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Sample records for maintaining pancreatic organ

  1. FGF10 signaling maintains the pancreatic progenitor cell state revealing a novel role of Notch in organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Gitte Anker; Jensen, Jan Nygaard; Jensen, Jan

    2003-12-15

    FGF10 plays an important role in the morphogenesis of several tissues by control of mesenchymal-to-epithelial signaling. In the pancreas, mesenchymal FGF10 is required to maintain the Pdx1-expressing epithelial progenitor cell population, and in the absence of FGF10 signaling, these cells fail to proliferate. Ectopic expression of FGF10 in the pancreatic epithelium caused increased proliferation of pancreatic progenitor cells and abrogation of pancreatic cell differentiation of all cell types. A hyperplastic pancreas consisting of undifferentiated cells expressing Pdx1, Nkx6.1, and cell adhesion markers normally characterizing early pancreatic progenitor cells resulted. Differentiation was attenuated even as proliferation of the pancreatic cells slowed during late gestation, suggesting that the trophic effect of FGF10 was independent of its effects upon cell differentiation. The FGF10-positive pancreatic cells expressed Notch1 and Notch2, the Notch-ligand genes Jagged1 and Jagged2, as well as the Notch target gene Hes1. This activation of Notch is distinct from the previously recognized mechanism of lateral inhibition. These data suggest that FGF10 signaling serves to integrate cell growth and terminal differentiation at the level of Notch activation, revealing a novel second role of this key signaling system during pancreatic development.

  2. Cytokines and organ failure in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Anders Møller

    2012-01-01

    We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP).......We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP)....

  3. The Notch Pathway Is Important in Maintaining the Cancer Stem Cell Population in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Ethan V.; Kim, Edward J.; Jingjiang Wu; Mark Hynes; Filip Bednar; Erica Proctor; Lidong Wang; Dziubinski, Michele L; Simeone, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized. Methods Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) that inhi...

  4. The Notch pathway is important in maintaining the cancer stem cell population in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan V Abel

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs represent a small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells that have the capacity to initiate and propagate tumor formation. However, the mechanisms by which pancreatic CSCs are maintained are not well understood or characterized.Expression of Notch receptors, ligands, and Notch signaling target genes was quantitated in the CSC and non-CSC populations from 8 primary human pancreatic xenografts. A gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI that inhibits the Notch pathway and a shRNA targeting the Notch target gene Hes1 were used to assess the role of the Notch pathway in CSC population maintenance and pancreatic tumor growth.Notch pathway components were found to be upregulated in pancreatic CSCs. Inhibition of the Notch pathway using either a gamma secretase inhibitor or Hes1 shRNA in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the percentage of CSCs and tumorsphere formation. Conversely, activation of the Notch pathway with an exogenous Notch peptide ligand increased the percentage of CSCs as well as tumorsphere formation. In vivo treatment of orthotopic pancreatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice with GSI blocked tumor growth and reduced the CSC population.The Notch signaling pathway is important in maintaining the pancreatic CSC population and is a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

  5. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated memb

  6. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated

  7. Cytokines and Organ Failure in Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Anders Møller

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods: Interleukin (IL) 6, IL-8, IL-18, and tumor necrosis factor > were measured on admission...

  8. Organ failure associated with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Jun Zhu; Jing-Sen Shi; Xue-Jun Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and organ failure.METHODS: Clinical data of 74 cases of SAP from Jan. 1993 to Dec. 2002 were retrospectively reviewed, and the relationship between organ failure and age, gender, etiology,extent of necrosis, infection of necrosis and mortality was analyzed.RESULTS: A total of 47 patients (63.5 %) showed organ failure, 20 patients (27.0 %) multiple organ failure, whereas 27 patients (36.5 %) with dysfunction of a single organ system. Pulmonary failure was the most common organ dysfunction (23.0 %) among single organ failures. There were no significant differences in age, gender and gallstone pancreatitis among patients with or without organ failure (P>0.05). The incidence of organ failure in infected necrosis was not higher compared with sterile necrosis, and patients with increased amount of necrosis did not have an increased prevalence of organ failure (P>0.05). Patients with organ failure had a higher mortality rate compared with those without organ failure (P<0.05). The death of SAP was associated with multiple organ failure (P<0.005), pulmonary failure (P<0.005), cardiovascular dysfunction (P<0.05) and gastrointestinal dysfunction (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Organ failure is common in patients with SAP, and patients with multiple organ failure and pulmonary failure have a higher mortality rate. Prevention and active treatment of organ failure can improve the outcome of patients with SAP.

  9. Spinal microglia initiate and maintain hyperalgesia in a rat model of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Yi; Lu, Ching-Liang; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lee, I-Hui; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen; Chen, Chun-Chia; Lee, Hsing-Feng; Lin, Han-Chieh; Chang, Full-Young; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2012-01-01

    The chronic, persistent pain associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) has many characteristics of neuropathic pain, initiated and maintained by the activation of spinal microglia. We investigated whether activated microglia in the thoracic spinal cord contribute to chronic pain in a rat model of CP. CP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by an intraductal injection of 2% trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Hyperalgesia was assessed by the measurement of mechanical sensitivity of the abdomen and nocifensive behavior to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Three weeks after induction of CP, spinal samples were analyzed by immunostaining and immunoblot analyses for levels of CD11 (a marker of microglia, determined with the antibody OX42) and phosphorylated p38 (P-p38, a marker of activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling). We examined the effects of minocycline (inhibitor of microglia) and fractalkine (microglia-activating factor) on visceral hyperalgesia in rats with CP. Rats with CP had increased sensitivity and nociceptive behaviors to mechanical probing of the abdomen and electrical stimulation of the pancreas. The dorsal horn of the thoracic spinal cords of rats with CP contained activated microglia (based on increased staining with OX42), with an ameboid appearance. Levels of P-p38 increased in rats with CP and colocalized with OX42-positive cells. Intrathecal injection of minocycline reversed and prevented the increase of nocifensive behaviors and levels of P-p38 in rats with CP. Fractalkine induced hyperalgesia in rats without CP, which was blocked by minocycline. Activated spinal microglia have important roles in maintaining and initiating chronic pain in a rat model of CP. Microglia might be a target for treatment of hyperalgesia caused by pancreatic inflammation. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  11. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970359 CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma andchronic pancreatitis. LUAN Baoqing(栾宝庆), et al,Dept Radiol, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med U-niv, Beijing, 100050. Chin J Radiol 1997; 31(2): 114-118. Objective: To improve the diagnostic accuracy ofpancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. Materi-

  12. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950347 Pancreatic endorcine response to parenteralnutrition in experimental acute pancreatitis.SUN Xi-aoguang(孙晓光),et al.Dept Nucl Med,ZhongshanHosp,Shanghai Med Univ,Shanghai.Shanghai Med J1995;18(2),74-70.In order to study the pancreatic endocrine responseto parenteral nutrition (PN) in acute pancreatitis,thedisease was induced in dogs by injecting 4% tauro-cholate sodium 0.5ml/kg plus trypsin 0.5mg/kg into the pancreatic duct.Intravenous infusion of PN wasinitiated one hour after the establishment of the dis-

  13. Teaching and maintaining ethical behavior in a professional organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodhead, Matthew T; Higbee, Thomas S

    2012-01-01

    In addition to continuing education mandates by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB), behavior-analytic professional organizations may adopt systems that teach and maintain ethical behavior in its employees. Systems of ethical supervision and management may allow for an organization to customize training that prevents ethical misconduct by employees. These systems may also allow supervisors to identify ethical problems in their infancy, allowing the organization to mitigate concerns before they further develop. Systems of ethical management and supervision also may help to improve services and promote consumer protection. Additional benefits might include both avoiding litigation and loss of consumers and income. These systems may promote the field of Behavior Analysis as a desirable, consumer-friendly approach to solving socially significant behavior problems.

  14. Organ dysfunction as a risk factor for early severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan De Waele; S.Blot; Francis Colardyn

    2004-01-01

    @@ To the Editor: We read with interest the review paper by Tao et al.[1] on the topic of early severe acute pancreatitis (EASP, defined as severe acute pancreatitis according to the Altanta criteria[2], with organ dysfunction within 72 h after the start of symptoms) in a recent issue of the World Journal of Gastroenterology. It addresses an important problem in patients with severe acute pancreatitis,namely early organ dysfunction and its effect on outcomes.

  15. Gene profile identifies zinc transporters differentially expressed in normal human organs and human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Cui, X; Yao, W; Yu, X; Cen, P; Hodges, S E; Fisher, W E; Brunicardi, F C; Chen, C; Yao, Q; Li, M

    2013-03-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008318 Proteomics of hyperlipidemia-associated pancreatitis using differential gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry: experiment with rats. ZHANG Wei(张伟), et al. Dept Gastroenterol, Shanghai 1st Hosp, Shanghai Jiaotong Univ, Shanghai 200080. Natl Med J China 2008;88(16):1132-1131.Objective To analyze the injury mechanismof hyperlipidemia-associated acute pancreatitis utilizing pro-teomics.Methods Ten SD rats were fed with high fat feed to establish hyperlipidemic models,and 10 SD rats were fed with normal feed to be used as control group.

  17. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009216 Relation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate with calcium metabolism in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.SHI Chengxian(石承先),et al.Dept Live Bili Pancre Surg,Guizhou Prov Hosp,Guiyang 550002.World Chin J Digestol,2009;17(6):598-601.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintaining good health. Can chronic pancreatitis give my child cancer? If your child has chronic pancreatitis, he or she will be at an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to the general population. The degree of ...

  19. Heparin improves organ microcirculatory disturbances in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Dobosz; Lucjanna Mionskowska; Stanislaw Ha(a); Sebastian Dobrowolski; Dariusz Dymecki; Zdzislaw Wajda

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Microcirculatory disturbances are important early pathophysiological events in various organs during acute pancreatitis. The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in microperfusion of the pancreas, liver, kidney, stomach,colon, skeletal muscle, and to investigate the influence of heparin on the organ microcirculation in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Acute pancreatitis was induced by 4 intraperitoneal injections of caerulein (Cn) (15 μg/kg). The organ microcirculation was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Serum interleukin 6 and hematocrit levels were analysed.RESULTS: Acute pancreatitis resulted in a significant drop of microperfusion in all examined organs. Heparin administration (2×2.5 mg/kg) improved the microcirculation in pancreas (36.9±4% vs 75.9±10%), liver (56.6±6% vs 75.2±16%), kidney (45.1±6% vs 79.3±5%), stomach (65.2±8% vs78.1±19%), colon (69.8±6% vs102.5±19%),and skeletal muscle (59.2±6% vs 77.9±13%). Heparin treatment lowered IL-6 (359.0±66 U/mL vs288.5±58 U/mL)and hematocrit level (53±4% vs 46±3%).CONCLUSION: Heparin administration has a positive influence on organ microcirculatory disturbances accompanying experimental Ch-induced acute pancreatitis.

  20. Unusual fatal multiple-organ dysfunction and pancreatitis induced by a single wasp sting

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    C Azad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS is a well-known complication following multiple wasp stings. However, MODS after a single wasp sting has been rarely reported in children and acute pancreatitis have probably never been observed before. Herein we describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who had urticaria and abdominal pain after a single wasp sting. The child gradually developed MODS while his abdominal complaints were worsening. Despite aggressive supportive management, the child did not survive. Afterward, the cause of the acute abdomen was finally diagnosed as acute pancreatitis. Both MODS and pancreatitis following a single wasp sting are very unusual. Thus, although pancreatitis is rarely manifested, it should be suspected after a wasp sting if there are predominant abdominal symptoms.

  1. Microproteinuria Predicts Organ Failure in Patients Presenting with Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Swärd, Per; Håkansson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The disease course of acute pancreatitis (AP) ranges from mild and self-limiting to severe inflammation, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. At present, there are no universally accepted and reliable predictors for severity. Microproteinuria has been associated...

  2. Intense adrenal enhancement in patients with acute pancreatitis and early organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, T L; van Santvoort, H C; Besselink, M G H; van Ramshorst, B; van Es, H W; Gooszen, H G

    2007-10-01

    Intense adrenal enhancement has previously been reported in patients with hypovolemic and septic shock. The purpose of this study was to assess whether this computed tomography (CT) finding is also observed in patients presenting with severe acute pancreatitis and early organ failure. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database was performed. Out of 38 consecutive patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis, 3 patients showed intense bilateral adrenal enhancement on early CT. All patients had early multiple organ failure and subsequently died. In two cases, pathologic correlation was obtained. Intense adrenal enhancement may be a new prognostic indicator in patients with acute pancreatitis, particularly when organ failure is present at the time of CT examination. Further studies are necessary to confirm this observation.

  3. Fetal endocannabinoids orchestrate the organization of pancreatic islet microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenczyk, Katarzyna; Keimpema, Erik; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Calvigioni, Daniela; Björklund, Peyman; Mackie, Kenneth; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Hökfelt, Tomas G M; Dobrzyn, Agnieszka; Harkany, Tibor

    2015-11-10

    Endocannabinoids are implicated in the control of glucose utilization and energy homeostasis by orchestrating pancreatic hormone release. Moreover, in some cell niches, endocannabinoids regulate cell proliferation, fate determination, and migration. Nevertheless, endocannabinoid contributions to the development of the endocrine pancreas remain unknown. Here, we show that α cells produce the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in mouse fetuses and human pancreatic islets, which primes the recruitment of β cells by CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) engagement. Using subtractive pharmacology, we extend these findings to anandamide, a promiscuous endocannabinoid/endovanilloid ligand, which impacts both the determination of islet size by cell proliferation and α/β cell sorting by differential activation of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) and CB1Rs. Accordingly, genetic disruption of TRPV1 channels increases islet size whereas CB1R knockout augments cellular heterogeneity and favors insulin over glucagon release. Dietary enrichment in ω-3 fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation in mice, which permanently reduces endocannabinoid levels in the offspring, phenocopies CB1R(-/-) islet microstructure and improves coordinated hormone secretion. Overall, our data mechanistically link endocannabinoids to cell proliferation and sorting during pancreatic islet formation, as well as to life-long programming of hormonal determinants of glucose homeostasis.

  4. A Unifying Organ Model of Pancreatic Insulin Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Gaetano

    Full Text Available The secretion of insulin by the pancreas has been the object of much attention over the past several decades. Insulin is known to be secreted by pancreatic β-cells in response to hyperglycemia: its blood concentrations however exhibit both high-frequency (period approx. 10 minutes and low-frequency oscillations (period approx. 1.5 hours. Furthermore, characteristic insulin secretory response to challenge maneuvers have been described, such as frequency entrainment upon sinusoidal glycemic stimulation; substantial insulin peaks following minimal glucose administration; progressively strengthened insulin secretion response after repeated administration of the same amount of glucose; insulin and glucose characteristic curves after Intra-Venous administration of glucose boli in healthy and pre-diabetic subjects as well as in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Previous modeling of β-cell physiology has been mainly directed to the intracellular chain of events giving rise to single-cell or cell-cluster hormone release oscillations, but the large size, long period and complex morphology of the diverse responses to whole-body glucose stimuli has not yet been coherently explained. Starting with the seminal work of Grodsky it was hypothesized that the population of pancreatic β-cells, possibly functionally aggregated in islets of Langerhans, could be viewed as a set of independent, similar, but not identical controllers (firing units with distributed functional parameters. The present work shows how a single model based on a population of independent islet controllers can reproduce very closely a diverse array of actually observed experimental results, with the same set of working parameters. The model's success in reproducing a diverse array of experiments implies that, in order to understand the macroscopic behaviour of the endocrine pancreas in regulating glycemia, there is no need to hypothesize intrapancreatic pacemakers, influences between different

  5. Early organ dysfunction affects long-term survival in acute pancreatitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Christos; Hayes, Alastair J; Williams, Linda; Garden, O James; Parks, Rowan W; Mole, Damian J

    2014-01-01

    Background The effect of early organ dysfunction on long-term survival in acute pancreatitis (AP) patients is unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to ascertain whether early organ dysfunction impacts on long-term survival after an episode of AP. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed using survival data sourced from a prospectively maintained database of patients with AP admitted to the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh during a 5-year period commencing January 2000. A multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) score of ≥ 2 during the first week of admission was used to define early organ dysfunction. After accounting for in-hospital deaths, long-term survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier test. The prognostic significance of patient characteristics was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses using Cox's proportional hazards methods. Results A total of 694 patients were studied (median follow-up: 8.8 years). Patients with early organ dysfunction (MODS group) were found to have died prematurely [mean survival: 10.0 years, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.4–10.6 years] in comparison with the non-MODS group (mean survival: 11.6 years, 95% CI 11.2–11.9 years) (log-rank test, P = 0.001) after the exclusion of in-hospital deaths. Multivariate analysis confirmed MODS as an independent predictor of long-term survival [hazard ratio (HR): 1.528, 95% CI 1.72–2.176; P = 0.019] along with age (HR: 1.062; P < 0.001), alcohol-related aetiology (HR: 2.027; P = 0.001) and idiopathic aetiology (HR: 1.548; P = 0.048). Conclusions Early organ dysfunction in AP is an independent predictor of long-term survival even when in-hospital deaths are accounted for. Negative predictors also include age, and idiopathic and alcohol-related aetiologies. PMID:24712663

  6. Clinical features and treatment of organ failure in severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Lijian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Organ failure is an important factor causing death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. In recent years, thanks to the further study of pathophysiology of SAP and the continuous accumulation of experience and technology, substantial progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of SAP complicated by organ failure. The clinical features of SAP complicated by organ failure and the measures to be strengthened in the treatment of SAP are summarized. Currently, it is thought that organ failure tends to appear once SAP occurs, so timely, standardized treatment can shorten the course of disease and significantly reduce mortality.

  7. Organ failure in acute pancreatitis and its impact on outcome in critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The most important determinant of mortality in acute pancreatitis is organ failure (OF. The aim of this prospective observational study was to determine the incidence of organ failure in acute pancreatitis and its relation with the extent of necrosis and outcome. Sixty-one patients were divided into 3 groups: no organ failure (NOF, transient organ failure ( 48 hrs (POF. Of 61 patients, 30 patients had no organ failure (49.1%, while 11 patients (18% had TOF and 20 patients (32.7% had POF. The mean age was 46.5 yrs with male predominance. Pulmonary and renal failures were the most common (32%, followed by CVS (cardiovascular system, coagulation system and CNS (central nervous system. Fourteen (46.4% patients had one or two OF, 17 (56.6% had more than two OF. There were no deaths in patients with up to two organ failures but a 70% (7 death rate in those with three organ involvement, 80% (4 with four and 100% with five OF. The percentage of pancreatic necrosis was evaluated for its relationship with organ failure. In the NOF group 19 (63.3% patients had no necrosis, as compared to 11 patients with necrosis in TOF and POF groups (35.4%. Out of 61 patients, 13 patients died. All 13 patients who expired belonged to the POF group (p <.001. Early persisting and deteriorating organ failure had the worst outcomes. There was an increase in mortality with an increasing number of organs involved. The extent of necrosis was directly related with incidence of organ failure.

  8. Demonstration of Pelvic Anatomy by Modified Midline Transection that Maintains Intact Internal Pelvic Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Hanno; Saito, Toshiyuki; Herrmann, Gudrun; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Hammer, Niels; Sandrock, Mara; Itoh, Masahiro; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Gross dissection for demonstrating anatomy of the human pelvis has traditionally involved one of two approaches, each with advantages and disadvantages. Classic hemisection in the median plane through the pelvic ring transects the visceral organs but maintains two symmetric pelvic halves. An alternative paramedial transection compromises one side…

  9. A Distinct Slow-Cycling Cancer Stem-like Subpopulation of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells is maintained in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, Jennifer L., E-mail: jennifer.dembinski@rr-research.no; Krauss, Stefan [Cellular and Genetic Therapy, Department of Microbiology, Cancer Stem Cell Innovation Center (CAST), Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway)

    2010-11-29

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst prognosis of any major malignancy, with <5% of patients surviving five years. This can be contributed to the often late diagnosis, lack of sufficient treatment and metastatic spread. Heterogeneity within tumors is increasingly becoming a focus in cancer research, as novel therapies are required to target the most aggressive subpopulations of cells that are frequently termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). In the current study, we describe the identification of a slow-cycling cancer stem-like population of cells in vivo in BxPC-3 and Panc03.27 xenografts. A distinct slow-cycling label-retaining population of cells (DiI+/SCC) was found both at the edge of tumors, and in small circumscribed areas within the tumors. DiI+/SCC in these areas display an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) fingerprint, including an upregulation of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and N-cadherin and a loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin. DiI+/SCC also displayed a critical re-localization of beta-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus. Additionally, the DiI+/SCC population was found to express the developmental signaling molecule sonic hedgehog. This study represents a novel step in defining the biological activities of a tumorigenic subpopulation within the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment in vivo. Understanding the interactions and functions of a CSC population within the context of the tumor microenvironment is critical to design targeted therapeutics.

  10. Importance of maintaining left gastric arterial flow at Appleby operation preserving whole stomach for central pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akifumi; Yamamoto, Junji; Aosasa, Suefumi; Hatsuse, Kazuo; Nishikawa, Makoto; Nishiyama, Kiyoshi; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Hase, Kazuo; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Kaji, Tatsumi

    2012-01-01

    The safety of whole stomach-preserving Appleby operation with resection of the left gastric artery (LGA) for pancreatic cancer cannot be assured. The anatomy of the celiac axis (CA) with special regard to the position of the origin of the LGA was examined. Using 3D images of the vascular architecture reconstructed from volume data of helical CT, the length of the CA and the position of the origin of the LGA from the CA were measured in 53 patients. Among 53 patients, 47 patients (89%) had classical anatomy of the CA branches. The mean length(2 standard deviation) of the CA and the distance from the root of the LGA to the bifurcation of the CA were 25.2mm (-4.9) (range 14.6-36.5) and 10.3mm (+4.5)(range 2.4-21.9), respectively. In 23 (45%) cases, the LGA arose farther than 10mm away from the bifurcation of the CA. Among six patients with anatomical variation of the arteries, two (4%) had the LGA directly arising from the aorta. Conservation of the LGA at modified Appleby operation would give complete cancer removal by en bloc resection of the nerve plexus, without risk of ischemic complications of the stomach and liver.

  11. Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of Organ Failure in Acute Pancreatitis: Protocol of the PANCREA II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie LM Das

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Organ failure is a major determinant of mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. These patients usually requireadmission to high dependency or intensive care units and consume considerable health care resources. Given a low incidence rate of organ failure and a lack of large non-interventional studies in the field of acute pancreatitis, the characteristics of organ failure that influence outcomes of patients with acute pancreatitis remain largely unknown. Therefore, the Pancreatitis Across Nations Clinical Research and Education Alliance (PANCREA aims to conduct a meta-analysis of individual patient data from prospective non-interventional studies to determine the influence of timing, duration, sequence, and combination of different organ failures on mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods Pancreatologists currently active with acute pancreatitis clinical research will be invited to contribute. To be eligible for inclusion patients will have to meet the criteria of acute pancreatitis, develop at least one organ failure during the first week of hospitalization, and not be enrolled into an intervention study. Raw data will then be collated and checked. Individual patient data analysis based on a logistic regression model with adjustment for confounding variables will be done. For all analyses, corresponding 95% confidence intervals and P values will be reported. Conclusion This collaborative individual patient data meta-analysis will answer important clinical questions regarding patients with acute pancreatitis that develop organ failure. Information derived from this study will be used to optimize routine clinical management and improve care strategies. It can also help validate outcome definitions, allow comparability of results and form a more accurate basis for patient allocation in further clinical studies.

  12. Academic portfolio in the digital era: organizing and maintaining a portfolio using reference managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Puneet; Patel, Vatsal B; Iyer, Ramesh S; Moshiri, Mariam; Robinson, Tracy J; Lall, Chandana; Heller, Matthew T

    2015-02-01

    The academic portfolio has become an integral part of the promotions process. Creating and maintaining an academic portfolio in paper-based or web-based formats can be a cumbersome and time-consuming task. In this article, we describe an alternative way to efficiently organize an academic portfolio using a reference manager software, and discuss some of the afforded advantages. The reference manager software Papers (Mekentosj, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) was used to create an academic portfolio. The article outlines the key steps in creating and maintaining a digital academic portfolio. Using reference manager software (Papers), we created an academic portfolio that allows the user to digitally organize clinical, teaching, and research accomplishments in an indexed library enabling efficient updating, rapid retrieval, and easy sharing. To our knowledge, this is the first digital portfolio of its kind.

  13. Should Organic Agriculture Maintain Its Opposition to GM? New Techniques Writing the Same Old Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fern Wickson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biotechnology is diversifying rapidly through the development and application of new approaches to genome editing and ongoing research into synthetic biology. Proponents of biotechnology are enthusiastic about these new developments and have recently begun calling for environmental movements to abandon their campaigns against Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs and for organic agriculture to reconsider its exclusion of Genetic Modification (GM. In this article, we begin by describing the diversity of practices that cluster under both the terms GM and organic and show that although there is a clash of different cultures of agriculture at stake, there is also a spectrum of practices existing between these two poles. Having established the terms of the debate, we then go on to analyse whether the organic movement should reconsider its position on GM in light of new plant breeding techniques (NPBTs, using the criteria highlighted as important by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM in their 2016 draft revised position on GMOs. Through this analysis, we suggest that given the in-context-trajectory of biotechnology development, the continued narrow framing of agricultural problems and the ongoing exclusion of important socio-economic, political and cultural dimensions, the organic movement is justified in maintaining its opposition to GM in the face of NPBTs.

  14. The Outcomes in Patients with Acute Idiopathic Pancreatitis: The Lost Tribe of Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute idiopathic pancreatitis remains a challenge with no available strong recommendations. Its impact on patient outcome is not clear. This study compared the outcomes between patients with idiopathic pancreatitis and acute non-idiopathic pancreatitis. Methods A retrospective analysis of electronic prospectively maintained database of all episodes of acute pancreatitis over a 4-year study period. Patients’ clinicopathological data for hospital admissions were collected. Primary end points were organ failure, intensive care unit admission, pancreatic necrosis and mortality. Data analysis using SPSS version 19.0 with Chi-square test and unpaired Student t-test comparing the outcomes between idiopathic pancreatitis and non-idiopathic pancreatitis with p-value <0.05 set as statistically significance. Results 569 episodes of acute pancreatitis were recorded in 446 patients during the study period. The median age for all episodes was 62 (13-100 years with 264 males and 305 females. 142/569 (25% and 427/569 (75% were idiopathic pancreatitis and non-idiopathic pancreatitis respectively. Both groups were similar in their pre-admission co-morbidities (p=0.77 and demographics except for a preponderance of female patients in the idiopathic pancreatitis (63% compared to the idiopathic pancreatitis (51% (p=0.012. 21/142 (15% patients with IP had overall poor outcomes compared with 30/427 (7% in the non-idiopathic pancreatitis group (odds ratio 2.29; 95% confidence interval 1.27-4.16; P=0.006. Significantly poor outcomes noted in idiopathic pancreatitis compared with non-idiopathic pancreatitis for pancreatitis specific mortality (odds ratio 3.17; confidence interval 1.408-7.180; P=0.004, intensive care unit admission (odds ratio 2.73; confidence interval 1.36-5.46; P=0.003 and multi-organ failure (odds ratio 2.97; confidence interval 1.36-6.49; P=0.004. Conclusions Outcomes is significantly poor in idiopathic pancreatitis and this reflects our

  15. Capu and Spire assemble a cytoplasmic actin mesh that maintains microtubule organization in the Drosophila oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgaard, Katja; Raposo, Alexandre A S F; Niccoli, Teresa; St Johnston, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    Mutants in the actin nucleators Cappuccino and Spire disrupt the polarized microtubule network in the Drosophila oocyte that defines the anterior-posterior axis, suggesting that microtubule organization depends on actin. Here, we show that Cappuccino and Spire organize an isotropic mesh of actin filaments in the oocyte cytoplasm. capu and spire mutants lack this mesh, whereas overexpressed truncated Cappuccino stabilizes the mesh in the presence of Latrunculin A and partially rescues spire mutants. Spire overexpression cannot rescue capu mutants, but prevents actin mesh disassembly at stage 10B and blocks late cytoplasmic streaming. We also show that the actin mesh regulates microtubules indirectly, by inhibiting kinesin-dependent cytoplasmic flows. Thus, the Capu pathway controls alternative states of the oocyte cytoplasm: when active, it assembles an actin mesh that suppresses kinesin motility to maintain a polarized microtubule cytoskeleton. When inactive, unrestrained kinesin movement generates flows that wash microtubules to the cortex.

  16. The Role of Performance Management in Creating and Maintaining a High-Performance Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André A. de Waal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is still a good deal of confusion in the literature about how the use of a performance management system affects overall organizational performance. Some researchers find that performance management enhances both the financial and non-financial results of an organization, while others do not find any positive effects or, at most, ambiguous effects. An important step toward getting more clarity in this relationship is to investigate the role performance management plays in creating and maintaining a high-performance organization (HPO. The purpose of this study is to integrate performance management analysis (PMA and high-performance organization (HPO. A questionnaire combining questions on PMA dimensions and HPO factors was administered to two European-based multinational firms. Based on 468 valid questionnaires, a correlation analysis was performed on the PMA dimensions and the HPO factors in order to test the impact of performance management on the factors of high organizational performance. The results show strong and significant correlations between all the PMA dimensions and all the HPO factors, indicating that a performance management system that fosters performance-driven behavior in the organization is of critical importance to strengthen overall financial and non-financial performance.

  17. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... pancreatitis; Pancreas - inflammation Images Digestive system Endocrine glands Pancreatitis, acute - CT scan Pancreatitis - series References Forsmark CE. Pancreatitis. ...

  18. Corporation as Civil Organization in a CSR Campaign: The Challenge of Maintaining Credibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2011-01-01

    , governments and civil society (Van Marrewijk, 2003). Within this framework, the case study contributes to our understanding of the motivation for the increasing number of CSR partnerships between business and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) (Googins & Rochlin, 2000). More specifically, the analysis...... are recognized and maintained in CSR campaigns, challenges to a company’s credibility and reputation can arise. Key words: corporate social responsibility, corporate communication, cross-sector partnerships, corporate sustainability, campaigns, collaboration Paper type: case study Googins, B. K., Rochlin, S. A....... (2000). Creating the partnership society: Understanding the rhetoric and reality of cross-sectoral partnerships. Business and Society Review, 105(1), 127-144. Stohl, C., Stohl, M. & Popova, L. (2009). A new generation of corporate codes of ethics. Journal of Business Ethics, 90(4), 607-622. Van...

  19. [Autoimmune pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, G; Menzel, J; Krüger, P-C; Ribback, S; Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a relatively rare form of chronic pancreatitis which is characterized by a lymphoplasmatic infiltrate with a storiform fibrosis and often goes along with painless jaundice and discrete discomfort of the upper abdomen. Clinically we distinguish between two subtypes, which differ in terms of their histology, clinical picture and prognosis. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is the pancreatic manifestation of the IgG4-associated syndrome which also involves other organs. About one third of the patients can only be diagnosed after either histological prove or a successful steroid trail. Type 2 is IgG4-negative with the histological picture of an idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis and is to higher degree associated with inflammatory bowel disease. A definitive diagnosis can only be made using biopsy. Usually both forms show response to steroid treatment, but in type 1 up to 50 % of the patients might develop a relapse. The biggest challenge and most important differential diagnosis remains the discrimination of AIP from pancreatic cancer, because also AIP can cause mass of the pancreatic head, lymphadenopathy and ductal obstruction. This article summarizes recent advances on epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic strategy, therapy and differential diagnosis in this relatively unknown disease.

  20. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  1. The effects of ω-3 fish oil lipid emulsion on inflammation-immune response and organ function in patients with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许强宏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of ω-3 fish oil lipid emulsion via vein on the inflammatory response,immune and organ function in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Methods A total of 53 patients with severe acute pancreatitis were randomized into conventional

  2. [Multiple organ failure complicating a severe acute necrotising pancreatitis secondary of a severe hypertriglyceridemia: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degardin, J; Pons, B; Ardisson, F; Gallego, J-P; Thiery, G

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old man admitted for a multi-organ failure with a coma, a hemodynamic instability, a respiratory distress syndrome, an acute renal failure and a thrombocytopenia. The blood samples highlighted a milky serum and allowed to diagnose an acute pancreatitis associated with a major dyslipidemia: hypertriglyceridemia 11,800 mg/dL and hypercholesterolemia 1195 mg/dL. The CT-scans do not reveal any cerebral abnormalities but highlighted pancreatic lesions without biliary obstruction. A multi-organ failure complicating a severe acute pancreatitis secondary of a major hypertriglyceridemia was mentioned. Despite the absence of clear guidelines, a session of plasma exchange was started in emergency. Symptomatic treatment with protective ventilation, vasopressors, continuous heparin and insulin was continued. The clinical and biological course was good in parallel of the normalization of lipid abnormalities. The patient was discharged at day 17 with a lipid-lowering therapy. We discuss the various treatments available for the management of acute pancreatitis complicating a severe hypertriglyceridemia and their actual relevance in the absence of clear recommendations.

  3. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol is a known risk factor for both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Therefore it is recommended that all HP patients ... Pancreatitis Patient Info Animated Pancreas Patient Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Research Research Grant Application Research History Grant ...

  4. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  5. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  6. Comparison of Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, BISAP, APACHE-II, CTSI Scores, IL-6, CRP, and Procalcitonin in Predicting Severity, Organ Failure, Pancreatic Necrosis, and Mortality in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay K. Khanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multifactorial scorings, radiological scores, and biochemical markers may help in early prediction of severity, pancreatic necrosis, and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP. Methods. BISAP, APACHE-II, MOSS, and SIRS scores were calculated using data within 24 hrs of admission, whereas Ranson and Glasgow scores after 48 hrs of admission; CTSI was calculated on day 4 whereas IL-6 and CRP values at end of study. Predictive accuracy of scoring systems, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of various markers in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis, organ failure, pancreatic necrosis, admission to intensive care units and mortality were calculated. Results. Of 72 patients, 31 patients had organ failure and local complication classified as severe acute pancreatitis, 17 had pancreatic necrosis, and 9 died (12.5%. Area under curves for Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, APACHE-II, BISAP, CTSI, IL-6, and CRP in predicting SAP were 0.85, 0.75, 0.73, 0.73, 0.88, 0.80, 0.90, and 0.91, respectively, for pancreatic necrosis 0.70, 0.64, 0.61, 0.61, 0.68, 0.61, 0.75, 0.86, and 0.90, respectively, and for mortality 0.84, 0.83, 0.77, 0.76, 0.86, 0.83, 0.57, 0.80, and 0.75, respectively. Conclusion. CRP and IL-6 have shown a promising result in early detection of severity and pancreatic necrosis whereas APACHE-II and Ranson score in predicting AP related mortality in this study.

  7. Bernard Organ Failure Score in estimation of most severe forms of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glišić Tijana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite intensive research, efforts and clinical investigations on pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP and system morbidity during the illness onset, mortality is still very high in the group of severe forms. A significantly high number of patients show moderate, self-limited forms of illness, with a minimal degree of systemic or local complications, with full recovery. However, some of them have a severe form, followed by a high percent of morbidity and mortality, and system organ failure. The distinction between mild and severe forms of AP within 24-48 hours of hospital admission is very important for the treatment of these patients. The usage of multifactorial scoring systems holds a lot of promise, reaching reliability in the disease severity estimation of approximately 70-80%. Objective. The main purpose of this prospective study was to assess the correlation of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and the Bernard Organ Failure Score (BOFS scoring systems in estimation of disease severity and outcome prediction. Methods. Sixty patients with AP participated in the study, all of them scored with the APACHE II and BOFS scores. The results were used for integration of laboratory and clinical parameters. Results. In our study, we had a highly significant correlation between the APACHE II and BOFS scores from the disease onset until the end of treatment. There was a highly significant correlation between these two scores and the serum C-reactive protein concentration level. Conclusion. The concept of the BOFS score has more advantages than the APACHE II score in the patients with severe forms of AP with organ dysfunction.

  8. Kynurenine–3–monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie ZM; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew GF; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah EM; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death1,2 Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20%3 and for those who survive the initial episode, their lifespan is typically shorter than the general population4. There are no specific therapies available that protect individuals against AP-MODS. Here, we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism5, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain deficient for Kmo with a robust biochemical phenotype that protected against extrapancreatic tissue injury to lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo and afforded therapeutic protection against AP-MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS and open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  9. Glucococorticoid-induced death of pancreatic Beta cells: an organized chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Joselyn; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Cabrera, Mayela; Cabrera, Mayela; Bermúdez, Valmore; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-31

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are renowned for their pleiotropic effects in all organ systems, their ubiquitous use in numerous clinical settings, and the abundant adverse effects they may exert, particularly in the endocrine-metabolic sphere. Although hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are well-defined GC-induced diabetogenic phenomena, an added component of direct injury to pancreatic β cells (PBC) may also participate in this scenario. Indeed, the apoptotic capacity of GC is widely recognized, and PBC do not escape this situation. No unified pathway has been characterized regarding GC-induced cell death; instead, it appears to depend on the specific machinery of each cell type, determining a great heterogeneity in GC-dependent apoptotic mechanisms among different tissues. In PBC, GC can induce the expression or activation of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, BAD, p38), repress anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2), deactivate pro-survival mechanisms (cAMP-PKA signaling) and sensitize the cell to death induced by oxidative stress, fatty acids, hyperglycemia and cytokines. Although proliferative pathways (TGF-β, H-ras) are activated simultaneously - and an increase in PBC mass may be observed initially - pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative mechanisms appear to eventually overcome their pro-survival counterparts, due to their synergic and aggregative action. Key molecules such as p38 and the cAMP-PKA system may be promising therapeutic targets in the prevention of GC-induced cell death.

  10. Study of the Protective Effects of Dexamethasone on Multiple Organ Injury in Rats with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Ping Zhang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreas, lung, kidney and liver injury has been proven to play an important role in severe acute pancreatitis. Objective To observe theprotective effects of dexamethasone on multiple organs (pancreas, lung, kidney and liver inrats with severe acute pancreatitis. AnimalsOne hundred and thirty-five Sprague-Dawley rats. DesignNinety rats were prepared as severe acute pancreatitis models and were randomly divided into a control group and the dexamethasone treatmentgroup (45 rats in each group. Another 45 rats were selected to be the sham operation group. Each group was randomly subdivided into 3 subgroups which were observed at 3, 6, and 12 h after surgery (15 rats in each subgroup. Main outcome measuresThe survival, gross and pathological findings under the light microscope, and the pathological scores of multiple organs in each group were recorded. ResultsThere was no significant difference in survival between the dexamethasone treatment group and the control group (P=0.494. The pancreas pathological score was significantly lower in the dexamethasone treatment group than in the control group at the various time intervals (overall: P<0.001; 3 h: P=0.019; 6 h: P=0.010, 12 h: P<0.001. The lung pathological score was significantly lower in the dexamethasone treatment group than in the control group at 6 and 12 h (P=0.023 and P<0.001, respectively. The kidney (P<0.001 and liver (P=0.009 pathological scores were also significantly lower in the overall dexamethasone treatment group than in the overall control group, but significant differenceswere found only in some time intervals (kidney: 6 and 12 h, P=0.006 and P=0.044, respectively; liver: 12 h, P=0.046. ConclusionIntravenous injection of dexamethasone can alleviate pancreas, lung, kidney and liver injury of rats with severe acute pancreatitis and may have protective effects on multiple organ injury.

  11. Probiotic treatment with Probioflora in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis without organ failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, M.C. van; Kohout, P.; Besselink, M.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Benes, Z.; Zazula, R.; Rijkers, G.T.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that probiotic prophylaxis, in patients with predicted severe pancreatitis, did not prevent infectious complications but unexpectedly increased the risk of bowel ischemia and mortality. The suggestion that these negative findings are only observed in the presen

  12. Probiotic treatment with Probioflora in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis without organ failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, M.C. van; Kohout, P.; Besselink, M.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Benes, Z.; Zazula, R.; Rijkers, G.T.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that probiotic prophylaxis, in patients with predicted severe pancreatitis, did not prevent infectious complications but unexpectedly increased the risk of bowel ischemia and mortality. The suggestion that these negative findings are only observed in the presen

  13. Effects of dexamethasone and Salvia miltiorrhiza on multiple organs in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-min OU; Xi-ping ZHANG; Cheng-jun WU; Di-jiong WU; Ping YAN

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of action of dexamethasone and Salvia miltiorrhiza on multiple organs in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).Methods:The rats were divided into sham-operated,model control,dexamethasone treated,and Salvia mi/tiorrhiza treated groups.At 3,6,and 12 h after operation,the mortality rate of different groups,pathological changes,Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) protein expression levels in multiple organs (the pancreas,liver,kidneys,and lungs),toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) protein levels (only in the liver),intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) protein levels (only in the lung),and terminal deoxynucleotidy transferase mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick end labeling (TUNEL)staining expression levels,as well as the serum contents of amylase,glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT),glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT),blood urea nitrogen (BUN),and creatinine (CREA) were observed.Results:The mortality rate of the dexamethasone treated group was significantly lower than that of the model control group (P<0.05).The pathological changes in multiple organs in the two treated groups were relieved to different degrees (P<0.05 and P<0.01,respectively),the expression levels of Bax and NF-κB proteins,and apoptotic indexes of multiple organs were reduced (P<0.05 and P<0.01,respectively).The contents of amylase,GPT,GOT,BUN,and CREA in the two treated groups were significantly lower than those in model control groups (P<0.05 and P<0.01,respectively).The expression level of ICAM-1 protein in the lungs (at 3 and 12 h) in the dexamethasone treated group was significantly lower than that in the Salvia miltiorrhiza treated group (P<0.05).The serum contents of CREA (at 12 h) and BUN (at 6 h)of the Salvia miltiorrhiza treated group were significantly lower than those in the dexamethasone treated group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Both dexamethasone and Salvia

  14. Perfusion-decellularized pancreas as a natural 3D scaffold for pancreatic tissue and whole organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Saik-Kia; Bertera, Suzanne; Olsen, Phillip; Candiello, Joe; Halfter, Willi; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Johnson, Scott; Sicari, Brian; Kollar, Elizabeth; Badylak, Stephen F.; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, with insulin supplementation as the most common treatment measure. Regenerative medicine approaches such as a bioengineered pancreas has been proposed as potential therapeutic alternatives. A bioengineered pancreas will benefit from the development of a bioscaffold that supports and enhances cellular function and tissue development. Perfusion-decellularized organs are a likely candidate for use in such scaffolds since they mimic compositional, architectural and biomechanical nature of a native organ. In this study, we investigate perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas and the feasibility to recellularize the whole pancreas scaffold with pancreatic cell types. Our result demonstrates that perfusion-decellularization of whole pancreas effectively removes cellular and nuclear material while retaining intricate three-dimensional microarchitecture with perfusable vasculature and ductal network and crucial extracellular matrix (ECM) components. To mimic pancreatic cell composition, we recellularized the whole pancreas scaffold with acinar and beta cell lines and cultured up to 5 days. Our result shows successful cellular engraftment within the decellularized pancreas, and the resulting graft gave rise to strong up-regulation of insulin gene expression. These findings support biological utility of whole pancreas ECM as a biomaterials scaffold for supporting and enhancing pancreatic cell functionality and represent a step toward bioengineered pancreas using regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:23787110

  15. Preparation method of an ideal model of multiple organ injury of rat with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Qian Ye; Xin-Ge Jiang; Mei-Li Ma; Fei-Bo Zhu; Rui-Ping Zhang; Qi-Hui Cheng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish an ideal model of multiple organ injury of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: SAP models were induced by retrograde injection of 0.1 mL/100 g 3.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct of Sprague-Dawley rats.The plasma and samples of multiple organ tissues of rats were collected at 3, 6 and 12 h after modeling. The ascites volume, ascites/body weight ratio, and contents of amylase, endotoxin, endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitrogen monoxidum (NO), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma were determined. The histological changes of multiple organs were observed under light microscope.RESULTS: The ascites volume, ascites/body weight ratio, and contents of various inflammatory mediators in blood were higher in the model group than in the sham operation group at all time points [2.38 (1.10), 2.58(0.70), 2.54 (0.71) vs 0.20 (0.04), 0.30 (0.30), 0.22 (0.10)at 3, 6 and 12 h in ascites/body weight ratio; 1582 (284),1769 (362), 1618 (302) (U/L) vs 5303 (1373), 6276(1029), 7538 (2934) (U/L) at 3, 6 and 12 h in Amylase;0.016 (0.005), 0.016 (0.010), 0.014 (0.015) (EU/mL) vs0.053 (0.029), 0.059 (0.037), 0.060 (0.022) (EU/mL)at 3, 6 and 12 h in Endotoxin; 3.900 (3.200), 4.000(1.700), 5.300 (3.000) (ng/L) vs 41.438 (37.721), 92.151(23.119), 65.016 (26.806) (ng/L) at 3, 6 and 12 hin TNF-α, all P < 0.01]. Visible congestion, edema and lamellar necrosis and massive leukocytic infiltration were found in the pancreas of rats of model group. There were also pathological changes of lung, liver, kidney,ileum, lymphonode, thymus, myocardium and brain.CONCLUSION: This rat model features reliability,convenience and a high achievement ratio. Complicated with multiple organ injury, it is an ideal animal model of SAP.

  16. Pancreatic Expression database: a generic model for the organization, integration and mining of complex cancer datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine Nicholas R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer death in both males and females. In recent years, a wealth of gene and protein expression studies have been published broadening our understanding of pancreatic cancer biology. Due to the explosive growth in publicly available data from multiple different sources it is becoming increasingly difficult for individual researchers to integrate these into their current research programmes. The Pancreatic Expression database, a generic web-based system, is aiming to close this gap by providing the research community with an open access tool, not only to mine currently available pancreatic cancer data sets but also to include their own data in the database. Description Currently, the database holds 32 datasets comprising 7636 gene expression measurements extracted from 20 different published gene or protein expression studies from various pancreatic cancer types, pancreatic precursor lesions (PanINs and chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatic data are stored in a data management system based on the BioMart technology alongside the human genome gene and protein annotations, sequence, homologue, SNP and antibody data. Interrogation of the database can be achieved through both a web-based query interface and through web services using combined criteria from pancreatic (disease stages, regulation, differential expression, expression, platform technology, publication and/or public data (antibodies, genomic region, gene-related accessions, ontology, expression patterns, multi-species comparisons, protein data, SNPs. Thus, our database enables connections between otherwise disparate data sources and allows relatively simple navigation between all data types and annotations. Conclusion The database structure and content provides a powerful and high-speed data-mining tool for cancer research. It can be used for target discovery i.e. of biomarkers from body fluids, identification and analysis

  17. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhunen, Jyrki; Tonnessen, Tor Inge

    2017-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT) during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly) gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs) are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP. PMID:28316860

  18. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runkuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP.

  19. The role of professional nursing organizations in maintaining a healthy workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Barbara B

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how professional nursing organizations contribute to the goal of a healthy nursing practice environment through offering continuing education, developing practice standards, and promoting nursing competence through certifications.

  20. The Role of Performance Management in Creating and Maintaining a High-Performance Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, A.A de; Heijden, B.I.J.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    There is still a good deal of confusion in the literature about how the use of a performance management system affects overall organizational performance. Some researchers find that performance management enhances both the financial and non-financial results of an organization, while others do not f

  1. Shallow non-inversion tillage in organic farming maintains crop yields and increases soil C stocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, Julia; Baranski, Marcin; Stewart, Gavin; Nobel-de Lange, Majimcha; Bàrberi, Paolo; Fließbach, Andreas; Peigné, Josephine; Berner, Alfred; Brock, Christopher; Casagrande, Marion; Crowley, Oliver; David, Christophe; Vliegher, De Alex; Döring, Thomas F.; Dupont, Aurélien; Entz, Martin; Grosse, Meike; Haase, Thorsten; Halde, Caroline; Hammerl, Verena; Huiting, Hilfred; Leithold, Günter; Messmer, Monika; Schloter, Michael; Sukkel, Wijnand; Heijden, van der Marcel G.A.; Willekens, Koen; Wittwer, Raphaël; Mäder, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Reduced tillage is increasingly promoted to improve sustainability and productivity of agricultural systems. Nonetheless, adoption of reduced tillage by organic farmers has been slow due to concerns about nutrient supply, soil structure, and weeds that may limit yields. Here, we compiled the resu

  2. Impact of global Fxr deficiency on experimental acute pancreatitis and genetic variation in the FXR locus in human acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian M Nijmeijer

    Full Text Available Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR, which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis.Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs.In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology.We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a secondary phenomenon.

  3. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan Yin; Goh, Germaine; Chia, Joanne; Boey, Adrian; Gunko, Natalia V; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC's regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC's action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase.

  4. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Yin Lee

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC's regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC's action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  6. Pancreatic pseudocysts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    at formulating a classification that can be used to dictate treatment strategy ... standing of the natural history of pancreatic fluid collec- ... ring, protein plug, or stone, the ongoing pancreatic secretion ... exocrine function in chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Bacteriological profile of pancreatic juice in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Salil Kumar; Pottakkat, Biju; Raja, Kalayarasan; Vijayahari, Ranjit; Lakshmi, Chandrasekharan Padma

    2014-09-28

    Information regarding the association of bacteria in the pancreatic fluid in patients with chronic pancreatitis is limited. This study was designed to analyze the prevalence of bacteria in pancreatic juice in patients with chronic pancreatitis and the association of positive pancreatic fluid culture with pre-operative and post-operative parameters. All patients with chronic pancreatitis who underwent operation from November 2011 to October 2013 were prospectively included in the study. Intra-operatively pancreatic duct fluid was collected and sent for culture sensitivity in all patients. The bacteriology of the fluid was analyzed and was correlated with preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative parameters. A total of 26 patients were analyzed. Two patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) preoperatively. Bacteria was present in pancreatic duct fluid in 11 (42%) patients. Both patients who underwent ERCP had positive cultures. Most common organism observed was Escherichia coli (6/11, 55%) followed by Klebsiella pneumonia (3/11, 27%). Five patients with positive culture developed wound infection. Bacteria isolated from the wound were similar to pancreatic fluid. Bacteria is commonly present in the pancreatic juice in patients with chronic pancreatitis and its presence may have an effect on the post-operative infections following operations. Based on the pancreatic fluid culture results appropriate antibiotic can be given to the patients who will develop septic complications following surgery. Role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of the chronic calcific pancreatitis needs to be investigated in future studies.

  8. Capu and Spire Assemble a Cytoplasmic Actin Mesh that Maintains Microtubule Organization in the Drosophila Oocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgaard, Katja; Raposo, Alexandre A.S.F.; Niccoli, Teresa; St Johnston, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Mutants in the actin nucleators Cappuccino and Spire disrupt the polarized microtubule network in the Drosophila oocyte that defines the anterior-posterior axis, suggesting that microtubule organization depends on actin. Here, we show that Cappuccino and Spire organize an isotropic mesh of actin filaments in the oocyte cytoplasm. capu and spire mutants lack this mesh, whereas overexpressed truncated Cappuccino stabilizes the mesh in the presence of Latrunculin A and partially rescues spire mutants. Spire overexpression cannot rescue capu mutants, but prevents actin mesh disassembly at stage 10B and blocks late cytoplasmic streaming. We also show that the actin mesh regulates microtubules indirectly, by inhibiting kinesin-dependent cytoplasmic flows. Thus, the Capu pathway controls alternative states of the oocyte cytoplasm: when active, it assembles an actin mesh that suppresses kinesin motility to maintain a polarized microtubule cytoskeleton. When inactive, unrestrained kinesin movement generates flows that wash microtubules to the cortex. PMID:17925229

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  10. Nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis Soporte nutricional en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Marcela Peláez Hernández

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis is associated with a systemic inflammatory response leading to a hypermetabolic, hypercatabolic condition; for those reasons, patients suffering from this disease require an excellent artificial nutritional support in order to maintain the structural integrity and the function of vital organs with minimal pancreatic secretion. Total parenteral nutrition has been the standard practice in the treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis because of the favorable outcomes of early nutritional support while avoiding pancreatic stimulation; however, recent evidence suggests there are potentially greater benefits with enteral as compared with parenteral nutrition, including fewer septic and metabolic complications and lesser costs. That is why present guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis recommend that enteral instead of parenteral nutrition be used in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. La pancreatitis aguda, especialmente en su forma grave, está asociada con una respuesta inflamatoria sistémica que lleva a un estado de hipermetabolismo e hipercatabolismo, en el que se requiere un excelente soporte nutricional que permita mantener la integridad estructural y la función de los órganos vitales con un estímulo mínimo de la secreción pancreática. La nutrición parenteral total era el soporte de elección, que permitía obtener todos los beneficios de la nutrición temprana sin estimular la secreción pancreática; pero la evidencia actual muestra mayores beneficios con la nutrición enteral, porque se asocia con menos complicaciones infecciosas y metabólicas y con disminución en los costos. Por ello las guías actuales de tratamiento de la pancreatitis aguda grave recomiendan como primera elección el soporte nutricional enteral.

  11. Brain Networks Maintain a Scale-Free Organization across Consciousness, Anesthesia, and Recovery: Evidence for Adaptive Reconfiguration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, UnCheol; Oh, GabJin; Kim, Seunghwan; Noh, GyuJung; Choi, ByungMoon

    2010-01-01

    Background Loss of consciousness is an essential feature of general anesthesia. Although alterations of neural networks during anesthesia have been identified in the spatial domain, there has been relatively little study of temporal organization. Methods Ten normal male volunteers were anesthetized with an induction dose of propofol on two separate occasions. The duration of network connections in the brain was analyzed by multichannel electroencephalography and the minimum spanning tree method. Entropy of the connections was calculated based on Shannon entropy. The global temporal configuration of networks was investigated by constructing the cumulative distribution function of connection times in different frequency bands and different states of consciousness. Results General anesthesia was associated with a significant reduction in the number of network connections, as well as significant alterations of their duration. These changes were most prominent in the delta bandwidth and were also associated with a significant reduction in entropy of the connection matrix. Despite these and other changes, a global “scale-free” organization was consistently preserved across multiple subjects, multiple anesthetic exposures, multiple states of consciousness and multiple frequencies of the electroencephalogram. Conclusions Our data suggest a fundamental principle of temporal organization of network connectivity that is maintained during both consciousness and anesthesia, despite local changes. These findings are consistent with a process of adaptive reconfiguration during general anesthesia. PMID:20881595

  12. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  13. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  14. Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2007-03-01

    fibrillary acidic protein, neural cell adhesion molecule and neurotrophin nerve growth factor just as hepatic stellate cells do. Pancreatic stellate cells contain the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase [11] and, when activated, they assume a myofibroblastlike phenotype [12]. Activated pancreatic stellate cells are characterized by the disappearance of fat globules and the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin. These cells have proliferative and migratory [13, 14, 15] functions and they also synthesize and secrete extracellular fibrous tissue matrix proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors [16]; it has also been demonstrated that pancreatic stellate cells have phagocytic activity [17]. Thus, the ability of pancreatic stellate cells to synthesize as well as to degrade extracellular matrix proteins suggests their role in maintaining a normal pancreatic architecture which can shift towards fibrogenesis if the balance is altered. Ethanol, acetaldehyde and oxidant stress are capable of activating activate pancreatic stellate cells via three mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways [18], namely extracellular signal kinase, p38 kinase and c-jun amino terminal kinase [19, 20, 21], and ethanol and acetaldehyde are also capable of activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C [22]. On the other hand, extracellular signal kinase activation occurs via a signal transduction pathway which involves Gprotein Ras and serine threonine protein kinase Raf-1 [23, 24]. The Ras superfamily G proteins undergo post-translational modification involving isoprenylation, a process which requires intermediate substrates of cholesterol biosynthesis [25, 26] which is regulated by HMG CoA reductase [27]. The paracrine pro-fibrogenic effect of TGF-beta on pancreatic stellate cells is mediated via smad while the autocrine effect is mediated through the extracellular signal kinase pathway [28]; furthermore, the role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma seems to be

  15. Effect of Early Hemofiltration on Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Responses and Multiple Organ Failure in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨智勇; 王春友; 陶京; 熊炯炘; 万赤丹; 周锋

    2004-01-01

    The effects of early hemofiltration on the serum levels of cytokines, pro- and anti-inflammatory balance and organ function in pigs with severe acute pancreatits (SAP) were studied. SAP pig model was induced by retrograde injection of artificial bile into the pancreatic duct. The pigs were randomly divided into SAP hemofiltration treatment group (HF group, n= 8) and SAP nonhemofiltration treatment group (NHF group, n=8). In the HF group, the animals were subjected to high-volume and zero-balance hemofiltration therapy. The results showed that as compared with NHF group, MAP, CVP and PaO2/FiO2 were significantly increased (P<0.01), while HR, urinary protein content, serum ALT level, pulmonary coefficient and lung wet/dry ratio obviously decreased (P<0.05) in HF group. Under a light microscope, the pulmonary histologic scoring was lower that in HF group (P<0.01) and the lesions of renal and liver tissues were milder. However,there was no significant difference in the pancreatic histologic scoring between the two groups. Six h after establishment of the model, the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β were lower, while the IL-10/TNF-α ratio was higher in HF group (all P<0.05). It was suggested that early hemofiltration could effectively remove the serum cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in SAP pigs, elevate the ratio of IL-10/TNF-α, improve hemodynamics and alleviate the lesions of lung, kidney and liver tissues.

  16. Effectiveness of the GAEC standard of cross compliance Crop rotations in maintaining organic matter levels in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberto Borrelli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Our study was conducted in the framework of EFFICOND project, with the aim of evaluating the environmental effectiveness of GAEC (Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions standards with particular focus to the maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM levels through the appropriate crop rotation. The study analyzed the effect of crop rotation on the build-up of soil organic matter in three different areas of Italy, located in the North (Lodi, Centre (Fagna, Firenze and South (Foggia of Italy, characterized by different climate, soil, and cropping systems. In the two experiments conducted in the South of Italy, in a dry Mediterranean climate, the stock of C was kept steady in most of the rotations compared with the monoculture of durum wheat. In such environment, with very dry and hot summers, introducing a year of fallow seems to improve SOM content, but these data need further investigation. In the Centre of Italy (Fagna, with less extreme climate than in Foggia, the effect of rotation compared to the monoculture of maize is negligible, but investigation on the soil organic matter composition, showed that in the rotation the SOM appeared to be more stable and, in the long term, probably more resistant to degradation. Eventually, experiments conducted in the North of Italy, showed that the monoculture, despite the application of FYM (Farm Yard Manure or semi-liquid manure, led to a decrease of SOM. To an increase of the rotation complexity, corresponded an increase in the stock of C in soil. Summarizing, results showed that crop rotation could guarantee the maintenance of SOM level, given that the input of C to the soil is maintained at a good level or, in other word, that productivity of the system is high. Other practices such as conservation tillage, appropriate management of residues, and manure application could enhance the positive effect of rotations. Moreover, preliminary investigation of soil microbial diversity, suggests the

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  18. Pancreatic Involvement in Melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vui Heng Chong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Melioidosis is endemic to tropical regions and, despite the common occurrence of intra-abdominal abscesses, pancreatic involvement in melioidosis has not previously been reported. Objective We report our experience with pancreatic melioidosis. Patients All 65 patients treated for melioidosis who had computed tomography (CT scans were identified from prospective databases and were retrospectively reviewed. Main outcome measures A detailed review of cases with pancreas involvement was carried out. Results There were four cases (three males and one female; median age 29.5 years, range: 25-48 years with pancreatic melioidosis, giving a prevalence of 6.2%. All had predisposing conditions (two had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and two had thalassemia for melioidosis. Fever (100%, anorexia (100%, weight loss (100%, rigor (75% and abdominal pain (75% were the most common symptoms at presentation and the median duration of symptoms before presentation was six weeks (range: 2-8 weeks. All pancreatic abscesses were detected on CT scan. Multiple foci involvement was common (3 to 6 sites: blood (4 patients, liver (3 patients, psoas muscle (2 patients, spleen (2 patients, infected ascites (2 patients and lung (1 patient. Pancreatic involvement ranged from multi-focal micro-abscesses to focal large abscesses and involved all parts of the pancreas (body 100%, head 75% and tail 50%. Associated pancreatic findings included splenic vein thrombosis, peripancreatic inflammation and peripancreatic fat streaking. All the pancreatic abscesses were resolved with antibiotics without requiring pancreatic abscess drainage (including one patient who died from disseminated melioidosis. Conclusion Pancreatic involvement typically occurs as part of multi-organ involvement and commonly manifests as multifoci micro-abscesses. Associated pancreatic abnormalities were also common. All responded to treatment without requiring drainage

  19. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis.

  20. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  1. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or oily stools Pale or clay-colored stools Exams and Tests Tests to diagnose pancreatitis include: Fecal ... in the diet, or as extra supplements Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. ...

  2. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  3. Pancreatic abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000270.htm Pancreatic abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A pancreatic abscess is an area filled with pus within the ...

  4. Childhood pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  5. Updates on Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojas Vyas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains a therapeutic challenge. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2014 about 46,420 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and about 39,590 people will die of pancreatic cancer in the United States [1]. The incidence of pancreatic carcinoma has markedly increased over the past several decades and it now ranks as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the high mortality rate associated with pancreatic cancer, its etiology is poorly understood. Although progress in the development of new cytotoxic and biological drugs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer continues, the outcome remains grim. Many organizations and associations have taken an effort to improve knowledge, understanding and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. Pancreas Club, since its founding in 1966, is aimed to promote the interchange of ideas between physicians and scientists focused on pancreas throughout the world in an informal “club” atmosphere. We attended the 48th Annual Meeting of Pancreas Club in Chicago and reviewed many interesting posters and oral presentations. Here we discuss a few selected abstracts.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  7. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  8. Maintaining health sector collaborations between United States non-governmental organizations and North Korea through innovation and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Eugene S; Choi, Ricky Y; VanRooyen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Humanitarian agencies in North Korea operate within a complex sociopolitical environment historically characterized by a baseline of mistrust. As a result of operating within such a heated environment, health sector collaborations between such agencies and the North Korean government have followed unpredictable courses. The factors that have contributed to successful programmatic collaborations, as perceived by United States non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and North Korean officials were investigated. A qualitative, multi-case, comparative, research design using semistructured interviews was used. Expert North Korean informants were interviewed to generate a list of factors contributing to programmatic success, defined as fulfilling mutually established objectives through collaboration. The North Korean informants were asked to identify US NGOs that fulfill these criteria ("mission-compatible NGOs"). Representatives from all of the mission compatible NGOs were interviewed. All informants provided their perspectives on the factors that contributed to successful programmatic collaborations. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for thematic content. North Korean informants identified six mission-compatible US NGOs. The North Korean and US NGO informants provided a number of factors that contributed to successful programs. These factors were grouped into the following themes: (1) responsiveness to North Korean requests; (2) resident status; (3) program monitoring; (4) sincerity (apolitical objectives); (5) information gathering; and (6) interagency collaboration. Some US NGOs have devised innovative measures to work within a unique set of parameters in North Korea. Both US NGOs and North Korean authorities have made significant concessions to maintain their programmatic partnerships. In this manner, seasoned collaborators have employed creative strategies and a form of health diplomacy to facilitate programmatic success in North Korea by

  9. [Treatment of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumovski-Mihalić, Slavica

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an autodigestive disease in which the pancreatic tissue is damaged by the digestive enzimes produces by the acinar cells and is associated with severe upper abdominal pain. The severity of acute pancreatitis ranges from edema to necrosis of the gland. The edematous form of the disease occurs in about 80-85% of patients and is self-limited, with recovery in few days. In the 15-20% of patients with the most severe form of pancreatitis, hospitalization is prolonged and commonly associated with infection and other complications including multiple organ failure. The main causes of acute pancreatitis in adults are gallstones, other gallbladder (biliary) diseases and alcohol abuse. Treatment of acute pancreatitis-depends on the severity oft he condition. Generaly, the patients need, hospitalisation with administration of intravenous fluid to help restore blood volume, pain control, supplemental oxygen as required and correction of electrolite and metabolic abnormalities. Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and sistemic infection. Begin oral feeding once abdominal pain has resolved and the patients regains appetite. The diet should be low in fat and protein. Patients suffering from infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. During recent years the management of acute pancreatitis has changed. This has been due particulary in response to the general availability of computed tomography, improved intensive care facilities, knowledge about the central role of pancreatic infection and refinements in surgical and other interventional techniques.

  10. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Slavin1; Paula Ghaneh; Robert Sutton1; Mark Hartley; Peter Rowlands; Conall Garvey; Mark Hughes; John Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB,and the role of enteral feeding.

  11. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  12. TNF-alpha gene (TNFA) variants increase risk for multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Sharma, Arun; Stello, Kimberly; Toth, Chad; O'Connell, Michael Richard; Evans, Anna C; LaRusch, Jessica; Muddana, Venkata; Papachristou, Georgios I; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complex inflammatory syndrome with unpredictable progression to systemic inflammation and multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a cytokine that may link inflammation to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which usually precedes MODS. Small genetic cohort studies of the TNFA promoter in AP produced ambiguous results. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of TNFA promoter variants to assess both susceptibility to AP and risk of progression to MODS. We prospectively ascertained 401 controls and 211 patients with AP that were assessed for persistent SIRS (>48 h) and MODS. MODS was defined as failure of ≥2 organ systems (cardiovascular, pulmonary, and/or renal) persisting more than 48 h. Subjects were genotyped by DNA sequencing and analyzed for SNPs at -1031 C/T (rs1799964), -863 A/C (rs1800630), -857 C/T (rs1799724), -308 A/G (rs1800629), and -238 A/G (rs361525). Twenty-three of 211 AP patients (11%) developed MODS. TNFA promoter variants were not associated with susceptibility to AP, but progression to MODS was associated with the minor allele at -1031C (56.5% vs. 32.4% P = 0.022, OR: 2.7; 95%CI: 1.12-6.51) and -863A (43.5% vs. 21.8% P = 0.022, OR: 2.76; 95%CI: 1.12-6.74). TNFA promoter variants do not alter susceptibility to AP, but rather the TNF-α expression-enhancing -1031C and -863A alleles significantly increased the risk of AP progression to MODS. These data, within the context of previous studies, clarify the risk of specific genetic variants in TNFA and therefore the role of TNF-α in the overall AP syndrome. Copyright © 2012 IAP and EPC. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of continuous blood purification in treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo observe the effect of continuous blood purification (CBP on serum inflammatory mediators in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS. MethodsSixty-five SAP patients with MODS who were treated in General Hospital of Chengdu Command Area of Chinese PLA from April 2008 to December 2013 were enrolled and divided into two groups. The 33 patients in the control group received comprehensive internal medicine treatment, and the 32 patients in the treatment group received comprehensive internal medicine treatment and CBP. Changes in APACHE II score, MODS score, and the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6, IL-18, platelet-activating factor (PAF, and nitric oxide (NO after treatment were observed. Independent-samples t test was applied for comparison of continuous data between the two groups, and paired t test was applied for before-after comparison within the same group; chi-squared test was applied for comparison of categorical data between the two groups. ResultsIn both groups, APACHE II score, MODS score, and the serum levels of TNFα, CRP, IL-6, IL-18, PAF, and NO decreased significantly after treatment (all P<0.05, and the treatment group had significantly greater decreases in these values than the control group (all P<0.001; the survival rates in the treatment group and the control group were 90.6% (29/32 and 78.8% (26/33, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups (χ2=1.749, P=0.186. ConclusionIn SAP patients with MODS, CBP can effectively clear the serum inflammatory mediators to block systemic inflammatory response and improve organ function, and, therefore, it is an effective method to treat SAP.

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  15. Spectrum of microorganisms in infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis - Impact on organ failure and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Palle N; Roug, Stine; Feldager Hansen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    %) needed treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU), and 9 (11%) died during hospital admission. The prevailing microbial findings at the index endoscopy were enterococci (45%), enterobacteriaceae (42%), and fungi (22%). There was a significant association between the development of organ failure (p ... drainage, and antibiotic treatment influenced the microbial findings. METHODS: Retrospective review of medical charts on 78 patients who underwent ETDN in our tertiary referral centre between November 2005 and November 2011. RESULTS: Twenty-four patients (31%) developed one or more organ failures, 23 (29.......001), need of treatment in ICU (p admission as compared to survivors. CONCLUSION: Different microbes...

  16. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios Papaioannides

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context :Acute pancreatitis can be caused by a variety of infectious agents but it is regarded as an extremely rare complication of brucellosis. Case report: We briefly describe a 56-yearold man who presented with acute pancreatitis, fever, myalgia, and other clinical symptoms. Brucella melitensis was cultured from his blood. All clinical manifestations gradually resolved with the institution of intramuscular streptomycin and oral doxycycline therapy. Conclusion :Acute pancreatitis may rarely be a complication of infection with B. melitensis. In areas where brucellosis is endemic, it should be kept in mind that acute pancreatitis may result from infection with brucella organisms..

  17. Pancreatic Juice Culture in Acute Pancreatitis and Other Pancreatic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Kikuyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated the results of pancreatic juice cultures of patients with acute pancreatitis and other pancreatic disorders. Methods Twenty patients who underwent pancreatic juice culture were studied. Nine had acute pancreatitis due to alcohol (n=5, idiopathic causes (n=2, drugs (n=1, or gallstones (n=1, and remaining 11 had other pancreatic disorders such as an intraductal papillary mucin-producing neoplasm (n=3 and main pancreatic duct dilatation with a stricture due to a tumorous lesion suspected of pancreatic cancer (n=7 or chronic pancreatitis (n=1 without symptoms. Nasopancreatic drainage tubes were placed for pancreatic duct drainage in acute pancreatitis and for pancreatic juice cytology in other disorders. Pancreatic juice was obtained through the drainage tube and cultured. Results Pancreatic juice cultures were positive in all patients with acute pancreatitis for Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus species, and others. Six among 11 patients (54.5% with other disorders showed positive results for Escherichia coli, Streptococcus salivarius, and others. The rate of positive pancreatic juice cultures was significantly higher in acute pancreatitis (p=0.038. Seven of the 9 patients with acute pancreatitis were classified as having severe acute pancreatitis, and all survived treatment. Conclusions Pancreatic juice culture was highly positive in acute pancreatitis. Further study is needed to confirm the relationship between orally indigenous bacteria identified in the pancreatic juice and acute pancreatitis.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child ... pancreatitis will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are ...

  19. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  20. Impact of jaw position on sparing organs at risk in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Paudel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this work is to investigate the impact of collimator jaw position on dose to organs at risk (OARs during a 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT of pancreatic cancer and postulate a method to minimize OAR dose by proper positioning of the jaws.Methods: Clinically delivered 3DCRT treatment plans for 10 patients optimized with multiple static beams using multileaf collimator (MLC leaves conformed to a block margin around target, and collimator jaws aligned with outer extent of the block margin were selected. Subsequent plans were generated by displacing the collimator jaws outward in lateral, superior-inferior or both directions by 1 and 2 cm without altering the MLC position. Computed dose to OARs and target with unaltered dose normalization were compared against the corresponding dose obtained from the original plans.Results: Outward displacement of the collimator jaws by 1 cm in lateral and/or superior-inferior direction resulted in a significant increase in mean dose to the studied OARs. The increase was found to be proportional to the outward displacement of the jaws. The increase in maximum dose to spinal cord was significant in a few patients while it was insignificant for all other OARs.Conclusion: Collimator jaws aligned with outer extent of a block margin minimize dose to OARs. Any gap between the block margin and the collimator jaws can lead to an inadvertent delivery of higher dose to the OARs. Hence, the use of an optimal jaw position during treatment planning becomes important to all patient plans.

  1. Obesity, pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbs, Andrew A

    2008-09-01

    The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on the contribution of chronic inflammatory state of morbidly obese patients in an effort to better understand the contribution of inflammation to the comorbidities of obesity. Notably, population studies are beginning to show that one of the most serious potential comorbidities of obesity is an increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. In this article, the current literature that exists supporting this Chronic Inflammatory Hypothesis as it pertains to obesity and pancreatic carcinogenesis is reviewed. To date, studies have focused on interleukin-6, a cytokine known to play a role in obesity, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The anti-inflammatory adipocytokine, adiponectin, has also shown promise as a key player in this mechanism and has recently been found to be more specific than standard tumor markers in differentiating pancreatic cancer from chronic pancreatitis. If the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer is related to hormone levels associated with obesity, such as adipocytokines, and cytokines associated with chronic inflammation, this could potentially lead to the development of new pancreatic cancer tumor markers and ultimately new therapies and methods of prevention.

  2. Organizer-Derived WOX5 Signal Maintains Root Columella Stem Cells through Chromatin-Mediated Repression of CDF4 Expression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pi, L.; Graaff, van der E.; Llavata Peris, C.I.; Weijers, D.; Henning, L.; Groot, de E.; Laux, T.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells in plants and animals are maintained pluripotent by signals from adjacent niche cells. In plants, WUSCHEL HOMEOBOX (WOX) transcription factors are central regulators of stem cell maintenance in different meristem types, yet their molecular mode of action has remained elusive. Here we show

  3. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  4. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  5. Capu and Spire Assemble a Cytoplasmic Actin Mesh that Maintains Microtubule Organization in the Drosophila Oocyte

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlgaard, Katja; Alexandre A.S.F. Raposo; Niccoli, Teresa; St Johnston, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Mutants in the actin nucleators Cappuccino and Spire disrupt the polarized microtubule network in the Drosophila oocyte that defines the anterior-posterior axis, suggesting that microtubule organization depends on actin. Here, we show that Cappuccino and Spire organize an isotropic mesh of actin filaments in the oocyte cytoplasm. capu and spire mutants lack this mesh, whereas overexpressed truncated Cappuccino stabilizes the mesh in the presence of Latrunculin A and partially rescues ...

  6. Clinical effects of continuous high volume hemofiltration on severe acute pancreatitis complicated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wang; Wei-Qin Li; Wei Zhou; Ning Li; Jie-Shou Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficiency of continuous high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS).METHODS: A total of 28 SAP patients with an average of 14.36±3.96 APACHE Ⅱ score were involved. Diagnostic criteria for SAP standardized by the Chinese Medical Association and diagnostic criteria for MODS standardized by American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) were applied for inclusion. HVHF was started 6.0±6.1 (1-30) days after onset of the disease and sustained for at least 72 hours, AN69 hemofilter (1.2 m2)was changed every 24 hours. The ultrafiltration rate during HVHF was 4 000 mi/h, blood flow rate was 250-300 mi/min,and the substitute fluid was infused with pre-dilution. Low molecular weight heparin was used for anticoagulation.RESULTS: HVHF was well tolerated in all the patients, and lasted for 4.04±3.99 (3-24) days. 20 of the patients survived,6 patients died and 2 of the patients quited for financial reason.The ICU mortality was 21.4%. Body temperature, heart rate and breath rate decreased significantly after HVHF.APACHE Ⅱ score was 14.4±3.9 before HVHF, and 9.9±4.3after HVHF, which decreased significantly (P<0.01). Partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood before HVHF was 68.5±19.5 mmHg, and increased significantly after HVHF,which was 91.9±25 mmHg (P<0.01). During HVHF the hemodynamics was stable, and serum potassium, sodium,chlorine, glucose and pH were at normal level.CONCLUSION: HVHF is technically possible in SAP patients complicated with MODS. It does not appear to have detrimental effects and may have beneficial effects.Continuous HVHF, which seldom disturbs the hemodynamics and causes few side-effects, is expected to become a beneficial adjunct therapy for SAP complicated with MODS.

  7. Early onset of organ failure is the best predictor of mortality in acute pancreatitis El fracaso orgánico precoz como mejor factor predictivo de mortalidad en la pancreatitis aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Poves Prim

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: APACHE II is a multifactorial scoring system for predicting severity in acute pancreatitis (AP. Organ failure (OF has been correlated with mortality in AP. Objectives: to evaluate the usefulness of APACHE II as an early predictor of severity in AP, its correlation with OF, and the relevance of an early establishment of OF during the course of AP. Patients and methods: from January 1999 to November 2001, 447 consecutive cases of AP were studied. APACHE II scores and Atlanta criteria were used for defining severity and OF. Results: twenty-five percent of patients had severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. APACHE II at 24 h after admission showed a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 52, 77, 46, and 84%, respectively, for predicting severity. Mortality for SAP was 20.5%. Seventy percent of patients who developed OF did so within the first 24 hours of admission, and their mortality was 52%. Mortality was statistically significant (p Introducción: el APACHE II se ha utilizado como factor predictivo de gravedad en la pancratitis aguda (PA. La instauración de fracaso orgánico (FO en la PA se correlaciona con una mayor mortalidad. Objetivos: evaluar la utilidad del APACHE II como factor predictivo precoz de gravedad en la PA, su correlación con el FO y la relevancia del establecimiento precoz del FO en la PA. Pacientes y métodos: desde enero de 1999 hasta noviembre de 2001 se estudiaron 447 pacientes ingresados consecutivamente por PA. Se utilizó el sistema APACHE II y los criterios de Atlanta para evaluar la gravedad. Resultados: el 25% de los pacientes presentaron una pancreatitis aguda grave (PAG. El APACHE II a las 24 horas del ingreso mostró una sensibilidad, especificidad, valor predictivo positivo y negativo del 52, 77, 46 y 84%, respectivamente, como marcador de gravedad. La mortalidad global de la PAG fue del 20,5%. El 70% de los pacientes que presentaron FO lo hicieron en las primeras 24 horas

  8. A review on the role of organic inputs in maintaining the soil carbon pool of the terrestrial ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Satya Sundar; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Das, Subhasish; Uchimiya, Minori; Jeon, Byong Hun; Kwon, Eilhann; Szulejko, Jan E

    2016-02-01

    Among the numerous sources of greenhouse gases, emissions of CO2 are considerably affected by changes in the extent and type of land use, e.g., intensive agriculture, deforestation, urbanization, soil erosion, or wetland drainage. As a feasible option to control emissions from the terrestrial ecosystems, the scientific community has explored the possibility of enhancing soil carbon (C) storage capacity. Thus, restoration of damaged lands through conservation tillage, crop rotation, cover cropping, reforestation, sub-soiling of compacted lands, sustainable water management practices, and organic manuring are the major antidotes against attenuation of soil organic C (SOC) stocks. In this research, we focused on the effect of various man-made activities on soil biotic organics (e.g., green-, farm-yard manure, and composts) to understand how C fluxes from various sources contribute to the establishment of a new equilibrium in the terrestrial ecosystems. Although such inputs substitute a portion of chemical fertilizers, they all undergo activities that augment the rate and extent of decay to deplete the SOC bank. Here, we provide perspectives on the balancing factors that control the mineralization rate of organic matter. Our arguments are placed in the background of different land use types and their impacts on forests, agriculture, urbanization, soil erosion, and wetland destruction.

  9. Elements of Organizational Culture Superintendents Perceive as Important to Create and Maintain a Successful Organization in Times of Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marylou K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the elements of culture public school superintendents perceive to be most important in creating and sustaining successful organizations in times of crisis. In addition, it was the purpose of this study to identify and describe the leadership strategies superintendents use to create…

  10. Elements of Organizational Culture Superintendents Perceive as Important to Create and Maintain a Successful Organization in Times of Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Marylou K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the elements of culture public school superintendents perceive to be most important in creating and sustaining successful organizations in times of crisis. In addition, it was the purpose of this study to identify and describe the leadership strategies superintendents use to create…

  11. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan L. Iovanna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  12. Hypoxia Induced Tumor Metabolic Switch Contributes to Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasseur, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.vasseur@inserm.fr; Tomasini, Richard; Tournaire, Roselyne; Iovanna, Juan L. [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, BP 915,13288 Marseille cedex 9 (France)

    2010-12-16

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most lethal of all solid tumors with an overall five-year survival rate of only 3–5%. Its aggressive biology and resistance to conventional and targeted therapeutic agents lead to a typical clinical presentation of incurable disease once diagnosed. The disease is characterized by the presence of a dense stroma of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, termed desmoplasia, which limits the oxygen diffusion in the organ, creating a strong hypoxic environment within the tumor. In this review, we argue that hypoxia is responsible for the highly aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and drives pancreatic cancer cells to oncogenic and metabolic changes facilitating their proliferation. However, the molecular changes leading to metabolic adaptations of pancreatic cancer cells remain unclear. Cachexia is a hallmark of this disease and illustrates that this cancer is a real metabolic disease. Hence, this tumor must harbor metabolic pathways which are probably tied in a complex inter-organ dialog during the development of this cancer. Such a hypothesis would better explain how under fuel source limitation, pancreatic cancer cells are maintained, show a growth advantage, and develop metastasis.

  13. Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failure in Trauma and Critical Illiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The problem being addressed is the unknown mechanism(s) in patients with acute pancreatitis, multiple trauma, severe burn, or sepsis responsible...technology. MSD technology enables measurement of biomarker levels using electrochemiluminescense detection . This process is initiated at carbon electrodes...enhance detection and improve sensitivity. Cytokines well-known to be involved in the SIRS early in AP were measured including interleukin-1β (IL-1β

  14. Characteristic findings in images of extra-pancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinaga, Yasunari, E-mail: fujinaga@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Kadoya, Masumi [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Kawa, Shigeyuki [Center of Health, Safety and Environmental Management, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Hamano, Hideaki [Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan); Ueda, Kazuhiko; Momose, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Sachie; Hatta, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Yukiko [Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390-8621 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a unique form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a variety of extra-pancreatic involvements which are frequently misdiagnosed as lesions of corresponding organs. The purpose of this study was to clarify the diagnostic imaging features of extra-pancreatic lesions associated with autoimmune pancreatitis. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed diagnostic images of 90 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis who underwent computer-assisted tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or gallium-67 scintigraphy before steroid therapy was initiated. Results: AIP was frequently (92.2%) accompanied by a variety of extra-pancreatic lesions, including swelling of lachrymal and salivary gland lesions (47.5%), lung hilar lymphadenopathy (78.3%), a variety of lung lesions (51.2%), wall thickening of bile ducts (77.8%), peri-pancreatic or para-aortic lymphadenopathy (56.0%), retroperitoneal fibrosis (19.8%), a variety of renal lesions (14.4%), and mass lesions of the ligamentum teres (2.2%). Characteristic findings in CT and MRI included lymphadenopathies of the hilar, peri-pancreatic, and para-aortic regions; wall thickening of the bile duct; and soft tissue masses in the kidney, ureters, aorta, paravertebral region, ligamentum teres, and orbit. Conclusions: Recognition of the diagnostic features in the images of various involved organs will assist in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and in differential diagnoses between autoimmune pancreatitis-associated extra-pancreatic lesions and lesions due to other pathologies.

  15. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  16. From non-obese diabetic to Network for the Pancreatic Organ Donor with Diabetes: New heights in type 1 diabetes research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lourdes; Ramirez; Abdel; Rahim; A; Hamad

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of therapeutic insulin in 1922 and the development of the non-obese diabetic spontaneous mouse model in 1980,the establishment of Network for Pancreatic Organ Donor with Diabetes(n POD) in 2007 is arguably the most important milestone step in advancing type 1 diabetes(T1D) research. In this perspective,we briefly describe how n POD is transforming T1 D research via procuring and coordinating analysis of disease pathogenesis directly in human organs donated by deceased diabetic and control subjects. The successful precedent set up by n POD is likely to spread far beyond the confines of research in T1 D to revolutionize biomedical research of other disease using high quality procured human cells and tissues.

  17. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be cancerous when found. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a growth in the main pancreatic duct or one of its side branches. IPMN may be precancerous or cancerous. It occurs most ...

  18. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  19. Pancreatic infection with Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, R; Serrano-Heranz, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans have been implicated as pathogens in intravascular (bloodstream, intravascular devices, endocarditis) and extravascular (arthritis, osteomielitis, endophtalmitis) infections. C. parapsilosis, however, is rarely implicated in intra-abdominal infections (peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis, complicating surgery or solid-organ transplantation). We describe a case of a 48-y-old male with acute pancreatitis who had a pancreatic abscess produced by primary C. parapsilosis infection. Although he received adequate treatment with antifungal medication and surgical drainage, the outcome was fatal. Because the clinical findings are indistinguishable from bacterial abscesses, Candida species should be considered in cases of complicated pancreatitis, in order to establish a prompt adequate treatment.

  20. Stress kinase inhibition modulates acute experimental pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Fleischer; R. Dabew; B. Goke; ACC Wagner

    2001-01-01

    AIM To examine the role of p38 during acute experimental cerulein pancreatitis.METHODS Rats were treated with cerulein with or without a specific JNK inhibitor (CEP1347)andy or a specific p38 inhbitor (SB203380) and pancreatic stress kinase activity wasdetermined. Parameters to assess pancreatitis included trypsin, amylase, lipase, pancreatic weight and histology.RESULTS JNK inhibition with CEP1347ameliorated pancreatitis, reducing pancreatic edema. In contrast, p38 inhibition with SB203580aggravated pancreatitis with higher trypsinlevels and, with induction of acinar necrosis not normally found after cerulein hyperstimulation.Simultaneous treatment with both CEP1347 and SB203580 mutually abolished the effects of either compound on cerulein pancreatitis.CONCLUSION Stress kinases modulatepancreatitis differentially. JNK seems to promote pancreatitis development, possibly by supporting inflammatory reactions such as edema formation while its inhibition ameliorates pancreatitis. In contrast, p38 may help reduce organ destruction while inhibition of p38 during induction of cerulein pancreatitis leads to the occurrence of acinar necrosis.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Mark; A; Wells; Katrina; J; Schneider; Shailender; Singh

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellatecells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease.

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  3. Evolutionary Effects on Morphology and Agronomic Performance of Three Winter Wheat Composite Cross Populations Maintained for Six Years under Organic and Conventional Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Brumlop

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Three winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. composite cross populations (CCPs that had been maintained in repeated parallel populations under organic and conventional conditions from the F5 to the F10 were compared in a two-year replicated field trial under organic conditions. The populations were compared to each other, to a mixture of the parental varieties used to establish the CCPs, and to three winter wheat varieties currently popular in organic farming. Foot and foliar diseases, straw length, ear length, yield parameters, and baking quality parameters were assessed. The overall performance of the CCPs differed clearly from each other due to differences in their parental genetics and not because of their conventional or organic history. The CCPs with high yielding background (YCCPs also yielded higher than the CCPs with a high baking quality background (QCCPs; in the absence of extreme winter stress. The QCCPs performed equally well in comparison to the reference varieties, which were also of high baking quality. Compared to the parental mixture the CCPs proved to be highly resilient, recovering much better from winter kill in winter 2011/12. Nevertheless, they were out yielded by the references in that year. No such differences were seen in 2013, indicating that the CCPs are comparable with modern cultivars in yielding ability under organic conditions. We conclude that—especially when focusing on traits that are not directly influenced by natural selection (e.g. quality traits—the choice of parents to establish a CCP is crucial. In the case of the QCCPs the establishment of a reliable high-quality population worked very well and quality traits were successfully maintained over time. However, in the YCCPs lack of winter hardiness in the YCCP parents also became clearly visible under relevant winter conditions.

  4. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a putative risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and temporality of this association. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies investigating the association between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. We...... computed overall effect estimates (EEs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects meta-analytic model. The EEs were stratified by length of follow-up from chronic pancreatitis diagnosis to pancreatic cancer (lag period). Robustness of the results was examined in sensitivity...... analyses. We identified 13 eligible studies. Pooled EEs for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis were 16.16 (95% CI: 12.59-20.73) for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 2 years from their chronic pancreatitis diagnosis. The risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic...

  5. Bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis:comparison with other scoring systems in predicting severity and organ failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Young Park; Tae Joo Jeon; Tae Hwan Ha; Jin Tae Hwang; Dong Hyun Sinn; Tae-Hoon Oh

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The  early  identification  of  severe  acute pancreatitis is important for the management and for improving outcomes. The bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP)  has  been  considered  as  an  accurate  method  for  risk stratification  in  patients  with  acute  pancreatitis.  This  study aimed to evaluate the comparative usefulness of the BISAP. METHODS: We  retrospectively  analyzed  303  patients  with acute pancreatitis diagnosed at our hospital from March 2007 to  December  2010.  BISAP,  APACHE-II,  Ranson  criteria,  and CT  severity  index  (CTSI)  of  all  patients  were  calculated.  We stratified  the  number  of  patiants  with  severe  pancreatitis, pancreatic  necrosis,  and  organ  failure  as  well  as  the  number of deaths by BISAP score. We used the area under the receiver-operating  curve  (AUC)  to  compare  BISAP  with  other  scoring systems,  C-reactive  protein  (CRP),  hematocrit,  and  body mass  index  (BMI)  with  regard  to  prediction  of  severe  acute pancreatitis, necrosis, organ failure, and death. RESULTS: Of  the  303  patiants,  31  (10.2%)  were  classified  as having severe acute pancreatitis. Organ failure occurred in 23 (7.6%) patients, pancreatic necrosis in 40 (13.2%), and death in 6 (2.0%). A BISAP score of 2 was a statistically significant cutoff value for the diagnosis of severe acute pancreatitis, organ failure, and mortality. AUCs for BISAP predicting severe pancreatitis and death were 0.80 and 0.86, respectively, which were similar to those for APACHE-II (0

  6. A Novel Ras Inhibitor (MDC-1016 Reduces Human Pancreatic Tumor Growth in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo G Mackenzie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers partly because of its persistent resistance to chemotherapy. The currently limited treatment options for pancreatic cancer underscore the need for more efficient agents. Because activating Kras mutations initiate and maintain pancreatic cancer, inhibition of this pathway should have a major therapeutic impact. We synthesized phospho-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (PFTS; MDC-1016 and evaluated its efficacy, safety, and metabolism in preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. PFTS inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells in culture in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In an MIA PaCa-2 xenograft mouse model, PFTS at a dose of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced tumor growth by 62% and 65% (P < .05 vs vehicle control. Furthermore, PFTS prevented pancreatitis-accelerated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia in mice with activated Kras. PFTS appeared to be safe, with the animals showing no signs of toxicity during treatment. Following oral administration, PFTS was rapidly absorbed, metabolized to FTS and FTS glucuronide, and distributed through the blood to body organs. Mechanistically, PFTS inhibited Ras-GTP, the active form of Ras, both in vitro and in vivo, leading to the inhibition of downstream effector pathways c-RAF/mitogen-activated protein-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK/ERK1/2 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT. In addition, PFTS proved to be a strong combination partner with phospho-valproic acid, a novel signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 inhibitor, displaying synergy in the inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth. In conclusion, PFTS, a direct Ras inhibitor, is an efficacious agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer in preclinical models, deserving further evaluation.

  7. Evaluating steatosis in pancreatic transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Aneesha Ratan; Papalois, Vassilios

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic transplant remains the only treatment that cures insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. It is recognized by transplant surgeons that donor pancreases with excessive fat infiltration have a poorer clinical outcome, resulting in significant recipient morbidity and mortality. However, no objective measure of pancreatic fat infiltration exists, and no study has been done that correlates the level of fat infiltration with clinical outcome. There have been significant radiologic advances that allow assessment of fat content of organs, and these could be used to accurately quantify the extent of pancreatic fat infiltration. We reviewed the literature regarding pancreatic steatosis, and examined ways in which the level of steatosis could be objectively measured before transplant, thereby improving clinical outcome.

  8. Pancreatic Necrosis Associated with Preeclampsia-Eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar MS

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is rare and commonly occurs in association with biliary disease. Preeclampsia is associated with microvascular abnormalities that may involve cerebral, placental, hepatic, renal and splanchnic circulation and rarely can cause acute pancreatitis. CASE REPORT: A case of acute pancreatitis in a patient with preeclampsia-eclampsia where the diagnosis was missed initially that resulted in a protracted course and development of organized pancreatic necrosis. The pancreatic necrosis resolved with conservative management over 8 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: The development of severe hypoalbuminemia, out of proportion to proteinuria, hypocalcemia and findings of capillary leak should alert the physician to search for other inflammatory causes, including acute pancreatitis so that early and effective management be given to avoid complications.

  9. Pancreatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself Pancreatic cancer Cystic fibrosis, a genetic disorder in which thick, sticky mucus can also block tubes in your pancreas The pancreas also plays a role in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of ...

  10. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samir Habashi; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Initial diagnosis is accomplished most often by cross-sectional imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration has become the preferred test to help distinguish pseudocyst from other cystic lesions of the pancreas. Most pseudocysts resolve spontaneously with supportive care. The size of the pseudocyst and the length of time the cyst has been present are poor predictors for the potential of pseudocyst resolution or complications, but in general, larger cysts are more likely to be symptomatic or cause complications. The main two indications for some type of invasive drainage procedure are persistent patient symptoms or the presence of complications (infection, gastric outlet or biliary obstruction, bleeding). Three different strategies for pancreatic pseudocysts drainage are available: endoscopic (transpapillary or transmural) drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. To date, no prospective controlled studies have compared directly these approaches. As a result, the management varies based on local expertise, but in general, endoscopic drainage is becoming the preferred approach because it is less invasive than surgery, avoids the need for external drain, and has a high long-term success rate. A tailored therapeutic approach taking into consideration patient preferences and involving multidisciplinary team of therapeutic endoscopist, interventional radiologist and pancreatic surgeon should be considered in all cases.

  11. 14.2.Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930325 A clinical study on a lipid—based sys-tem of parenteral nutrition in acute pancreati-tis.ZHU Jiangfan (朱江帆),et al.Dept Hepato-bill Surg,lst Teach Hosp,3rd Milit Med Coll.Chin J Digest 1992;12(4):195—197.A controlled prospective study on a lipid-based system of parenteral nutrition has beencarried out in patients with acute pancreatitis.The results show that the patients’ positive ni-trogen balance can be obtained and the visceralproteins can be maintained within normal range

  12. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  13. A long journey: report of a case with pancreatic abscess extending to the groin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hui-min; ZHANG Zhao-da; HU Wei-ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with variable involvement of regional tissue, remote organ systems, or both. Various complications of pancreatitis are common, including intra- or extrapancreatic fluid collections and development of a pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess, or even pancreatic tissue necrosis.

  14. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the circ...

  15. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evalu...

  16. Apigenin Inhibits Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activity in Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Amy A.; Porro, Laura J.; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Falzon, Miriam; Spratt, Heidi; Zhou, Jia; Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by recurrent pancreatic injury, resulting in inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis. There are currently no drugs limiting pancreatic fibrosis associated with CP, and there is a definite need to fill this void in patient care. MATERIALS AND METHODS Pancreatitis was induced in C57/BL6 mice using supraphysiologic doses of cerulein (CR), and apigenin treatment (once daily, 50 μg/mouse by oral gavage) was initiated one week into the recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) protocol. Pancreata were harvested after four weeks of RAP. Immunostaining with fibronectin antibody was used to quantify the extent of pancreatic fibrosis. To assess how apigenin may decrease organ fibrosis, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) in vitro. Lastly, we assessed apigenin’s effect on gene expression in PSCs stimulated with parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), a pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory mediator of pancreatitis, using RT-PCR. RESULTS After four weeks of RAP, apigenin significantly reduced the fibrotic response to injury while preserving acinar units. Apigenin inhibited viability and induced apoptosis of PSCs in a time and dose-dependent manner. Lastly, apigenin reduced PTHrP-stimulated increases in the PSC mRNA expression levels of extracellular matrix proteins collagen 1A1 and fibronectin, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, TGF-β, and IL-6. CONCLUSIONS These in vivo and in vitro studies provide novel insights regarding apigenin’s mechanism(s) of action in reducing the severity of RAP. Additional preclinical testing of apigenin analogs is warranted to develop a therapeutic agent for patients at risk for CP. PMID:25799526

  17. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grinó P

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic neoplasms are an uncommon aetiology of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours are a rare subgroup of pancreatic neoplasms. CASE REPORT: We report on three patients having acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, one of them with severe pancreatitis, and review the published cases up to now. Only 22 patients with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours have been reported (including the present cases. Most of these cases were of non-functioning neoplasms and the course of the pancreatitis tended to be mild. In the most recent reports and in the present cases, the initial diagnostic method was CT scan. Less than half had metastases when the tumour was diagnosed and mortality from these neoplasms reached approximately 50%. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours can cause acute pancreatitis even in patients under 50 years of age. On many occasions, the tumours are non-functioning; therefore, acute pancreatitis may be the first clinical symptom. Consequently, faced with acute pancreatitis of unknown origin, a non-functioning neuroendocrine tumour should be ruled out.

  18. Infection increases mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Novovic, Srdjan; Schmidt, Palle N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of infection on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: Eligible prospective and retrospective studies were identified through manual and electronic searches (August 2015). The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Meta...... sterile necrosis and organ failure was associated with a mortality of 19.8%. If the patients had infected necrosis without organ failure the mortality was 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are more than twice as likely to die if the necrosis becomes infected. Both organ failure...... and infected necrosis increase mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis....

  19. Surgical management of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stavros Gourgiotis; Stylianos Germanos; Marco Pericoli Ridolifni

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Treatment of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a challenging condition for surgeons. During the last decades, increasing knowledge about pathophysiology of CP, improved results of major pancreatic resections, and integration of sophisticated diagnostic methods in clinical practice have resulted in signiifcant changes in surgery for CP. DATA SOURCES:To detail the indications for CP surgery, the surgical procedures, and outcome, a Pubmed database search was performed. The abstracts of searched articles about surgical management of CP were reviewed. The articles could be identiifed and further scrutinized. Further references were extracted by cross-referencing. RESULTS: Main indications of CP for surgery are intractable pain, suspicion of malignancy, and involvement of adjacent organs. The goal of surgical treatment is to improve the quality of life of patients. The surgical approach to CP should be individualized according to pancreatic anatomy, pain characteristics, baseline exocrine and endocrine function, and medical co-morbidity. The approach usually involves pancreatic duct drainage and resection including longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy, pancreatoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure), pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy, total pancreatectomy, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (Beger's procedure), and local resection of the pancreatic head with longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy (Frey's procedure). Non-pancreatic and endoscopic management of pain has also been advocated. CONCLUSIONS:Surgical procedures provide long-term pain relief, a good postoperative quality of life with preservation of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, and are associated with low early and late mortality and morbidity. In addition to available results from randomized controlled trials, new studies are needed to determine which procedure is the most effective for the management of patients with CP.

  20. Eph/ephrin signaling maintains the boundary of dorsal forerunner cell cluster during morphogenesis of the zebrafish embryonic left-right organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Xingfeng

    2016-01-01

    The Kupffer's vesicle (KV) is the so-called left-right organizer in teleost fishes. KV is formed from dorsal forerunner cells (DFCs) and generates asymmetrical signals for breaking symmetry of embryos. It is unclear how DFCs or KV cells are prevented from intermingling with adjacent cells. In this study, we show that the Eph receptor gene ephb4b is highly expressed in DFCs whereas ephrin ligand genes, including efnb2b, are expressed in cells next to the DFC cluster during zebrafish gastrulation. ephb4b knockdown or mutation and efnb2b knockdown cause dispersal of DFCs, a smaller KV and randomization of laterality organs. DFCs often dynamically form lamellipodium-like, bleb-like and filopodium-like membrane protrusions at the interface, which attempt to invade but are bounced back by adjacent non-DFC cells during gastrulation. Upon inhibition of Eph/ephrin signaling, however, the repulsion between DFCs and non-DFC cells is weakened or lost, allowing DFCs to migrate away. Ephb4b/Efnb2b signaling by activating RhoA activity mediates contact and repulsion between DFCs and neighboring cells during gastrulation, preventing intermingling of different cell populations. Therefore, our data uncover an important role of Eph/ephrin signaling in maintaining DFC cluster boundary and KV boundary for normal left-right asymmetrical development. PMID:27287807

  1. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  2. ERCP in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jijo V Cherian; Joye Varghese Selvaraj; Rajesh Natrayan; Jayanthi Venkataraman

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the management of acute pancreatitis has evolved over years since its introduction in 1968. Its importance in diagnosing the etiology of pancreatitis has steadily declined with the advent of less invasive diagnostic tools. The therapeutic implications of ERCP in acute pancreatitis are many fold and are directed towards management of known etiological factors or its related complications. This article highlights the current status of ERCP in acute pancreatitis. DATA SOURCES:An English literature search using PubMed database was conducted on ERCP in acute pancreatitis, the etiologies and complications of pancreatitis amenable to endotherapy and other related subjects, which were reviewed. RESULTS: ERCP serves as a primary therapeutic modality for management of biliary pancreatitis in speciifc situations, pancreatitis due to microlithiasis, speciifc types of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, pancreas divisum, ascariasis and malignancy. In recurrent acute pancreatitis and smoldering pancreatitis it has a deifnite therapeutic utility. Complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic-duct disruptions or leaks, benign pancreatic-lfuid collections and pancreatic necrosis can be beneifcially dealt with. Intraductal ultrasound and pancreatoscopy during ERCP are useful in detecting pancreatic malignancy. CONCLUSIONS:The role of ERCP in acute pancreatitis is predominantly therapeutic and occasionally diagnostic. Its role in the management continues to evolve and advanced invasive procedures should be undertaken only in centers dedicated to pancreatic care.

  3. Autoimmune Pancreatitis Presenting as Simultaneous Masses in the Pancreatic Head and Gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Gumbs

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized by pancreatic ductal narrowing and pancreatic parenchymal edema on computed tomography and rarely with intermittent attacks of abdominal pain. Recently, it has been found to be a systemic disease with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration that has been associated with several autoimmune diseases and described in multiple organs including the extrahepatic bile duct, liver and gallbladder. Case report We describe the clinical, radiographic and histopathologic aspects of a patient who presented with synchronous masses in the pancreatic head and gallbladder. Postoperatively, the patient's jaundice subsided and IgG4 levels, which were drawn one week postoperatively, were all within normal limits. Nonetheless, immunohistochemical staining for IgG4 was positive. Conclusion Autoimmune pancreatitis is the most common benign entity identified in patients that underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for presumed pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our patient with autoimmune pancreatitis presented with simultaneous inflamematory masses in the gallbladder and pancreatic head, an association not previously reported. Preoperative evaluation of IgG4 or autoantibody levels may have obviated the need for an operation. Therefore, we have begun screening for elevated serum IgG4 concentrations to identify patients with possible autoimmune pancreatitis who present without definitive pathological or radiographic evidence for malignancy. If preoperative diagnosis is not made, immunohistochemical staining of pathology specimens can confirm the diagnosis.

  4. Influence of dexamethasone on inflammatory mediators and NF-кB expression in multiple organs of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Ling Zhang; Lin-Jie Chen; Qi-Hui Cheng; Jian-Mei Wang; Wei Cai; Hai-Ping Shen; Jun Cai

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe the therapeutic effects of dexamethasone on rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and investigate the influences of dexamethasone on the inflammatory mediators and NF-κB expression in multiple organs of SAP rats as well as the mechanisms involved.METHODS: Ninety Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with SAP were randomly divided into the model group (n = 45) and dexamethasone treatment group (n = 45), and another 45 rats were selected for the sham operation group. All groups were randomly subdivided into the 3 h, 6 h and 12 h groups, each group containing 15 rats.The survival of all groups and pathological changes of multiple organs (liver, kidney and lung) were observed at different time points after the operation. The pathological score of multiple organs was carried out, followed by the determination of amylase, endotoxin and TNF-α contents in blood. The tissue microarray was used to detect the expression levels of NF-κB p65 protein in multiple organs.RESULTS: There was no marked difference between the model group and treatment group in the survival rate. The amylase contentof the treatment group was significantly lower compared to the model group at 12 h (P < 0.01, 7791.00 vs 9195.00). Moreover, the endotoxin and TNF-α levels of the treatment group were significantly lower than that of the model group at 6 h and 12 h (P < 0.01, 0.040 vs 0.055, 0.042 vs 0.059 and P < 0.05, 58.30 vs 77.54, 38.70 vs 67.30, respectively).Regarding the changes in liver NF-κB expression, the model group significantly exceeded the sham operation group at 3 h (P < 0.01, 1.00 vs 0.00), and the treatment group significantly exceeded the sham operation group at 12 h (P < 0.01, 1.00 vs 0.00), whereas no marked difference was observed between the model group and treatment group at all time points. The kidney NF-κB expression level in the treatment group significantly exceeded the model group (P < 0.05, 2.00 vs 0.00) and the sham operation group (P < 0.01, 2.00 vs

  5. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B;

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate...... the circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP)....

  6. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Park, Young Hee; Kim, Soo Mi; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-04-15

    A retrospective analysis of ultrasonograms of 24 patients with acute pancreatitis and 8 patients with chronic pancreatitis was performed. Nine cases were proven by surgery and 23 cases were diagnosed clinically. Generalized pancreatic enlargement with normal or decreased echogenecity was principal findings in acute pancreatitis, while pancreas was normal in size and echogenecity was normal or slightly altered in chronic pancreatitis. Ultrasonography is considered a simple and accurate method in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and thus it could be an initial test in patients with suspected acute pancreatitis.

  7. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  8. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Hsu; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer are smoking, family history, chronic pancreatitis, and diabetes. There is controversy with regards to the causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer because many patients with pancreatic cancer have new onset diabetes. Abstracts presented at the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting highlighted and supported the positive association ...

  9. Pancreatic transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pancreas transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy pancreas from a donor into a patient whose pancreas no longer functions properly. Exocrine pancreas transplantation remains the standard treatment of choice for patients with diabetes mellitus complicated by end-stage renal disease. The use of pancreas transplantation for type 2 diabetes mellitus is an emerging concept. A pancreas transplant is often done in conjunction with a kidney transplant. Even if pancreas transplantation provides the best glycemic control option for diabetes mellitus, it is associated with significant morbidities related to infectious disease. The present article provides with a review of pancreatic transplantation.

  10. Morbimortality Indicators in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercio De Campos

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to determine the factors related to the development of systemic complications, mortality and pancreatic necrosis in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Patients Thirty-nine patients (22.3% out of 175 patients with acute pancreatitis who were admitted to our center, had an APACHE II score greater than 8; they were classified as having severe acute pancreatitis and were evaluated in the study. Main outcome measures Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA and Marshall scores were obtained. The variables analyzed were age, sex, etiology, hematocrit, leukocyte count, CRP level, CT findings and length of hospital stay. These variables were related to the development of systemic complications, mortality and necrotizing pancreatitis. Results The mean APACHE II value of the patients included was 11.6±3.1, the mean SOFA score was 3.2±2.0 and the Marshall score was 1.5±1.9. Eleven patients developed necrotizing pancreatitis. The mortality rate among severe acute pancreatitis patients was 3 out of 39 (7.7%. Variables found to be related to systemic complications were the APACHE II score as well as SOFA and Marshall scores greater than 3. The variables related to mortality were SOFA score greater than 3 and leukocytosis greater than 19,000 mm-3. CRP greater than 19.5 mg/dL and length of hospital stay were related to necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusions The scoring systems, especially the SOFA score, were related to the development of systemic complications and mortality. CRP showed a relationship to necrotizing pancreatitis. There was no relationship between the evaluated scoring systems and necrotizing pancreatitis in patients with severe acute pancreatitis.

  11. Necrotizing pancreatitis: a review of multidisciplinary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Anthony; Goussous, Naeem; Sardana, Neeraj; Patel, Shirali; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this review is to summarize the current state of the art of the management of necrotizing pancreatitis, and to clarify some confusing points regarding the terminology and diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis, as these points are essential for management decisions and communication between providers and within the literature. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Despite the publication of the Atlanta guidelines, misuse of pancreatitis terminology continues in the literature and in clinical practice, especially regarding the local complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Necrotizing pancreatitis is a manifestation of severe acute pancreatitis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is aided by pancreas-protocol computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, ideally 72 h after onset of symptoms to achieve the most accurate characterization of pancreatic necrosis. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, organ failure, need for debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach, ideally at a high-volume pancreatic center. The role of antibiotics is determined by the presence of infected necrosis. Early enteral feeds improve outcomes compared with parenteral nutrition. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with a multitude of complications which can lead to long-term morbidity or mortality. Interventional therapy should be guided by available resources and the principle of a minimally invasive approach. When open debridement is necessary, it should be delayed at least 3-6 weeks to allow demarcation of necrotic from viable tissue.

  12. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  13. Silencing Mist1 Gene Expression Is Essential for Recovery from Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Karki

    Full Text Available Acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas are tasked with synthesizing, packaging and secreting vast quantities of pro-digestive enzymes to maintain proper metabolic homeostasis for the organism. Because the synthesis of high levels of hydrolases is potentially dangerous, the pancreas is prone to acute pancreatitis (AP, a disease that targets acinar cells, leading to acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM, inflammation and fibrosis-events that can transition into the earliest stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite a wealth of information concerning the broad phenotype associated with pancreatitis, little is understood regarding specific transcriptional regulatory networks that are susceptible to AP and the role these networks play in acinar cell and exocrine pancreas responses. In this study, we examined the importance of the acinar-specific maturation transcription factor MIST1 to AP damage and organ recovery. Analysis of wild-type and Mist1 conditional null mice revealed that Mist1 gene transcription and protein accumulation were dramatically reduced as acinar cells underwent ADM alterations during AP episodes. To test if loss of MIST1 function was primarily responsible for the damaged status of the organ, mice harboring a Cre-inducible Mist1 transgene (iMist1 were utilized to determine if sustained MIST1 activity could alleviate AP damage responses. Unexpectedly, constitutive iMist1 expression during AP led to a dramatic increase in organ damage followed by acinar cell death. We conclude that the transient silencing of Mist1 expression is critical for acinar cells to survive an AP episode, providing cells an opportunity to suppress their secretory function and regenerate damaged cells. The importance of MIST1 to these events suggests that modulating key pancreas transcription networks could ease clinical symptoms in patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  14. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 1: acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yener, Ö

    2015-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas that may also involve surrounding tissues or remote organs. The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Generally, imaging is recommended to confirm the clinical diagnosis, investigate the etiology, and grade the extend and severity of the acute pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging modality in most centers for the confirmation of the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and the ruling out of other causes of acute abdomen, but it has limitations in the acute clinical setting. Computed tomography not only establishes the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but also enables to stage severity of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging has earned an ever more important role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. It is especially useful for imaging of patients with iodine allergies, characterizing collections and assessment of an abnormal or disconnected pancreatic duct. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of the acute pancreatitis, clarify confusing terminology, underline the role of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging according to the proper clinical context and compare the advantages and limitations of each modality.

  15. [Obesity and pancreatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Gak; Han, Jimin

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is defined as BMI (calculated as weight in kg divided by height in m2) more than 30, and overweight is defined as BMI of 25-29.9. Obesity has been considered as a risk factor for pancreatic diseases, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Severe acute pancreatitis is significantly more frequent in obese patients. Furthermore, obese patients develop systemic and local complications of acute pancreatitis more frequently. The underlying mechanisms are increased inflammation and necrosis from increased amount of intra- and peri-pancreatic fat. In addition, obesity is a poor prognostic factor in acute pancreatitis, and overweight before disease onset appears to be a risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Overweight and/or obesity are associated with greater risk of pancreatic cancer and younger age of onset. Physical activity appears to decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, especially among those who are overweight. Long-standing diabetes increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. The pathogenic mechanism is that obesity and physical inactivity increase insulin resistance. In a state of hypersinulinemia, increased circulating level of insulin-like growth factor-1 induces cellular proliferation of pancreatic cancer. Obesity is associated with negative prognostic factor and increased mortality in pancreatic cancer. However, there are controversies regarding the effects of obesity on long-term post-operative results in the patient with pancreatic cancer.

  16. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  17. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs.The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P systems could consistently reflect the clinical outcome of patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Meanwhile, both criteria could be independent predictors for survival analysis of p-NETs.

  18. Pancreatic candidiasis that mimics a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor on magnetic resonance imaging: A case report in an immunocompetent patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Min Jung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor.

  19. Pancreatic Candidiasis That Mimics a Malignant Pancreatic Cystic Tumor on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Case Report in an Immunocompetent Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Minjung; Kang, Tae Wook; Ha, Sang Yun

    2015-01-01

    Candida is a commensal organism that is frequently found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is the most common organism that causes pancreatic fungal infections. However, magnetic resonance imaging findings of Candida infection in the pancreas have not been described. We report imaging findings of pancreatic candidiasis in a patient in immunocompetent condition. It presented as a multi-septated cystic mass with a peripheral solid component in the background of pancreatitis and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted image that mimicked a malignant pancreatic cystic tumor.

  20. Acute Pancreatitis Concomitant Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okay Abacı

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory syndrome with unpredictable progression to systemic inflammation and multi-organ dysfunction. As in our case rarely, acute pancreatitis can be presented with the coexistance of acute coronary syndrome. To prevent a misdiagnosis of acute situation presented with chest or abdominal pain, physicians must be aware for coexisting pathophysiologies and take into account the differential diagnosis of all life-threatening causes such as cardiac ischemia or acute abdominal situations.

  1. BISAP: A NOVEL METHOD FOR ASSESSING SEVERITY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingeshwara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are many multifactorial scoring systems, radiological scores, and biochemical markers are available for early prediction of severity, and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP. The bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP has been considered as an accurate method for risk stratification in patients with acute pancreatitis. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of the BISAP as a predictor for severe pancreatitis. METHODS AND MATERIAL: We analyzed 100 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis at our hospital between October 2012 and April 2013. We used BISAP score in all such patients within 24 hours of admission. Patient were assessed for organ failure and followed throughout the period of hospitalization for complications. Statistical analysis was made using the student t test and chi-square test and statistical significance was analyzed. RESULTS: Out of 100 patients, 20% had severe pancreatitis. Acute Pancreatitis was seen male (87%, in 4th decade (70%, alcohol was the most common etiology (60%, biliary pancreatitis (25%, remaining idiopathic (15%. Patients with BISAP >= 3 was associated with transient or persistent organ failure and pancreatic necrosis. CONCLUSION: BISAP scoring is a simple clinical method to identify patients at risk of increased mortality within 24 hours of presentation in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  2. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene testing for hereditary pancreatitis is now available. Ataxia telangiectasia The team at Johns Hopkins discovered that inherited ... are known to cause the clinical syndrome of "ataxia telangiectasia," and 2-3% of people with familial pancreatic ...

  3. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiran; K; Busireddy; Mamdoh; AlObaidy; Miguel; Ramalho; Janaka; Kalubowila; Liu; Baodong; Ilaria; Santagostino; Richard; C; Semelka

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrastenhanced computed tomography(MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI.

  4. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  5. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shin [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Masamune, Atsushi, E-mail: amasamune@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Hamada, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Oncology, Department of Life Sciences, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji (Japan); Kobune, Masayoshi [Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Satoh, Kennichi [Division of Cancer Stem Cell, Miyagi Cancer Center Research Institute, Natori (Japan); Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  6. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  7. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun, Jong Jin; Lee, Hong Sik

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is character...

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the proposed diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms.

  9. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the pancreas remains one of the deadliest cancer types. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates, pancreatic cancer causes more than 331000 deaths per year, ranking as the seventh leading cause of cancer death in both sexes together. Globally, about 338000 people had pancreatic cancer in 2012, making it the 11th most common cancer. The highest incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer are found in developed countries. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied ...

  10. Pancreatic Rest or Not? The Debate on the Nutrition in Acute Pancreatitis Continues...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis creates a catabolic stress state promoting a systemic inflammatory response and nutritional deterioration; as a consequence, adequate supply of nutrients plays an important role in recovery [1]. Up to the 1990s, total parenteral nutrition and gastrointestinal tract rest have been comprehensively recommended in acute pancreatitis, which make pancreas at rest to reduce pancreatic exocrine secretion and also meet nutritional need [2, 3, 4]. Afterwards, several studies showed that intestinal mucosa undergoes atrophy during oral fasting, which would induce bacteria translocation in gastrointestinal tract and cause pancreatic necrotic tissue infection [5, 6]. According to this, animal experiments and human studies have shown that enteral nutrition is safe and can preserve the integrity of intestinal mucosa to decrease the incidence of infectious complications and other severe complications, such as multiple organ deficiency syndrome [4]. Furthermore, enteral nutrition does not stimulate pancreatic exocrine secretion, if the feeding tube is positioned in the jejunum by nasojejunal or jejunostomy routes.

  11. [Carcinoma and acute pancreatitis--case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarska, Jadwiga; Puchalski, Zbigniew; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Hady, Razak H; Kamiński, Fabian; Dadan, Jacek

    2007-10-01

    The coexistence of pancreatic carcinoma with severe form of acute pancreatitis (AP) is not only an extremely rare phenomenon described in literature but also a real problem in the aspect of differential diagnostics of neoplastic and inflammatory morphological changes in this organ. The study objective was the analysis of clinical material obtained from patients with inflammatory and neoplastic lesions, treated surgically in I Department of General and Endocrinological Surgery, Medical University of Bialystok in the years 1980-2005. Of these patients, 7 had pancreatic carcinoma at various stages of advancement diagnosed in the late postoperative period after severe form of AP. Patients' history, physical examination as well as biochemical tests and imaging diagnostic procedures (ultrasonography, CT) of the abdominal cavity explicitly showed severe form of acute pancreatitis. In every case, CA19-9 antigen values were substantially elevated (mean 780 +/-325 IU/ml, norm 0-37 IU/ml). Histopathological analyses of samples collected during laparotomy revealed the presence of necrotic-purulent tissues. In the late postoperative period, i.e. 3-24 months, all these patients were reoperated on for pancreatic carcinoma or its metastases. Only in one case, radical Whipple surgery was performed. All the remaining patients underwent palliative procedures or samples for histopathological examinations were only collected. In all the seven cases, metastatic carcinoma was diagnosed, including pancreatic carcinoma in 6 patients. These observations seem to indicate that severe AP may be insidiously accompanied by pancreatic carcinoma and that this coexistence should always be taken into consideration.

  12. STUDY ANALYSIS OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS BY CT

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    Bulabai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Study analysis of pancreatitis by computed tomography in terms of morphology of pancreas in acute pancreatitis, complications of pancreatitis and duration of hospital stay by grading the severity of disease using Modified CT severity index. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This prospective study of 100 patients suspected of pancreatitis was evaluated with multidetector spiral CT scanner, somatom, (Spirit Siemens at Tertiary care center, for period of one year. The series consists of patients of pancreatitis which were clinically diagnosed and sent directly for CT examination and in the patients in whom abdominal ultrasound examination was suggestive of pancreatitis. Water with iodinated contrast is used as oral contrast so as to distend the stomach and small bowel followed by IV contrast study. All images were viewed at window width-300, window level-40 with a wide and narrow window setting as necessary. RESULT ANALYSIS: Acute Pancreatitis was more common in males than females with alcohol consumption was the commonest etiological factor in 79.5%. In contrary biliary pathology was the commonest factor in females of 41.6%. Among the 100 cases 41 patients (41% developed complications. CONCLUSION: We had documented a statistically significant correlation between the numeric score obtained with the Modified CT Severity index and the presence of infection, the need for surgery and percutaneous interventions, and the length of the hospital stay. Finally the modified CTSI closely indicates with patient outcome in all study parameters, especially with the length of the hospital stay and the development of organ failure.

  13. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis--recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, I; Díte, P; Lata, J; Nechutová, H; Kianicka, B

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1--lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2--duct centric fibrosis, characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions in the pancreas without systemic involvement. In the diagnosis of AIP, two diagnostic criterions are used--the HISORt criteria and Asian Diagnostic Criteria. In the differential diagnosis, the pancreatic cancer must be excluded by endosonographically guided pancreatic biopsy. Typical signs of AIP are concomitant disorders in other organs (kidney, liver, biliary tract, salivary glands, colon, retroperitoneum, prostate). Novel clinicopathological entity was proposed as an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' (IgG4-RSC). Extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocyte infiltration is a common characteristics of this disease. Recently, IgG4-RSC syndrome was extended to a new entity, characterized by IgG4 hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, this being considered an expression of a lymphoproliferative disease, 'IgG4-positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome'. This syndrome includes Mikulicz's disease, mediastinal fibrosis, autoimmune hypophysitis, and inflammatory pseudotumor--lung, liver, breast. In the therapy of AIP, steroids constitute first-choice treatment. High response to the corticosteroid therapy is an important diagnostic criterion. In the literature, there are no case-control studies that determine if AIP predisposes to pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, AIP is currently a hot topic in pancreatology.

  15. Recurrent pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Shelat, V G; Low, H C; Ho, K Y; Diddapur, R K

    2009-06-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides infestations are endemic in tropical countries. Ascaris lumbricoides can occasionally cause biliary obstruction and result in obstructive jaundice or pancreatitis. We present a 34-year-old Bangladeshi woman with biliary ascariasis, resulting in recurrent pancreatitis. Her diagnosis was made with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed during an acute attack of pain.

  16. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procacci, Carlo; Mansueto, Giancarlo; D' Onofrio, Mirko; Gasparini, Anna; Ferrara, Rosa Maria [Department of Radiology, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy); Falconi, Massimo [Department of Surgery, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    Pancreatic emergency, unrelated to traumatic events, can occur as a consequence of the more significant pancreatic pathologies (acute and chronic pancreatitis, tumors) or of the interventional or surgical treatment carried out as therapy for the above-mentioned lesions. Acute pancreatic conditions are represented by pancreatic infections, the involvement of organs, structures, and adjacent spaces within the pancreatic disease, and, lastly, vascular complications. Acute pancreatic conditions are common in pancreatic diseases and can be catastrophic; even if there is a gamut in the severity of clinical presentation, each can be potentially life threatening. Immediate radiological detection of the lesions together with a correct therapeutic percutaneous radiological approach whenever an interventional procedure is preferable to surgery or, when performed before surgery, whenever it can optimize its results, is of fundamental importance in the management of these patients. This article focuses on the essential role of radiology and the integration of imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions. (orig.)

  17. Pancreatic pseudo-cyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Raúl Sánchez Aguilar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic pseudocyst is the most common cystic lesion of the pancreas. It constitutes an amilasa rich liquid collection, located inside or adjacent to the pancreas; surrounded by a wall without ephithelium, as result of a sharp or chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic trauma, or obstruction of pancreatic conduit. 50 % solves spontaneously in 6 weeks, but some of they require surgical treatment. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Pancreatic pseudocysts, approved by consent in the 3th National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Camagüey, Cuba; February 23 – 26, 2004.

  18. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS).

  20. Improving the Outcome of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Marco J

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common indication for hospital admission and its incidence is rising. It has a variable prognosis, which is mainly dependent upon the development of persistent organ failure and infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the past few years, based on large-scale multicenter randomized trials, some novel insights regarding clinical management have emerged. In patients with infected pancreatic necrosis, a step-up approach of percutaneous catheter drainage followed by necrosectomy only when the patient does not improve, reduces new-onset organ failure and prevents the need for necrosectomy in about a third of patients. A randomized pilot study comparing surgical to endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis showed a striking reduction of the pro-inflammatory response following endoscopic necrosectomy. These promising results have recently been tested in a large multicenter randomized trial whose results are eagerly awaited. Contrary to earlier data from uncontrolled studies, a large multicenter randomized trial comparing early (within 24 h) nasoenteric tube feeding compared with an oral diet after 72 h, did not show that early nasoenteric tube feeding was superior in reducing the rate of infection or death in patients with AP at high risk for complications. Although early ERCP does not have a role in the treatment of predicted mild pancreatitis, except in the case of concomitant cholangitis, it may ameliorate the disease course in patients with predicted severe pancreatitis. Currently, a large-scale randomized study is underway and results are expected in 2017.

  1. Pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, M

    1992-12-01

    The pathophysiology of pancreatic autodigestion is poorly understood. Pancreatitis affects all age groups, and the diagnosis is sometimes missed when serum amylase and lipase activities are not measured in the child with abdominal pain. Acute pancreatitis in children has become a more commonly seen condition and the causes have varied. Laboratory and radiological studies play an important role in determining the diagnosis and prognosis. Family history is important in the diagnosis of idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Most acute episodes resolve with supportive care, but the mortality in acute pancreatitis is currently about 15% (Hadorn et al., 1980). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram may be necessary to investigate relapses of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition requiring lifetime medical management.

  2. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported.

  3. Pancreaticoureteral fistula: A rare complication of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren G Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may result in progressive parenchymal damage and fibrosis which can ultimately lead to destruction of pancreatic tissue. Fistulas to the pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, and peripancreatic organs may form as a complications of pancreatitis. This case report describes an exceedingly rare complication, pancreaticoureteral fistula (PUF. Only two additional cases of PUF have been reported. However, they evolved following traumatic injury to the ureter or pancreatic duct. No published reports describe PUF as a complication of pancreatitis. Case Report: A 69-year-old Hispanic female with a past medical history of cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst, and recurrent episodes of pancreatitis presented with severe, sharp, and constant abdominal pain. Upon imaging, a fistulous tract was visualized between the left renal pelvis (at the level of an upper pole calyx and the pancreatic duct and a ureteral stent was placed to facilitate fistula closure. Following the procedure, the patient attained symptomatic relief and oral intake was resumed. A left retrograde pyelogram was repeated 2 months after the initial stent placement and demonstrating no evidence of a persistent fistulous tract. Conclusion: Due to PUF′s unclear etiology and possible variance of presentation, it is important for physicians to keep this rare complication of pancreatitis in mind, especially, when evaluating a patient with recurrent pancreatitis, urinary symptoms and abnormal imaging within the urinary collecting system and pancreas.

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik K; Early, Dayna

    2017-09-06

    This review describes the rationale for pancreatic cancer screening, outlines groups that are at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer, and summarizes the relative risk in each setting. We also review the methods available for performing pancreatic cancer screening and the recommended screening intervals. Several genetic mutations have been identified that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. Most are rare, however, and at-risk individuals are most often those with a strong family history of pancreatic cancer (with multiple family members affected) but no identifiable genetic mutation. Known genetic syndromes that increase the risk for pancreatic cancer include hereditary pancreatitis, familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Lynch syndrome, BRCA mutations, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Genetic testing should be performed in conjunction with genetic counseling, and testing of an affected family member is preferred if possible.The goal of pancreatic cancer screening is to identify pancreatic cancer at an early, curable stage or, ideally, to identify precancerous lesions that can be resected to prevent the development of cancer. Imaging can be performed with either endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). These techniques are generally considered to be complementary, although an advantage of EUS is that cysts or solid lesions can be sampled at the time of the procedure. Published results of small cohorts of high-risk patients in pancreatic cancer screening programs have demonstrated a high prevalence of small cystic lesions identified on EUS or MRCP, which often represent side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Knowledge of conditions and syndromes that increase pancreatic cancer risk allows one to identify those patients that may benefit from pancreatic cancer screening. As we gather evidence from large, international, multicenter cohorts of patients at high-risk for pancreatic

  5. Computed Tomography Appearances of Various Complications Associated with Pancreatic Pseudocysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheol Kim, Hyun; Mo Yang, Dal; Jung Kim, Hyoung; Ho Lee, Dong; Tae Ko, Young; Won Lim, Joo (Dept. of Radiology, East-West Neo Medical Center, Kyung-Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea))

    2008-09-15

    Most pancreatic pseudocysts are common complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. They usually occur within the pancreas or in peripancreatic tissues, and are visualized as round or oval fluid collections with thin or thick walls on computed tomography (CT) scans. However, pancreatic pseudocysts are often combined with various complications, e.g., various organ involvements, infection, hemorrhage with pseudoaneurysm formation, rupture with fistula formation, or gastrointestinal or biliary obstruction, which may necessitate prompt intervention or surgery. This review illustrates the CT appearances of various complications associated with pancreatic pseudocysts

  6. Acute Pancreatitis and Splenic Vein Thrombosis due to Hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ercan Gündüz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a condition characterised by the activation of the normally inactive digestive enzymes due to an etiological factor and digestion of the pancreatic tissues, resulting in extensive inflammation and leading to local, regional, and systemic complications in the organism. It may vary from the mild edematous to the hemorrhagic and severely necrotising form. The most common causes are biliary stones and alcohol abuse. In this case study, we would like to present a patient with AP due to hypertriglyceridemia (HPTG, which is a rare cause of pancreatitis, and splenic vein thrombosis, which is a rare complication of pancreatitis.

  7. [Prognostic significance of helical CT in patients with destructive pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, T V

    2000-01-01

    Spiral scanning computed tomography (CT) is able not only to image the pancreas and to evaluate its structure, but to interpret the status of the adjacent organs and tissues. CT symptoms of pancreatic necrotic changes and multiorgan failure were studied in the prospective follow-up of 47 patients with prior destructive pancreatitis (158 studies). CT differentially substantiated indications for choosing treatment policy for different forms of pancreatic lesions. The paper gives a quantitative assessment of necrotic pancreatic parencymatous areas and shows its prognostic value.

  8. Acute Pancreatitis and Splenic Vein Thrombosis due to Hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ercan; Dursun, Recep; İçer, Mustafa; Zengin, Yılmaz; Güloğlu, Cahfer

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a condition characterised by the activation of the normally inactive digestive enzymes due to an etiological factor and digestion of the pancreatic tissues, resulting in extensive inflammation and leading to local, regional, and systemic complications in the organism. It may vary from the mild edematous to the hemorrhagic and severely necrotising form. The most common causes are biliary stones and alcohol abuse. In this case study, we would like to present a patient with AP due to hypertriglyceridemia (HPTG), which is a rare cause of pancreatitis, and splenic vein thrombosis, which is a rare complication of pancreatitis.

  9. Current concept of pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ning Wu

    2000-01-01

    @@ The pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis is very complicated. It is a multifactorial as well as multifaceted disease. First of all, the etiologic agents initiate the pancreatic acinar injury by release of pancreatic enzymes and overstimulation of macrophages and neutrophils, then the cytokines and inflammatory mediators are liberated. There is also interaction between neutrophils and endothelial cells producing free radicals, the cytokines cause increasing vascular permeability, activating complement component, resulting in microcirculatory impairment and imbalance of thrombo-fibrinolytic system. Many of these events occur not only in the pancreas itself, but also in the other vital organs and tissues, leading to severe acute pancreatitis and complications. The sequencial events are as follows.

  10. Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically.Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop in the late course infection of necroses. Morbidity of SAP is biphasic, in the first week strongly related to early and persistence of organ or multi-organ dysfunction. Clinical sepsis caused by infected necrosis leading to multi-organ failure syndrome (MOFS) occurs in the later course after the first week. To predict sepsis, MOFS or deaths in the first 48-72 h, the highest predictive accuracy has been objectified for procalcitonin and IL-8; the SepsisRelated Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)-score predicts the outcome in the first 48 h, and provides a daily assessment of treatment response with a high positive predictive value. Contrast-enhanced CT provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for necrotizing pancreatitis when performed after the first week of disease. Patients who suffer early organ dysfunctions or at risk of developing a severe disease require early intensive care treatment. Early vigorous intravenous fluid replacement is of foremost importance. The goal is to decrease the hematocrit or restore normal cardiocirculatory functions.Antibiotic prophylaxis has not been shown as an effective preventive treatment. Early enteral feeding is based on a high level of evidence, resulting in a reduction of local and systemic infection. Patients suffering infected necrosis causing clinical sepsis, pancreatic abscess or surgical acute abdomen are candidates for early intervention. Hospital mortality of SAP after interventional or surgical debridement has decreased in high volume centers to below 20%.

  11. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  12. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chia Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates proteaseactivated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study.

  13. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, H.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821721

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In

  14. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In arou

  15. ORGANIZATIONS' RESPONSIBILITY IN MAINTAINING THE SECURITY OF PERSONAL DATA POSTED ONLINE BY ROMANIAN CONSUMERS: AN EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF FACEBOOK AND LINKEDIN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreea Ionescu; Laurentiu-Dan Anghel; Gheorghe Jinga

    2014-01-01

    ... networking sites in Romania, Facebook and LinkedIn. The research shows that organizations must assume greater responsibility in ensuring consumers' safety who sometime neglect protecting their personal information, otherwise confidential...

  16. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Patel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his acute condition and treatment with topical steroid cream. Conclusion We discuss and review the literature along with highlighting for the readers the important clinical and histopathologic features of acute pancreatitis associated pancreatic panniculitis.

  17. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Stamatakos; Charikleia; Stefanaki; Konstantinos; Kontzoglou; Spyros; Stergiopoulos; Georgios; Giannopoulos; Michael; Safioleas

    2010-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN), formerly known as pancreatic abscess is a late complication of acute pancreatitis. It can be lethal, even though it is rare. This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding knowledge about WOPN, by review of current data from references identified in Medline and PubMed, to September 2009, using key words, such as WOPN, infected pseudocyst, severe pancreatitis, pancreatic abscess, acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), pancreas, inflammation and al...

  18. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgios K Georgiou; Haralampos Harissis; Michalis Mitsis; Haralampos Batsis; Michalis Fatouros

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse.The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy,trauma or surgery,and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention.However,when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly,the patient may present with signs of peritonitis.Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation,appendicitis or visceral ischemia.Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported.Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis.This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis,and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis.The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer,since,due to hypertriglyceridemia,serum amylase values appeared within the normal range.Moreover,abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis.Following abdominal lavage and drainage,the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  19. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  20. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  1. Antiproteases in the Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoji Kitagawa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis relates to the inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin and a lack of the prompt elimination of the active trypsin inside the pancreas. Therefore, trypsin is believed to be the key enzyme in the initiation and exacerbation of acute pancreatitis by activating pancreatic zymogens. The activation of digestive enzymes causes pancreatic injury and results in an inflammatory response. The acute inflammatory response in the pancreas induces the systemic production of cytokines causing substantial tissue damage, and may progress beyond the pancreas to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, multi-organ failure (MOF or death [1]. In several studies, protease inhibitors have not been shown to be of significant value in the treatment of acute pancreatitis and are not available in the United States [2]. Several guidelines [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12] on the treatment of acute pancreatitis do not recommend them and the debate about the use of protease inhibitors is mentioned.

  2. Prevention of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroczycki-Saniutycz, Stefan; Grzeszczuk, Agnieszka; Zwierz, Zbigniew Wojciech; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Szczesiul, Jakub; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Ościłowicz, Krystyna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  3. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuroczycki-Saniutycz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  4. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue in gallbladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylhin Joana Lopez Marcano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The heterotopic pancreas (PH is the atypical presence of pancreatic tissue without any anatomic or vascular continuity with the pancreas. PH is a rare condition that can be observed at any level of the gastrointestinal tract and even in other organs. Histopathological characterization of PH allows surgeons to distinguish it from other lesions. Although it is usually a benign and asymptomatic disease, it can occasionally cause complications (obstruction, hemorrhage, inflammation, or malignant transformation. In conclusion, localization in the gallbladder in the few cases of PH is very rare. We present two cases in which, after cholecystectomy indicated by other causes, in the pathological study of the surgical specimen, type 2 pancreatic tissue was found according to the Heinrich classification. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(4.000: 250-253

  5. Keratins provide virus-dependent protection or predisposition to injury in coxsackievirus-induced pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Toivola, SE Ostrowski

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available DM Toivola1, SE Ostrowski2, H Baribault3, TM Magin4, AI Ramsingh2, MB Omary51Åbo Akademi University, Dept. Biology, BioCity, Turku, Finland and Stanford University School of Medicine and Digestive Disease Center; 2New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA; 3Amgen, South San Francisco, CA, USA; 4University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 5Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Mi, USAAbstract: Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18 are the two major intermediate filament proteins in hepatocytes and pancreatic acinar cells. Acinar cell keratins are organized as cytoplasmic and apicolateral filaments. An important role of hepatocyte K8/K18 is to maintain cellular integrity, while this cytoprotective function of K8/K18 is not evident in the pancreas since keratin-deficient mice cope well with pancreatitis models. To further study the roles of keratins in the exocrine pancreas, we used coxsackievirus B4-models, CVB4-V and CVB4-P, to induce severe acute/chronic pancreatitis and acute pancreatitis, respectively, in K8-null (which lack acinar keratins and K18-null (which lack cytoplasmic keratins mice. Despite similar virus titers in all mice, CVB4-V resulted in 40% mortality of the K8-null mice 14 days post-infection compared to no lethality of WT and K18-null mice. In contrast, K8-null mice were far less susceptible to CVB4-P-induced damage as determined by histology and serology analysis, and they recover faster than WT and K18-null mice. After CVB4 virus infection, keratins aggregated during acinar degranulation, and K8/K18 site-specific phosphorylation was observed during degranulation and recovery. Hence, keratins significantly affect CVB4 virulence, positively or negatively, depending on the virus subtype and keratin makeup, in a virus replication-independent manner.Keywords: keratin, pancreatitis, coxsackievirus

  6. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Kuroczycki-Saniutycz; Agnieszka Grzeszczuk; Zbigniew Wojciech Zwierz; Paweł Kołodziejczyk; Jakub Szczesiul; Beata Zalewska-Szajda; Krystyna Ościłowicz; Napoleon Waszkiewicz; Krzysztof Zwierz; Sławomir Dariusz Szajda

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy...

  7. Recurrent acute pancreatitis in a Saudi child with isovaleric acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satti Abdelrahim Satti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Isovaleric acidemia (IVA, also known as the sweaty foot syndrome, is an autosomal recessive organic acid disorder due to a defect in the mitochondrial Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD-dependent enzyme isovaleryl CoA dehydrogenase. Acute pancreatitis as a complication has been reported. We are presenting a rare case of recurrent acute pancreatitis complicating a 9-year-old girl with IVA. She presented with repeated attacks of vomiting, severe abdominal pain, and fever since the age of 18 months. These were diagnosed as attacks of pancreatitis with high serum amylase presenting clinically as diabetic ketoacidosis. Later, she developed chronic pancreatitis which is proved by lapratomy. In the last attack, she was comatosed with fulminant sepsis and sooner the patient died. Blood sample taken during this last attack confirmed the diagnosis of IVA. An inborn error of organic acid metabolism should be considered in children with pancreatitis of unknown origin.

  8. Peritoneal absorption of pancreatic enzymes in bile-induced acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Y; Hayakawa, T; Kondo, T; Shibata, T; Kishimoto, W

    1990-01-01

    To clarify the contribution of peritoneal absorption of enzyme-rich exudate to the persistent elevation of serum amylase in bile-induced pancreatitis in dogs, serum amylase, lipase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) levels were measured during 24 h after induction of pancreatitis with and without peritoneal lavage. The basal level of serum amylase activity (m +/- s.e. = 1291 +/- 111 U/L) reached a plateau at 30 min (2688 +/- 185) after induction of pancreatitis and continued to rise until 24 h (7201 +/- 424). This persistent amylase elevation could be reduced significantly by peritoneal lavage. Serum IRT rose to a peak (378 +/- 103 ng/mL) at 30 min from the basal (20 +/- 5), then decreased until 3 h (211 +/- 34) and maintained a consistent level thereafter. Serum lipase elevation took an intermediate course between the levels of serum amylase and IRT. Intraperitoneal injection of 5 mL pancreatic juice could reproduce similar elevations to those of the respective enzymes, except lipase, seen in pancreatitis. These results suggest that transperitoneal absorption of pancreatic enzymes contributes to the elevation in serum enzymes levels and that rates of peritoneal absorption and serum disappearance differ from enzyme to enzyme.

  9. Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Therapeutic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic pseudocyst develops in both acute and chronic pancreatitis. It is an entity likely to either remain asymptomatic or develop devastating complications. Despite being diagnosed easily, treatment exercise is still at crossroads whether in the form of internal or external drainage or endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open intervention with a good radiological guidance. The therapeutic dilemma whether to treat a patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst, as well as when and with what technique, is a difficult one. This paper is intended to get information about diagnostic and therapeutic exercises most appropriate for acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocyst.

  10. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, ...

  12. Pharmacological interventions for acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggia, Elisabetta; Koti, Rahul; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Fazio, Federico; Pereira, Stephen P; Davidson, Brian R; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2017-04-21

    In people with acute pancreatitis, it is unclear what the role should be for medical treatment as an addition to supportive care such as fluid and electrolyte balance and organ support in people with organ failure. To assess the effects of different pharmacological interventions in people with acute pancreatitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers to October 2016 to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We also searched the references of included trials to identify further trials. We considered only RCTs performed in people with acute pancreatitis, irrespective of aetiology, severity, presence of infection, language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and extracted data. We did not perform a network meta-analysis as planned because of the lack of information on potential effect modifiers and differences of type of participants included in the different comparisons, when information was available. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the binary outcomes and rate ratios with 95% CIs for count outcomes using a fixed-effect model and random-effects model. We included 84 RCTs with 8234 participants in this review. Six trials (N = 658) did not report any of the outcomes of interest for this review. The remaining 78 trials excluded 210 participants after randomisation. Thus, a total of 7366 participants in 78 trials contributed to one or more outcomes for this review. The treatments assessed in these 78 trials included antibiotics, antioxidants, aprotinin, atropine, calcitonin, cimetidine, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), gabexate, glucagon, iniprol, lexipafant, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), octreotide, oxyphenonium, probiotics, activated protein C, somatostatin, somatostatin plus omeprazole, somatostatin

  13. ROLE OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN EVALUATION OF PANCREATIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh N. Pawar, Aruna S. Deshmukh, Bharati P. Chavan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The evolving role of CT in the study of pancreas is not only in its ability to directly define the presence of an abnormality but it also surpasses the other imaging modalities in being able to demonstrate the extent of the disease and its spread to contiguous areas by virtue of its being a non-organ specific investigation. The ability of CT to image the pancreas adequately regardless of the bowel gas and fat gives it an advantage over ultrasound. Objectives: To study age and size distribution in pancreatic diseases. To differentiate cystic from solid pancreatic lesions. To differentiate inflammatory and neoplastic conditions with their characteristic imaging features. To classify and grade pancreatitis with the help of CT imaging features. Methods: This study comprises 50 patients of different age groups in whom there was clinical suspicion of pancreatic disorder. This includes 35 male and 15 female patients. Each patient had been studied by using plain and contrast computed tomography. Results: Maximum no. of patients’ age was from 23 – 30. Pancreatic diseases were more commonly found in males than in females. Inflammatory diseases were found to be more common than neoplastic masses. Chronic pancreatitis were showing pancreatic duct dilatation, pancreatic atrophy and pancreatic calcification. Pseudocysts were associated with chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic carcinomas extent and metastases was studied accordingly. Conclusion: CT alone is an excellent noninvasive imaging modality with a sensitivity of about 94% in diagnosing pancreatic diseases when used judiciously in good clinical settings and accuracy of almost 100% when used in conjunction with other imaging modalities like endoscopic retrograde colangiopancreatography, angiography and biopsy whenever indicated.

  14. Intravenous Selenium Modulates L-Arginine-Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hardman

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Oxidative stress is understood to have a critical role in the development of acinar injury in experimental acute pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that compound multiple antioxidant therapy ameliorates end-organ damage in the intra-peritoneal L-arginine rat model. As the principal co-factor for glutathione, selenium is a key constituent of multiple antioxidant preparations. Objective The intention of this study was to investigate the effect of selenium on pancreatic and remote organ injury in a wellvalidated experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to one of 3 groups (n=5/group and sacrificed at 72 hours. Acute pancreatitis was induced by 250 mg per 100 g body weight of 20% L-arginine hydrochloride in 0.15 mol/L sodium chloride. Group allocations were: Group 1, control; Group 2, acute pancreatitis; Group 3, selenium. Main outcome measures Serum amylase, anti-oxidant levels, bronchoalveolar lavage protein, lung myeloperoxidase activity, and histological assessment of pancreatic injury. Results L-arginine induced acute pancreatitis characterised by oedema, neutrophil infiltration, acinar cell degranulation and elevated serum amylase. Selenium treatment was associated with reduced pancreatic oedema and inflammatory cell infiltration. Acinar degranulation and dilatation were completely absent. A reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein content was also demonstrated. Conclusion Intravenous selenium given 24 hours after induction of experimental acute pancreatitis was associated with a reduction in the histological stigmata of pancreatic injury and a dramatic reduction in broncho-alveolar lavage protein content. Serum selenium fell during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis and this effect was not reversed by exogenous selenium supplementation.

  15. Chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma and the black box in-between

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia JURA; Herbert ARCHER; Dafna BAR-SAGI

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a challenging disease for patients, doctors and researchers who for decades have searched for a cure for this deadly malignancy. Although existing mouse models of pancreatic cancer have shed light on the mechanistic basis of the neoplastic conversion of the pancreas, their impact in terms of offering new diagnostics and therapeutic modalities remains limited. Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas that is associated with a gradual damage of the organ and an increased risk of developing neoplastic lesions. In this review, we propose that detailed studies of chronic inflammatory processes in the pancreas will provide insights into the evolution of pancreatic cancer. This information may prove useful in the design of effective therapeutic strategies to battle the disease.

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  17. The microtubule plus-end tracking proteins SPR1 and EB1b interact to maintain polar cell elongation and directional organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galva, Charitha; Kirik, Viktor; Lindeboom, Jelmer J; Kaloriti, Despoina; Rancour, David M; Hussey, Patrick J; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Ehrhardt, David W; Sedbrook, John C

    2014-11-01

    The microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) END BINDING1b (EB1b) and SPIRAL1 (SPR1) are required for normal cell expansion and organ growth. EB proteins are viewed as central regulators of +TIPs and cell polarity in animals; SPR1 homologs are specific to plants. To explore if EB1b and SPR1 fundamentally function together, we combined genetic, biochemical, and cell imaging approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that eb1b-2 spr1-6 double mutant roots exhibit substantially more severe polar expansion defects than either single mutant, undergoing right-looping growth and severe axial twisting instead of waving on tilted hard-agar surfaces. Protein interaction assays revealed that EB1b and SPR1 bind each other and tubulin heterodimers, which is suggestive of a microtubule loading mechanism. EB1b and SPR1 show antagonistic association with microtubules in vitro. Surprisingly, our combined analyses revealed that SPR1 can load onto microtubules and function independently of EB1 proteins, setting SPR1 apart from most studied +TIPs in animals and fungi. Moreover, we found that the severity of defects in microtubule dynamics in spr1 eb1b mutant hypocotyl cells correlated well with the severity of growth defects. These data indicate that SPR1 and EB1b have complex interactions as they load onto microtubule plus ends and direct polar cell expansion and organ growth in response to directional cues.

  18. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Proteins SPR1 and EB1b Interact to Maintain Polar Cell Elongation and Directional Organ Growth in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galva, Charitha; Kirik, Viktor; Lindeboom, Jelmer J.; Kaloriti, Despoina; Rancour, David M.; Hussey, Patrick J.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.; Ehrhardt, David W.; Sedbrook, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule plus-end tracking proteins (+TIPs) END BINDING1b (EB1b) and SPIRAL1 (SPR1) are required for normal cell expansion and organ growth. EB proteins are viewed as central regulators of +TIPs and cell polarity in animals; SPR1 homologs are specific to plants. To explore if EB1b and SPR1 fundamentally function together, we combined genetic, biochemical, and cell imaging approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that eb1b-2 spr1-6 double mutant roots exhibit substantially more severe polar expansion defects than either single mutant, undergoing right-looping growth and severe axial twisting instead of waving on tilted hard-agar surfaces. Protein interaction assays revealed that EB1b and SPR1 bind each other and tubulin heterodimers, which is suggestive of a microtubule loading mechanism. EB1b and SPR1 show antagonistic association with microtubules in vitro. Surprisingly, our combined analyses revealed that SPR1 can load onto microtubules and function independently of EB1 proteins, setting SPR1 apart from most studied +TIPs in animals and fungi. Moreover, we found that the severity of defects in microtubule dynamics in spr1 eb1b mutant hypocotyl cells correlated well with the severity of growth defects. These data indicate that SPR1 and EB1b have complex interactions as they load onto microtubule plus ends and direct polar cell expansion and organ growth in response to directional cues. PMID:25415978

  19. Prevention of the disrupted enamel phenotype in Slc4a4-null mice using explant organ culture maintained in a living host kidney capsule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wen

    Full Text Available Slc4a4-null mice are a model of proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA. Slc4a4 encodes the electrogenic sodium base transporter NBCe1 that is involved in transcellular base transport and pH regulation during amelogenesis. Patients with mutations in the SLC4A4 gene and Slc4a4-null mice present with dysplastic enamel, amongst other pathologies. Loss of NBCe1 function leads to local abnormalities in enamel matrix pH regulation. Loss of NBCe1 function also results in systemic acidemic blood pH. Whether local changes in enamel pH and/or a decrease in systemic pH are the cause of the abnormal enamel phenotype is currently unknown. In the present study we addressed this question by explanting fetal wild-type and Slc4a4-null mandibles into healthy host kidney capsules to study enamel formation in the absence of systemic acidemia. Mandibular E11.5 explants from NBCe1-/- mice, maintained in host kidney capsules for 70 days, resulted in teeth with enamel and dentin with morphological and mineralization properties similar to cultured NBCe1+/+ mandibles grown under identical conditions. Ameloblasts express a number of proteins involved in dynamic changes in H+/base transport during amelogenesis. Despite the capacity of ameloblasts to dynamically modulate the local pH of the enamel matrix, at least in the NBCe1-/- mice, the systemic pH also appears to contribute to the enamel phenotype. Extrapolating these data to humans, our findings suggest that in patients with NBCe1 mutations, correction of the systemic metabolic acidosis at a sufficiently early time point may lead to amelioration of enamel abnormalities.

  20. A comparative study of diagnostic scoring systems for autoimmune pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Buijs (Jorie); M. van Heerde (Marianne); E.A.J. Rauws (Erik); L.J.M. De Buy Wenniger (Lucas J. Maillette); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); K. Biermann (Katharina); J. Verheij (Joanne); F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); M.A. Brink (Menno); U. Beuers (Ulrich); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); H.R. van Buuren (Henk); M.J. Bruno (Marco)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Several diagnostic scoring systems for autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) have been proposed including the Asian, HISORt (Histology, Imaging, Serology, Other organ involvement and Response to therapy), and International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC), which have been compared

  1. Endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement for inflammatory pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of endoscopic therapy in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuously evolving; at present most pathological conditions of the pancreas are successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS),or both. Endoscopic placement of stents has played and still plays a major role in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, pancreas divisum, main pancreatic duct injuries, pancreatic fistulae, complications of acute pancreatitis, recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis,and in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. These stents are currently routinely placed to reduce intraductal hypertension, bypass obstructing stones, restore lumen patency in cases with dominant, symptomatic strictures,seal main pancreatic duct disruption, drain pseudocysts or fluid collections, treat symptomatic major or minor papilla sphincter stenosis, and prevent procedure-induced acute pancreatitis. The present review aims at updating and discussing techniques, indications, and results of endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas.

  2. Treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunschot, S. van; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Bollen, T.L.; Fockens, P.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Dutch Pancreatitis Study, G.

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common and potentially lethal disease. It is associated with significant morbidity and consumes enormous health care resources. Over the last 2 decades, the treatment of acute pancreatitis has undergone fundamental changes based on new conceptual insights and evidence from cl

  3. Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen A Lehman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available History, physical examination, simple laboratory and radiological tests, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP are able to establish the cause of recurrent acute pancreatitis in 70% to 90% of patients. Dysfunction of the biliary and/or pancreatic sphincter, as identified by sphincter of Oddi manometry, accounts for the majority of the remaining cases. The diagnosis may be missed if the pancreatic sphincter is not evaluated. Pancreas divisum is a prevalent congenital abnormality that is usually innocuous but can lead to recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis or abdominal pain. In select cases, endoscopic sphincterotomy of the minor papilla can provide relief of symptoms and prevent further attacks. A small proportion of patients with idiopathic pancreatitis have tiny stones in the common bile duct (microlithiasis. Crystals can be visualized during microscopic analysis of bile that is aspirated at the time of ERCP. Neoplasia is a rare cause of pancreatitis, and the diagnosis can usually be established by computerized tomography or ERCP. A wide variety of medications can also cause recurrent pancreatitis. ERCP, sphincter of Oddi manometry, and microscopy of aspirated bile should be undertaken in patients with recurrent pancreatitis in whom the diagnosis is not obvious.

  4. Organizations` Responsibility in Maintaining the Security of Personal Data posted Online by Romanian Consumers: an Exploratory Analysis of Facebook and Linkedin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Ionescu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite increased consumer concern about the privacy threat posed by new technologies and the Internet as a whole, there is relatively little evidence that people’s privacy concerns actually translate into privacy-enhancing behaviors while online. One can say that it is not yet well understood how privacy concerns and trust influence social interactions between consumers within social networking sites. That is why, this article presents an exploratory study of perceptions of trust and privacy concern, along with willingness to share information and develop new relationships within two of the most popular social networking sites in Romania, Facebook and LinkedIn. The research shows that organizations must assume greater responsibility in ensuring consumers’ safety who sometime neglect protecting their personal information, otherwise confidential. In this respect, the application of ISO 26000 standard recommendations by organizations would allow them to pass from just good intentions towards consumers to good actions, so that they are truly protected. The information was gathered with the help of an online questionnaire, administered to people over 18 years old. It is a very useful and needed tool for Romanian companies, as it presents the users’ point of view, allowing them to find the best and most ethical way to do social data mining or use consumers’ private information, disclosed on such sites. It is our strong belief that sometimes companies have to play an active part in helping users protect themselves from actually disclosing too much personal information on social networking sites. The paper begins with a summary of relevant research related to social networking sites. Then, the online survey methodology is described and the results presented, followed by limitations and conclusions.

  5. Orlistat-induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is a rare but important cause of pancreatic injury. Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of obesity. We present a case of orlistat- induced mild acute pancreatitis that developed 8 days after starting treatment.

  6. Treatment of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mofleh Ibrahim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis. Majority of patients with acute pancreatitis respond to medical therapy. Supportive measures and close observations represent the cornerstone of the medical therapy. Failure to respond to medical treatment may indicate choledocholithiasis or infected necrosis. Endoscopic papillotomy with stone retrieval is beneficial in patients with severe biliary pancreatitis. Image-guided fine needle aspiration and bacteriological examination of aspirate is reliable in detecting infection and deliniating causative pathogen. Surgical debridement is the method of choice for treatment of infected necrosis. In contrast, in pancreatic abscess, surgery is preserved for those, who do not respond to percutaneous drainage combined with antibiotics. The benefit of antisecretory and antiproteolytic agents is debatable. A combination of antioxidants, calcium channel antagonists and antibiotics may play a major role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis in the future.

  7. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins,autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted.

  8. Pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells activation during experimental acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inmaculada; Lopez-Font; Sabrina; Gea-Sorlí; Enrique; de-Madaria; Luis; M; Gutiérrez; Miguel; Pérez-Mateo; Daniel; Closa

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To study the activation of pancreatic and pulmonary mast cells and the effect of mast cell inhibition on the activation of peritoneal and alveolar macrophages during acute pancreatitis.METHODS:Pancreatitis was induced by intraductal infusion of 5% sodium taurodeoxycholate in rats.The mast cell inhibitor cromolyn was administered intraperitoneally(i.p.) 30 min before pancreatitis induction.The pancreatic and pulmonary tissue damage was evaluated histologically and mast cells and their state of activation...

  9. Pancreatic Stellate Cells : A Starring Role in Normal and Diseased Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoti eApte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While the morphology and function of cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas have been studied over several centuries, one important cell type in the gland, the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC, had remained undiscovered until as recently as twenty years ago. Even after its first description in 1982, it was to be another 16 years before its biology could begin to be studied, because it was only in 1998 that methods were developed to isolate and culture PSCs from rodent and human pancreas. PSCs are now known to play a critical role in pancreatic fibrosis, a consistent histological feature of two major diseases of the pancreas - chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In health, PSCs maintain normal tissue architecture via regulation of the synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. Recent studies have also implied other additional functions for PSCs as progenitor cells, immune cells or intermediaries in exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans.During pancreatic injury, PSCs transform from their quiescent phase into an activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype that secretes excessive amounts of ECM proteins leading to the fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. An ever increasing number of factors that stimulate and/or inhibit PSC activation via paracrine and autocrine pathways are being identified and characterized. It is also now established that PSCs interact closely with pancreatic cancer cells to facilitate cancer progression. Based on these findings, several therapeutic strategies have been examined in experimental models of chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer, in a bid to inhibit/retard PSC activation and thereby alleviate chronic pancreatitis or reduce tumour growth in pancreatic cancer. The challenge that remains is to translate these pre-clinical developments into clinically applicable treatments for patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

  10. A rare disease in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis: acute brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Yetkin, Funda; Unlu, Serkan; Yilmaz, Sami; Bentli, Recep; Bazna, Sezai

    2014-01-01

    Some infectious organisms may give rise to acute pancreatitis; brucellosis, however, extremely rarely leads to acute pancreatitis. A 40-year-old man was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, the etiology of which was determined to be acute brucellosis. The patient was discharged without complications approximately 15 days after the initiation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and doxycycline treatment. Brucella infections may rarely be complicated by acute pancreatitis. Thus, brucellosis should be remembered in the etiology of acute pancreatitis in regions such as Turkey, where Brucella infections are endemic.

  11. Refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura following acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebisa Bekele; Bethel Shiferaw; Alexandra Sokolova; Arpan Shah; Phillip Saunders; Alida Podrumar; Javed Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare blood disorder with an estimated incidence of 4–5 cases per million people per year. It is characterized by small-vessel platelet-rich thrombi that cause thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ damage. There are reports in literature that TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated, indicating each can be the cause of the other. However, acute pancreatitis triggering TTP is very rare. A 71 years old female presented with abdominal pain of 3 days, followed by dark urine. She had icteric sclera, petechial rash and mild epigastric tenderness. Lab findings were significant for hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated lipase. CT of abdomen showed evidence of pancreatitis and cholelithiasis. After admission, patient developed symptoms of stroke. Further investigation showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase and normal coagulation studied with peripheral blood smear showed 5–6 schistocytes/high power field. Disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-13 (ADAMTS13) activity showed less than 3% with high ADAMTS13 inhibitor 2.2. Patient required 6–7 weeks of daily plasmapheresis until she showed complete response. Our patient presented with clinical features of pancreatitis prior to having dark urine and petechial rash. Therefore, we strongly believe that our patient had pancreatitis which was followed by TTP. Patient's ADMTS13 activity was 6%after 10 plasma exchanges, signifying refractory TTP and higher risk for morbidity and mortality. There are limited data and consensus on the management of refractory TTP. TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated. However, refractory TTP following acute pancreatitis is rarely mentioned in the literature. We would like to emphasize the importance of having higher clinical suspicion of the association of both disease entities.

  12. Metabolic signalling in pancreatic beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piipari, K.

    2011-01-01

    The main function of pancreatic beta cells is to maintain correct glucose homeostasis within the body by secretion of insulin in response to increased blood glucose concentration. Beta cell dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Using transgenic mouse models, the work described in this thesis has investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in beta cell function and their role in the regulation of ...

  13. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer; the clinical aspects and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.M. Sikkens (Edmée)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, the pancreas is unable to deliver a sufficient quantity of pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine to digest food. It may occur in several life threatening diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Due to this lack or

  14. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer; the clinical aspects and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.M. Sikkens (Edmée)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, the pancreas is unable to deliver a sufficient quantity of pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine to digest food. It may occur in several life threatening diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Due to this lack or absence

  15. SCORING IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS: WHEN IMAGING IS APPROPRIATE?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucuteanu, B; Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi; Mihai, Cătălina; Dranga, Mihaela; Negru, D

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent presentation to the emergency departments with a rising incidence and a great variability in clinical severity and outcome. The aim of this review is to offer a succinct presentation on acute pancreatitis scoring systems and the use of different imaging methods in severity prediction: Ranson criteria, Glasgow criteria, Hong Kong Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), computed tomography scoring systems, Bedside Index of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis (BISAP) score, Panc 3, Japanese Severity Score (JSS), Harmless Acute Pancreatitis Score (HAPS), Pancreatitis Outcome Prediction (POP), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA). This article also describes the Revised Atlanta Classification of AP (2012) and the correlation with computed tomography.

  16. A sister of PIN1 gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) defines leaf and flower organ initiation patterns by maintaining epidermal auxin flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ciera C; Koenig, Daniel; Chitwood, Daniel H; Sinha, Neelima R

    2016-11-01

    The spatiotemporal localization of the plant hormone auxin acts as a positional cue during early leaf and flower organogenesis. One of the main contributors to auxin localization is the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1). Phylogenetic analysis has revealed that PIN1 genes are split into two sister clades; PIN1 and the relatively uncharacterized Sister-Of-PIN1 (SoPIN1). In this paper we identify entire-2 as a loss-of-function SlSoPIN1a (Solyc10g078370) mutant in Solanum lycopersicum. The entire-2 plants are unable to specify proper leaf initiation leading to a frequent switch from the wild type spiral phyllotactic pattern to distichous and decussate patterns. Leaves in entire-2 are large and less complex and the leaflets display spatial deformities in lamina expansion, vascular development, and margin specification. During sympodial growth in entire-2 the specification of organ position and identity is greatly affected resulting in variable branching patterns on the main sympodial and inflorescence axes. To understand how SlSoPIN1a functions in establishing proper auxin maxima we used the auxin signaling reporter DR5: Venus to visualize differences in auxin localization between entire-2 and wild type. DR5: Venus visualization shows a widening of auxin localization which spreads to subepidermal tissue layers during early leaf and flower organogenesis, showing that SoPIN1 functions to focus auxin signaling to the epidermal layer. The striking spatial deformities observed in entire-2 help provide a mechanistic framework for explaining the function of the SoPIN1 clade in S.lycopersicum. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Administration of Anti-Reg I and Anti-PAPII Antibodies Worsens Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterbo, Domenico; Callender, Gordon E; DiMaio, Theresa; Mueller, Cathy M; Smith-Norowitz, Tamar; Zenilman, Michael E; Bluth, Martin H

    2009-01-01

    Context The regeneration protein family (Reg), which includes Reg I and PAPII, is expressed in pancreas acinar cells, and increases in acute pancreatitis. We have demonstrated that Reg gene knockdown worsens severity of acute pancreatitis in the rat and hypothesize that the proteins offer a protective effect in this disease. Objective We investigated the ability of anti-Reg and anti-PAP antibody to neutralize pancreatic Reg protein and affect pancreatitis severity. Intervention Pancreatitis was induced in rats by retrograde ductal injection of 4% sodium taurocholate. Animals Eighty-four rats: 48 with induced pancreatitis, 30 sham operated, and 6 normal animals. Setting Intraductal anti-Reg I and/or anti-PAPII antibody was administered at induced pancreatitis and sham operated subgroups of 6 rats each. Main outcome measure Serum and pancreata were harvested 24 and/or 48 hours later and assessed for pancreatitis severity by pancreatic wet weight, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), amylase, PAPII levels, and histopathology. Results Animals induced with pancreatitis with administration of anti-Reg/PAP antibodies had significantly higher wet weights compared with taurocholate and histopathological analysis revealed that anti-Reg/PAP treated animals had worse tissue inflammation and necrosis compared with controls. Serum CRP, amylase, and Reg levels did not significantly differ between experimental and sham control groups. Conclusions Administration of anti-Reg/PAP antibody worsened taurocholate-induced organ specific pancreatitis. These data suggest that the Reg family of proteins is protective in acute pancreatitis. PMID:19129610

  18. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  19. The potential role of kinesin and dynein in Golgi scattering and cytoplasmic vacuole formation during acute experimental pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ina A Weber; Igor Buchwalow; Daniela Hahn; Wolfram Domschke; Markus M Lerch; Jürgen Schnekenburger

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Acute pancreatitis is initiated in pancreatic acinar cells and characterized by a profound disturbance in intracel-lular vesicle transport. Moreover, secretion of pancreatic zymogens is blocked, paralleled by the formation of cytoplasmic vacuoles with premature protease activation that precedes cellular necrosis and organ damage.

  20. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, J

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the definition of the disease, the etiological diagnosis of idiopathic disease, the correlation between fibrosis degree and pancreatic secretion in the early stages of chronic pancreatitis, the treatment of the disease and of pain, the clinical relevance of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. A new mechanistic definition of chronic pancreatitis has been proposed. Genetic testing is mainly of help in patients with relapsing idiopathic pancreatitis. A significant correlation has been shown between the degree of pancreatic fibrosis as evaluated by elastography and pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate. New data supports the efficacy of antioxidants and simvastatin for the therapy of chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatoscopy-guided intraductal lithotripsy is an effective alternative to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular events. Fine needle biopsy and contrast enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography are of help for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Pancreatic Resections for Advanced M1-Pancreatic Carcinoma: The Value of Synchronous Metastasectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Seelig

    2010-01-01

    Materials and Methods. From January 1, 2004 to December, 2007 a total of 20 patients with pancreatic malignancies were retrospectively evaluated who underwent pancreatic surgery with synchronous resection of hepatic, adjacent organ, or peritoneal metastases for proven UICC stage IV periampullary cancer of the pancreas. Perioperative as well as clinicopathological parameters were evaluated. Results. There were 20 patients (9 men, 11 women; mean age 58 years identified. The primary tumor was located in the pancreatic head (n=9, 45%, in pancreatic tail (n=9, 45%, and in the papilla Vateri (n=2, 10%. Metastases were located in the liver (n=14, 70%, peritoneum (n=5, 25%, and omentum majus (n=2, 10%. Lymphnode metastases were present in 16 patients (80%. All patients received resection of their tumors together with metastasectomy. Pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy was performed in 8 patients, distal pancreatectomy in 8, duodenopancreatectomy in 2, and total pancreatectomy in 2. Morbidity was 45% and there was no perioperative mortality. Median postoperative survival was 10.7 months (2.6–37.7 months which was not significantly different from a matched-pair group of patients who underwent pancreatic resection for UICC adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (median survival 15.6 months; P=.1. Conclusion. Pancreatic resection for M1 periampullary cancer of the pancreas can be performed safely in well-selected patients. However, indication for surgery has to be made on an individual basis.

  2. Factors affecting morbidity and mortality in pancreatic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdag, Z; Kapan, M; Ulger, B V; Turkoglu, A; Uslukaya, O; Oğuz, A; Aldemir, M

    2016-04-01

    Difficulties in the detection of pancreatic damage result in morbidity and mortality in cases of pancreatic trauma. This study was performed to determine factors affecting morbidity and mortality in pancreatic trauma. The records of 33 patients who underwent surgery for pancreatic trauma between January 2004 and December 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. The types of injury were penetrating injury and blunt abdominal trauma in 75.8 and 24.2 % of all cases, respectively. Injuries were classified as stage 1 in 6 cases (18.2 %), stage 2 in 18 cases (54.5 %), stage 3 in 5 cases (15.2 %), and stage 4 in 4 cases (12.1 %). The average injury severity scale (ISS) value was 25.70 ± 9:33. Six patients (18.2 %) had isolated pancreatic injury, 27 (81.2 %) had additional intraabdominal organ injuries and 10 patients (30.3 %) had extraabdominal organ injuries. The mean length of hospital stay was 13.24 ± 9 days. Various complications were observed in eight patients (24.2 %) and mortality occurred in three (9.1 %). Complications were more frequent in patients with high pancreatic damage scores (p = 0.024), additional organ injuries (p = 0.05), and blunt trauma (p = 0.026). Pancreatic injury score was associated with morbidity, while the presence of major vascular injury was associated with mortality. Complications were significantly more common in injuries with higher pancreatic damage scores, additional organ injuries, and blunt abdominal trauma. Pancreatic injury score was associated with morbidity, while the presence of major vascular injury was associated with mortality.

  3. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Bukowczan

    Full Text Available Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion.Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8 nmol/kg/dose was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula.Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food intake and

  4. Pathophysiology of pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George W Browne; CS Pitchurnoni

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in its severe form is complicated by multiple organ system dysfunction, most importantly by pulmonary complications which include hypoxia,acute respiratory distress syndrome, atelectasis, and pleural effusion. The pathogenesis of some of the above complications is attributed to the production of noxious cytokines. Clinically significant is the early onset of pleural effusion, which heralds a poor outcome of acute pancreatitis. The role of circulating trypsin, phospholipase A2, platelet activating factor, release of free fatty acids,chemoattractants such as tumor necrsosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-8, fMet-leu-phe (a bacterial wall product), nitric oxide, substance P, and macrophage inhibitor factor is currently studied. The hope is that future management of acute pancreatitis with a better understanding of the pathogenesis of lung injury will be directed against the production of noxious cytokines.

  5. Pediatric pancreatic trauma: trending toward nonoperative management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alex G; Islam, Saleem

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic trauma is rare in children and optimal care has not been defined. We undertook this study to review the cumulative experience from three centers. After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval at each site, the trauma registries of three institutions were searched for pancreatic injuries. The charts were reviewed and data pertaining to demographics, hospital course, and outcome were obtained and analyzed. During the study period, a total of 79 pancreatic injuries were noted. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle crash (44%) followed by child abuse (11%) and bicycle crashes (11%). Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained in 95 per cent with peripancreatic fluid the most common finding. Median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 9, whereas median organ injury score was 2, and a higher grade correlated with need for operation (P = 0.001). Pancreatic operations were performed in 32 patients, whereas nonoperative management was noted in 47 cases. We noted no differences in length of stay, age, ISS, or initial blood pressure in operative versus nonoperatively managed cases. Pancreatic injuries were rare in children with trauma. CT scans were the most common method of diagnosis. Nonoperative management appeared to be safe and was more common, especially for the lower grade injuries.

  6. Molecular regulation of pancreatic stellate cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaster Robert

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until now, no specific therapies are available to inhibit pancreatic fibrosis, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. One major reason is the incomplete knowledge of the molecular principles underlying fibrogenesis in the pancreas. In the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs are the predominant source of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in the diseased organ. PSCs are vitamin A-storing, fibroblast-like cells with close morphological and biochemical similarities to hepatic stellate cells (also known as Ito-cells. In response to profibrogenic mediators such as various cytokines, PSCs undergo an activation process that involves proliferation, exhibition of a myofibroblastic phenotype and enhanced production of ECM proteins. The intracellular mediators of activation signals, and their antagonists, are only partially known so far. Recent data suggest an important role of enzymes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family in PSC activation. On the other hand, ligands of the nuclear receptor PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ stimulate maintenance of a quiescent PSC phenotype. In the future, targeting regulators of the PSC activation process might become a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic fibrosis.

  7. Endosonography guided management of pancreatic fluid collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmann, Andreas S; Menachery, John; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Srinivasan, Indu; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was adopted by international consensus, and is based on actual local and systemic determinants of disease severity. The local determinant is pancreatic necrosis (sterile or infected), and the systemic determinant is organ failure. Local complications of pancreatitis can include acute peri-pancreatic fluid collection, acute necrotic collection, pseudocyst formation, and walled-off necrosis. Interventional endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been increasing utilized in managing these local complications. After performing a PubMed search, the authors manually applied pre-defined inclusion criteria or a filter to identify publications relevant to EUS and pancreatic collections (PFCs). The authors then reviewed the utility, efficacy, and risks associated with using therapeutic EUS and involved EUS devices in treating PFCs. Due to the development and regulatory approval of improved and novel endoscopic devices specifically designed for transmural drainage of fluid and necrotic debris (access and patency devices), the authors predict continuing evolution in the management of PFCs. We believe that EUS will become an indispensable part of procedures used to diagnose PFCs and perform image-guided interventions. After draining a PFC, the amount of tissue necrosis is the most important predictor of a successful outcome. Hence, it seems logical to classify these collections based on their percentage of necrotic component or debris present when viewed by imaging methods or EUS. Finally, the authors propose an algorithm for managing fluid collections based on their size, location, associated symptoms, internal echogenic patterns, and content.

  8. Pancreatic groove cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Shih-Chin; Shyr, Bor-Uei; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wang, Shin-E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic groove cancer is very rare and can be indistinguishable from groove pancreatitis. This study is to clarify the characteristics, clinical features, managements, and survival outcomes of this rare tumor. Brief descriptions were made for each case of pancreatic groove cancer encountered at our institute. Individualized data of pancreatic groove cancer cases described in the literature were extracted and added to our database to expand the study sample size for a more complete analysis. A total of 33 patients with pancreatic groove cancer were included for analysis, including 4 cases from our institute. The median tumor size was 2.7 cm. The most common symptom was nausea or vomiting (89%), followed by jaundice (67%). Duodenal stenosis was noted by endoscopy in 96% of patients. The histopathological examination revealed well differentiated tumor in 43%. Perineural invasion was noted in 90%, and lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement in 83%. Overall 1-year survival rate was 93.3%, and 3- or 5-year survival rate was 62.2%, with a median survival of 11.0 months. Survival outcome for the well-differentiated tumors was better than those of the moderate/poorly differentiated ones. Early involvement of duodenum causing vomiting is often the initial presentation, but obstructive jaundice does not always happen until the disease progresses. Tumor differentiation is a prognostic factor for survival outcome. The possibility of pancreatic groove cancer should be carefully excluded before making the diagnosis of groove pancreatitis for any questionable case. PMID:28079795

  9. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Milena; Ilic, Irena

    2016-11-28

    Cancer of the pancreas remains one of the deadliest cancer types. Based on the GLOBOCAN 2012 estimates, pancreatic cancer causes more than 331000 deaths per year, ranking as the seventh leading cause of cancer death in both sexes together. Globally, about 338000 people had pancreatic cancer in 2012, making it the 11(th) most common cancer. The highest incidence and mortality rates of pancreatic cancer are found in developed countries. Trends for pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality varied considerably in the world. A known cause of pancreatic cancer is tobacco smoking. This risk factor is likely to explain some of the international variations and gender differences. The overall five-year survival rate is about 6% (ranges from 2% to 9%), but this vary very small between developed and developing countries. To date, the causes of pancreatic cancer are still insufficiently known, although certain risk factors have been identified, such as smoking, obesity, genetics, diabetes, diet, inactivity. There are no current screening recommendations for pancreatic cancer, so primary prevention is of utmost importance. A better understanding of the etiology and identifying the risk factors is essential for the primary prevention of this disease.

  10. Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourian, Kiumars; Seneviratne, Dammika; Galar, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  11. Pancreatic cyst development: insights from von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Asselt Sophie J

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic cysts are a heterogeneous group of lesions, which can be benign or malignant. Due to improved imaging techniques, physicians are more often confronted with pancreatic cysts. Little is known about the origin of pancreatic cysts in general. Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease is an atypical ciliopathy and inherited tumor syndrome, caused by a mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene encoding the VHL protein (pVHL. VHL patients are prone to develop cysts and neuroendocrine tumors in the pancreas in addition to several other benign and malignant neoplasms. Remarkably, pancreatic cysts occur in approximately 70% of VHL patients, making it the only hereditary tumor syndrome with such a discernible expression of pancreatic cysts. Cellular loss of pVHL due to biallelic mutation can model pancreatic cystogenesis in other organisms, suggesting a causal relationship. Here, we give a comprehensive overview of various pVHL functions, focusing on those that can potentially explain pancreatic cyst development in VHL disease. Based on preclinical studies, cilia loss in ductal cells is probably an important early event in pancreatic cyst development.

  12. Familial pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, A P; Hruban, R H; Brune, K A; Petersen, G M; Goggins, M

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and will be responsible for an estimated 28,900 deaths in 2001. Relatively little is known of its etiology, and the only well-established risk factor is cigarette smoking. Studies over the past 3 decades have shown that 4%-16% of patients with pancreatic cancer have a family history of the disease. A small fraction of this aggregation can be accounted for in inherited cancer syndromes, including familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, hereditary pancreatitis, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These syndromes arise as a result of germline mutations in the BRCA2, pl6 (familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma), mismatch repair (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), and STK11 (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) genes. In addition, hereditary plays a role in predisposing certain patients with apparently sporadic pancreatic cancer. Many patients with pancreatic cancers caused by a germline mutation in a cancer-causing gene do not have a pedigree that is suggestive of a familial cancer syndrome. A recent prospective analysis of the pedigrees in the National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry found that individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer in multiple first-degree relatives have a high risk of pancreatic cancer themselves. The identification of such high-risk individuals will help clinicians target screening programs and develop preventive interventions with the hope of reducing the mortality of pancreatic cancer in these families.

  13. Emphysematous Pancreatitis. Radiological Curiosity or a Cause for Concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Dev Wig

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Emphysematous pancreatitis is a rare, potentially fatal variant of severe acute pancreatitis with gas in the pancreatic bed. There are isolated case reports describing this condition. Objective This report summarizes our experience with the management of this condition in order to compare its clinical characteristics, microbiological and radiological features, surgical management and the outcome of patients with emphysematous pancreatitis and nonemphysematous infected pancreatic necrosis. Setting The hospital records of the patients who underwent necrosectomy for infected pancreatic necrosis between 2002 and 2006 were reviewed. Patients Fifty-seven patients were identified: 11 of them (19.3% had gas in and around the pancreas on computed tomography and 46 (80.7% had non-emphysematous infected pancreatic necrosis. Main outcome measures The clinical characteristics and the hospital course of the two groups of patients were compared. Results The mean age of 11 patients with emphysematous pancreatitis was 34.0±11.5 years and alcohol was the most common etiology (54.5%. The median computed tomography severity index was 10. All 11 patients with emphysematous pancreatitis had growth of organisms on culture of fine needle aspiration or pancreatic tissue obtained at surgery, with Escherichia coli in all of them. Polymicrobial infection was seen in 5 (45.5% of them. In comparing patients having emphysematous pancreatitis with those having non-emphysematous infected necrosis, there was no significant difference in the severity of the disease (P=0.319, time to surgical intervention (P=0.553, incidence of organ failure (P=0.297, hospital stay (P=0.580 or mortality rate (P=0.739. The total number of locoregional complications was significantly higher in patients with emphysematous pancreatitis (P=0.049. However, when compared separately, the incidence of enteric fistula, bleeding, intraabdominal collections and wound complications were similar in the

  14. Cardiocirculatory pathophysiological mechanisms in severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mónica; García; José; Julián; Calvo

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and potentially lethal acute inflammatory process. Although the majority of patients have a mild episode of AP, 10%-20% develop a severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and suffer systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and/or pancreatic necrosis. The main aim of this article is to review the set of events, f irst localized in the pancreas, that lead to pancreatic inflammation and to the spread to other organs contributing to multiorganic shock. The early pathogenic mechanisms in SAP are not completely understood but both premature activation of enzymes inside the pancreas, related to an impaired cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis, as well as release of pancreatic enzymes into the bloodstream are considered important events in the onset of pancreatitis disease. Moreover, afferent f ibers within the pancreas release neurotransmitters in response to tissue damage. The vasodilator effects of these neurotransmitters and the activation of pro-inflammatory substances play a crucial role in amplifying the inflammatory response, which leads to systemic manifestation of AP. Damage extension to other organs leads to SIRS, which is usually associated with cardiocirculatoryphysiology impairment and a hypotensive state. Hypotension is a risk factor for death and is associated with a signif icant hyporesponsiveness to vasoconstrictors. This indicates that stabilization of the patient, once this pathological situation has been established, would be a very diff icult task. Therefore, it seems particularly necessary to understand the pathological mechanisms involved in the f irst phases of AP to avoid damage beyond the pancreas. Moreover, efforts must also be directed to identify those patients who are at risk of developing SAP.

  15. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  16. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients......, and survival. The results are published annually. CONCLUSION: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database has registered data on 2,217 patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The data have been obtained nationwide over a period of 4 years and 2 months. The completeness...

  17. Delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion postsplenectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of pancreatic pleural effusion,secondary to an internal pancreatic fistula,is a rare clinical syndrome and diagnosis is often missed.The key to the diagnosis is a dramatically elevated pleural fluid amylase.This pancreatic pleural effusion is also called a pancreatic pleural fistula.It is characterized by profuse pleural fluid and has a tendency to recur.Here we report a case of delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion emerging after splenectomy.From the treatment ...

  18. Preoperative assessment and optimization in periampullary and pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Myatra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative management of pancreatic and periampullary cancer poses a considerable challenge to the pancreatic surgeon, anesthesiologist, and the intensive care team. The preoperative surgical evaluation of a pancreatic lesion aims to define the nature of the lesion (malignant or benign, stage the tumor, and to determine resectability or other non-surgical treatment options. Patients are often elderly and may have significant comorbidities and malnutrition. Obstructive jaundice may lead to coagulopathy, infection, renal dysfunction, and adverse outcomes. Routine preoperative biliary drainage can result in higher complication rates, and metal stents may be preferred over plastic stents in selected patients with resectable disease. Judicious use of antibiotics and maintaining fluid volume preoperatively can reduce the incidence of infection and renal dysfunction, respectively. Perioperative fluid therapy with hemodynamic optimization using minimally invasive monitoring may help improve outcomes. Careful patient selection, appropriate preoperative evaluation and optimization can greatly contribute to a favorable outcome after major pancreatic resections.

  19. [Efficacy of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) for severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nobuya; Hirano, Takeshi; Moriguchi, Takeshi; Hirasawa, Hiroyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2004-11-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) is involved in the development of pancreatic infection in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and influences the prognosis. We should suppress BT to prevent pancreatic infection and improve survival rate. Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) is rational treatment. We should aim at effective SDD, ensuring the following 4 points: (1) enteral antimicrobials, in combination with, (2) parenteral antibiotics given immediately on admission, (3) hand hygiene, (4) surveillance cultures of throat and rectum. Starting enteral feeding as soon as possible and avoiding long-term SDD is useful for maintaining the defenses of the intestinal mucosa and preventing emergence of resistant bacteria. We used glutamine and dietary fiber besides SDD and were able to reduce pancreatic infection.

  20. BITC Sensitizes Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas to TRAIL-induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Christina A.; Sahu, Ravi P.; Kulkarni-Datar, Kashmira; Srivastava, Sanjay K.; Brown, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer with a greater than 95% mortality rate and short survival after diagnosis. Chemotherapeutic resistance hinders successful treatment. This resistance is often associated with mutations in codon 12 of the K-Ras gene (K-Ras 12), which is present in over 90% of all pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Codon 12 mutations maintain Ras in a constitutively active state leading to continuous cellular proliferation. Our study determined if TRAIL resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinomas with K-Ras 12 mutations could be overcome by first sensitizing the cells with Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC). BITC is a component of cruciferous vegetables and a cell cycle inhibitor. BxPC3, MiaPaCa2 and Panc-1 human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines were examined for TRAIL resistance. Our studies show BITC induced TRAIL sensitization by dual activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. PMID:20559452

  1. Environmental effectiveness of GAEC cross-compliance standard 2.2 "Maintaining the level of soil organic matter through crop rotation" and economic evaluation of the competitiveness gap for farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamberto Borrelli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the Project MO.NA.CO was evaluated the Environmental effectiveness of GAEC cross-compliance standard 2.2 “Maintaining the level of soil organic matter through crop rotation” and economic evaluation of the competitiveness gap for farmers who support or not the cross-compliance regime. The monitoring was performed in nine experimental farms of the Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA distributed throughout Italy and with different soil and climatic conditions. Were also evaluated the soil organic matter and some yield parameters, in a cereal monocropping (treatment counterfactual and a two-year rotation cereal-legume or forage (treatment factual. The two-years application of the standard “crop rotations” has produced contrasting results with regards to the storage of soil organic matter through crop rotation and these were not sufficient to demonstrate a statistically significant effect of treatment in any of the farms considered in monitoring, only in those farms subjected to more years of monitoring was recorded only a slight effect of the standard as a trend. The variations of organic matter in soils in response to changes in the culture technique or in the management of the soil may have long lag times and two years of time are not sufficient to demonstrate the dynamics of SOM associated with the treatment, also in consideration of the large inter annual variability recorded in different monitored sites.

  2. Metal Stents in Management of Pancreatic Pseudocyst and Walled Off Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Paramasivam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The science behind pancreatitis and its complications is an ever evolving and challenging field. More than two centuries after the first description of pancreatic pseudocyst by Eugene Opie, some clear consensus and guidelines have evolved. Atlanta Symposium in 1992 attempted to offer a global ‘consensus’ and a universally applicable classification system for acute pancreatitis, tough comprehensive; some of the definitions were confusing [1]. Recent data and deeper understanding of pathophysiology of organ failure and necrotising pancreatitis, and the advent of superior diagnostic imaging have propelled towards the formation of revised Atlanta classification in 2012. Local complications of acute pancreatitis among others are acute pancreatic fluid collection, pancreatic pseudocyst, acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis. Rarer complications are gastric outlet dysfunction, splenic and portal vein thrombosis, and colonic necrosis

  3. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis.

  4. Long noncoding RNA MALAT-1 enhances stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiao, Feng; Hu, Hai; Han, Ting; Yuan, Cuncun; Wang, Lei; Jin, Ziliang; Guo, Zhen; Wang, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    .... The mechanisms that maintain the stemness of these cells remain largely unknown. Our previous study indicated that MALAT-1 may serve as an oncogenic long noncoding RNA in pancreatic cancer by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT...

  5. Management of Acute Pancreatitis in Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güniz Meyancı Köksal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is characterized by an inflammation occuring due to digestion of pancreatic self tissues and other organs after activation of digestive enzymes which are stable under normal conditions . For all the pancreatitis cases, the mortality rate is <%15. In the acute pancreatitis cases, the monitorization of the inspiration system, cardiovascular system and the metabolic status are needed. There is no primary therapy for the pancreatitis. All the therapy protocols are support therapy. The basic support therapy methods are: Liquid replacement, respiration support, pain management, pancreas secretion inhibition, metabolic support, intra-abdominal monitoring and decompression, nutrition, antibiotherapy, immunomodulation, coagulation mechanism monitoring. In the acute pancreatitis, the causes of early deaths are pancreatic shock and acute pulmonary thrombohemorrhage, within the first 7 days the causes of the 75% deaths are pulmonary shock and congestion and after 7 days the causes of the 77% are pancreas abscess, MOF (multiple organ failure, purulent peritonitis and erosive hemorrhage. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2010; 8: 85-9

  6. [Acute hypertrygliceridemic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senosiain Lalastra, Carla; Tavío Hernández, Eduardo; Moreira Vicente, Victor; Maroto Castellanos, Maite; García Sánchez, Maria Concepción; Aicart Ramos, Marta; Téllez Vivajos, Luis; Cuño Roldán, José Luis

    2013-04-01

    Acute hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis is the third cause of acute pancreatitis in the Western population. There is usually an underlying alteration in lipid metabolism and a secondary factor. Clinical presentation is similar to that of pancreatitis of other etiologies, but the course of acute hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis seems to be worse and more recurrent. Some laboratory data can be artefacts, leading to diagnostic errors. This is the case of amylase, which can show false low levels. Treatment is based on intense fluidotherapy and analgesia. When there is no response to conservative management, other methods to lower triglyceride levels should be used. Several options are available, such as plasmapheresis, insulin, and heparin. The present article provides a review of the current literature on this entity.

  7. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  8. Acute pancreatitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokić Radoica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute pancreatitis in children is mostly due to abdominal trauma, diseases or congenital anomalies of the biliary-pancreatic tree. Both exogenous and endogenous functions of the gland could be disturbed by various levels of damage. Clinical Finding and Diagnostics. Acute abdominal pain, gastrointestinal signs and general deterioration are the main clinical findings. The examination can be completed by blood and urine tests of amylase, electrolytes level, and the C-reactive protein. In addition to these tests, ultrasound, computed tomography and endoscopy are required as well. Therapeutic Methods. The therapy of choice is non-operative treatment using medicaments to control the pain, decrease the pancreatic activity and prevent further complications. If the conservative treatment fails, the surgical approach is necessary: drainage, resections, by-pass procedures, etc. Conclusion. Acute pancreatitis is a very serious disease in childhood. Clinical experience and rational approach are very important in the diagnostic and therapeutic methods.

  9. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also called 5-HT ) or its precursor, 5-HTP. The treatment and outlook for pancreatic NETs depend ... known as precancers ). Because people are getting imaging tests such as CT scans more often than in ...

  10. Obesity and Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Dominique S

    Pancreatic cancer has few known risk factors, providing little in the way of prevention, and is the most rapidly fatal cancer with 7 % survival rate at 5 years. Obesity has surfaced as an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer as epidemiological studies with strong methodological designs have removed important biases and solidified the obesity associations. Moreover, studies indicate that obesity early in adulthood is strongly associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer and that abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor. There is increasing evidence suggesting long-standing diabetes type 2 and insulin resistance are important etiological factors of this disease, providing a strong mechanistic link to obesity. The challenge remains to determine whether intended weight loss in midlife will reduce risk of pancreatic cancer and to elucidate the complex underlying pathways directly involved with risk.

  11. Tests for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from a gallstone, a tumor, or other disease). Tumor markers: Tumor markers are substances that can sometimes be found in the blood when a person has cancer. Two tumor markers may be helpful in pancreatic cancer: CA 19- ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risks of other cancers (or other health problems). Examples of genetic syndromes that can cause exocrine pancreatic cancer include: Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome , caused by mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes Familial atypical ...

  13. [Hereditary aspects of pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Daniel; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bal, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis presents clinically as acute and chronic form. A common characteristic of these two forms is enzymatic autodigestion of pancreas in the course of the disease. It results from premature activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes and disturbance of subtle balance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors. The way to understand the character of mechanisms leading to development of pancreatitis has been simplified by discovery of genetic factors, which are able to initiate pathological changes at tissue level. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene (first of all R122H and N29I mutations), which encodes for cationic trypsin, cause trypsin to be protected from autodegradation. These mutations also cause precursor of trypsin - trypsinogen, to be activated easier. On the other hand mutations in the SPINK1 gene have been identified. SPINK1 gene encodes for the most important protease inhibitor of the pancreatic fluid. The most frequent mutation, namely N34S, decrease SPINK1 protein in its activity. The link between the genotype and phenotype is not clear in every case. It is probable that pancreatitis will be recognized as poligenic with many genes engaged in the disease development. Pancreatic cancer is a frequent consequence of pancreatitis. It is a very invasive cancer with high mortality. In the course of pancreatic inflammation intensive cell proliferation takes place for regeneration of pancreas damage. It is the chance for amplification of pathological changes in DNA, which have arisen as a ROS's (Reactive Oxygen Species) and RNOS's (Reactive Nitrogen Oxide Species) action effect. ROS and RNOS are generated in the course of pancreas inflammation.

  14. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  15. Blood microcirculation of ischemic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, Irina V.; Arakelian, Sergei M.; Antonov, Olga V.

    1998-06-01

    Blood Microcirculation includes many of different components, which are joined by unique multiple system. Capillaries are one of the main link in this morpho-functional chain. Changes in any components of blood microcirculation are revealed by many of pathological processes in different organs and systems of the whole organism. We investigated 250 patients from 30 to 77 ages. Men included 149, women -- 101. The main diagnosis of all patients was the ischaemic pancreatitis. For verification of this diagnosis we used the whole spectrum of clinical, laboratorial and instrumental methods. These were the following: the definition of amylase of blood and urine, sonography and computer's tomography of pancreas, angiography of vessels of pancreas and Doppler's sonography of abdominal aorta and her branches: arteria mesenterica superior (AMS), truncus coeliacus (TC), arteria hepatica communis (AHC) and arteria lienalis (AL). We investigated the blood microcirculation of the mucous of the inferior lip, using Laser Dopplerography. The equipment for this research was LACC-01 with modified computer's program. The normal levels of blood microcirculation were from 120 to 180 Units. But patients with ischaemic pancreatitis had more lower level than in normal situation. This method are suggested as express diagnostic in the cases of abdominal ischaemic pathology. It can used as singel method or in combined with ultrasound Dopplerography.

  16. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Smyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  17. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niraj; Jani; James; Buxbaum

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis(AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4(Ig G4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreaticmanifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG 4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG 4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings.

  18. Ascl1b and Neurod1, instead of Neurog3, control pancreatic endocrine cell fate in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasse, Lydie C; Pirson, Justine L; Stern, David G; Von Berg, Virginie; Manfroid, Isabelle; Peers, Bernard; Voz, Marianne L

    2013-07-08

    NEUROG3 is a key regulator of pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation in mouse, essential for the generation of all mature hormone producing cells. It is repressed by Notch signaling that prevents pancreatic cell differentiation by maintaining precursors in an undifferentiated state. We show that, in zebrafish, neurog3 is not expressed in the pancreas and null neurog3 mutant embryos do not display any apparent endocrine defects. The control of endocrine cell fate is instead fulfilled by two basic helix-loop-helix factors, Ascl1b and Neurod1, that are both repressed by Notch signaling. ascl1b is transiently expressed in the mid-trunk endoderm just after gastrulation and is required for the generation of the first pancreatic endocrine precursor cells. Neurod1 is expressed afterwards in the pancreatic anlagen and pursues the endocrine cell differentiation program initiated by Ascl1b. Their complementary role in endocrine differentiation of the dorsal bud is demonstrated by the loss of all hormone-secreting cells following their simultaneous inactivation. This defect is due to a blockage of the initiation of endocrine cell differentiation. This study demonstrates that NEUROG3 is not the unique pancreatic endocrine cell fate determinant in vertebrates. A general survey of endocrine cell fate determinants in the whole digestive system among vertebrates indicates that they all belong to the ARP/ASCL family but not necessarily to the Neurog3 subfamily. The identity of the ARP/ASCL factor involved depends not only on the organ but also on the species. One could, therefore, consider differentiating stem cells into insulin-producing cells without the involvement of NEUROG3 but via another ARP/ASCL factor.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis with Rapid Clinical Improvement in a Child with Isovaleric Acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elpis Mantadakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isovaleric acidemia is a rare branched-chain organic acidemia. The authors describe a 3.5-year-old girl with isovaleric acidemia and acute abdominal pain associated with bilious emesis. Elevated serum amylase and abdominal ultrasonography demonstrating an enlarged and edematous pancreas, along with the presence of peripancreatic exudates, confirmed the presence of acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered quickly with intravenous hydration, pancreatic rest, and administration of intravenous L-carnitine. Pancreatitis should be ruled out in the context of vomiting in any patient with isovaleric acidemia. Conversely, branched-chain organic acidemias should be included in the differential diagnosis of any child with pancreatitis of unknown origin.

  20. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazale, Amaar H; Chari, Suresh T; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2008-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of a systemic fibroinflammatory disease (IgG4-related systemic disease) in which affected organs demonstrate dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with abundant IgG4-positive cells. The diagnosis of AIP and its differentiation from pancreatic cancer, its main differential diagnosis, remains a clinical challenge. The five cardinal features of AIP are characteristic histology, imaging, and serology; other organ involvement; and response to steroid therapy. Recent advances in our understanding of these features have resulted in enhanced recognition and diagnosis of this benign disease. This in turn has resulted in the avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures for suspected malignancy. This article reviews recent updates in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  1. Maintaining Learners’Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Zi-han

    2015-01-01

    Foreign language learning is a complex process and its success is determined by a variety of factors. The prime one of them is motivation ,which, as everyone knows, could be controlled by external forces so as to be taken advantage of. Motivation could prompt the learner to have his own learning goals and let him finish his learning task autonomously. All of that shows the im⁃portance of maintaining learners’motivation. This paper will demonstrate not only the definition and the types of motivation, but al⁃so the methods that could be used to stimulate and maintain the motivation.

  2. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  3. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  4. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  5. Extremely fast increase in the organic loading rate during the co-digestion of rapeseed oil and sewage sludge in a CSTR--characterization of granules formed due to CaO addition to maintain process stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasina, M; Kleyböcker, A; Michalik, M; Würdemann, H

    2015-01-01

    In a co-digestion system running with rapeseed oil and sewage sludge, an extremely fast increase in the organic loading rate was studied to develop a procedure to allow for flexible and demand-driven energy production. The over-acidification of the digestate was successfully prevented by calcium oxide dosage, which resulted in granule formation. Mineralogical analyses revealed that the granules were composed of insoluble salts of long chain fatty acids and calcium and had a porous structure. Long chain fatty acids and calcium formed the outer cover of granules and offered interfaces on the inside thereby enhancing the growth of biofilms. With granule size and age, the pore size increased and indicated degradation of granular interfaces. A stable biogas production up to the organic loading rate of 10.4 kg volatile solids m(-3) d(-1) was achieved although the hydrogen concentration was not favorable for propionic acid degradation. However, at higher organic loading rates, unbalanced granule formation and degradation were observed. Obviously, the adaption time for biofilm growth was too short to maintain the balance, thereby resulting in a low methane yield.

  6. Primary Culture of Porcine Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao X

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a method for the primary culture of porcine pancreatic acinar cells. INTERVENTIONS: Dispersed pancreatic acinar cells available utilizing RPMI-1640 medium containing collagenase III. After purification, the isolated acinar cells were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium with the addition of 2.5% fetal bovine serum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The morphological characteristics of acinar cells were described. (3H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells and the activity of amylase or lipase were determined during the culture process. RESULTS: There were no remarkable morphological changes in the pancreatic acinar cells during the 20 days culture. The acini showed a tendency to gather but did not attach to the walls of the culture disks. A good (3H-thymidine incorporation of acinar cells in the primary culture was maintained. The secretion of amylase or lipase from the acini decreased with the length of time of the culture. DISCUSSION: The primary culture of acinar cells from a porcine pancreas which was carried out in this study maintained the normal morphology of the acinar cells and their ability to grow but not their secretion of amylase or lipase. The method would benefit by the further experiments on acini of porcine pancreas.

  7. Strategy to differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreas cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kensuke Takuma; Terumi Kamisawa; Rajesh Gopalakrishna; Seiichi Hara; Taku Tabata; Yoshihiko Inaba; Naoto Egawa

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly described entity of pancreatitis in which the pathogenesis appears to involve autoimmune mechanisms.Based on histological and immunohistochemical examinations of various organs of AIP patients,AIP appears to be a pancreatic lesion reflecting a systemic "IgG4-related sclerosing disease".Clinically,AIP patients and patients with pancreatic cancer share many features,such as preponderance of elderly males,frequent initial symptom of painless jaundice,development of new-onset diabetes mellitus,and elevated levels of serum tumor markers.It is of uppermost importance not to misdiagnose AIP as pancreatic cancer.Since there is currently no diagnostic serological marker for AIP,and approach to the pancreas for histological examination is generally difficult,AIP is diagnosed using a combination of clinical,serological,morphological,and histopathological features.Findings suggesting AIP rather than pancreatic cancer include:fluctuating obstructive jaundice; elevated serum IgG4 levels; diffuse enlargement of the pancreas; delayed enhancement of the enlarged pancreas and presence of a capsule-like rim on dynamic computed tomography; low apparent diffusion coefficient values on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance image; irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; less upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography,presence of other organ involvement such as bilateral salivary gland swelling,retroperitoneal fibrosis and hilar or intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis;negative work-up for malignancy including endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration; and steroid responsiveness.Since AIP responds dramatically to steroid therapy,accurate diagnosis of AIP can avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection.

  8. Refractor y thrombotic thrombocytopenic pur pura following acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ebisa Bekele; Bethel Shiferaw; Alexandra Sokolova; Arpan Shah; Phillip Saunders; Alida Podrumar; Javed Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare blood disorder with an estimated incidence of 4–5 cases per million people per year. It is characterized by small-vessel platelet-rich thrombi that cause thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ damage. There are reports in literature that TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated, indicating each can be the cause of the other. However, acute pancreatitis triggering TTP is very rare. A 71 years old female ...

  9. Altered central pain processing after pancreatic surgery for chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S.A.W.; Ali, U. Ahmed; Broek, R.P. Ten; Issa, Y.; Eijck, C.H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Goor, H. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic abdominal pain is common in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and may involve altered central pain processing. This study evaluated the relationship between pain processing and pain outcome after pancreatic duct decompression and/or pancreatic resection in patients with CP. METHODS: Pati

  10. Pancreatic ductal system obstruction and acute recurrent pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Delhaye; C Matos; M Arvanitakis; J Devière

    2008-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis is a clinical entity largely associated with pancreatic ductal obstruction.This latter includes congenital variants,of which pancreas divisum is the most frequent but also controversial,chronic pancreatitis,tumors of the pancreaticobiliary junction and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.This review summarizes current knowledge about diagnostic work-up and therapy of these conditions.

  11. Economy Maintains Good Health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    China’s national economy has maintained rapid even growth in the first half of 2007, according to Xie Fuzhan, Commissioner of the National Bureau of Statistics. He was referring to major economic indicators of the January-June period that reveal that Chi

  12. Maintaining cell identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comet, Itys; Riising, Eva M; Leblanc, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    trials. Several observations show that PRC2 can have both oncogenic and tumour-suppressive functions. We propose that these apparently opposing roles of PRC2 in cancer are a consequence of the molecular function of the complex in maintaining, rather than specifying, the transcriptional repression state...

  13. Loperamide-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halla Vidarsdottir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a common disease leading to hospitalizations, most often caused by gallstones or alcohol. We present a case of a patient diagnosed with acute pancreatitis considered to be due to loperamide treatment for diarrhea.

  14. Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pancreatitis has been exclusively surgical for a long time. Recently, endoscopic therapy has become widely used as a primary therapeutic option.Initially performed for drainage of pancreatic cysts and pseudocysts, endoscopic treatments were adapted to biliary and pancreatic ducts stenosis. Pancreatic sphincterotomy which allows access to pancreatic ducts was firstly reported. Secondly, endoscopic methods of stenting, dilatation, and stones extraction of the bile ducts were applied to pancreatic ducts. Nevertheless,new improvements were necessary: failures of pancreatic stone extraction justified the development of extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy; dilatation of pancreatic stenosis was improved by forage with a new device; moreover endosonography allowed guidance for celiac block, gastro-cystostomy, duodeno-cystostomy and pancreatico-gastrostomy. Although endoscopic treatments are more and more frequently accepted,indications are still debated.

  15. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Pancreatic disorders and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisterfeld, R; Ehehalt, F; Saeger, H D; Solimena, M

    2008-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease among patients with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis, disorders of the exocrine pancreas. Different clinical features of diabetes are associated with these two conditions: hyperinsulinemia and peripheral insulin resistance are the prevailing diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, whereas reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are typically observed in chronic pancreatitis. Whether or not a causal relationship exists between diabetes and pancreatic carcinoma is an intriguing but unanswered question. Diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer and is thus regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. Conversely, pancreatic cancer may secrete diabetogenic factors. Given these findings, there is increasing interest in whether close monitoring of the glycemic profile may aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions.

  17. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  18. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional ... lies between the stomach and the spine . Enlarge Anatomy of the pancreas. The pancreas has three areas: ...

  19. Indications and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Liang Han; Jun Chen; Hong-Zhong Zhou; Sheng-Hong Lan; Pei-Chen Zhang; Guan-Bao Zhu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) may require surgery mainly because of intractable pain, suspicion of malignancy, or complications related to CP. This study aimed to analyze the efifcacy of surgical treatment for patients with CP in terms of pain relief, control of local complications, and pancreatic endocrine/exocrine function. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with CP were treated surgically at our hospital from June 1985 to November 2005. The clinical data of these patients were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS:  The follow-up time ranged from 8 to 130 months with a median of 60.6 months. No patients were lost to follow-up. All patients had improvement of clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain, steatorrhea and weight loss, to some degree, especially pain relief in patients with good dilation and high pressure of the main pancreatic duct. The endocrine and exocrine functions were not alleviated in all patients, otherwise the impaired glucose tolerance was improved in 8 (30.8%), 15 (57.7%) maintained the same body weight, one (3.8%) had an acute attack of CP, and 2 (7.7%) developed pancreatic carcinoma in the 16th and 28th month postoperatively and died within 3 years after operation for CP. The 1-, 3-, 5-year pain-free rates of CP patients were 96.2%(25/26), 88.5%(23/26) and 84.6%(22/26), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients with CP, surgical treatment is a safe procedure and can effectively relieve pain and control local complications;also, it is helpful to improve the quality of life for patients with pancreatitis, and to control the development of this disease.

  20. [Acute pancreatitis induced by valproic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomli, R; Nacef, F; Douki, S

    2013-09-01

    We describe the case of an adult man aged 49, without personal antecedents, or family psychiatric history, treated for bipolar disorder since 1995 and stabilised in the last 8 years by valproic acid, who presented in January 2010 an acute drug-induced pancreatitis. Drug-induced pancreatitis has been described since 1955. It may be induced by more than 260 various molecules, as well as by valproic acid, which remains underreported in the literature because there is a problem of imputability. The prevalence of acute drug-induced pancreatitis is set between 1 and 2 %. However, it must remain as an exclusion diagnosis after conducting an exhaustive etiological investigation that will, notably, eliminate bilary and alcoholic causes. The most incriminated drugs are the inhibitors of the conversion enzyme, sulfa drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, diuretics and anticonvulsants, including valproic acid. In Tunisia, the prescription of valproic acid is increasing in bipolar disorder therapy because it is known for its weak toxicity and easy handling. The case of our patient, who suffers from an acute Balthazar stage C pancreatitis with severe evolution after the drug was stopped, the imputability of valproic acid was considered strong and the collegial decision between the surgery, pharmacovigilance and psychiatry services maintained the drug-induced origin and consequently stopped the valproic acid. This case supports the idea that acute pancreatitis may be induced by valproic acid, even after a prescription lasting for a long period of time, it has no predictable factors and is totally independent of the drug-related dose and of depakine blood levels. There are no predictive factors to the present day, but the evolution is generally good except in rare cases where it may be dangerous. This leads us to think of bipolar patients who are found within weak grounds, such as alcoholics, cancer and HIV positive patients. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson

  1. CT of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Toshio (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author).

  2. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Ifosfamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Chiu Hung

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication during chemotherapy for pediatric patients with solid tumors. We report a 9-year-old boy with osteosarcoma who experienced 2 episodes of pancreatitis 1 day and 48 days after infusion of ifosfamide (IFOS, respectively. From a MEDLINE search, this is the 3rd reported case and 2nd reported pediatric case of IFOS-induced pancreatitis, and only this case experienced late-onset pancreatitis.

  3. Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Kornmann; Doris Henne-Bruns; Jan Scheele; Christian Rainer Wirtz; Thomas Kapapa; Johannes Lemke

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreat...

  4. Management of splenic and pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Cristiano, N; Siebert, M; Barbois, S; Létoublon, C; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    The spleen and pancreas are at risk for injury during abdominal trauma. The spleen is more commonly injured because of its fragile structure and its position immediately beneath the ribs. Injury to the more deeply placed pancreas is classically characterized by discordance between the severity of pancreatic injury and its initial clinical expression. For the patient who presents with hemorrhagic shock and ultrasound evidence of major hemoperitoneum, urgent "damage control" laparotomy is essential; if splenic injury is the cause, prompt "hemostatic" splenectomy should be performed. Direct pancreatic injury is rarely the cause of major hemorrhage unless a major neighboring vessel is injured, but if there is destruction of the pancreatic head, a two-stage pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) may be indicated. At open laparotomy when the patient's hemodynamic status can be stabilized, it may be possible to control splenic bleeding without splenectomy; it is always essential to search for injury to the pancreatic duct and/or the adjacent duodenum. Pancreatic contusion without ductal rupture is usually treated by drain placement adjacent to the injury; ductal injuries of the pancreatic body or tail are treated by resection (distal pancreatectomy with or without splenectomy), with generally benign consequences. For injuries of the pancreatic head with pancreatic duct disruption, wide drainage is usually performed because emergency PD is a complex gesture prone to poor results. Postoperatively, the placement of a ductal stent by endoscopic retrograde catheterization may be decided, while management of an isolated pancreatic fistula is often straightforward. Non-operative management is the rule for the trauma victim who is hemodynamically stable. In addition to the clinical examination and conventional laboratory tests, investigations should include an abdominothoracic CT scan with contrast injection, allowing identification of all traumatized organs and assessment of the severity of

  5. Use of pre-, pro- and synbiotics in patients with acute pancreatitis:A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinical outcomes of pre-, pro-and synbiotics therapy in patients with acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The databases including Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Chinese Biomedicine Database were searched for all relevant randomized controlled trials that studied the effects of pre-, pro- or synbiotics in patients with acute pancreatitis. Main outcome measures were postoperative infections, pancreatic infections, multiple organ failure (MOF), systemic inflammatory resp...

  6. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was

  7. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  8. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are consid

  9. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was foun

  10. Vaginal metastasis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhayoune, Khadija; El Fatemi, Hinde; El Ghaouti, Meryem; Bannani, Abdelaziz; Melhouf, Abdelilah; Harmouch, Taoufik

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal metastasis from pancreatic cancer is an extreme case and often indicates a poor prognosis. We present a case of pancreatic carcinoma with metastasis to the vagina that was discovered by vaginal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world of a primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma discovered of symptoms from a vaginal metastasis.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient.

  12. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  13. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-07

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease.

  14. Nuclear power plant maintainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminara, J L; Parsons, S O

    1982-09-01

    In the mid-1970s a general awareness of human factors engineering deficiencies associated with power plant control rooms took shape and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) awarded the Lockheed Corporation a contract to review the human factors aspects of five representative operational control rooms and their associated simulators. This investigation revealed a host of major and minor deficiencies that assumed unforeseen dimensions in the post- Three Mile Island accident period. In the course of examining operational problems (Seminara et al, 1976) and subsequently the methods for overcoming such problems (Seminara et al, 1979, 1980) indications surfaced that power plants were far from ideal in meeting the needs of maintenance personnel. Accordingly, EPRI sponsored an investigation of the human factors aspects of power plant maintainability (Seminara, 1981). This paper provides an overview of the maintainability problems and issues encountered in the course of reviewing five nuclear power plants.

  15. Histopathological Sequential Changes in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinikumar Kudari

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Experimental models of acute pancreatitis have been developed in order to understand its pathophysiology and extrapancreatic manifestations. Objective The objective of our study was to study sequential changes in the pancreas and distant organs in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis in a rat model. Animals Sixteen male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g. Design The rats were distributed into two groups: induced acute pancreatitis (study group: 8 rats and a control group (8 rats. Within each group, the animals were divided into subgroups: those who were sacrificed early (24 h and 72 h; two each and those who were sacrificed late (120 h and 240 h; two each. Intervention Acute pancreatitis was induced in the rats by multiple intraparenchymal injections of 10% sodium taurocholate solution. In the controls, the same amount of normal saline was injected into the pancreatic parenchyma. Main outcome measures Pathological examination of the pancreas, lungs, kidneys, intestine and liver was done. Results In this model of taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, the early changes observed in the pancreas were focal hemorrhages, parenchymal necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. At 72 hours, the changes observed were acinar necrosis, edema, fibrin deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration. Late changes were fibrinoid necrosis and fibroblast proliferation. In the acute phase, the histological changes in the lungs were congestion, focal pulmonary edema and intraalveolar hemorrhages while, in the late stage, there was persistence of vascular congestion. The changes observed in the kidneys were vacuolization of tubular epithelium in the subcapsular region and areas of hemorrhage in the interstitium. Intestinal changes included degenerative changes in the villous epithelium in the acute phase with normalization of the histology in the late phase. Conclusion Our findings correlate with the clinical observation of multisystem organ failure in

  16. Direct bonded space maintainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, V L; Almeida, M A; Mello, H S; Keith, O

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically a bonded space maintainer, which would reduce chair-side time and cost. Sixty appliances were fabricated from 0.7 mm stainless steel round wire and bonded using light-cured composite to the two teeth adjacent to the site of extraction of a posterior primary tooth. Twenty males and sixteen females (age range 5-9-years-old) were selected from the Pedodontic clinic of the State University of Rio de Janeiro. The sixty space maintainers were divided into two groups according to the site in which they were placed: a) absent first primary molar and b) absent second primary molar. Impressions and study models were obtained prior to and 6 months after bonding the appliances. During this period only 8.3% of failures were observed, most of them from occlusal or facial trauma. Student t-test did not show statistically significant alterations in the sizes of the maintained spaces during the trial period.

  17. Biosynthesis and release of thyrotropin-releasing hormone immunoreactivity in rat pancreatic islets in organ culture. Effects of age, glucose, and streptozotocin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolva, L O; Welinder, B S; Hanssen, K F;

    1983-01-01

    /islet) than in adult rat islets, which, however, increased their content from 1.3 +/- 0.5 to 7.0 +/- 0.5 fmol/islet during the first 3 d of culture. Adult rat islets maintained in medium with 20 mM glucose released significantly more TRH-IR than islets in 3.3 mM glucose medium (13.0 +/- 0.7 vs. 4.3 +/- 0...

  18. Primary Pancreatic Head Tuberculosis: Great Masquerader of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dhaval; Patel, Jatin; Rathi, Chetan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is considered an extremely rare condition, even in the developing countries. Most reported cases of pancreatic TB are diagnosed after exploratory laparotomy or autopsy. Pancreatic TB is a potential mimic of invasive pancreatic malignancy and the presence of vascular invasion does not distinguish one condition from the other. Every effort should be made for the earliest diagnosis of this condition as TB is a treatable condition and it avoids unnecessary management of pancreatic carcinoma. Here we report a rare case of primary pancreatic head TB in a 58-year-old male who presented with hypodense lesion in head of pancreas with double duct sign and portal vein invasion mimicking non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27785295

  19. The clinical assessment of intraductal ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the clinical value of intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis with conventional imaging methods. Methods: IDUS was carried out in eighteen patients with pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

  20. Maintaining the Harmonious Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2006-01-01

    between social harmony and individual competitions has, in some Korean corporations, led to social negotiation and struggles to define the aim and character of the collective effort. By describing the subsequent social dynamics of a Korean Bank corporation the purpose of this paper is to show how...... the perception of group harmony as a stabile entity in East Asian organizations is too static for analyzing the social organization. Rather, the dynamics of the continuous production and reproduction has to be taken into account understanding social interaction and social sustainability of Korean organizations....

  1. Pancreatic and Colonic Abscess Formation Secondary to HELLP Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. O’Brien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia and the variant HELLP syndrome are systemic conditions associated with vascular changes resulting in vasoconstriction. Most commonly, patients present with elevated blood pressure and proteinuria, with a background of complaints such as headache, scotoma, and right upper quadrant pain. The systemic vascular changes experienced can target any organ system, oftentimes with more than one organ system being involved. We present the case of a patient admitted with HELLP syndrome who subsequently developed multisystem organ dysfunction, including placental abruption, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, acute renal failure, colitis, abdominal ascites, pancreatitis, and the development of pancreatic and colonic abscesses.

  2. Pancreatic Cancer: Updates on Translational Research and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos G Sarris

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies with a mortality rate almost equal to its incidence. It is ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and despite intensive basic and clinical research over the last few years, the survival benefit for the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer is still disappointing. Due to the absence of specific symptoms and the lack of early detection tests, pancreatic cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced inoperrable stage and palliative chemotherapy with the purine analogue gemcitabine in combination with the targeted agent erlotinib, remains the mainstay method in the management of these patients. Therefore, there is an imperative need for new findings in the translational research field with prognostic, predictive and therapeutic value. In this paper we summarize five most interesting research abstracts as presented at the 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. In particular, we focus on Abstract #141 which investigates the interaction between liver and pancreatic organ damage in patients with pancreatic cancer and the potential contribution of the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 (PNPLA3 gene variation in pancreatic cancer development and on Abstract #149, in which, the prognostic and predictive role of SWI/SNF complex, a chromatin-remodeling complex, is examined. The key role of pharmacogenomics, in terms of predicting response and resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer patients, is analyzed in Abstract #142 and the contribution of circulating tumor cell detection in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, allowing the avoidance of more invasive procedures like EUS-FNA, is discussed in Abstract #157. Lastly, in Abstract #164, the diagnostic utility of YKL-40 and IL-6 in pancreatic cancer patients is investigated.

  3. Controlled clinical study on pancreatic stenting in the relief of pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高飞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of pancreatic stenting in the relief of abdominal pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct.Methods A tolal of 61 patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma companied with dilated pancreatic duct were divided into two groups.Twenty-eight cases(two cases were excluded because of stent loss)in stent group treated with

  4. Environmental effectiveness of GAEC cross-compliance standard 2.1 ‘Maintaining the level of soil organic matter through management of stubble and crop residues’ and economic evaluation of the competitiveness gap for farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Ventrella

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the Project MO.NA.CO. the Environmental effectiveness of GAEC cross-compliance standard 2.2 ‘Maintaining the level of soil organic matter through management of stubble and crop residues’ and economic evaluation of the competitiveness gap for farmers were evaluated. The monitoring was performed in eight experimental farms of the Council for agricultural research and economics (CREA, distributed throughout Italy and with different soil and climatic conditions. Yield parameters and several components of soil organic matter were evaluated in two contrasting treatments applied to one-year rotation of winter durum wheat and maize: i incorporation into the soil of crop residues (Factual treatment and ii burning or removal of crop residues (Counterfactual treatment. The application of the standard ‘crop residue management’ has showed contrasting results with differences (for yield and soil between the two treatments resulted almost always non significant. The analysis of economic competitiveness gap showed that the CR incorporation is more expensive than CR burning or removal, but the economic disadvantage can be considered rather small and thus easily compensated by Community aids. Therefore, the soil incorporation of crop residues can be considered a ‘good agricultural practice’ that does not penalize farmers in terms of production and cost and at the same time contributes to the maintenance of fertility and soil biodiversity. On the contrary, the removal and burning of residues result in a low or no-addition of organic matter into the soil. Moreover, burning can contribute to decrease the biodiversity and to increase the risk of air pollution, fires and road accidents.

  5. Post-partum pancreatitis.

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    Pai P

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy and post-partum period, rarely encountered in surgical practice, can have a lethal effect on the mother and the foetus. We report here a case of a 35 year old tertigravida who presented with high grade fever, abdominal pain with distension, tachycardia and tachypnoea. Chest examination and X-rays were suggestive of pneumonia. The abdomen was tense and tender. Peristalsis was absent. Ultrasound revealed presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity which on paracentesis was found to contain Gram positive cocci. Fluid amylase levels were high. On exploratory laparotomy, haemorrhagic oedematous pancreatitis was noticed. The patient expired on the 2nd post operative day.

  6. Primary Pancreatic Lymphomas

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    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs represent up to 30-40% of all NHL cases. The gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly involved extranodal site; accounting for about half of such cases [1]. Stomach and the small intestine constitute the most common gastrointestinal sites. Secondary invasion of the pancreas from contiguous, retroperitoneal lymph node disease is the prevalent mode of involvement. Secondary involvement of the pancreas from the duodenum or adjacent peripancreatic lymphadenopathy is well-known. Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL is an extremely rare disease [2]. PPL can present as an isolated mass mimicking pancreatic carcinoma. However, unlike carcinomas, PPL are potentially treatable [3].

  7. Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

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    Pathy Sushmita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

  8. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: Fact or fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future. PMID:25386069

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis characterized by predominant CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    She-Yu Li; Xiang-Yang Huang; Yong-Tao Chen; Yi Liu; Sha Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare form of pancreatitis characterized by prominent lymphocyte infiltration and pancreatic fibrosis resulting in organ dysfunction.The pathogenesis and pathology of AIP remain unknown. A 64-year-old Chinese man presented with symptoms and signs of bile duct obstruction diffuse enlargement of the head of pancreas, elevated IgG levels, and negative autoimmune antibody responses. A pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy was performed and a pancreatic tumor was suspected. However,periductal lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis were found in the head of pancreas and nearby organs instead of tumor cells. Four months after surgery, the patient was readmitted because of reoccurrence of severe jaundice and sustained abdominal distension. Prednisone 30 mg/d was administered orally as an AIP was suspected. One and a half months later, the symptoms of the patient disappeared, and globulin, aminotransferase and bilirubin levels decreased significantly. Over a 9-mo follow-up period, the dose of prednisone was gradually decreased to 10 mg/d and the patient remained in good condition. We further demonstrated dominant CD3+/CD8+ populations, CD20+ cells and a few CD4+ cells in the pancreatic parenchyma, duodenum and gallbladder wall by immunohistochemical assay. This AIP case presented with significant CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration in the pancreas and extra-pancreatic lesions, indicating that this cell population may be more important in mediating AIP pathogenesis than previously known and that AIP might be a poorly defined autoimmune disease with heterogeneous pathogenesis.

  10. MR imaging of pancreatic diseases

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    Ito, Katsuyoshi E-mail: itokatsu@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2001-05-01

    This article presents current MR imaging techniques for the pancreas, and review a spectrum of MR imaging features of various pancreatic diseases. These include: 1) congenital anomalies such as anomalous union of pancreatobiliary ducts, divisum, and annular pancreas, 2) inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic pancreatitis with complications, groove pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis, tumor-forming pancreatitis, 3) pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, islet cell tumors, and cystic neoplasms (microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic tumor). Particular attention is paid to technical advances in MR imaging of the pancreas such as fat-suppression, MR pancreatography (single- or multi-slice HASTE), and thin-section 3D multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic sequences. Imaging characteristics that may lead to a specific diagnosis or narrow the differential diagnosis are also discussed.

  11. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Filippo Antonini; Raffaele Pezzilli; Lucia Angelelli; Giampiero Macarri

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been rec-orded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) compared to the general population.Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced,in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic,suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD.Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD.

  12. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  13. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; PANG Lin-lin; YU Lei; YANG Hai-fan; LIU Guang-da; LI Hai-jiao

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the most common pancreatic neoplasm characterized by latentmorbidit, poor prognosis, high mortality rate and limited choice of treatment. Quite a lot studies focused on its pathogenesis, and showed molecular genetic alterations, which derived of genetic and environmental factors and played an important role in tumorigenesis. Recently, more and more findings laid particular emphasis on the changes of gene molecule and some were confirmed in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we made a review and summarized the arked molecular changes and signalings of the four pathways to understand their functions in Pancreatic carcinoma. The most important changes concentrate on K-RAS, p16 INK4α, P53 and SMAD4 gene, secondly, the changes of pl4ARF, TGF-β, LKB1 /STK11, BRCA2 and growth factor Hedgehog and Notch path way and Telomere also play a important role in pancreatic carcinoma. The vast majority (83%) of pancreatic carcinomas had a distinctive genetic fingerprint, comprising activation of the K-ras oncogene and inactivation of the p 16 gene, generally also accompanied by alterations in the p53 gene (in 76 % of the tumors). The activation of K-ras appears nearly to be a prerequisite for the development of pancreatic carcinoma. Also, the binary alteration of K-ras and p16 is an extremely uncommon combination among other human tumor types. This particular genetic imprint of pancreatic carcinomas could have diagnostic utility in the evaluation of patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin. The evaluation of genetic alterations as they naturally occur in humantumors allows the formulation of hypotheses concerning the biological processes that involve human tumongenesis. A central tenet of tumori genesis, that positive selection is exerted upon those tumor cells that alterrate-limiting regulatory pathways, implies that mutation of one gene abrogates the need for inactivation of another gene in the same tumor suppressive pathway. It

  14. A Proteomic Comparison of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Pancreatic Tissue from Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Chronic Pancreatitis, and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Joao A; Kadiyala, Vivek; Brizard, Scott; Banks, Peter A; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L

    2015-01-01

    Context Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a standard for specimen preservation, and as such FFPE tissue banks are an untapped resource of histologically-characterized specimens for retrospective biomarker investigation for pancreatic disease. Objectives We use liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare FFPE specimens from three different diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Design We investigated the proteomic profile of FFPE pancreatic tissue from 9 archived specimens that were histologically classified as: autoimmune pancreatitis (n=3), chronic pancreatitis (n=3), and pancreatic cancer (n=3), using LC-MS/MS. Setting This is a proteomic analysis experiment of FFPE pancreatic tissue in an academic center. Patients FFPE tissue specimens were provided by Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (Boston, MA, USA). Interventions FFPE tissue specimens were collected via routine surgical resection procedures. Main outcome measures We compared proteins identified from chronic pancreatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer FFPE pancreatic tissue. Results We identified 386 non-redundant proteins from 9 specimens. Following our filtering criteria, 73, 29, and 53 proteins were identified exclusively in autoimmune pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer specimens, respectively. Conclusions We report that differentially-expressed proteins can be identified among FFPE tissues specimens originating from individuals with different histological diagnoses. These proteins merit further confirmation with a greater number of specimens and orthogonal validation, such as immunohistochemistry. The mass spectrometry-based methodology used herein has the potential to enhance diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target discovery, further advancing pancreatic research. PMID:23846938

  15. Angiographic Features in Acute Pancreatitis: The Severity of Abdominal Vessel Ischemic Change Reflects the Severity of Acute Pancreatitis

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    Inoue K

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Assessment of tissue microcirculation is one of the important aspects of pathological evaluation in acute pancreatitis. Severe ischemic change sometimes leads to the development of organ dysfunction and/or infectious complications. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the angiographic features of acute pancreatitis and correlate them with the severity of the disease. DESIGN: Retrospective study. PATIENTS: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis who had undergone angiography were retrospectively investigated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Vascular findings and Ranson score. RESULTS: Ischemic changes were found in 18 patients (66.7%; 11 (40.7% were severe changes. Pseudoaneurysm, bleeding, and staining were seen in 4 (14.8%, 2 (7.4% and 5 (18.5% patients, respectively. The rate of severe ischemic changes was significantly correlated with the Ranson score (P=0.012. Conclusions Angiographic findings are useful for the evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis.

  16. Sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition provides opportunities for targeted therapy by sulforaphane in regulating pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal.

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    Mariana Rodova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway has been associated with cancer stem cells (CSC and implicated in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic CSCs are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew, and are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to current therapies. The lethality of these incurable, aggressive and invasive pancreatic tumors remains a daunting clinical challenge. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of Shh pathway in pancreatic cancer and to examine the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane (SFN, an active compound in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits self-renewal capacity of human pancreatic CSCs. Interestingly, we demonstrate here that Shh pathway is highly activated in pancreatic CSCs and plays important role in maintaining stemness by regulating the expression of stemness genes. Given the requirement for Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer, we investigated whether hedgehog blockade by SFN could target the stem cell population in pancreatic cancer. In an in vitro model, human pancreatic CSCs derived spheres were significantly inhibited on treatment with SFN, suggesting the clonogenic depletion of the CSCs. Interestingly, SFN inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli transcriptional activity. Interference of Shh-Gli signaling significantly blocked SFN-induced inhibitory effects demonstrating the requirement of an active pathway for the growth of pancreatic CSCs. SFN also inhibited downstream targets of Gli transcription by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors (Nanog and Oct-4 as well as PDGFRα and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, SFN induced apoptosis by inhibition of BCL-2 and activation of caspases. Our data reveal the essential role of Shh-Gli signaling in controlling the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs. We propose that pancreatic cancer preventative effects of SFN may result from inhibition of the Shh pathway

  17. Ipsilateral kidney sparing in treatment of pancreatic malignancies using volumetric-modulated arc therapy avoidance sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Raymond W., E-mail: rwc3b@alumni.virginia.edu; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2015-10-01

    Recent research has shown treating pancreatic cancer with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to be superior to either intensity-modulated radiation therapy or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), with respect to reducing normal tissue toxicity, monitor units, and treatment time. Furthermore, using avoidance sectors with RapidArc planning can further reduce normal tissue dose while maintaining target conformity. This study looks at the methods in reducing dose to the ipsilateral kidney, in pancreatic head cases, while observing dose received by other critical organs using avoidance sectors. Overall, 10 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient had preoperative/unresectable pancreatic tumor and were selected based on the location of the right kidney being situated within the traditional 3D-CRT treatment field. The target planning target volume (286.97 ± 85.17 cm{sup 3}) was prescribed to 50.4 Gy using avoidance sectors of 30°, 40°, and 50° and then compared with VMAT as well as 3D-CRT. Analysis of the data shows that the mean dose to the right kidney was reduced by 11.6%, 15.5%, and 21.9% for avoidance angles of 30°, 40°, and 50°, respectively, over VMAT. The mean dose to the total kidney also decreased by 6.5%, 8.5%, and 11.0% for the same increasing angles. Spinal cord maximum dose, however, increased as a function of angle by 3.7%, 4.8%, and 6.1% compared with VMAT. Employing avoidance sector angles as a complement to VMAT planning can significantly reduce high dose to the ipsilateral kidney while not greatly overdosing other critical organs.

  18. Ipsilateral kidney sparing in treatment of pancreatic malignancies using volumetric-modulated arc therapy avoidance sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond W; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has shown treating pancreatic cancer with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to be superior to either intensity-modulated radiation therapy or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), with respect to reducing normal tissue toxicity, monitor units, and treatment time. Furthermore, using avoidance sectors with RapidArc planning can further reduce normal tissue dose while maintaining target conformity. This study looks at the methods in reducing dose to the ipsilateral kidney, in pancreatic head cases, while observing dose received by other critical organs using avoidance sectors. Overall, 10 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient had preoperative/unresectable pancreatic tumor and were selected based on the location of the right kidney being situated within the traditional 3D-CRT treatment field. The target planning target volume (286.97 ± 85.17 cm(3)) was prescribed to 50.4 Gy using avoidance sectors of 30°, 40°, and 50° and then compared with VMAT as well as 3D-CRT. Analysis of the data shows that the mean dose to the right kidney was reduced by 11.6%, 15.5%, and 21.9% for avoidance angles of 30°, 40°, and 50°, respectively, over VMAT. The mean dose to the total kidney also decreased by 6.5%, 8.5%, and 11.0% for the same increasing angles. Spinal cord maximum dose, however, increased as a function of angle by 3.7%, 4.8%, and 6.1% compared with VMAT. Employing avoidance sector angles as a complement to VMAT planning can significantly reduce high dose to the ipsilateral kidney while not greatly overdosing other critical organs.

  19. HEPATOBILIARY ASCARIASIS COMPLICATED BY PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Muhammad; Sheikh, Ali Sibtain Farooq; Khan, Asim; Mustafa, Saqib; Shah, Imran Ali; Hameed, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the commonest organism causing soil-transmitted helminth infection. It is particularly common in poor sanitary conditions. Nevertheless, involvement of the gallbladder by Ascaris is a rare entity. A lady presented to us with long-standing history of vague abdominal symptoms suggesting dyspepsia. Ultrasound showed a tube like structure invading the biliary channels. Serum amylase was elevated and the patient was managed conservatively, as for acute pancreatitis. She improved clinically, but subsequent imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed worm in the gallbladder. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was done and Ascaris lumbricoides was removed. Ascaris infestation is an important differential diagnosis of patients with upper abdominal symptoms and screening with stool examination and ultrasound is warranted in high-risk population.

  20. Management of Severe Pancreatic Fistula After Pancreatoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, F Jasmijn; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Besselink, Marc G; Batenburg, Marilot C T; Slooff, Robbert A E; Boerma, Djamila; Busch, Olivier R; Coene, Peter P L O; van Dam, Ronald M; van Dijk, David P J; van Eijck, Casper H J; Festen, Sebastiaan; van der Harst, Erwin; de Hingh, Ignace H J T; de Jong, Koert P; Tol, Johanna A M G; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula is a potentially life-threatening complication after pancreatoduodenectomy. Evidence for best management is lacking. To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients undergoing catheter drainage compared with relaparotomy as primary treatment for pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy. A multicenter, retrospective, propensity-matched cohort study was conducted in 9 centers of the Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group from January 1, 2005, to September 30, 2013. From a cohort of 2196 consecutive patients who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy, 309 patients with severe pancreatic fistula were included. Propensity score matching (based on sex, age, comorbidity, disease severity, and previous reinterventions) was used to minimize selection bias. Data analysis was performed from January to July 2016. First intervention for pancreatic fistula: catheter drainage or relaparotomy. Primary end point was in-hospital mortality; secondary end points included new-onset organ failure. Of the 309 patients included in the analysis, 209 (67.6%) were men, and mean (SD) age was 64.6 (10.1) years. Overall in-hospital mortality was 17.8% (55 patients): 227 patients (73.5%) underwent primary catheter drainage and 82 patients (26.5%) underwent primary relaparotomy. Primary catheter drainage was successful (ie, survival without relaparotomy) in 175 patients (77.1%). With propensity score matching, 64 patients undergoing primary relaparotomy were matched to 64 patients undergoing primary catheter drainage. Mortality was lower after catheter drainage (14.1% vs 35.9%; P = .007; risk ratio, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.20-0.76). The rate of new-onset single-organ failure (4.7% vs 20.3%; P = .007; risk ratio, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.03-0.60) and new-onset multiple-organ failure (15.6% vs 39.1%; P = .008; risk ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.20-0.77) were also lower after primary catheter drainage. In this propensity-matched cohort, catheter drainage as first intervention for severe

  1. Pancreatic plasmacytomas in a patient with multiple myeloma: CT and ultrasound findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, M C; Kalbhen, C L; Posniak, H V

    1993-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are an unusual manifestation of multiple myeloma. They occur most frequently in tissues or organs rich in reticulo-endothelial cells. Pancreatic plasmacytomas are rare, with only a few case reports in the literature. We present the ultrasound (US) and computed tomographic (CT) findings of two pancreatic plasmacytomas in a patient with multiple myeloma.

  2. Predictors of successful non-operative management of grade III & IV blunt pancreatic trauma

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    Suman B Koganti

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Non-operative measures should be attempted in a select group of grade III&IV blunt pancreatic trauma. In hemodynamically stable patients with a controlled leak walled off as a pseudocyst without associated organ injuries and pancreatic necrosis, NOM has a higher success rate.

  3. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data.

  4. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes.

  5. Pancreatitis del surco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Araújo-Fernández

    2014-03-01

    It is a rare disease, but we must keep it in mind when we make the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain of unknown origin. It is very important to distinguish this pathology from a pancreatic head carcinoma, as both treatments and prognosis differ greatly, so we believe important communication of a new case.

  6. Autoimmune Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien-Fu Lin

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: AIP should be a differential diagnosis in distal CBD stricture and pancreatic head mass when the patient has: (1 diffuse or long segmental enlargement of the pancreas without peripancreatic fat infiltration, with multiple narrowing of the MPD without much upstream dilatation, or narrowing of the MPD not corresponding to the region of CBD stricture; and (2 abnormal immunoserologic tests.

  7. Hepato-pancreatic ascariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Uptal; Mukherjee, M; Das, S; Kumar, Rupesh

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal infestation of humans by Ascaris lumbricoides is endemic in India. The usual habitat of the adult worm is the jejunum. Hepatopancreatic ascariasis (HPA) is designated to a rare group of diseases caused by lodgement of adult worms in the bile or pancreatic ducts. This short report illustrates four rare cases of patients with HPA.

  8. Study on chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer using MRS and pancreatic juice samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Chao Ma; Zhuan Liao; Bing Tian; Jian-Ping Lu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the markers of pancreatic diseases and provide basic data and experimental methods for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. METHODS: There were 15 patients in the present study, among whom 10 had pancreatic cancer and 5, chronic pancreatitis. In all patients, pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis was located on the head of the p-a-ncreas. Pathology data of all pa tients was confirmed by biopsy and surgery. Among the 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 3 people had a medical history of longterm alcohol consumption. Of 5 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 4 men suffered from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic juice samples were obtained from patients by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopyn was performed on an 11.7-T scanner (Bruker DRX-500) using Call-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. The parameters were as follows: spectral width, 15 KHz; time domain, 64 K; number of scans, 512; and acquisition time, 2.128 s. RESULTS: The main component of pancreatic juice included leucine, iso-leucine, valine, lactate, alanine, acetate, aspartate, lysine, glycine, threonine, tyrosine, histidine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine. On performing 1D 1H and 2D total correlation spectroscopy, we found a triplet peak at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm, which only appeared in the spectra of pancreatic juice obtained from patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. This triplet peak was considered the resonance of the methyl of ethoxy group, which may be associated with the metabolism of alcohol in the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The triplet peak, at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm is likely to be the characteristic metabolite of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Jun Wang; Chun-Fang Gao; Dong Wei; Cun Wang; Si-Qin Ding

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome.

  10. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

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    Hill, M.C. (Univ. of Miami, FL); Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  12. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Raheel Altaf; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Frandsen, Thomas Leth

    2012-01-01

    , allergic reactions, thrombotic events, hepatotoxicity and hyperlipidaemia. Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common reasons for stopping treatment with l-asparaginase. Short-term complications of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis include development of pseudocysts and pancreatic necrosis. Long...

  13. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-18

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  14. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mika Hori; Michihiro Mutoh; Toshio Imai; Hitoshi Nakagama; Mami Takahashi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mell...

  15. Immune-Manipulation of the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis. What Can Be Expected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinaldesi R

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis still has a high mortality rate and multiple organ failure is considered to be a severe complication of the disease. Activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes have an important role in the development of multiple organ failure which may result from acute pancreatitis and they are an important pathogenetic factor in the severity of this disease. Therefore, a logical therapeutic approach is to limit the organ damage by selective suppression of inflammatory mediators involved in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and protect against systemic complication. In this paper, we review the recent literature data on the possible manipulation of the immune response in acute pancreatitis.

  16. Pancreatic resections for solid or cystic pancreatic masses in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, C O; Guérin, F; Goldzmidt, D; Fouquet, V; Franchi-Abella, S; Fabre, M; Branchereau, S; Martelli, H; Gauthier, F

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the diagnosis and management of solid pancreatic neoplasm in children and the type of surgical treatment, focusing on short- and long-term outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of all children who had undergone pancreatic resection for suspicion of pancreatic tumor in Kremlin Bicêtre Hospital, Paris, between 1986 and 2008. We studied the symptoms at diagnosis, the type of surgery, and the short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. Of 18 patients identified, there were 7 pseudopapillary tumors, 3 neuroblastomas, 2 rhabdomyosarcomas, 1 acinar cell carcinoma, 1 endocrine cell carcinoma, 1 renal angiomyolipoma, and 3 pancreatic cysts. Symptoms at diagnosis were abdominal trauma, abdominal mass, and jaundice. Operative procedures were duodenopancreatectomy (11), mid-pancreatic resections (2), splenopancreatectomy (2), distal pancreatectomy (1), and tumorectomy (2). There were no deaths related to surgery. The postoperative morbidity rate was 45%, including 2 cases of fistula (11%) occurring after a mid-pancreatic resection and a pancreaticoduodenectomy. The median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 2-11). There was no diabetes mellitus, but there was 1 case of fat diet intolerance requiring pancreatic enzyme substitution. All of the children had a growth curve within normal limits. In this experience, pancreatic resections have proven to be a safe and efficient procedure, with low long-term morbidity, for the treatment of tumoral and selected nontumoral pancreatic masses.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru B.H. Ko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is a progressive inflammatory disease in which the pancreatic secretory parenchyma is destroyed and replaced by fibrosis. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stone(s is important for the diagnosis of CP; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in CP were left largely unknown. CFTR is a chloride channel expressed in the apical plasma membrane of pancreatic duct cells and plays a central role in HCO3- secretion. In previous studies, we have found that CFTR is largely mislocalized to the cytoplasm of pancreatic duct cells in all forms of CP and corticosteroids normalizes the localization of CFTR to the proper apical membrane at least in autoimmune pancreatitis. From these observations, we could conclude that the mislocalization of CFTR is a cause of protein plug formation in CP, subsequently resulting in pancreatic stone formation.Considering our observation that the mislocalization of CFTR also occurs in alcoholic or idiopathic CP, it is very likely that these pathological conditions can also be treated by corticosteroids, thereby preventing pancreatic stone formation in these patients. Further studies are definitely required to clarify these fundamental issues.

  18. Role of bacterial infections in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Dominique S.

    2013-01-01

    Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including tobacco smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Inflammation plays a key role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, but it is unclear what causes local inflammation, other than pancreatitis. Epidemiological data suggest that Helicobacter pylori may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and more recently, data suggest that periodontal disease, and Porp...

  19. Genetically Determined Chronic Pancreatitis but not Alcoholic Pancreatitis Is a Strong Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Shallu; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Kabra, Madhulika; Chattopadhyay, Tushar Kanti; Joshi, Yogendra Kumar; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2016-11-01

    To study if chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Through a cohort and a case-control study design, CP and other important risk factors including smoking, diabetes, alcohol, obesity, and genetic mutations were studied for their association with pancreatic cancer. In the cohort study, 402 patients with CP were included. During 3967.74 person-years of exposure, 5 of the 402 patients (4 idiopathic CP, 1 hereditary CP) developed pancreatic cancer after 16.60 ± 3.51 years of CP. The standardized incidence ratio was 121. In the case-control study, 249 pancreatic cancer patients and 1000 healthy controls were included. Of the 249 patients with pancreatic cancer, 24 had underlying idiopathic CP, and none had alcoholic pancreatitis. SPINK1 gene mutation was present in 16 of 26 patients with idiopathic CP who had pancreatic cancer. Multivariable analysis showed CP (odds ratio [OR], 97.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.69-751.36), diabetes (>4 years duration) (OR, 3.05; 95% CI, 1.79-5.18), smoking (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.38-2.69) as significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The population attributable risk was 9.41, 9.06, and 9.50 for diabetes, CP, and smoking, respectively. Genetically determined CP but not alcoholic CP is a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer.

  20. Do We Really Need a New Category of Severity for Patients with Acute Pancreatitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years several international surveys have confirmed that approximately 15-20% of patients suffering from acute pancreatitis have a severe outcome [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. The most widely used system for defining an episode of acute pancreatitis as severe derives from the Symposium on classifying acute pancreatitis held in Atlanta, GA, U.S.A. in 1992 [9]. This innovative classification system pays specific attention to the morphological data, the complications of acute pancreatitis and the terminology. In a short period of time, the Atlanta criteria enjoyed worldwide diffusion and wide international agreement. Its clinical and scientific relevance is witnessed by the fact that, since 1994, virtually every paper published in any journal having a high impact factor and which deals with acute pancreatitis from a clinical point of view refers to the Atlanta criteria for patient stratification. Acute pancreatitis is categorized as either “mild” or “severe”, severe being defined as the presence of any one of the following: a failure of one or more organ systems (respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal or circulatory at any time during the course of the disease; b occurrence of one or more local complications (pancreatic necrosis, pseudocyst or abscess. In short, acute pancreatitis is classified as severe in the presence of any organ failure and/or the presence of any local complication. As a consequence, all patients having any type of organ dysfunction after a single examination were described as severe acute pancreatitis without any distinction between minimal or multi-organ failure, and transient or persistent organ dysfunction. At the same time, all patients showing evidence of pancreatic necrosis were described as severe, independently of the entity of the necrotic process.

  1. Carbofuran-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizos E

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Carbamate insecticides are widely used in commercial agriculture and home gardening. A serious side effect of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis. CASE REPORT: A 36-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital with cholinergic crisis and pancreatitis soon after the ingestion of a carbamate insecticide (carbofuran. An abdominal CT scan disclosed pancreatic necrosis with intrapancreatic fluid collection, consistent with the development of a pancreatic pseudocyst in a subsequent CT scan. No predisposing factor for pancreatitis was evident. Pseudocholinesterase levels returned to normal 7 days later and the patient was discharged in good physical condition one month after admission. DISCUSSION: Although acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after organophosphate intoxication, it is quite rare after carbamate ingestion and has not been previously reported after carbofuran intoxication.

  2. Diagnostic criteria for autoimmune chronic pancreatitis revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu-Pyo Kim; Myung-Hwan Kim; Jong Cheol Kim; Sang Soo Lee; Dong Wan Seo; Sung Koo Lee

    2006-01-01

    Autoimmune chronic pancreatitis (AIP) is increasingly being recognized worldwidely, as knowledge of this entity builds up. Above all, AIP is a very attractive disease to clinicians in terms of its dramatic response to the oral steroid therapy in contrast to ordinary chronic pancreatitis. Although many characteristic findings of AIP have been described, definite diagnostic criteria have not been fully established. In the year 2002, the Japan Pancreas Society published the diagnostic criteria of AIP and many clinicians around the world use these criteria for the diagnosis of AIP. The diagnostic criteria proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society, however, are not completely satisfactory and some groups use their own criteria in reporting AIP. This review discusses several potential limitations of current diagnostic criteria for this increasingly recognized condition. The manuscript is organized to emphasize the need for convening a consensus to develop improved diagnostic criteria.

  3. CT findings of pancreatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi Sook; Park, In Sook; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jong Jin [College of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    CT was found to be a reliable, often specific, and noninvasive method for detecting pancreatic diseases. In a study of pancreatic lesions, 37 cases having satisfactory operative and histological proofs were analyzed by CT at PMC from Jan. 1986 to Oct. 1987. The results were as following: 1. Male:female is 26:11. 2. The incidence of pancreatic disease were as follows: 1) Pancreatic cancer:21 cases (56%) a.Head:12 cases b.Body:4 cases c.Tail:1 case d.Body and tail:1 case e.Uncinate process:2 cases f.Entire pancreas: 1 case 2) Acute pancreatitis: 6 cases (16%) 3) Chronic pancreatitis:5 cases (14%) 3. The characteristic CT findings: 1) 100% of pancreatic head cancer showed focal mass or alteration of pancreatic head contour and biliary tree dilatation, and 33% (7/12) fat line obliteration. 2) All of other pancreatic cancer except head appeared as focal mass or contour alteration and fat line obliteration. 3) Total 6 cases of acute pancreatitis showed that 5 cases diffuse enlargement of pancreas, 3 fluid collection (2 cases:left anterior pararenal and posterior pararenal space and lesser sac, 1 case:only pancreas body) and 1 case abscess formation. 4) Total 5 cases of chronic pancreatitis revealed diffuse enlargement 2 cases and atrophy 1 case, pancreatic ductal dilatation 3 cases, calcification 2 cases, and biliary tree dilatation with CBD tapering appearance 1 case. 5) All cases of pseudocysts were well marginated cystic lesions that located at head in 3 cases and tail 3 cases, and 4 cases were well defined pure cystic masses but 1 case was well capsulated cyst with multiple internal septation.

  4. Protective effects of Ligustrazine, Kakonein and Panax Notoginsenoside on the small intestine and immune organs of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Jun Jiang; Qi-Hui Cheng; QianYe; Wei-Juan Li; Hua Zhu; Jun-Ya Shen

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severeacutepancreatitis(SAP)ischaracterized by fatal pathogenic conditions and a high mortality. It is important to study SAP complicated with multiple organ injury. In this study we compared the protective effects of three traditional Chinese medicines (Ligustrazine, Kakonein and Panax Notoginsenoside) on the small intestine and immune organs (thymus, spleen and lymph nodes) of rats with SAP and explored their mechanism of action. METHODS: One hundred forty-four rats with SAP were randomly divided into model control, Ligustrazine-treated, Kakonein-treated, and Panax Notoginsenoside-treated groups (n=36 per group). Another 36 normal rats comprised the sham-operated group. According to the different time points after operation, the experimental rats in each group were subdivided into 3-, 6- and 12-hour subgroups (n=12). At various time points after operation, the mortality rate of rats and pathological changes in the small intestine and immune organs were recorded and the serum amylase levels were measured. RESULTS: Compared to the model control groups, the mortality rates in all treated groups declined and the pathological changes in the small intestine and immune tissues were relieved to different degrees. The serum amylase levels in the three treated groups were significantly lower than those in the model control group at 12 hours. The pathological severity scores for the small intestinal mucosa, thymus and spleen (at 3 and 12 hours) in the Ligustrazine-treated group, for the thymus (at 3 and 12 hours) and spleen (at 3 and 6 hours) in the Kakonein-treated group, and for the thymus (at 3 hours) and spleen (at 3 hours) in the Panax Notoginsenoside-treated group were significantly lower than those in the model control group. The pathological severity scores of the small intestinal mucosa (at 6 and 12 hours) and thymus (at 6 hours) in the Ligustrazine-treated group were significantly lower than those in the Kakonein- and Panax Notoginsenoside

  5. Maintaining Web Cache Coherency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Document coherency is a challenging problem for Web caching. Once the documents are cached throughout the Internet, it is often difficult to keep them coherent with the origin document without generating a new traffic that could increase the traffic on the international backbone and overload the popular servers. Several solutions have been proposed to solve this problem, among them two categories have been widely discussed: the strong document coherency and the weak document coherency. The cost and the efficiency of the two categories are still a controversial issue, while in some studies the strong coherency is far too expensive to be used in the Web context, in other studies it could be maintained at a low cost. The accuracy of these analysis is depending very much on how the document updating process is approximated. In this study, we compare some of the coherence methods proposed for Web caching. Among other points, we study the side effects of these methods on the Internet traffic. The ultimate goal is to study the cache behavior under several conditions, which will cover some of the factors that play an important role in the Web cache performance evaluation and quantify their impact on the simulation accuracy. The results presented in this study show indeed some differences in the outcome of the simulation of a Web cache depending on the workload being used, and the probability distribution used to approximate updates on the cached documents. Each experiment shows two case studies that outline the impact of the considered parameter on the performance of the cache.

  6. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; Whitcomb, David C.; Gleeson, Ferga C; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  7. Pharmacological prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Hemant; Thuluvath, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of clinically significant pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) ranges from 1-13.5%. It is more common after therapeutic procedures such as sphincterotomy or balloon dilatation of the sphincter, and diagnostic procedures such as biliary or pancreatic manometry. The severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis may vary from very mild to extremely severe disease with multiple organ failure and fatal outcome. Several factors including papillary oedema, injection of hyperosmolar contrast-material, introduction of previously activated enzymes during repeated cannulation, bacterial contamination and thermal injury from endoscopic sphincterotomy have been implicated as triggering factors that initiate the sequential cascade of pancreatic autodigestion and release of proinflammatory cytokines leading to acute pancreatitis. Recovery from post-ERCP pancreatitis is usually rapid when the injury is confined to the pancreas. However, systemic production of inflammatory mediators may lead to the development of more serious manifestations including multiorgan failure.A wide range of pharmacological agents has been tested in experimental and clinical trials, but the results have been largely disappointing. Several drugs are discussed in this review, but only somatostatin and gabexate (gabexate mesilate) have consistently shown a moderate beneficial effect. In clinical trials, both gabexate and somatostatin appear equally effective in reducing the incidence of pancreatitis by two-thirds compared with controls. However, both drugs need to be given by continuous infusion for about 12 hours and this makes them less cost-effective than conventional treatment. One potential strategy is to reserve these drugs for high-risk patients undergoing ERCP. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results with nitroglycerin, antibacterials and heparin. However, these observations need to be corroborated in a rigorous fashion in large, randomised, double

  8. An overview of hereditary pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis. The prevalence was evaluated to 0.3/100000 in Western Countries. Genetic disorders are due to mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). Since 1996, more than 30 mutations were found. The three more common mutations are R122H, N29I and A16V. First symptoms begin since childhood, mainly before 10 years old. Main symptoms are pancreatic pain and acute pancreatitis (>70%). CP morphological changes as pancreatic calcifications are diagnosed at a median age of 22-25 years. Exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency occurred in 34% and 26% at a median age of 29 and 38 years. No clinical differences exist according to the mutation type. No excess of mortality in hereditary pancreatitis population compared to general population was found, despite a real risk of cancer. The cumulative risks of pancreatic cancer at 50, 60 and, 75 years are 10%, 18.7% and, 53.5%, respectively. The relative risk of cancer increases in smokers and is evaluated to 8.55. Hereditary pancreatitis diagnosis permits to propose an adapted management in expert centres.

  9. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of the disease, the pharmacological treatment of pain, and knowledge of the natural history of autoimmune pancreatitis. New evidence supports the relatively low prevalence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, and the role of tobacco in triggering the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis is better understood. Some studies have identified certain factors that are associated with having a positive genetic test in adults with chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, which should help to select those patients who should undergo genetic studies. Antioxidant therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Finally, the development of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a very common finding during the long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Smoking also seems to play a role in this type of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  12. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. A Study on the Dietary Intake and the Nutritional Status among the Pancreatic Cancer Surgical Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jimin; Park, Joon Seong; Yoon, Dong Sup; Kim, Woo Jeong; Chung, Hae-Yun; Lee, Song Mi; Chang, Namsoo

    2016-01-01

    The adequate dietary intake is important to maintain the nutritional status of the patients after pancreatic cancer surgery. This prospective study was designed to investigate the dietary intake and the nutritional status of the patients who had pancreatic cancer surgery. Thirty-one patients (15 men, 16 women) were enrolled and measured body weight, body mass index (BMI), nutritional risk index (NRI), and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST). Actual oral intake with nutritional impact...

  14. Simulating pancreatic neuroplasticity: in vitro dual-neuron plasticity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Tieftrunk, Elke; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2014-04-14

    Neuroplasticity is an inherent feature of the enteric nervous system and gastrointestinal (GI) innervation under pathological conditions. However, the pathophysiological role of neuroplasticity in GI disorders remains unknown. Novel experimental models which allow simulation and modulation of GI neuroplasticity may enable enhanced appreciation of the contribution of neuroplasticity in particular GI diseases such as pancreatic cancer (PCa) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Here, we present a protocol for simulation of pancreatic neuroplasticity under in vitro conditions using newborn rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and myenteric plexus (MP) neurons. This dual-neuron approach not only permits monitoring of both organ-intrinsic and -extrinsic neuroplasticity, but also represents a valuable tool to assess neuronal and glial morphology and electrophysiology. Moreover, it allows functional modulation of supplied microenvironmental contents for studying their impact on neuroplasticity. Once established, the present neuroplasticity assay bears the potential of being applicable to the study of neuroplasticity in any GI organ.

  15. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery.

  16. Pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in multidetector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hua-dan; LIU Wei; XIAO Yu; SUN Hao; WANG Xuan; LEI Jing; JIN Zheng-yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pictorial review aimed to summarize the most possible differential diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor (PICT).Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English. And all clinical images in this review were from Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.Study selection Cases of pancreatic cystadenoma, solid pseudo-papillary tumor of the pancreas, pancreatic metastasis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, para-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Castleman disease, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, splenic artery aneurysm and accessory spleen were selected in this pictorial review for differential diagnosis of PICT.Results Careful analysis of imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations may allow a more specific diagnosis. It is also important that the radiologist is familiar with the anatomic variants and disease entities which mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in order to avoid an improper treatment protocol.Conclusions Many congenital anatomic variants or other pancreatic and peri-pancreatic diseases may mimic MDCT appearance of pancreatic islet cell tumor. Radiological, clinical and pathological characteristics should be considered for the final diagnosis.

  17. Carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world and the sixth in Europe. Pancreatic cancer is more frequent in males than females. Worldwide, following diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, <2% of patients survive for 5 years, 8% survive for 2 years and <50% survive for only approx. 3 months. The biggest risk factor in pancreatic cancer is age, with a peak of morbidity at 65 years. Difficulty in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer causes a delay in its detection. It is one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose and therefore to treat successfully. Additional detection of carbohydrate markers may offer a better diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate markers of cancer may be produced by the cancer itself or by the body in response to cancer, whose presence in body fluids suggests the presence and growth of the cancer. The most widely used, and best-recognized, carbohydrate marker of pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9 [CA (carbohydrate antigen) 19-9]. However, the relatively non-specific nature of CA 19-9 limits its routine use in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but it may be useful in monitoring treatment of pancreatic cancer (e.g. the effectiveness of chemotherapy), as a complement to other diagnostic methods. Some other carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer may be considered, such as CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), CA 50 and CA 242, and the mucins MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC, but enzymes involved in the processing of glycoconjugates could also be involved. Our preliminary research shows that the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases, including HEX (N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase), GAL (β-D-galactosidase), FUC (α-L-fucosidase) and MAN (α-D-mannosidase), in serum and urine may be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Fascin promotes the motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Feng Xu; Shuang-Ni Yu; Zhao-Hui Lu; Jian-Ping Liu; Jie Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of actin-bundling protein, fascin during the progression of pancreatic cancer. METHODS: The plasmid expressing human fascin-1 was stably transfected into the pancreatic cancer cell line MIA PaCa-2. The proliferation, cell cycle, motility, scattering, invasiveness and organization of the actin filament system in fascin-transfected MIA PaCa-2 cells and control non-transfected cells were determined. RESULTS: Heterogeneous overexpression of fascin markedly enhanced the motility, scattering, and invasiveness of MIA PaCa-2 cells. However, overexpression of fascin had minimal effect on MIA PaCa-2 cell proliferation and cell cycle. In addition, cell morphology and organization of the actin filament system were distinctly altered in fascin overexpressed cells. When transplanted into BALB/c-nu mice, fascin-transfected pancreatic cancer cells developed solid tumors at a slightly slower rate, but these tumors displayed more aggressive behavior in comparison with control tumors. CONCLUSION: Fascin promotes pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion and scattering, thus contributes to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells.

  19. Maintaining strategic momentum : The CEO's agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. Maljers (Floris); C.W.F. Baden-Fuller (Charles); F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe question of how the CEO of a large complex organization maintain strategic momentum is addressed. This represents a great challenge when there are no obvious external threats, and no obvious reasons for having a concerted action. The inherent tensions which exist between stability an

  20. Modified bonded bridge space maintainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegeois, F; Limme, M

    1999-01-01

    The premature loss of primary teeth can create the need for space maintenance and restoration of function. This article presents a fixed bonded space maintainer, which allows space to be maintained with economy of dental tissues.

  1. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Hori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, which are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, whether fatty infiltration is a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer has not been established. Recent clinical studies show there is a positive correlation between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas. Animal experimental studies also show an association between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Syrian golden hamsters, which are sensitive to chemical carcinogens in the pancreas, develop fatty infiltration of the pancreas with age. The combination of a high-fat diet and a chemical carcinogen that induces a K-ras mutation increases the severity of fatty infiltration of the pancreas. Thus, fatty infiltration of the pancreas is suggested to promote pancreatic carcinogenesis via a K-ras activating mutation. It is assumed that increased expression of adipokines and of inflammatory and proliferation-associated factors elicited by fatty infiltration of the pancreas may contribute to pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to suppression of Ras activation, methods to modulate fatty infiltration in the pancreas can be considered as a strategy for preventing pancreatic cancer.

  2. Groove pancreatitis: A rare form of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharivi Jani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple′s procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction

  3. Acute pancreatitis in patients with pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaojun; Tian, Bole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare manifestation of pancreatic cancer (PC). The relationship between AP and PC remains less distinct. From January 2009 to November 2015, 47consecutive patients with PC who presented with AP were reviewed for this study. Clinical features, clinicopathologic variables, postoperative complications, and follow-up evaluations of patients were documented in detail from our database. In order to identify cutoff threshold time for surgery, receiver operating curve (ROC) was built according to patients with or without postoperative complications. Cumulative rate of survival was calculated by using the Kaplan–Meier method. The study was conducted in accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the guidelines of West China Hospital. This study included 35 men (74.5%) and 12 women (25.5%) (mean age: 52 years), with a median follow-up of 40 months. AP was clinically mild in 45 (95.7%) and severe in 2 (4.3%). The diagnosis of PC was delayed by 2 to 660 days (median 101 days). Thirty-nine (83.0%) cases underwent surgery. Eight (17.0%) cases performed biopsies only. Of 39 patients, radical surgery was performed in 32 (82.1%) cases and palliative in 7 (19.9%) cases. Two (8.0%) patients were needed for vascular resection and reconstruction. Postoperative complications occurred in 12 (30.8%) patients. About 24.5 days was the best cutoff point, with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.727 (P = 0.025, 95% confidence interval: 0.555–0.8999). The survival rate of patients at 1 year was 23.4%. The median survival in patients with vascular resection and reconstruction was 18 months, compared with 10 months in patients without vascular resection (P = 0.042). For the primary stage (T), Tix was identified in 3 patients, the survival of whom were 5, 28, 50 months, respectively. And 2 of them were still alive at the follow-up period. The severity of AP was mainly mild. Surgical intervention after 24.5 days may benefit for

  4. Assessing optimal software architecture maintainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Jan; Bengtsson, P.O.; Smedinga, Rein; Sousa, P; Ebert, J

    2000-01-01

    Over the last decade, several authors have studied the maintainability of software architectures. In particular, the assessment of maintainability has received attention. However, even when one has a quantitative assessment of the maintainability of a software architecture, one still does not have

  5. Assessing optimal software architecture maintainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Jan; Bengtsson, P.O.; Smedinga, Rein; Sousa, P; Ebert, J

    2000-01-01

    Over the last decade, several authors have studied the maintainability of software architectures. In particular, the assessment of maintainability has received attention. However, even when one has a quantitative assessment of the maintainability of a software architecture, one still does not have a

  6. Management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera, Oliver; Ghanem, Ismael; Nasimi, Rula; Prieto, Isabel; Koren, Laura; Feliu, Jaime

    2016-01-14

    Currently, pancreatic adenocarcinoma mainly occurs after 60 years of age, and its prognosis remains poor despite modest improvements in recent decades. The aging of the population will result in a rise in the incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma within the next years. Thus, the management of pancreatic cancer in the elderly population is gaining increasing relevance. Older cancer patients represent a heterogeneous group with different biological, functional and psychosocial characteristics that can modify the usual management of this disease, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, polypharmacy, performance status, comorbidities and organ dysfunction. However, the biological age, not the chronological age, of the patient should be the limiting factor in determining the most appropriate treatment for these patients. Unfortunately, despite the increased incidence of this pathology in older patients, there is an underrepresentation of these patients in clinical trials, and the management of older patients is thus determined by extrapolation from the results of studies performed in younger patients. In this review, the special characteristics of the elderly, the multidisciplinary management of localized and advanced ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and the most recent advances in the management of this condition will be discussed, focusing on surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and palliative care.

  7. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2016-01-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature.

  8. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debra Ouyang; Deepti Dhall; Run Yu

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults,which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery.α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia.Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge.Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels,and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  9. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...

  10. Pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Debra; Dhall, Deepti; Yu, Run

    2011-01-01

    Pathologic hyperplasia of various pancreatic endocrine cells is rare but has been long known. β cell hyperplasia contributes to persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, which is commonly caused by mutations in the islet ATP-sensitive potassium channel, and to non-insulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia in adults, which may or may not be associated with bariatric surgery. α cell hyperplasia may cause glucagonoma syndrome or induce pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. An inactivating mutation of the glucagon receptor causes α cell hyperplasia and asymptomatic hyperglucagonemia. Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia has been described without a clearly-characterized clinical syndrome and hyperplasia of other endocrine cells inside the pancreas has not been reported to our knowledge. Based on morphological evidence, the main pathogenetic mechanism for pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia is increased endocrine cell neogenesis from exocrine ductal epithelium. Pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia should be considered in the diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia, elevated islet hormone levels, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Further studies of pathologic pancreatic endocrine cell hyperplasia will likely yield insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:21245985

  11. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology : changing "landscape"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Hackeng, Wenzel M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Hruban, Ralph H; Wood, Laura D

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improv

  12. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-11-23

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  15. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  16. Serotonin, calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlstrøm, Kirsten Lykke; Novovic, Srdan; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate plasma levels of serotonin, calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the course of acute pancreatitis (AP) taking organ failure, etiology and severity into consideration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty consecutive patients with alco......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate plasma levels of serotonin, calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the course of acute pancreatitis (AP) taking organ failure, etiology and severity into consideration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty consecutive patients...... dysfunction. We hypothesize that serotonin plays a pathogenic role in the compromised pancreatic microcirculation, and calcitonin a role as a biomarker of severity in AP....

  17. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...... food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids...

  18. [Clinical study on the relationship between pancreatic fistula and the degree of pancreatic fibrosis after pancreatic and duodenal resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M W; Deng, Y; Huang, T; Zhang, L D

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To explore the risk factors of pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy and its relationship with pancreatic fibrosis. Methods: Retrospective analysis was made including 408 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy from January 2013 to December 2015 in Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery of the First Affiliated Hospital of Third Military Medical University. There were 274 males and females, aging from 14 to 82 years with an average age of 54.6 years. Postoperative pathological diagnosis: 285 cases with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, 81 cases with gastrointestinal tumors, 13 cases with neuroendocrine tumors, 16 cases with inflammatory changes, 8 cases with pancreatic papillary tumors, 4 cases with serous cystadenoma, 1 case with retroperitoneal liposarcoma.Univariate analysis using pearson's χ(2) test, multivariate analysis using binary Logistic regression analysis, correlation analysis using Spearman rank correlation analysis and the predictive value of pancreatic fibrosis in pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic(ROC) curve. Results: There were 123 cases (30.1%) with postoperative pancreatic fistula among 408 patients. Univariate analysis showed that body mass index(BMI)(P=0.005), preoperative gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase content(P=0.046), pancreatic duct diameter(P=0.001), CT value of pancreatic tissue(P=0.049), operation time(P=0.037), pancreatic stiffness (intraoperative judgment)(P=0.001) and percentage of pancreatic fibrosis(P=0.034) were the prognostic factors of pancreatic fistula. Multivariate analysis showed that BMI≥25 kg/m(2), pancreatic duct diameter ≤3 mm, pancreatic tissue CT value fistula occurrence of high-risk factor(Pfistula's CT value and percentage of pancreatic fibrosis were significantly lower than non-pancreatic fistula group, the difference was statistically significant(Pfistulae(Pfistula severity was negatively correlated with

  19. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  20. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids.

  1. Autoimmune Pancreatitis - A Riddle Wrapped in an Enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, George J

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was recognized as a clinical entity, at least in the West little more than 10 years ago. Since then, studies globally, and international collaboration, have led to important advances in our understanding of its clinical features, disease course, and management, although the aetiopathogenesis of this curious disease remains to be fully elucidated. Types 1 and 2 AIP have been described, of which type 1 is the commonest form, and best defined. International consensus now recognizes it as one of the many clinical manifestations of IgG4-related disease, and is now termed IgG4-related pancreatitis (IgG4-RP). The disease is not confined to a particular race, gender, or age, but often presents after the fifth decade in men. A common presentation is with jaundice due to low bile duct obstruction related to diffuse pancreatic enlargement (historically often leading to a misdiagnosis of cancer). Acute pancreatitis is unusual. Other organ involvement is a particular feature, including biliary disease, retroperitoneal fibrosis, generalized lymphadenopathy, renal, and lung involvement. No single test makes the diagnosis, and diagnostic criteria for type 1 AIP/IgG4-RP, which incorporate clinical, laboratory, radiological, pathological, and therapeutic parameters should be applied. A particular attempt should be made to make a histological diagnosis, which is characterized by an IgG4-positive lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Management is not based on randomized studies, but corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, providing rapid clinical and radiological benefit. However, clinical relapse is common (particularly in type 1 AIP, and in those with associated other organ involvement). Additional immunosuppression may be required, including azathioprine, and rituximab may play an emerging role. The disease course is variable, but loss of organ function (especially pancreatic exocrine failure and pancreatic atrophy) may occur.

  2. The clinical significance of pancreatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Mark M; van Geenen, Erwin J M

    2011-03-01

    More research is now focused on pancreatic steatosis. Multiple definitions, clinical associations and synonyms for pancreatic steatosis are described in the literature and can be confusing. The integration and comparison of several studies concerning this topic is therefore challenging. In the past, pancreatic steatosis was considered an innocuous condition, a bystander of many underlying diseases (such as congenital syndromes, hemochromatosis and viral infection). However, evidence that pancreatic steatosis (strongly associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome) has a role in type 2 diabetes mellitus, pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, acute pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and the formation of pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery is emerging. This Review focuses on the different etiological factors and the clinical consequences of pancreatic steatosis.

  3. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancre

  4. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U.A.; Issa, Y.; Hagenaars, J.C.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Witteman, B.J.; Brink, M.A.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Dejong, C.H.; Spanier, B.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Boermeester, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  5. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/380766086; Bakker, Olaf J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314099050; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821721; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  6. Refractor y thrombotic thrombocytopenic pur pura following acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebisa Bekele

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare blood disorder with an estimated incidence of 4–5 cases per million people per year. It is characterized by small-vessel platelet-rich thrombi that cause thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ damage. There are reports in literature that TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated, indicating each can be the cause of the other. However, acute pancreatitis triggering TTP is very rare. A 71 years old female presented with abdominal pain of 3 days, followed by dark urine. She had icteric sclera, petechial rash and mild epigastric tenderness. Lab findings were significant for hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated lipase. CT of abdomen showed evidence of pancreatitis and cholelithiasis. After admission, patient developed symptoms of stroke. Further investigation showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase and normal coagulation studied with peripheral blood smear showed 5–6 schistocytes/high power field. Disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-13 (ADAMTS13 activity showed less than 3% with high ADAMTS13 inhibitor 2.2. Patient required 6–7 weeks of daily plasmapheresis until she showed complete response. Our patient presented with clinical features of pancreatitis prior to having dark urine and petechial rash. Therefore, we strongly believe that our patient had pancreatitis which was followed by TTP. Patient's ADMTS13 activity was 6% after 10 plasma exchanges, signifying refractory TTP and higher risk for morbidity and mortality. There are limited data and consensus on the management of refractory TTP. TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated. However, refractory TTP following acute pancreatitis is rarely mentioned in the literature. We would like to emphasize the importance of having higher clinical suspicion of the association of both disease entities.

  7. Pancreatic microcirculatory impairment in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Guang Zhou; You-Dai Chen; Wei Sun; Zhong Chen

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the feature of pancreatic microcirculatoryimpairment, especially the initial changes, in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: The pancreatic microcirculation of caerulein-induced AP model was studied by intravital fluorescencemicroscopy with FITC-labeled erythrocytes (FITC-RBC),scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts,and light microscopy of Chinese ink-injected/cleared tissues.RESULTS: Animals in caerulein-treated group showedhyperamylemia (× 2), pancreatic oedema, infiltration ofinflammatory cells in pancreas. Constrictions of intralobulararteriolar sphincters, presence of vacuoles in all layers ofsphincter, and gross irregularity in capillary network of aciniwere found in the AP specimens. The decrease of pancreaticcapillary blood flow (0.34±0.10 nl @ min-1 vs0.910.06 nl @rain-1 of control, P<0.001), reduction of functional capillarydensity(277± 13 cm-1 vs349±8 cm-1 of control, P<0.001),and irregular intermittent perfusion were observed incaerulein-induced groups.CONCLUSION: Impairment and constriction of pancreaticintralobular arteriolar sphincter are the initial microcirculatorylesions in the early phase of acute pancreatitis, and play akey role in the pancreatic ischaemia and pancreaticmicrovascular failure in acute pancreatitis.

  8. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kobayashi, Akira, E-mail: kbys@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Takahashi, Masafumi [Center for Molecular Medicine Division of Bioimaging Sciences, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimono, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Miyagawa, Shinichi [Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  9. CT and MRI Findings of Autoimmune Polymorph Bifocal Pancreatitis Mimicking Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

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    Roman Rotzinger MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis. It is supposed to be a pancreatic manifestation of an immune-complex modulated systemic disorder. In contrast, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most frequent malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. Within the rare type of focal autoimmune pancreatitis, only few presentations with multifocal pancreatic lesions have been described. Herein we report a case of a 58-year-old patient with autoimmune pancreatitis presenting with bifocal manifestations of the pancreatic head and tail, mimicking pancreatic adenocarcinoma clinically, on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Typical imaging findings of autoimmune pancreatitis are compared with typical findings in pancreatic carcinoma. The diagnostic dilemma of differentiating between both entities is discussed. A review of the present literature regarding multifocal presence of autoimmune pancreatitis is performed.

  10. Mechanical Prevention of Post-ERCP Pancreatitis by Pancreatic Stents: Results, Techniques, and Indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarnasky PR

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired pancreatic drainage may be most important in the pathophysiology of post-ERCP pancreatitis. When there is a mechanical problem, there is often a mechanical solution. Pancreatic stenting reduces the incidence and severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis in high-risk patients. Young patients with suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction or prior pancreatitis and those undergoing procedures with either a difficult cannulation, precut and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy should be strongly considered for pancreatic stenting. Stents should be removed within about one week or have the proximal flaps removed to allow early spontaneous distal migration. Pancreatic stent placement following biliary intervention can occasionally be difficult. In cases where the primary goal is pancreatic therapy, one should consider establishing pancreatic access before addressing the bile duct. A pancreatic stent can then serve as a guide for sphincterotomy, but most importantly, protect against post-ERCP pancreatitis.

  11. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  12. Alcoholic pancreatitis:Lessons from the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Katrina; J; Mahan

    2010-01-01

    The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years. Despite the fact that this association is well recognized, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse leads to pancreatic tissue damage are not entirely clear. Alcohol abuse is the major factor associated with pancreatitis in the Western world. Interestingly, although most cases of chronic pancreatitis and many cases of acute pancreatitis are associated with alcohol abuse, only a small percentage of individuals w...

  13. Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications.

  14. Proinflammatory effects of pancreatic elastase are mediated through TLR4 and NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietaranta, Antti; Mustonen, Harri; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Haapiainen, Reijo; Kemppainen, Esko

    2004-10-01

    Pancreatic elastase has been implicated in the pathophysiology of severe acute pancreatitis, characterized by systemic inflammatory response, distant organ failure, and high mortality. Here we show that pancreatic elastase activates transcription factors NF-kappaB, AP-1, and NFAT in human myeloid cells (U-937 and THP-1) in culture. Pancreatic elastase also induces TNF-alpha secretion and increased expression of CD11b in THP-1 cells which can be inhibited by neutralizing anti-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antibodies. NF-kappaB blocking agents (MG-132, PGA1) prevented elastase-induced TNF-alpha secretion from THP-1 cells. Our results suggest that pancreatic elastase-induced proinflammatory effects are mediated by TLR4 and NF-kappaB in human myeloid cells.

  15. Recurrent acute pancreatitis and cholangitis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

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    Kambiz Yazdanpanah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is an inherited disorder associated with multiple cyst formation in the different organs. Development of pancreatic cyst in ADPKD is often asymptomatic and is associated with no complication. A 38-year-old man with ADPKD was presented with six episodes of acute pancreatitis and two episodes of cholangitis in a period of 12 months. Various imaging studies revealed multiple renal, hepatic and pancreatic cysts, mild ectasia of pancreatic duct, dilation of biliary system and absence of biliary stone. He was managed with conservative treatment for each attack. ADPKD should be considered as a potential risk factor for recurrent acute and/or chronic pancreatitis and cholangitis.

  16. [PECULIARITIES OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF AN ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN ELDERLY AND SENILE PATIENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, D V; Chornomydz, A V

    2016-04-01

    Peculiarities of clinical course, diagnosis and treatment of elderly patients for an acute pancreatitis were analyzed. There was established, that the clinical course of an acute pancreatitis is atypical with obscure symptoms. Late admittance to hospital, presence of concomitant diseases, low reactivity of the organism defense systems, morpho-functional changes in pancreatic gland complicate the early diagnosis. While the abdominal pain occurrence in the patient it is necessary always to keep in mind the diagnosis of an acute pancreatitis and not to rely on the diagnosis with which the patient was delivered to hospital. Because of presence of several concomitant diseases in a patient with an acute pancreatitis the treatment must be multimodal with multidisciplinary approach, including surgeon, anesthesiologist and therapeutist. Operative intervention is mandatory only in presence of a life-threatening complications and in insufficiency of conservative therapy. Miniinvasive technologies constitute the first-line procedures.

  17. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  18. Screening for Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Keita; Takaori, Kyoichi; Traverso, L William

    2015-10-01

    Neither extended surgery nor extended indication for surgery has improved survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. According to autopsy studies, presumably 90% are metastatic. The only cure is complete removal of the tumor at an early stage before it becomes a systemic disease or becomes invasive. Early detection and screening of individuals at risk is currently under way. This article reviews the evidence and methods for screening, either familial or sporadic. Indication for early-stage surgery and precursors are discussed. Surgeons should be familiar with screening because it may provide patients with a chance for cure by surgical resection.

  19. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, Andre; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs

  20. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, R.M.; Schaap, F.G.; Smits, A.J.A.; Kremer, A.E.; Akkermans, L.M.; Kroese, A.B.A.; Rijkers, G.T.; Schipper, M.E.; Verheem, A.; Wijmenga, C.; Gooszen, H.G.; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs

  1. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M; Schaap, Frank G; Smits, Alexander J J; Kremer, Andreas E; Akkermans, Louis M A; Kroese, A.B.; Rijkers, Ger T; Schipper, Marguerite E I; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G; van Erpecum, Karel J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs in

  2. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, Andre; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs in

  3. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  4. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Nandy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, insulin-like growth factor (IGF, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, epidermal growth factor (EGF, and transforming growth factor (TGF in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  5. Mortality in Acute Pancreatitis: Is It an Early or a Late Event?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carnovale

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Many prior studies have suggested that the majority of deaths in severe acute pancreatitis occur late in the course of the disease as a result of pancreatic sepsis or pancreatic septic-like syndrome. Other have observed that at least half of the deaths occur early as a result of multisystem organ failure. Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the timing of mortality of severe acute pancreatitis and to analyze the course of the disease in a large series of patients. Patients All consecutive patients with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis admitted to our Centre from October 1984 to December 2000 were retrospectively studied. One thousand one hundred and fifty episodes of acute pancreatitis occurred in 1,135 patients. Main outcome measures Total mortality and frequency of early deaths (less than or equal to 14 days after admission. The clinical features of patients who died were also compared in the early and late mortality groups. Results The overall mortality rate of acute pancreatitis was 4.8% (55 deaths out of 1,135 cases and when considering the severe forms only, it was13.5% (55 deaths out of 408 cases; 28 deaths (50.9% occurred within the first two weeks of hospitalization (median day 8, range 2-14 whereas 27 cases (49.1% occurred after two weeks (median day 28, range 15-56. Early deaths resulted primarily from multisystem organ failure; late deaths occurred mainly from complications in patients having infected necrosis. Conclusion Early deaths in severe acute pancreatitis occur in the half of patients within the first 14 days owing to multi-organ system failure. The remainder of deaths occur later from complications secondary to the infection of pancreatic necrosis; in this subgroup of patients, the association of infected necrosis with organ failure is found frequently.

  6. Isolated pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma is rare as compared to other visceral organs. Isolated injury to the pancreas is even more rare. The clinical presentation is subtle resulting in delayed treatment with high morbidity and mortality. A three-year-old female child presented with vomiting 18h following a motor vehicle accident. She was hemodynamically stable with no external signs of injury. Investigations revealed hyperamylasemia and isolated grade III pancreatic injury. Laparotomy with distal pancreatic resection and splenectomy was done. A high degree of clinical suspicion with due consideration to the mechanism of injury is the key to good outcome in these patients. Major ductal injury is the critical issue in the management and a number of therapeutic choices are available specific to the location of the insult.

  7. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  8. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Zavoral; Petra Minarikova; Filip Zavada; Cyril Salek; Marek Minarik

    2011-01-01

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  9. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  10. Tratamiento nutricional de los enfermos con pancreatitis aguda: cuando el pasado es presente Nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis: when the past is present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García Almansa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Los pacientes con pancreatitis aguda sufren con frecuencia un acusado deterioro de su estado nutricional. En algunos éste es ya anterior a su ingreso hospitalario, como ocurre en muchos casos de etiología alcohólica. En otras ocasiones la desnutrición se manifiesta posteriormente en el seno de una pancreatitis de larga evolución o complicada, que impide una correcta alimentación por un tiempo prolongado. A todo ello hay que sumar el hipercatabolismo proteico y el estrés que presentan estos enfermos. Es norma habitual en el tratamiento de la pancreatitis aguda mantener al enfermo en ayuno absoluto. En las pancreatitis leves este estado solo es necesario durante muy pocos días, iniciándose la realimentación por vía oral progresivamente, y no se requieren especiales cuidados nutricionales, salvo que presenten una desnutrición previa. Ahora bien, en los pacientes con pancreatitis moderada y/o grave en los que se prevé un ayuno prolongado por más de una semana, debemos siempre recurrir a un soporte nutricional artificial, que preserve el estado nutricional de estos enfermos, ya que no es suficiente la habitual reposición hidroelectrolítica. En este capítulo realizaremos una revisión actualizada del tratamiento nutricional en estas situaciones, intentando responder a diferentes preguntas entre las que se incluyen el tipo de soporte nutricional indicado, cuándo hay que instaurarlo y hasta qué momento.Patients with acute pancreatitis usually present nutritional status impairment. In alcoholic pancreatitis this impairment is usually presented before hospital admission. In patients with long-term complicated pancreatitis, malnutrition develops during the course of the disease. Besides, these patients present an increased stress and protein hypercatabolism. Treatment of acute pancreatitis usually maintains patients in a short period of starvation. In mild pancreatitis, starvation is needed for a few days, beginning progressively oral

  11. Renal cell carcinoma mimicking IgG4-related pseudotumor in autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ali; Kamal, Sehrish; Ahmad, Usman; Chowdhury, Mohammed Andaleeb; Nawras, Ali

    2014-09-28

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is classified into two distinct clinical profiles. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is considered to be a manifestation of a novel clinicopathological entity called IgG4 related sclerosing disease, diagnosed using the Mayo Clinic HISORt criteria. Extra-pancreatic manifestations can include involvement of bile ducts, salivary gland, lung nodules, thyroiditis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal masses, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis on the other hand is confirmed by histologically seen duct centric pancreatitis without elevation of IgG4 or involvement of other organs. In type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis, extrapancreatic manifestations like bile duct strictures, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal nodules, retroperitoneal fibrosis respond to steroid therapy. We present a case of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis in which the renal mass did not respond to steroid therapy and was later on found to be renal cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge this is only the third reported case of autoimmune pancreatitis in which the patient had renal cell carcinoma. Our case highlights the importance of close follow up of lesions that do not respond to steroid treatment which in this case proved to be renal cell cancer.

  12. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  13. Novel GATA6 mutations in patients with pancreatic agenesis and congenital heart malformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S Chao

    Full Text Available Patients with pancreatic agenesis are born without a pancreas, causing permanent neonatal diabetes and pancreatic enzyme insufficiency. These patients require insulin and enzyme replacement therapy to survive, grow, and maintain normal blood glucose levels. Pancreatic agenesis is an uncommon condition but high-throughput sequencing methods provide a rare opportunity to identify critical genes that are necessary for human pancreas development. Here we present the clinical history, evaluation, and the genetic and molecular analysis from two patients with pancreatic agenesis. Both patients were born with intrauterine growth restriction, minor heart defects and neonatal diabetes. In both cases, pancreatic agenesis was confirmed by imaging studies. The patients are clinically stable with pancreatic enzymes and insulin therapy. In order identify the etiology for their disease, we performed whole exome sequencing on both patients. For each proband we identified a de novo heterozygous mutation in the GATA6 gene. GATA6 is a homeobox containing transcription factor involved in both early development of the pancreas and heart. In vitro functional analysis of one of the variants revealed that the mutation creates a premature stop codon in the coding sequence resulting in the production of a truncated protein with loss of activity. These results show how genetic mutations in GATA6 may lead to functional inactivity and pancreatic agenesis in humans.

  14. Romanian guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Seicean, Andrada; Saftoiu, Adrian; Tantau, Marcel; Dumitru, Eugen; Jinga, Mariana; Negreanu, Lucian; Mateescu, Bogdan; Gheorghe, Liana; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Cijevschi, Cristina; Constantinescu, Gabriel; Dima, Simona; Diculescu, Mircea

    2015-03-01

    In assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), its diverse etiologies and the heterogeneous population affected should be considered. Diagnosing this condition remains a challenge in clinical practice especially for mild-to-moderate EPI, with the support of the time-consuming breath test or the coefficient of fat absorption. The fecal elastase-1 test, less precise for the diagnosis, cannot be useful for assessing treatment efficacy. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) is the mainstay of treatment, whereby enteric-coated mini-microspheres are taken with every meal, in progressive doses based on an individual's weight and clinical symptoms. The main indication for PERT is chronic pancreatitis, in patients who have clinically relevant steatorrhea, abnormal pancreatic function test or abnormal function tests associated with symptoms of malabsorption such as weight loss or meteorism. While enzyme replacement therapy is not recommended in the initial stages of acute pancreatitis, pancreatic exocrine function should be monitored for at least 6-18 months. In the case of unresectable pancreatic cancer, replacement enzyme therapy helps to maintain weight and improve overall quality of life. It is also indicated in patients with celiac disease, who have chronic diarrhea (in spite of gluten-free diet), and in patients with cystic fibrosis with proven EPI.

  15. Role of fibrillar Tenascin-C in metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Zhiyu; Chen, Ming; Li, Dajiang; Li, Zhihua; Xiong, Yan; Dong, Jiahong; Li, Xiaowu

    2009-04-01

    Interaction of cancer cells with stroma cells facilitates tumor progression by rebuilding the existing extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment. In the tumor, upregulation of Tenascin-C (Tn-C) expression potentially can alter tumor behavior. However, the molecular mechanisms by which tumor-stroma interactions affect the tumor microenvironment have not been well characterized. In this study, we analyzed the expression of fibrillar Tn-C (fTn-C) in human metastatic pancreatic cancers. After co-culturing two pancreatic cancer cell lines, highly metastatic BxPc3 cells and non-metastatic PaCa2 cells, with stromal fibroblasts (SF), we evaluated the roles of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activation and SF in promoting Tn-C organization. Next, we evaluated whether fibrillar Tn-C promotes pancreatic cancer cell movement using cell adhesion and migration assays. Finally, we observed the relationship between MMP-2 activation and fTn-C formation in vivo by injecting the BxPc3 and PaCa2 cells into nude mice. We found that fTn-C was increased in metastatic pancreatic cancer. The fTn-C expression correlated with MMP-2 activity. In the in vitro co-culture, fTn-C organization was found only in BxPc3/SF co-cultures, and required the participation of active MMP-2. The fTn-C reduced cell adhesion and promote pancreatic cancer cell migration by decreasing the adhesive interactions between integrin alpha6beta1 and the ECM. The in vivo tumorigenesis analysis showed that the fTn-C formation and active MMP-2 were significantly increased in the BxPc3 tumors, compared to the PaCa2 tumors. These results demonstrate that Tn-C deposition into the ECM requires participation of active MMP-2 and SF. The deposited Tn-C could promote pancreatic cancer progression.

  16. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

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    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  17. Proteomics in Pancreatic Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihui Geng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis and deeply affects the life of people. Therefore, the earlier diagnosis and better treatments are urgently needed. In recent years, the proteomic technologies are well established and growing rapidly and have been widely applied in clinical applications, especially in pancreatic cancer research. In this paper, we attempt to discuss the development of current proteomic technologies and the application of proteomics to the field of pancreatic cancer research. This will explore the potential perspective in revealing pathogenesis, making the diagnosis earlier and treatment.

  18. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Semb, S.; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  19. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  20. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N

    1992-01-01

    A casual relation between pancreatic pressure and pain has been searched for decades but lack of appropriate methods for pressure measurements has hindered progress. During the 1980's the needle method has been used for direct intraoperative pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements and later...... for percutaneous sonographically-guided pressure measurements. Clinical and experimental evaluation of the method showed comparable results at intraoperative and percutaneous measurements and little week-to-week variation. Furthermore, comparable pressures in duct and adjacent pancreatic tissue were found, i.......e. the needle pressure mirrors the intraductal pressure. Comparisons of pain registrations, morphological and functional parameters with pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements have revealed a relation between pressure and pain which probably is causal. In patients with pain the high pressures previously...

  1. [Eosinophilic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis: comparison, differential diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Turrin

    2017-03-01

    Here we discuss the importance of hypereosinophilia in EP and IgG increase in type 1 AIP (included in IgG-related systemic diseases. Differential diagnosis with pancreatic neoplasms and therapy schedules are discussed as well.

  2. Radical resection of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Koliopanos; C Avgerinos; Athanasios Farfaras; C Manes; Christos Dervenis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa) is a disease with dismal prognosis, and the only possibility of cure, albeit small, is based on the combination of complete resection with negative histopathological margins (R0 resection) with adjuvant treatment. Therefore, a lot of effort has been made during the last decade to assess the role of extensive surgery in both local recurrence and survival of patients with PCa. DATA SOURCES:Medline search and manual cross-referencing were utilized to identify published evidence-based data for PCa surgery between 1973 and 2006, with emphasis to feasibility, efifcacy, long-term survival, disease free survival, recurrence rates, pain relief and quality of life. RESULTS: Extended surgery is safe and feasible in high volume surgical centers with comparable short-term results. Organ preserving surgery is a main goal because of quality of life reasons and is performed whenever possible from the tumor extent. Concerning long-term survival major vein resection does not adversely affect outcome. To date, there are no changes in long-term survival attributed to the extended lymph node dissection. However, there is a beneift in locoregional control with fewer local recurrences and extended lymphadenectomy allows better staging for the disease. CONCLUSIONS:Extended PCa surgery is safe and feasible despite the inconclusive results in patient's survival beneift. In the future, appropriately powered randomized trials of standard vs. extended resections may show improved outcomes for PCa patients.

  3. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  4. Radioimmunoassay in the evaluation of pancreatic function in chronic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubovskij, G.A.; Vasil' chenko, S.A. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Rentgenologii i Radiologii, Moscow (USSR))

    1983-12-01

    Insular apparatus function in primary chronic and reactive pancreatitis associated with hepatobiliary pathology was studied in 178 patients by radioimmunoassay. Typical changes of insulin and C-peptide concentration in the presence of an intravenous glucose tolerance test are shown that make it possible to differentiate in combination with the trypsin concentration in the serum primary and reactive pancreatitis as well as exacerbation and remission stages of the disease.

  5. Growth hormone is a growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, S; Welinder, B S; Billestrup, N;

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of the growth of the pancreatic beta-cell is poorly understood. There are previous indications of a role of GH in the growth and insulin production of the pancreatic islets. In the present study we present evidence for a direct long-term effect of GH on proliferation and insulin...... biosynthesis of pancreatic beta-cells in monolayer culture. In culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with 2% normal human serum islets or dissociated islet cells from newborn rats maintained their insulin-producing capacity. When supplemented with 1-1000 ng/ml pituitary or recombinant human GH the islet cells....... It is concluded that GH is a potent growth factor for the differentiated pancreatic beta-cell....

  6. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  7. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmas, Nevra E-mail: elmas@med.ege.edu.tr

    2001-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities.

  8. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer: review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pross, Moritz; Wellner, Ulrich F; Honselmann, Kim C; Jung, Carlo; Deichmann, Steffen; Keck, Tobias; Bausch, Dirk

    2015-03-20

    Pancreatic cancer is still associated with a high mortality and morbidity for affected patients. To this date the role of neoadjuvant therapy in the standard treatment of pancreatic cancer remains elusive. The aim of our study was to review the latest results and current approaches in neoadjuvant therapy of pancreatic cancer. We performed a literature review for neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. We divided the results into resectable disease and local advanced pancreatic cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer is safe. But currently no standard guidelines exist in neoadjuvant approaches on pancreatic cancer. For local advanced pancreatic cancer the available data tends to show a positive effect on survival rates for neoadjuvant approaches. For resectable disease we found no benefit of neoadjuvant therapy. The negative or positive effects of neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer remain unclear for the lack of sufficient and prospective data.

  10. Diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis and acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis in 5 severe acute pancreatitis by plain computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Keishoku; Kim, Jong-hyo; Nakasaku, Osamu

    1987-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is still mainly based on the clinical signs and symptoms of patients. In a prospective study of 64 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomography (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical types of acute pancreatitis. We were able to correctly diagnose 3 acute necrotizing pancreatitis with autopsy and 2 acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis by plain CT about 48 hours after onset. At present, CT about 48 hours after onset seems to be the most accurate method for the early detection of necrotizing, hemorrhagic and edematous forms of acute pancreatitis.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis associated with a large pancreatic pseudocyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thilo Welsch; J(o)rg Kleeff; Irene Esposito; Markus W Büchler; Helmut Friess

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions comprise various entities with different histopathological characteristics and their differential diagnosis is often a challenge for clinicians.Autoimmune pancreatitis (ATP) is usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions, but often mimics the morphological aspects of pancreatic neoplasm. We report the case of a 64-year-old male patient with a cystic pancreatic head lesion (diameter 5 cm) and stenosis of the distal bile duct requiring repeated stentlng. Because of the clinical presentation together with moderate elevation of serum CA19-9 and massive elevation of cyst fluid CA19-9 (122.695 U/L; normal range: <37.0 U/L), the patient underwent explorative laparotomy and pylorus preserving partial pancreaticoduodenectomy.Histology revealed surprisingly ATP with an inflammatory pseudocyst. Tn conclusion, cyst fluid analysis of tumor markers and cyst fluid cytology lack high accuracy to clearly differentiate cystic pancreatic lesions. Although ATP is rarely associated with pseudocysts, the disease has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions. Early examination of serum IgG,IgG4 and auto-antibodies might save these patients from unnecessary endoscopical and surgical procedures.

  12. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma associated with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia:repor t of a case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajkumar Krishnasamy; Shaleen Agarwal; Shivendra Singh; Sunil Puri; Puja Sakhuja; Anil K Agarwal

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The presence of pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a risk factor for development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHOD: A case of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma associated with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia was diagnosed in the setting of chronic pancreatitis. RESULTS:Distal pancreatectomy combined with splenec-tomy was performed with a diagnosis of pancreatic body carcinoma. Histopathological examination suggested adenocarcinoma associated with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia. The tumor was detected in the remaining head of the pancreas, for which a total pancreatectomy was done. CONCLUSIONS: When a patient with pancreatic ductal intraepithelial neoplasia associated with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas in the setting of chronic pancreatitis is at an increased risk of recurrence in the remaining pancreatic parenchyma, total pancreatectomy may be feasible.

  13. Recruitment and activation of pancreatic stellate cells from the bone marrow in pancreatic cancer: a model of tumor-host interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Scarlett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are characterised by extensive stellate cell mediated fibrosis, and current therapeutic development includes targeting pancreatic cancer stroma and tumor-host interactions. Recent evidence has suggested that circulating bone marrow derived stem cells (BMDC contribute to solid organs. We aimed to define the role of circulating haematopoietic cells in the normal and diseased pancreas. METHODS: Whole bone marrow was harvested from male β-actin-EGFP donor mice and transplanted into irradiated female recipient C57/BL6 mice. Chronic pancreatitis was induced with repeat injections of caerulein, while carcinogenesis was induced with an intrapancreatic injection of dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA. Phenotype of engrafted donor-derived cells within the pancreas was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. RESULTS: GFP positive cells were visible in the exocrine pancreatic epithelia from 3 months post transplantation. These exhibited acinar morphology and were positive for amylase and peanut agglutinin. Mice administered caerulein developed chronic pancreatitis while DMBA mice exhibited precursor lesions and pancreatic cancer. No acinar cells were identified to be donor-derived upon cessation of cerulein treatment, however rare occurrences of bone marrow-derived acinar cells were observed during pancreatic regeneration. Increased recruitment of BMDC was observed within the desmoplastic stroma, contributing to the activated pancreatic stellate cell (PaSC population in both diseases. Expression of stellate cell markers CELSR3, PBX1 and GFAP was observed in BMD cancer-associated PaSCs, however cancer-associated, but not pancreatitis-associated BMD PaSCs, expressed the cancer PaSC specific marker CELSR3. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that BMDC can incorporate into the pancreas and adopt the differentiated state of the exocrine compartment. BMDC that

  14. microRNAs in Pancreatic β-Cell Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Sabire

    2015-01-01

    The β-cells within the pancreas are responsible for production and secretion of insulin. Insulin is released from pancreatic β-cells in response to increasing blood glucose levels and acts on insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle and liver in order to maintain normal glucose homeostasis. Therefore, defects in pancreatic β-cell function lead to hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus. A new class of molecules called microRNAs has been recently demonstrated to play a crucial role in regulation of pancreatic β-cell function under normal and pathophysiological conditions. miRNAs have been shown to regulate endocrine pancreas development, insulin biosynthesis, insulin exocytosis, and β-cell expansion. Many of the β-cell enriched miRNAs have multiple functions and regulate pancreas development as well as insulin biosynthesis and exocytosis. Furthermore, several of the β-cell specific miRNAs have been shown to accumulate in the circulation before the onset of diabetes and may serve as potential biomarkers for prediabetes. This chapter will focus on miRNAs that are enriched in pancreatic β-cells and play a critical role in modulation of β-cell physiology and may have clinical significance in the treatment of diabetes.

  15. Does etiology of acute pancreatitis matter? A review of 391 consecutive episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Gunther; Woitalla, Julia; Wellhöner, Peter; Schmidt, Klaus; Büning, Jürgen; Fellermann, Klaus

    2015-03-20

    Acute pancreatitis can be triggered by a variety of factors ranging from short lasting to sustained disruptions. It is plausible that the characteristics and course of disease differ among etiologies. Data distinguishing characteristics of patients with pancreatitis of biliary, alcoholic, idiopathic or other origin are scarce and conflicting. To compare patients' characteristics, baseline parameters on admission, and outcome in patients with an episode of acute pancreatitis in whom the etiology was thoroughly determined. Retrospective study. Single center. Three-hundreds and 91 consecutive episodes of acute pancreatitis through the years 2008 to 2011. Gender, age, body mass index, Charlson comorbidity index, history of pancreatitis, heart rate, blood pressure, plasma lipase, hematocrit, plasma creatinine, white blood cell count, rate of persistent organ failure and necrosis, maximum C-reactive protein, duration of hospitalization, mortality. There were marked differences between the groups. Biliary etiology was associated with higher age and body weight, female predominance, higher plasma lipase, and a favourable outcome. Alcoholic etiology had male predominance, a tendency for initial hemoconcentration, a lower plasma lipase, and the highest rate of necrosis. Idiopathic etiology had the highest rate of persistent organ failure and the highest mortality. Biliary, alcoholic and idiopathic acute pancreatitis should be treated as distinct entities. While alcoholic episodes have the highest risk of necrosis, the worst outcome was observed in the idiopathic group. Hence, finding no causality for an episode of acute pancreatitis after thorough investigation might be a predictor for poor outcome. Larger studies are warranted to confirm this.

  16. Genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif; Lena Karapanagiotou; Kostas Syrigos

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating for patients and their relatives as the incidence rate is approximately the same as mortality rate. Only a small percentage, which ranges from 0.4% to 4% of patients who have been given this diagnosis, will be alive at five years. At the time of diagnosis, 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have unresectable or metastatic disease.Moreover, the therapeutic alternatives offered by chemotherapy or radiotherapy are few, if not zero. For all these reasons, there is an imperative need of analyzing and understanding the primitive lesions that lead to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Molecular pathology of these lesions is the key of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of this cancer and will probably help us in earlier diagnosis and better therapeutic results. This review focuses on medical research on pancreatic cancer models and the underlying genetic alterations.

  17. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double......-lumen duodenal perfusion/aspiration techniques over 6 hours. Subjects were assigned to no feeding (n = 7), duodenal feeding with a polymeric diet (n = 7) or low-fat elemental diet (n = 6), mid-distal jejunal feeding (n = 11), or intravenous feeding (n = 5). All diets provided 40 kcal/kg ideal body weight/d and 1...

  18. Nutrition Support in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestis Ioannidis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of acute pancreatitis differs according to its severity. Approximately 75% of patients with acute pancreatitis have mild disease with a mortality rate below 1%. Mortality increases up to 20% if the disease progresses to its severe necrotizing form and, in the most severe cases, mortality can increase to 30-40%. Severe acute pancreatitis is usually accompanied by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS which results in hypermetabolism with prominent protein catabolism. Acute malnutrition, commonly observed in patients with acute pancreatitis, is associated with immunological disturbances, septic complications and delayed healing of surgical wounds, and may lead to multiorgan dysfunction or failure syndrome (MODS or MOFS and increased morbidity and mortality [1].

  19. Overview of Exocrine Pancreatic Pathobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Pandiri, Arun R.

    2013-01-01

    Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differ...

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zografos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship.

  1. Pancreatic islet blood flow and its measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Leif; Barbu, Andreea; Bodin, Birgitta; Drott, Carl Johan; Espes, Daniel; Gao, Xiang; Grapensparr, Liza; Källskog, Örjan; Lau, Joey; Liljebäck, Hanna; Palm, Fredrik; Quach, My; Sandberg, Monica; Strömberg, Victoria; Ullsten, Sara; Carlsson, Per-Ola

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic islets are richly vascularized, and islet blood vessels are uniquely adapted to maintain and support the internal milieu of the islets favoring normal endocrine function. Islet blood flow is normally very high compared with that to the exocrine pancreas and is autonomously regulated through complex interactions between the nervous system, metabolites from insulin secreting β-cells, endothelium-derived mediators, and hormones. The islet blood flow is normally coupled to the needs for insulin release and is usually disturbed during glucose intolerance and overt diabetes. The present review provides a brief background on islet vascular function and especially focuses on available techniques to measure islet blood perfusion. The gold standard for islet blood flow measurements in experimental animals is the microsphere technique, and its advantages and disadvantages will be discussed. In humans there are still no methods to measure islet blood flow selectively, but new developments in radiological techniques hold great hopes for the future.

  2. Pancreatic cancer chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Thomas B; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal gastrointestinal tumour. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of therapy in the majority of the patients whereas resection is the only chance of cure but only possible in 15-20% of all patients. The integration of radiotherapy into multimodal treatment concepts is heavily investigated. It is now commonly accepted that induction chemotherapy should precede radiotherapy. When fractionated conventionally it should be given as chemoradiotherapy. Recently, stereotactic body radiotherapy emerged as an alternative, but will have to be carefully investigated in clinical trials. This review aims to give an overview of radiotherapeutic strategies with a focus on the latest developments in the field in the context of chemotherapy and surgery.

  3. Genetic abnormalities in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamboni Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence and mortality of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are nearly coincident having a five-year survival of less than 5%. Enormous advances have been made in our knowledge of the molecular alterations commonly present in ductal cancer and other pancreatic malignancies. One significant outcome of these studies is the recognition that common ductal cancers have a distinct molecular fingerprint compared to other nonductal or endocrine tumors. Ductal carcinomas typically show alteration of K-ras, p53, p16INK4, DPC4 and FHIT, while other pancreatic tumor types show different aberrations. Among those tumors arising from the exocrine pancreas, only ampullary cancers have a molecular fingerprint that may involve some of the same genes most frequently altered in common ductal cancers. Significant molecular heterogeneity also exists among pancreatic endocrine tumors. Nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors have frequent mutations in MEN-1 and may be further subdivided into two clinically relevant subgroups based on the amount of chromosomal alterations. The present review will provide a brief overview of the genetic alterations that have been identified in the various subgroups of pancreatic tumors. These results have important implications for the development of genetic screening tests, early diagnosis, and prognostic genetic markers.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis and Ileus Postcolonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hin Hin Ko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpolypectomy bleeding and perforation are the most common complications of colonoscopy. A case of acute pancreatitis and ileus after colonoscopy is described. A 60-year-old woman underwent a gastroscopy and colonoscopy for investigation of iron deficiency anemia. Gastroscopy was normal; however, the colonoscope could not be advanced beyond the splenic flexure due to a tight angulation. Two polypectomies were performed in the descending colon. After the procedure, the patient developed a distended, tender abdomen. Bloodwork was remarkable for an elevated amylase level. An abdominal x-ray and computed tomography scan showed pancreatitis (particularly of the tail, a dilated cecum and a few air-fluid levels. The patient improved within 24 h of a repeat colonoscopy and decompression tube placement. The patient had no risk factors for pancreatitis. The causal mechanism of pancreatitis was uncertain but likely involved trauma to the tail of the pancreas during the procedure. Our patient developed ileus, likely secondary to pancreatitis. The present case is the first report of clinical pancreatitis and ileus associated with colonoscopy.

  5. ULTRASONOGRAPHY V / S COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE EVALUATION OF PANCREATITIS: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Maheswara Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The pancreas is a difficult organ to evaluate by both clinical and routine radiological methods. An inflammatory pathology involving the pancreas will form part of the differential diagnosis of other conditions presenting with abdominal pain. The combinati on of appropriate clinical findings and laboratory tests permit an accurate diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in most patients. Chronic pancreatitis, on the other hand, forms a much more difficult entity to evaluate clinically or biochemically. The clinical and biochemical parameters form a key factor in the diagnosis of Acute Pancreatitis. Cross - sectional imaging with ultrasound and CT has afforded rapid, accurate and noninvasive evaluation of the pancreas. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This study included 50 cases of Acute and chronic pancreatitis of 16 to 67 years age of both male and females who were diagnosed on imaging studies (Ultrasound and/or CT or on a constellation of signs, symptoms and laboratory data indicative of pancreatitis during the period from Au gust 2011 to July 2013. RESULTS: A total of 50 cases were studied of which 40 had acute pancreatitis and 10 had chronic pancreatitis. In the 40 cases with acute pancreatitis, ultrasound alone was done in 16 cases, CT alone in 4 cases and both modalities we re employed in the remaining 20 patients. All the 10 cases with chronic pancreatitis had an ultrasound study but only one required a CT scan. CONCLUSION: Ultrasonography is an initial screening modality in a suspected case of pancreatitis and MDCT is the i nvestigation of choice for definitive diagnosis and estimation of severity of pancreatitis. The pancreas is a difficult organ to evaluate by both clinical and routine radiological methods. An inflammatory pathology involving the pancreas will form part of the differential diagnosis of other conditions presenting with abdominal pain. The combination of appropriate clinical findings and laboratory tests such as serum

  6. Pancreatic Stellate Cells and Pancreatic Carcinoma: An Unholy Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes-Matthias Löhr

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the stromal compartment in the development, proliferation, invasion, metastasis and resistance of epithelial cancers has increasingly been recognized in recent decades [1, 2]. This stromal reaction is found in many carcinomas, e.g. in breast, prostate, colon, ovarian and pancreatic cancer. It is made up of stromal cells, endothelial cells, immune cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Moreover, the ECM proteins in the stroma act as a reservoir for growth factors released either by tumor or stromal cells, thus enabling autocrine and paracrine stimulation of the cells within the tumor mass. In this respect, groundbreaking work in solid tumors was done by Mina Bissell with breast carcinoma as her model system [3]. Recently, Vonlaufen et al. have contributed a review on the relationship between activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells which is worth reading [4]. Vonlaufen et al., with their own study [5] and those of some other groups (see their review, convincingly demonstrate a reciprocal influence of both nonepithelial and epithelial constituents of pancreatic carcinoma which works to their mutual benefit. Thus, the coinjection of PSC and pancreatic tumor cells enhances tumor growth and metastasis. In In vitro and animal models, PSCs increase tumor cell proliferation and decrease basal and induced apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells. On the other hand, pancreatic tumor cells activate PSCs, recruit them to their vicinity and stimulate their proliferation. This review clearly exemplifies the specialized milieu in which both cell types grow to their mutual benefit, thus forming one of the deadliest tumors we know.

  7. A Novel Polarization Maintaining Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    It introduces a novel elliptical jacket polarization maintaining fiber, whose SAP is like numeral "1". One preform can be drawn over 8km. Fiber's performances show that it is fit for fiber gyroscope and other sensors.

  8. A Novel Polarization Maintaining Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Xue

    2003-01-01

    It introduces a novel elliptical jacket polarization maintaining fiber, whose SAP is like numeral "1" One preform can be drawn over 8km. Fiber's performances show that it is fit for fiber gyroscope and other sensors.

  9. Simple fixed functional space maintainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Puneet; Sarawgi, Aditi; Marwah, Nikhil; Gumber, Parvind; Dutta, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Premature loss of a primary tooth is one of the most common etiology for malocclusion. Space maintainers are employed to prevent this complication. In anterior region, esthetics is an important concern along with function and space management. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retained space maintainer solves all these purposes ef ficiently and ef fectively. In addition, the technique is simple and the appliance is very comfortable inside the oral cavity. Here is a case of premature loss of anterior primary tooth which was replaced by FRC retained esthetic functional space maintainer. The appliance was found to be functioning satisfactorily inside the oral cavity till the last visit (1 Year). How to cite this article: Goenka P, Sarawgi A, Marwah N, Gumber P, Dutta S. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):225-228.

  10. Marshal: Maintaining Evolving Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SIFT proposes to design and develop the Marshal system, a mixed-initiative tool for maintaining task models over the course of evolving missions. Marshal-enabled...

  11. How to maintain improved cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parlevliet, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Improved cultivars loose their identity and healthiness unless maintained properly. Contaminating and degrading forces, such as outcrossing, volunteer plants, mixing, natural selection, mutation and seed-borne diseases, are at the root of this. Maintenance selection can prevent this deterioration.

  12. Pancreatic and pancreatic-like microbial proteases accelerate gut maturation in neonatal rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Prykhodko

    Full Text Available Postnatal gut maturation in neonatal mammals, either at natural weaning or after precocious inducement, is coinciding with enhanced enzymes production by exocrine pancreas. Since the involvement of enzymes in gut functional maturation was overlooked, the present study aimed to investigate the role of enzymes in gut functional maturation using neonatal rats.Suckling rats (Rattus norvegicus were instagastrically gavaged with porcine pancreatic enzymes (Creon, microbial-derived amylase, protease, lipase and mixture thereof, while controls received α-lactalbumin or water once per day during 14-16 d of age. At 17 d of age the animals were euthanized and visceral organs were dissected, weighed and analyzed for structural and functional properties. For some of the rats, gavage with the macromolecular markers such as bovine serum albumin and bovine IgG was performed 3 hours prior to blood collection to assess the intestinal permeability.Gavage with the pancreatic or pancreatic-like enzymes resulted in stimulated gut growth, increased gastric acid secretion and switched intestinal disaccharidases, with decreased lactase and increased maltase and sucrase activities. The fetal-type vacuolated enterocytes were replaced by the adult-type in the distal intestine, and macromolecular transfer to the blood was declined. Enzyme exposure also promoted pancreas growth with increased amylase and trypsin production. These effects were confined to the proteases in a dose-dependent manner.Feeding exogenous enzymes, containing proteases, induced precocious gut maturation in suckling rats. This suggests that luminal exposure to proteases by oral loading or, possibly, via enhanced pancreatic secretion involves in the gut maturation of young mammals.

  13. Revising You the Staging for Pancreatic Cancer in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, there were an estimated 43,140 new cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and 36,800 deaths from pancreatic cancer in the United States [1]. This represents the 10th most common cancer diagnosis but the 4th most common cause of cancer-related death among men and women (6% of all cancer-related deaths, highlighting the disproportionate mortality associated with this diagnosis [2]. Why is Staging so Important? Sadly, only 20% patients are “resectable” at the time of diagnosis [3]. Pancreatic cancer is “resectable” if the tumor is confined to the pancreas without the encasement of adjacent surrounding major vessels, or distant metastases. Even among those patients who undergo resection for pancreatic cancer and have tumor-free margins, the 5-year survival rate after resection is 10-25% and the median survival is 15-19 months [3]. “Locally advanced pancreatic cancer” is defined as the tumor that has a local invasion: arterial (celiac trunk, hepatic artery, superior mesenteric artery or venous (portal vein, superior mesenteric vein but not metastasized, and represents about 25% of pancreatic cancer cases at presentation [4]. Locally advanced stage is associated with a median survival of 6-10 months. The vast majority of these patients develop metastatic disease within the first year of therapy. The tumor is considered “advanced” when it has metastasized to other organs, such as the liver or distant areas of the abdomen. Approximately 45% to 55% of patients are diagnosed at this stage. The prognosis of patients with advanced disease remains extremely poor, with a median survival of 6 months [5].

  14. Hemoconcentration is a poor predictor of severity in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José M. Remes-Troche; Andrés Duarte-Rojo; Gustavo Morales; Guillermo Robles-Díaz

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the hematocrit (Hct) at admission or at 24 h after admission was associated with severe acute pancreatitis (AP), organ failure (OF), and pancreatic necrosis.METHODS: A total of 336 consecutive patients with a first AP episode were studied. Etiology, Hct values at admission and at 24 h, development of severe AP according to Atlanta's criteria, pancreatic necrosis, OF and mortality were recorded. Hemoconcentration was defined as Hct level >44% for males and >40% for females. The t-test and χ2 test were used to assess the association of hemoconcentration to the severity, necrosis and OF.Diagnostic accuracy was also determined.RESULTS: Biliary disease was the most frequent etiology(n = 148). Mean Hct levels at admission were 41±6%for females and 46±7% for males (P<0.01). Seventyeight (23%) patients had severe AP, and OF developed in 45 (13%) patients. According to contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, 36% (54/150) patients showed pancreatic necrosis. Hct levels were elevated in58% (55/96) and 61% (33/54) patients with interstitial and necrotizing pancreatitis, respectively. Neither Hct levels at admission nor hemoconcentration at 24 h were associated with the severity, necrosis or OF. Sensitivity,specificity and positive predictive values for both determinations were very low; and negative predictive values were between 61% and 86%, being the highest value for OF.CONCLUSION: Hct is not a useful marker to predict a worse outcome in acute pancreatitis. In spite of the high negative predictive value of hemoconcentration, the prognosis gain is limited due to an already high incidence of mild disease.

  15. Simple Fixed Functional Space Maintainer

    OpenAIRE

    Goenka, Puneet; Sarawgi, Aditi; Marwah, Nikhil; Gumber, Parvind; Dutta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Premature loss of a primary tooth is one of the most common etiology for malocclusion. Space maintainers are employed to prevent this complication. In anterior region, esthetics is an important concern along with function and space management. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retained space maintainer solves all these purposes ef ficiently and ef fectively. In addition, the technique is simple and the appliance is very comfortable inside the oral cavity. Here is a case of premature ...

  16. Inflammation, Autophagy, and Obesity: Common Features in the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gukovsky, Ilya; Li, Ning; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovskaya, Anna; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation and autophagy are cellular defense mechanisms. When these processes are deregulated (deficient or overactivated) they produce pathologic effects, such as oxidative stress, metabolic impairments, and cell death. Unresolved inflammation and disrupted regulation of autophagy are common features of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, obesity, a risk factor for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, promotes inflammation and inhibits or deregulates autophagy, creating an env...

  17. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure in chronic pancreatitis. Relation to pain, morphology, and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Bülow, J

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain, morphology, and function was studied in a cross-sectional investigation. Pressure measurements were performed by percutaneous fine-needle puncture. Thirty-nine patients with chronic pancreatitis were included, 25 with pain and 14...... calcifications. In conclusion, pancreatic tissue fluid pressure is a valuable indicator of pain in chronic pancreatitis....

  18. JPN Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis: cutting-edge information

    OpenAIRE

    Takada, Tadahiro; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Koichi; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sekimoto, Miho; Hirota, Masahiko; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Takeda, Kazunori; Isaji, Shuji; Koizumi, Masaru; Otsuki, Makoto; Matsuno, Seiki

    2006-01-01

    The JPN Guidelines for the Management of Acute Pancreatitis are organized under the subject headings: epidemiology, diagnosis, management strategy, severity assessment and transfer criteria, management of gallstone pancreatitis, nonsurgical management, and surgical management. The Guidelines contain cutting-edge information on each of these subjects, as well as a section on the Japanese medical insurance system which provides information that should prove useful to physicians in other countri...

  19. Recurrent pancreatitis in a patient with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia treated successfully with cinacalcet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Ashley; Druce, Maralyn

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 22-year-old female student presented with a history of recurrent pancreatitis. The commonest causes of pancreatitis, including drugs, gallstones, corticosteroids, excess alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia, were excluded. She was found to have an elevated serum calcium level that was considered to be the cause of her pancreatitis, with a detectable serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). An initial diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was made. However, two neck explorations failed to reveal a parathyroid adenoma. She was referred to our unit three years later as her episodes of pancreatitis were becoming more frequent and her calcium level remained persistently elevated. Her investigations were as follows: elevated adjusted calcium level of 2.79 mmol/l (2.2–2.58), PTH level of 4.2 pmol/l (0.6–6.0), low 24 h urine calcium of 0.3 mmol/l and a urine calcium:creatinine ratio of A mutation in the calcium-sensing receptor gene. Although the hypercalcaemia of FHH is usually without sequelae due to the generalised changes in calcium sensing, in the presence of this complication she was started on cinacalcet 30 mg daily. She had one further episode of pancreatitis with calcium levels ranging between 2.53 and 2.66 mmol/l. Her cinacalcet was gradually increased to 30 mg three times daily, maintaining her calcium levels in the range of 2.15–2.20 mmol/l. She has not had a further episode of pancreatitis for more than 2 years. FHH is usually a benign condition with minimal complications from hypercalcaemia. Pancreatitis has been reported rarely, and no clear management strategy has been defined in these cases. Cinacalcet was successfully used in treating recurrent pancreatitis in a patient with FHH by maintaining calcium levels in the lower part of the reference range. Whether or not this is an effective long-term treatment remains yet to be seen. Learning points FHH is an important differential diagnosis for hypercalcaemia.FHH can rarely cause

  20. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis.

  1. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzakovic, Alexander; Superina, Riccardo

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis is becoming increasingly prevalent in children, posing new challenges to pediatric health care providers. Although some general adult treatment paradigms are applicable in the pediatric population, diagnostic workup and surgical management of acute and chronic pancreatitis have to be tailored to anatomic and pathophysiological entities peculiar to children. Nonbiliary causes of acute pancreatitis in children are generally managed nonoperatively with hydration, close biochemical and clinical observation, and early initiation of enteral feeds. Surgical intervention including cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is often required in acute biliary pancreatitis, whereas infected pancreatic necrosis remains a rare absolute indication for pancreatic debridement and drainage via open, laparoscopic, or interventional radiologic procedure. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by painful irreversible changes of the parenchyma and ducts, which may result in or be caused by inadequate ductal drainage. A variety of surgical procedures providing drainage, denervation, resection, or a combination thereof are well established to relieve pain and preserve pancreatic function.

  2. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Winter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions’ experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27-60. All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9-173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation.

  3. CLINICAL STUDY ON ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaib Rehaman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Early diagnosis and severity evaluation on patients with acute pancreatitis are very important due to its potential morbidity and mortality. Given the wide spectrum of disease seen, the care of patients with pancreatitis must be highly individualized. Sev eral clinical, laboratory and radiologic factors and many scoring systems have been proposed for outcome prediction. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the symptomatology, clinical presentation and management in pancreatitis . To study the severity of acute panc reatitis according to Glasgow Scale . METHODS: Present study includes consecutive 38 patients hospitalized in CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital over the period of 2 years. All patients were thoroughly investigated and were stratified according to the Glasgow criteria. Data was collected on complications, investigations and interventions undertaken, outcome, duration of stay in hospital and ICU. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Descriptive, Chi square tests, Crosstabs (Contingency coefficient analysis . RESULTS : Mean age of presentation in our study was 43.1 years. There was a male predominance accounting for 68.4% compared to 31.6% females. Alcohol was the main etiological factor in about 50% of the patients. Sensitivity to S. amylase was about 100%. Accuracy of USG abdomen in diagnosing pancreatitis was about 88.5%. Ascitis was the commonest complication seen in 13.2%. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.2 days. The patient were stratified according to Glasgow scoring system into mild (0 - 3 and severe (>3 panc reatitis. In our study 32 people were graded with mild pancreatitis, all improved and in 6 people who were graded with severe pancreatitis, 83.3 % improved and 2.6% expired because of complications. Test statistics showed Contingency coefficient 0.355 and P 0.019 (NS. CONCLUSION : Glasgow scoring system remains a valid predicting system for the outcome in patients with acute pancreatitis. It is simple easy to apply with

  4. Pancreatic cancer: yesterday, today and tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Tingstedt, Bobby; Andersson, Bodil; Holmquist, Fredrik; Sturesson, Christian; Williamsson, Caroline; Sasor, Agata; Borg, David; Bauden, Monika; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of our most lethal malignancies. Despite substantial improvements in the survival rates for other major cancer forms, pancreatic cancer survival rates have remained relatively unchanged since the 1960s. Pancreatic cancer is usually detected at an advanced stage and most treatment regimens are ineffective, contributing to the poor overall prognosis. Herein, we review the current understanding of pancreatic cancer, focusing on central aspects of disease management from radiology, surgery and pathology to oncology.

  5. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  6. Pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parimal Chowdhury; Priya Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Use of alcohol is a worldwide habit regardless of socioeconomic background. Heavy alcohol consumption is a potential risk factor for induction of pancreatitis. The current review cites the updated literature on the alcohol metabolism, its effects on gastrointestinal and pancreatic function and in causing pancreatic injury, genetic predisposition of alcohol induced pancreatitis. Reports describing prospective mechanisms of action of alcohol activating the signal transduction pathways, induction of oxidative stress parameters through the development of animal models are being presented.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasonography findings in autoimmune pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elisabetta Buscarini; Claudio De Angelis; Stefania De Lisi; Paolo Giorgio Arcidiacono; Maria Chiara Petrone; Arnaldo Fuini; Rita Conigliaro; Guido Manfredi; Raffaele Manta; Dario Reggio

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool for pancreatic masses and chronic pancreatitis. In recent years there has been a growing interest in the worldwide medical community in autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), a form of chronic pancreatitis caused by an autoimmune process. This paper reviews the current available literature about the endoscopic ultrasonographic findings of AIP and the role of this imaging technique in the management of this protean disease.

  8. Transversal Descriptive Study of Xenobiotic Exposures in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Yvonne Jeppe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been a substantial number of reports in the literature linking pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer to certain xenobiotics and occupations. It has been hypothesized that exposure to volatile hydrocarbons and particularly petrochemicals increases susceptibility to pancreatitis. We performed a study aimed to enumerate occupational and environmental xenobiotics described in the literature as potential risk factors for pancreatitis and to document exposures to these in chronic pancreatitis patients presenting with chronic pain for surgery.

  9. [Persistence of chronic inflammatory responses, role in the development of chronic pancreatitis, obesity and pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khristich, T N

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the review--to analyze the basic data of the role of chronic low-intensity inflammatory response as general biological process in the development and progression of chronic pancreatitis, obesity, and pancreatic cancer. Highlighted evidence from epidemiological studies showing that chronic pancreatitis and obesity are independent risk factors for pancreatic cancer, regardless of diabetes. Studied role of adipokines as Cytokines regulating of immune inflammatory response. Draws attention to the staging of pancreatic cancer in obesity.

  10. Control of Apoptosis in Treatment and Biology of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Shrey; Kir, Devika; Banerjee, Sulagna; Saluja, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is estimated to be the 12th most common cancer in the United States in 2014 and yet this malignancy is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Late detection and resistance to therapy are the major causes for its dismal prognosis. Apoptosis is an actively orchestrated cell death mechanism that serves to maintain tissue homoeostasis. Cancer develops from normal cells by accruing significant changes through one or more mechanisms, leading to DNA damage and mutations, which in a normal cell would induce this programmed cell death pathway. As a result, evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells. PDAC is notoriously resistant to apoptosis, thereby explaining its aggressive nature and resistance to conventional treatment modalities. The current review is focus on understanding different intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in pancreatic cancer that may affect apoptosis in this disease.

  11. 36 CFR 1222.34 - How must agencies maintain records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT CREATION AND MAINTENANCE OF FEDERAL RECORDS Agency Recordkeeping Requirements... organizing and storing records; (b) Maintain electronic, audiovisual and cartographic, and microform records in accordance with 36 CFR parts 1236, 1237, and 1238 of this subchapter, respectively; (c)...

  12. Acute Pancreatitis Complicated with Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Young Adult without Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Oh, Myung Jin

    2016-11-25

    Systemic complications related to acute pancreatitis include acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hypocalcemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin dependent diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. In practice, the development of diabetic ketoacidosis induced by acute pancreatitis is rare and generally associated with hypertriglyceridemia. However, herein we report a case of a 34-year-old female without hypertriglyceridemia, who was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis. The patient was admitted with complaints of febrile sensation, back pain, and abdominal pain around the epigastric area. Levels of serum amylase and lipase were elevated to 663 U/L and 3,232 U/L. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed pancreatic swelling, peri-pancreatic fat infiltration and fluid collection. The patient was initially diagnosed with simple acute pancreatitis. Though the symptoms were rapidly relieved after initiation of treatment, severe hyperglycemia (575 mg/dL), severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.9), and ketonuria developed at four days after hospitalization. However, serum triglyceride levels remained within the normal range (134 mg/dL). Finally, the patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis unrelated to hypertriglyceridemia. She recovered through insulin and fluid therapy, and receives insulin therapy at the outpatient clinic.

  13. The regulatory role of immunosuppressants on immune abnormalities in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUAN, LIGENG; MA, YU; CHI, JUNLIN; WANG, XU; WESLEY, ALEXANDER J.; CHEN, XIAOLI

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled progression of the inflammatory cascade is the main cause underlying the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in acute pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of several immunosuppressants on mitigating the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome (SIRS) and the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) associated with acute pancreatitis. A total of 93 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: group 1 was the sham group and group 2 underwent laparoscopic intrapancreatic duct injection of sodium taurocholate to induce pancreatitis. The remaining 3 groups were the same as group 2, with the addition of methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate treatment (metastab, CTX or MTX groups, respectively). Following establishment of the acute pancreatitis model, the serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 were found to be significantly elevated. Following immunosuppressant administration, the levels of all inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines investigated in groups 3, 4 and 5 were decreased compared to those in group 2. The pancreatic amylase levels and pancreatic wet weight (PWW) were also decreased in groups 3, 4 and 5 compared to those in group 2. Therefore, immunosuppressants may reduce inflammation-related cytokine levels in acute pancreatitis and relieve disease progression. PMID:24649095

  14. Analysis of the delayed approach to the management of infected pancreatic necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nilesh Doctor; Sujith Philip; Vidhyachandra Gandhi; Maharra Hussain; Savio G Barreto

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze outcomes of delayed single-stage necrosectomy after early conservative management of patients with infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN) associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: Between January 1998 and December 2009, data from patients with SAP who developed IPN and were managed by pancreatic necrosectomy wereanalyzed.RESULTS: Fifty-nine of 61 pancreatic necrosectomies were performed by open surgery and 2 laparoscopically.In 55 patients, single-stage necrosectomy couldbe performed (90.2%). Patients underwent surgery at a median of 29 d (range 13-46 d) after diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Sepsis and multiple organ failure accounted for the 9.8% mortality rate. Pancreatic fistulae (50.8%) predominantly accounted for the morbidity. The median hospital stay was 23 d, and the median interval for return to regular activities was 110 d.CONCLUSION: This series supports the concept of delayed single-stage open pancreatic necrosectomy for IPN. Advances in critical care, antibiotics and interventional radiology have played complementary role in improving the outcomes.

  15. Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Igg4-Related Pseudotumor in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Khan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Autoimmune pancreatitis is classified into two distinct clinical profiles. Care report Type 1 autoimmunepancreatitis (AIP is considered to be a manifestation of a novel clinicopathological entity called IgG4 related sclerosingdisease, diagnosed using the Mayo Clinic HISORt criteria. Extra-pancreatic manifestations can include involvement of bileducts, salivary gland, lung nodules, thyroiditis, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal masses, and retroperitoneal fibrosis. Type2 autoimmune pancreatitis on the other hand is confirmed by histologically seen duct centric pancreatitis without elevationof IgG4 or involvement of other organs. In type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis, extrapancreatic manifestations like bile ductstrictures, tubulointerstitial nephritis, renal nodules, retroperitoneal fibrosis respond to steroid therapy. Conclusion Wepresent a case of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis in which the renal mass did not respond to steroid therapy and was later on found to be renal cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge this is only the third reported case of autoimmune pancreatitis in which the patient had renal cell carcinoma. Our case highlights the importance of close follow up of lesions that do not respond to steroid treatment which in this case proved to be renal cell cancer.

  16. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Atin Kumar; Ananya Panda; Shivanand Gamanagatti

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography(CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful nonoperative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma.

  17. Obesity, Intrapancreatic Fatty Infiltration, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Maitra, Anirban; Wang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and intrapancreatic fatty infiltration are associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions. The interplay among obesity, inflammation, and oncogenic Kras signaling promotes pancreatic tumorigenesis. Targeting the interaction between obesity-associated inflammation and Kras signaling may provide new strategies for prevention and therapy of pancreatic cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Pharmacological management of pain in chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esch, A.A.J.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Goor, H. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Pain is the major presenting symptom of chronic pancreatitis. Patients with chronic pancreatitis experience substantial impairments in health-related quality of life. Pain may be considered as the most important factor affecting the quality of life. The pathogenesis of pancreatic pain is poorly unde

  19. Pancreatic β- and α-cell adaptation in response to metabolic changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne Hendrike (Rianne)

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells are essential to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. β-cells can adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased β-cell function and/or increased β-cell mass. Inadequate β-cell adaptation leads to hyperglycemia a

  20. Pancreatic β- and α-cell adaptation in response to metabolic changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne Hendrike (Rianne)

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells are essential to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. β-cells can adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased β-cell function and/or increased β-cell mass. Inadequate β-cell adaptation leads to hyperglycemia