cells (ESCs),which could be isolated directly from the blastocyst inner cell mass,have permanent self-renewal capability and developmental pluripotency and therefore might be an ideal cell source in the treatment of hepatic discords.However,differentiation of hESCS into hepatocytes with significant numbers remains a challenge.This review updates our current understanding of differentiation of ESCs into hepatic lineage cells,their future therapeutic uses and problems in liver regeneration.

  19. Clinical Potential of Regulatory T Cell Therapy in Liver Diseases: An Overview and Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Brown, Solomon; Oo, Ye Htun

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg). The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis, or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients. Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment, and good manufacturing practice facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), chronic rejection, and posttransplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases, and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the AILD for more than three decades; thus, the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior, and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients. PMID:27656181

  20. Hepatocyte-specific NEMO deletion promotes NK/NKT cell- and TRAIL-dependent liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraza, Naiara; Malato, Yann; Sander, Leif E; Al-Masaoudi, Malika; Freimuth, Julia; Riethmacher, Dieter; Gores, Gregory J; Roskams, Tania; Liedtke, Christian; Trautwein, Christian

    2009-08-03

    Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) is one of the main transcription factors involved in regulating apoptosis, inflammation, chronic liver disease, and cancer progression. The IKK complex mediates NF-kappaB activation and deletion of its regulatory subunit NEMO in hepatocytes (NEMO(Delta hepa)) triggers chronic inflammation and spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma development. We show that NEMO(Delta hepa) mice were resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis but hypersensitive to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as the result of a strong up-regulation of its receptor DR5 on hepatocytes. Additionally, natural killer (NK) cells, the main source of TRAIL, were activated in NEMO(Delta hepa) livers. Interestingly, depletion of the NK1.1(+) cells promoted a significant reduction of liver inflammation and an improvement of liver histology in NEMO(Delta hepa) mice. Furthermore, hepatocyte-specific NEMO deletion strongly sensitized the liver to concanavalin A (ConA)-mediated injury. The critical role of the NK cell/TRAIL axis in NEMO(Delta hepa) livers during ConA hepatitis was further confirmed by selective NK cell depletion and adoptive transfer of TRAIL-deficient(-/-) mononuclear cells. Our results uncover an essential mechanism of NEMO-mediated protection of the liver by preventing NK cell tissue damage via TRAIL/DR5 signaling. As this mechanism is important in human liver diseases, NEMO(Delta hepa) mice are an interesting tool to give insight into liver pathophysiology and to develop future therapeutic strategies.

  1. Human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF-modified hepatic oval cells improve liver transplant survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Li

    Full Text Available Despite progress in the field of immunosuppression, acute rejection is still a common postoperative complication following liver transplantation. This study aims to investigate the capacity of the human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF in modifying hepatic oval cells (HOCs administered simultaneously with orthotopic liver transplantation as a means of improving graft survival. HOCs were activated and isolated using a modified 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH model in male Lewis rats. A HOC line stably expressing the HGF gene was established following stable transfection of the pBLAST2-hHGF plasmid. Our results demonstrated that hHGF-modified HOCs could efficiently differentiate into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells in vitro. Administration of HOCs at the time of liver transplantation induced a wider distribution of SRY-positive donor cells in liver tissues. Administration of hHGF-HOC at the time of transplantation remarkably prolonged the median survival time and improved liver function for recipients compared to these parameters in the other treatment groups (P<0.05. Moreover, hHGF-HOC administration at the time of liver transplantation significantly suppressed elevation of interleukin-2 (IL-2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ levels while increasing the production of IL-10 and TGF-β1 (P<0.05. HOC or hHGF-HOC administration promoted cell proliferation, reduced cell apoptosis, and decreased liver allograft rejection rates. Furthermore, hHGF-modified HOCs more efficiently reduced acute allograft rejection (P<0.05 versus HOC transplantation only. Our results indicate that the combination of hHGF-modified HOCs with liver transplantation decreased host anti-graft immune responses resulting in a reduction of allograft rejection rates and prolonging graft survival in recipient rats. This suggests that HOC-based cell transplantation therapies can be developed as a means of treating severe liver

  2. Magnetic targeting of iron-oxide-labeled fluorescent hepatoma cells to the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciani, Alain [Universite Rene Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie, EA 4062, Paris (France); Imagerie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France); Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence [Universite Paris Diderot, Batiment Condorcet, Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes, CNRS-UMR 7057, Paris Cedex (France); Bruneval, Patrick [Anatomopathologie, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Cunin, Patrick [Unite de Recherche Clinique, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France); Autret, Gwennhael; Clement, Olivier [Universite Rene Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie, EA 4062, Paris (France); Rahmouni, Alain [Imagerie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an external magnet field can induce preferential trafficking of magnetically labeled Huh7 hepatoma cells to the liver following liver cell transplantation. Huh7 hepatoma cells were labeled with anionic magnetic nanoparticles (AMNP) and tagged with a fluorescent membrane marker (PKH67). Iron-uptake was measured by magnetophoresis. Twenty C57Bl6 mice received an intrasplenic injection of 2 x 10{sup 6} labeled cells. An external magnet (0.29 T; 25 T/m) was placed over the liver of 13 randomly selected animals (magnet group), while the remaining 7 animals served as controls. MRI (1.5 T) and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) were performed 10 days post-transplantation. The presence and location of labeled cells within the livers were compared in the magnet group and controls, and confronted with histological analysis representing the standard of reference. Mean iron content per cell was 6 pg. Based on histology, labeled cells were more frequently present within recipient livers in the magnet group (p < 0.01) where their distribution was preferentially peri-vascular (p<0.05). MRI and CFM gave similar results for the overall detection of transplanted cells (kappa=0.828) and for the identification of peri-vascular cells (kappa=0.78). Application of an external magnet can modify the trafficking of transplanted cells, especially by promoting the formation of perivascular aggregates. (orig.)

  3. Development of a 3D cell printed construct considering angiogenesis for liver tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Yong, Woon-Jae; Pati, Falguni; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kang, Kyung Shin; Kang, In-Hye; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have focused on the regeneration of liver tissue in a two-dimensional (2D) planar environment, whereas actual liver tissue is three-dimensional (3D). Cell printing technology has been successfully utilized for building 3D structures; however, the poor mechanical properties of cell-laden hydrogels are a major concern. Here, we demonstrate the printing of a 3D cell-laden construct and its application to liver tissue engineering using 3D cell printing technology through a multi-head tissue/organ building system. Polycaprolactone (PCL) was used as a framework material because of its excellent mechanical properties. Collagen bioink containing three different types of cells-hepatocytes (HCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells , and human lung fibroblasts--was infused into the canals of a PCL framework to induce the formation of capillary--like networks and liver cell growth. A co-cultured 3D microenvironment of the three types of cells was successfully established and maintained. The vascular formation and functional abilities of HCs (i.e., albumin secretion and urea synthesis) demonstrated that the heterotypic interaction among HCs and nonparenchymal cells increased the survivability and functionality of HCs within the collagen gel. Therefore, our results demonstrate the prospect of using cell printing technology for the creation of heterotypic cellular interaction within a structure for liver tissue engineering.

  4. Characterization of Natural Killer Cells in the Liver of Young Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhao; Jiansheng Guo; GuangJun Wang; Qiang Chi; Dequan Wu; Zhaolin Zeng; Xuefeng Bai; Xishan Hao

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the quantity and quality of liver NK cells from young and adult mice and compare their characteristics.METHODS C57BL/6 mice were used at 2 weeks (young) and 8 weeks (adult) of age.The percentage and absolute number of NK cells in the liver and spleen were analyzed.The cytotoxicity of NK cells in the liver and spleen aaainsl various targets were detected by a 4 h 51Cr-release method.FACScan was used to analyze the expression of CD69,Mac-1,Ly49C/I and CD94 on the NK cells.Perforin Mrna levels were analyzed by the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESUTLS The percentages of NK cells in the liver of young and adult mice were similar (11.9%±1.7% vs.9.9%±1.6%,P>0.05),but the absolute number per liver weight was higher in the young animals (11.6±2.5x105/g vs.3.4±0.8x105/g,P<0.05).The level of NK cytotoxicity was extremely high in the liver of young compared to adult mice (71.0%±5.5%VS.23.8%±4.4%,P<O.05).but this difference was not obsewed in the spleen.Phenotypes of the liver NK cells from young and adult mice were completely different from each other.The liver NK cells from young mice were CD69high Mac-1lowLy49C/Ilow.whereas NK cells from older mice displayed inverse antigen levels (CD69low Mac-1high Ly49C/Ihigh).The expression levels of other NK cell-related markers were similar in both groups.The perforin Mrna level in the liver lymphocytes from young mice was consistently greater compared to adult mice.CONCLUSION From 2 to 8 weeks C57BL/6 mice liver NK cells undergo age-associated changes.At 2 weeks of age the liver NK cells showed a high level of NK cytotoxicity and a unique phenotype which was not apparent at 8 weeks of age.

  5. Effector CD8(+) T cell-derived interleukin-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Jessica; Di Lucia, Pietro; Magini, Diletta; Moalli, Federica; Boni, Carolina; Benechet, Alexandre Pierre; Fumagalli, Valeria; Inverso, Donato; Vecchi, Andrea; Fiocchi, Amleto; Wieland, Stefan; Purcell, Robert; Ferrari, Carlo; Chisari, Francis V; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Besides secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and effector molecules, effector CD8(+) T cells that arise upon acute infection with certain viruses have been shown to produce the regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and, therefore, contain immunopathology. Whether the same occurs during acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and role that IL-10 might play in liver disease is currently unknown. Mouse models of acute HBV pathogenesis, as well as chimpanzees and patients acutely infected with HBV, were used to analyse the role of CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 in liver immunopathology. Mouse HBV-specific effector CD8(+) T cells produce significant amounts of IL-10 upon in vivo antigen encounter. This is corroborated by longitudinal data in a chimpanzee acutely infected with HBV, where serum IL-10 was readily detectable and correlated with intrahepatic CD8(+) T cell infiltration and liver disease severity. Unexpectedly, mouse and human CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 was found to act in an autocrine/paracrine fashion to enhance IL-2 responsiveness, thus preventing antigen-induced HBV-specific effector CD8(+) T cell apoptosis. Accordingly, the use of mouse models of HBV pathogenesis revealed that the IL-10 produced by effector CD8(+) T cells promoted their own intrahepatic survival and, thus supported, rather than suppressed liver immunopathology. Effector CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology. Altogether, these results extend our understanding of the cell- and tissue-specific role that IL-10 exerts in immune regulation. Lay summary: Interleukin-10 is mostly regarded as an immunosuppressive cytokine. We show here that HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells produce IL-10 upon antigen recognition and that this cytokine enhances CD8(+) T cell survival. As such, IL-10 paradoxically promotes rather than suppresses liver disease. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells Promote Liver Regeneration in a Rat Model of Toxic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Koellensperger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the light of the persisting lack of donor organs and the risks of allotransplantations, the possibility of liver regeneration with autologous stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSC is an intriguing alternative. Using a model of a toxic liver damage in Sprague Dawley rats, generated by repetitive intraperitoneal application of retrorsine and allyl alcohol, the ability of human ADSC to support the restoration of liver function was investigated. A two-thirds hepatectomy was performed, and human ADSC were injected into one remaining liver lobe in group 1 (n = 20. Injection of cell culture medium performed in group 2 (n = 20 served as control. Cyclosporine was applied to achieve immunotolerance. Blood samples were drawn weekly after surgery to determine liver-correlated blood values. Six and twelve weeks after surgery, animals were sacrificed and histological sections were analyzed. ADSC significantly raised postoperative albumin (P < 0.017, total protein (P < 0.031, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (P < 0.001, and lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.04 levels compared to injection of cell culture medium alone. Transplanted cells could be found up to twelve weeks after surgery in histological sections. This study points towards ADSC being a promising alternative to hepatocyte or liver organ transplantation in patients with severe liver failure.

  7. Stem cells for end stage liver disease: How far have we got?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefania Lorenzini; Stefano Gitto; Elena Grandini; Pietro Andreone; Mauro Bernardi

    2008-01-01

    End stage liver disease (ESLD) is a health problem worldwide. Liver transplantation is currently the only effective therapy, but its many drawbacks include a shortage of donors, operative damage, risk of rejection and in some cases recidivism of the pre-transplant disease. These factors account for the recent growing interest in regenerative medicine. Experiments have sought to identify an optimal source of stem cells,sufficient to generate large amounts of hepatocytes to be used in bioartificial livers or injected in vivo to repair the diseased organ. This update aims to give non-stem cell specialists an overview of the results obtained to date in this fascinating field of biomedical research.

  8. Autologous CD34~+ and CD133~+ stem cells transplantation in patients with end stage liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hosny; Salama; Abdel-Rahman; N; Zekri; Abeer; A; Bahnassy; Eman; Medhat; Hanan; A; Halim; Ola; S; Ahmed; Ghada; Mohamed; Sheren; A; Al; Alim; Ghada; M; Sherif

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To assess the utility of an autologous CD34 + and CD133 + stem cells infusion as a possible therapeutic modality in patients with end-stage liver diseases.METHODS:One hundred and forty patients with endstage liver diseases were randomized into two groups.Group 1,comprising 90 patients,received granulocyte colony stimulating factor for five days followed by autologous CD34 + and CD133 + stem cell infusion in the portal vein.Group 2,comprising 50 patients,received regular liver treatment only and served a...

  9. Treatment with 4-methylpyrazole modulated stellate cells and natural killer cells and ameliorated liver fibrosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyon-Seung Yi

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that retinol and its metabolites are closely associated with liver fibrogenesis. Recently, we demonstrated that genetic ablation of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3, a retinol metabolizing gene that is expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs and natural killer (NK cells, attenuated liver fibrosis in mice. In the current study, we investigated whether pharmacological ablation of ADH3 has therapeutic effects on experimentally induced liver fibrosis in mice.Liver fibrosis was induced by intraperitoneal injections of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 or bile duct ligation (BDL for two weeks. To inhibit ADH3-mediated retinol metabolism, 10 μg 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP/g of body weight was administered to mice treated with CCl4 or subjected to BDL. The mice were sacrificed at week 2 to evaluate the regression of liver fibrosis. Liver sections were stained for collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA. In addition, HSCs and NK cells were isolated from control and treated mice livers for molecular and immunological studies.Treatment with 4-MP attenuated CCl4- and BDL-induced liver fibrosis in mice, without any adverse effects. HSCs from 4-MP treated mice depicted decreased levels of retinoic acids and increased retinol content than HSCs from control mice. In addition, the expression of α-SMA, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and type I collagen α1 was significantly reduced in the HSCs of 4-MP treated mice compared to the HSCs from control mice. Furthermore, inhibition of retinol metabolism by 4-MP increased interferon-γ production in NK cells, resulting in increased apoptosis of activated HSCs.Based on our data, we conclude that inhibition of retinol metabolism by 4-MP ameliorates liver fibrosis in mice through activation of NK cells and suppression of HSCs. Therefore, retinol and its metabolizing enzyme, ADH3, might be potential targets for therapeutic intervention of liver fibrosis.

  10. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called "second pathway of liver regeneration." The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin.

  11. Gene expression profiling of liver cancer stem cells by RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Y Ho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence supports that tumor growth and cancer relapse are driven by cancer stem cells. Our previous work has demonstrated the existence of CD90(+ liver cancer stem cells (CSCs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Nevertheless, the characteristics of these cells are still poorly understood. In this study, we employed a more sensitive RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq to compare the gene expression profiling of CD90(+ cells sorted from tumor (CD90(+CSCs with parallel non-tumorous liver tissues (CD90(+NTSCs and elucidate the roles of putative target genes in hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD90(+ cells were sorted respectively from tumor and adjacent non-tumorous human liver tissues using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The amplified RNAs of CD90(+ cells from 3 HCC patients were subjected to RNA-Seq analysis. A differential gene expression profile was established between CD90(+CSCs and CD90(+NTSCs, and validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR on the same set of amplified RNAs, and further confirmed in an independent cohort of 12 HCC patients. Five hundred genes were differentially expressed (119 up-regulated and 381 down-regulated genes between CD90(+CSCs and CD90(+NTSCs. Gene ontology analysis indicated that the over-expressed genes in CD90(+CSCs were associated with inflammation, drug resistance and lipid metabolism. Among the differentially expressed genes, glypican-3 (GPC3, a member of glypican family, was markedly elevated in CD90(+CSCs compared to CD90(+NTSCs. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that GPC3 was highly expressed in forty-two human liver tumor tissues but absent in adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues. Flow cytometry indicated that GPC3 was highly expressed in liver CD90(+CSCs and mature cancer cells in liver cancer cell lines and human liver tumor tissues. Furthermore, GPC3 expression was positively correlated with the number of CD90(+CSCs in liver tumor tissues. CONCLUSIONS

  12. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  13. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations.

  14. Effect of New Water-Soluble Dendritic Phthalocyanines on Human Colorectal and Liver Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru YABAŞ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1 cells were treated with the synthesized water soluble phthalocyanine derivatives to understand the effect of the compounds both on colorectal and liver cancer cells. The compounds inhibited cell proliferation and displayed cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines however; the effect of the compounds on healthy control fibroblast cell line was comparatively lower. The compounds can be employed for cancer treatment as anticancer agents.

  15. [Regulation of autophagy on dendritic cells during rat liver regeneration by IPA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiwen, Wang; Wei, Jin; Cuifang, Chang; Cunshuan, Xu

    2015-03-01

    To understand the mechanism underlying autophagy in regulating dendritic cells during rat liver regeneration, we used the method of percoll density gradient centrifugation combined with immunomagnetic bead to isolate dendritic cells, the Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array to determine the expression changes of autophagy-related genes, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis 9.0 (IPA) to determine the autophagy activities. The results indicated that LC3, BECN1, ATG7 and SQSTM1 genes had significant expression changes during rat liver regeneration. There were 593 genes related to autophagy, among which 210 genes were identified as significant. We also showed that the activity of autophagy was enhanced in the priming phase and teminal phase of liver regeneration, weakened in the proliferative stage by comparative analysis method of IPA. The autophagy-related physiological activities mainly included RNA expression, RNA transcription, cell differentiation and proliferation, involving in PPARα/RXRα activation, acute phase response signaling, TREM1 signaling, IL-6 signaling, IL-8 signaling and IL-1 signaling, whose activities were increased or decreased in liver regeneration. Cluster analysis found that P53 and AMPK signaling participated in the regulation of dendritic cells autophagy, with AMPK signaling in the priming phase of liver regeneration, and both signaling pathways in the terminal phase. We conclude that dendritic cells autophagy played an important role in initiation of the immune response in priming phase and depletion of dendritic cells in late phase during rat liver regeneration.

  16. Three-dimentional growth of liver / stem cells in vitro under simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei Fu

    Liver is a important and largest parenchymatous organ in vivo, and have complex and diverse structures and functions. In the world, there are many peoples suffers from liver injury and dis-ease, especially in Asia, but serious shortage of donor organ, especially for organic pathological changes, is a big problem in the world. Stem cells have the capabilities to self-renew and differ-entiate into multiple lineages, and are very significant in both theoretical research and clinical applications. Compared with traditional cell culture, cells of 3D growth are more close to their situation in vivo. The specific physics environment in space provides a great opportunity for 3D growth of cells and tissues. Due to the chance for entering into the space is so scarce, to mimic microgravity effects using a rotating cell culture system (RCCS) designed by NASA, and some other methods were studied for cellular 3D growth in vitro. Neonatal mouse liver Cells, hepatic progenitor/stem cells from fetal liver and WB-F344 cells were cultured in a 1:1 mixture of DMEM and F-12 supplemented with 10 % FCS and several factors, and seeded into the RCCS, 6-well and 24-well plates. Their growth characteristic, metabolism, differentiation and gene expression were studied by SEM, Histochemistry, Flow Cytometry, RT-PCR and so on. The results showed: 1. Neonatal mouse liver Cells (1day after birth) seem easy to grow for a three-dimentional-like structure, when the cells were cultured in the RCCS, a cell aggregate formed after 1 day of culture and were kept during 10 days culture. The size of aggregate was about 1 2 mm in diameter. 2. Hepatic progenitor/stem cells from fetal liver seem a good cell resource for liver disease'cell therapy. They expressed AFP and CKs, and no mature hepato-cytes marker and bile duct epithelial cells marker were detected. When were transplanted into Nod-Scid mice, they had multi-potential differentiation. 3. WB-F344 cells, a liver epithelial cell line, could grew well on

  17. Procalcitonin Impairs Liver Cell Viability and Function In Vitro: A Potential New Mechanism of Liver Dysfunction and Failure during Sepsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, Johannes; Wagner, Nana-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Liver dysfunction and failure are severe complications of sepsis and result in poor outcome and increased mortality. The underlying pathologic mechanisms of hepatocyte dysfunction and necrosis during sepsis are only incompletely understood. Here, we investigated whether procalcitonin, a biomarker of sepsis, modulates liver cell function and viability. Materials and Methods. Employing a previously characterized and patented biosensor system evaluating hepatocyte toxicity in vitro, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2/C3A) were exposed to 0.01–50 ng/mL procalcitonin for 2 × 72 h and evaluated for proliferation, necrosis, metabolic activity, cellular integrity, microalbumin synthesis, and detoxification capacity. Acetaminophen served as positive control. For further standardization, procalcitonin effects were confirmed in a cellular toxicology assay panel employing L929 fibroblasts. Data were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey's test. Results. Already at concentrations as low as 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin induced HepG2/C3A necrosis (P < 0.05) and reduced metabolic activity, cellular integrity, synthesis, and detoxification capacity (all P < 0.001). Comparable effects were obtained employing L929 fibroblasts. Conclusion. We provide evidence for procalcitonin to directly impair function and viability of human hepatocytes and exert general cytotoxicity in vitro. Therapeutical targeting of procalcitonin could thus display a novel approach to reduce incidence of liver dysfunction and failure during sepsis and lower morbidity and mortality of septic patients. PMID:28255555

  18. Autologous Stem Cells Transplantation in Egyptian Patients with Liver Cirrhosis on Top of Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Tayeb, Hoda; El Dorry, Ahmed; Amer, Nehad; Mowafy, Nadia; Zimaity, Maha; Bayoumy, Essam; Saleh, Shereen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Use of pluripotent stem cells is an ideal solution for liver insufficiencies. This work aims is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of autologous stem cells transplantation (SCT) in Egyptian patients of liver cirrhosis on top of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Subjects and Results 20 patients with HCV induced liver cirrhosis were divided into 2 groups. Group I: included 10 patients with liver cirrhosis Child score ≥9, for whom autologous stem cell transplantation was done using granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for stem cells mobilization. Separation and collection of the peripheral blood stem cells was done by leukapheresis. G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (G-CSF PB-MNCs) were counted by flow cytometry. Stem cell injection into the hepatic artery was done. Group II: included 10 patients with HCV induced liver cirrhosis as a control group. Follow up and comparison between both groups were done over a follow up period of 6 months. The procedure was well tolerated. Mobilization was successful and the total number of G-CSF PB-MNCs in the harvests ranged from 25×106 to 191×106. There was improvement in the quality of life, serum albumin, total bilirubin, liver enzymes and the Child-Pugh score of group I over the first two-three months after the procedure. Conclusion SCT in HCV induced liver cirrhosis is a safe procedure. It can improve the quality of life and hepatic functions transiently with no effect on the life expectancy or the fate of the liver cirrhosis. PMID:26634069

  19. Characteristics of Tfh cells in the peripheral blood in recipients of liver allograft: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-chao SHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the expression characteristics of peripheral blood follicular helper T cells (Tfh and their molecules during pre- and post-transplantation period in liver transplant patients to explore the role of Tfh in alloreactive response after liver transplantation. Methods Twenty liver transplant (LT patients and 20 healthy individuals as control were enrolled in this study. Thirteen LT patients with stable liver function were included for cross-sectional study. Another seven LT patients with complete clinical data were included for follow-up study. The frequencies of Tfh cells were examined by flow cytometry. For the seven patients, Tfh cells and level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT were monitored dynamically for one month after LT. Results The frequencies of CD4+CXCR5+Tfh and CD4+CXCR5+PD-1+ cells in peripheral blood increased significantly after liver transplantation as compared with those before liver transplantation (P<0.05. In addition, the frequencies of CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+ cells showed a rising trend, but no statistical difference. In early follow-up period it was found that the frequencies of CD4+CXCR5+Tfh obviously increased after liver transplantation in patients with stable liver function, and reached the peak value after one week and then decreased. The ALT level also decreased when reaching peak 10 days after surgery. Interestingly, the frequencies of CD4+CXCR5+ Tfh in one patient with acute rejection after liver transplantation showed the same trend with ALT levels changes. Furthermore, the frequencies of CD4+CXCR5+Tfh, CD4+CXCR5+PD-1+ and CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+ cells in stable liver function group were higher than those in the healthy control group (P<0.05. Conclusion The CD4+CXCR5+Tfh cells in peripheral blood will be upregulated in liver transplant patients, which indicates that the Tfh may be involved in liver alloreactive response. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.12.08

  20. Pretreatment with TCDD exacerbates liver injury from Concanavalin A: critical role for NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Aaron M; Roth, Robert A; Ganey, Patricia E

    2013-11-01

    For many liver diseases, including viral and autoimmune hepatitis, immune cells play an important role in the development and progression of liver injury. Concanavalin A (Con A) administration to rodents has been used as a model of immune-mediated liver injury resembling human autoimmune hepatitis. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to alter the development of immune-mediated diseases. Mice pretreated with TCDD developed exacerbated liver injury in response to administration of a mild dose (6 mg/kg) of Con A. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD pretreatment exacerbates Con A-induced liver injury by enhancing the activation and recruitment of accessory cell types including neutrophils, macrophages, and natural killer (NK) cells. Mice were treated with 0, 0.3, 3, or 30 μg/kg TCDD and 4 days later with Con A or saline. TCDD pretreatment with doses of 3 and 30 μg/kg significantly increased liver injury from Con A administration. The plasma concentrations of neutrophil chemokines were significantly increased in TCDD-pretreated mice after Con A administration. NKT cell-deficient (CD1d KO) mice were used to examine whether NKT cells were required for TCDD/Con A-induced liver injury. CD1d KO mice were completely protected from liver injury induced by treatment with Con A alone, whereas the injury from TCDD/Con A treatment was reduced but not eliminated. However, T-cell deficient (RAG1 KO) mice were protected from liver injury induced by Con A irrespective of pretreatment with TCDD. TCDD/Con A treatment increased the percentage of NK cells expressing the activation marker CD69. Depletion of NK cells prior to treatment resulted in significant reductions in plasma interferon-γ and liver injury from TCDD/Con A treatment. In summary, exposure to TCDD exacerbated the immune-mediated liver injury induced by Con A, and our findings suggest that NK cells play a critical role in this response.

  1. Intraportal mesenchymal stem cell transplantation prevents acute liver failure through promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Feng Sang; Xiao-Lei Shi; Bin Han; Tao Huang; Xu Huang; Hao-Zhen Ren; Yi-Tao Ding

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been regarded as a potential treatment for acute liver failure (ALF), but the optimal route was unknown. The present study aimed to explore the most effective MSCs trans-plantation route in a swine ALF model. METHODS: The swine ALF model induced by intravenous injection of D-Gal was treated by the transplantation of swine MSCs through four routes including intraportal injection (InP group), hepatic intra-arterial injection (AH group), pe-ripheral intravenous injection (PV group) and intrahepatic injection (IH group). The living conditions and survival time were recorded. Blood samples before and after MSCs trans-plantation were collected for the analysis of hepatic function. The histology of liver injury was interpreted and scored in terminal samples. Hepatic apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay. Apoptosis and proliferation related protein expressions including cleaved caspase-3, survivin, AKT, phospho-AKT (Ser473), ERK and phospho-ERK (Tyr204) were analyzed by Western blotting. RESULTS: The average survival time of each group was 10.7 ± 1.6 days (InP), 6.0±0.9 days (AH), 4.7±1.4 days (PV), 4.3± 0.8 days (IH), respectively, when compared with the average survival time of 3.8±0.8 days in the D-Gal group. The sur-vival rates between the InP group and D-Gal group revealed a statistically signiifcant difference (P CONCLUSIONS: Intraportal injection was superior to other pathways for MSC transplantation. Intraportal MSC trans-plantation could improve liver function, inhibit apoptosis and prolong the survival time of swine with ALF. The transplanted MSCs may participate in liver regeneration via promoting cell proliferation and suppressing apoptosis during the initial stage of ALF.

  2. T cells infiltrate the liver and kill hepatocytes in HLA-B(∗)57:01-associated floxacillin-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuillemin, Natascha; Terracciano, Luigi; Beltraminelli, Helmut; Schlapbach, Christoph; Fontana, Stefano; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Pichler, Werner J; Yerly, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major safety issue. It can cause severe disease and is a common cause of the withdrawal of drugs from the pharmaceutical market. Recent studies have identified the HLA-B(∗)57:01 allele as a risk factor for floxacillin (FLUX)-induced liver injury and have suggested a role for cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in the pathomechanism of liver injury caused by FLUX. This study aimed to confirm the importance of FLUX-reacting cytotoxic lymphocytes in the pathomechanism of liver injury and to dissect the involved mechanisms of cytotoxicity. IHC staining of a liver biopsy from a patient with FLUX-induced liver injury revealed periportal inflammation and the infiltration of cytotoxic CD3(+) CD8(+) lymphocytes into the liver. The infiltration of cytotoxic lymphocytes into the liver of a patient with FLUX-induced liver injury demonstrates the importance of FLUX-reacting T cells in the underlying pathomechanism. Cytotoxicity of FLUX-reacting T cells from 10 HLA-B(∗)57:01(+) healthy donors toward autologous target cells and HLA-B(∗)57:01-transduced hepatocytes was analyzed in vitro. Cytotoxicity of FLUX-reacting T cells was concentration dependent and required concentrations in the range of peak serum levels after FLUX administration. Killing of target cells was mediated by different cytotoxic mechanisms. Our findings emphasize the role of the adaptive immune system and especially of activated drug-reacting T cells in human leukocyte antigen-associated, drug-induced liver injury.

  3. Kupffer cells hasten resolution of liver immunopathology in mouse models of viral hepatitis.

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    Giovanni Sitia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs are widely considered important contributors to liver injury during viral hepatitis due to their pro-inflammatory activity. Herein we utilized hepatitis B virus (HBV-replication competent transgenic mice and wild-type mice infected with a hepatotropic adenovirus to demonstrate that KCs do not directly induce hepatocellular injury nor do they affect the pathogenic potential of virus-specific CD8 T cells. Instead, KCs limit the severity of liver immunopathology. Mechanistically, our results are most compatible with the hypothesis that KCs contain liver immunopathology by removing apoptotic hepatocytes in a manner largely dependent on scavenger receptors. Apoptotic hepatocytes not readily removed by KCs become secondarily necrotic and release high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1 protein, promoting organ infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils. Overall, these results indicate that KCs resolve rather than worsen liver immunopathology.

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas with liver metastasis: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang-pu; OU Kun; GUAN Qing-hai; ZHANG Fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is an unusual cancer of ductal cell origin. In a review of 6668 cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer from various registries reported from 1950 through 1985, the incidence of squamous carcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma was 0.005% and 0.01%, respectively.1 We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas with liver metastasis.

  5. Continuous cell injury promotes hepatic tumorigenesis in cdc42-deficient mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hengel, Jolanda; D'Hooge, Petra; Hooghe, Bart

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The Rho small guanosine triphosphatase Cdc42 is critical for diverse cellular functions, including regulation of actin organization, cell polarity, intracellular membrane trafficking, transcription, cell-cycle progression, and cell transformation. This implies that Cdc42 might ....... CONCLUSIONS: We describe a mouse model in which chronic liver disease leads to hepatocarcinogenesis....

  6. Inhibitory effects of capsaicin on hepatic stellate cells and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fu-Xiang; Teng, Yin-Yan; Zhu, Qian-Dong; Zhang, Qi-Yu; Tang, Yin-He

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play an important role in the process of liver fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of capsaicin on HSCs and liver fibrosis. Cultured HSCs were incubated with various concentrations of capsaicin. Cell proliferation was examined using a cell counting kit. Production of hydrogen peroxide was determined using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. The mRNA and protein expression of target genes was analyzed by reverse transcription PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Cell apoptosis was evaluated by annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide (PI) costaining followed by flow cytometric analysis. A CCl4 rat liver fibrosis model was used to assess in vivo effects of capsaicin by histological examination and measurement of liver fibrosis markers, including hydroxyproline content, serum type III collagen, and hyaluronic acid (HA) levels. Our results show that capsaicin dose-dependently inhibited cell proliferation, suppressed cell activation, and decreased hydrogen peroxide production in cultured HSCs. Capsaicin reduced the mRNA levels of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in HSCs. Moreover, capsaicin-induced cell apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Bax, cytochrome c (cyt c), and caspase-3, but reduced levels of Bcl-2. The animal studies further revealed that capsaicin efficiently reduced the extent of liver fibrosis, inhibited HSC proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis. Our findings suggest that capsaicin might inhibit fibrogenesis by inhibiting the activities of HSCs.

  7. Liver tryptase-positive mast cells and fibrosis in children with hepatic echinococcosis

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    Gulubova Maya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The hepatic echinococcosis in children is a serious surgical problem. The aim of this study is to investigate the participation of mast cells in liver inflammatory reactions triggered by echinococcal cysts. Liver biopsy samples were collected from the tissue surrounding the cysts from 16 sick children (11 boys and 5 girls in the course of abdominal surgery and from 5 controls. Light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibody against tryptase. Light microscopical immunocytochemistry revealed abundance of tryptase-positive (MCT mast cells in the capsules of the cysts (43.58 cells/mm2. There were also observed greatly increased numbers of mast cells in portal tracts surrounding the cyst, compared to those of control biopsies (26.49 vs. 1.78 cells/mm2, p=0.0009, Mann-Whitney U test. Based on the ultrastructural appearance of tryptase-positive mast cell granules, morphological sings of activation of most of the mast cells were distinguished. In conclusion, we suggest that the accumulated and activated tryptase-positive mast cells in liver tissues surrounding the echinococcal cysts play a crucial role in modulation of the inflammatory liver response and could induce chronic inflammation and fibrogenesis, resulting in serious liver injury such as nonspecific reactive hepatitis.

  8. Wnt/β-catenin signaling cell-autonomously converts non-hepatic endodermal cells to a liver fate

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    Juhoon So

    2012-07-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays multiple roles in liver development including hepatoblast proliferation and differentiation, hepatocyte differentiation, and liver zonation. A positive role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in liver specification was recently identified in zebrafish; however, its underlying cellular mechanisms are unknown. Here, we present two cellular mechanisms by which Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates liver specification. First, using lineage tracing we show that ectopic hepatoblasts, which form in the endoderm posterior to the liver upon activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, are derived from the direct conversion of non-hepatic endodermal cells, but not from the posterior migration of hepatoblasts. We found that endodermal cells at the 4–6th somite levels, which normally give rise to the intestinal bulb or intestine, gave rise to hepatoblasts in Wnt8a-overexpressing embryos, and that the distribution of traced endodermal cells in Wnt8a-overexpressing embryos was similar to that in controls. Second, by using an endoderm-restricted cell-transplantation technique and mosaic analysis with transgenic lines that cell-autonomously suppress or activate Wnt/β-catenin signaling upon heat-shock, we show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling acts cell-autonomously in endodermal cells to induce hepatic conversion. Altogether, these data demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling can induce the fate-change of non-hepatic endodermal cells into a liver fate in a cell-autonomous manner. These findings have potential application to hepatocyte differentiation protocols for the generation of mature hepatocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells, supplying a sufficient amount of hepatocytes for cell-based therapies to treat patients with severe liver diseases.

  9. Effect of adoptive transfer or depletion of regulatory T cells on triptolide-induced liver injury

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    Xinzhi eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg in triptolide (TP-induced hepatotoxicity. MethodsFemale C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 hours after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to ALT and AST levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levles of transcription factor FoxP3 and RORγt, IL-10, SOCS and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated.ResultsDuring TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while Th17 cell transcription factor RORγt, SOCS signaling and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1 and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3 and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. ConclusionsThese results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  10. Hepatic reconstruction from fetal porcine liver cells using a radial flow bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuji Ishii; Ryota Saito; Hideki Marushima; Ryusuke Ito; Taro Sakamoto; Katsuhiko Yanaga

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To examine the efficacy of the radial flow bioreactor (RFB) as an extracorporeal bioartificial liver (BAL) and the reconstruction of liver organoids using embryonic pig liver cells.METHODS:We reconstructed the liver organoids using embryonic porcine liver cells in the RFB.We also determined the gestational time window for the optimum growth of embryonic porcine liver cells.Five weeks of gestation was designated as embryonic day (E) 35 and 8 wk of gestation was designated as E56.These cells were cultured for one week before morphological and functional examinations.Moreover,the efficacy of pulsed administration of a high concentration hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was examined.RESULTS:Both cell growth and function were excellent after harvesting on E3S.The pulsed administration of a high concentration of HGF promoted the differentiation and maturation of these fetal hepatic cells.Microscopic examination of organoids in the RFB revealed palisading and showed that bile duct-like structures were well developed,indicating that the organoids were mini livers.Transmission electron microscopy revealed microvilli on the luminal surfaces of bile duct-like structures and junctional complexes,which form the basis of the cytoskeleton of epithelial tissues.Furthermore,strong expression of connexin (Cx) 32,which is the mainprotein of hepatocyte gap junctions,was observed.With respect to liver function,ammonia detoxification and urea synthesis were shown to be performed effectively.CONCLUSION:Our system can potentially be applied in the fields of BAL and transplantation medicine.

  11. Fatty Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abbreviations Weights & Measures ENGLISH View Professional English Deutsch Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, ... inside liver cells. Just consuming a high-fat diet does not result in fatty liver. Rarely, fat ...

  12. Liver cell adenoma showing sequential alteration of radiological findings suggestive of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takayuki Kogure; Yoshiyuki Ueno; Satoshi Sekiguchi; Kazuyuki Ishida; Takehiko Igarashi; Yuta Wakui; Takao Iwasaki; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2009-01-01

    A liver tumor 35 mm in diameter was found incidentally in a 40-year-old woman who had no history of liver diseases or the use of oral contraceptives. Radiological diagnostics showed the typical findings of liver cell adenoma (LCA). Dynamic computed tomography revealed that the tumor showed a homogenous enhancement in the arterial phase and almost the same enhancement as the surrounding liver parenchyma in the delayed phase. The tumor was found to contain fat on magnetic resonance imaging. A benign fat containing liver tumor was suggested. However, radiological findings altered, which caused us to suspect that a welldifferentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) containing fat was becoming dedifferentiated. Partial hepatectomy was performed and the pathological findings showed the typical findings of LCA. This case was an extremely rare LCA, which had no background of risk for LCA and developed the sequential alteration of the radiological findings to suspect well-differentiated HCC.

  13. Carcinoma-associated perisinusoidal laminin may signal tumour cell metastasis to the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1992-01-01

    The perisinusoidal space of the liver shows extensive modulation of the extracellular matrix in response to various pathological conditions. We studied perisinusoidal laminin expression immunohistochemically using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in 110 human liver specimens obtained at autopsy...... in cancer patients without liver metastasis. In 3 cases of leukaemia sinusoids were laminin negative. In cirrhosis and chronic passive congestion there was, as expected, laminin immunoreactivity in the perisinusoidal space. The results obtained using polyclonal antibodies against laminin were confirmed...... using chain-specific monoclonal antibodies against B2 laminin. In an ex vivo assay, viable tumour cells (Panc-1 and clone A) were found to bind with remarkable specificity to frozen sections of liver tissue containing perisinusoidal laminin as opposed to liver tissues without laminin. We suggest...

  14. Prediction of Drug-Induced Liver Injury in HepG2 Cells Cultured with Human Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Min; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Jeon, Jang Su; Ryu, Chang Seon; Kim, Young-Mi; Lee, Kiho; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2015-05-18

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) via metabolic activation by drug-metabolizing enzymes, especially cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a major cause of drug failure and drug withdrawal. In this study, an in vitro model using HepG2 cells in combination with human liver microsomes was developed for the prediction of DILI. The cytotoxicity of cyclophosphamide, a model drug for bioactivation, was augmented in HepG2 cells cultured with microsomes in a manner dependent on exposure time, microsomal protein concentration, and NADPH. Experiments using pan- or isoform-selective CYP inhibitors showed that CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 are responsible for the bioactivation of cyclophosphamide. In a metabolite identification study employing LC-ESI-QTrap and LC-ESI-QTOF, cyclophosphamide metabolites including phosphoramide mustard, a toxic metabolite, were detected in HepG2 cells cultured with microsomes, but not without microsomes. The cytotoxic effects of acetaminophen and diclofenac were also potentiated by microsomes. The potentiation of acetaminophen cytotoxicity was dependent on CYP-dependent metabolism, and the augmentation of diclofenac cytotoxicity was not mediated by either CYP- or UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-dependent metabolism. The cytotoxic effects of leflunomide, nefazodone, and bakuchiol were attenuated by microsomes. The detoxication of leflunomide by microsomes was attributed to mainly CYP3A4-dependent metabolism. The protective effect of microsomes against nefazodone cytotoxicity was dependent on both CYP-mediated metabolism and nonspecific protein binding. Nonspecific protein binding but not CYP-dependent metabolism played a critical role in the attenuation of bakuchiol cytotoxicity. The present study suggests that HepG2 cells cultured with human liver microsomes can be a reliable model in which to predict DILI via bioactivation by drug metabolizing enzymes.

  15. Effects of cadmium on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and proto-oncogene expression in zebrafish liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying Ying; Zhu, Jin Yong; Chan, King Ming, E-mail: kingchan@cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers. • Cd down regulated p53 and RAD51. • Cd up regulated immediate early cancer genes of GADD45 and growth factors. • Cd promoted tumorigenic effects in ZFL cells. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major transitional metal that has toxic effects in aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem; however, its hepatic toxicity and carcinogenicity are not very well characterized. We used a zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line as a model to investigate the mechanism of Cd-induced toxicity on hepatocytes. Our results showed that Cd can be effectively accumulated in ZFL cells in our exposure experiments. Cell cytotoxicity assays and flow cytometer measurements revealed that Cd{sup 2+} stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers indicating potentially tumorigenic effects of Cd in ZFL cells. Gene expression profiles also indicated that Cd downregulated oncogenes p53 and rad51 and upregulated immediate response oncogenes, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (gadd45) genes, and growth factors. We also found dramatic changes in the gene expression of c-jun and igf1rb at different exposure time points, supporting the notion that potentially tumorigenic of Cd-is involved in the activation of immediate early genes or genes related to apoptosis in cancer promotion.

  16. Label-free quantitative proteomics of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Sheng-Ta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells, which are characterized by their resistance to conventional chemotherapy and their tumor initiation ability at limited dilutions, have been recognized as a critical target in liver cancer therapeutics. In the current work, we developed a label-free quantitative method to investigate the proteome of CD133-positive liver cancer stem cells for the purpose of identifying unique biomarkers that can be utilized for targeting liver cancer stem cells. Label-free quantitation was performed in combination with ID-based Elution time Alignment by Linear regression Quantitation (IDEAL-Q and MaxQuant. Results Initially, IDEAL-Q analysis revealed that 151 proteins were differentially expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells when compared with CD133-negative cells. We then analyzed these 151 differentially expressed proteins by MaxQuant software and identified 10 significantly up-regulated proteins. The results were further validated by RT-PCR, western blot, flow cytometry or immunofluorescent staining which revealed that prominin-1, annexin A1, annexin A3, transgelin, creatine kinase B, vimentin, and EpCAM were indeed highly expressed in the CD133-positive hepatoma cells. Conclusions These findings confirmed that mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitative proteomics can be used to gain insights into liver cancer stem cells.

  17. Silencing of WWP2 inhibits adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yong; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Pan, De-Biao; Ye, Guan-Xiong; Wu, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Shi; Wang, Chao-Jun; Jiang, Jin-Yan; Fu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The role and clinical implication of the WWP2 E3 ubiquitin ligase in liver cancer are poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the expression level of WWP2 and its functions in cell adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer. We used real-time PCR to detect the expression of WWP2 in liver cancer and adjacent samples from the People's Hospital of Lishui and also analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-seq data by bioinformatics. Migration and invasion were detected by transwell analysis. We detected a strong WWP2 expression in tumor tissues of the People's Hospital of Lishui, and the survival rate was significantly higher in patients with lower WWP2-expressing tumors. WWP2 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus stably infected cells (shWWP2), Huh7, showed slower growth speed compared with scramble control-infected cells in a xenograft mouse model. Knockdown of WWP2 Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells demonstrated a reduction in adhesion, invasion, and migration. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that WWP2 is positively correlated to cancer-related pathways including the chemokine signaling pathway. WWP2 also regulated MMP-9, caspase-9, CXCR3, and CCR5 expression in liver cancer cells. In addition, knockdown of CXCR3 and CCR5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and migration in Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells. Our data suggest that targeting of WWP2 may be a therapeutic strategy for liver cancer treatment.

  18. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  19. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or ...

  20. Liver-derived systemic factors drive β-cell hyperplasia in insulin resistant states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Kawamori, Dan; Dirice, Ercument; Liew, Chong Wee; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Hu, Jiang; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Qian, Weijun; Wagers, Amy J.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2013-02-21

    Integrative organ cross-talk regulates key aspects of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation may underlie metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. To test the hypothesis that cross-talk between the liver and pancreatic islets modulates β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance, we used the Liver-specific Insulin Receptor Knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a unique model that exhibits dramatic islet hyperplasia. Using complementary in vivo parabiosis and transplantation assays, and in vitro islet culture approaches, we demonstrate that humoral, non-neural, non-cell autonomous factor(s) induce β-cell proliferation in LIRKO mice. Furthermore, we report that a hepatocyte-derived factor(s) stimulates mouse and human β-cell proliferation in ex vivo assays, independent of ambient glucose and insulin levels. These data implicate the liver as a critical source of β-cell growth factors in insulin resistant states.

  1. Liver Graft versus Host Disease after Allogeneic Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation: Update on Etiopathogenesis and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihăilă, R-G

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is the main complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and is more frequent after peripheral stem cell transplants. Graft versus leukemia or lymphoma component of them is beneficial to eradicate residual tumor mass after previous treatment and conditioning regimen. A severe GVHD may endanger the patient's life. The most important liver manifestations of GVHD are increased serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin values. The last allows to estimate the GVHD severity. Sometimes, an increase of aminotransferases can mimic an acute hepatitis. Donor-derived hematopoietic cells appeared to turn in mesenchymal liver cells. Activated CD4(+) T cells, humoral and complement activation, a large number of cytokines and cytokine receptors are involved in GVHD development. Correct and early recognition of GVHD and its differentiation from the other liver diseases are essential for the medical practice.

  2. The role of natural killer cells in autoimmune liver disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, Kelly; Pontarini, Elena; Tentorio, Paolo; Cimino, Matteo; Donadon, Matteo; Torzilli, Guido; Lugli, Enrico; Della Bella, Silvia; Gershwin, M Eric; Mavilio, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are important players of the innate arm of the immune system and provide an early defense against pathogens and tumor-transformed cells. Peripheral blood NK (PB-NK) cells were first identified because of their ability to spontaneously kill tumor-cell targets in vitro without the need for specific antigen priming, which is the reason that they were named 'natural killer' cells. The characterization of NK cells in human tissues and body organs represented another important step forward to better understand their physiology and physiopathology. In this regard, many reports revealed over the past decade a differential anatomic distribution of NK cell subsets in several sites such as the intestine, lung, cervix, placenta and liver as well as in secondary lymphoid organs such as spleen, lymph nodes and tonsils. Among all these tissues, the liver is certainly unique as its parenchyma contains an unusually high number of infiltrating immune cells with 30-50% of total lymphocytes being NK cells. Given the constant liver intake of non-self antigens from the gastrointestinal tract via the portal vein, hepatic NK (H-NK) cells must retain a certain degree of tolerance in the context of their immune-surveillance against dangers to the host. Indeed, the breakdown of the tolerogenic state of the liver-associated immune system has been shown to induce autoimmunity. However, the role of NK cells during the course of autoimmune liver diseases is still being debated mainly because a complete characterization of H-NK cells normally resident in healthy human liver has not yet been fully disclosed. Furthermore, the differences in phenotype and functions between human and mouse H-NK cells often preclude translation of results obtained from murine models into experimental approaches to be performed in humans. Here, we provide an extensive characterization of the phenotype of H-NK cells physiologically resident in the human liver by both mentioning data available

  3. Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: Interactions between Liver Parenchymal and Nonparenchymal Cells

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    Nancy Magee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common type of chronic liver disease in the Western countries, affecting up to 25% of the general population and becoming a major health concern in both adults and children. NAFLD encompasses the entire spectrum of fatty liver disease in individuals without significant alcohol consumption, ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and cirrhosis. NASH is a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and hepatic disorders with the presence of steatosis, hepatocyte injury (ballooning, inflammation, and, in some patients, progressive fibrosis leading to cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of NASH is a complex process and implicates cell interactions between liver parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells as well as crosstalk between various immune cell populations in liver. Lipotoxicity appears to be the central driver of hepatic cellular injury via oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. This review focuses on the contributions of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells to NASH, assessing their potential applications to the development of novel therapeutic agents. Currently, there are limited pharmacological treatments for NASH; therefore, an increased understanding of NASH pathogenesis is pertinent to improve disease interventions in the future.

  4. An efficient method of sorting liver stem cells by using immuno-magnetic microbeads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fei He; Yin-Kun Liu; Dong-Mei Gao; Jun Chen; Peng-Yuan Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop a method to isolate liver stem cells fast and efficiently.METHODS: Fetal mouse liver cells were characterized by cell surface antigens (c-Kit and CD45/TER119) using flow cytometry. The candidate liver stem cells were sorted by using immuno-magnetic microbeads and identified by clone-forming culture, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence assays.RESULTS: The c-Kit-(CD45/TER119)-cell population with 97.9% of purity were purified by immuno-magnetic microbeads at one time. The yield of this separation was about 6% of the total sorting cells and the cell viability was above 98%. When cultured in vitro these cells had high clone-forming and self-renewing ability and expressed markers of hepatocytes and bile duct cells.Functionally mature hepatocytes were observed after 21 d of culture.CONCLUSION: This method offers an excellent tool for the enrichment of liver stem cells with high purity and viability, which could be used for further studies. It is fast, efficient, simple and not expensive.

  5. Liver Development and In vitro Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells to Hepatocytes

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    Behshad Pournasr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells are characterized with two specific properties: self renewal and differentiationpotential. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells that can be differentiatedinto three kind of germ layers; ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm. These properties makethem ideal for developmental research, toxicology and transplantation in animal model ofhuman diseases. These cells can be differentiated spontaneously into three germ layercells, but in direct differentiation, molecules and growth factors involved in natural developmentof desired cells must well characterized to gain a proper differentiation in vitro.There are increasing numbers of death because of liver disease and failure of organtransplantation in our country and the world. This made stem cell scientists to work onembryonic stem cell differentiation to hepatocyte like cells to create an accessible cellsource in regenerative medicine of liver disease in the future, and also to establish stemcell derived hepatocyte for in vitro screening of drugs.In this review we will summarize the process of liver development including moleculesand growth factors incorporate in the liver development as a template for in vitro differentiationof mouse and human embryonic stem cells and then we will discuss the relatedstudies and techniques for analyzing functionality of differentiated cells.

  6. Stages based molecular mechanisms for generating cholangiocytes from liver stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Hui; Ren, Li-Na; Chen, Tao; Liu, Li-Ye; Tang, Li-Jun

    2013-11-07

    Except for the most organized mature hepatocytes, liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) can differentiate into many other types of cells in the liver including cholangiocytes. In addition, LSPCs are demonstrated to be able to give birth to other kinds of extra-hepatic cell types such as insulin-producing cells. Even more, under some bad conditions, these LSPCs could generate liver cancer stem like cells (LCSCs) through malignant transformation. In this review, we mainly concentrate on the molecular mechanisms for controlling cell fates of LSPCs, especially differentiation of cholangiocytes, insulin-producing cells and LCSCs. First of all, to certificate the cell fates of LSPCs, the following three features need to be taken into account to perform accurate phenotyping: (1) morphological properties; (2) specific markers; and (3) functional assessment including in vivo transplantation. Secondly, to promote LSPCs differentiation, systematical attention should be paid to inductive materials (such as growth factors and chemical stimulators), progressive materials including intracellular and extracellular signaling pathways, and implementary materials (such as liver enriched transcriptive factors). Accordingly, some recommendations were proposed to standardize, optimize, and enrich the effective production of cholangiocyte-like cells out of LSPCs. At the end, the potential regulating mechanisms for generation of cholangiocytes by LSPCs were carefully analyzed. The differentiation of LSPCs is a gradually progressing process, which consists of three main steps: initiation, progression and accomplishment. It's the unbalanced distribution of affecting materials in each step decides the cell fates of LSPCs.

  7. An attempt to eliminate fibroblast-like cells from primary cultures of fetal human livers.

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    Tokiwa,Takayoshi

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available The elimination of fibroblast-like cells from primary cultures of fetal human livers was studied. A fibroblast-like cell line (HuF, which was obtained by subculturing fetal human liver cells 4 or more times, was briefly treated with hydrocortisone (HC or putrescine (PUT. The growth of HuF cells was inhibited by HC at a concentration of 10(-2 M and by PUT at a concentration higher than 10(-3 M. Long-term treatment of HuF cells with 10(-3 M HC inhibited the growth of the cells. Primary cultures of fetal human livers were made in medium containing HC or PUT, and morphological and functional examinations were made. The cultures were predominantly composed of epithelial-like cells, with few fibroblast-like cells, when the HC concentration was 10(-5M to 10(-3 M. A high amount of albumin was secreted at these concentrations of HC. On the other hand, at 10(-3 M PUT, many epithelial-like cells were seen, but albumin was undetectable. The present results indicate that albumin-producing epithelial-like cells can be selectively maintained in medium containing HC, in primary cultures of fetal human livers.

  8. Chlamydia pneumoniae replicates in Kupffer cells in mouse model of liver infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonella Marangoni; Manuela Donati; Francesca Cavrini; Rita Aldini; Silvia Accardo; Vittorio Sambri; Marco Montagnani; Roberto Cevenini

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop an animal model of liver infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae (C.pneumoniae) in intraperitoneally infected mice for studying the presence of chlamydiae in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes.METHODS: A total of 80 BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with C. pneumoniae and sacrificed at various time points after infection. Chlamydiae were looked for in liver homogenates as well as in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes separated by liver perfusion with collagenase. C. pneumoniae was detected by both isolation in LLC-MK2 cells and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The releasing of TNFA-α by C. pneumoniae in vitro stimulated Kupffer cells was studied by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS: C. pneumoniae isolation from liver homogenates reached a plateau on d 7 after infection when 6 of 10 animals were positive, then decreased, and became negative by d 20. C. pneumoniae isolation from separated Kupffer cells reached a plateau on d 7 when 5 of 10 animals were positive, and became negative by d 20.The detection of C. pneumoniae in separated Kupffer cells by FISH, confirmed the results obtained by culture.Isolated hepatocytes were always negative. Stimulation of Kupffer cells by alive C. pneumoniae elicited high TNF-α levels.CONCLUSION: A productive infection by C. pneumoniae may take place in Kupffer cells and C. pneumoniae induces a local pro-inflammatory activity. C. pneumoniae is therefore, able to act as antigenic stimulus when localized in the liver. One could speculate that C. pneumoniae infection, involving cells of the innate immunity such as Kupffer cells, could also trigger pathological immune reactions involving the liver, as observed in human patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

  9. Th2-Associated Alternative Kupffer Cell Activation Promotes Liver Fibrosis without Inducing Local Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Navarrete, Giuliana; Ramos-Martínez, Espiridión; Suárez-Álvarez, Karina; Aguirre-García, Jesús; Ledezma-Soto, Yadira; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Gudiño-Zayas, Marco; Guzmán, Carolina; Gutiérrez-Reyes, Gabriela; Hernández-Ruíz, Joselín; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Robles-Díaz, Guillermo; Kershenobich, David; Terrazas, Luis I.; Escobedo, Galileo

    2011-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the final outcome of liver fibrosis. Kupffer cell-mediated hepatic inflammation is considered to aggravate liver injury and fibrosis. Alternatively-activated macrophages are able to control chronic inflammatory events and trigger wound healing processes. Nevertheless, the role of alternative Kupffer cell activation in liver harm is largely unclear. Thus, we evaluated the participation of alternatively-activated Kupffer cells during liver inflammation and fibrosis in the murine model of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage. To stimulate alternative activation in Kupffer cells, 20 Taenia crassiceps (Tc) larvae were inoculated into BALBc/AnN female mice. Six weeks post-inoculation, carbon tetrachloride or olive oil were orally administered to Tc-inoculated and non-inoculated mice twice per week during other six weeks. The initial exposure of animals to T. crassiceps resulted in high serum concentrations of IL-4 accompanied by a significant increase in the hepatic mRNA levels of Ym-1, with no alteration in iNOS expression. In response to carbon tetrachloride, recruitment of inflammatory cell populations into the hepatic parenchyma was 5-fold higher in non-inoculated animals than Tc-inoculated mice. In contrast, carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis was significantly less in non-inoculated animals than in the Tc-inoculated group. The latter showed elevated IL-4 serum levels and low IFN-γ concentrations during the whole experiment, associated with hepatic expression of IL-4, TGF-β, desmin and α-sma, as well as increased mRNA levels of Arg-1, Ym-1, FIZZ-1 and MMR in Kupffer cells. These results suggest that alternative Kupffer cell activation is favored in a Th2 microenvironment, whereby such liver resident macrophages could exhibit a dichotomic role during chronic hepatic damage, being involved in attenuation of the inflammatory response but at the same time exacerbation of liver fibrosis. PMID:22110380

  10. Th2-Associated Alternative Kupffer Cell Activation Promotes Liver Fibrosis without Inducing Local Inflammation

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    Giuliana López-Navarrete, Espiridión Ramos-Martínez, Karina Suárez-Álvarez, Jesús Aguirre-García, Yadira Ledezma-Soto, Sonia León-Cabrera, Marco Gudiño-Zayas, Carolina Guzmán, Gabriela Gutiérrez-Reyes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis is the final outcome of liver fibrosis. Kupffer cell-mediated hepatic inflammation is considered to aggravate liver injury and fibrosis. Alternatively-activated macrophages are able to control chronic inflammatory events and trigger wound healing processes. Nevertheless, the role of alternative Kupffer cell activation in liver harm is largely unclear. Thus, we evaluated the participation of alternatively-activated Kupffer cells during liver inflammation and fibrosis in the murine model of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage. To stimulate alternative activation in Kupffer cells, 20 Taenia crassiceps (Tc larvae were inoculated into BALBc/AnN female mice. Six weeks post-inoculation, carbon tetrachloride or olive oil were orally administered to Tc-inoculated and non-inoculated mice twice per week during other six weeks. The initial exposure of animals to T. crassiceps resulted in high serum concentrations of IL-4 accompanied by a significant increase in the hepatic mRNA levels of Ym-1, with no alteration in iNOS expression. In response to carbon tetrachloride, recruitment of inflammatory cell populations into the hepatic parenchyma was 5-fold higher in non-inoculated animals than Tc-inoculated mice. In contrast, carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis was significantly less in non-inoculated animals than in the Tc-inoculated group. The latter showed elevated IL-4 serum levels and low IFN-γ concentrations during the whole experiment, associated with hepatic expression of IL-4, TGF-β, desmin and α-sma, as well as increased mRNA levels of Arg-1, Ym-1, FIZZ-1 and MMR in Kupffer cells. These results suggest that alternative Kupffer cell activation is favored in a Th2 microenvironment, whereby such liver resident macrophages could exhibit a dichotomic role during chronic hepatic damage, being involved in attenuation of the inflammatory response but at the same time exacerbation of liver fibrosis.

  11. MR tracking of SPIO-labeled mesenchymal stem cells in rats with liver fibrosis could not monitor the cells accurately.

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    Zhou, Bin; Li, Dan; Qian, Jiesheng; Li, Zhengran; Pang, Pengfei; Shan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is effective in tracking superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in rats with liver fibrosis. SPIO-labeling-induced signal reduction on MR images was completely reversed within 15 days after transplantation. It is still unclear whether the signal changes in MR imaging could reflect the number of transplanted cells in the liver. In the present study, BMSCs of male rats were doubly labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and SPIO and injected intravascularly into female rats with liver fibrosis. At different time points after injection, MR imaging was performed. The distribution of SPIO particles and EGFP-positive cells was determined by Prussian blue staining and EGFP immunohistochemistry, respectively. The distribution of transplanted BMSCs in various organs was assessed by detection of the SRY gene using real-time quantitative PCR. At 15 days post transplantation, the numbers of transplanted cells were significantly decreased in the lung, kidney, spleen and muscle, but not liver and heart, in comparison with those at 7 days after transplantation. EGFP staining-positive cells were observed in the liver intralobular parenchyma, while Prussian blue staining was negative at 42 days after transplantation. Taken together, SPIO particles and EGFP-labeled BMSCs show a different tissue distribution pattern in rats with liver fibrosis after a long-term period of monitoring. SPIO-based MR imaging may not be suitable for long-term tracking of transplanted BMSCs in vivo.

  12. The ileum as a determinant organ of the functional liver cell mass in rats

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    Aldo Cunha Medeiros

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate if the ileum resection changes the functioning liver cell mass, the hepatic metabolism and the biodistribution of radiopharmaceutical in rats. METHODS: Twelve Wistar rats weighing 285g±34g were randomly divided into the ileum resection group (n = 6 and sham group rats (n = 6. After 30 days, they were anesthetized and 0.1mL of 99m-Tc-phytate (0.66MBq was injected via femoral vein. After 30 minutes, blood samples were collected for red blood cells radioactive labeling and serum ALT, AST and gammaGT. Liver samples were used for 99m-Tc-phytate percentage of radioactivity/gram of tissue and histopathology. Student 's t test was used with significance 0.05. RESULTS: There was a higher uptake of 99m-Tc-phytate in the liver of sham rats, compared to the ileum resection group (p<0.05. GammaGT, ALT and AST were increased in ileum resection rats compared to sham (p<0.05. The he patocytes count was significantly lower in ileum resection group than in sham (p<0.05. Liver: body mass ratio was lower in experimental animals than in sham group (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: These data support that the ileum has important role in liver function and liver mass regulation, and they have potential clinical implications regarding the pathogenesis of liver injury following lower bowel resection.

  13. Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Hepatectomy for Primary Clear Cell Hepatocellular Carcinoma of the Liver

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    Kazutoshi Kida

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of primary clear cell hepatocellular carcinoma of the liver (PCCCL for which we performed hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatectomy. A 71-year-old female with hepatitis C infection and diabetes mellitus was admitted to our department for a hepatic tumor with gallstone. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor 25 mm in diameter on the surface in segment 5 of the liver. The imaging results suggested small hepatocellular carcinoma located on the surface in segment 5 of the liver, and we performed laparoscopic surgery aiming at a minimally invasive procedure. We performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatectomy. Histopathological findings showed moderately differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma, and as the proportion of clear cells was 75%, the tumor was diagnosed as PCCCL. This is the first report of hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatectomy for PCCCL. Laparoscopic hepatectomy is a useful minimally invasive surgical procedure when the tumor is located on the surface of the liver.

  14. Liver cell transplantation for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I: Update a and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe A Lysy; Mustapha Najimi; Xavier Stephenne; Annick Bourgois; Francoise Smets; Etienne M Sokal

    2008-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation is an attractive technique to treat liver-based inborn errors of metabolism. The feasibility and efficacy of the procedure has been demonstrated, leading to medium term partial metabolic control of various diseases. CriglerNajjar is the paradigm of such diseases in that the host liver is lacking one function with an otherwise normal parenchyma. The patient is at permanent risk for irreversible brain damage. The goal of liver cell transplantation is to reduce serum bilirubin levels within safe limits and to alleviate phototherapy requirements to improve quality of life. Preliminary data on Gunn rats, the rodent model of the disease, were encouraging and have led to successful clinical trials. Herein we report on two additional patients and describe the current limits of the technique in terms of durability of the response as compared to alternative therapeutic procedures. We discuss the future developments of the technique and new emerging perspectives.

  15. Cancer Stem Cells in Primary Liver Cancers: Pathological Concepts and Imaging Findings

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    Joo, Ijin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haeryoung [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    There is accumulating evidence that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play an integral role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis and the maintaining of tumor growth. Liver CSCs derived from hepatic stem/progenitor cells have the potential to differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. Primary liver cancers originating from CSCs constitute a heterogeneous histopathologic spectrum, including hepatocellular carcinoma, combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with various radiologic manifestations. In this article, we reviewed the recent concepts of CSCs in the development of primary liver cancers, focusing on their pathological and radiological findings. Awareness of the pathological concepts and imaging findings of primary liver cancers with features of CSCs is critical for accurate diagnosis, prediction of outcome, and appropriate treatment options for patients.

  16. Intravenous administration of glutathione protects parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells against reperfusion injury following rat liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rolf J. Schauer; Sinan Kalmuk; Alexander L. Gerbes; Rosemarie Leiderer; Herbert Meissner; Friedrich W. Schildberg; Konrad Messmer; Manfred Bilzer

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of intravenous administration of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) on reperfusion injury following liver transplantation.METHODS: Livers of male Lewis rats were transplantedafter 24 h of hypothermic preservation in University of Wisconsin solution in a syngeneic setting. During a 2-h reperfusion period either saline (controls, n=8) or GSH administered via the jugular vein.RESULTS: Two hours after starting reperfusion plasma ALT increased to 1 457±281 U/L (mean±SE) in controls but to only 908±187 U/L (P<0.05) in animals treated with morphological findings on electron microscopy: GSH treatment prevented detachment of sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs) as well as loss of microvilli and mitochondrial swelling of hepatooytes. Accordingly, postischemic bile flow increased 2-fold. Intravital fluorescence microscopy revealed a nearly complete restoration of sinusoidal blood flow and a significant reduction of leukocyte adherence to sinusoids and postsinusoidal venules. Following infusion of 50 μmol and and 97±18 mol/L, but to only 20±3 mol/L in untreated recipients. Furthermore, plasma glutathione disulfide (GSSG) increased untreated controls (1.8±0.5 mol/L vs 2.2±0.2 mol/L).CONCLUSION: Plasma GSH levels above a critical level may act as a "sink" for ROS produced in the hepatic vasculature during reperfusion of liver grafts. Therefore, GSH can be considered a candidate antioxidant for the prevention of reperfusion injury after liver transplantation, in particular since it has a low toxicity in humans.

  17. Advances in mesenchymal stem cells combined with traditional Chinese medicine therapy for liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Dong; Shi-bing Su

    2014-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a primary cause of liver cirrhosis, and even hepatocarcinoma. Recently, the usage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been investigated to improve liver ifbrosis. It has been reported that the differentiation, proliferation and migration of MSCs can be regulated by traditional Chinese medicine treatment;however, the mechanisms are still unclear. In this article, the authors review the characteristics of MSCs such as multidirectional differentiation and homing, and its application in animal experiments and clinical trials. The authors also list areas that need further investigation, and look at the future prospects of clinical application of MSCs.

  18. Follicular helper T cells promote liver pathology in mice during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

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    Xiaojun Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Following Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum infection, granulomatous responses are induced by parasite eggs trapped in host organs, particular in the liver, during the acute stage of disease. While excessive liver granulomatous responses can lead to more severe fibrosis and circulatory impairment in chronically infected host. However, the exact mechanism of hepatic granuloma formation has remained obscure. In this study, we for the first time showed that follicular helper T (Tfh cells are recruited to the liver to upregulate hepatic granuloma formation and liver injury in S. japonicum-infected mice, and identified a novel function of macrophages in Tfh cell induction. In addition, our results showed that the generation of Tfh cells driven by macrophages is dependent on cell-cell contact and the level of inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL on macrophages which is regulated by CD40-CD40L signaling. Our findings uncovered a previously unappreciated role for Tfh cells in liver pathology caused by S. japonicum infection in mice.

  19. Ulinastatin reduces the resistance of liver cancer cells to epirubicin by inhibiting autophagy.

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    Bin Song

    Full Text Available During chemotherapy, drug resistance caused by autophagy remains a major challenge to successful treatment of cancer patients. The purpose of this study is to show that ulinastatin (UTI, a trypsin inhibitor, could reduce the resistance of liver cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agent epirubicin (EPI. We achieved this conclusion by analyzing the effect of EPI alone or UTI plus EPI on SMMC-7721 and MHCC-LM3 liver cancer cells. We also generated an EPI-resistant liver cancer cell line (MHCC-LM3er cells, and found that UTI could sensitize the LM3er cells to EPI. Autophagy usually functions to protect cancer cells during chemotherapy. Our study showed that UTI inhibited the autophagy induced by EPI in liver cancer cells, which promoted apoptosis, and therefore, reduced the resistance of the cancer cells to EPI. Further studies showed that the UTI-mediated inhibition on autophagy was achieved by inhibiting transcriptional factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB signaling pathway. To verify our results in vivo, we injected MHCC-LM3 liver cancer cells or EPI-resistant LM3er cells into mice, and found that EPI could only effectively inhibit the growth of tumor in MHCC-LM3 cell-injected mice, but not in LM3er cell-injected mice. However, when UTI was also administered, the growth of tumor was inhibited in the MHCC-LM3er cell-injected mice as well. Our results suggest that UTI may be used in combination with anti-cancer drugs, such as EPI, to improve the outcome of cancer therapy.

  20. Stem cells for liver tissue repair:Current knowledge and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells from extra- or intrahepatic sources have been recently characterized and their usefulness for the generation of hepatocyte-like lineages has been demonstrated.Therefore,they are being increasingly considered for future applications in liver cell therapy.In that field,liver cell transplantation is currently regarded as a possible alternative to whole organ transplantation,while stem cells possess theoretical advantages on hepatocytes as they display higher in vitro culture performances and could be used in autologous transplant procedures.However,the current research on the hepatic fate of stem cells is still facing difficulties to demonstrate the acquisition of a full mature hepatocyte phenotype,both in vitro and in vivo.Furthermore,the lack of obvious demonstration of in vivo hepatocyte-like cell functionality remains associated to low repopulation rates obtained after current transplantation procedures.The present review focuses on the current knowledge of the stern cell potential for liver therapy.We discuss the characteristics of the principal cell candidates and the methods to demonstrate their hepatic potential in vitro and in vivo.We finally address the question of the future clinical applications of stem cells for liver tissue repair and the technical aspects that remain to be investigated.

  1. Infusion of donor spleen cells and rejection in liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scornik, J C; Lauwers, G Y; Reed, A I; Howard, R J; Dickson, R C; Rosen, C B

    2000-02-01

    Intact or inactivated donor lymphoid cells have been found to downregulate the alloimmune response in a number of experimental models. We conducted a randomized, prospective, double blind, and placebo-controlled trial to determine whether heat-treated donor spleen cells would affect early rejection after liver transplantation. Donor spleen was obtained during organ procurement for 40 patients undergoing liver transplantation. All patients were treated with cyclosporine, azathioprine and steroids. The patients were randomized after surgery to receive either heat-treated (45 degrees C for 1 h) spleen cells or placebo. Patients underwent protocol biopsies at 1 wk, 4 and 12 months, or as needed. Biopsies were reviewed in a blind fashion and scored according to the Banff consensus criteria. Randomization resulted in 19 patients in the spleen cell group and 21 in the placebo group. One-yr graft survival was 94 and 100%, respectively. Early rejection was more frequent in the spleen cell group (61 vs. 35%, p, not significant). The histopathological rejection activity index at 7 d was also higher for the patients in the spleen cell group: 39% of spleen cell treated patients had a score of 4 or higher as opposed to 5% in the placebo group (p spleen cell group versus 1.3 + 1.7 for the placebo group (p = 0.034). It is concluded that heat-treated donor spleen cells given within 24 h after liver transplantation were not clinically beneficial and increased the intensity of rejection in 7-d protocol liver biopsies.

  2. Immunohistochemical Analysis of the Stem Cell Marker LGR5 in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zahida; Orr, Anne; Michalopoulos, George K; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan

    2017-01-01

    Aims In regenerating liver, hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are recruited in response to injury; however, few highly specific human HPC markers exist for the hepatocyte lineage. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), a Wnt-associated stem cell marker, has been extensively studied in intestinal stem cells, but little is known about its expression in human liver. We hypothesized that LGR5+ HPCs are induced in the regenerative response to pediatric liver injury. Methods and results Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize LGR5 expression in pediatric liver explants (n = 36). We found cytoplasmic LGR5 expression in all cases; although, much less was observed in acute hepatic necrosis compared to chronic liver diseases. In the latter cases, >50% of hepatocytes were LGR5+, signifying a robust regenerative response mainly in the periphery of regenerative nodules. Only weak LGR5 staining was noted in bile ducts, suggesting hepatocyte-specific expression at the interface. Conclusions Although we observed some degree of regenerative response in all cases, LGR5 was highly expressed in chronic liver disease, possibly due to alternate regeneration and reprogramming pathways. LGR5 is predominant in peri-septal hepatocytes rather than epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive ductular reactions in chronic pediatric liver diseases and may represent a transitional HPC phenotype for the hepatocyte lineage. These studies are the first to support a unique role for LGR5 in human hepatocyte regeneration and as a potential predictive biomarker for recovery of liver function in children. Future work will also investigate the molecular mechanisms behind LGR5 expression.

  3. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson CY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Christa Y Watson, Ramon M Molina, Andressa Louzada, Kimberly M Murdaugh, Thomas C Donaghey, Joseph D BrainCenter for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Molecular and Integrative Physiological Sciences Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USABackground: Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV administration.Materials and methods: First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively.Results: We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, reflecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of

  4. GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Aghayan, Hamid-Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy seems a promising avenue in regenerative medicine. Within various stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells have progressively used for cellular therapy. Because of the age-related decreasing in the frequency and differentiating capacity of adult MSCs, fetal tissues such as fetal liver, lung, pancreas, spleen, etc. have been introduced as an alternative source of MSCs for cellular therapy. On the other hand, using stem cells as advanced therapy medicinal products, must be performed in compliance with cGMP as a quality assurance system to ensure the safety, quality, and identity of cell products during translation from the basic stem cell sciences into clinical cell transplantation. In this chapter the authors have demonstrated the manufacturing of GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  5. Ultrastructural characteristics of novel epithelial cell types identified in human pathologic liver specimens with chronic ductular reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    De Vos, R; Desmet, V

    1992-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies on human liver biopsies with chronic ductular reaction revealed the presence of "small cells" with bile-duct type cytokeratin profile in the periportal area. This study identified similar cells by electron microscopy. The authors studied 13 human liver specimens with various liver diseases, but all characterized by chronic ductular reaction. In all specimens, variable numbers of "small cells" with common epithelial characteristics were identified in the pe...

  6. Therapy with bone marrow cells reduces liver alterations in mice chronically infected by Schistosoma mansoni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheilla Andrade Oliveira; Bruno Solano Freitas Souza; Cada Adriana Guimar(a)es-Ferreira; Elton Sá Barreto; Siane Campos Souza; Luiz Antonio Rodrigues Freitas; Ricardo Ribeiro-dos-Santos; Milena Botelho Pereira Soares

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MCs) in the regeneration of hepatic lesions induced by Schistosoma mansoni (S.mansoni) chronic infection.METHODS: Female mice chronically infected with S.mansoni were treated with BM-MCs obtained from male green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice by intravenous or intralobular injections. Control mice received injections of saline in similar conditions. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for GFP DNA, immunofluorescence and morphometric studies were performed.RESULTS: Transplanted GFP+ cells migrated to granuloma areas and reduced the percentage of liver fibrosis. The presence of donor-derived cells was confirmed by Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for detection of cells bearing Y chromosome and by PCR analysis for detection of GFP DNA. The levels of TGF-β, a cytokine associated with fibrosis deposition, in liver fragments of mice submitted to therapy were reduced. The number of oval cells in liver sections of S.rnansoni-infected mice increased 3-4 fold after transplantation. A partial recovery in albumin expression, which is decreased upon infection with S.mansoni, was found in livers of infected mice after cellular therapy.CONCLUSION: In conclusion, transplanted BMCs migrate to and reduce the damage of chronic fibrotic liver lesions caused by S.mansoni.

  7. Effect of matrine on Kupffer cell activation in cold ischemia reperfusion injury of rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Hua Zhu; Yu-Dong Qiu; Hao Shen; Ming-Ke Shi; Yi-Tao Ding

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of matrine on activation of Kupffer cell during cold ischemia and reperfusion injury in rat orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT).METHODS: 168 syngeneic SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: untreated group, small-dose treated group, large-dose treated group and sham operation group. After 5 hours of preservation in Ringer's (LR) solution, orthotopic implantation of the donor liver was performed. At 1 h, 2 h, 4 h and 24 h after reperfusion of the portal vein, 6 rats were killed in each group to collect the serum and the liver for assay and pathology.RESULTS: Matrine markedly inhibited the activation of Kupffer cells and their release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). TNF cytotoxicity level at 2 h decreased significantly by matrine treatment (7.94±0.42, 2.39±0.19 and 2.01±0.13 U/ml,respectively; P<0.01), so did the other three time points. The level of hylluronic acid (HA) and alanine transaminase (ALT) decreased significantly in both treated groups, and matrine treatment markedly ameliorated focal necrosis of hepatocytes, inflammatory cells aggregating, rounding and detachment of sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC). And no significant difference was observed between the treated groups.CONCLUSION: Matrine can inhibit the activation of Kupffer cell and prevent the donor liver from cold preservation and reperfusion injury in rat orthotopic liver transplantation.

  8. Isolation of Human Fetal Liver Progenitors and Their Enhanced Proliferation by Three-Dimensional Coculture with Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Anming; Austin, Timothy W.; Lagasse, Eric; Uchida, Nobuko; Tamaki, Stanley; Bordier, Bruno B.; Weissman, Irving L.; Glenn, Jeffrey S.; Millan, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells, characterized by the coexpression of biliary and hepatocyte lineage markers and the ability to form colonies in culture, were isolated by flow cytometry from primary human fetal livers. These prospectively isolated liver progenitor cells supported hepatitis D virus infection, expressed, and produced albumin and α-fetoprotein, as tracked by albumin-and α-fetoprotein–driven lentiviral promoter reporter constructs and measured by ELISA, respectively. Coculture in three-dimensional (3D) fibrin gel with endothelial cells resulted in the formation of vascular structures by the endothelial cells and increased proliferation of liver progenitors. The enhanced proliferation of liver progenitors that was observed when liver progenitors and endothelial cells were cultured in direct contact was not achieved when liver progenitors and endothelial cells were cultured on adjacent but separate matrices and when they were cultured across transwell membranes. In conclusion, coculture of liver progenitors and endothelial cells in three-dimensional matrix resulted in enhanced liver progenitor proliferation and function. This coculture methodology offers a novel coculture system that could be applied for the development of engineered liver tissues. PMID:19230124

  9. MiR-525-3p enhances the migration and invasion of liver cancer cells by downregulating ZNF395.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Pang

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is one of leading causes of cancer-related deaths. A deeper mechanistic understanding of liver cancer could lead to the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. In our previous work, we screened 646 miRNAs and identified 11 that regulate liver cancer cell migration. The current study shows that miR-525-3p is frequently up-regulated in liver cancer tissues, and enhanced expression of miR-525-3p can promote liver cancer cell migration and invasion. Zinc finger protein 395 (ZNF395 is the direct functional target gene for miR-525-3p, and it is frequently down-regulated in liver cancer tissues. High expression of ZNF395 can significantly inhibit while knockdown of ZNF395 expression can markedly enhance the migration and invasion of liver cancer cells, suggesting that ZNF395 suppresses metastasis in liver cancer. Down-regulation of ZNF395 can mediate miR-525-3p induced liver cancer cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, miR-525-3p promotes liver cancer cell migration and invasion by directly targeting ZNF395, and the fact that miR-525-3p and ZNF395 both play important roles in liver cancer progression makes them potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Transdifferentiation of Fetal Liver-delivered Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Cardiomyocyte-like Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Jing; Cheng Jian-bin; Jia Feng-peng; Lei Han

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To explore the possibility to induce mesenchymal stem cells from human fetal livers (FMSCs) to differentiate along cardiac lineage and the way to obtain high rate of differentiation. Methods Cells from passage 6-9 were plated at the density of 1.5 × 104/cm2 and were treated with the combination of 5-azacytine(5-aza), retinoitic acid(RA) and Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in different doses when near confluence. 24 hours later, the treatment was removed by changing into normal medium without inducers. Different culture conditions were tried, including temperature, oxygen content and medium. Results When FMSCs were treated with highdose combination ( 5-aza 50 μM +RA 10-1 μM +DMSO 1%) and modified combination(5-aza 50 μM+RA 10-3 μM + DMSO 0.8 %) in cardiac differentiation medium (CDM), at 37℃ and 20% O2, the cardiac differentiation was induced. When near confluence, cells became round and tended to gather together to form ball-like structures. 3 weeks after treatment, the cells were harvested and stained with anti-desmin and cardiac troponin I antibodies, and about 40% of the cells were positively stained. No beating cells observed during observation. Conclusions FMSCs have the potential to differentiate along cardiac lineage, and the stimulus for the cardiac differentiation is different from those for MSCs from different species.

  11. Biochemical and Cytological Aspects of Liver Cell Function During Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    liver (Pekarek et al., 1972a), iron into ferritin (Konijn and Hershko, 1977), and zinc, at least in part, into metallothioneins (Sobocinski et al., 1978...corre- sponds to the same point in time as the change in the concentration of the acute- phase serum proteins. This suggests that the accelerated rate of... serum protein concentration . The isotopic label- ing of the albumin fraction, on the other hand, decreases by 50% (Williams et .- . ... ... 115 r 22

  12. Establishment and identification of induced pluripotent stem cells in liver cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Ming Zhang; Jian-Jun Li; Peng Yan; Jian-Ting Hu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To induce pluripotent stem (IPS) cells from fibrocytes that are separated from liver cancer patients. Methods: The fibrocytes were reprogrammed to IPS cells by lentiviral vector, stained and identified by immunohistochemistry. Results: The IPS cells were successfully established from fibrocytes after infection, and IPS cell clones formed in round shape under a microscopy. The induction rate was 0.013%±0.007%. No tumor formed at the back of nude mice within 8 weeks after the inoculation of cell clones. However, tetatoma appeared in nude mice within 1 week after IPS inoculation. A few tumors formed in nude mice within 4 weeks after the inoculation of cell clones. However, subcutaneous tumors formed within 1 week after IPS inoculation. The induced IPS cells showed three germ layers in tetatoma. Nanog and OCT4 in the induced IPS cells showed hypomethylation. SSEA-A, TRA-1-6-, TRA-1-81 and Nanog were highly expressed in the induced IPS cells, indicating the IPS cells possessed the similar ability as the stem cells. Conclusion: The IPS cells of liver cancer patients can be established effectively from fibrocytes and can be cultured stably in vitro, which provides an approach for the treatment of intermediate or advanced stage liver cancer.

  13. Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway in primary liver cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Yi Guo; Pei Liu; Ying Wen; Wei Cui; Ying Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate clinical significance ofSonicHedgehog(SHH) signaling pathway molecularShh,Smo andGli2 in primary hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) tissue.Methods:A total of30HCC tissue samples were collected.Protein expression ofSHH signaling pathway moleculesShh,Smo andGli2 inHCC tissues and para - carcinoma tissue were detected by using immunohistochemical method.Cirrhosis and normal liver tissue specimens were observed as control to analyze the expression ofSHH signaling pathway molecularShh,Smo andGli2 mRNA inHCC tissues and corresponding para-carcinoma tissues and its relationship with the onset of HCC.Results:There was no expression ofShh,Smo andGli2 protein in normal liver tissue, while their positive rates were63.3%,76.7% and66.7% inHCC tissues, respectively, with asignificantly higher expression level than that in the para - carcinoma tissue(P0.05);Shh andSmo protein was detected in part of cirrhosis with positive expression, butGli2 protein was not observable in cirrhosis tissues.Conclusions:InHCC tissues, the high expression level ofSHH signaling pathway molecules signal peptide(Shh), membrane protein receiptor(Smo) and nuclear transcription molecular(Gli2) can be indicators of the onset of liver cancer.

  14. Liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-04-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review provides an overview of the models of study currently used in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus is placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration, including small-for-size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting-edge topics in liver regeneration, including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a 3-dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation, are proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration.

  15. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  16. Hepatic stellate cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 exacerbates liver fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Hong, Wenxuan; Hao, Chenzhi; Li, Luyang; Xu, Huihui; Li, Ping; Xu, Yong

    2017-09-14

    Liver fibrosis is widely perceived as a host defense mechanism that aids tissue repair following liver injury. Excessive fibrogenesis, however, serves to disrupts normal liver structure and precedes such irrevocable human pathologies as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a hallmark event during liver fibrosis. In the present study we investigated the mechanism by which the lysine deacetylase SIRT1 regulates HSC activation. We report here that SIRT1 levels were decreased in the liver in different mouse models and in cultured HSCs undergoing activation. SIRT1 down-regulation paralleled HDAC4 up-regulation. HDAC4 was recruited to the SIRT1 promoter during HSC activation and removed acetylated histones H3 and H4 from the SIRT1 promoter leading to SIRT1 trans‑repression. HDAC4 silencing restored SIRT1 expression and attenuated HSC activation in SIRT1-dependent manner. More important, selective deletion of SIRT1 in HSCs exacerbated CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice. Mechanistically, SIRT1 deacetylated PPARγ to block HSC activation. Together, our data reveal an HDAC4-SIRT1-PPARγ axis that contributes to the regulation of HSC activation and liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Susceptibility to T cell-mediated liver injury is enhanced in asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Casey, Carol A; Osna, Natalia A; Tuma, Dean J

    2013-05-01

    T cell activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine production is a pathological feature of inflammatory liver disease. It is also known that liver injury is associated with marked impairments in the function of many hepatic proteins including a hepatocyte-specific binding protein, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Recently, it has been suggested that hepatic ASGPRs may play an important role in the physiological regulation of T lymphocytes, leading to our hypothesis that ASGPR defects correlate with inflammatory-mediated events in liver diseases. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether changes in hepatocellular ASGPR expression were related to the dysregulation of intrahepatic T lymphocytes and correlate with the development of T-cell mediated hepatitis. Mice lacking functional ASGPRs (receptor-deficient, RD), and wild-type (WT) controls were intravenously injected with T-cell mitogens, Concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 antibody. As a result of T cell mitogen treatment, RD mice lacking hepatic ASGPRs displayed enhancements in liver pathology, transaminase activities, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and caspase activation compared to that observed in normal WT mice. Furthermore, FACS analysis demonstrated that T-cell mitogen administration resulted in a significant rise in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes present in the livers of RD animals versus WT mice. Since these two mouse strains differ only in whether they express the hepatic ASGPR, it can be concluded that proper ASGPR function exerts a protective effect against T cell mediated hepatitis and that impairments to this hepatic receptor could be related to the accumulation of cytotoxic T cells that are observed in inflammatory liver diseases.

  18. Dietary administration of Nexrutine inhibits rat liver tumorigenesis and induces apoptotic cell death in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggested that plant-based dietary supplements can reduce the risk of liver cancer. Nexrutine (NX, an herbal extract from Phellodendronamurense, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activities. In the present study, we have shown the anti-tumor potential of NX against Solt-Farber model with elimination of PH, rat liver tumor induced by diethylnitrosoamine (DEN as carcinogen and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF as co-carcinogen. The elucidation of mechanistic pathways was explored in human liver cancer cells. Dietary intake of NX significantly decreased the cell proliferation and inflammation, as well as increased apoptosis in the liver sections of DEN/2-AAF-treated rats. Moreover, NX (2.5–10 μg/ml exposure significantly decreased the viability of liver cancer cells and modulated the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins levels. NX treatment resulted in increased cytochrome-c release and cleavage of caspases 3 and 9. In addition, NX decreased the expression of CDK2, CDK4 and associated cyclins E1 and D1, while up-regulated the expression of p21, p27 and p53 expression. NX also enhanced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs ERK1/2, p38 and JNK1/2. Collectively, these findings suggested that NX-mediated protection against DEN/2-AAF-induced liver tumorigenesis involves decrease in cell proliferation and enhancement in apoptotic cell death of liver cancer cells.

  19. Hepatic progenitor cells in human liver cirrhosis:Immunohistochemical,electron microscopic and immunofluorencence confocal microscopic findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Cheng Xiao; Xiao-Long Jin; Peter Ruck; Anne Adam; Edwin Kaiserling

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether hepatic progenitor cells (HPC),that reveal the features of oval cells in rodents and small epithelial cells (SEC) in certain human liver disease, were also found in human liver cirrhosis (HLC).METHODS: Surgical liver specimens from 20 cases of hepatitis B virus-positive HLC (15 cases containing hepatocellular carcinoma) were investigated by light microscopic immunohistochemistry (LM-IHC). Among them specimens from 15 cases were investigated by electron microscopy (EM)and those from 5 cases by immunofluorencence confocal laser scanning microscopy (ICLSM). Antibodies against cytokeratin 7 and albumin were used and single and/or double labelling were performed respectively.RESULTS: LM-IHC showed that at the margins of regenerating nodules and in the fibrous septae, a small number of cells in the proliferating bile ductules were positive for CK7 and albumin. At the EM level these HPC were morphologically similar to the SEC described previously, and also similar to the oval cells seen in experimental hepatocarcinogenesis.They were characterized by their small size, oval shape, a high nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, a low organelle content in cytoplasm, and existence of tonofilaments and intercellular junctions. ICLSM revealed that HPC expressed both cytokeratin 7 and albumin.CONCLUSION: HPC with ultrastructural and immunophenotypical features of oval cells, i.e., hepatic stem cell-like cells as noted in other liver diseases, were found in HLC. These findings further support the hypothesis that bipotent hepatic stem cells, that may give rise to biliary epithelial cells and hepatocytes, exist in human livers.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA3 on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA3 may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Anticarcinogenic effects of glycoalkaloids from potatoes against human cervical, liver, lymphoma, and stomach cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel; Lee, Kap-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Kozukue, Nobuyuke

    2005-07-27

    Methods were devised for the isolation of large amounts of pure alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine from Dejima potatoes and for the extraction and analysis of total glycoalkaloids from five fresh potato varieties (Dejima, Jowon, Sumi, Toya, and Vora Valley). These compounds were then evaluated in experiments using a tetrazolium microculture (MTT) assay to assess the anticarcinogenic effects of (a) the isolated pure glycoalkaloids separately, (b) artificial mixtures of the two glycoalkaloids, and (c) the total glycoalkaloids isolated from each of the five potato varieties. All samples tested reduced the numbers of the following human cell lines: cervical (HeLa), liver (HepG2), lymphoma (U937), stomach (AGS and KATO III) cancer cells and normal liver (Chang) cells. The results show that (a) the effects of the glycoalkaloids were concentration dependent in the range of 0.1-10 mug/mL (0.117-11.7 nmol/mL); (b) alpha-chaconine was more active than was alpha-solanine; (c) some mixtures exhibited synergistic effects, whereas other produced additive ones; (d) the different cancer cells varied in their susceptibilities to destruction; and (e) the destruction of normal liver cells was generally lower than that of cancer liver cells. The decreases in cell populations were also observed visually by reversed-phase microscopy. The results complement related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of food ingredients.

  2. Free cholesterol accumulation in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells exacerbates acetaminophen hepatotoxicity via TLR9 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teratani, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kengo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Furuhashi, Hirotaka; Irie, Rie; Hida, Shigeaki; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Kurihara, Chie; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Saito, Hidetsugu; Hibi, Toshifumi; Miura, Soichiro; Hokari, Ryota; Kanai, Takanori

    2017-05-26

    Although obesity is a risk factor for acute liver failure, the pathogenic mechanisms are not yet fully understood. High cholesterol (HC) intake, which often underlies obesity, is suggested to play a role in the mechanism. We aimed to elucidate the effect of a HC diet on acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the USA. C57BL/6 Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) knockout (Tlr9(-/-)) mice and their Tlr9(+/+) littermates were fed an HC diet for fourweeks and then treated with acetaminophen. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) were isolated from the mice for in vivo and in vitro analyses. The HC diet exacerbated acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in a TLR9/inflammasome pathway-dependent manner. LSECs played a major role in the cholesterol loading-induced exacerbation. The accumulation of free cholesterol in the endolysosomes in LSECs enhanced TLR9-mediated signaling, thereby exacerbating the pathology of acetaminophen-induced liver injury through the activation of the TLR9/inflammasome pathway. The accumulation of free cholesterol in LSEC endolysosomes induced a dysfunction of the Rab7 membrane trafficking recycling mechanism, thus disrupting the transport of TLR9 from late endosomes to the lysosomes. Consequently, the level of active TLR9 in the late endosomes increased, thereby enhancing TLR9 signaling in LSECs. HC intake exaggerated acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury via free cholesterol accumulation in LSECs, demonstrating a novel role of free cholesterol as a metabolic factor in TLR9 signal regulation and pathologies of acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Therapeutic approaches may target this pathway. Lay summary: High cholesterol intake exacerbated acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury via the accumulation of free cholesterol in the endolysosomes of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. This accumulation enhanced Toll-like receptor 9 signaling via impairment of its membrane trafficking mechanism

  3. Prostaglandin E2 Regulates Liver versus Pancreas Cell Fate Decisions and Endodermal Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Sahar; Sherwood, Richard I.; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Saunders, Diane; Harris, James M.; Esain, Virginie; Carroll, Kelli J.; Frechette, Gregory M.; Kim, Andrew J.; Hwang, Katie L.; Cutting, Claire C.; Elledge, Susanna; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The liver and pancreas arise from common endodermal progenitors. How these distinct cell fates are specified is poorly understood. Here, we describe prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a regulator of endodermal fate specification during development. Modulating PGE2 activity has opposing effects on liver-versus-pancreas specification in zebrafish embryos as well as mouse endodermal progenitors. The PGE2 synthetic enzyme cox2a and receptor ep2a are patterned such that cells closest to PGE2 synthesis acquire a liver fate whereas more distant cells acquire a pancreas fate. PGE2 interacts with the bmp2b pathway to regulate fate specification. At later stages of development, PGE2 acting via the ep4a receptor promotes outgrowth of both the liver and pancreas. PGE2 remains important for adult organ growth, as it modulates liver regeneration. This work provides in vivo evidence that PGE2 may act as a morphogen to regulate cell fate decisions and outgrowth of the embryonic endodermal anlagen. PMID:24530296

  4. Injury-dependent retention of intraportally administered mesenchymal stromal cells following partial hepatectomy of steatotic liver does not lead to improved liver recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Boeykens

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC administration on liver function following partial hepatectomy (PHx of methionine/choline-deficient (MCD diet induced steatotic livers in rodents. Here we identified and validated serum cholinesterase (CHE and triglyceride (TG levels as non-invasive markers to longitudinally monitor rat liver function. Using in vivo bioluminescence imaging, retention of BM-MSC in the liver was observed following intraportal administration, but not after intravenous administration. Therefore, BM-MSC were intraportally delivered to investigate the effect on liver recovery and/or regeneration after PHx. However, despite recovery to normal body weight, liver weight and NAS score, both serum CHE and TG levels of non-treated and cell-treated rats with PHx after MCD diet remained significantly lower as compared to those of control rats. Importantly, serum CHE levels, but not TG levels, of cell-treated rats remained significantly lower as compared to those of non-treated rats, thereby warranting that certain caution should be considered for future clinical application of IP BM-MSC administration in order to promote liver regeneration and/or function.

  5. Elusive liver factor that causes pancreatic α cell hyperplasia: A review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run; Yu; Yun; Zheng; Matthew; B; Lucas; Yun-Guang; Tong

    2015-01-01

    Tumors and cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas are commonly derived from precursor lesions so that understanding the physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of precursor lesions is critical for the prevention and treatment of those neoplasms. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors(PNETs) can also be derived from precursor lesions. Pancreatic α cell hyperplasia(ACH), a specific and overwhelming increase in the number of α cells, is a precursor lesion leading to PNET pathogenesis. One of the 3 subtypes of ACH, reactive ACH is caused by glucagon signaling disruption and invariably evolves into PNETs. In this article, the existing work on the mechanisms underlying reactive ACH pathogenesis is reviewed. It is clear that the liver secretes a humoral factor regulating α cell numbers but the identity of the liver factor remains elusive. Potential approaches to identify the liver factor are discussed.

  6. Elusive liver factor that causes pancreatic α cell hyperplasia: A review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Run; Zheng, Yun; Lucas, Matthew B; Tong, Yun-Guang

    2015-11-15

    Tumors and cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas are commonly derived from precursor lesions so that understanding the physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of precursor lesions is critical for the prevention and treatment of those neoplasms. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) can also be derived from precursor lesions. Pancreatic α cell hyperplasia (ACH), a specific and overwhelming increase in the number of α cells, is a precursor lesion leading to PNET pathogenesis. One of the 3 subtypes of ACH, reactive ACH is caused by glucagon signaling disruption and invariably evolves into PNETs. In this article, the existing work on the mechanisms underlying reactive ACH pathogenesis is reviewed. It is clear that the liver secretes a humoral factor regulating α cell numbers but the identity of the liver factor remains elusive. Potential approaches to identify the liver factor are discussed.

  7. SIRT1 antagonizes liver fibrosis by blocking hepatic stellate cell activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Hong, Wenxuan; Hao, Chenzhi; Li, Luyang; Wu, Dongmei; Shen, Aiguo; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Yuanlin; Li, Ping; Xu, Yong

    2017-09-26

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are a major source of fibrogenesis in the liver contributing to cirrhosis. When activated, HSCs transdifferentiate into myofibroblast and undergo profound functional alterations paralleling an overhaul of the transcriptome, the mechanism of which remains largely undefined. We investigated the involvement of the class III deacetylase sirtuin (silent information regulator 1, SIRT1) in HSC activation and liver fibrosis. SIRT1 levels were down-regulated in the livers in mouse models of liver fibrosis, in patients with cirrhosis, and in activated HSCs as opposed to quiescent HSCs. SIRT1 activation halted whereas SIRT1 inhibition promoted HSC trans-differentiation into myofibroblast. Liver fibrosis was exacerbated in mice with HSC-specific deletion of SIRT1 (conditional knockout, cKO), receiving CCl4 (1 mg/kg) injection or subjected to bile duct ligation, compared to wild-type littermates. SIRT1 regulated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcription by deacetylating enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) in quiescent HSCs. Finally, EZH2 inhibition or PPARγ activation ameliorated fibrogenesis in cKO mice. In summary, our data suggest that SIRT1 plays an essential role guiding the transition of HSC phenotypes.-Li, M., Hong, W., Hao, C., Li, L., Wu, D., Shen, A., Lu, J., Zheng, Y., Li, P., Xu, Y. SIRT1 antagonizes liver fibrosis by blocking hepatic stellate cell activation in mice. © FASEB.

  8. Progression from Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Is Marked by a Higher Frequency of Th17 Cells in the Liver and an Increased Th17/Resting Regulatory T Cell Ratio in Peripheral Blood and in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Monika; Schilling, Anne-Kristin; Meertens, Jan; Hering, Ilona; Weiss, Johannes; Jurowich, Christian; Kudlich, Theodor; Hermanns, Heike M; Bantel, Heike; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is increasing in prevalence. It can be subdivided into nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Five to twenty percent of cases progress from NAFL to NASH. Increased hepatic Th17 cells and IL-17 expression were observed in NASH mice and patients, respectively. We analyzed CD4(+) effector T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood and livers of NAFL and NASH patients. A total of 51 NAFL patients, 30 NASH patients, 31 nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients (without histology), and 43 healthy controls were included. FACS analysis was performed on PBMCs and intrahepatic lymphocytes. Compared with healthy controls, a lower frequency of resting Tregs (rTregs; CD4(+)CD45RA(+)CD25(++)) and higher frequencies of IFN-γ(+) and/or IL-4(+) cells were detected among CD4(+) T cells of peripheral blood in NASH, and to a lesser degree in NAFL. In hepatic tissue, NAFL to NASH progression was marked by an increase in IL-17(+) cells among intrahepatic CD4(+) T cells. To define immunological parameters in peripheral blood to distinguish NAFL from NASH, we calculated different ratios. Th17/rTreg and Th2/rTreg ratios were significantly increased in NASH versus NAFL. The relevance of our findings for NASH pathogenesis was highlighted by the normalization of all of the changes 1 y after bariatric surgery. In conclusion, our data indicate that NAFL patients show changes in their immune cell profile compared with healthy controls. NAFL to NASH progression is marked by an increased frequency of IL-17(+) cells among intrahepatic CD4(+) T cells and higher Th17/rTreg and Th2/rTreg ratios in peripheral blood.

  9. Intravenous injection of mesenchymal stem cells is effective in treating liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhao; Jun-Jie Li; Da-Yong Cao; Xiao Li; Lin-Ying Zhang; Yong He; Shu-Qiang Yue

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To compare the influence of different transplant sites in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy for liver fibrosis.METHODS:MSCs isolated from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were induced into hepatocyte-like cells.Liver fibrosis in SD rats was induced with carbon tetrachloride.Following hepatocyte induction in vitro,4',6-diamidino2-phenylindole (DAPI)-labeled MSCs were transplanted by intravenous,intrahepatic,and intraperitoneal injection.Histopathological staining,immunohistochemistry,and biochemical analysis were used to compare the morphological and functional liver regeneration among different MSC injection modalities.The expression di-ferences of interleukins,growth factor,extracellular matrix,matrix metalloproteinases,and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase were examined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).RESULTS:Four days after exposure to hepatocyte differentiation medium,MSCs that did not express hepatocyte markers could express α-fetoprotein,albumin,and cytokeratin 18.The results of histopathological staining,immunohistochemistry,and biochemical analysis indicated that intravenous injection is more effective at rescuing liver failure than other injection modalities.DAPI-labeled cells were found around liver lobules in all three injection site groups,but the intravenous group had the highest number of cells.PCR and ELISA analysis indicated that interleukin-10 (IL-10)was highest in the intravenous group,whereas il1β,il6,tnfα and tgfβ,which can be regulated by IL10 and are promoters of liver fibrosis,were significantly lower than in the other groups.CONCLUSION:MSC administration is able to protect against liver fibrosis.Intravenous injection is the most favorable treatment modality through promotion of IL10 expression.

  10. Development of liver cell-targeted drug delivery systems: experimental approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenkov, Ya A.; Maklakova, S. Yu; Beloglazkina, E. K.; Zyk, N. V.; Nazarenko, A. G.; Tonevitsky, A. G.; Kotelianski, V. E.; Majouga, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The review is devoted to liver cell-targeted drug delivery systems. Primary attention is paid to the therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma, liver fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, viral hepatitis (A-G), cholangiocarcinoma, autoimmune liver diseases and some metabolic disorders. A general overview, modern classification and specific features of drug delivery systems are presented. The key characteristics and parameters of these systems and their advantages and restrictions for clinical applications are discussed. A considerable body of information is presented as summary tables convenient for perception and comparison. The data presented are critically analyzed and an expert evaluation of the therapeutic potential of the drug delivery systems in question is given. Discussion of invasive local delivery approaches, transmembrane systems and implants, as well as prodrugs is beyond the scope of the review, except for a few examples. The bibliography includes 344 references.

  11. Characterization and enrichment of hepatic progenitor cells in adult rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Lan Qin; Xia-Qiu Zhou; Wei Zhang; Hong Yu; Qin Xie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To detect the markers of oval cells in adult rat liver and to enrich them for further analysis of characterization in vitro.METHODS: Rat model for hepatic oval cell proliferation was established with 2-acetylaminofluorene and two third partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH). Paraffin embedded rat liver sections from model (11 d after hepatectomy) and control groups were stained with HE and OV6, cytokeratin19 (CK19),albumin, alpha fetoprotein (AFP), connexin43, and c-kit antibodies by immunohistochemistry. Oval cell proliferation was measured with BrdU incorporation test. C-kit positive oval cells were enriched by using magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) .The sorted oval cells were cultured in a low density to observe colony formation and to examine their characterization in vitroby immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR. RESULTS: A 2-AAF/PH model was successfully established to activate the oval cell compartment in rat liver. BrdU incorporation test of oval cell was positive. The hepatic oval cells coexpressed oval cell specific marker OV6, hepatocytemarker albumin and cholangiocyte-marker CK19. They also expressed AFP and connexin 43. C-kit, one hematopoietic stem cell receptor, was expressed in hepatic oval cells at high levels. By using c-kit antibody in conjunction with MACS,we developed a rapid oval cell isolation protocol. The sorted cells formed colony when cultured in vitro. Cells in the colony expressed albumin or CK19 or coexpressed both and BrdU incorporation test was positive. RT-PCR on colony showed expression of albumin and CK19 gene.CONCLUSION: Hepatic oval cells in the 2-AAF/PH model had the properties of hepatic stem/progenitor cells. Using MACS, we established a method to isolate oval cells. The sorted hepatic oval cells can form colony in vitro which expresses different combinations of phenotypic markers and genes from both hepatocytes and cholangiocyte lineage.

  12. Granulin-epithelin precursor and ATP-dependent binding cassette (ABC)B5 regulate liver cancer cell chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Siu Tim; Cheung, Phyllis F Y; Cheng, Christine K C; Wong, Nicholas C L; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy is used to treat unresectable liver cancer with marginal efficacy; this might result from hepatic cancer cells with stem cell and chemoresistant features. Gene expression profiling studies have shown that hepatic cancer cells express granulin-epithelin precursor (GEP); we investigated its role in hepatic cancer stem cell functions and chemoresistance. The effects of GEP and drug transporter signaling on chemoresistance were investigated in hepatic cancer stem cells. We analyzed the expression patterns of 142 clinical samples from liver tumors, adjacent nontumorous liver tissue, and liver tissue from patients who did not have cancer. GEP regulated the expression of the adenosine triphosphate-dependent binding cassette (ABC)B5 drug transporter in liver cancer cells. Chemoresistant cells that expressed GEP had increased levels of ABCB5; suppression of ABCB5 sensitized the cells to doxorubicin uptake and apoptosis. Most cells that expressed GEP and ABCB5 also expressed the hepatic cancer stem cell markers CD133 and EpCAM; blocking ABCB5 reduced their expression. Expression levels of GEP and ABCB5 were correlated in human liver tumor samples. ABCB5 levels were increased in liver cancer cells compared with nontumor liver tissue from patients with cirrhosis or hepatitis, or normal liver tissue. ABCB5 expression was associated with the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after partial hepatectomy. Expression of GEP and ABCB5 in liver cancer stem cells is associated with chemoresistance and reduced survival times of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Reagents designed to target these proteins might be developed as therapeutics and given in combination with chemotherapy to patients with liver cancer. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impaired function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in murine liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakura, Katsuya; Masuda, Haruchika; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Obi, Syotaro; Ito, Rie; Shizuno, Tomoko; Kurihara, Yusuke; Mine, Tetsuya; Asahara, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Liver fibrosis (LF) caused by chronic liver damage has been considered as an irreversible disease. As alternative therapy for liver transplantation, there are high expectations for regenerative medicine of the liver. Bone marrow (BM)- or peripheral blood-derived stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), have recently been used to treat liver cirrhosis. We investigated the biology of BM-derived EPC in a mouse model of LF. C57BL/6J mice were subcutaneously injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) every 3 days for 90 days. Sacrificed 2 days after final injection, whole blood (WB) was collected for isolation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) and biochemical examination. Assessments of EPC in the peripheral blood and BM were performed by flow cytometry and EPC colony-forming assay, respectively, using purified MNCs and BM c-KIT(+), Sca-1(+), and Lin(-) (KSL) cells. Liver tissues underwent histological analysis with hematoxylin/eosin/Azan staining, and spleens were excised and weighed. CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited histologically bridging fibrosis, pseudolobular formation, and splenomegaly, indicating successful induction of LF. The frequency of definitive EPC-colony-forming-units (CFU) as well as total EPC-CFU at the equivalent cell number of 500 BM-KSL cells decreased significantly (p changes in primitive EPC-CFU occurred in LF mice. The frequency of WB-MNCs of definitive EPC-CFU decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in LF mice compared with control mice. Together, these findings indicated the existence of impaired EPC function and differentiation in BM-derived EPCs in LF mice and might be related to clinical LF.

  14. Gene expression profiles of hepatic cell-type specific marker genes in progression of liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshiyuki Takahara; Mitsuo Takahashi; Hiroki Wagatsuma; Fumihiko Yokoya; Qing-Wei Zhang; Mutsuyo Yamaguchi; Hiroyuki Aburatani; Norifumi Kawada

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the gene expression profile data for the whole liver during development of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis.METHODS: Marker genes were identified for different types of hepatic cells, including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (including other inflammatory cells),and hepatocytes, using independent temporal DNA microarray data obtained from isolated hepatic cells.RESULTS: The cell-type analysis of gene expression gave several key results and led to formation of three hypotheses: (1) changes in the expression of HSCspecific marker genes during fibrosis were similar to gene expression data in in vitro cultured HSCs, suggesting a major role of the self-activating characteristics of HSCs in formation of fibrosis; (2) expression of mast cell-specific marker genes reached a peak during liver fibrosis,suggesting a possible role of mast cells in formation of fibrosis; and (3) abnormal expression of hepatocytespecific marker genes was found across several metabolic pathways during fibrosis, including sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and drug metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic relationship between these abnormalities and symptoms of liver fibrosis.CONCLUSION: Analysis of marker genes for specific hepatic cell types can identify the key aspects of fibrogenesis. Sequential activation of inflammatory cells and the self-supporting properties of HSCs play an important role in development of fibrosis.

  15. Liver Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  16. Investigation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in the Mouse Model of Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To date liver transplantation is the only effective treatment for end-stage liver diseases. Considering the potential of pluripotency and differentiation into tridermal lineages, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs may serve as an alternative of cell-based therapy. Herein, we investigated the effect of iPSC transplantation on thioacetamide- (TAA- induced acute/fulminant hepatic failure (AHF in mice. Firstly, we demonstrated that iPSCs had the capacity to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-Heps that expressed various hepatic markers, including albumin, α-fetoprotein, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β, and exhibited biological functions. Intravenous transplantation of iPSCs effectively reduced the hepatic necrotic area, improved liver functions and motor activity, and rescued TAA-treated mice from lethal AHF. 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate cell labeling revealed that iPSCs potentially mobilized to the damaged liver area. Taken together, iPSCs can effectively rescue experimental AHF and represent a potentially favorable cell source of cell-based therapy.

  17. Structures of nucleolus and transcription sites of rRNA genes in rat liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶伟; 焦明大; 赫杰; 何孟元; 郝水

    2000-01-01

    We observed the ultrastructure of nucleolus in rat liver cells by conventional electron microscopy, and employed cytochemistry NAMA-Ur DNA specific stain method to analyze the distribution and position of nucleolar DNA in situ. The results showed that nucleolar DNA of rat liver cells comes from nucleolus-associated chromatin, and continuously extends in the dense fibrillar component (DFC) of nucleolus, localizes at the periphery of fibrillar center (FC) and in DFC. Furthermore, by employing anti-DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies, we directly and selectively labeled transcription sites of rRNA genes and testified that localization of transcription sites not only to DFC but also to the periphery of FC.

  18. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-03-30

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models.

  19. Multi-cellular 3D human primary liver cell culture elevates metabolic activity under fluidic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Mandy B; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Wang, Ying I; Miller, Paula; Llamas-Vidales, Jose Ricardo; Naughton, Brian A; Applegate, Dawn R; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-05-21

    We have developed a low-cost liver cell culture device that creates fluidic flow over a 3D primary liver cell culture that consists of multiple liver cell types, including hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (fibroblasts, stellate cells, and Kupffer cells). We tested the performance of the cell culture under fluidic flow for 14 days, finding that hepatocytes produced albumin and urea at elevated levels compared to static cultures. Hepatocytes also responded with induction of P450 (CYP1A1 and CYP3A4) enzyme activity when challenged with P450 inducers, although we did not find significant differences between static and fluidic cultures. Non-parenchymal cells were similarly responsive, producing interleukin 8 (IL-8) when challenged with 10 μM bacterial lipoprotein (LPS). To create the fluidic flow in an inexpensive manner, we used a rocking platform that tilts the cell culture devices at angles between ±12°, resulting in a periodically changing hydrostatic pressure drop between reservoirs and the accompanying periodically changing fluidic flow (average flow rate of 650 μL min(-1), and a maximum shear stress of 0.64 dyne cm(-2)). The increase in metabolic activity is consistent with the hypothesis that, similar to unidirectional fluidic flow, primary liver cell cultures increase their metabolic activity in response to fluidic flow periodically changes direction. Since fluidic flow that changes direction periodically drastically changes the behavior of other cells types that are shear sensitive, our findings support the theory that the increase in hepatic metabolic activity associated with fluidic flow is either activated by mechanisms other than shear sensing (for example increased opportunities for gas and metabolite exchange), or that it follows a shear sensing mechanism that does not depend on the direction of shear. Our mode of device operation allows us to evaluate drugs under fluidic cell culture conditions and at low device manufacturing and operation

  20. Placental amniotic epithelial cells and their therapeutic potential in liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli eTahan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As a unique source of stem cells, there is a growing interest in amniotic epithelial (AE cells. Placenta is readily available; in fact, it is often discarded following delivery. As such, it is without the ethical concerns of embryonic stem cells. Further advantages to AE include that AE cells do not demonstrate tumorigenicity upon transplantation, and are gifted with immunomodulatory and anti-inflamatory properties. Thus, AE cells have exceptional features for use as cell-based therapies for liver disease.

  1. Hepatitis C virus and ethanol alter antigen presentation in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia A Osna

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholic patients have a high incidence of hepatitis Cvirus (HCV) infection. Alcohol consumption enhances the severity of the HCV disease course and worsens the outcome of chronic hepatitis C. The accumulation of virally infected cells in the liver is related to the HCVinduced inability of the immune system to recognizeinfected cells and to develop the immune responses. This review covers the effects of HCV proteins and ethanol on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classⅠ- and class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. Here, we discuss the liver which functions as an immune privilege organ; factors, which affect cleavage and loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC classⅠand class Ⅱ in hepatocytes and dendritic cells, and the modulating effects of ethanol and HCV on antigen presentation by liver cells. Altered antigen presentation in the liver limits the ability of the immune system to clear HCV and infected cells and contributes to disease progression. HCV by itself affects dendritic cell function, switching their cytokine profile to the suppressive phenotype of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) predominance,preventing cell maturation and allostimulation capacity.The synergistic action of ethanol with HCV results in the suppression of MHC class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. In addition, ethanol metabolism and HCV proteins reduce proteasome function and interferon signaling, thereby suppressing the generation of peptides for MHC classⅠ-restricted antigen presentation.Collectively, ethanol exposure further impairs antigen presentation in HCV-infected liver cells, which may provide a partial explanation for exacerbations and the poor outcome of HCV infection in alcoholics.

  2. Host-cell sensors for Plasmodium activate innate immunity against liver-stage infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liehl, Peter; Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Chan, Jennie; Zillinger, Thomas; Baptista, Fernanda; Carapau, Daniel; Konert, Madlen; Hanson, Kirsten K; Carret, Céline; Lassnig, Caroline; Müller, Mathias; Kalinke, Ulrich; Saeed, Mohsan; Chora, Angelo Ferreira; Golenbock, Douglas T; Strobl, Birgit; Prudêncio, Miguel; Coelho, Luis P; Kappe, Stefan H; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Pichlmair, Andreas; Vigário, Ana M; Rice, Charles M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Barchet, Winfried; Mota, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    Before they infect red blood cells and cause malaria, Plasmodium parasites undergo an obligate and clinically silent expansion phase in the liver that is supposedly undetected by the host. Here, we demonstrate the engagement of a type I interferon (IFN) response during Plasmodium replication in the liver. We identified Plasmodium RNA as a previously unrecognized pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) capable of activating a type I IFN response via the cytosolic pattern recognition receptor Mda5. This response, initiated by liver-resident cells through the adaptor molecule for cytosolic RNA sensors, Mavs, and the transcription factors Irf3 and Irf7, is propagated by hepatocytes in an interferon-α/β receptor-dependent manner. This signaling pathway is critical for immune cell-mediated host resistance to liver-stage Plasmodium infection, which we find can be primed with other PAMPs, including hepatitis C virus RNA. Together, our results show that the liver has sensor mechanisms for Plasmodium that mediate a functional antiparasite response driven by type I IFN.

  3. Hedgehog signal activation coordinates proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Yoshikazu [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Itoh, Tohru, E-mail: itohru@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Miyajima, Atsushi [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2009-09-10

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays crucial roles in development and homeostasis of various organs. In the adult liver, it regulates proliferation and/or viability of several types of cells, particularly under injured conditions, and is also implicated in stem/progenitor cell maintenance. However, the role of this signaling pathway during the normal developmental process of the liver remains elusive. Although Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the ventral foregut endoderm from which the liver derives, the expression disappears at the onset of the liver bud formation, and its possible recurrence at the later stages has not been investigated. Here we analyzed the activation and functional relevance of Hh signaling during the mouse fetal liver development. At E11.5, Shh and an activation marker gene for Hh signaling, Gli1, were expressed in Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts, the fetal liver progenitor cells, and the expression was rapidly decreased thereafter as the development proceeded. In the culture of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts isolated from the E11.5 liver, activation of Hh signaling stimulated their proliferation and this effect was cancelled by a chemical Hh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine. In contrast, hepatocyte differentiation of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts in vitro as manifested by the marker gene expression and acquisition of ammonia clearance activity was significantly inhibited by forced activation of Hh signaling. Taken together, these results demonstrate the temporally restricted manner of Hh signal activation and its role in promoting the hepatoblast proliferation, and further suggest that the pathway needs to be shut off for the subsequent hepatic differentiation of hepatoblasts to proceed normally.

  4. Recent Strategies Combining Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Bone, Liver and Skin Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Sabrina; Salerno, Simona; Ahmed, Haysam Mohamed Magdy; Piscioneri, Antonella; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the combination of biomaterials with stem cells as a promising strategy for bone, liver and skin regeneration. At first, we describe stem cell-based constructs for bone tissue engineering with special attention to recent advanced approaches based on the use of biomaterial scaffolds with renewable stem cells that have been used for bone regeneration. We illustrate the strategies to improve liver regeneration by using liver stem cells and biomaterials and/or devices as therapeutic approaches. In particular, examples of biomaterials in combination with other technologies are presented since they allow the differentiation of stem cells in hepatocytes. After a description of the role and the benefit of MSCs in wound repair and in skin substitutes we highlight the suitability of biomaterials in guiding stem cell differentiation for skin regeneration and cutaneous repair in both chronic and acute wounds. Finally, an overview of the types of bioreactors that have been developed for the differentiation of stem cells and are currently in use, is also provided. The examples of engineered microenvironments reported in this review indicate that a detailed understanding of the various factors and mechanisms that control the behavior of stem cells in vivo has provided useful information for the development of advanced bioartificial systems able to control cell fate.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium prevents radiation-induced liver injury by inhibiting inflammation and protecting sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Xing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Sun, Jing; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Huang, Yan-; Zhang, Zhen-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Current management of radiation-induced liver injury is limited. Sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) apoptosis and inflammation are considered to be initiating events in hepatic damage. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions during hepatic irradiation, acting via paracrine mechanisms. This study aims to examine whether MSC-derived bioactive components are protective against radiation-induced liver injury in rats. MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) was generated from rat bone marrow-derived MSCs. The effect of MSC-CM on the viability of irradiated SECs was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Activation of the Akt and ERK pathways was analyzed by western blot. MSC-CM was also delivered to Sprague-Dawley rats immediately before receiving liver irradiation, followed by testing for pathological features, changes in serum hyaluronic acid, ALT, and inflammatory cytokine levels, and liver cell apoptosis. MSC-CM enhanced the viability of irradiated SECs in vitro and induced Akt and ERK phosphorylation in these cells. Infusion of MSC-CM immediately before liver irradiation provided a significant anti-apoptotic effect on SECs and improved the histopathological features of injury in the irradiated liver. MSC-CM also reduced the secretion and expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. MSC-derived bioactive components could be a novel therapeutic approach for treating radiation-induced liver injury. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation via different approaches in treatment of liver cirrhosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Lixia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC transplantation via different approaches in the treatment of liver cirrhosis in mice. Methods A total of 46 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into normal control group with 5 mice and liver cirrhosis model group with 41 mice. Subcutaneously injected carbon tetrachloride olive oil was used to establish the mouse model of liver cirrhosis. A total of 36 mice with liver cirrhosis were randomly divided into control group, caudal vein BMSC transplantation group, and spleen BMSC transplantation group, with 12 mice in each group. Whole bone marrow adherent culture was performed to obtain the third-generation BMSCs, and flow cytometry was used for cell surface identification. BMSCs were injected into the mice through the caudal vein or spleen. Blood samples were collected at 4 weeks after transplantation to measure liver function. HE and Masson staining and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA immunohistochemistry were performed for liver sections. Liver injury and fibrosis in mice were examined. A one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between groups. Results At 8 weeks after the establishment of the model, the mice in the model group had sparse and dark yellow hair, reduced food consumption and activity, and a reduction in body weight. After transplantation, compared with the model control group, the caudal vein BMSC transplantation group and spleen BMSC transplantation group showed a significant increase in albumin and significant reductions in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (all P<0.01. There were no significant differences between the two transplantation approaches (P>0.05. After transplantation, there were significant changes in diseased tissue, alleviated liver cirrhosis, reduced collagen fiber and necrotic area, and a good structure. Immunohistochemistry showed both transplantation groups showed significant reductions in

  7. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of human basophilic cells derived from dispersed fetal liver with murine T cell factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seldin, D.C.; Caulfield, J.P.; Hein, A.; Osathanondh, R.; Nabel, G.; Schlossman, S.F.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.

    1986-03-15

    Metachromatically granulated cells were generated from human fetal liver stem cells cultured in heterologous mouse conditioned medium rich in interleukin 3. After 2 to 3 wk of culture with biweekly changes of medium and selection of nonadherent cells, all cells present in five cultures had cytoplasmic granules. Ultrastructurally, many granules contained fibrillar material or electron-dense cores with fibrils and vesicular fragments. In addition, the granules of many cells were filled with electron-dense material, which in some cases had a fine structure consisting of concentric whorls or a reticular pattern. Analysis of high-affinity IgE receptors on the cultured cells by flow cytometry demonstrated a unimodel fluorescence pattern, suggesting that most cells were in the basophil or mast cell lineage. The cells contained 52 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of histamine and incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate at an average rate of 31,300 cpm/10/sup 6/ cells/4 hr into 175,000 m.w. chondroitin sulfate A proteoglycans. Upon activation with 1 ..mu..M calcium ionophore A23187, the cultured cells released 53% of their cell-associated histamine and metabolized arachidonic acid to 15.0 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of immunoreactive leukotriene C/sub 4/ equivalents, 0.5 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of leukotriene B/sub 4/, and 3.1 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of prostaglandin D/sub 2/ (means, n = 3). Thus, stem cells present in human fetal liver give rise, as do stem cells in mouse fetal liver, to metachromatically granulated cells when cultured in the presence of mouse interleukin 3.

  8. Effect of isoorientin on intracellular antioxidant defence mechanisms in hepatoma and liver cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Wang, Jing; Wu, Wanqiang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Xuebo

    2016-07-01

    Isoorientin (ISO) is considered one of the most important flavonoid-like compounds responsible for health benefits, including the prevention of liver damage as well as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-nociceptive activities. Our previous study showed that ISO inhibited the proliferation of hepatoma cells through increasing intracellular ROS levels. Interestingly, ISO protects rat liver cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation stress by decreasing intracellular ROS levels. Why are there different effects of ISO on ROS in different physiological and pathophysiological circumstances? The present study investigated the effect of ISO on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and phase II detoxifying enzyme activities in human hepatoblastoma cancer cells (HepG2), buffalo rat liver cells (BRL-3A) and human liver cancer cells (HL-7702). The results showed that intracellular ROS levels and the protein expression of the respiratory chain complexes was significantly (p<0.01) higher in the HepG2 cells than in the BRL-3A and HL-7702 cells. Additionally, ISO notably (p<0.01) increased ROS levels in the HepG2 cells, while no significance was found in the BRL-3A and HL-7702 cells. Furthermore, in the HepG2 cells, the protein expression of the respiratory chain complexes and the phase II detoxifying enzyme activities and GSH content were decreased by ISO (p<0.01), while ISO, in a certain range, enhanced the expression of the protein complexes and the phase II detoxifying enzyme activities and GSH content in BRL-3A and HL-7702 cells. All of these results demonstrated, for the first time, that ISO possesses a notable hepatoprotective effect, which might be mediated through the respiratory chain complexes and phase II detoxifying enzyme activities.

  9. Mechanism of action of novel piperazine containing a toxicant against human liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthimathi, MS; Haerian, Batoul Sadat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytotoxic potential of a novel piperazine derivative (PCC) against human liver cancer cells. SNU-475 and 423 human liver cancer cell lines were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on liver cancer cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 µM and 7.76 ± 0.45 µM against SNU-475 and SNU-423 respectively after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. Results of this study suggest that PCC is a potent anti-cancer agent inducing both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27019772

  10. BMP9-Induced Survival Effect in Liver Tumor Cells Requires p38MAPK Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García-Álvaro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs role in tumorigenic processes, and specifically in the liver, has gathered importance in the last few years. Previous studies have shown that BMP9 is overexpressed in about 40% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients. In vitro data have also shown evidence that BMP9 has a pro-tumorigenic action, not only by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT and migration, but also by promoting proliferation and survival in liver cancer cells. However, the precise mechanisms driving these effects have not yet been established. In the present work, we deepened our studies into the intracellular mechanisms implicated in the BMP9 proliferative and pro-survival effect on liver tumor cells. In HepG2 cells, BMP9 induces both Smad and non-Smad signaling cascades, specifically PI3K/AKT and p38MAPK. However, only the p38MAPK pathway contributes to the BMP9 growth-promoting effect on these cells. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that p38MAPK activation, although dispensable for the BMP9 proliferative activity, is required for the BMP9 protective effect on serum withdrawal-induced apoptosis. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the signaling pathways involved in the BMP9 pro-tumorigenic role in liver tumor cells.

  11. Peroxiredoxin II Is Essential for Maintaining Stemness by Redox Regulation in Liver Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taeho; Bak, Yesol; Park, Young-Ho; Jang, Gyu-Beom; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Yoo, Jeong Eun; Park, Young Nyun; Bak, In Seon; Kim, Jin-Man; Yoon, Do-Young; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2016-05-01

    Redox regulation in cancer stem cells (CSCs) is viewed as a good target for cancer therapy because redox status plays an important role in cancer stem-cell maintenance. Here, we investigated the role of Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II), an antioxidant enzyme, in association with maintenance of liver CSCs. Our study demonstrates that Prx II overexpressed in liver cancer cells has high potential for self-renewal activity. Prx II expression significantly corelated with expression of epithelial-cell adhesion molecules (EpCAM) and cytokerain 19 in liver cancer tissues of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Downregulation of Prx II in Huh7 cells with treatment of siRNA reduced expression of EpCAM and CD133 as well as Sox2 in accordance with increased ROS and apoptosis, which were reversed in Huh7-hPrx II cells. Huh7-hPrx II cells exhibited strong sphere-formation activity compared with mock cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) exposure enhanced sphere formation, cell-surface expression of EpCAM and CD133, and pSTAT3 along with activation of VEGF receptor 2 in Huh7-hPrx II cells. The result also emerged in Huh7-H-ras(G12V) and SK-HEP-1-H-ras(G12V) cells with high-level expression of Prx II. Prx II was involved in regulation of VEGF driving cancer stem cells through VEGFR-2/STAT3 signaling to upregulate Bmi1 and Sox2. In addition, knockdown of Prx II in Huh7-H-ras(G12V) cells showed significant reduction in cell migration in vitro and in tumorigenic potential in vivo. Taken together, all the results demonstrated that Prx II plays a key role in the CSC self-renewal of HCC cells through redox regulation. Stem Cells 2016;34:1188-1197.

  12. Transcriptome atlas of aromatic amino acid family metabolism-related genes in eight liver cell types uncovers the corresponding metabolic pathways in rat liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cuifang; Xu, CunShuan

    2010-10-01

    To explore gene expression of aromatic amino acid family metabolism and their metabolic pathways of eight liver cell types in rat liver regeneration, eight kinds of rat regenerating liver cells were isolated by using the combination of percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic bead methods. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression changes of genes associated with aromatic amino acid family metabolism. The transcriptome atlas showed that the metabolic pathway of phenylalanine was mainly catalyzed into tyrosine in hepatic stellate cells in the initiation stage, tyrosine was oxidized into dopa and norepinephrine in biliary epithelia cells and dendritic cells, and norepinephrine was finally catalyzed into adrenaline in biliary epithelia cells and pit cells in the progress stage. Thyroid hormone of tyrosine catabolites was synthesized from tyrosine in almost all cells in different stage of LR, among which genes of T3 biosynthesis were increased in HCs, BECs, SECs and DCs in the progress stage. Tryptophan was decarboxylated to 5-hydroxytryptamine in dendritic cells in the progress stage. Based on the results as above, we concluded that phenylalanine is the major source of tyrosine, proliferation of biliary epithelia cells and dendritic cells maybe promote by tyrosine catabolites-dopa and norepinephrine, biliary epithelia cells and pit cells maybe promote by adrenaline. T3 maybe play a major role on proliferation of HCs, BECs, SECs and DCs in the progress stage. The proliferation of dendritic cells maybe promote by tryptophan catabolites-5-hydroxytryptamine. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Transplantation of human stem cell-derived hepatocytes in an animal model of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Beeston, John T; Lee, David D; Wen, Xuejun; Mangino, Martin J; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocyte cell transplantation can be life-saving in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); however, primary human hepatocyte transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells in an animal xenotransplant model of ALF. Intraperitoneal d-galactosamine was used to develop a lethal model of ALF in the rat. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), human mesenchymal stem cells, and human iPSC combined with human endothelial cells (iPSC + EC) were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells and transplanted into the spleens of athymic nude rats with ALF. A reproducible lethal model of ALF was achieved with nearly 90% death within 3 days. Compared with negative controls, rats transplanted with stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells were associated with increased survival. Human albumin was detected in the rat serum 3 days after transplantation in more than one-half the animals transplanted with hepatocyte-like cells. Only animals transplanted with iPSC + EC-derived hepatocytes had serum human albumin at 14 days posttransplant. Transplanted hepatocyte-like cells homed to the injured rat liver, whereas the ECs were only detected in the spleen. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells improved survival with evidence of in vivo human albumin production. Combining ECs may prolong cell function after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro cultivation and differentiation of fetal liver stem cells from mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Qing FENG; Li Ying DU; Zhen Quan GUO

    2005-01-01

    During embryonic development, pluripotent endoderm tissue in the developing foregut may adopt pancreatic fate or hepatic fate depending on the activation of key developmental regulators. Transdifferentiation occurs between hepatocytes and pancreatic cells under specific conditions. Hepatocytes and pancreatic cells have the common endodermal progenitor cells. In this study we isolated hepatic stem/progenitor cells from embryonic day (ED) 12-14 Kun-Ming mice with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The cells were cultured under specific conditions. The cultured cells deploy dithizone staining and immunocytochemical staining at the 15th, 30th and 40th day after isolation. The results indicated the presence of insulin-producing cells. When the insulin-producing cells were transplanted into alloxaninduced diabetic mice, the nonfasting blood glucose level was reduced. These results suggested that fetal liver stem/progenitor cells could be converted into insulin-producing cells under specific culture conditions. Fetal liver stem/progenitor cells could become the potential source of insulin-producing cells for successful cell transplantation therapy strategies of diabetes.

  15. Endothelial cell Toll-like receptor 4 regulates fibrosis associated angiogenesis in liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagavelu, K; Routray, C; Shergill, U; O’Hara, SP; Faubion, W; Shah, VH

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis defines the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vascular endothelial networks and corresponds with the wound healing process that is typified by the process of liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis is also associated with increased endotoxin within the gut lumen and its associated portal circulation. However, the interrelationship of gut endotoxin and its receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), with liver fibrosis and associated angiogenesis remains incompletely defined. RESULT Here we provide evidence, using complementary genetic, molecular, and pharmacologic approaches that the pattern recognition receptor that recognizes endotoxin, TLR4, expressed on liver endothelial cells (LEC), regulates angiogenic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies reveal a key role for a cognate TLR4 effector protein, MyD88 in this process which culminates in extracellular protease production that regulates LEC invasive capacity, a key step in angiogenesis. Furthermore TLR4 dependent angiogenesis in vivo corresponds with fibrosis in complementary liver models of fibrosis. CONCLUSION These studies provide evidence that the TLR4 pathway in LEC regulates angiogenesis through its MyD88 effector protein by regulating extracellular protease production and that this process is linked to the development of liver fibrosis. PMID:20564354

  16. Ablation effects of noninvasive radiofrequency field-induced hyperthermia on liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyun Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To have in-depth analysis of clinical ablation effect of noninvasive radiofrequency field-induced hyperthermia on liver cancer cells, this paper collected liver cancer patients’ treatment information from 10 hospitals during January 2010 and December 2011, from which 1050 cases of patients were randomly selected as study object of observation group who underwent noninvasive radiofrequency field-induced hyperthermia treatment; in addition, 500 cases of liver cancer patients were randomly selected as study object of control group who underwent clinical surgical treatment. After treatment was completed, three years of return visit were done, survival rates of the two groups of patients after 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years were compared, and clinical effects of radiofrequency ablation of liver cancer were evaluated. Zoom results show that the two groups are similar in terms of survival rate, and the difference is without statistical significance. 125 patients in observation group had varying degrees of adverse reactions, while 253 patients in control group had adverse reactions. There was difference between groups P < 0.05, with significant statistical significance. It can be concluded that radiofrequency ablation of liver cancer is more secure. Therefore, the results of this study fully demonstrate that liver cancer treatment with noninvasive radiofrequency field-induced hyperthermia is with safety effect and satisfactory survival rate, thus with relatively high clinical value in clinical practice.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The experimental protocols used in the investigation of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration in rodents are characterized by activation of the hepatic stem cell compartment in the canals of Hering followed by transit amplification of oval cells and their subsequent differentiation along hepatic...... lineages. Although the protocols are numerous and often used interchangeably across species, a thorough comparative phenotypic analysis of oval cells in rats and mice using well-established and generally acknowledged molecular markers has not been provided. In the present study, we evaluated and compared...... the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro...

  19. Modulating the Substrate Stiffness to Manipulate Differentiation of Resident Liver Stem Cells and to Improve the Differentiation State of Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Cozzolino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many cell types, several cellular processes, such as differentiation of stem/precursor cells, maintenance of differentiated phenotype, motility, adhesion, growth, and survival, strictly depend on the stiffness of extracellular matrix that, in vivo, characterizes their correspondent organ and tissue. In the liver, the stromal rigidity is essential to obtain the correct organ physiology whereas any alteration causes liver cell dysfunctions. The rigidity of the substrate is an element no longer negligible for the cultivation of several cell types, so that many data so far obtained, where cells have been cultured on plastic, could be revised. Regarding liver cells, standard culture conditions lead to the dedifferentiation of primary hepatocytes, transdifferentiation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts, and loss of fenestration of sinusoidal endothelium. Furthermore, standard cultivation of liver stem/precursor cells impedes an efficient execution of the epithelial/hepatocyte differentiation program, leading to the expansion of a cell population expressing only partially liver functions and products. Overcoming these limitations is mandatory for any approach of liver tissue engineering. Here we propose cell lines as in vitro models of liver stem cells and hepatocytes and an innovative culture method that takes into account the substrate stiffness to obtain, respectively, a rapid and efficient differentiation process and the maintenance of the fully differentiated phenotype.

  20. ADAM12 in human liver cancers: TGF-beta-regulated expression in stellate cells is associated with matrix remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Pabic, Hélène; Bonnier, Dominique; Wewer, Ulla M

    2003-01-01

    "A disintegrin and metalloproteinases" (ADAMs) form a family of cell-surface glycoproteins with potential protease and cell-adhesion activities. We have investigated ADAM expression in human liver cancers and their regulation by several cytokines involved in liver injury. Using degenerative RT-PC...

  1. Differential genomic effects of six different TiO2 nanomaterials on human liver HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanoparticles are reported to cause liver toxicity in vivo. To better assess the mechanism of the in vivo liver toxicity, we used the human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2) as a model system. Human HepG2 cells were exposed to 6 TiO2 nanomaterials (with dry primary partic...

  2. Contribution of mononuclear bone marrow cells to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Qiang Cao; Ji-Zong Lin; Yue-Si Zhong; Shao-Bin Huang; Nan Lin; Zhao-Feng Tang; Rui Chen; Peng Xiang; Rui-Yun Xu

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study the inhibitory effect of mononuclear bone marrow cell (BMC) transplantation on carbon tetrachloride (CCIt) -induced liver fibrosis in rats.METHODS:Rat liver fibrosis models were induced by CCN and alcohol administration. After 8 wk,twenty rats were randomly allocated into treatment group (n = 10) and control group (n = 10). BMC were infused into the rats in treatment group via the portal vein,while heparinized saline was infused in control group. CCU was hypodermically injected into the rats twice a week for 4 wk. At the end of wk 12,all rats were humanely sacrificed. Liver samples were taken and stained with HE or Masson trichrome. The general conditions,liver fibrSsis (hydroxyproline and collagen fibre) and liver pathological grades in rats were evaluated.± 128.8μg/g in treatment group,and 596.0 ± 341. 8μg/g in control group.The percentage of collagen fibre was 3.75% ± 0.98% in treatment group and 5.02% ± 0.44% in control group.There was a significant difference berween the two groups (P<0.05).Liver pathological grade decreased from grade Ⅳ to grade Ⅲ partially in treatment group (P<0.05) with no obvious improvement in control group (P<0.05).There was a significant difference between treatment group and control group(P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Transplantation of BMC can improve liver fibrosis due to chronic liver injury in rats.

  3. Chemopreventive effects of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract on Chang liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S S; Kuszynski, C A; Bagchi, M; Bagchi, D

    2000-11-30

    In an attempt to ameliorate the chemotherapy associated normal cell toxicity, in this study a known antioxidant, grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) using Chang liver cells has been used. Chang liver cells were treated in vitro with idarubicin (Ida) (30 nM) and 4-hydroxyperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC) (1 microg/ml) with or without proanthocyanidin (25 microg/ml). The cells were grown in vitro and the growth rate of the cells were determined using MTT assay. The results showed that the GSPE decreased growth inhibitory effects of Ida and 4-HC on Chang liver cells in vitro. Since these chemotherapeutic agents are known to induce apoptosis in the target cells, these cells were also analyzed for presence of apoptotic cells using flow cytometry. The GSPE decreased the number of apoptotic cell population induced by either chemotherapy. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms of ameliorating effects of proanthocyanidin, the expression of apoptosis/cell cycle/growth related genes, Bcl-2, p53 and c-myc was determined in the treated and control cells using Western blotting or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. There was an increased expression of Bcl-2 in the cells treated with GSPE. However, there was a significant decrease in the expression of other cell cycle related genes such as p53 and c-myc in these cells following treatment with GSPE. Thus, these results indicate that proanthocyanidin can be a potential candidate to ameliorate the toxic effects associated with chemotherapeutic agents used in treatment of cancer.

  4. On the cell biology of pit cells, the liver-specific NK cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian Zhong Luo; David Vermijlen; Bülent Ahishali; Vasilis Triantis; Georgia Plakoutsi; Filip Braet; Karin Vanderkerken; Eddie Wisse

    2000-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Natural killer (NK) cells are functionally defined by their ability to kill certain tumor cells and virusinfected cells without prior sensitization[1]. NK cells comprise about 10% to 15% of lymphocytes in the peripheral blood and most of these cells in human and rat have the morphology of large granular lymphocytes ( LGL )[2]. However, recent studies have demonstrated that small agranular lymphocytes, lacking CD3 expression, have cytolytic activity comparable to NK cells[3].

  5. Early changes of graft function, cytokines and superoxide dismutase serum levels after donor liver denervation and Kupffer cell depletion in a rat-to-rat liver transplantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhu; Catena Marco; Ferla Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Hepatic reperfusion injury may cause acute inlfammatory damage, producing signiifcant organ dysfunction, and is an important problem in liver transplantation. This experiment aimed to study early changes of hepatic function after donor liver denervation and Kupffer cell depletion in rat-to-rat liver transplantation and to evaluate the effect of pre-treatment on liver reperfusion injury. METHODS:Donor rats were divided into four groups:control group; group G was pre-treated with gadolinium chloride (G), an inhibitor of Kupffer cells; group H with hexamethonium (H), a sympathetic ganglionic blocking agent; and group HG, with combined H and G pre-treatment. Under the same conditions, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), arterial ketone body ratio (AKBR), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of recipient rats were assessed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours after liver transplantation. Histological studies of the grafts were compared. RESULTS:HG pre-treatment signiifcantly decreased ALT, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels, increased AKBR and SOD levels, and demonstrated less pathological damage at 8, 16 and 24 hours compared with the control group. Similar trends were also found in the other groups (G and H). However, the differences among them were not signiifcant at 4 post-operative hours.CONCLUSIONS:Donor denervation and Kupffer cell depletion had preventive effect on liver reperfusion injury. HG pre-treatment is a feasible and reproducible method to protect grafts from reperfusion injury.

  6. Relevance of activated hepatic stellate cells in predicting the development of pediatric liver allograft fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Carla; Reding, Raymond; Quinones, Jorge Abarca; Sokal, Etienne; Rahier, Jacques; Bueno, Javier; Sempoux, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main collagen-producing cells in liver fibrogenesis. With the purpose of analyzing their presence and relevance in predicting liver allograft fibrosis development, 162 liver biopsies of 54 pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients were assessed at 6 months, 3 years, and 7 years after LT. The proportion of activated HSCs, identified by α-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) immunostaining, and the amount of fibrosis, identified by picrosirius red (PSR%) staining, were determined by computer-based morphometric analysis. Fibrosis was also staged by using the semiquantitative liver allograft fibrosis score (LAFSc), specifically designed to score fibrosis in the pediatric LT population. Liver allograft fibrosis displayed progression over time by PSR% (P ASMA expression decreased in the long term, with inverse evolution with respect to fibrosis (P ASMA-positive HSCs area ≥ 8% at 6 months (n = 20) developed a higher fibrosis proportion compared to those with ASMA-positive HSCs area ≤ 8% (n = 34) at the same period of time and in the long term (P = 0.03 and P ASMA expression ≥ 8% at 6 months was found to be an independent risk factor for 7-year fibrosis development by PSR% (r(2) = 0.5; P ASMA expression ≥ 8% at 3 years showed an association with the development of fibrosis at 7 years (P = 0.02). In conclusion, there is a high proportion of activated HSCs in pediatric LT recipients. ASMA ≥ 8% at 6 months seems to be a risk factor for early and longterm fibrosis development. In addition, activated HSCs showed inverse evolution with respect to fibrosis in the long term. Liver Transplantation 22 822-829 2016 AASLD.

  7. Neutrophil adhesion and crawling dynamics on liver sinusoidal endothelial cells under shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Li, Ning; Du, Yu; Tong, Chunfang; Lü, Shouqin; Hu, Jinrong; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte, PMN) recruitment in the liver sinusoid takes place in almost all liver diseases and contributes to pathogen clearance or tissue damage. While PMN rolling unlikely appears in liver sinusoids and Mac-1 or CD44 is assumed to play respective roles during in vivo local or systematic inflammatory stimulation, the regulating mechanisms of PMN adhesion and crawling dynamics are still unclear from those in vivo studies. Here we developed a two-dimensional in vitro sinusoidal model with primary liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and Kupffer cells (KCs) to investigate TNF-α-induced PMN recruitment under shear flow. Our data demonstrated that LFA-1 dominates the static or shear resistant adhesion of PMNs while Mac-1 decelerates PMN crawling on LSEC monolayer. Any one of LFA-1, Mac-1, and CD44 molecules is not able to work effectively for mediating PMN transmigration across LSEC monolayer. The presence of KCs only affects the randomness of PMN crawling. These findings further the understandings of PMN recruitment under shear flow in liver sinusoids.

  8. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  9. Ectopic expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in mouse liver endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, M B; Berchtold, M W; Rülicke, T;

    1997-01-01

    vasoconstriction via calcium signalling, were investigated in the mouse liver perfused in situ. Vasoconstriction, thought to be mediated by the Ito cell, was not affected in the transgenic animals, whereas microvascular exchange, probed with the multiple indicator dilution technique, was markedly decreased...

  10. Expression of rat liver cell membrane transporters for thyroid hormone in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Docter (Roel); E.C.H. Friesema (Edith); P.G.J. van Stralen (Paul); E.P. Krenning (Eric); M.E. Everts (Maria); T.J. Visser (Theo); G. Hennemann

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe present study was conducted to explore the possible use of Xenopus laevis oocytes for the expression cloning of cell membrane transporters for iodothyronines. Injection of stage V-VI X. laevis oocytes with 23 ng Wistar rat liver polyadenylated RNA (mRNA)

  11. Production of human liver prolidase by Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-hao WANG; Min LIU; Mu-gen CHI; Qing-ding WANG; Man-ji SUN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and express the recombinant human liver prolidase in yeast and explore the activities of both dipeptidase and organophosphoric acid anhydrolase (OPAA). METHODS: The cDNA encoding human liver prolidase derived from healthy adult liver was cloned into the pYES2, an expression vector of S cerevisiae, and then transformed into S cerevisiae INVScl by electroporation. The transformant with the highest enzymatic activity was induced by galactose for expression. The optimal induction conditions (temperature, induction time, and the initial amount of inoculation cells) were estimated by orthogonal experimental design. The recombinant prolidase and OPAA activities were assayed by spectrocolorimetric methods. RESULTS: The recombinant enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of organophosphorous compound soman as well as the hydrolysis of dipeptide Gly-Pro. Under the optimal induction conditions (20 h, 25 ℃, initial OD600=0.4), the maximum activities of prolidase and OPAA came to enzyme in disrupted cell supernatants showed a molecular weight of 56 kDa. Intensity scanning of the SDS-PAGE gel revealed that the enzyme accounted for 3.16 % of the total protein in the supernatant. One liter incubation medium produced 7 g of wet yeast cell containing 4.56 mg of the recombination protein. CONCLUSION: The recombinant human liver prolidase produced by yeast cell (S cerevisiae) exhibited both dipeptidase and OPAA activities.

  12. Imaging findings in Langerhans` cell histiocytosis of the liver and the spleen in an adult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mampaey, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium)]|[Dept. of Radiology, University of Antwerp (Belgium); Warson, F. [Dept. of Anatomopathology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Hedent, E. van [Dept. of Radiology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Schepper, A.M. de [Dept. of Radiology, University of Antwerp (Belgium)

    1999-02-01

    We present a case of Langerhans` cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the liver and spleen in an adult. The imaging features are different from those in the few previously reported cases of individual organ involvement by LCH. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 5 refs.

  13. Targeting dexamethasone to Kupffer cells : Effects on liver inflammation and fibrosis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melgert, BN; Olinga, P; Van der Laan, JMS; Weert, B; Cho, J; Schuppan, D; Groothuis, GMM; Meijer, DKF; Poelstra, K

    2001-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory liver diseases leading to fibrosis. Anti-inflammatory drugs are only effective when administered at high doses that may cause side effects. Therefore, dexamethasone coupled to mannosylated albumin (Dexa(5)-Man(10)-HSA) was

  14. Expression pattern of mda-7/IL-24 receptors in liver cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhu; Zhi-Bin Yang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mda-7/IL-24 receptor belongs to the typeⅡ cytokine receptor family, and its two heterodimeric receptors are IL-22R1/IL-20R2 and IL-20R1/IL-20R2. Mda-7/IL-24 receptor expression in liver cancer cell lines has not yet been described. This information may be helpful for further clinical gene therapy. METHODS: With normal skin total RNA as template, the cDNA sequences of IL-20R1, IL-20R2 and IL-22R were ampliifed by RT-PCR. Total RNA was extracted from cultured liver cancer cell lines and a normal liver cell line, then detected by northern blotting, and the expression of mda-7/IL-24 receptors was analyzed. RESULTS: PLC/PRF/5 and SMMC-7721 expressed IL-20R1;BEL-7402, Hep3B, HepG2, and PLC/PRF/5 expressed IL-20R2; and HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 expressed IL-22R. Only HepG2 expressed the IL-22R/IL-20R2 receptor complex. PLC/PRF/5 completely expressed both heterodimeric receptors. Huh-7, QGY-7701 and WRL-68 did not express the IL-24 receptor. CONCLUSION: Complete mda-7/IL-24 receptors are seldom expressed in liver cancer cell lines.

  15. Human telomerase activity, telomerase and telomeric template expression in hepatic stem cells and in livers from fetal and postnatal donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Reid, Lola M

    2009-10-01

    Although telomerase activity has been analyzed in various normal and malignant tissues, including liver, it is still unknown to what extent telomerase can be associated with specific maturational lineage stages. We assessed human telomerase activity, protein and gene expression for the telomerase reverse transcriptase, as well as expression of the telomeric template RNA hTER in hepatic stem cells and in various developmental stages of the liver from fetal to adult. In addition, the effect of growth factors on telomerase activity was analyzed in hepatic stem cells in vitro. Telomerase was found to be highly active in fetal liver cells and was significantly higher than in hepatic stem cells, correlating with gene and protein expression levels. Activity in postnatal livers from all donor ages varied considerably and did not correlate with age or gene expression levels. The hter expression could be detected throughout the development. A short stimulation by growth factors of cultured hepatic stem cells did not increase telomerase activity. Telomerase is considerably active in fetal liver and variably in postnatal livers. Although telomerase protein is present at varying levels in liver cells of all donor ages, gene expression is solely associated with fetal liver cells.

  16. GP73-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses possess potent killing effect on human liver cancer stem-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Liu, Tao; Yang, Yu; Xie, Wenjie; Liu, Xianglei; Huang, Fang; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, are highly metastatic, chemo-resistant and tumorigenic, and are critical for cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. Oncolytic adenovirus could targetedly kill CSCs and has been acted as a promising anticancer agent. Currently, a novel GP73-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 was constructed to specifically treat liver cancer and exhibited obvious cytotoxicity effect. However, there remains to be confirmed that whether GD55 could effectively eliminate liver CSCs. We first utilized the suspension culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, which acquires the properties of liver CSCs in self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, chemo-resistance and tumorigenicity. The results indicated that GD55 elicited more significant cytotoxicity and stronger oncolytic effect in liver CSC-like cells compared to common oncolytic virus ZD55. Additionally, GD55 possessed the greater efficacy in suppressing the growth of implanted tumors derived from liver CSC-like cells than ZD55. Furthermore, GD55 induced remarkable apoptosis of liver CSC-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the propogation of cells and angiogenesis in xenograft tumor tissues. Thus, GD55 may virtually represent an attractive therapeutic agent for targeting liver CSCs to achieve better clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:27121064

  17. FAT10 suppression stabilizes oxidized proteins in liver cells: Effects of HCV and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Murali; Hindman, Joseph; Tillman, Brittany; Jaramillo, Lee; Poluektova, Larisa I; French, Barbara A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; French, Samuel W; Osna, Natalia A

    2015-12-01

    FAT10 belongs to the ubiquitin-like modifier (ULM) family that targets proteins for degradation and is recognized by 26S proteasome. FAT10 is presented on immune cells and under the inflammatory conditions, is synergistically induced by IFNγ and TNFα in the non-immune (liver parenchymal) cells. It is not clear how viral proteins and alcohol regulate FAT10 expression on liver cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether FAT10 expression on liver cells is activated by the innate immunity factor, IFNα and how HCV protein expression in hepatocytes and ethanol-induced oxidative stress affect the level of FAT10 in liver cells. For this study, we used HCV(+) transgenic mice that express structural HCV proteins and their HCV(-) littermates. Mice were fed Lieber De Carli diet (control and ethanol) as specified in the NIH protocol for chronic-acute ethanol feeding. Alcohol exposure enhanced steatosis, induced oxidative stress and decreased proteasome activity in the liversof these mice, with more robust response to ethanol in HCV(+) mice. IFNα induced transcriptional activation of FAT10 in liver cells, which was dysregulated by ethanol feeding. Accordingly, IFNα-activated expression of FAT10 in hepatocytes (measured by indirect immunofluorescent of liver tissue) was also suppressed by ethanol exposure in both HCV(+) and HCV(-) mice. This suppression was accompanied with ethanol-mediated induction of lipid peroxidation marker, 4-HNE. All aforementioned effects of ethanol were attenuated by in vivo feeding of mice with the pro-methylating agent, betaine, which exhibits strong anti-oxidant properties. Based on this study, we hypothesize that FAT10 targets oxidatively modified proteins for proteasomal degradation, and that the reduction in FAT10 levels along with decreased proteasome activity may contribute to stabilization of these altered proteins in hepatocytes. In conclusion, IFNα induced FAT10 expression, which is suppressed by ethanol feeding in both HCV

  18. Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Cascade of Events Leading to Cell Death, Apoptosis or Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, Andrea; Dara, Lily; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) can broadly be divided into predictable and dose dependent such as acetaminophen (APAP) and unpredictable or idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI). Liver injury from drug hepatotoxicity (whether idiosyncratic or predictable) results in hepatocyte cell death and inflammation. The cascade of events leading to DILI and the cell death subroutine (apoptosis or necrosis) of the cell depend largely on the culprit drug. Direct toxins to hepatocytes likely induce oxidative organelle stress (such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress) leading to necrosis or apoptosis, while cell death in idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI) is usually the result of engagement of the innate and adaptive immune system (likely apoptotic), involving death receptors (DR). Here, we review the hepatocyte cell death pathways both in direct hepatotoxicity such as in APAP DILI as well as in IDILI. We examine the known signaling pathways in APAP toxicity, a model of necrotic liver cell death. We also explore what is known about the genetic basis of IDILI and the molecular pathways leading to immune activation and how these events can trigger hepatotoxicity and cell death. PMID:28486401

  19. Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Cascade of Events Leading to Cell Death, Apoptosis or Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorga, Andrea; Dara, Lily; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-05-09

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) can broadly be divided into predictable and dose dependent such as acetaminophen (APAP) and unpredictable or idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI). Liver injury from drug hepatotoxicity (whether idiosyncratic or predictable) results in hepatocyte cell death and inflammation. The cascade of events leading to DILI and the cell death subroutine (apoptosis or necrosis) of the cell depend largely on the culprit drug. Direct toxins to hepatocytes likely induce oxidative organelle stress (such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress) leading to necrosis or apoptosis, while cell death in idiosyncratic DILI (IDILI) is usually the result of engagement of the innate and adaptive immune system (likely apoptotic), involving death receptors (DR). Here, we review the hepatocyte cell death pathways both in direct hepatotoxicity such as in APAP DILI as well as in IDILI. We examine the known signaling pathways in APAP toxicity, a model of necrotic liver cell death. We also explore what is known about the genetic basis of IDILI and the molecular pathways leading to immune activation and how these events can trigger hepatotoxicity and cell death.

  20. Preparation and characterization of nano-hydroxyapatite nanomaterials for liver cancer cell treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhaveni, Sathiyamoorthy; Yuvakkumar, Rathinam; Rajkumar, Mani; Sundaram, Nachiappan Meenakshi; Rajendran, Venkatachalam

    2013-03-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite was synthesized by means of the hydrothermal treatment. The effects of nano-hydroxyapatite material on the behaviour of G2 liver cancer cells were explored. About 50% of cell viability was lost in nHAp material treated cells at 200 degrees C @ 5 h, followed by -30% in nHAp treated cells at 100 degrees C @ 5 h. Compared with control, nHAp material treated cells at 200 degrees C @ 5 h showed 60% and nHAp material treated cells at 100 degrees C @ 5 h showed 15% morphological change. Moreover, 50% of cell death was observed at 24 h incubation with nHAp material treated at 200 degrees C @ 5 h cells and 56% cell death at 48 h incubation and hence alters and disturbs the growth of cancer cells. In contrast, the nHAp material treated at 100 degrees C @ 5 h protects the cells and could be used for liver cancer cell treatment.

  1. Association between expression of Carboxypeptidase 4 and stem cell markers and their clinical significance in liver cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichao; Guo, Chunguang; Burnett, Joseph; Pan, Jian; Yang, Zhihua; Ran, Yuliang; Sun, Duxin

    2017-01-01

    The development of liver cancer would undergo a sequential progression from chronic inflammatory liver disease, cirrhosis to neoplasia. During these pathophysiological changes, abnormal liver microenvironment might induce the hepatocytes to die, abnormally proliferate and initiate cancer stem cells. Metallocarboxypeptidases (MCPs) involved in multiple biological functions including inflammation, fibrosis and stem cell niche formation. This study aimed to evaluate the expression of carboxypeptidase 4 (CPA4) in hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer tissues, and revealed its clinical significance in liver cancer progression. We firstly found that the CPA4 levels in tissues were significantly higher in liver cancer patients than those in other three groups. Then, elevated levels of CPA4 was observed in 57/100 (57%) liver cancer samples, and significantly correlated with Grade and Stage. We also identified a significant positive correlation between aberrant elevation of CPA4 and overexpression of stem cell markers including CD90, AFP and CD34 with follow-up data (n=100). Further Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that high levels of CPA4 and CD90 were significant predictors of poor overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression model showed that CPA4 was an independent prognostic factor for patients with liver cancer. This study demonstrated for the first time that high CPA4 expression was closely correlated with hepatocarcinogenesis, and might be used as an independent poor prognostic factor in liver cancer.

  2. Prolongation of liver allograft survival by dendritic cells modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Qing Xu; Yu-Ping Suo; Jian-Ping Gong; Ming-Man Zhang; Lü-Nan Yan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To induce the tolerance of rat liver allograft by dendritic cells (DCs) modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs).METHODS: Bone marrow (BM)-derived DCs from SD rats were propagated in the presence of GM-CSF or GM-CSF+IL-4to obtain immature DCs or mature DCs. GM-CSF+IL-4-propagated DCs were treated with double-strand NF-κB decoy ODNs containing two NF-κB binding sites or scrambled ODNs to ascertain whether NF-κB decoy ODNs might prevent DC maturation. GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GMCSF+NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs were treated with LPS for 18 h to determine whether NF-κB decoy ODNs could prevent LPS-induced IL-12production in DCs. NF-κB binding activities, costimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80, CD86) surface expression, IL-12protein expression and allostimulatory capacity of DCs were measured with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA),flow cytometry, Western blotting, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), respectively. GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GMCSF+IL-4 -propagated DCs, and GM-CSF+NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs were injected intravenously into recipient LEW rats 7 d prior to liver transplantation and immediately after liver transplantation.Histological grading of liver graft rejection was determined 7 d after liver transplantation. Expression of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ mRNA in liver graft and in recipient spleen was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Apoptosis of liver allograft-infiltrating cells was measured with TUNEL staining.RESULTS: GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GM-CSF+NF-κB decoy ODNs-propagated DCs and GM-CSF+ scrambled ODNspropagated DCs exhibited features of immature DCs, with similar low level of costimulatory molecule(CD40, CD80,CD86) surface expression, absence of NF-κB activation,and few allocostimulatory activities. GM-CSF+IL-4-propagated DCs displayed features of mature DCs, with high levels of costimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80, CD86) surface expression, marked NF-κB activation, and

  3. Cryopreserved hepatic progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells can arrest progression of liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Arundhati; Raju, Sheena; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocytes generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are considered to be an excellent candidate for restoring the liver function deficiencies. We have earlier standardized a three-step differentiation protocol to generate functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) from hESCs, which expressed the major hepatic markers. We have also found that the HLCs remain stable and functional even after extended period of in vitro culture and cryopreservation. In the present study, we have aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of cryopreserved-thawed hESC-derived hepatic progenitor cells following transplantation in carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrotic rat livers. Significant therapeutic effects, including improved hepatic histology and normal serum biochemistry of hepatic enzymes along with increased survival rate, were observed in the cell transplanted rats. This result is an encouraging indication to develop methods for clinical application of hESC-derived hepatic lineage cells.

  4. Multiple hormonal control of enzyme synthesis in liver and hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, F.T.; Lee, K.L.; Pomato, N.; Nickol, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Synthesis of hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase is accelerated in vivo by either of the pancreatic hormones, insulin and glucagon as well as by glucocorticoids, and glucagon acts via the intracellular mediator, cyclic AMP. The mechanisms responsive to these hormones have also been retained in cultured hepatoma cells: in H-35 cells the responses appear to be essentially identical to those in liver, especially in that each inducer can act independently of the others. In this paper we describe recent analyses of the cellular mechanisms involved in this multiple hormonal control of synthesis of a single enzyme. These experiments have been done with rat liver in vivo, owing to a need for larger quantities of cellular components that can readily be obtained from cultured cells. As some of these results appear to be at variance in important respects with those of earlier analyses carried out in H-35 cells, we briefly review these earlier experiments as well.

  5. CWP232228 targets liver cancer stem cells through Wnt/β-catenin signaling: a novel therapeutic approach for liver cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan-Kyu; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Hong, In-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation, which may destroy tumor masses, but not all liver CSCs contribute to tumor initiation, metastasis, and relapse. In the present study, we showed that liver CSCs with elevated Wnt/β-catenin signaling possess much greater self-renewal and clonogenic potential. We further documented that the increased clonogenic potential of liver CSCs is highly associated with changes in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and that Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity is positively correlated with CD133 expression and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymatic activity. Notably, the small molecule inhibitor CWP232228, which antagonizes the binding of β-catenin to TCF in the nucleus, inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and depletes CD133+/ALDH+ liver CSCs, thus ultimately diminishing the self-renewal capacity of CSCs and decreasing tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that CWP232228 acts as a candidate therapeutic agent for liver cancer by preferentially targeting liver CSCs. PMID:26967248

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Hepatic Differentiation of Adult Somatic Stem Cells and Extraembryonic Stem Cells for Treating End Stage Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxia Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of liver donors is a major handicap that prevents most patients from receiving liver transplantation and places them on a waiting list for donated liver tissue. Then, primary hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers have emerged as two alternative treatments for these often fatal diseases. However, another problem has emerged. Functional hepatocytes for liver regeneration are in short supply, and they will dedifferentiate immediately in vitro after they are isolated from liver tissue. Alternative stem-cell-based therapeutic strategies, including hepatic stem cells (HSCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are more promising, and more attention has been devoted to these approaches because of the high potency and proliferation ability of the cells. This review will focus on the general characteristics and the progress in hepatic differentiation of adult somatic stem cells and extraembryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo for the treatment of end stage liver diseases. The hepatic differentiation of stem cells would offer an ideal and promising source for cell therapy and tissue engineering for treating liver diseases.

  7. Completion of hepatitis C virus replication cycle in heterokaryons excludes dominant restrictions in human non-liver and mouse liver cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Frentzen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is hepatotropic and only infects humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, an immunocompetent small animal model is lacking. The restricted tropism of HCV likely reflects specific host factor requirements. We investigated if dominant restriction factors expressed in non-liver or non-human cell lines inhibit HCV propagation thus rendering these cells non-permissive. To this end we explored if HCV completes its replication cycle in heterokaryons between human liver cell lines and non-permissive cell lines from human non-liver or mouse liver origin. Despite functional viral pattern recognition pathways and responsiveness to interferon, virus production was observed in all fused cells and was only ablated when cells were treated with exogenous interferon. These results exclude that constitutive or virus-induced expression of dominant restriction factors prevents propagation of HCV in these cell types, which has important implications for HCV tissue and species tropism. In turn, these data strongly advocate transgenic approaches of crucial human HCV cofactors to establish an immunocompetent small animal model.

  8. Leishmania infantum antigens modulate memory cell subsets of liver resident T lymphocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A; Claro, M; Alexandre-Pires, G; Santos-Mateus, D; Martins, C; Valério-Bolas, A; Rafael-Fernandes, M; Pereira, M A; Pereira da Fonseca, I; Tomás, A M; Santos-Gomes, G

    2017-02-01

    In the recent years, the liver has been recognized as an important immune organ with major regulatory functions and immune memory, adding to the well-described vital metabolic functions. There are evidences from experimental infections performed with visceral Leishmania species that immune responses to parasite infection can be organ-specific. The liver is the compartment of acute resolving infection, with minimal tissue damage and resistance to reinfection, whereas the spleen is the compartment of parasite persistence. Control of hepatic infection in mice requires a coordinated immune response that involves the development of inflammatory granulomas. It is also described that the liver harbors populations of resident lymphocytes, which may exhibit memory characteristics. Therefore, the present study aims to address the role of the liver as an immune memory organ in the context of Leishmania infantum infection, by characterizing phenotypically resident liver T lymphocytes. The dynamics of memory T cells in L. infantum infected BALB/c mice and the effect of anti-leishmanial treatment in the differentiation of memory cell subsets were analyzed. The potential of recognition, differentiation and selection of memory lymphocytes by three L. infantum recombinant proteins were also explored. L. infantum infection generates effector and central memory T cells, but the cells did not expand when recalled, demonstrating a possible parasite silencing effect. The treatment with a leishmanicidal drug (antimoniate meglumine) increases the levels of memory and effector T cells, eliciting a more robust hepatic immune response. L. infantum parasites with a decreased sensitivity to the leishmanicidal drug favor the expansion of memory CD8(+) T cell subset, but inhibit the proliferation of CD8(+) T effector cells, possibly assuring their own survival. The recombinant proteins LirCyp1 and LirSOD are strongly recognized by memory cells of treated mice, indicating that these proteins

  9. Functional Characteristics of Reversibly Immortalized Hepatic Progenitor Cells Derived from Mouse Embryonic Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Liver is a vital organ and retains its regeneration capability throughout adulthood, which requires contributions from different cell populations, including liver precursors and intrahepatic stem cells. To overcome the mortality of hepatic progenitors (iHPs in vitro, we aim to establish reversibly immortalized hepatic progenitor cells from mouse embryonic liver. Methods and Results: Using retroviral system to stably express SV40 T antigen flanked with Cre/LoxP sites, we establish a repertoire of iHP clones with varied differentiation potential. The iHP cells maintain long-term proliferative activity and express varied levels of progenitor markers (Pou5f1/Oct4 and Dlk and hepatocyte markers (AFP, Alb and ApoB. Five representative iHP clones express hepatic/pancreatic transcription factors HNF3α/Foxa1, HNF3β/Foxa2, and HNF4α/MODY1. Dexamethasone is shown to promote the expression of hepatocyte markers AFP and TAT, along with ICG-uptake and glycogen storage functions in the iHP clones. Cre-mediated removal of SV40 T antigen reverses the proliferative activity of iHP cells. When iHP cells are subcutaneously implanted in athymic nude mice, no tumor formation is observed for up to 8 weeks. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the established iHP cells are stable, reversible, and non-tumorigenic hepatic progenitor-like cells, which should be valuable for studying liver organogenesis, metabolic regulations, and hepatic lineage-specific differentiation.

  10. Isolated Liver Metastasis in Hürthle Cell Thyroid Cancer Treated with Microwave Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Segkos; Carl Schmidt; Fadi Nabhan

    2017-01-01

    Hürthle cell thyroid cancer (HCTC) is a less common form of differentiated thyroid cancer. It rarely metastasizes to the liver, and when it does, the metastasis is almost never isolated. Here we report a 62-year-old male with widely invasive Hürthle cell thyroid cancer, who underwent total thyroidectomy and received adjuvant treatment with I-131 with posttreatment scan showing no evidence of metastatic disease. His thyroglobulin however continued to rise after that and eventually an isolated ...

  11. Degradation of transplanted rat liver mitochondrial-outer-membrane proteins in hepatoma cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, S.M.; Mayer, R J

    1983-01-01

    Reductively [3H]methylated 3H mitochondrial-outer-membrane vesicles from rat liver and vesicles where monoamine oxidase has been derivatized irreversibly by [3H]-pargyline have been deliberately miscompartmentalized by heterologous transplantation into hepatoma (HTC) cells by poly(ethylene glycol)-mediated vesicle-cell fusion. Fluorescein-conjugated mitochondrial-outer-membrane vesicles have also been used to show that transplanted material is patched, capped and internalized. Reductively met...

  12. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  13. HuR contributes to Hepatic Stellate Cell activation and liver fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Woodhoo, A.; Iruarrizaga-Lejarreta, M.; Beraza, N.; García-Rodríguez, J.L.; Embade, N.; Fernández-Ramos, D.; Matinez-Lopez, N.; Gutiérrez, Virginia; Arteta, B; Caballeria, J.; Lu, S.C. (Shelly C.); Mato, J.M. (José María); Varela-Rey, M.; Martinez-Chantar, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a major role in control of mRNA turnover and translation rates. We examined the role of the RBP human antigen R (HuR) during cholestatic liver injury and hepatic stellate cells (HSC) activation. HuR silencing attenuated fibrosis development in vivo after BDL, reducing liver damage, oxidative stress, inflammation, and collagen and α-SMA (α-smooth muscle actin) expression. HuR expression increased in activated HSC from BDL mice and during HSC activation in vitro...

  14. Cytoglobin is expressed in hepatic stellate cells, but not in myofibroblasts, in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Hiroyuki; Komiya, Tohru; Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Tamori, Akihiro; Enomoto, Masaru; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Iwai, Shuji; Uchida-Kobayashi, Sawako; Fujii, Hideki; Hagihara, Atsushi; Kawamura, Etsushi; Murakami, Yoshiki; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2014-02-01

    Cytoglobin (CYGB) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytoplasm of fibroblastic cells in many organs, including hepatic stellate cells. As yet, there is no specific marker with which to distinguish stellate cells from myofibroblasts in the human liver. To investigate whether CYGB can be utilized to distinguish hepatic stellate cells from myofibroblasts in normal and fibrotic human liver, human liver tissues damaged by infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and at different stages of fibrosis were obtained by liver biopsy. Immunohistochemistry was performed on histological sections of liver tissues using antibodies against CYGB, cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), thymocyte differentiation antigen 1 (Thy-1), and fibulin-2 (FBLN2). CYGB- and CRBP-1-positive cells were counted around fibrotic portal tracts in histological sections of the samples. The expression of several of the proteins listed above was examined in cultured mouse stellate cells. Quiescent stellate cells, but not portal myofibroblasts, expressed both CYGB and CRBP-1 in normal livers. In fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, stellate cells expressed both CYGB and α-SMA, whereas myofibroblasts around the portal vein expressed α-SMA, Thy-1, and FBLN2, but not CYGB. Development of the fibrotic stage was positively correlated with increases in Sirius red-stained, α-SMA-positive, and Thy-1-positive areas, whereas the number of CYGB- and CRBP-1-positive cells decreased with fibrosis development. Primary cultured mouse stellate cells expressed cytoplasmic CYGB at day 1, whereas they began to express α-SMA at the cellular margins at day 4. Thy-1 was undetectable throughout the culture period. In human liver tissues, quiescent stellate cells are CYGB positive. When activated, they also become α-SMA positive; however, they are negative for Thy-1 and FBLN2. Thus, CYGB is a useful marker with which to distinguish stellate cells from portal myofibroblasts in the damaged human

  15. Thinking outside the liver: induced pluripotent stem cells for hepatic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subba Rao, Mekala; Sasikala, Mitnala; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2013-06-14

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) unraveled a mystery in stem cell research, after identification of four re-programming factors for generating pluripotent stem cells without the need of embryos. This breakthrough in generating iPSCs from somatic cells has overcome the ethical issues and immune rejection involved in the use of human embryonic stem cells. Hence, iPSCs form a great potential source for developing disease models, drug toxicity screening and cell-based therapies. These cells have the potential to differentiate into desired cell types, including hepatocytes, under in vitro as well as under in vivo conditions given the proper microenvironment. iPSC-derived hepatocytes could be useful as an unlimited source, which can be utilized in disease modeling, drug toxicity testing and producing autologous cell therapies that would avoid immune rejection and enable correction of gene defects prior to cell transplantation. In this review, we discuss the induction methods, role of reprogramming factors, and characterization of iPSCs, along with hepatocyte differentiation from iPSCs and potential applications. Further, we discuss the location and detection of liver stem cells and their role in liver regeneration. Although tumor formation and genetic mutations are a cause of concern, iPSCs still form a promising source for clinical applications.

  16. A Convenient and Efficient Method to Enrich and Maintain Highly Proliferative Human Fetal Liver Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Shu; Dou, Ya-ling; Guo, Xiang-fei; Chen, Zhao-li; Wang, Xin-wei; Shen, Zhi-qiang; Qiu, Zhi-gang; Jin, Min; Li, Jun-wen

    2015-06-01

    Pluripotent human hepatic stem cells have broad research and clinical applications, which are, however, restricted by both limited resources and technical difficulties with respect to isolation of stem cells from the adult or fetal liver. In this study, we developed a convenient and efficient method involving a two-step in situ collagenase perfusion, gravity sedimentation, and Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich and maintain highly proliferative human fetal liver stem cells (hFLSCs). Using this method, the isolated hFLSCs entered into the exponential growth phase within 10 days and maintained sufficient proliferative activity to permit subculture for at least 20 passages without differentiation. Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry results showed that these cells expressed stem cell markers, such as c-kit, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), oval cell marker-6 (OV-6), epithelial marker cytokeratin 18 (CK18), biliary ductal marker CK19, and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Gene expression analysis showed that these cells had stable mRNA expression of c-Kit, EpCAM, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), CK19, CK18, AFP, and claudin 3 (CLDN-3) throughout each passage while maintaining low levels of ALB, but with complete absence of cytochrome P450 3A4 (C3A4), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), telomeric repeat binding factor (TRF), and connexin 26 (CX26) expression. When grown in appropriate medium, these isolated liver stem cells could differentiate into hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, osteoblasts, adipocytes, or endothelial cells. Thus, we have demonstrated a more economical and efficient method to isolate hFLSCs than magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). This novel approach may provide an excellent tool to isolate highly proliferative hFLSCs for tissue engineering and regenerative therapies.

  17. Observations of liver cancer cells in scanning probe acoustic microscope: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Xi, Qing; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) can be used to acquire the morphology image as well as the non-destructive internal structures acoustic image. However, the observations of the morphology image as well as the internal structures acoustic image of liver cancer cells in SPAM are few. In this paper, we cultured 4 different types of liver cancer cells on the silicon wafer and coverslip to observe their morphology images as well as acoustic images in SPAM, and made a preliminary study of the 8 types of cells specimens (hereinafter referred to as the silicon specimens and coverslips specimens). The experimental measurement results showed that some cellular pseudopodium were observed in the morphology images of the coverslip specimens while no such cellular pseupodium were appeared in the morphology images of the silicon specimens, which concluded that the living liver cancer cells were less likely to grow on the silicon wafer. SPAM provides a rapid and sensitive visual method for studying the morphology and internal structures of the cancer cells. The proposed method can be also used to obtain the morphology and internal information in both solid and soft material wafers, such as silicon and cells, with the resolution of nanometer scale.

  18. Distribution of myofibroblastic cells in the liver and kidney of Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Naoto; Ishiura, Yoshihito; Kawashima, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Eriko; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Enzan, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MGS) is a rare disorder characterized by occipital encephalocele, polydactyly and polycystic kidney. Early diagnosis is very important because MGS has a high risk of recurrence and infants with MGS are frequently stillborn or die soon after birth. An autopsy case of MGS is presented and the focus is specifically on the myofibroblastic cells of the liver and polycystic kidney. Although routine histological examination did not reveal hepatic fibrosis, a specific distribution of alpha smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA)-positive and h-caldesmon (h-CD)-negative stromal cells (myofibroblastic cells) was observed along the limiting plate of the portal area. Furthermore, myofibroblastic cells were focally distributed along the sinusoidal wall and around the bile ducts in the portal area. In the polycystic kidney, the presence of myofibroblastic cells in the stroma between the cystic lesions was also confirmed by electron microscopy. In conclusion, myofibroblastic cells were distributed in the liver and kidney of a patient with MGS and their specific distribution in the liver may be indicative of prestage hepatic fibrosis.

  19. ATRA inhibits experimental liver metastasis of gastric cancer cells in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qiang Chen; Qiao Wu; Zheng Ming Chen; Fu Chen; Wen Jin Su

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the effects of ATRA on experimental liver metastasis of gastric cancer cells.METHODS MGc80-3 and SGC-7901 cells were injectied into spleen subcapsule of nude mice, who weresubsequently administrated with ATRA every other day. Food-intake and body weight of mice were measuredweekly. After six weeks, the nude mice were executed, tumors in spleen and liver were examinedpathologically, microtumor vessel density (MVD) was accounted by immunohistochemical method and serumCEA was measured by radioimmunoassay.RESULTS Nude mice administrated with ATRA, the growth of spleen tumor and its metastatic ability toliver were inhibited, the metastatic rate was decreased by 33.3% (MGc80-3) and 50.0% (SGC-7901). SpleenMVD and liver MVD were reduced by 28.6% and 22.9% (MGc80-3), 23.7% and 37.6% (SGC-7901),respectively. The serum CEA was lowered by 43.4% (MGc80-3).CONCLUSION ATRA can effectively inhibit the experimental liver metastasis of gastric cancer cells,which is relavant with the decrease of MVD and CEA.

  20. Osteoclast-like giant cell tumors of the pancreas and liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juergen Bauditz; Birgit Rudolph; Wolfram Wermke

    2006-01-01

    Osteoclast-like giant cell tumors (OGCT) are rare abdominal tumors, which mainly occur in the pancreas.The neoplasms are composed of two distinct cell populations and frequently show an inhomogenous appearance with cystic structures. However, due to the rarity of these tumors, only very limited clinical data are available, Imaging features and sonographic appearance have hardly been characterized. Here we report on two cases of osteoclast-like giant cell tumors, one located within the pancreas, the other within the liver,in which OGCTs are extremely rare. Both patients were investigated by contrast sonography, which demonstrated a complex, partly cystic and strongly vascularized tumor within the head of the pancreas in the first patient and a large, hypervascularized neoplasm with calcifications within the liver in the second patient. The liver OGCT responded well to a combination of carboplatin,etoposide and paclitaxel. With a combination of surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation and chemotherapy,the patient's survival is currently more than 15 mo,making him the longest survivor with an OGCT of the liver to date.

  1. Characterization of CD133~+ parenchymal cells in the liver: Histology and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seiichi Yoshikawa; Yoh Zen; Takahiko Fujii; Yasunori Sato; Tetsuo Ohta; Yutaka Aoyagi; Yasuni Nakanuma

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To reveal the characteristics of CD133~+ cells in the liver.METHODS: This study examined the histological characteristics of CD133~+ cells in non-neoplastic and neoplastic liver tissues by immunostaining, and also analyzed the biological characteristics of CD133~+ cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or cholangiocarcinoma cell lines.RESULTS: Immunostaining revealed constant expression of CD133 in non-neoplastic and neoplastic biliary epithelium, and these cells had the immunophenotype CD133~+/CK19+/HepPar-1~-. A small number of CD133~+/CK19~-/HepPar-1~+ cells were also identified in HCC and combined hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinoma. In addition, small ductal structures, resembling the canal of Hering, partly surrounded by hepatocytes were positive for CD133. CD133 expression was observed in three HCC (HuH7, PLC5 and HepG2) and two cholangiocarcinoma cell and HepG2) and two cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (HuCCT1 and CCKS1). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) revealed that CD133~+ and CD133~-cells derived from HuH7 and HuCCT1 cells similarly produced CD133~+ and CD133~-cells during subculture. To examine the relationship between CD133~+ cells and the side population (SP) phenotype, FACS was performed using Hoechst 33342 and a monoclonal antibody against CD133. The ratios of CD133~+/CD133~-cells were almost identical in the SP and non-SP in HuH7. In addition, four different cellular populations (SP/CD133~+, SP/CD133~-, non-SP/CD133~+, and non-SP/CD133~-) could similarly produce CD133~+ and CD133~-cells during subculture. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that CD133 could be a biliary and progenitor cell marker in vivo. However, CD133 alone is not sufficient to detect tumor-initiating cells in cell lines.

  2. Definition of the transcription initiation site of human plasminogen gene in liver and non hepatic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgaretti, N; Bruno, L; Pontoglio, M; Candiani, G; Meroni, G; Ottolenghi, S; Taramelli, R

    1990-12-31

    We have mapped the cap site of the human plasminogen mRNA by primer extension and PCR techniques and found that it is located at position -161 relative to the first ATG, 97 bases upstream to the 5' end of the previously isolated cDNA clone. Seven human hepatic and non hepatic cell lines and fresh liver cells were tested for human plasminogen mRNA expression: the liver and the liver derived HepG2 cell line represent the major site of plasminogen RNA synthesis while the other cell lines (Hep3B, HeLa, IMR, 293 CaCo and SW626) show much lower levels.

  3. YKL-40 expression in CD14+ liver cells in acute and chronic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oscar Pizano-Martínez; Vidal Delgado-Rizo; Irinea Ya(n)ez-Sánchez; Pilar Alatorre-Carranza; Alejandra Miranda-Díaz; Pablo C Ortiz-Lazareno; Trinidad García-Iglesias; Adrian Daneri-Navarro; Mónica Vázquez-Del Mercado; Mary Fafutis-Morris

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate that CD14+ cells are an important source of the growth factor YKL-40 in acute and chronic liver damage.METHODS: Rats were inoculated with one dose of CCl4 to induce acute damage. Liver biopsies were obtained at 0, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h. For chronic damage, CCl4 was administered three days per week for 6 or 8 wk. Tissue samples were collected, and cellular populations were isolated by liver digestion and purified by cell sorting. YKL-40 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. RESULTS: Acute liver damage induced a rapid increase of YKL-40 mRNA beginning at 12 h. Expression peaked at 24 h, with a 26-fold increase over basal levels. By 72 h however, YKL-40 expression levels had nearly returned to control levels. On the other hand, chronic damage induced a sustained increase in YKL-40 expression, with 7- and 9-fold higher levels at 6 and 8 wk, respectively. The pattern of YKL-40 expression in different subpopulations showed that CD14+ cells, which include Kupffer cells, are a source of YKL-40 after acute damage at 72 h [0.09 relative expression units (REU)] as well as after chronic injury at 6 wk (0.11 REU). Hepatocytes, in turn, accounted for 0.06 and 0.01 REU after 72 h (acute) or 6 wk (chronic), respectively. The rest of the CD14- cells (including T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, natural killer and natural killer T cells) yielded 0.07 and 0.15 REU at 72 h and 6 wk, respectively. YKL-40 protein expression in liver was detected at 72 h as well as 6 and 8 wk, with the highest expression relative to controls (11-fold; P ≤ 0.05) seen at 6 wk. Macrophages were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. We demonstrate that under these conditions, these cells showed maximum expression of YKL-40 at 12 h, with P < 0.05 compared with controls.CONCLUSION: Hepatic CD14+ cells are an YKL-40 mRNA and protein source in acute and chronic liver injury, with expression patterns similar to growth factors implicated

  4. Acute liver failure at 26 weeks' gestation in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Mara; Daugherty, Tami J; Elihu, Arvand; Sharaf, Ravi; Concepcion, Waldo; Druzin, Maurice; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2009-10-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for acute liver failure (ALF) during pregnancy is an uncommon occurrence with variable outcomes. In pregnancy-related liver failure, prompt diagnosis and immediate delivery are essential for a reversal of the underlying process and for maternal and fetal survival. In rare cases, the reason for ALF during pregnancy is either unknown or irreversible, and thus OLT may be necessary. This case demonstrates the development of cryptogenic ALF during the 26th week of pregnancy in a woman with sickle cell disease. She underwent successful cesarean delivery of a healthy male fetus at 27 weeks with concurrent OLT. This report provides a literature review of OLT in pregnancy and examines the common causes of ALF in the pregnant patient. On the basis of the management and outcome of our case and the literature review, we present an algorithm for the suggested management of ALF in pregnancy.

  5. Liver Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GGT) – another enzyme found mainly in liver cells Lactate dehydrogenase (LD) – an enzyme released with cell damage; found ... and with conditions, such as congestive heart failure . Lactate dehydrogenase (LD) This is a non-specific marker of ...

  6. Antitumor effects of interleukin-18 gene-modified hepatocyte cell line on implanted liver carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷建杭; 张立煌; 姚航平; 曹雪涛

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antitumor effects of intrasplenically transplanted interleukin-18 (IL-18) gene-modified hepatocytes on murine implanted liver carcinoma.Methods Embryonic murine hepatocyte cell line (BNL-CL2) was transfected with a recombinant adenovirus encoding IL-18 and used as delivery cells for IL-18 gene transfer. Two cell lines, BNL-LacZ and BNL-CL2, were used as controls. One week after intrasplenic injection of C26 cells (colon carcinoma line), tumor-bearing syngeneic mice underwent the intrasplenic transplantation of IL-18 gene-modified hepatocyte cell line and were divided into treatment group (BNL IL-18) and control groups (BNL-LacZ and BNL-CL2 ). Two weeks later, the serum levels of IL-18, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) in the implanted liver carcinoma-bearing mice were assayed, the cytotoxicity of murine splenic cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) was measured, and the morphology of the hepatic tumors was studied to evaluate the antitumor effects of the approach. Results In the treatment group, the serum levels of IL-18, IFN-γ, TNF-α and NO increased significantly. The splenic CTL activity increased markedly (P<0.01) , accompanied by a substantial decrease in tumor volume and the percentage of tumor area and prolonged survival of liver carcinomo-being mice.Conclusions In vivo IL-18 expression by ex vivo manipulated cells with IL-18 recombinant adenovirus is able to exert potent antitumor effects by inducing a predominantly T-cell-helper type 1 (Th1) immune response. Intrasplenic transplantation of adenovirus-mediated IL-18 gene-modified hepatocytes could be used as a targeting treatment for implanted liver carcinoma.

  7. Triple Staining Including FOXA2 Identifies Stem Cell Lineages Undergoing Hepatic and Biliary Differentiation in Cirrhotic Human Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Charles E; Bebawee, Remon; Matarlo, Joe; Locker, Joseph; Pattamanuch, Nicole; Gupta, Sanjeev; Rogler, Leslie E

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations have reported many markers associated with human liver stem/progenitor cells, "oval cells," and identified "niches" in diseased livers where stem cells occur. However, there has remained a need to identify entire lineages of stem cells as they differentiate into bile ducts or hepatocytes. We have used combined immunohistochemical staining for a marker of hepatic commitment and specification (FOXA2 [Forkhead box A2]), hepatocyte maturation (Albumin and HepPar1), and features of bile ducts (CK19 [cytokeratin 19]) to identify lineages of stem cells differentiating toward the hepatocytic or bile ductular compartments of end-stage cirrhotic human liver. We identified large clusters of disorganized, FOXA2 expressing, oval cells in localized liver regions surrounded by fibrotic matrix, designated as "micro-niches." Specific FOXA2-positive cells within the micro-niches organize into primitive duct structures that support both hepatocytic and bile ductular differentiation enabling identification of entire lineages of cells forming the two types of structures. We also detected expression of hsa-miR-122 in primitive ductular reactions expected for hepatocytic differentiation and hsa-miR-23b cluster expression that drives liver cell fate decisions in cells undergoing lineage commitment. Our data establish the foundation for a mechanistic hypothesis on how stem cell lineages progress in specialized micro-niches in cirrhotic end-stage liver disease.

  8. Autophagy-related cell death by pan-histone deacetylase inhibition in liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fazio, Pietro; Waldegger, Petra; Jabari, Samir; Lingelbach, Susanne; Montalbano, Roberta; Ocker, Matthias; Slater, Emily P.; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Illig, Romana; Neureiter, Daniel; Wissniowski, Thaddeus T.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic, catabolic degradation process and cell fate essential regulatory mechanism. Protracted autophagy triggers cell death; its aberrant function is responsible for several malignancies. Panobinostat, a potent pan-deacetylase inhibitor, causes endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of autophagy in deacetylase inhibitor-triggered liver cancer cell death. HepG2 (p53wt) and Hep3B (p53 null) liver cancer cell lines were exposed to panobinostat. RT-qPCR and western blot confirmed autophagic factor modulation. Immuno-fluorescence, -precipitation and -histochemistry as well as transmission electron microscopy verified autophagosome formation. The cytotoxicity of panobinostat and autophagy modulators was detected using a real time cell viability assay. Panobinostat induced autophagy-related factor expression and aggregation. Map1LC3B and Beclin1 were significantly over-expressed in HepG2 xenografts in nude mice treated with panobinostat for 4 weeks. Subcellular distribution of Beclin1 increased with the appearance of autophagosomes-like aggregates. Cytosolic loss of p53, in HepG2, and p73, in Hep3B cells, and a corresponding gain of their nuclear level, together with modulation of DRAM1, were observed. Autophagosome aggregation was visible after 6 h of treatment. Treatment of cells stably expressing GFP-RFPtag Map1LC3B resulted in aggregation and a fluorescence switch, thus confirming autophagosome formation and maturation. Tamoxifen, an inducer of autophagy, caused only a block in cell proliferation; but in combination with panobinostat it resulted in cell death. Autophagy triggers cell demise in liver cancer. Its modulation by the combination of tamoxifen and panobinostat could be a new option for palliative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27058414

  9. The nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione reduces apoptotic primary liver cell loss in a three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model developed for liver support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jose M; Vodovotz, Yoram; Baun, Matthew J; Monga, Satdarshan Pal; Billiar, Timothy R; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2010-03-01

    Artificial extracorporeal support for hepatic failure has met with limited clinical success. In hepatocytes, nitric oxide (NO) functions as an antiapoptotic modulator in response to a variety of stresses. We hypothesized that NO administration would yield improved viability and hepatocellular restructuring in a four-compartment, hollow fiber-based bioreactor with integral oxygenation for dynamic three-dimensional perfusion of hepatic cells in bioartificial liver support systems. Isolated adult rat liver cells were placed in culture medium alone (control) or medium supplemented with various concentrations of an NO donor (S-nitrosoglutathione [GSNO]) in the bioreactors. Media samples were obtained from the cell perfusion circuit to monitor cellular response. After 24 and 72 h, histology biopsies were taken to investigate spontaneous restructuring of the cells. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to quantify apoptotic nuclei. Control bioreactors exhibited 47.9 +/- 2.9% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) apoptotic nuclei. In contrast, NO-treated bioreactors exhibited a biphasic response. Fewer apoptotic nuclei were seen in the 200 and 500 microM GSNO groups (14.4 +/- 0.4%). No effect was observed in the 10 microM GSNO group (47.3%), and increased TUNEL staining was observed in the 1000 microM GSNO group (82.6%). Media lactate dehydrogenase levels were lower in bioreactor groups treated with 200 or 500 microM GSNO (310 +/- 38 IU/L) compared with the control group (919 +/- 188 IU/L; p bioreactors at 24 h vs. 110 +/- 13 in controls; p = 0.851). Histologically, all of the bioreactor groups exhibited liver cell aggregates with some attached to the bioreactor capillaries. Increased numbers of cells in the aggregates and superior spontaneous restructuring of the cells were seen at 24 and 72 h in the bioreactor groups treated with either 200 or 500 microM GSNO compared with the control groups. Addition of an NO donor

  10. Single-cell spatial reconstruction reveals global division of labour in the mammalian liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Shenhav, Rom; Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Tóth, Beáta; Lemze, Doron; Golan, Matan; Massasa, Efi E; Baydatch, Shaked; Landen, Shanie; Moor, Andreas E; Brandis, Alexander; Giladi, Amir; Stokar-Avihail, Avigail; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2017-02-16

    The mammalian liver consists of hexagon-shaped lobules that are radially polarized by blood flow and morphogens. Key liver genes have been shown to be differentially expressed along the lobule axis, a phenomenon termed zonation, but a detailed genome-wide reconstruction of this spatial division of labour has not been achieved. Here we measure the entire transcriptome of thousands of mouse liver cells and infer their lobule coordinates on the basis of a panel of zonated landmark genes, characterized with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization. Using this approach, we obtain the zonation profiles of all liver genes with high spatial resolution. We find that around 50% of liver genes are significantly zonated and uncover abundant non-monotonic profiles that peak at the mid-lobule layers. These include a spatial order of bile acid biosynthesis enzymes that matches their position in the enzymatic cascade. Our approach can facilitate the reconstruction of similar spatial genomic blueprints for other mammalian organs.

  11. Characteristic changes and their significance of peripheral follicular helper T cell subsets in liver transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke ZHANG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the expression of follicular helper T (Tfh cell subsets in peripheral blood of patients with liver transplantation (LT and relevance to the prognosis. Methods  Eleven liver transplant patients with stable liver function were enrolled in this study. The frequencies of Tfh subsets were examined by flow cytometry. The frequencies and the level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST and total bilirubin (TBIL were monitored dynamically within one month after LT. Results  The frequency of CD4+CXCR5+CXCR3–CCR6– Tfh2 subset in peripheral blood increased significantly after LT as compared with those before transplantation (P<0.05. In addition, the frequency of CD4+CXCR5+CXCR3–CCR6+ Tfh17 subset in peripheral blood showed a trend of increase. The frequency of CD4+CXCR5+CXCR3+CCR6– Tfh1 subset, however, showed a downtrend, but no statistical difference was found. Conclusion  The subsets of Tfh2 and Tfh17 may be involved in the regulation of alloimmune response and play a role in maintaining liver function stability in liver transplant patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.08

  12. How does a single cell know when the liver has reached its correct size?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Hohmann

    Full Text Available The liver is a multi-functional organ that regulates major physiological processes and that possesses a remarkable regeneration capacity. After loss of functional liver mass the liver grows back to its original, individual size through hepatocyte proliferation and apoptosis. How does a single hepatocyte 'know' when the organ has grown to its final size? This work considers the initial growth phase of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in which the mass is restored. There are strong and valid arguments that the trigger of proliferation after partial hepatectomy is mediated through the portal blood flow. It remains unclear, if either or both the concentration of metabolites in the blood or the shear stress are crucial to hepatocyte proliferation and liver size control. A cell-based mathematical model is developed that helps discriminate the effects of these two potential triggers. Analysis of the mathematical model shows that a metabolic load and a hemodynamical hypothesis imply different feedback mechanisms at the cellular scale. The predictions of the developed mathematical model are compared to experimental data in rats. The assumption that hepatocytes are able to buffer the metabolic load leads to a robustness against short-term fluctuations of the trigger which can not be achieved with a purely hemodynamical trigger.

  13. Long-chain PUFA in Granulocytes, Mononuclear Cells, and RBC in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis: Relation to Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Marianne H.; Ott, Peter; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2012-01-01

    regulator protein (CFTR)-regulated tissues such as granulocytes, monocytes, and lymphocytes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether patients with CF-related liver disease have lower n-3 LCPUFA level than patients with CF without liver disease.Methods: Twenty patients with known CF...... of liver disease was negatively associated with LCPUFA n-3 levels in CFTR-expressing white blood cells but unrelated to those levels in CFTR-negative RBC....

  14. Anti-Erythropoietin Antibody Associated Pure Red Cell Aplasia Resolved after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie K. Hung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C often develop anemia secondary to ribavirin and interferon. Recombinant erythropoietin has been used to improve anemia associated with antiviral therapy and to minimize dose reductions, which are associated with decreased rates of sustained virologic response. A rare potential side effect of recombinant erythropoietin is anti-erythropoietin antibody associated pure red cell aplasia. In chronic kidney disease patients with this entity, there have been good outcomes associated with renal transplant and subsequent immunosuppression. In this case, a chronic liver disease patient developed anti-erythropoietin associated pure red cell aplasia and recovered after liver transplantation and immunosuppression. It is unclear whether it is the transplanted organ, the subsequent immunosuppression, or the combination that contributed to the response. In conclusion, anti-erythropoietin associated pure red cell aplasia is a serious complication of erythropoietin therapy, but this entity should not be considered a contraindication for solid organ transplantation.

  15. Genomic instability in liver cells caused by an LPS-induced bystander-like effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kovalchuk

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection has been linked to carcinogenesis, however, there is lack of knowledge of molecular mechanisms that associate infection with the development of cancer. We analyzed possible effects of the consumption of heat-killed E. coli O157:H7 cells or its cellular components, DNA, RNA, protein or lipopolysaccharides (LPS on gene expression in naïve liver cells. Four week old mice were provided water supplemented with whole heat-killed bacteria or bacterial components for a two week period. One group of animals was sacrificed immediately, whereas another group was allowed to consume uncontaminated tap water for an additional two weeks, and liver samples were collected, post mortem. Liver cells responded to exposure of whole heat-killed bacteria and LPS with alteration in γH2AX levels and levels of proteins involved in proliferation, DNA methylation (MeCP2, DNMT1, DNMT3A and 3B or DNA repair (APE1 and KU70 as well as with changes in the expression of genes involved in stress response, cell cycle control and bile acid biosynthesis. Other bacterial components analysed in this study did not lead to any significant changes in the tested molecular parameters. This study suggests that lipopolysaccharides are a major component of Gram-negative bacteria that induce molecular changes within naïve cells of the host.

  16. Analysis of CD8+CD28- T-suppressor cells in living donor liver transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Xin Lin; Lan-Lan Wang; Lu-Nan Yan; Pei Cai; Bo Li; Tian-Fu Wen; Yong Zeng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human CD8+CD28- T-suppressor (Ts) cells have been considered to indicate a reduced need for immunosuppression in pediatric liver-intestine transplant recipients and recipients of deceased heart-kidney transplants. However, in adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-A LDLT) little information is available and the clinical signiifcance is still unknown. METHODS: Flow cytometry was used to detect the population of CD8+CD28- Ts cells present in peripheral blood in A-A LDLT recipients (n=31), patients with end-stage liver disease (n=24) and healthy controls (n=19). Meanwhile, we tested the graft function and trough levels of immunosuppression in recipients. The clinical and follow-up data of 31 transplant recipients were analyzed. RESULTS: Compared with diseased controls (P=0.007) and healthy individuals (P=0.000), a notable expansion of CD8+CD28- Ts cells was found in recipients of A-A LDLT. This was associated with graft function, levels of immunosuppression and rejection episodes. CONCLUSIONS: To monitor the CD8+CD28- Ts cells levels is important to evaluate the immune state of recipients. Meanwhile, it is also important to promote expansion of CD8+CD28- Ts cells in recipients of A-A LDLT, not only to sustain good graft function and decrease the dosage of immunosuppressants, but also to reduce the occurrence of rejection.

  17. Complement proteins C7 and CFH control the stemness of liver cancer cells via LSF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Hyang Sook; Lee, Sang Eun; Song, Joon Seon; Rhee, Je-Keun; Singh, Shree Ram; Chang, Suhwan; Jang, Se Jin

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-initiating cells are important for the formation and maintenance of tumor bulks in various tumors. To identify surface markers of liver tumor-initiating cells, we performed primary tumorsphere culture and analyzed the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD) antigen genes using NanoString. Interestingly, we found significant upregulation of the complement proteins (p = 1.60 × 10(-18)), including C7 and CFH. Further studies revealed that C7 and CFH are required to maintain stemness in liver cancer cells. Knockdown of C7 and CFH expression abrogated tumorsphere formation and induced differentiation, whereas overexpression stimulated stemness factor expression as well as in vivo cell growth. Mechanistically, by studying C7 and CFH-dependent LSF-1 expression and its direct role on stemness factor transcription, we found that LSF-1 is involved in this regulation. Taken together, our data demonstrate the unprecedented role of complement proteins on the maintenance of stemness in liver tumor-initiating cells.

  18. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Folch-Puy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS. This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR, which comprises cellular mechanisms for adaptation and the safeguarding of cell survival or, in cases of excessively severe stress, for the initiation of the cell death program. Recent experimental data suggest the involvement of ERS in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI of the liver graft, which has been considered as one of major problems influencing outcome after liver transplantation. The purpose of this review is to summarize updated data on the molecular mechanisms of ERS/UPR and the consequences of this pathology, focusing specifically on solid organ preservation and liver transplantation models. We will also discuss the potential role of ERS, beyond the simple adaptive response and the regulation of cell death, in the modification of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes.

  19. MicroRNAs involved in neoplastic transformation of liver cancer stem cells

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    Wang Xinchuan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The existence of cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has been verified by characterizing side population (SP cells based on efflux of Hoechst 33342 dye from stem cells. Recent advances in microRNA (miRNA biology have revealed that miRNAs play an important role in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. However, it is still unclear which miRNAs participate in the neoplastic transformation of liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs during hepatocarcinogenesis. Methods To identify the unique set of miRNAs differentially regulated in LCSCs, we applied SP sorting to primary cultures of F344 rat HCC cancer cells treated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN and normal syngenic fetal liver cells, and the stem-like characteristics of SP cells were verified through detecting expression of CD90.1, AFP and CK-7. Global miRNA expression profiles of two groups of SP cells were screened through microarray platform. Results A total of 68 miRNAs, including miR-10b, miR-21, miR-470*, miR-34c-3p, and let-7i*, were identified as overexpressed in SP of HCC cells compared to fetal liver cells. Ten miRNAs were underexpressed, including miR-200a* and miR-148b*. These miRNAs were validated using stem-loop real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Conclusions Our results suggest that LCSCs may have a distinct miRNA expression fingerprint during hepatocarcinogenesis. Dissecting these relationships will provide a new understanding of the function of miRNA in the process of neoplastic transformation of LCSCs.

  20. 3D hepatic cultures simultaneously maintain primary hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell phenotypes.

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    Yeonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Developing in vitro engineered hepatic tissues that exhibit stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of hepatic tissue engineering. However, the rapid dedifferentiation of hepatic parenchymal (hepatocytes and non-parenchymal (liver sinusoidal endothelial, LSEC cell types when removed from their natural environment in vivo remains a major obstacle. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate that hepatic cells cultured in layered architectures could preserve or potentially enhance liver-specific behavior of both cell types. Primary rat hepatocytes and rat LSECs (rLSECs were cultured in a layered three-dimensional (3D configuration. The cell layers were separated by a chitosan-hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM, which served to mimic the Space of Disse. Hepatocytes and rLSECs exhibited several key phenotypic characteristics over a twelve day culture period. Immunostaining for the sinusoidal endothelial 1 antibody (SE-1 demonstrated that rLSECs cultured in the 3D hepatic model maintained this unique feature over twelve days. In contrast, rLSECs cultured in monolayers lost their phenotype within three days. The unique stratified structure of the 3D culture resulted in enhanced heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which led to improvements in hepatocyte functions. Albumin production increased three to six fold in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Only rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures exhibited increasing CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A activity. Well-defined bile canaliculi were observed only in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Together, these data suggest that rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures are highly suitable models to monitor the transformation of toxins in the liver and their transport out of this organ. In summary, these results indicate that the layered rLSEC-PEM-hepatocyte model, which recapitulates key features of hepatic sinusoids, is a potentially powerful medium for obtaining comprehensive knowledge on liver metabolism

  1. Adipocyte cell death, fatty liver disease and associated metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Akiko; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S.A. and many other parts of the world. Obesity increases the risk of a number of adverse health conditions including type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hepatic steatosis. Adipocyte hypertrophy occurs during weight gain and is associated with recruitment of immune cells, mainly macrophages, into the adipose tissue (AT). These cells typically surround a dying or dead adipocyte with the formation of crown-like structures that are present in experimental models of obesity as well as obese humans. The immune infiltration of AT results in increased production of various adipokines, cytokines, and chemokines that play a crucial role in the development of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. The pathogenic mechanisms resulting in AT macrophage recruitment are under intense investigation and remain incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that various programmed cell death pathways are activated in stressed hypertrophied adipocytes and may result in cell death. These events appear to occur at early stages and be important in triggering the metabolic dysregulation associated with obesity.

  2. Comparative studies of different cryopreservation methods for mesenchymal stem cells derived from human fetal liver.

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    Todorov, Plamen; Hristova, Elena; Konakchieva, Rossitza; Michova, Antoaneta; Dimitrov, Josif

    2010-03-29

    Fetal stem cells possess some intriguing characteristics, which delineate them as promising cellular therapeutics. They are less immunogenic, at lower stage of differentiation and have higher potential for repopulation and migration. Furthermore, the fetal stem cells secrete a set of cytokines and growth factors, which stimulate the regeneration of the recipient tissue. The present study indicated that the adhesive fraction of human fetal liver cells possessed the morphological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells, as well as potential to differentiate into adipocyte and osteoblast lineages. The immunophenotypic analysis showed that the cells expressed CD13, CD73, CD90 and CD105 (typical for mesenchymal stem cells) and lacked the haematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Addressing the issue of the low-temperature storage of the human fetal liver cells, four different methods for cryopreservation were assessed: conventional slow freezing, program freezing and two vitrification protocols. The obtained results demonstrated that the cells were cryotolerant and maintained their properties and differentiation potential after thawing. Program freezing showed to be the most efficient method for cryopreservation of the investigated cells.

  3. Human Muse cells, non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, have the capacity for liver regeneration by specific homing and replenishment of new hepatocytes in liver fibrosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Masahiro; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Akimoto, Takahiro; Mizuma, Masamichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Asada, Ryuta; Shimizu, Shinobu; Unno, Michiaki; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-11-02

    Muse cells, a novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells reside in the bone marrow, skin and adipose tissue, are collectable as cells positive for pluripotent surface marker SSEA-3. They are able to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers. The capacity of intravenously injected human bone marrow-Muse cells to repair the liver fibrosis model of immunodeficient mice was evaluated in this study. They exhibited the ability for differentiation spontaneously into hepatoblast/hepatocyte-lineage cells and high migration toward the serum and liver tissue of carbon tetrachloride-treated mice in vitro. In vivo, they specifically accumulated into the liver, but not into other organs except the lower rate in the lung at 2 weeks after intravenous injection into the liver fibrosis model. After homing, Muse cells spontaneously differentiated in vivo into HepPar-1 (71.1±15.2%), human albumin (54.3±8.2%) and anti-trypsin (47.9±4.6%)-positive cells without fusing with host hepatocytes, and expressed mature functional markers such as human-CYP1A2, and human-Glc-6-Pase, at 8 weeks. Recovery in serum total bilirubin and albumin, and significant attenuation of fibrosis were recognized with statistical differences between the Muse group and control groups which received the vehicle or the same number of non-Muse cells, namely cells other than Muse cells in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, unlike ES and iPS cells, Muse cells are unique in their efficient migration and integration into damaged liver only by intravenous injection, nontumorigenicity, and spontaneous differentiation into hepatocytes, rendering induction into hepatocytes prior to transplantation unnecessary. They are suggested to repair liver fibrosis in two simple steps; expansion after collection from the bone marrow and intravenous injection. Such feasible strategy might provide impressive regenerative performance to liver disease patients.

  4. Berberine Inhibition of Fibrogenesis in a Rat Model of Liver Fibrosis and in Hepatic Stellate Cells

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    Ning Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the effect of berberine (BBR on liver fibrosis and its possible mechanisms through direct effects on hepatic stellate cells (HSC. Methods. The antifibrotic effect of BBR was determined in a rat model of bile duct ligation- (BDL- induced liver fibrosis. Multiple cellular and molecular approaches were introduced to examine the effects of BBR on HSC. Results. BBR potently inhibited hepatic fibrosis induced by BDL in rats. It exhibited cytotoxicity to activated HSC at doses nontoxic to hepatocytes. High doses of BBR induced apoptosis of activated HSC, which was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and Bcl-2/Bax imbalance. Low doses of BBR suppressed activation of HSC as evidenced by the inhibition of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression and cell motility. BBR did not affect Smad2/3 phosphorylation but significantly activated 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signalling, which was responsible for the transcriptional inhibition by BBR of profibrogenic factors α-SMA and collagen in HSC. Conclusion. BBR is a promising agent for treating liver fibrosis through multiple mechanisms, at least partially by directly targeting HSC and by inhibiting the AMPK pathway. Its value as an antifibrotic drug in patients with liver disease deserves further investigation.

  5. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Liver in a Patient with Sjogren Syndrome

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    Vadim Gorodetskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome (SS has the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders transformation among autoimmune diseases. We present a case of extranodal high grade lymphoma of the liver in a 52-year-old patient with long history of SS. Lymphoma manifested with sharp significant pain in the right hypochondrium, weakness, and profuse night sweats. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (CT-scan of the abdomen revealed multiple low density foci with homogeneous structure and clear contours in both lobes of the liver. Histologically, proliferation of medium sized lymphoma cells with round-oval and slightly irregular nuclei with fine chromatin was shown. Immunohistochemical and molecular features of the tumors allowed diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. To exclude secondary liver lesion by non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chest and small pelvis CT-scan, endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract and study of bone marrow were performed. After 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, the complete remission was achieved, which persists after 45 months of follow-up. Primary hepatic lymphomas are extremely rare, and previously only low-grade hepatic lymphomas have been described in SS. To our knowledge, the patient described here represents the first reported case of DLBCL with primary liver involvement in SS.

  6. Functional changes of dendritic cells derived from allogeneic partial liver graft undergoing acute rejection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Qing Xu; Zhen-Xiang Yao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate functional change of dendritic cells (DCs)derived from allogeneic partial liver graft undergoing acuterejection in rats.METHODS: Allogeneic (SD rat to LEW rat) whole and 50 %partial liver transplantation were performed. DCs from livergrafts 0 hr and 4 days after transplantation were isolated andpropagated in the presence of GM-CSFin vitro. Morphologicalcharacteristics of DCs propagated for 4 days and 10 dayswere observed by electron rmicroscopy. Phenotypical featuresof DCs propagated for 10 days were analyzed by flowcytometry. Expression of IL-12 protein and IL-12 receptormRNA in DCs propagated for 10 days was also measured byWestern blotting and semiquantitative RT-PCR, respectively.Histological grading of rejection were determined.RESULTS: Allogeneic whole liver grafts showed no featuresof rejection at day 4 after transplantation. In contrast,allogeneic partial liver grafts demonstrated moderate tosevere rejection at day 4 after transplantation. DCs derivedfrom allogeneic partial liver graft 4 days after transplantationexhibited typical morphological characteristics of DC after 4days' culture in the presence of GM-CSF. DCs from allogeneicwhole liver graft 0 hr and 4 days after transplantation didnot exhibit typical morphological characteristics of DC untilafter 10 days' culture in the presence of GM-CSF. After 10days' propagationin vitro, DCs derived from allogeneic wholeliver graft exhibited features of immature DC, with absenceof CD40, CD80 and CD86 surface expression, and low levelsof IL-12 proteins (IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40) and IL-12receptor (IL-12Rβ1 and IL-12Rβ2) mRNA, whereas DCs fromallogeneic partial liver graft 4 days after transplantationdisplayed features of mature DC, with high levels of CD40,CD80 and CD86 surface expression, and as a consequence,higher expression of IL-12 proteins (IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40)and IL-12 receptors (IL-12Rβ1 and IL-12Rβ2) mRNA thanthose of DCs both from partial liver graft 0 hr and whole livergraft

  7. Postnatal Hyperoxia Exposure Differentially Affects Hepatocytes and Liver Haemopoietic Cells in Newborn Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Guya Diletta; Zara, Susi; De Colli, Marianna; Di Valerio, Valentina; Rapino, Monica; Zaramella, Patrizia; Dedja, Arben; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele; Porzionato, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Premature newborns are frequently exposed to hyperoxic conditions and experimental data indicate modulation of liver metabolism by hyperoxia in the first postnatal period. Conversely, nothing is known about possible modulation of growth factors and signaling molecules involved in other hyperoxic responses and no data are available about the effects of hyperoxia in postnatal liver haematopoiesis. The aim of the study was to analyse the effects of hyperoxia in the liver tissue (hepatocytes and haemopoietic cells) and to investigate possible changes in the expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α), endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS), and Nuclear Factor-kB (NF-kB). Experimental design of the study involved exposure of newborn rats to room air (controls), 60% O2 (moderate hyperoxia), or 95% O2 (severe hyperoxia) for the first two postnatal weeks. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were performed. Severe hyperoxia increased hepatocyte apoptosis and MMP-9 expression and decreased VEGF expression. Reduced content in reticular fibers was found in moderate and severe hyperoxia. Some other changes were specifically produced in hepatocytes by moderate hyperoxia, i.e., upregulation of HIF-1α and downregulation of eNOS and NF-kB. Postnatal severe hyperoxia exposure increased liver haemopoiesis and upregulated the expression of VEGF (both moderate and severe hyperoxia) and eNOS (severe hyperoxia) in haemopoietic cells. In conclusion, our study showed different effects of hyperoxia on hepatocytes and haemopoietic cells and differential involvement of the above factors. The involvement of VEGF and eNOS in the liver haemopoietic response to hyperoxia may be hypothesized. PMID:25115881

  8. Preferential accumulation of T helper cells but not cytotoxic T cells characterizes benign subclinical rejection of human liver allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Anna K; Schlue, Jerome; Noyan, Fatih; Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias; Lehner, Frank; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Klempnauer, Juergen; Manns, Michael P; Taubert, Richard; Jaeckel, Elmar

    2016-07-01

    Subclinical rejection (SCR) is a common event in protocol biopsies after liver transplantation (LT). So far the interpretation of the underlying histological changes and clinical significance is limited. Previous studies were restricted to SCR manifestations within the first weeks after transplantation with limited follow-up. We analyzed clinical data from our prospective protocol biopsy program and found late SCR (at least 3 months after transplantation) to be a common event (41/94 patients). SCR manifested much later than acute cellular rejection (ACR). In the second year after transplantation, the SCR incidence in protocol biopsies reached a plateau of approximately 25% and remained at this level until the latest observed manifestations more than 5 years after transplantation. During a median follow-up of 32 months after SCR, no acute or chronic rejection, relevant graft fibrosis, graft loss, or liver-related death occurred even without specific therapy for SCR. Immunophenotyping of liver biopsies during SCR showed that similar to ACR, the composition of intrahepatic T cells depended on the severity of histological rejection. However, SCR showed a different pattern of infiltrating T cells with a stronger accumulation of CD4(+) cells, an increasing CD4(+) /CD8(+) ratio, and an increasing CD4(+) forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cell (Treg)/CD8(+) ratio, which was not seen in ACR. These intrahepatic T cell patterns were not reflected in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, late SCR after LT has a good clinical prognosis, and it seems safe to leave it untreated. This benign clinical course compared to ACR is associated with intrahepatic T cell infiltration patterns showing less cytotoxic T cells and more CD4(+) FOXP3(+) Tregs. Liver Transplantation 22 943-955 2016 AASLD.

  9. Cytotoxic and antimigratory effects of Cratoxy formosum extract against HepG2 liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranrat, Benjaporn; Mairuae, Nootchanat; Kanchanarach, Watchara

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying Cratoxylum formosum (CF) Dyer-induced cancer cell death and antimigratory effects in HepG2 liver cancer cells. The cytotoxic, antiproliferative and antimigratory effects of CF leaf extract on human liver cancer HepG2 cell lines were evaluated using sulforhodamine B, colony formation, and wound healing assays. In addition, apoptosis induction mechanisms were investigated via reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, caspase 3 activities, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) disruption. Gene expression and apoptosis-associated protein levels were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. CF induced HepG2 cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner with half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 219.03±9.96 and 124.90±6.86 µg/ml at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Treatment with CF caused a significant and dose-dependent decrease in colony forming ability and cell migration. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that CF induced ROS formation, increased caspase 3 activities, decreased the ΔΨm, and caused HepG2 apoptosis. CF marginally decreased the expression level of the cell cycle regulatory protein, ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (rho family, small GTP binding protein Rac1) and the downstream protein, cyclin dependent kinase 6. Additionally, CF significantly enhanced p21 levels, reduced cyclin D1 protein levels and triggered cancer cell death. CF leaf extracts induced cell death, stimulated apoptosis and inhibited migration in HepG2 cells. Thus, CF may be useful for developing an anticancer drug candidate for the treatment of liver cancer.

  10. Effects of Melatonin on Differentiation Potential of Ito Cells in Mice with Induced Fibrosis of the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalobin, D S; Suprunenko, E A; Golichenkov, V A

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effects of melatonin on differentiation potential of Ito cells during atypical regeneration of mouse liver under conditions of CCl4-induced fibrosis. The dynamics of fibrosis was traced at the histological level and the effects of melatonin on the differentiation potential of mouse Ito cells were evaluated. Melatonin alleviated fibrotic changes in the liver tissue and reduced differentiation of Ito cells into myofibroblasts under conditions of atypical regeneration of the liver in induced fibrosis. The hepatoprotective role of melatonin was shown.

  11. TM4SF1 Promotes Proliferation, Invasion, and Metastasis in Human Liver Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Kun; Fan, Xue-Gong; Qiu, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane 4 superfamily member 1 (TM4SF1) is a member of tetraspanin family, which mediates signal transduction events regulating cell development, activation, growth and motility. Our previous studies showed that TM4SF1 is highly expressed in liver cancer. HepG2 cells were transfected with TM4SFl siRNA and TM4SF1-expressing plasmids and their biological functions were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. HepG2 cells overexpressing TM4SF1 showed reduced apoptosis and increased cell migration in vitro and enhanced tumor growth and metastasis in vivo, whereas siRNA-mediated silencing of TM4SF1 had the opposite effect. TM4SF1 exerts its effect by regulating a few apoptosis- and migration-related genes including caspase-3, caspase-9, MMP-2, MMP-9 and VEGF. These results indicate that TM4SF1 is associated with liver tumor growth and progression, suggesting that TM4SF1 may be a potential target for treatment of liver cancer in future. PMID:27153056

  12. Hydrogen peroxide impairs autophagic flux in a cell model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Jiang, Pengtao [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Zhen [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 17 Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100021 (China); Zhao, Hong, E-mail: zhaohong9@sina.com [Department of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, 17 Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100021 (China); Wei, Taotao, E-mail: weitt@moon.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Free fatty acids exposure induces elevated autophagy. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits autophagic flux through impairing the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes. •Inhibition of autophagy potentiates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver disease, but the pathogenesis of NAFLD is not fully clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether autophagy plays a role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. We found that the levels of autophagy were elevated in hepatoma cells upon exposure to free fatty acids, as confirmed by the increase in the number of autophagosomes. However, exposure of hepatoma cells to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and TNF-α, two typical “second hit” factors, increased the initiation of autophagy but inhibited the autophagic flux. The inhibition of autophagy sensitized cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy acts as a protective mechanism in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and that impairment of autophagy might induce more severe lesions of the liver. These findings will be a benefit to the understanding of the pathogenesis of NAFLD and might suggest a strategy for the prevention and cure of NAFLD.

  13. Prokineticin 2/Bv8 is expressed in Kupffer cells in liver and is down regulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the implication of prokineticin 1 (PK1/EG VEGF) and prokineticin 2 (PK2/Bv8) in hepatocellular carcinoma angiogenesis. METHODS: The gene induction of PK1/EG-VEGF and PK2/Bv8 was investigated in 10 normal, 28 fibrotic and 28 tumoral livers by using real time PCR. Their expression was compared to the expression of VEGF (an angiogenesis marker), vWF (an endothelial cell marker) and to CD68 (a monocyte/macrophage marker). Furthermore, the mRNA levels of PK1/EG-VEGF, PK2/Bv8, prokineticin receptor 1 and 2 were evaluated by real time PCR in isolated liver cell populations. Finally, PK2/Bv8protein was detected in normal liver paraffin sections and in isolated liver cells by immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry.RESULTS:PK2/Bv8 mRNA but not PK1/EG-VEGF was expressed in all types of normal liver samples examined. In the context of liver tumor development, we reported that PK2/Bv8 correlates only with CD68 and showed a significant decrease in expression as the pathology evolves towards cancer. Whereas, VEGF and vWF mRNA were significantly upregulated in both fibrosis and HCC, as expected. In addition, out of all isolated liver cells examined, only Kupffer cells (liver resident macrophages) express significant levels of PK2/Bv8 and its receptors, prokineticin receptor 1 and 2.CONCLUSION:In normal liver PK2/Bv8 and its receptors were specifically expressed by Kupffer cells. PK2/Bv8 expression decreased as the liver evolves towards cancer and did not correlate with HCC angiogenesis.

  14. Substrate stiffness and matrix composition coordinately control the differentiation of liver progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourouklis, Andreas P; Kaylan, Kerim B; Underhill, Gregory H

    2016-08-01

    Recent approaches have utilized microfabricated platforms to examine combinations of microenvironmental signals that regulate stem and progenitor cell differentiation. However, the majority of these efforts have focused on the biochemical properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) or soluble factors without simultaneously exploring the biomechanical effects of cell-substrate interactions. To address this need, we combined a high-throughput approach for the analysis of combinatorial ECM cues with substrates of modular stiffness and traction force microscopy. This integrated approach enabled the characterization of cell-generated traction stress and phenotypic expression in response to ECM cues. We investigated the impact of substrate stiffness and ECM composition on the differentiation of bipotential mouse embryonic liver (BMEL) progenitor cells. We observed that hepatocyte differentiation was primarily regulated by ECM composition, and cholangiocyte differentiation was cooperatively influenced by ECM proteins and stiffness properties. In particular, stiffness-mediated cholangiocyte differentiation was observed for cells cultured on fibronectin, while collagen IV promoted differentiation independent of substrate stiffness. We demonstrated the influence of cell contractility and traction stress in early cholangiocyte specification and further uncovered the roles of ERK and ROCK in this differentiation process. Overall, these findings illustrate the involvement of biomechanical signals in liver progenitor differentiation. Further, this approach could enable investigations for a broad range of cell types and ECM proteins, providing an integrated platform for evaluating the combinatorial effects of biochemical and biophysical signals in cell differentiation.

  15. Role of p53 in the cellular response following oleic acid accumulation in Chang liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Ah Young; Chang, Seung-Hee; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Jae-Ho; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2014-01-03

    Abnormal accumulation of fatty acids triggers the harmful cellular response called lipotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the cellular response following accumulation of oleic acid (OA), a monounsaturated fatty acid, in human Chang liver cells. OA droplets were distributed freely in the cytoplasm and/or degraded within lysosomes. OA exposure increased ATP production and concomitantly dilated mitochondria. At 24h after OA exposure, cell viability decreased slightly and was coupled with a reduction in mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, the alteration in cell viability was also associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species and changes in the cell cycle. Moreover, OA treatment increased the expression of autophagy- and apoptotic cell death-related proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we investigated the role of p53, a tumor suppressor protein, in the cellular response elicited by OA accumulation. OA-induced changes in cell viability and ATP production were rescued to control levels when cells were pretreated with pifithrin-alpha (PTA), a p53 inhibitor. By contrast, the expressions of LC3-II and perilipin, proteins required for lipophagy, were down-regulated by PTA pretreatment. Taken together, our results suggest that p53 plays a key role in the cellular response elicited by OA accumulation in Chang liver cells.

  16. The microcell mediated transfer of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line C5F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Liu; Sheng-Long Ye; Jiong Yang; Zhao-You Tang; Yin-Kun Liu; Lun-Xiu Qin; Shuang-Jian Qiu; Rui-Xia Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Our previous research on the surgical samples of primary liver cancer with CGH showed that the loss of human chromosome 8p had correlation with the metastatic phenotype of liver cancer. In order to seek the functional evidence that there could be a metastatsis suppressor gene (s) for liver cancer on human chromosome 8, we tried to transfer normal human chromosome 8 into rat liver cancer cell line C5F, which had high metastatic potential to lung.METHODS: Human chromosome 8 randomly marked with neo gene was introduced into C5F cell line by MMCT and positive microcell hybrids were screened by double selections of G418 and HAT. Single cell isolation cloning was applied to clone microcell hybrids. Finally, STS-PCR and WCP-FISH were used to confirm the introduction.RESULTS: Microcell hybrids resistant to HAT and G418 were obtained and 15 clones were obtained by single-cell isolation cloning. STS-PCR and WCP-FISH proved that human chromosome 8 had been successfully introduced into rat liver cancer cell line C5F. STS-PCR detected a random loss in the chromosome introduced and WCP-FISH found a consistent recombination of the introduced human chromosome with the rat chromosome.CONCLUSION: The successful introduction of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line builds the basis for seeking functional evidence of a metastasis suppressor gene for liver cancer harboring on human chromosome 8 and its subsequent cloning.

  17. Successful orthotopic liver transplantation in an adult patient with sickle cell disease and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morey Blinder

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease can lead to hepatic complications ranging from acute hepatic crises to chronic liver disease including intrahepatic cholestasis, and iron overload. Although uncommon, intrahepatic cholestasis may be severe and medical treatment of this complication is often ineffective. We report a case of a 37 year-old male patient with sickle cell anemia, who developed liver failure and underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation. Both pre and post-operatively, he was maintained on red cell transfusions. He remains stable with improved liver function 42 months post transplant. The role for orthotopic liver transplantation is not well defined in patients with sickle cell disease, and the experience remains limited. Although considerable challenges of post-transplant graft complications remain, orthotopic liver transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for sickle cell disease patients with end-stage liver disease who have progressed despite conventional medical therapy. An extended period of red cell transfusion support may lessen the post-operative complications.

  18. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway.

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    Guido Carpino

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production.

  19. In vivo migration of labeled autologous natural killer cells to liver metastases in patients with colon carcinoma

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    Satolli Maria A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides being the effectors of native anti-tumor cytotoxicity, NK cells participate in T-lymphocyte responses by promoting the maturation of dendritic cells (DC. Adherent NK (A-NK cells constitute a subset of IL-2-stimulated NK cells which show increased expression of integrins and the ability to adhere to solid surface and to migrate, infiltrate, and destroy cancer. A critical issue in therapy of metastatic disease is the optimization of NK cell migration to tumor tissues and their persistence therein. This study compares localization to liver metastases of autologous A-NK cells administered via the systemic (intravenous, i.v. versus locoregional (intraarterial, i.a. routes. Patients and methods A-NK cells expanded ex-vivo with I