WorldWideScience

Sample records for magnum-2d heat transport

  1. Heat transport within the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to interpret Earth's dynamic processes based upon heat transport concepts derived from ordinary experience. But, ordinary experience can be misleading, especially when underlain by false assumptions. Geodynamic considerations traditionally have embraced three modes of heat transport: conduction, convection, and radiation. Recently, I introduced a fourth, "mantle decompression thermal tsunami" that, I submit, is responsible for emplacing heat at the base of the Earth's crust. Here, I review thermal transport within the Earth and speculate that there might be a fifth mode: "heat channeling", involving heat transport from the core to "hot-spots" such as those that power the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland.

  2. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-02-06

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  3. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  4. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Kar M.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ˜ 106 Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξs ˜ 10-9 m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξs ˜ 10-8 m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10-8 m with 106 Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  5. Vapor phase heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedstrom, J.C.; Neeper, D.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes progress in theoretical and experimental investigations of various forms of a vapor transport system for solar space heating, which could also be applied to service water heating. Refrigerant is evaporated in a solar collector, which may be located on the external wall or roof of a building. The vapor is condensed in a passively discharged thermal storage unit located within the building. The condensed liquid can be returned to the collector either by a motor-driven pump or by a completely passive self-pumping mechanism in which the vapor pressure lifts the liquid from the condenser to the collector. The theoretical investigation analyzes this self-pumping scheme. Experiments in solar test cells compare the operation of both passive and active forms of the vapor system with the operation of a passive water wall. The vapor system operates as expected, with potential advantages over other passive systems in design flexibility and energy yield.

  6. Macroscopic heat transport equations and heat waves in nonequilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yangyu; Jou, David; Wang, Moran

    2017-03-01

    Heat transport may behave as wave propagation when the time scale of processes decreases to be comparable to or smaller than the relaxation time of heat carriers. In this work, a generalized heat transport equation including nonlinear, nonlocal and relaxation terms is proposed, which sums up the Cattaneo-Vernotte, dual-phase-lag and phonon hydrodynamic models as special cases. In the frame of this equation, the heat wave propagations are investigated systematically in nonequilibrium steady states, which were usually studied around equilibrium states. The phase (or front) speed of heat waves is obtained through a perturbation solution to the heat differential equation, and found to be intimately related to the nonlinear and nonlocal terms. Thus, potential heat wave experiments in nonequilibrium states are devised to measure the coefficients in the generalized equation, which may throw light on understanding the physical mechanisms and macroscopic modeling of nanoscale heat transport.

  7. Ion heat transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P; Angioni, C; Baiocchi, B

    2011-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of ion heat transport have been carried out in JET exploiting the upgrade of active charge exchange spectroscopy and the availability of multi-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating with 3He minority. The determination of ion temperature gradient (ITG) threshold a...

  8. Heat transport experiments on the HSX stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Gavin McCabe

    It has been observed in tokamaks that temperature profiles are resilient to changes in heating, and that this effect has not been observed in conventional stellarators. Electron temperature profile resiliency is attributed to anomalous transport driven by turbulent micro-instabilities, and the resulting stiffness in the electron heat flux is measured using a combination of steady-state and perturbative experiments. In this work, stiffness measurements are presented in the quasihelically symmetric configuration of the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. A second gyrotron and transmission line have been installed and tested to facilitate modulated heating experiments on HSX, and a multi-pass absorption model accurately predicts the total absorption and spatial extent of the electron cyclotron resonance heating during a modulation experiment. The electron cyclotron emission measured by an absolutely calibrated 16-channel radiometer is used to measure the local electron temperature and its response to the modulated heating. The amplitude and phase of the heat wave through the foot of the steep electron temperature gradient region of the plasma, 0.2It has been observed in tokamaks that temperature profiles are resilient to changes in heating, and that this effect has not been observed in conventional stellarators. Electron temperature profile resiliency is attributed to anomalous transport driven by turbulent micro-instabilities, and the resulting stiffness in the electron heat flux is measured using a combination of steady-state and perturbative experiments. In this work, stiffness measurements are presented in the quasihelically symmetric configuration of the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. A second gyrotron and transmission

  9. Vibrational Heat Transport in Molecular Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We review studies of vibrational energy transfer in a molecular junction geometry, consisting of a molecule bridging two heat reservoirs, solids or large chemical compounds. This setup is of interest for applications in molecular electronics, thermoelectrics, and nanophononics, and for addressing basic questions in the theory of classical and quantum transport. Calculations show that system size, disorder, structure, dimensionality, internal anharmonicities, contact interaction, and quantum coherent effects are factors that combine to determine the predominant mechanism (ballistic/diffusive), effectiveness (poor/good), and functionality (linear/nonlinear) of thermal conduction at the nanoscale. We review recent experiments and relevant calculations of quantum heat transfer in molecular junctions. We recount the Landauer approach, appropriate for the study of elastic (harmonic) phononic transport, and outline techniques that incorporate molecular anharmonicities. Theoretical methods are described along with examples illustrating the challenge of reaching control over vibrational heat conduction in molecules.

  10. Heat Transfer in Directional Water Transport Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Directional water transport fabrics can proactively transfer moisture from the body. They show great potential in making sportswear and summer clothing. While moisture transfer has been previously reported, heat transfer in directional water transport fabrics has been little reported in research literature. In this study, a directional water transport fabric was prepared using an electrospraying technique and its heat transfer properties under dry and wet states were evaluated, and compared with untreated control fabric and the one pre-treated with NaOH. All the fabric samples showed similar heat transfer features in the dry state, and the equilibrium temperature in the dry state was higher than for the wet state. Wetting considerably enhanced the thermal conductivity of the fabrics. Our studies indicate that directional water transport treatment assists in moving water toward one side of the fabric, but has little effect on thermal transfer performance. This study may be useful for development of “smart” textiles for various applications.

  11. Modelling heat transport through completely positive maps

    CERN Document Server

    Wichterich, H; Gemmer, J; Henrich, M J; Michel, M; Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Gemmer, Jochen; Henrich, Markus J.; Michel, Mathias; Wichterich, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    We investigate heat transport in a spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain, coupled locally to independent thermal baths of different temperature. The analysis is carried out within the framework of the theory of open systems by means of appropriate quantum master equations. The standard microscopic derivation of the weak-coupling Lindblad equation in the secular approximation is considered, and shown to be inadequate for the description of stationary nonequilibrium properties like a non-vanishing energy current. Furthermore, we derive an alternative master equation that is capable to describe a stationary energy current and, at the same time, leads to a completely positive dynamical map. This paves the way for efficient numerical investigations of heat transport in larger systems based on Monte Carlo wave function techniques.

  12. Vapor-phase heat-transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedstrom, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A vapor-phase heat-transport system is being tested in one of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The system consists of one selective-surface collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by gravity or with a pump. Results from several operating configurations are presented, together with a comparison with other passive systems. A new self-pumping concept is presented.

  13. Heat transport in coupled inhomogeneous chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Tao; Bai Meng; Hu Ke; Tang Yi

    2011-01-01

    We first investigate the heat transport in a network model consisting of two coupled dimerized chains. Results indicate that the thermal resistance of each chain increases with the decrease of the mass ratio γ of the two types of atoms. Then, we find, when a light impurity or a heavy one is added in the two coupled homogeneous chains and coupled with a particle of another chain, the interface thermal resistances Rlint andRγint present different dependences on the mass ratio γ'. Finally, a persistent circulation of energy current is observed in coupled inhomogeneous chains with two pairs of interchain coupling.

  14. Heat Transport of Electron-Doped Cobaltates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; LIANG Ying; FENG Shi-Ping; CHEN Wei-Yeu

    2006-01-01

    Within the t-J model, the heat transport of electron-doped cobaltates is studied based on the fermionspin theory. It is shown that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is characterized by the low-temperature peak located at a finite temperature. The thermal conductivity increases monotonously with increasing temperature at low-temperatures T < 0.1 J, and then decreases with increasing temperature for higher temperatures T > 0.1 J, in qualitative agreement with experimental result observed from NaxCoO2.

  15. Least dissipation principle of heat transport potential capacity and its application in heat conduction optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In the viewpoint of heat transfer, heat transport potential capacity and its dissipation are defined based on the essence of heat transport phenomenon. Respectively, their physical meanings are the overall heat transfer capabilityand the dissipation rate of the heat transfer capacity. Then the least dissipation principle of heat transport potential capacity is presented to enhance the heat conduction efficiency in the heat conduction optimization. The principle is,for a conduction process with the constant integral of the thermal conductivityover the region, the optimal distribution of thermal conductivity, which corresponds to the highest heat conduction efficiency, is characterized by the least dissipation of heat transport potential capacity. Finally the principle is applied to some cases in heat conduction optimization.

  16. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  17. Barents Sea heattransport, storage and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Skagseth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of the Barents Sea to variation in ocean heat transport and surface fluxes is explored using a 1-D column model. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force model results that reproduce the observed winter convection and surface warming and freshening well. Model results are compared to existing estimates of the ocean to air heat fluxes and horizontally averaged profiles for the southern and northern Barents Sea. Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production. The northern Barents Sea, the major part of the area, receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss in the north, the balance is achieved by long wave loss removing most of the solar heating, and the model also suggests a positive sensible heat gain. During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. Despite large changes the Barents Sea heat loss remains robust, the temperature adjusts, and the yearly cycle remains. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport probably leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  18. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction......The project is a basic study on the expected thermal behaviour of gravel storage initiated as a part of a research and demonstration gravel storage for seasonal heat storage.The goal of the investigation is to determine the heat transfer between heat pipes and sand-gravel storage media by carrying...... media no convectional heat transport is found. It would be relevant to extend the investigation to media that enables convectional heat transport. A last conclusion is that such experiments, necessary for proper designing of sand-gravel storage types, are a very cheap form of collecting information...

  19. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of extern

  20. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, Taha Jibril

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of extern

  1. Carbon nanostructured surfaces for enhanced heat transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of high performance thermal systems has stimulated interest in methods to improve heat transfer rates. Considerable efforts have been made to increase heat transfer rates by implementing passive convective heat transfer enhancement methods that require no direct consumption of

  2. Borehole model for simulation transport geothermal heat with heat pipe system and with forced circulation of heat carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhard Richard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the call OPVaV-2008/2.2/01-SORO Operational Programme Research and Development - knowledge and technology transfer from research and development into practice (ITMS-26220220057, whose strategic goal is "Device to use low-potential geothermal heat without forced circulation of heat carrier deep in the well "in the Department of Energy laboratory techniques to construct a simulator of transport low potential of geothermal energy in comparative test-drilling in the laboratory. The article describes a device that was designed as a scale model of two deep boreholes each of which withdraws the earth's heat by heat transfer technology and heat carrier. Device using forced circulation of heat carrier will respond in the construction of equipment currently used to transport heat from deep borehole. As the heat carrier will be used CO2. Facilities without using forced circulation of heat carrier, the new technology, which will be used as heat carrier ammonia (NH3.

  3. A thermodynamic view of heat transfer in different transport regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubler, Gulru Babac

    2016-11-01

    The nature of the heat transfer process changes substantially according to transport regime. A thermodynamic view to micro/nano scale flows is considered to get a better understanding within this regime dependent change. The transport processes are expressed as a polytropic process and T-s diagram of different transport regimes are presented. In addition, a molecular dynamic simulation of nano channel flows is presented. Since the polytropic processes are strongly related with the heat capacities, the heat capacity calculations are also taken into account in MD simulations. The theoretical predictions are approved with the molecular dynamic simulations for monatomic gases.

  4. Experimental Study of Heat Transport in Fractured Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta M.; Redondo, Jose M.; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in transport of natural resources or contaminants transport through subsurface systems. In recent years, interest has grown in investigating heat transport by means of tracer tests, driven by the important current development of geothermal applications. In literature different methods are available for predicting thermal breakthrough in fractured reservoirs based on the information coming from tracer tests. Geothermal energy is one of the largest sources of renewable energies that are extracted from the earth. The growing interest in this new energy source has stimulated attempts to develop methods and technologies for extracting energy also from ground resource at low temperature. An example is the exploitation of low enthalpy geothermal energy that can be obtained at any place with the aid of ground-source heat pump system from the soil, rock and groundwater. In such geothermal systems the fluid movement and thermal behavior in the fractured porous media is very important and critical. Existing theory of fluid flow and heat transport through porous media is of limited usefulness when applied to fractured rocks. Many field and laboratory tracer tests in fractured media show that fracture -matrix exchange is more significant for heat than mass tracers, thus thermal breakthrough curves (BTCs) are strongly controlled by matrix thermal diffusivity. In this study the behaviour of heat transport in a fractured network at bench scale has been investigated. Heat tracer tests on an artificially created fractured rock sample have been carried out. The observed thermal BTCs obtained with six thermocouple probes located at different locations in the fractured medium have been modeled with the Explicit Network Model (ENM) based an adaptation of Tang's solution for solute transport in a semi-infinite single fracture embedded in a porous matrix. The ENM model is able to represent the behavior of observed heat transport except where the

  5. Constructs of highly effective heat transport paths by bionic optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Xinguang; (程新广); LI; Zhixin; (李志信); GUO; Zengyuan; (过增元)

    2003-01-01

    The optimization approach based on the biological evolution principle is used to construct the heat transport paths for volume-to-point problem. The transport paths are constructed by inserting high conductivity materials in the heat conduction domain where uniform or nonuniform heat sources exist. In the bionic optimization process, the optimal constructs of the high conductivity material are obtained by numerically simulating the evolution and degeneration process according to the uniformity principle of the temperature gradient. Finally, preserving the features of the optimal constructs, the constructs are regularized for the convenience of engineering manufacture. The results show that the construct obtained by bionic optimization is approximate to that obtained by the tree-network constructal theory when the heat conduction is enhanced for the domain with a uniform heat source and high conductivity ratio of the inserting material to the substrate, the high conductivity materials are mainly concentrated on the heat outlet for the case with a uniform heat source and low thermal conductivity ratio, and for the case with nonuniform heat sources, the high conductivity material is concentrated in the heat source regions and construacts several highly effective heat transport paths to connect the regions to the outlet.

  6. Behaviors of Electron Heat Transportation in HT-7 Sawtoothing Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Liqun; Xu Yi; Wan Baonian; Shi Yuejiang; Zhen Xiangjun; Chen Zhongyong; Lin Shiyao; HT-7 Team

    2005-01-01

    It is found that in HT-7 ohmic plasma, main energy loss comes from electron heat conduction, hence quantitative data of electron heat diffusivity is a very important issue for investigation of electron heat transportation behavior in different target plasmas so as to get high performance plasma. A time-to-peak method of the heat pulse propagation originating from the sawtooth activity on the soft x-ray intensity signal has been adopted to experimentally determine electron heat diffusivity XHPe on the HT-7 tokamak. Aiming to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N)ratio of the original signal to get a stable and reasonable electron heat diffusivity XHDe value, some data processing methods, including average of tens of sawteeth, is discussed. The electron heat diffusivity XHPe is larger than XPBe which is determined from the balance of background plasma power. Based on variation of the measured electron heat diffusivity XHPe, performances of different high confinement plasmas are analyzed.

  7. Transport coefficient and heat pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Kubota, Tetsuyuki; Toda, Shinichiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Hanada, Kazuaki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    The problem of deducing {Chi}{sub e} from heat pulse propagation measurements is addressed. It is indicated that diffusive models can not explain the experimental observations on WT-3 tokamak. The equation taking account of the convective term gives a good fit to experimental results. It may indicate that for the sawtooth free plasma, there exists a convection of heat pulse. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-A. Knietzsch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized earthlike aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is put on the Lorenz energy cycle and the atmospheric mean meridional circulation. The latter is analysed by means of the Kuo–Eliassen equation. The atmospheric heat transport compensates the imposed oceanic heat transport changes to a large extent in conjunction with significant modification of the general circulation. Up to a maximum about 3 PW, an increase of the oceanic heat transport leads to an increase of the global mean near-surface temperature and a decrease of its equator-to-pole gradient. For larger transports, the gradient is reduced further but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. A larger oceanic heat transport leads to a reduction of all reservoirs and conversions of the Lorenz energy cycle but of different relative magnitude for the individual components. The available potential energy of the zonal mean flow and its conversion to eddy available potential energy are affected most. Both the Hadley and Ferrel cell show a decline for increasing oceanic heat transport, with the Hadley cell being more sensitive. Both cells exhibit a poleward shift of their maxima, and the Hadley cell broadens for larger oceanic transports. The partitioning, by means of the Kuo–Eliassen equation, reveals that zonal mean diabatic heating and friction are the most important sources for changes of the Hadley cell, while the behaviour of the Ferrell cell is mostly controlled by friction.

  9. Experimental investigation of heat transport through single synthetic fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Nicola; Cherubini, Claudia; Giasi, Concetta I.; Redondo, Jose M.

    2017-04-01

    In fractured geothermal reservoirs, heat transport is highly influenced by the presence of the fractures, so appropriate knowledge of heat behaviour in fractured porous media is essential for accurate prediction of the energy extraction in geothermal reservoirs. The present study focuses on the study of heat transport within single synthetic fractures. In particular manner several tests have been carried out in order to explore the role of fracture roughness, aperture variability and the fracture-matrix ratio on the heat transport dynamics. The Synfrac program together with a 3d printer have been used to build several fracture planes having different geometrical characteristics that have been moulded to generate concrete porous fractured blocks. The tests regard the observation of the thermal breakthrough curves obtained through a continuous flow injection in correspondence of eight thermocouples located uniformly on the fractured blocks. The physical model developed permits to reproduce and understand adequately some features of heat transport dynamics in fractured media. The results give emphasis on the errors of the assumptions commonly used in heat transport modelling.

  10. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years

  11. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years

  12. The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation

    CERN Document Server

    Knietzsch, Marc-Andre; Lunkeit, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized earthlike aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is put on the Lorenz energy cycle and the atmospheric mean meridional circulation. The latter is analysed by means of the Kuo-Eliassen equation. The atmospheric heat transport compensates the imposed oceanic heat transport changes to a large extent in conjunction with significant modification of the general circulation. Up to a maximum about 3PW, an increase of the oceanic heat transport leads to an increase of the global mean near surface temperature and a decrease of its equator-to-pole gradient. For larger transports, the gradient is reduced further but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. A larger oceanic heat transport leads to a reduction of all reservoirs and conversions of the Lorenz energy cycl...

  13. An oceanic heat transport pathway to the Amundsen Sea Embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Angelica R.; Mazloff, Matthew R.; Gille, Sarah T.

    2016-05-01

    The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) on the West Antarctic coastline has been identified as a region of accelerated glacial melting. A Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) is analyzed over the 2005-2010 time period in the Amundsen Sea region. The SOSE oceanic heat budget reveals that the contribution of parameterized small-scale mixing to the heat content of the ASE waters is small compared to advection and local air-sea heat flux, both of which contribute significantly to the heat content of the ASE waters. Above the permanent pycnocline, the local air-sea flux dominates the heat budget and is controlled by seasonal changes in sea ice coverage. Overall, between 2005 and 2010, the model shows a net heating in the surface above the pycnocline within the ASE. Sea water below the permanent pycnocline is isolated from the influence of air-sea heat fluxes, and thus, the divergence of heat advection is the major contributor to increased oceanic heat content of these waters. Oceanic transport of mass and heat into the ASE is dominated by the cross-shelf input and is primarily geostrophic below the permanent pycnocline. Diagnosis of the time-mean SOSE vorticity budget along the continental shelf slope indicates that the cross-shelf transport is sustained by vorticity input from the localized wind-stress curl over the shelf break.

  14. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakkaraju, R.; Stevens, R.J.A.M.; Oresta, P.; Verzicco, R.; Lohse, D.; Prosperetti, A.

    2013-01-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to giv

  15. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction...... in sand-gravel material, the storage media is to be water satured. In this case, handling of such material on site is rather complex. The conduction is highly dependent on the thermal properties of the storage media and so is the overall thermal performance of a storage applying such media. For sandy...... media no convectional heat transport is found. It would be relevant to extend the investigation to media that enables convectional heat transport. A last conclusion is that such experiments, necessary for proper designing of sand-gravel storage types, are a very cheap form of collecting information...

  16. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Yuanming [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  17. Io Volcanism: Modeling Vapor And Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Daniel R.; Howell, R. R.

    2010-10-01

    Loki is a large, active volcanic source on Jupiter's moon, Io, whose overall temperatures are well explained by current cooling models, but there are unexplainable subtleties. Using the SO2 atmospheric models of Ingersoll (1989) as a starting point, we are investigating how volatiles, specifically sulfur, are transported on the surface and how they modify the temperatures at Loki and other volcanoes. Voyager images reveal light colored deposits, colloquially called "sulfur bergs,” on Loki's dark patera floor that may be sulfur fumaroles. Galileo images show the presence of red short-chain sulfur deposits around the patera. We are investigating the mechanisms that lead to these features. The light deposits are a few kilometers across. Calculations of the mean free paths for day time conditions on Io indicate lengths on the order of 0.1 km while poorly constrained night time conditions indicate mean free paths about 100 times greater, on the order of what is needed to produce the deposits under ballistic conditions. Preliminary calculations reveal horizontal transport length scales for diffuse transport in a collisional atmosphere of approximately 30 km for sublimating S8 sulfur at 300 K. These length scales would be sufficient to move the sulfur from the warm patera floor to the locations of the red sulfur deposits. At a typical Loki temperature of 300 K, the sublimation/evaporation rate of S8 is a few tens of microns/day. It then requires just a few days to deposit an optically thick 100 µm layer of material. Preliminary length scales and sublimation rates are thus of sufficient scale to produce the deposits. Investigations into the sulfur transport and its effect on temperature are ongoing.

  18. Effect of Joule heating on electrokinetic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Barbaros; Li, Dongqing

    2008-03-01

    The Joule heating (JH) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in electrokinetic flow due to the presence of electrical potential gradient and electrical current. JH may become pronounced for applications with high electrical potential gradients or with high ionic concentration buffer solutions. In this review, an in-depth look at the effect of JH on electrokinetic processes is provided. Theoretical modeling of EOF and electrophoresis (EP) with the presence of JH is presented and the important findings from the previous studies are examined. A numerical study of a fused-silica capillary PCR reactor powered by JH is also presented to extend the discussion of favorable usage of JH.

  19. Heat transport at the boundary of ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, C.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center; Herrmann, A.; Murmann, H.; Reimerdes, H.; Schweinzer, J.; Suttrop, W.; Salzmann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany). EURATOM-IPP Association; ASDEX Upgrade Team; NBI Group

    1997-01-17

    The flow of heat in the scrape-off layer region of ASDEX Upgrade is investigated and compared with simple modelling. Parallel heat transport is found to be consistent with electron heat conduction based on Spitzer-Haerm conductivity. Cross-field heat transport is characterized using radial e-folding distances for power, temperature and plasma pressure, which are all found to vary weakly over a wide range of discharge conditions. Type I ELMs, also characterized, introduce a discreteness to the power flow into the SOL and carry approximately half of the power exhaust from the discharge. The divertor plates are effectively screened from the ELM energy, even in low radiation discharges, suggesting enhanced radiation rates during ELMs. (orig.)

  20. Heat transport at the boundary of ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, C.S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hermann, A.; Murmann, H. [IPP-EURATOM Association, Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The flow of heat in the scrape-off layer (SOL) region of ASDEX Upgrade is investigated and compared with simple modelling. Parallel heat transport is found to be consistent with electron heat conduction based on Spitzer-Harm conductivity. Cross-field heat transport is characterized using radial e-folding distances for power, temperature and plasma pressure, which are all found to vary weakly over a wide range of discharge conditions. Type I ELMs, also characterized, introduce a discreteness to the power flow into the SOL and carry approximately half of the power exhaust from the discharge. The divertor plates are effectively screened from the ELM energy, even in low-radiation discharges, suggesting enhanced radiation rates during ELMs. (Author).

  1. High heat flux transport by microbubble emission boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi

    2007-10-01

    In highly subcooled flow boiling, coalescing bubbles on the heating surface collapse to many microbubbles in the beginning of transition boiling and the heat flux increases higher than the ordinary critical heat flux. This phenomenon is called Microbubble Emission Boiling, MEB. It is generated in subcooled flow boiling and the maximum heat flux reaches about 1 kW/cm2(10 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s for a small heating surface of 10 mm×10 mm which is placed at the bottom surface of horizontal rectangular channel. The high pressure in the channel is observed at collapse of the coalescing bubbles and it is closely related the size of coalescing bubbles. Periodic pressure waves are observed in MEB and the heat flux increases linearly in proportion to the pressure frequency. The frequency is considered the frequency of liquid-solid exchange on the heating surface. For the large sized heating surface of 50 mm length×20 mm width, the maximum heat flux obtained is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s. This is considerably higher heat flux than the conventional cooling limit in power electronics. It is difficult to remove the high heat flux by MEB for a longer heating surface than 50 mm by single channel type. A model of advanced cooling device is introduced for power electronics by subcooled flow boiling with impinging jets. Themaxumum cooling heat flux is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2). Microbubble emission boiling is useful for a high heat flux transport technology in future power electronics used in a fuel-cell power plant and a space facility.

  2. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.;

    1987-01-01

    The temperature profiles produced by various heating profiles are calculated from local heat transport models. The models take the heat flux to be the sum of heat diffusion and a non-diffusive heat flow, consistent with local measurements of heat transport. Two models are developed analytically i...

  3. Thermodynamic framework for a generalized heat transport equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yangyu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a generalized heat transport equation including relaxational, nonlocal and nonlinear effects is provided, which contains diverse previous phenomenological models as particular cases. The aim of the present work is to establish an extended irreversible thermodynamic framework, with generalized expressions of entropy and entropy flux. Nonlinear thermodynamic force-flux relation is proposed as an extension of the usual linear one, giving rise to the nonlinear terms in the heat transport equation and ensuring compatibility with the second law. Several previous results are recovered in the linear case, and some additional results related to nonlinear terms are also obtained.

  4. Laboratory experimental investigation of heat transport in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicoletta Maria

    2017-01-01

    Low enthalpy geothermal energy is a renewable resource that is still underexploited nowadays in relation to its potential for development in society worldwide. Most of its applications have already been investigated, such as heating and cooling of private and public buildings, road defrosting, cooling of industrial processes, food drying systems or desalination. Geothermal power development is a long, risky and expensive process. It basically consists of successive development stages aimed at locating the resources (exploration), confirming the power generating capacity of the reservoir (confirmation) and building the power plant and associated structures (site development). Different factors intervene in influencing the length, difficulty and materials required for these phases, thereby affecting their cost. One of the major limitations related to the installation of low enthalpy geothermal power plants regards the initial development steps that are risky and the upfront capital costs that are huge. Most of the total cost of geothermal power is related to the reimbursement of invested capital and associated returns. In order to increase the optimal efficiency of installations which use groundwater as a geothermal resource, flow and heat transport dynamics in aquifers need to be well characterized. Especially in fractured rock aquifers these processes represent critical elements that are not well known. Therefore there is a tendency to oversize geothermal plants. In the literature there are very few studies on heat transport, especially on fractured media. This study is aimed at deepening the understanding of this topic through heat transport experiments in fractured networks and their interpretation. Heat transfer tests have been carried out on the experimental apparatus previously employed to perform flow and tracer transport experiments, which has been modified in order to analyze heat transport dynamics in a network of fractures. In order to model the obtained

  5. Heat transport in the Hadean mantle: From heat pipes to plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankanamge, Duminda G. J.; Moore, William B.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonics is a unique feature of Earth, and it plays a dominant role in transporting Earth's internally generated heat. It also governs the nature, shape, and the motion of the surface of Earth. The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth has been difficult to establish observationally, and modeling of the plate breaking process has not consistently accounted for the nature of the preplate tectonic Earth. We have performed numerical simulations of heat transport in the preplate tectonic Earth to understand the transition to plate tectonic behavior. This period of time is dominated by volcanic heat transport called the heat pipe mode of planetary cooling. These simulations of Earth's mantle include heat transport by melting and melt segregation (volcanism), Newtonian temperature-dependent viscosity, and internal heating. We show that when heat pipes are active, the lithosphere thickens and lithospheric isotherms are kept flat by the solidus. Both of these effects act to suppress plate tectonics. As volcanism wanes, conduction begins to control lithospheric thickness, and large slopes arise at the base of the lithosphere. This produces large lithospheric stress and focuses it on the thinner regions of the lithosphere resulting in plate breaking events.

  6. Phonon heat transport in gallium arsenide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Saini; Vinod Ashokan; B D Indu; R Kumar

    2012-03-01

    The lifetimes of quantum excitations are directly related to the electron and phonon energy linewidths of a particular scattering event. Using the versatile double time thermodynamic Green’s function approach based on many-body theory, an ab-initio formulation of relaxation times of various contributing processes has been investigated with newer understanding in terms of the linewidths of electrons and phonons. The energy linewidth is found to be an extremely sensitive quantity in the transport phenomena of crystalline solids as a collection of large number of scattering processes, namely, boundary scattering, impurity scattering, multiphonon scattering, interference scattering, electron–phonon processes and resonance scattering. The lattice thermal conductivities of three samples of GaAs have been analysed on the basis of modified Callaway model and a fairly good agreement between theory and experimental observations has been reported.

  7. Unidirectional Heat Transport Driven by Rotating Cholesteric Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sayumi; Bono, Shinji; Tabe, Yuka

    2017-02-01

    When a cholesteric liquid crystal (LC) is submitted to a thermal gradient, it exhibits continuous director rotation. The phenomenon is called the Lehmann effect and is understood as a thermomechanical coupling in chiral LCs without mirror symmetry. Since the Lehmann effect is considered to possess time-reversal symmetry, one can expect the inverse process, i.e., rotating chiral LCs to pump heat along the rotational axis. We report the first observation of heat transport driven by rotating cholesteric droplets. This result suggests a new function of the cholesterics as a micro heat pump.

  8. Turbulent heat transport and its anisotropy in an impinging jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petera Karel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent heat transport is anisotropic in many cases as reported by several researchers. RANS-based turbulence models use the turbulent viscosity when expressing the turbulent heat flux in the energy balance (analogy of the Reynolds stresses in the momentum balance. The turbulent (eddy viscosity calculation comes from the Boussinesq analogy mainly and it represents just a scalar value, hence a possible anisotropy in the turbulent flow field cannot be simply transferred to the temperature field. The computational cost of a LES-based approach can be too prohibitive in complex cases, therefore simpler explicit algebraic heat flux models describing the turbulent heat flux in the time-averaged energy equation could be used to get more accurate CFD results. This paper compares several turbulence models for the case of a turbulent impinging jet and deals with a methodology of implementing a user-defined function describing the anisotropic turbulent heat flux in a CFD code.

  9. Mechanisms of heat transport across a nano-scale gap in heat assisted magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares different mechanisms of heat transport across nano-scale gaps and discusses the role of electromagnetic phenomena in heat transport in general nano-scale layered structures. The results of the analysis suggest that heat transfer across sub-5 nm gaps like that appearing in prototypes of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) systems is dominated by direct intermolecular interactions between the separated bodies and is little affected by electromagnetic radiation. The analysis further suggests that local heating for HAMR with sub-5 nm spacing can be more efficiently achieved by a Joule heater that is simpler to fabricate than laser-based optical systems and is less destructive for the nano-scale transducers than laser radiation, which may lead to their structural damage and short duration life of nanoscale transducers.

  10. TOUGH2. Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-05-01

    TOUGH2 is a new and improved version of TOUGH. TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures (water, water with tracer; water, CO2; water, air; water, air, with vapor pressure lowering and water, hydrogen), facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. TOUGH2 is a multi-dimensional numerical model for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in porous and fractured media. The program provides options for specifying injection or withdrawal of heat and fluids. Although primarily designed for studies of high-level nuclear waste isolation in partially saturated geological media, it should also be useful for a wider range of problems in heat and moisture transfer, and in the drying of porous materials. For example, geothermal reservoir simulation problems can be handled simply by setting the air mass function equal to zero on input. The TOUGH2 simulator was developed for problems involving strongly heat-driven flow. To describe these phenomena a multi-phase approach to fluid and heat flow is used, which fully accounts for the movement of gaseous and liquid phases, their transport of latent and sensible heat, and phase transitions between liquid and vapor. TOUGH2 takes account of fluid flow in both liquid and gaseous phases occurring under pressure, viscous, and gravity forces according to Darcy`s law. Interference between the phases is represented by means of relative permeability functions. The code handles binary, but not Knudsen, diffusion in the gas phase and capillary and phase adsorption effects for the liquid phase. Heat transport occurs by means of conduction with thermal conductivity dependent on water saturation, convection, and binary diffusion, which includes both sensible and latent heat.

  11. Heat Transport in Confined Strongly Coupled 2D Dust Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kudelis, Giedrius; Bonitz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Dusty plasmas are a model system for studying strong correlation. The dust grains' size of a few micro-meters and their characteristic oscillation frequency of a few hertz allows for an investigation of many particle effects on an atomic level. In this article, we model the heat transport through an axially confined 2D dust cluster from the center to the outside. The system behaves particularly interesting since heat is not only conducted within the dust component but also transfered to the neutral gas. Fitting the analytical solution to the obtained radial temperature profiles allows to determine the heat conductivity $\\kheat$. The heat conductivity is found to be constant over a wide range of coupling strengths even including the phase transition from solid to liquid here, as it was also found in extended systems by V. Nosenko et al. in 2008 \\cite{PhysRevLett.100.025003}

  12. Perturbative Heat Transport Experiments on TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguilor, S.; Castejon, F.; Luna, E. de la; Cappa, A.; Likin, K.; Fernandez, A.; Tj-II, T.

    2002-07-01

    Heat wave experiments are performed on TJ-II stellarator plasmas to estimate both heat diffusivity and power deposition profiles. High frequency ECRH modulation experiments are used to obtain the power deposition profiles, which is observed to be wider and duller than estimated by tracing techniques. The causes of this difference are discussed in the paper. Fourier analysis techniques are used to estimate the heat diffusivity in low frequency ECRH modulation experiments. This include the power deposition profile as a new ingredient. ECHR switch on/off experiments are exploited to obtain power deposition and heat diffusivities profile. Those quantities are compared with the obtained by modulation experiments and transport analysis, showing a good agreement. (Author) 18 refs.

  13. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  14. Fractional-order theory of heat transport in rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingales, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    The non-local model of heat transfer, used to describe the deviations of the temperature field from the well-known prediction of Fourier/Cattaneo models experienced in complex media, is framed in the context of fractional-order calculus. It has been assumed (Borino et al., 2011 [53], Mongioví and Zingales, 2013 [54]) that thermal energy transport is due to two phenomena: (i) A short-range heat flux ruled by a local transport equation; (ii) A long-range thermal energy transfer proportional to a distance-decaying function, to the relative temperature and to the product of the interacting masses. The distance-decaying function is assumed in the functional class of the power-law decay of the distance yielding a novel temperature equation in terms of α-order Marchaud fractional-order derivative (0⩽α⩽1). Thermodynamical consistency of the model is provided in the context of Clausius-Plank inequality. The effects induced by the boundary conditions on the temperature field are investigated for diffusive as well as ballistic local heat flux. Deviations of the temperature field from the linear distributions in the neighborhood of the thermostated zones of small-scale conductors are qualitatively predicted by the used fractional-order heat transport model, as shown by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Heat Transport Effects in Rotating Gases and Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmes, Elijah; Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    In some contexts, rotating gases and plasmas exhibit heat transport effects that are substantially different from what would be found in the absence of rotation. For instance, a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a device which separates an input stream of (neutral) gas into hot and cold streams by setting up a rotating flow in a specially designed cylindrical chamber. One class of vortex tube models involves radial motion that carries gas up and down the pressure gradients set up by the centrifugal potential inside the tube and which results in adiabatic heating and cooling of the radially moving material. The approach of producing heat transport in a rotating flow using pressure gradients and motion along those gradients may have applications in plasma systems. We discuss possible applications for rotational heat transport effects in plasma systems, including Z-pinch configurations. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory; U.S. Defense Reduction Agency Grant No. HDTRA1-11-1-0037; and the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-NA0002948.

  16. Optimal Heat Transport in Rayleigh-B\\'enard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Sondak, David; Waleffe, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers $Pr$ and Rayleigh number up to $Ra\\sim 10^9$. Power law scalings of $Nu\\sim Ra^{\\gamma}$ are observed with $\\gamma\\approx 0.31$, where the Nusselt number $Nu$ is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. Any dependence of the scaling exponent on $Pr$ is found to be extremely weak. On the other hand, the presence of two local maxima of $Nu$ with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same $Ra$ leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport. For $Pr \\lesssim 7$, optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber. In these fluids, the optimal structure is a plume of warm rising fluid which spawns left/right horizontal arms near the top of the channel, leading to downdrafts adjacent to the central updraft. For $Pr > 7$ at high-enough Ra, the optimal structure is a...

  17. Mobile heat accumulators for lorry or train transport?; Mobile Waermespeicher fuer den LKW- oder Zugtransport?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, Philipp

    2013-07-01

    Where heat grids cannot be laid for geographic reasons, mobile heat accumulators may be appropriate. The mobile heat accumulators are transported by lorry or train between the heat source and the heat sink. The waste heat can be decoupled from biogas plants, waste incineration plants or industrial sites. Existing road or rail networks can be used for transportation. Decisive factors to achieve low heat production costs are: free waste heat, large and continuous heat quantities as well as a short distance between the heat source and the heat sink. (orig.)

  18. Water, heat and salt transport through the Strait of Otranto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Sadegh; Gačić, Miroslav; Kovačević, Vedrana; Cardin, Vanessa

    2010-05-01

    The water, heat and salt transports through the Strait of Otranto are estimated applying direct method to historical current and hydrographical data (from December 94 through November 95). A variational inverse method based on a variational principle and a finite element solver is used to reconstruct the current, temperature and salinity fields across the Strait section from sparse measurements. The mean annual inflow and outflow water transport rates are estimated as 0.901±0.039 Sv and -0.939±0.315 Sv, respectively, and the net transport for the period of study is equal to -0.032±0.208 Sv. Thus, on a yearly time interval, the inflow and the outflow are practically compensated. The heat and salt transports due to advection process are estimated for five monthly periods, namely December 1994, February, May, August and November 1995. Considering these five periods representative of the seasonal cycle during the year, their average values show that there is a net heat advection into the Adriatic Sea on a yearly basis. The estimated value of advected heat and the corresponding error are 2.408±0.490 TW, which is equivalent to a heat gain of 17.37±3.53 W m-2 for the whole basin. This value is compared to the heat loss of -36±152 (std) W m-2 through the air-sea interface calculated by means of bulk formulas over the Adriatic Sea. The two values are expected to be balance each other in order to close the heat budget of the basin. The possible reasons for this difference to occur are discussed. On a yearly basis, the salt transport is estimated as an input of salt equal to 0.05×106 Kg s-1. The average annual fresh water budget is estimated as -0.002 Sv, equivalent to the mass of fresh water of 2.00×106Kg s-1 or to the level of 0.45 m yr-1 for the entire Adriatic Sea. The import of salt that is less than the gain of fresh water is in agreement with the fact that the Adriatic Sea is a dilution basin.

  19. Heat transport in a chaotic magnetic field; Transport de la chaleur dans un champ magnetique chaotique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feron, Samuel [Service de Physique des Plasmas de Fusion, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1997-09-25

    Heat transport in a plasma with a magnetic perturbation of amplitude b and a transverse diffusion of typical scale {delta} is investigated. On Tore Supra, such a perturbation is induced at the edge by the Ergodic Divertor. Classically, the heat transport is expected to be diffusive, but the experimental evidence does not support such a model. The main experimental features are temperature modulations and a transport barrier which allows no loss of confinement in the core plasma. An analysis of both temperature field and magnetic perturbation indicates clearly delimited regions of strong and weak transport that are related to the loss of memory on a field line due to the transverse diffusion. Furthermore, the perturbation is strongly space-dependent. This implies non-local transport and a region (separatrix) in which the Chirikov parameter is less than one. This analysis leads to a 1D analytical model which recovers modulations. A transport barrier is also expected, assuming a dissymmetrical transport process around the separatrix. A mapping transport code has also been developed which takes the basic features of ergodic divertor into account. Both experimental results, modulations, and a transport barrier are recovered. The latter depends on the ratio b/{delta}, but occurs without any assumption of dissymmetrical transport. For the same ratio b/{delta} as Tore Supra, the core confinement, as with the experiment, is not affected. A lower ratio leads to a loss of confinement, while a larger value produces improved confinement. The barrier can be attributed to non diffusive transport out of islands located around separatrix. The trapping mechanisms in these islands, combined with some small level of transverse transport, reduce the probability for particles to flow back to the perturbed region. A dissymmetrical process then appears and allows for a transport barrier. (author) 90 refs., 65 figs.

  20. Heat transport in a chaotic magnetic field; Transport de la chaleur dans un champ magnetique chaotique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feron, S. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-12-01

    Heat transport in a plasma with a magnetic perturbation of amplitude b and a transverse diffusion of typical scale {delta} is investigated. On Tore Supra, such a perturbation is induced at the edge by the Ergodic Divertor. Classically, the heat transport is expected to be diffusive, but the experimental evidence does not support such a model. The main experimental features are temperature modulations and a transport barrier which allows no loss of confinement in the core plasma. An analysis of both temperature filed nd magnetic perturbation indicates clearly delimited regions of strong and weak transport that are related to the loss of memory on a filed line due to the transverse diffusion. Furthermore, the perturbation is strongly space-dependent. This implies non local transport and a region (separatrix) in which the Chirikov parameter is less that one. This analysis leads to a 1D analytical model which recovers modulations. A transport barrier is also expected, assuming a dissymmetrical transport process around the separatrix. A mapping transport code has also been developed which takes the basic features of the ergodic divertor into account. Both experimental results, modulations, and a transport barrier are recovered. The latter depends on the ratio b/{delta}, but occurs without any assumption of dissymmetrical transport. For the same ratio b/{delta} as Tore Supra, the core confinement, as with the experiment, is not affected. A lower ratio leads to a loss of confinement, while a larger value produces improved confinement. The barrier can be attributed to non diffusive transport out of islands located around the separatrix. The trapping mechanisms in these islands, combined with some small level of transverse transport, reduce the probability for particles to flow back to the perturbed region. A dissymmetrical process then appears and allows for a transport barrier. (author) 90 refs.

  1. Molecular-dynamics calculation of the vacancy heat of transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelling, Patrick K.; Ernotte, Jacques; Shokeen, Lalit; Tucker, William C. [Advanced Material Processing and Analysis Center and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Woods Halley, J. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 555455 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    We apply the recently developed constrained-dynamics method to elucidate the thermodiffusion of vacancies in a single-component material. The derivation and assumptions used in the method are clearly explained. Next, the method is applied to compute the reduced heat of transport Q{sub v}{sup *}−h{sub fv} for vacancies in a single-component material. Results from simulations using three different Morse potentials, with one providing an approximate description of Au, and an embedded-atom model potential for Ni are presented. It is found that the reduced heat of transport Q{sub v}{sup *}−h{sub fv} may take either positive or negative values depending on the potential parameters and exhibits some dependence on temperature. It is also found that Q{sub v}{sup *}−h{sub fv} may be correlated with the activation entropy. The results are discussed in comparison with experimental and previous simulation results.

  2. Analysis of coupled heat and moisture transport on parallel computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Krejčí, Tomáš

    2017-07-01

    Coupled analysis of heat and moisture transport in complicated structural elements or in whole structures deserves a special attention because after space discretization, large number of degrees of freedom are needed. This paper describes possible solution of such problems based on domain decomposition methods executed on parallel computers. The Schur complement method is used with respect to nonsymmetric systems of algebraic equations. The method described is an alternative to other methods, e.g. two or more scale homogenization.

  3. Internal transport barrier with ICRH minority heating on Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, G.T.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Antar, G.; Aniel, T.; Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Devynck, P.; Lasalle, J.; Martin, G.; Saint-Laurent, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Budny, R.V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., N.J. (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Recently reversed magnetic shear (s) operation was performed using only ion cyclotron resonance frequency minority heating (ICRH) during current ramp-up. A wide region of reserved magnetic shear has been obtained. For the first time, an electron internal transport barrier sustained by ICRH is observed, with a dramatic drop of density fluctuations. This barrier was maintained, on the current flat top, for about 2 s. (authors)

  4. Climate in the Absence of Ocean Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, B. E. J.

    2015-12-01

    The energy transported by the oceans to mid- and high latitudes is small compared to the atmosphere, yet exerts an outsized influence on the climate. A key reason is the strong interaction between ocean heat transport (OHT) and sea ice extent. I quantify this by comparing a realistic control climate simulation with a slab ocean simulation in which OHT is disabled. Using the state-of-the-art CESM with a realistic present-day continental configuration, I show that the absence of OHT leads to a 23 K global cooling and massive expansion of sea ice to near 30º latitude in both hemisphere. The ice expansion is asymmetric, with greatest extent in the South Pacific and South Indian ocean basins. I discuss implications of this enormous and asymmetric climate change for atmospheric circulation, heat transport, and tropical precipitation. Parameter sensitivity studies show that the simulated climate is far more sensitive to small changes in ice surface albedo in the absence of OHT, with some perturbations sufficient to cause a runaway Snowball Earth glaciation. I conclude that the oceans are responsible for an enormous global warming by mitigating an otherwise very potent sea ice albedo feedback, but that the magnitude of this effect is still rather uncertain. I will also present some ideas on adapting the simple energy balance model to account for the enhanced sensitivity of sea ice to heating from the ocean.

  5. Heat transport modelling in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    A model to estimate the heat transport in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) is described. The model, based on experimental and theoretical results, divides the RFP electron heat diffusivity χe into three regions, one in the plasma core, where χe is assumed to be determined by the tearing modes, one located around the reversal radius, where χe is assumed not dependent on the magnetic fluctuations and one in the extreme edge, where high χe is assumed. The absolute values of the core and of the reversal χe are determined by simulating the electron temperature and the soft x-ray and by comparing the simulated signals with the experimental ones. The model is used to estimate the heat diffusivity and the energy confinement time during the flat top of standard plasmas, of deep F plasmas and of plasmas obtained with the intelligent shell.

  6. Effects of chemical bonding on heat transport across interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losego, Mark D; Grady, Martha E; Sottos, Nancy R; Cahill, David G; Braun, Paul V

    2012-04-22

    Interfaces often dictate heat flow in micro- and nanostructured systems. However, despite the growing importance of thermal management in micro- and nanoscale devices, a unified understanding of the atomic-scale structural features contributing to interfacial heat transport does not exist. Herein, we experimentally demonstrate a link between interfacial bonding character and thermal conductance at the atomic level. Our experimental system consists of a gold film transfer-printed to a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with systematically varied termination chemistries. Using a combination of ultrafast pump-probe techniques (time-domain thermoreflectance, TDTR, and picosecond acoustics) and laser spallation experiments, we independently measure and correlate changes in bonding strength and heat flow at the gold-SAM interface. For example, we experimentally demonstrate that varying the density of covalent bonds within this single bonding layer modulates both interfacial stiffness and interfacial thermal conductance. We believe that this experimental system will enable future quantification of other interfacial phenomena and will be a critical tool to stimulate and validate new theories describing the mechanisms of interfacial heat transport. Ultimately, these findings will impact applications, including thermoelectric energy harvesting, microelectronics cooling, and spatial targeting for hyperthermal therapeutics.

  7. Quantum Thermodynamics in Strong Coupling: Heat Transport and Refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Katz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance characteristics of a heat rectifier and a heat pump are studied in a non-Markovian framework. The device is constructed from a molecule connected to a hot and cold reservoir. The heat baths are modelled using the stochastic surrogate Hamiltonian method. The molecule is modelled by an asymmetric double-well potential. Each well is semi-locally connected to a heat bath composed of spins. The dynamics are driven by a combined system–bath Hamiltonian. The temperature of the baths is regulated by a secondary spin bath composed of identical spins in thermal equilibrium. A random swap operation exchange spins between the primary and secondary baths. The combined system is studied in various system–bath coupling strengths. In all cases, the average heat current always flows from the hot towards the cold bath in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The asymmetry of the double well generates a rectifying effect, meaning that when the left and right baths are exchanged the heat current follows the hot-to-cold direction. The heat current is larger when the high frequency is coupled to the hot bath. Adding an external driving field can reverse the transport direction. Such a refrigeration effect is modelled by a periodic driving field in resonance with the frequency difference of the two potential wells. A minimal driving amplitude is required to overcome the heat leak effect. In the strong driving regime the cooling power is non-monotonic with the system–bath coupling.

  8. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  9. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, T R; Stewart, Donald A; Martin, Gregory T; Weaver, James C

    2004-11-17

    Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1) surface contact heating and (2) spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42 degrees C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45 degrees C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. The heat transport system model of the skin was solved by exploiting the mathematical

  10. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  11. Heat transport capability and compensation chamber influence in loop heat pipes performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riehl, Roger R. [National Institute for Space Research-Space Mechanics and Control Division-DMC/Satelite Av. dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, 12227-010 (Brazil); Siqueira, Tulio C.P.A. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto-Departamento de Engenharia de Controle e Automacao Ouro Preto, MG, 35400-000 (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    The development of the loop heat pipe technology for application in future space missions requires that certain aspects related to the operation of this device in regard to the heat transport, geometry and selected working fluid must be carefully considered. As efforts have been focused in the construction of loop heat pipes able to manage up to 80W of applied heat using an alternative working fluid, designing and testing these devices have shown important results. Two loop heat pipes have been built and tested, where they differ from each other on their compensation chamber geometry and use high grade acetone as working fluid, in substitution of the so-used ammonia. Life tests have shown reliable operation for both loop heat pipes with successful startups and continuous operation without temperature overshoot or evaporator dryout. The life tests results investigation have generated important data that has been applied on the design and construction of loop heat pipes toward their use in future space applications. (author)

  12. Thermal balance and quantum heat transport in nanostructures thermalized by local Langevin heat baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sääskilahti, K; Oksanen, J; Tulkki, J

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of thermal transport in practical nanostructures requires making tradeoffs between the size of the system and the completeness of the model. We study quantum heat transfer in a self-consistent thermal bath setup consisting of two lead regions connected by a center region. Atoms both in the leads and in the center region are coupled to quantum Langevin heat baths that mimic the damping and dephasing of phonon waves by anharmonic scattering. This approach treats the leads and the center region on the same footing and thereby allows for a simple and physically transparent thermalization of the system, enabling also perfect acoustic matching between the leads and the center region. Increasing the strength of the coupling reduces the mean-free path of phonons and gradually shifts phonon transport from ballistic regime to diffusive regime. In the center region, the bath temperatures are determined self-consistently from the requirement of zero net energy exchange between the local heat bath and each atom. By solving the stochastic equations of motion in frequency space and averaging over noise using the general fluctuation-dissipation relation derived by Dhar and Roy [J. Stat. Phys. 125, 801 (2006)], we derive the formula for thermal current, which contains the Caroli formula for phonon transmission function and reduces to the Landauer-Büttiker formula in the limit of vanishing coupling to local heat baths. We prove that the bath temperatures measure local kinetic energy and can, therefore, be interpreted as true atomic temperatures. In a setup where phonon reflections are eliminated, the Boltzmann transport equation under gray approximation with full phonon dispersion is shown to be equivalent to the self-consistent heat bath model. We also study thermal transport through two-dimensional constrictions in square lattice and graphene and discuss the differences between the exact solution and linear approximations.

  13. Three dimensional heat transport modeling in Vossoroca reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcie Polli, Bruna; Yoshioka Bernardo, Julio Werner; Hilgert, Stephan; Bleninger, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater reservoirs are used for many purposes as hydropower generation, water supply and irrigation. In Brazil, according to the National Energy Balance of 2013, hydropower energy corresponds to 70.1% of the Brazilian demand. Superficial waters (which include rivers, lakes and reservoirs) are the most used source for drinking water supply - 56% of the municipalities use superficial waters as a source of water. The last two years have shown that the Brazilian water and electricity supply is highly vulnerable and that improved management is urgently needed. The construction of reservoirs affects physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water body, e.g. stratification, temperature, residence time and turbulence reduction. Some water quality issues related to reservoirs are eutrophication, greenhouse gas emission to the atmosphere and dissolved oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion. The understanding of the physical processes in the water body is fundamental to reservoir management. Lakes and reservoirs may present a seasonal behavior and stratify due to hydrological and meteorological conditions, and especially its vertical distribution may be related to water quality. Stratification can control heat and dissolved substances transport. It has been also reported the importance of horizontal temperature gradients, e.g. inflows and its density and processes of mass transfer from shallow to deeper regions of the reservoir, that also may impact water quality. Three dimensional modeling of the heat transport in lakes and reservoirs is an important tool to the understanding and management of these systems. It is possible to estimate periods of large vertical temperature gradients, inhibiting vertical transport and horizontal gradients, which could be responsible for horizontal transport of heat and substances (e.g. differential cooling or inflows). Vossoroca reservoir was constructed in 1949 by the impoundment of São João River and is located near to

  14. Heat and salt transport throughout the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Yuan, Dongliang

    2016-11-01

    Absolute geostrophic currents in the North Pacific Ocean are calculated using the P-vector method and gridded Argo profiling data from January 2004 to December 2012. Three-dimensional structures and seasonal variability of meridional heat transport (MHT) and meridional salt transport (MST) are analyzed. The results show that geostrophic and Ekman components are generally opposite in sign, with the southward geostrophic component dominating in the subtropics and the northward Ekman component dominating in the tropics. In combination with the net surface heat flux and the MST through the Bering Strait, the MHT and MST of the western boundary currents (WBCs) are estimated for the first time. The results suggest that the WBCs are of great importance in maintaining the heat and salt balance of the North Pacific. The total interior MHT and MST in the tropics show nearly the same seasonal variability as that of the Ekman components, consistent with the variability of zonal wind stress. The geostrophic MHT in the tropics is mainly concentrated in the upper layers, while MST with large amplitude and annual variation can extend much deeper. This suggests that shallow processes dominate MHT in the North Pacific, while MST can be affected by deep ocean circulation. In the extratropical ocean, both MHT and MST are weak. However, there is relatively large and irregular seasonal variability of geostrophic MST, suggesting the importance of the geostrophic circulation in the MST of that area.

  15. IMPACT OF THE TRANSPORT ON THE URBAN HEAT ISLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddad Louiza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although transport has resulted in many beneficial effects on society, but their development in fact have negative impacts on the environment. The car policy caused many problems such as: - the spectacular growth of fuel consumption hence the very vast increase in urban pollution, traffic congestion in certain places and at certain times, the increase in the number of accidents. The exhaust emissions from cars and weather conditions are the main factors that determine the level of pollution in urban atmosphere. These conditions lead to the phenomenon of heat transfer and radiation occurring between the air and the soil surface. These exchanges give rise, in urban areas, to the effects of heat islands that correspond to the appearance of excess air temperature between the city and its surrounding space. We perform a numerical simulation of the plume generated by the exhaust gases of cars and show that these gases form a screening effect above the urban cite which cause the heat island in the presence of wind flow. The study allows us: i- to understand the different mechanisms of interactions between these phenomenons, ii- to consider appropriate technical solutions to mitigate the effects of the heat island.

  16. Momentum transport and non-local transport in heat-flux-driven magnetic reconnection in HEDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Fox, Will; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    Strong magnetic fields are readily generated in high-energy-density plasmas and can affect the heat confinement properties of the plasma. Magnetic reconnection can in turn be important as an inverse process, which destroys or reconfigures the magnetic field. Recent theory has demonstrated a novel physics regime for reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas where the magnetic field is advected into the reconnection layer by plasma heat flux via the Nernst effect. In this work we elucidate the physics of the electron dissipation layer in this heat-flux-driven regime. Through fully kinetic simulation and a new generalized Ohm's law, we show that momentum transport due to the heat-flux-viscosity effect provides the dissipation mechanism to allow magnetic field line reconnection. Scaling analysis and simulations show that the characteristic width of the current sheet in this regime is several electron mean-free-paths. These results additionally show a coupling between non-local transport and momentum transport, which in turn affects the dynamics of the magnetic field. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008655.

  17. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Two physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32. m diameter by 0.99. m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed.Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1. cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9. cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6. cm of water and 55.9. cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat-sand-soil mix

  18. A simulation of heat transfer during billet transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaklic, A.; Glogovac, B. [Institute of Metals and Technology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kolenko, T. [University of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Faculty of Natural Science and Technology; Zupancic, B. [University of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Faculty of Electrical Engineering; Zak, B. T. [Terming d.o.o., Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a simulation model for billet cooling during the billet's transport from the reheating furnace to the rolling mill. During the transport, the billet is exposed to radiation, convection and conduction. Due to the rectangular shape of the billet, the three-dimensional finite-difference model could be applied to calculate the heat conduction inside the billet. The billets are reheated in a gas-fired walking-beam furnace and are exposed to scaling. The model takes into account the effect of the thin oxide scale. We proved that the scale significantly affects the temperature distribution in the billet and should not be neglected. The model was verified by using a thermal camera. (author)

  19. Topological Angular Momentum and Radiative Heat Transport in Closed Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    Here, we study the role of topological edge states of light in the transport of thermally generated radiation in a closed cavity at a thermodynamic equilibrium. It is shown that even in the zero temperature limit - when the field fluctuations are purely quantum mechanical - there is a persistent flow of electromagnetic momentum in the cavity in closed orbits, deeply rooted in the emergence of spatially separated unidirectional edge state channels. It is highlighted the electromagnetic orbital angular momentum of the system is nontrivial, and that the energy circulation is towards the same direction as that determined by incomplete cyclotron orbits near the cavity walls. Our findings open new inroads in topological photonics and suggest that topological states of light can determine novel paradigms in the context of radiative heat transport.

  20. Transport in nanoscale systems: hydrodynamics, turbulence, and local electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale systems is usually described as an open-boundary scattering problem. This picture, however, says nothing about the dynamical onset of steady states, their microscopic nature, or their dependence on initial conditions [1]. In order to address these issues, I will first describe the dynamical many-particle state via an effective quantum hydrodynamic theory [2]. This approach allows us to predict a series of novel phenomena like turbulence of the electron liquid [2], local electron heating in nanostructures [3], and the effect of electron viscosity on resistance [4]. I will provide both analytical results and numerical examples of first-principles electron dynamics in nanostructures using the above approach. I will also discuss possible experimental tests of our predictions. Work supported in part by NSF and DOE. [1] N. Bushong, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Approach to steady-state transport in nanoscale systems'' Nano Letters, 5 2569 (2005); M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, ``Transport in nanoscale systems: the microcanonical versus grand-canonical picture,'' J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, ``Hydrodynamic approach to transport and turbulence in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/05123326; J. Phys. Cond. Matt., in press. [3] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Local electron heating in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/0605312; Nano Letters, in press. [4] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale and M. Di Ventra, ``Dynamical corrections to the DFT-LDA electron conductance in nanoscale systems,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005).

  1. Heat Transport in Graphene Ferromagnet-Insulator-Superconductor Junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We study heat transport in a graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconducting junction. It is found that the thermal conductance of the graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor (FIS) junction is an oscillatory function of the barrier strength x in the thin-barrier limit. The gate potential U0 decreases the amplitude of thermal conductance oscillation. Both the amplitude and phase of the thermal conductance oscillation varies with the exchange energy Eh. The thermal conductance of a graphene FIS junction displays the usual exponential dependence on temperature, reflecting the s-wave symmetry of superconducting graphene.%@@ We study heat transport in a graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconducting junction.It is found that the thermal conductance of the graphene ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor(FIS)junction is an oscillatory function of the barrier strength X in the thin-barrier limit.The gate potential Uo decreases the amplitude of thermal conductance oscillation.Both the amplitude and phase of the thermal conductance oscillation varies with the exchange energy Eh.The thermal conductance of a graphene FIS junction displays the usual exponential dependence on temperature, reflecting the s-wave symmetry of superconducting graphene.

  2. Policies and initiatives for carbon neutrality in nordic heating and transport systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Jakob Glarbo; Wu, Qiuwei; Ostergaard, Jacob;

    2012-01-01

    to heat pumps in the Nordic region rely on both private economic and national economic incentives. Initiatives toward carbon neutrality in the transport system are mostly concentrated on research, development and demonstration for deployment of a large number of EVs. All Nordic countries have plans......Policies and initiatives promoting carbon neutrality in the Nordic heating and transport systems are presented. The focus within heating systems is the propagation of heat pumps while the focus within transport systems is initiatives regarding electric vehicles (EVs). It is found that conversion...... for the future heating and transport systems with the ambition of realizing carbon neutrality....

  3. Transition to ballistic regime for heat transport in helium II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciacca, Michele, E-mail: michele.sciacca@unipa.it [Dipartimento Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, Università degli studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Sellitto, Antonio, E-mail: ant.sellitto@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Informatica ed Economia, Università della Basilicata, Campus Macchia Romana, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Jou, David, E-mail: david.jou@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Catalans, Carme 47, 08001 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-07-04

    The size-dependent and flux-dependent effective thermal conductivity of narrow capillaries filled with superfluid helium is analyzed from a thermodynamic continuum perspective. The classical Landau evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of quiescent superfluid, or the Gorter–Mellinck regime of turbulent superfluids, is extended to describe the transition to ballistic regime in narrow channels wherein the radius R is comparable to (or smaller than) the phonon mean-free path ℓ in superfluid helium. To do so, we start from an extended equation for the heat flux incorporating non-local terms, and take into consideration a heat slip flow along the walls of the tube. This leads from an effective thermal conductivity proportional to R{sup 2} (Landau regime) to another one proportional to Rℓ (ballistic regime). We consider two kinds of flows: along cylindrical pipes and along two infinite parallel plates. - Highlights: • Heat transport in counterflow helium in the ballistic regime. • The one-fluid model based on the Extended Thermodynamics is used. • The transition from the Landau regime to the ballistic regime. • The transition from quantum turbulence to ballistic regime.

  4. Seasonal and Interdecadal Variations of Heat Transport over the Northern Hemisphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jilin; XU Delong; GU Dejun

    2006-01-01

    Using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, variations of heat transport in the Northern Hemisphere were studied.It was found that there are interdecadal variations in heat transport from middle latitudes to higher latitudes.The variations of interdecadal heat transport over longitudes around 120°E are out of phase with those over around 90°E and over the Northeastern Pacific.The seasonal variations of heat transport were also discussed.It was found that most heat is transported in the lower layer of the troposphere from middle latitudes to higher latitudes.Over around 120°E and over around 120°W, the seasonal and interannual variations of heat transport across 32.5°N are apparent and in phase.

  5. Optimal wall spacing for heat transport in thermal convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkina, Olga [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    The simulation of RB flow for Ra up to 1 x 10{sup 10} is computationally expensive in terms of computing power and hard disk storage. Thus, we gratefully acknowledge the computational resources supported by Leibniz-Rechenzentrum Munich. Compared to Γ=1 situation, a new physical picture of heat transport is identified here at Γ{sub opt} for any explored Ra. Therefore, a detailed comparison between Γ=1 and Γ=Γ{sub opt} is valuable for our further research, for example, their vertical temperature and velocity profiles. Additionally, we plan to compare the fluid with different Pr under geometrical confinement, which are computationally expensive for the situations of Pr<<1 and Pr>>1.

  6. Heat- and mass-transport in aqueous silica nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanov, A. N.; Tolmachev, Yuriy V.

    2009-10-01

    Using the transient hot wire and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods we determined the thermal conductivity and the solvent self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) in aqueous suspensions of quasi-monodisperse spherical silica nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity was found to increase at higher volume fraction of nanoparticles in accordance with the effective medium theory albeit with a smaller slope. On the other hand, the SDC was found to decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction faster than predicted by the effective medium theory. These deviations can be explained by the presence of an interfacial heat-transfer resistance and water retention by the nanoparticles, respectively. We found no evidence for anomalous enhancement in the transport properties of nanofluids reported earlier by other groups.

  7. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  8. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  9. Understanding of flux-limited behaviors of heat transport in nonlinear regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yangyu, E-mail: yangyuhguo@gmail.com [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics and CNMM, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jou, David, E-mail: david.jou@uab.es [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Wang, Moran, E-mail: mrwang@tsinghua.edu [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics and CNMM, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-01-28

    The classical Fourier's law of heat transport breaks down in highly nonequilibrium situations as in nanoscale heat transport, where nonlinear effects become important. The present work is aimed at exploring the flux-limited behaviors based on a categorization of existing nonlinear heat transport models in terms of their theoretical foundations. Different saturation heat fluxes are obtained, whereas the same qualitative variation trend of heat flux versus exerted temperature gradient is got in diverse nonlinear models. The phonon hydrodynamic model is proposed to act as a standard to evaluate other heat flux limiters because of its more rigorous physical foundation. A deeper knowledge is thus achieved about the phenomenological generalized heat transport models. The present work provides deeper understanding and accurate modeling of nonlocal and nonlinear heat transport beyond the diffusive limit. - Highlights: • Exploring flux-limited behaviors based on a categorization of existing nonlinear heat transport models. • Proposing phonon hydrodynamic model as a standard to evaluate heat flux limiters. • Providing accurate modeling of nonlocal and nonlinear heat transport beyond the diffusive limit.

  10. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Material transport is an important mechanism in microfluidics and drug delivery. The methods and solutions found in literature involve passively diffusing structures, microneedles and chemically fueled structures. In this work, we make use of optically actuated microtools with embedded metal layer as heating element for controlled loading and release. The new microtools take advantage of the photothermal-induced convection current to load and unload cargo. We also discuss some challenges encountered in realizing a self-contained polymerized microtool. Microfluidic mixing, fluid flow control and convection currents have been demonstrated both experimentally and numerically for static metal thin films or passively floating nanoparticles. Here we show an integration of aforementioned functionalities in an optically fabricated and actuated microtool. As proof of concept, we demonstrate loading and unloading of beads. This can be extended to controlled transport and release of genetic material, bio-molecules, fluorescent dyes. We envisioned these microtools to be an important addition to the portfolio of structure-mediated contemporary biophotonics.

  11. Air, contaminant and heat transport models. Integration and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorer, V.; Weber, A. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Section 175 Building Equipment, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    Comfort evaluations cover air quality, thermal, visual and acoustic comfort. Today, only few computer programs allow for the integrated evaluation of several or all relevant parameters. Heat transport, ventilation as well as lighting in a room are influenced by each other. Therefore they should be integrally modelled. As a part of the IEA-ECBCS Annex 23 'Multizone Air Flow Modelling' (IEA, International Energy Agency; ECBCS, Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems, an IEA research programme), such a coupling has been realised by integrating the air flow and contaminant transport simulation code of COMIS into the building and systems simulation code TRNSYS. This paper gives a short description of the concept used for the coupling. Then, two application examples typical for a building design study situation are presented, the first being a multi-storey school building which was passively cooled at night due to natural stack airflow. In the second example the facade of the same building was retrofitted with a glazed outer facade. Ventilation was provided by naturally driven shaft ventilation through the facade spaces. For such cases as described in the examples, it may be necessary due to the complex interactions, to study many configurations to find optimum control strategies for the openings and the blinds with respect to overheating risk as well as to air quality. For the upper floors, the risk of overheating and low air quality may be difficult to minimize without extending the shaft above roof level. (author)

  12. The Impact of Oceanic Heat Transport on the Atmospheric Circulation: a Thermodynamic Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Schröder, Alexander; Lunkeit, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates how global thermodynamic properties of the climate system are affected by the changes in the intensity of the imposed oceanic heat transport in an atmospheric general circulation model in aqua-planet configuration. Increasing the poleward oceanic heat transport results in an overall increase in the surface temperature and a decrease in the equator-to-pole surface temperature difference as a result of the ice-albedo feedback. Following the classical ansatz by Stone, the atmospheric heat transport changes in such a way that the total poleward heat transport remains almost unchanged. We also find that the efficiency of the climate machine, the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle and the material entropy production of the system decline with increased oceanic heat transport which suggests that the climate system becomes less efficient and turns into a state of reduced entropy production, as the enhanced oceanic transport performs a stronger large-scale mixing between geophysical fl...

  13. Influence of tube and particle diameter on heat transport in packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkink, J.G.H.; Borkink, J.G.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Influence of the tube and particle diameter and shape, as well as their ratio, on the radial heat transport in packed beds has been studied. Heat transport experiments were performed with four different packings in three wall-cooled tubes, which differed in inner diameter only. Experimental values f

  14. Influence of tube and particle diameter on heat transport in packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkink, J.G.H.; Borkink, J.G.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Influence of the tube and particle diameter and shape, as well as their ratio, on the radial heat transport in packed beds has been studied. Heat transport experiments were performed with four different packings in three wall-cooled tubes, which differed in inner diameter only. Experimental values

  15. Heating and ion transport in a Y-junction surface-electrode trap

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, G; Volin, C; Buikema, A; Nichols, C S; Stick, D; Brown, Kenneth R

    2014-01-01

    We measure ion heating following transport throughout a Y-junction surface-electrode ion trap. By carefully selecting the trap voltage update rate during adiabatic transport along a trap arm, we observe minimal heating relative to the anomalous heating background. Transport through the junction results in an induced heating between 37 and 150 quanta in the axial direction per traverse. To reliably measure heating in this range, we compare the experimental sideband envelope, including up to fourth-order sidebands, to a theoretical model. The sideband envelope method allows us to cover the intermediate heating range inaccessible to the first-order sideband and Doppler recooling methods. We conclude that quantum information processing in this ion trap will likely require sympathetic cooling in order to support high fidelity gates after junction transport.

  16. Point Lepreau primary heat transport pump wear ring cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licina, G. [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., San Jose, California (United States); Rankin, B. [Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station, Fredericton, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The number 3 Primary Heat Transport (PHT) pump from Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station (Point Lepreau) was disassembled after more than 30 years of service for inspection during station refurbishment. The disassembly and inspection were performed to provide assurance of continued satisfactory operation during life extension. The inspection revealed cracks in the wear ring, at and near the tack welds (Type 309 stainless steel weld metal) at the cap screws that attach the Type 420 stainless steel wear ring to the body of the pump. Investigative work consisted of on-site PT and replication of the microstructure at the surface of the wear ring, subsequent impressions of two crack faces, and hardness determinations. This paper describes the investigative work and conclusions associated with resolution of the following questions: 1. What is the most likely cause of the cracking? 2. Will the cracks propagate within the base metal of the wear ring? 3. If propagation is possible, what is the risk of cracks intersecting, such that a piece of metal could become dislodged? Question number 3 has clear ramifications with respect to foreign material entering and damaging a nuclear fuel-containing pressure tube. There are also questions associated with extent of condition, specifically, whether other PHT pumps may have similar or worse cracking and whether such cracks will grow. Results will be applied to wear rings in other PHT pumps at Point Lepreau and are likely to be applicable to similar components in other CANDU PHT pumps. (author)

  17. Global anomalous transport of ICRH- and NBI-heated fast ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkie, George J; Abel, Ian G; Dorland, William; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    By taking advantage of the trace approximation, one can gain an enormous computational advantage when solving for the global turbulent transport of impurities. In particular, this makes feasible the study of non-Maxwellian transport coupled in radius and energy, allowing collisions and transport to be accounted for on similar time scales, as occurs for fast ions. In this work, we study the fully-nonlinear ITG-driven trace turbulent transport of locally heated and injected fast ions. Previous results indicated the existence of MeV-range minorities heated by cyclotron resonance, and an associated density pinch effect. Here, we build upon this result using the t3core code to solve for the distribution of these minorities, consistently including the effects of collisions, gyrokinetic turbulence, and heating. Using the same tool to study the transport of injected fast ions, we contrast the qualitative features of their transport with that of the heated minorities. Furthermore, we move beyond the trace approximatio...

  18. Strong eddy compensation for the Gulf Stream heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenko, Oleg A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a high-resolution ocean model forced with high-resolution atmospheric fields, a 5 year mean heat budget of the upper ocean in the Gulf Stream (GS) region is analyzed. The heat brought to the region with the mean flows along the GS path is 2-3 times larger than the heat loss to the atmosphere, with the difference being balanced by a strong cooling effect due to lateral eddy heat fluxes. However, over a broad area off the Grand Banks, the eddies warm the uppermost ocean layers, partly compensating for the loss of heat to the atmosphere. The upward eddy heat flux, which brings heat from the deeper ocean to the upper layers, is 30-80% of the surface heat loss.

  19. Impact of model resolution for on-shelf heat transport along the West Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer A.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Klinck, John M.

    2016-10-01

    The flux of warm deep water onto Antarctic continental shelves plays a vital role in determining water mass properties adjacent to the continent. A regional model, with two different grid resolutions, has been used to simulate ocean processes along the West Antarctic Peninsula. At both 4 km and 1.5 km resolution, the model reproduces the locations of warm intrusions, as shown through comparison with observations from instrumented seals. However, the 1.5 km simulation shows greater on-shelf heat transport, leading to improved representation of heat content on the shelf. This increased heat transport is associated with increased eddy activity, both at the shelf-break and in the deep ocean off-shore. Cross-shelf troughs are key locations of on-shelf heat transport. Comparison of two troughs, Belgica and Marguerite, shows differing responses to increased resolution. At higher resolution, there is an increased on-shelf volume transport at Belgica Trough, but not at Marguerite Trough. This is likely related to the differing structure of the shelf-break jet between these two locations. The increased heat flux at Marguerite Trough is attributed to increased heat content in the on-shelf transport. Increased eddy activity off-shelf may lead to greater cross-front heat transport, and therefore increased heat available above the continental slope. While these simulations differ in their magnitude of heat transport, both show similar patterns of variability. Variations in wind stress lead to variations in speed of the shelf-break jet, and therefore on-shelf heat transport. These results demonstrate the importance of model resolution for understanding cross-shelf transport around Antarctica.

  20. Global anomalous transport of ICRH- and NBI-heated fast ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, G. J.; Pusztai, I.; Abel, I.; Dorland, W.; Fülöp, T.

    2017-04-01

    By taking advantage of the trace approximation, one can gain an enormous computational advantage when solving for the global turbulent transport of impurities. In particular, this makes feasible the study of non-Maxwellian transport coupled in radius and energy, allowing collisions and transport to be accounted for on similar time scales, as occurs for fast ions. In this work, we study the fully-nonlinear ITG-driven trace turbulent transport of locally heated and injected fast ions. Previous results indicated the existence of MeV-range minorities heated by cyclotron resonance, and an associated density pinch effect. Here, we build upon this result using the t3core code to solve for the distribution of these minorities, consistently including the effects of collisions, gyrokinetic turbulence, and heating. Using the same tool to study the transport of injected fast ions, we contrast the qualitative features of their transport with that of the heated minorities. Our results indicate that heated minorities are more strongly affected by microturbulence than injected fast ions. The physical interpretation of this difference provides a possible explanation for the observed synergy when neutral beam injection (NBI) heating is combined with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Furthermore, we move beyond the trace approximation to develop a model which allows one to easily account for the reduction of anomalous transport due to the presence of fast ions in electrostatic turbulence.

  1. A computational approach to calculate the heat of transport of aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lecce, Silvia; Albrecht, Tim; Bresme, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Thermal gradients induce concentration gradients in alkali halide solutions, and the salt migrates towards hot or cold regions depending on the average temperature of the solution. This effect has been interpreted using the heat of transport, which provides a route to rationalize thermophoretic phenomena. Early theories provide estimates of the heat of transport at infinite dilution. These values are used to interpret thermodiffusion (Soret) and thermoelectric (Seebeck) effects. However, accessing heats of transport of individual ions at finite concentration remains an outstanding question both theoretically and experimentally. Here we discuss a computational approach to calculate heats of transport of aqueous solutions at finite concentrations, and apply our method to study lithium chloride solutions at concentrations >0.5 M. The heats of transport are significantly different for Li+ and Cl− ions, unlike what is expected at infinite dilution. We find theoretical evidence for the existence of minima in the Soret coefficient of LiCl, where the magnitude of the heat of transport is maximized. The Seebeck coefficient obtained from the ionic heats of transport varies significantly with temperature and concentration. We identify thermodynamic conditions leading to a maximization of the thermoelectric response of aqueous solutions.

  2. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  3. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across m...

  4. Heat transport in metals irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavin, Andrei P.; Afanasiev, Yuri V.; Chichkov, Boris N.; Isakov, Vladimir A.; Smetanin, Igor V.

    2000-02-01

    Different regimes of heat propagation in metals irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses are studied on the basis of two-temperature diffusion model. New analytical solutions for the heat conduction equation, corresponding to the different temperature dependences of the electron thermal conductivity (formula available n paper), are found. It is shown that in case of a strong electron-lattice nonequilibrium, the heat penetration depth grows linearly with time, lT varies direct as t, in opposite to the ordinary diffusionlike behavior, lT varies direct as t1/2. Moreover, the heat propagation velocity decreases with increasing laser fluence.

  5. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Massman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change comes the need to improve modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing a one-dimensional non-equilibrium model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use with surface forcing ranging from daily solar cycles to extreme conditions encountered during fires. The model employs a linearized Crank–Nicolson scheme for the conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10 000 and 50 000 W m−2. The Hertz–Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. The model includes a dynamic residual soil moisture as a function of temperature and soil water potential, which allows the model to capture some of the dynamic aspects of the strongly bound soil moisture that seems to require temperatures well beyond 150 °C to fully evaporate. Furthermore, the model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50–90 °C. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the model's success results primarily from the use of a temperature and moisture potential dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term. The model's solution for water vapor density (and vapor pressure, which can exceed one standard atmosphere, cannot be experimentally verified, but they are supported by results from (earlier and very different models developed for somewhat different purposes and for different porous

  6. General circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating: Significance of planetary rotation and polar eddy heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    A high significance of planetary rotation and poleward eddy heat fluxes is determined for general circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating. In a high-resolution simplified Venus general circulation model, a planetary-scale mixed Rossby-gravity wave with meridional winds across the poles produces strong poleward heat flux and indirect circulation. This strong poleward heat transport induces downward momentum transport of indirect cells in the regions of weak high-latitude jets. It also reduces the meridional temperature gradient and vertical shear of the high-latitude jets in accordance with the thermal wind relation below the cloud layer. In contrast, strong equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets form in the cloud layer in the absence of polar indirect cells in an experiment involving Titan's rotation. Both the strong midlatitude jet and meridional temperature gradient are maintained in the situation that eddy horizontal heat fluxes are weak. The presence or absence of strong poleward eddy heat flux is one of the important factors determining the slow or fast superrotation state in the cloud layer through the downward angular momentum transport and the thermal wind relation. For fast Earth rotation, a weak global-scale Hadley circulation of the low-density upper atmosphere maintains equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets above the cloud layer, whereas multiple meridional circulations suppress the zonal wind speed below the cloud layer.

  7. Changes in Tropical Precipitation at the Mid-Holocene: Role of the Oceanic Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Battisti, D. S.; Donohoe, A.

    2015-12-01

    There is ample geological and geochemical evidence that precipitation in the tropics is largely different from today at the mid-Holocene, an era roughly 6,000 years ago when the Northern Hemisphere summer (winter) insolation was stronger (weaker) than today. These insolation differences are caused mainly by the precession of the earth's rotational axis, or called "precessional forcing". Using the mid-Holocene experiments of PMIP3, we studied changes in the zonal mean tropical precipitation, and its associated change in cross-equatorial energy transport. A northward movement of the zonal mean precipitation in the mid-Holocene is seen in 10 out of 13 PMIP3 models, with a correspondingly anomalous southward atmospheric heat transport across the equator. The slope is 3.0º per PW, close to the estimate given by Donohoe et al. (2013). The changes in cross-equatorial atmospheric heat transport are dictated by changes in the hemispheric asymmetry of heating from the surface, which in turn are associated with changes in the cross-equatorial oceanic heat transport: an anomalous northward oceanic heat transport at the equator is seen in all of the PMIP3 models. Analysis on this anomalous oceanic heat transport reveals that changes in the wind-driven gyre in the Pacific Ocean are primarily responsible for the changes in cross-equatorial ocean heat transport. Specifically, stronger easterly anomalies north of the equator in the western Pacific drives an anomalous northward mass transport, and therefore accomplishes an anomalous northward heat transport across the equator by acting on the asymmetric mean-state zonal temperature. The wind anomalies responsible for this anomalous ocean heat transport are seen in every PMIP3 model, as well as an ECHAM4-slab ocean model, indicating that it is atmospherically driven and independent of the changes in ocean heat transport. It also explains the consistency of ocean heat transport change, and eventually the relative consistency of zonal

  8. Directional heat transport through thermal reflection meta-device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Run; Zhou, Shuling; Shu, Weicheng; Xie, Bin; Ma, Yupu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-12-01

    Directional heat transfer may be hard to realize due to the fact that heat transfer is diffusive. In this paper, we try to take one step forward based on the transformation thermodynamics. A special structure and meta-device is proposed to "reflect" the heat flow directionally-just like the mirror to the light beam, in which the heat flow just one-time changes the direction rather than gradually changing the directions in isotropic materials. The benefits of such thermal reflection meta-device are discussed by comparing the corresponding thermal resistance with the same structures of isotropic materials. The proposed meta-device is verified to possess the low thermal resistance and high heat transfer ability with least energy loss, and can be made by nature-existing isotropic materials with specific structures.

  9. FEFLOW finite element modeling of flow, mass and heat transport in porous and fractured media

    CERN Document Server

    Diersch, Hans-Jörg G

    2013-01-01

    Placing advanced theoretical and numerical methods in the hands of modeling practitioners and scientists, this book explores the FEFLOW system for solving flow, mass and heat transport processes in porous and fractured media. Offers applications and exercises.

  10. Nonlinear heat transport in mesoscopic conductors: Rectification, Peltier effect, and Wiedemann-Franz law

    OpenAIRE

    López, Rosa; Sánchez, David

    2013-01-01

    We investigate nonlinear heat properties in mesoscopic conductors using a scattering theory of transport. Our approach is based on a leading-order expansion in both the electrical and thermal driving forces. Beyond linear response, the transport coefficients are functions of the nonequilibrium screening potential that builds up in the system due to interactions. Within a mean-field approximation, we self-consistently calculate the heat rectification properties of a quantum dot attached to two...

  11. Eddy heat and salt transports in the South China Sea and their seasonal modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gengxin; Gan, Jianping; Xie, Qiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Dongxiao; Hou, Yijun

    2012-05-01

    This study describes characteristics of eddy (turbulent) heat and salt transports, in the basin-scale circulation as well as in the embedded mesoscale eddy found in the South China Sea (SCS). We first showed the features of turbulent heat and salt transports in mesoscale eddies using sea level anomaly (SLA) data, in situ hydrographic data, and 375 Argo profiles. We found that the transports were horizontally variable due to asymmetric distributions of temperature and salinity anomalies and that they were vertically correlated with the thermocline and halocline depths in the eddies. An existing barrier layer caused the halocline and eddy salt transport to be relatively shallow. We then analyzed the transports in the basin-scale circulation using an eddy diffusivity method and the sea surface height data, the Argo profiles, and the climatological hydrographic data. We found that relatively large poleward eddy heat transports occurred to the east of Vietnam (EOV) in summer and to the west of the Luzon Islands (WOL) in winter, while a large equatorward heat transport was located to the west of the Luzon Strait (WLS) in winter. The eddy salt transports were mostly similar to the heat transports but in the equatorward direction due to the fact that the mean salinity in the upper layer in the SCS tended to decrease toward the equator. Using a 21/2-layer reduced-gravity model, we conducted a baroclinic instability study and showed that the baroclinic instability was critical to the seasonal variation of eddy kinetic energy (EKE) and thus the eddy transports. EOV, WLS, and WOL were regions with strong baroclinic instability, and, thus, with intensified eddy transports in the SCS. The combined effects of vertical velocity shear, latitude, and stratification determined the intensity of the baroclinic instability, which intensified the eddy transports EOV during summer and WLS and WOL during winter.

  12. Radial heat transport in packed beds at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, R.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Values were measured for the effective radial heat conductivity λeff, r and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall αw in a packed bed. This was done for superficial velocities of 5 – 70 cm s−1 and at pressures from 1 – 10 bar. Values for λeff, r and αw were obtained by simultaneous fitting of

  13. Influence of the ambient temperature during heat pipe manufacturing on its function and heat transport ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čaja A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat pipe is heat transfer device working at a minimum temperature difference of evaporator and condenser. Operating temperature of the heat pipe determine by properties of the working substance and pressure achieved during production. The contribution is focused on the determining the effect of the initial surrounding temperature where the heat pipe is manufactured and on the obtaining performance characteristics produced heat pipes in dependence of manufacturing temperature. Generally hold, that the boiling point of the working liquid decrease with decreasing ambient pressure. Based on this can be suppose that producing of lower ambient temperature during heat pipe manufacturing, will create the lower pressure, the boiling point of the working fluid will lower too and the heat pipe should be better performance characteristics.

  14. The Effect of Correlations on the Heat Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Torben; Donko, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    In a classical ideal plasma, a magnetic field is known to reduce the heat conductivity perpendicular to the field whereas it does not alter the one along the field. Here we show that, in strongly correlated plasmas that are observed at high pressure or/and low temperature, a magnetic field reduces the perpendicular heat transport much less and even {\\it enhances} the parallel transport. These surprising observations are explained by the competition of kinetic, potential and collisional contributions to the heat conductivity. Our results are based on first principle molecular dynamics simulations of a one-component plasma.

  15. Turbulent transport and heating of trace heavy ions in hot, magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M; Dorland, W

    2012-01-01

    Scaling laws for the transport and heating of trace heavy ions in low-frequency, magnetized plasma turbulence are derived and compared with direct numerical simulations. The predicted dependences of turbulent fluxes and heating on ion charge and mass number are found to agree with numerical results for both stationary and differentially rotating plasmas. Heavy ion momentum transport is found to increase with mass, and heavy ions are found to be preferentially heated, implying a mass-dependent ion temperature for very weakly collisional plasmas and for partially-ionized heavy ions in strongly rotating plasmas.

  16. Operational demonstration of a field of high performance flat plate collectors with isothermal heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merges, V.; Klippel, E.

    1983-12-01

    A solar plant with 21 sq m of highly efficient flat plate collectors and which requires no electricity is described. Heat transport is provided by saturated steam that condenses in a four cubic meter storage tank. The operation temperature is set by the buffer gas pressure between 100 and 140 C, and an absorption chiller is simulated as a heat consumer. The solar collectors were observed to exhibit high performance. Heat transport and temperature control offered high reliability and the thermal stratification in the tank was satisfactory. The positive result permits the design and construction of larger solar plants following the same technical principles.

  17. Solute or Heat Transport in a Flat Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Steady state solute and heat transfer for laminar flow in a flat duct has been widely studied[1-4]. The same problem in a circular tube is called the Graetz Problem[5,6]. The transfer rate of solute and heat from fluids is of importance in a number of processes, such as diffusion of drugs in the blood stream and the uptake of environmental contaminants by animals in aquatic media[7]. In this study the rate of solute or heat transfer from fluids was determined by solving the associated differential equation. Solution by the series approach in the complex plane was used with a series that had a gaussian factor. The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues involved were examined for two different sets of boundary conditions.

  18. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-14

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an "eyeball." For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs' habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets.

  19. Role of ocean heat transport in climates of tidally locked exoplanets around M dwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongyun; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive feature of tidally locked exoplanets is the very uneven heating by stellar radiation between the dayside and nightside. Previous work has focused on the role of atmospheric heat transport in preventing atmospheric collapse on the nightside for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. In the present paper, we carry out simulations with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model to investigate the role of ocean heat transport in climate states of tidally locked habitable exoplanets around M dwarfs. Our simulation results demonstrate that ocean heat transport substantially extends the area of open water along the equator, showing a lobster-like spatial pattern of open water, instead of an “eyeball.” For sufficiently high-level greenhouse gases or strong stellar radiation, ocean heat transport can even lead to complete deglaciation of the nightside. Our simulations also suggest that ocean heat transport likely narrows the width of M dwarfs’ habitable zone. This study provides a demonstration of the importance of exooceanography in determining climate states and habitability of exoplanets. PMID:24379386

  20. Thickness Optimisation of Textiles Subjected to Heat and Mass Transport during Ironing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korycki Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Let us next analyse the coupled problem during ironing of textiles, that is, the heat is transported with mass whereas the mass transport with heat is negligible. It is necessary to define both physical and mathematical models. Introducing two-phase system of mass sorption by fibres, the transport equations are introduced and accompanied by the set of boundary and initial conditions. Optimisation of material thickness during ironing is gradient oriented. The first-order sensitivity of an arbitrary objective functional is analysed and included in optimisation procedure. Numerical example is the thickness optimisation of different textile materials in ironing device.

  1. Nonlinear heat transport in mesoscopic conductors: Rectification, Peltier effect, and Wiedemann-Franz law

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rosa; Sánchez, David

    2013-07-01

    We investigate nonlinear heat properties in mesoscopic conductors using a scattering theory of transport. Our approach is based on a leading-order expansion in both the electrical and thermal driving forces. Beyond linear response, the transport coefficients are functions of the nonequilibrium screening potential that builds up in the system due to interactions. Within a mean-field approximation, we self-consistently calculate the heat rectification properties of a quantum dot attached to two terminals. We discuss nonlinear contributions to the Peltier effect and find departures from the Wiedemann-Franz law in the nonlinear regime of transport.

  2. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  3. Heat and Moisture Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media -- A Coupled Model in Terms of Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Transport phenomena in porous media are commonplace in our daily lives. Examples and applications include heat and moisture transport in soils, baking and drying of food stuffs, curing of cement, and evaporation of fuels in wild fires. Of particular interest to this study are heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils. Historically, mathematical models for these processes are derived by coupling classical Darcy's, Fourier's, and Fick's laws with volume averaged conservation of mass and energy and empirically based source and sink terms. Recent experimental and mathematical research has proposed modifications and suggested limitations in these classical equations. The primary goal of this thesis is to derive a thermodynamically consistent system of equations for heat and moisture transport in terms of the chemical potential that addresses some of these limitations. The physical processes of interest are primarily diffusive in nature and, for that reason, we focus on using the macroscale chemical potentia...

  4. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  5. Transport phenomena in capillary-porous structures and heat pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Henry

    2009-01-01

    With emphasis on the processes involved, this text explores the experimental efforts in two-phase thermal control technology research and development. This work evaluates and compares different theoretical approaches, experimental results, and models, such as semi-empirical models for critical boiling heat fluxes.

  6. Theory of nonlocal heat transport in fully ionized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximov, A.V. (Tesla Labs., Inc., La Jolla, CA (United States)); Silin, V.P. (P.N. Lebedev Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russia))

    1993-01-25

    A new analytic solution of the electron kinetic equation describing the interacting of the electromagnetic heating field with plasma is obtained in the region of plasma parameters where the Spitzer-Harm classical theory is invalid. A novel expression for the nonlocal electron thermal conductivity is derived. (orig.).

  7. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Palima, Darwin; Banas, Andrew Rafael;

    2016-01-01

    as heating element for controlled loading and release. The new microtools take advantage of the photothermal-induced convection current to load and unload cargo. We also discuss some challenges encountered in realizing a self-contained polymerized microtool. Microfluidic mixing, fluid flow control...

  8. Effect of wind forcing on the meridional heat transport in a coupled climate model: equilibrium response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haijun; Dai, Haijin

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the ocean surface winds on the meridional heat transports is studied in a coupled model. Shutting down the global surface winds causes significant reductions in both wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulations, resulting in a remarkable decrease in the poleward oceanic heat transport (OHT). The sea surface temperature responds with significant warming in the equator and cooling off the equator, causing an enhancement and equatorward shift in the Hadley cell. This increases the poleward atmospheric heat transport (AHT), which in turn compensates the decrease in the OHT. This compensation implies a fundamental constraint in changes of ocean-atmosphere energy transports. Several other compensation changes are also identified. For the OHT components, the changes in the Eulerian mean and bolus OHT are compensated with each other in the Southern Ocean, since a stronger wind driven Ekman transport is associated with a stronger meridional density gradient (stronger bolus circulation) and vice versa. For the AHT components, the changes in the dry static energy (DSE) and latent energy transports are compensated within the tropics (30°N/S), because a stronger Hadley cell causes a stronger equatorward convergence of moisture. In the extratropics, the changes in the mean and eddy DSE transports show perfect compensation, as a result of the equatorward shift of the Ferrell Cell and enhancement of atmospheric baroclinicity in mid-high latitudes, particularly over the North Atlantic. This work also shows how the Earth's climate is trying to maintain the balance between two hemispheres: the ocean in the Northern Hemisphere is colder than that in the Southern Hemisphere due to much reduced northward heat transports cross the Equator in the Atlantic, therefore, the atmosphere responds to the ocean with temperature colder in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere by transporting more heat northward cross the equator over the Pacific, in association

  9. Nonlinear charge transport in bipolar semiconductors due to electron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Valdovinos, S., E-mail: sergiom@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Académica de Física, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo, La Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac, México (Mexico); Gurevich, Yu.G. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Física, Av. IPN 2508, México D.F., CP 07360, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-27

    It is known that when strong electric field is applied to a semiconductor sample, the current voltage characteristic deviates from the linear response. In this letter, we propose a new point of view of nonlinearity in semiconductors which is associated with the electron temperature dependence on the recombination rate. The heating of the charge carriers breaks the balance between generation and recombination, giving rise to nonequilibrium charge carriers concentration and nonlinearity. - Highlights: • A new mechanism of nonlinearity of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) is proposed. • The hot electron temperature violates the equilibrium between electrons and holes. • This violation gives rise to nonequilibrium concentration of electrons and holes. • This leads to nonlinear CVC (along with the heating nonlinearity).

  10. Pump, and earth-testable spacecraft capillary heat transport loop using augmentation pump and check valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes heat-generating payload equipment, and a heat transport system with a cold plate thermally coupled to the equipment and a capillary-wick evaporator, for evaporating coolant liquid to cool the equipment. The coolant vapor is coupled to a condenser and in a loop back to the evaporator. A heated coolant reservoir is coupled to the loop for pressure control. If the wick is not wetted, heat transfer will not begin or continue. A pair of check valves are coupled in the loop, and the heater is cycled for augmentation pumping of coolant to and from the reservoir. This augmentation pumping, in conjunction with the check valves, wets the wick. The wick liquid storage capacity allows the augmentation pump to provide continuous pulsed liquid flow to assure continuous vapor transport and a continuously operating heat transport system. The check valves are of the ball type to assure maximum reliability. However, any type of check valve can be used, including designs which are preloaded in the closed position. The check valve may use any ball or poppet material which resists corrosion. For optimum performance during testing on Earth, the ball or poppet would have neutral buoyancy or be configured in a closed position when the heat transport system is not operating. The ball may be porous to allow passage of coolant vapor.

  11. Water and heat transport in boreal soils: Implications for soil response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Z.; Neff, J.C.; Harden, J.W.; Zhang, T.; Veldhuis, H.; Czimczik, C.I.; Winston, G.C.; O'Donnell, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil water content strongly affects permafrost dynamics by changing the soil thermal properties. However, the movement of liquid water, which plays an important role in the heat transport of temperate soils, has been under-represented in boreal studies. Two different heat transport models with and without convective heat transport were compared to measurements of soil temperatures in four boreal sites with different stand ages and drainage classes. Overall, soil temperatures during the growing season tended to be over-estimated by 2-4??C when movement of liquid water and water vapor was not represented in the model. The role of heat transport in water has broad implications for site responses to warming and suggests reduced vulnerability of permafrost to thaw at drier sites. This result is consistent with field observations of faster thaw in response to warming in wet sites compared to drier sites over the past 30. years in Canadian boreal forests. These results highlight that representation of water flow in heat transport models is important to simulate future soil thermal or permafrost dynamics under a changing climate. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Analysis for Heat Transfer in a High Current-Passing Carbon Nanosphere Using Nontraditional Thermal Transport Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol C Y; Chen, B C; Tsai, Y H; Ma, C; Wen, M Y

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the thermal transport in hollow microscale and nanoscale spheres subject to electrical heat source using nontraditional thermal transport model. Working as supercapacitor electrodes, carbon hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres needs excellent heat transfer characteristics to maintain high specific capacitance, long cycle life, and high power density. In the nanoscale regime, the prediction of heat transfer from the traditional heat conduction equation based on Fourier's law deviates from the measured data. Consequently, the electrical heat source-induced heat transfer characteristics in hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are studied using nontraditional thermal transport model. The effects of parameters on heat transfer in the hollow micrometer- and nanometer-sized spheres are discussed in this study. The results reveal that the heat transferred into the spherical interior, temperature and heat flux in the hollow sphere decrease with the increasing Knudsen number when the radius of sphere is comparable to the mean free path of heat carriers.

  13. Effect of rotational speed modulation on heat transport in a fluid layer with temperature dependent viscosity and internal heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Bhadauria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theoretical investigation has been carried out to study the combined effect of rotation speed modulation and internal heating on thermal instability in a temperature dependent viscous horizontal fluid layer. Rayleigh–Bénard momentum equation with Coriolis term has been considered to describe the convective flow. The system is rotating about it is own axis with non-uniform rotational speed. In particular, a time-periodic and sinusoidally varying rotational speed has been considered. A weak nonlinear stability analysis is performed to find the effect of modulation on heat transport. Nusselt number is obtained in terms of amplitude of convection and internal Rayleigh number, and depicted graphically for showing the effects of various parameters of the system. The effect of modulated rotation speed is found to have a stabilizing effect for different values of modulation frequency. Further, internal heating and thermo-rheological parameters are found to destabilize the system.

  14. Throughflow and Gravity Modulation Effects on Heat Transport in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of vertical throughflow and time-periodic gravity field has been investigated on Darcy convection. The amplitude of gravity modulation is considered to be very small and the disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of convection. A weak nonlinear stability analysis has been performed for the stationary mode of convection. As a consequence heat transport evaluated in terms of the Nusselt number, which is governed by the non-autonomous Ginzburg-Landau equation. Throughflow can stabilize or destabilize the system for stress free and isothermal boundary conditions. The amplitude and frequency of modulation, Prandtl Darcy number on heat transport have been analyzed and depicted graphically. Further, the study establishes that the heat transport can be controlled effectively by a mechanism that is external to the system. Finally flow patterns are presented in terms of streamlines and isotherms.

  15. Heat Transport by Coherent Rayleigh-B\\'enard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Waleffe, Fabian; Smith, Leslie M

    2015-01-01

    Steady but generally unstable solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations are obtained for no-slip boundary conditions and Prandtl number 7. The primary solution that bifurcates from the conduction state at Rayleigh number $Ra \\approx 1708$ has been calculated up to $Ra\\approx 5. 10^6$ and shows heat flux $Nu \\sim 0.143\\, Ra^{0.28}$ with a delicate spiral structure in the temperature field. Another solution that maximizes $Nu$ over the horizontal wavenumber has been calculated up to $Ra=10^9$ and its heat flux scales as $Nu \\sim 0.115\\, Ra^{0.31}$ for $10^7 < Ra \\le 10^9$, quite similar to 3D turbulent data. The latter is a simple yet multi-scale coherent solution whose horizontal wavenumber scales as $0.133 \\, Ra^{0.217}$ in that range. That optimum solution is unstable to larger scale perturbations and in particular to mean shear flows, yet it appears to be relevant as a backbone for turbulent solutions, possibly setting the scale, strength and spacing of elemental plumes.

  16. EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS OF CAMPUS HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM OF DNIPROPETROVSK NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF RAILWAY TRANSPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Pshinko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Heat consumption for heating and hot water supply of housing and industrial facilities is an essential part of heat energy consumption. Prerequisite for development of energy saving measures in existing heating systems is their preliminary examination. The investigation results of campus heating system of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan are presented in the article. On the basis of the analysis it is proposed to take the energy saving measures and assess their effectiveness. Methodology. Analysis of the consumption structure of thermal energy for heating domestic and hot water supply was fulfilled. The real costs of heat supply during the calendar year and the normative costs were compared. Findings. The recording expenditures data of thermal energy for heating supply of residential buildings and dormitories in 2012 were analyzed. The comparison of actual performance with specific regulations was performed. This comparison revealed problems, whose solution will help the efficient use of thermal energy. Originality. For the first time the impact of climate conditions, features of schemes and designs of heating systems on the effective use of thermal energy were analyzed. It was studied the contribution of each component. Practical value. Based on the analysis of thermal energy consumption it was developed a list of possible energy saving measures that can be implemented in the system of heat and power facilities. It was evaluated the fuel and energy resources saving.

  17. Solar-energy heats a transportation test center--Pueblo, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Petroleum-base, thermal energy transport fluid circulating through 583 square feet of flat-plate solar collectors accumulates majority of energy for space heating and domestic hot-water of large Test Center. Report describes operation, maintenance, and performance of system which is suitable for warehouses and similar buildings. For test period from February 1979 to January 1980, solar-heating fraction was 31 percent, solar hot-water fraction 79 percent.

  18. Analytical study of Joule heating effects on electrokinetic transportation in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Xiangchun; Li, Dongqing

    2005-02-04

    Electric fields are often used to transport fluids (by electroosmosis) and separate charged samples (by electrophoresis) in microfluidic devices. However, there exists inevitable Joule heating when electric currents are passing through electrolyte solutions. Joule heating not only increases the fluid temperature, but also produces temperature gradients in cross-stream and axial directions. These temperature effects make fluid properties non-uniform, and hence alter the applied electric potential field and the flow field. The mass species transport is also influenced. In this paper we develop an analytical model to study Joule heating effects on the transport of heat, electricity, momentum and mass species in capillary-based electrophoresis. Close-form formulae are derived for the temperature, applied electrical potential, velocity, and pressure fields at steady state, and the transient concentration field as well. Also available are the compact formulae for the electric current and the volume flow rate through the capillary. It is shown that, due to the thermal end effect, sharp temperature drops appear close to capillary ends, where sharp rises of electric field are required to meet the current continuity. In order to satisfy the mass continuity, pressure gradients have to be induced along the capillary. The resultant curved fluid velocity profile and the increase of molecular diffusion both contribute to the dispersion of samples. However, Joule heating effects enhance the sample transport velocity, reducing the analysis time in capillary electrophoretic separations.

  19. Fluctuation theory for transport properties in multicomponent mixtures: thermodiffusion and heat conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The theory of transport properties in multicomponent gas and liquid mixtures, which was previously developed for diffusion coefficients, is extended onto thermodiffusion coefficients and heat conductivities. The derivation of the expressions for transport properties is based on the general...... statistical theory of fluctuations around an equilibrium state. The Onsager matrix of phenomenological coefficients is expressed in terms of the penetration lengths, including the newly introduced penetration length for the energy transfer. As an example, this penetration length is found from the known value...... of the heat conductivity coefficient for ideal gas. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  20. Heat transport in low-dimensional materials: A review and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Xu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat transport is a key energetic process in materials and devices. The reduced sample size, low dimension of the problem and the rich spectrum of material imperfections introduce fruitful phenomena at nanoscale. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the understanding of heat transport process in low-dimensional materials, with focus on the roles of defects, disorder, interfaces, and the quantum-mechanical effect. New physics uncovered from computational simulations, experimental studies, and predictable models will be reviewed, followed by a perspective on open challenges.

  1. An Interactive Energy System with Grid, Heating and Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz de Cerio Mendaza, Iker

    is required. The models developed in this thesis include different features (thermal, mechanical, chemical…) which are not normally considered in the traditional power system modelling. In this sense, they are intended to serve as a reference for the new researchers starting in the field. Moreover, the grid......: thermostatic loads (electric water heaters and heat pumps), loads for hydrogen generation (alkaline electrolyzers) and load for electric mobility (plug-in and vehicle-to-grid concepts). Many of these are considered domestic loads and they fulfill certain need to the household they belong. Depending on the user...... requirements, these may perform a different power consumption patterns. In this context, the thermal comfort or mobility needs from Danish users are statistically analyzed. The outcome is used to generate random profiles that define the different thermal and mobility requirements from the users of a network...

  2. Turbulent heat transport in two- and three-dimensional temperature fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaraweera, Don Sarath Abesiri [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1978-03-01

    A fundamental numerical study of turbulent heat and mass transport processes in two- and three-dimensional convective flows is presented. The model of turbulence employed is the type referred to as a second-order closure. In this scheme transport equations for all nonzero components of the Reynolds stress tensor, for the isotropic dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, for all nonzero scalar flux tensor components and for the mean square scalar fluctuations are solved by a finite difference method along with the mean momentum and mean enthalpy (or concentration) equations. The model used for the stresses was developed earlier. Parallel ideas were utilised in obtaining a model for turbulent heat and mass transfer processes. The study has focused especially on the problem of nonaxisymmetric convective heat and mass transport in pipes, which arises when the boundary conditions are not axisymmetric. The few available experimental data on such situations have indicated anisotropy in effective diffusivities. To expand the available data base an experiment was conducted to obtain heat transfer measurements in strong three-dimensional heating conditions. Numerical procedures especially suitable for incorporation of second-order turbulent closure models have been developed. The effect of circumferential conduction in the tube material, which is influential in the asymmetric heating data currently available, was accounted for directly by extending the finite difference calculations into the pipe wall. The principal goal of predicting three-dimensional scalar transfer has been achieved.

  3. Ballistic heat transport in laser generated nano-bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Julien; Biben, Thierry; Merabia, Samy

    2016-08-01

    Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications.Nanobubbles generated by laser heated plasmonic nanoparticles are of interest for biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Of utmost importance is the maximal size of these transient bubbles. Here, we report hydrodynamic phase field simulations of the dynamics of laser induced nanobubbles, with the aim to understand which physical processes govern their maximal size. We show that the nanobubble maximal size and lifetime are to a large extent controlled by the ballistic thermal flux which is present inside the bubble. Taking into account this thermal flux, we can reproduce the fluence dependence of the maximal nanobubble radius as reported experimentally. We also discuss the influence of the laser pulse duration on the number of nanobubbles generated and their maximal size. These studies represent a significant step toward the optimization of the nanobubble size, which is of crucial importance for photothermal cancer therapy applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR02144A

  4. Heat science and transport phenomena in fuel cells; Thermique et phenomenes de transport dans les piles a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberatore, P.M.; Boillot, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique de Nancy, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Bonnet, C.; Didieerjean, S.; Lapicque, F.; Deseure, J.; Lottin, O.; Maillet, D.; Oseen-Senda, J. [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, 54 - Vandoeuvre Les Nancy (France); Alexandre, A. [Laboratoire d' Etudes Thermiques, ENSMA, 86 Poitiers (France); Topin, F.; Occelli, R.; Daurelle, J.V. [IUSTI / Polytech' Marseille, Institut universitaire des Systemes Thermiques Industriels Ecole, 13 - Marseille (France); Pauchet, J.; Feidt, M. [CEA Grenoble, Groupement pour la recherche sur les echangeurs thermiques (Greth), 38 (France); Voarino, C. [CEA Centre d' Etudes du Ripault, 37 - Tours (France); Morel, B.; Laurentin, J.; Bultel, Y.; Lefebvre-Joud, F. [CEA Grenoble, LEPMI, 38 (France); Auvity, B.; Lasbet, Y.; Castelain, C.; Peerohossaini, H. [Ecole Centrale de Nantes, Laboratoire de Thermocinetique de Nantes (LTN), 44 - Nantes (France)

    2005-07-01

    In this work are gathered the transparencies of the lectures presented at the conference 'heat science and transport phenomena in fuel cells'. The different lectures have dealt with 1)the gas distribution in the bipolar plates of a fuel cell: experimental studies and computerized simulations 2)two-phase heat distributors in the PEMFC 3)a numerical study of the flow properties of the backing layers on the transfers in a PEMFC 4)modelling of the heat and mass transfers in a PEMFC 5)two-phase cooling of the PEMFC with pentane 6)stationary thermodynamic model of the SOFC in the GECOPAC system 7)modelling of the internal reforming at the anode of the SOFC 8)towards a new thermal design of the PEMFC bipolar plates. (O.M.)

  5. Transport of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B.; Larsen, K. M. H.; Hátún, H.; Kristiansen, R.; Mortensen, E.; Østerhus, S.

    2015-09-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intense of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes), which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), which is projected to weaken during the 21st century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport has made it difficult to establish whether there are trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1) with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW = 1012 W). Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall increase over the 2 decades of observation was 9 ± 8 % for volume transport and 18 ± 9 % for heat transport (95 % confidence intervals). During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93) more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the

  6. A conceptual model of oceanic heat transport in the Snowball Earth scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, Darin; Kurtze, Douglas A.; Restrepo, Juan M.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic evidence suggests that the Earth may have been completely covered in ice in the distant past, a state known as Snowball Earth. This is still the subject of controversy, and has been the focus of modeling work from low-dimensional models up to state-of-the-art general circulation models. In our present global climate, the ocean plays a large role in redistributing heat from the equatorial regions to high latitudes, and as an important part of the global heat budget, its role in the initiation a Snowball Earth, and the subsequent climate, is of great interest. To better understand the role of oceanic heat transport in the initiation of Snowball Earth, and the resulting global ice covered climate state, the goal of this inquiry is twofold: we wish to propose the least complex model that can capture the Snowball Earth scenario as well as the present-day climate with partial ice cover, and we want to determine the relative importance of oceanic heat transport. To do this, we develop a simple model, incorporating thermohaline dynamics from traditional box ocean models, a radiative balance from energy balance models, and the more contemporary "sea glacier" model to account for viscous flow effects of extremely thick sea ice. The resulting model, consisting of dynamic ocean and ice components, is able to reproduce both Snowball Earth and present-day conditions through reasonable changes in forcing parameters. We find that including or neglecting oceanic heat transport may lead to vastly different global climate states, and also that the parameterization of under-ice heat transfer in the ice-ocean coupling plays a key role in the resulting global climate state, demonstrating the regulatory effect of dynamic ocean heat transport.

  7. A low-frequency wave motion mechanism enables efficient energy transport in carbon nanotubes at high heat fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-07-11

    The great majority of investigations of thermal transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the open literature focus on low heat fluxes, that is, in the regime of validity of the Fourier heat conduction law. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we investigated thermal transport in a single-walled CNT bridging two Si slabs under constant high heat flux. An anomalous wave-like kinetic energy profile was observed, and a previously unexplored, wave-dominated energy transport mechanism is identified for high heat fluxes in CNTs, originated from excited low frequency transverse acoustic waves. The transported energy, in terms of a one-dimensional low frequency mechanical wave, is quantified as a function of the total heat flux applied and is compared to the energy transported by traditional Fourier heat conduction. The results show that the low frequency wave actually overtakes traditional Fourier heat conduction and efficiently transports the energy at high heat flux. Our findings reveal an important new mechanism for high heat flux energy transport in low-dimensional nanostructures, such as one-dimensional (1-D) nanotubes and nanowires, which could be very relevant to high heat flux dissipation such as in micro/nanoelectronics applications.

  8. Coupled Normal Heat and Matter Transport in a Simple Model System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia-Monasterio, C.; Larralde, H.; Leyvraz, F.

    2001-06-11

    We introduce the first simple mechanical system that shows fully realistic transport behavior while still being exactly solvable at the level of equilibrium statistical mechanics. The system is a Lorentz gas with fixed freely rotating circular scatterers which scatter point particles via perfectly rough collisions. Upon imposing either a temperature gradient and/or a chemical potential gradient, a stationary state is attained for which local thermal equilibrium holds. Transport in this system is normal in the sense that the transport coefficients which characterize the flow of heat and matter are finite in the thermodynamic limit. Moreover, the two flows are nontrivially coupled, satisfying Onsager{close_quote}s reciprocity relations.

  9. Anharmonic effects and heat transport in complex systems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzcovitch, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    We have recently developed a hybrid strategy combining first principles molecular dynamics (MD) with vibrational normal mode analysis to obtain anharmonic frequency shifts and lifetimes of phonon quasi-particles. This approach is effective irrespective of crystal structure complexity and has been used to investigate anharmonicity in MgSiO3-perpovskite (MgPv) and cubic CaSiO3-perovskite (CaPv). The first is weakly anharmonic but has well identified temperature induced anharmonic Raman frequency shifts, while the second is strongly anharmonic. This method displays fine predictive capability by reproducing subtle measured effects in MgPv and proves to be robust and capable of handling soft phonon anharmonicity in CaPv. This strategy also facilitates calculation of anharmonic phonon dispersions throughout the Brillouin zone. Combination of analytical treatments of anharmonic free energy based on the phonon gas model (PGM) with thoroughly sampled anharmonic dispersions should improve considerably the accuracy of first-principles free energy calculations in crystalline solids at very high temperatures. This method also enables calculations of thermal conductivity, κ, using Boltzman transport equation with lifetimes calculated by MD. This is essential to predict thermodynamics properties and κ by first principles at very high temperatures. Research in collaboration with Tao Sun and Dong-Bo Zhang and supported by NSF award EAR-1019853.

  10. Micropaleontological evidence for increased meridional heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean during the pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Poore, R.Z.; Thompson, R.S.; Whatley, R.C.; Wood, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Middle Pliocene (???3 million years ago) has been identified as the last time the Earth was significantly warmer than it was during the Last Interglacial and Holocene. A quantitative micropaleontological paleotemperature transect from equator to high latitudes in the North Atlantic indicates that Middle Pliocene warmth involved increased meridional oceanic heat transport.

  11. Impact of compressibility on heat transport characteristics of large terrestrial planets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Čížková, Hana; van den Berg, Arie; Jacobs, Michel

    2017-01-01

    We present heat transport characteristics for mantle convection in large terrestrial exoplanets (M⩽8M⊕). Our thermal convection model is based on a truncated anelastic liquid approximation (TALA) for compressible fluids and takes into account a selfconsistent thermodynamic description of material

  12. Studies of Electron Transport and Isochoric Heating and Their Applicability to Fast Ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, M H; Amiranoff, F; Andersen, C; Batani, D; Baton, S D; Cowan, T; Fisch, N; Freeman, R; Gremillet, L; Hall, T; Hatchett, S; Hill, J; King, J; Kodama, R; Koch, J; Koenig, M; Lasinski, B; Langdon, B; MacKinnon, A; Martinolli, E; Norreys, P; Parks, P; Perrelli-Cippo, E; Rabec Le Gloahec, M; Rosenbluth, M; Rousseaux, C; Santon, J J; Scianitti, F; Snavely, R; Tabak, M; Tanaka, K; Town, R; Tsutumi, T; Stephens, R

    2003-10-30

    Experimental measurements of electron transport and isochoric heating in 100 J, 1 ps laser irradiation of solid A1 targets are presented. Modeling with a hybrid PIC code is compared with the data and good agreement is obtained using a heuristic model for the electron injection. The relevance for fast ignition is discussed.

  13. Heat transport in the geostrophic regime of rotating Rayleigh-B{\\'e}nard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Ecke, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of heat transport in rotating Rayleigh-B{\\'e}nard convection in a cylindrical convection cell with aspect ratio $\\Gamma = 1/2$. The fluid was helium gas with Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. The range of control parameters was Rayleigh number $4 \\times 10^9 < {\\rm Ra} < 4 \\times 10^{11}$ and Ekman number $2 \\times 10^{-7} < {\\rm Ek} < 3 \\times 10^{-5}$(corresponding to Taylor number $4 \\times 10^9 < {\\rm Ta} < 1 \\times 10^{14}$ and convective Rossby number $0.07 < {\\rm Ro} < 5$). We determine the crossover from weakly rotating turbulent convection to rotation dominated geostrophic convection through experimental measurements of the normalized heat transport Nu. The heat transport for the rotating state in the geostrophic regime, normalized by the zero-rotation heat transport, is consistent with scaling of $({\\rm RaEk}^{-7/4})^\\beta$ with $\\beta \\approx 1$. A phase diagram is presented that encapsulates measurements on the potential geostrophic turbulence reg...

  14. Heat transport by phonons and the generation of heat by fast phonon processes in ferroelastic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ding

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivity of ferroelastic device materials can be reversibly controlled by strain. The nucleation and growth of twin boundaries reduces thermal conductivity if the heat flow is perpendicular to the twin wall. The twin walls act as phonon barriers whereby the thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of such phonon barriers. Ferroelastic materials also show elasto-caloric properties with a high frequency dynamics. The upper frequency limit is determined by heat generation on a time scale, which is some 5 orders of magnitude below the typical bulk phonon times. Some of these nano-structural processes are irreversible under stress release (but remain reversible under temperature cycling, in particular the annihilation of needle domains that are a key indicator for ferroelastic behaviour in multiferroic materials.

  15. The role of atmospheric heat transport and regional feedbacks in the Arctic warming at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimori, Masakazu; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Laîné, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the Arctic warms much more than the rest of the world even under spatially quasi-uniform radiative forcing such as that due to an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration. While the surface albedo feedback is often referred to as the explanation of the enhanced Arctic warming, the importance of atmospheric heat transport from the lower latitudes has also been reported in previous studies. In the current study, an attempt is made to understand how the regional feedbacks in the Arctic are induced by the change in atmospheric heat transport and vice versa. Equilibrium sensitivity experiments that enable us to separate the contributions of the Northern Hemisphere mid-high latitude response to the CO2 increase and the remote influence of surface warming in other regions are carried out. The result shows that the effect of remote forcing is predominant in the Arctic warming. The dry-static energy transport to the Arctic is reduced once the Arctic surface warms in response to the local or remote forcing. The feedback analysis based on the energy budget reveals that the increased moisture transport from lower latitudes, on the other hand, warms the Arctic in winter more effectively not only via latent heat release but also via greenhouse effect of water vapor and clouds. The change in total atmospheric heat transport determined as a result of counteracting dry-static and latent heat components, therefore, is not a reliable measure for the net effect of atmospheric dynamics on the Arctic warming. The current numerical experiments support a recent interpretation based on the regression analysis: the concurrent reduction in the atmospheric poleward heat transport and future Arctic warming predicted in some models does not imply a minor role of the atmospheric dynamics. Despite the similar magnitude of poleward heat transport change, the Arctic warms more than the Southern Ocean even in the equilibrium response without ocean dynamics. It is shown that a

  16. Thermal transport in low dimensions from statistical physics to nanoscale heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Understanding non-equilibrium properties of classical and quantum many-particle systems is one of the goals of contemporary statistical mechanics. Besides its own interest for the theoretical foundations of irreversible thermodynamics(e.g. of the Fourier's law of heat conduction), this topic is also relevant to develop innovative ideas for nanoscale thermal management with possible future applications to nanotechnologies and effective energetic resources. The first part of the volume (Chapters 1-6) describes the basic models, the phenomenology and the various theoretical approaches to understand heat transport in low-dimensional lattices (1D e 2D). The methods described will include equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, hydrodynamic and kinetic approaches and the solution of stochastic models. The second part (Chapters 7-10) deals with applications to nano and microscale heat transfer, as for instance phononic transport in carbon-based nanomaterials, including the prominent case of na...

  17. Heat transport in the quasi-single-helicity islands of EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J.

    2009-03-01

    The heat transport inside the magnetic island generated in a quasi-single-helicity regime of a reversed-field pinch device is studied by using a numerical code that simulates the electron temperature and the soft x-ray emissivity. The heat diffusivity χe inside the island is determined by matching the simulated signals with the experimental ones. Inside the island, χe turns out to be from one to two orders of magnitude lower than the diffusivity in the surrounding plasma, where the magnetic field is stochastic. Furthermore, the heat transport properties inside the island are studied in correlation with the plasma current and with the amplitude of the magnetic fluctuations.

  18. On the locality of parallel transport of heat carrying electrons in the SOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chankin, A.V., E-mail: Alex.Chankin@ipp.mpg.de; Coster, D.P.

    2015-08-15

    A continuum Vlasov–Fokker–Planck code KIPP is used to assess the degree of locality of parallel transport of heat carrying electrons (HCE) in collisional SOLs. It is shown that for typical SOL collisionalities, the HCE are marginally collisionless which puts into question successful parameterization of kinetic code results of transport parameters such as parallel heat flux and ion–electron thermoforce in the present 2D fluid codes. A kinetic solution for the case of 90% recycling at the target and factor 10T{sub e} drop along the field line is also presented, showing the degree of heat flux ‘limiting’ upstream and ‘enhancement’ downstream, compared to predictions of the Braginskii’s (or Spitzer–Härm’s) formulas. Possible causes of these features are discussed.

  19. [The design of heat dissipation of the field low temperature box for storage and transportation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiancang; Suin, Jianjun; Wu, Jian

    2013-02-01

    Because of the compact structure of the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, which is due to the same small space where the compressor, the condenser, the control circuit, the battery and the power supply device are all placed in, the design for heat dissipation and ventilation is of critical importance for the stability and reliability of the box. Several design schemes of the heat dissipation design of the box were simulated using the FLOEFD hot fluid analysis software in this study. Different distributions of the temperature field in every design scheme were constructed intimately in the present study. It is well concluded that according to the result of the simulation analysis, the optimal heat dissipation design is decent for the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, and the box can operate smoothly for a long time using the results of the design.

  20. Graphene transport properties upon exposure to PMMA processing and heat treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Lene; Caridad, Jose; Cagliani, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    , allowing us to measure the evolution of the electrical transport properties during individual processing steps from the initial as-exfoliated to the PMMA-processed graphene. Heating generally promotes the conformation of graphene to SiO2 and is found to play a major role for the electrical properties......The evolution of graphene's electrical transport properties due to processing with the polymer polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and heat are examined in this study. The use of stencil (shadow mask) lithography enables fabrication of graphene devices without the usage of polymers, chemicals or heat...... of graphene while PMMA residues are found to be surprisingly benign. In accordance with this picture, graphene devices with initially high carrier mobility tend to suffer a decrease in carrier mobility, while in contrast an improvement is observed for low carrier mobility devices. We explain this by noting...

  1. Simulation of Volume and Heat Transport along 26.5°N in the Atlantic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Hui-Er; YU Yong-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The observed meridional overtuming circula- tion (MOC) and meridional heat transport (MHT) estimated from the Rapid Climate Change/Meridional Circu- lation and Heat Flux Array (RAPID/MOCHA) at 26.5°N are used to evaluate the volume and heat transport in the eddy-resolving model LASG/IAP Climate system Ocean Model (LICOM). The authors find that the Florida Cur- rent transport and upper mid-ocean transport of the model are underestimated against the observations. The simulated variability of MOC and MHT show a high correlation with the observations, exceeding 0.6. Both the simulated and observed MOC and MHT show a significant seasonal variability. According to the power spectrum analysis, LICOM can represent the mesoscale eddy characteristic of the MOC similar to the observation. The model shows a high correlation of 0.58 for the internal upper mid-ocean transport (MO) and a density difference between the western and eastern boundaries, as noted in previous studies.

  2. Water and heat transport in hilly red soil of southern China: Ⅱ. Modeling and simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jun; HUANG Zhi-zhen; HAN Xiao-fei

    2005-01-01

    Simulation models of heat and water transport have not been rigorously tested for the red soils of southern China.Based on the theory of nonisothermal water-heat coupled transfer, a simulation model, programmed in Visual Basic 6.0, was developed to predict the coupled transfer of water and heat in hilly red soil. A series of soil column experiments for soil water and heat transfer, including soil columns with closed and evaporating top ends, were used to test the simulation model. Results showed that in the closed columns, the temporal and spatial distribution of moisture and heat could be very well predicted by the model,while in the evaporating columns, the simulated soil water contents were somewhat different from the observed ones. In the heat flow equation by Taylor and Lary (1964), the effect of soil water evaporation on the heat flow is not involved, which may be the main reason for the differences between simulated and observed results. The predicted temperatures were not in agreement with the observed one with thermal conductivities calculated by de Vries and Wierenga equations, so that it is suggested that Kh, soil heat conductivity, be multiplied by 8.0 for the first 6.5 h and by 1.2 later on. Sensitivity analysis of soil water and heat coefficients showed that the saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, and the water diffusivity, D(θ), had great effects on soil water transport; the variation of soil porosity led to the difference of soil thermal properties, and accordingly changed temperature redistribution,which would affect water redistribution.

  3. Phonon and magnon heat transport and drag effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heremans, Joseph P.

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators and coolers constitute today's solid-state energy converters. The two goals in thermoelectrics research are to enhance the thermopower while simultaneously maintaining a high electrical conductivity of the same material, and to minimize its lattice thermal conductivity without affecting its electronic properties. Up to now the lattice thermal conductivity has been minimized by using alloy scattering and, more recently, nanostructuring. In the first part of the talk, a new approach to minimize the lattice thermal conductivity is described that affects phonon scattering much more than electron scattering. This can be done by selecting potential thermoelectric materials that have a very high anharmonicity, because this property governs phonon-phonon interaction probability. Several possible types of chemical bonds will be described that exhibit such high anharmonicity, and particular emphasis will be put on solids with highly-polarizable lone-pair electrons, such as the rock salt I-V-VI2 compounds (e.g. NaSbSe2). The second part of the talk will give an introduction to a completely new class of solid-state thermal energy converters based on spin transport. One configuration for such energy converters is based on the recently discovered spin-Seebeck effect (SSE). This quantity is expressed in the same units as the conventional thermopower, and we have recently shown that it can be of the same order of magnitude. The main advantage of SSE converters is that the problem of optimization is now distributed over two different materials, a ferromagnet in which a flux of magnetization is generated by a thermal gradient, and a normal metal where the flux of magnetization is converted into electrical power. The talk will focus on the basic physics behind the spin-Seebeck effect. Recent developments will then be described based on phonon-drag of spin polarized electrons. This mechanism has made it possible to reach magnitudes of SSE that are comparable

  4. Momentum, heat, and mass transfer analogy for vertical hydraulic transport of inert particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaćimovski Darko R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical liquid-solids flow, as well as in single phase flow, were studied. The aim of this investigation was to establish the analogy among those phenomena. Also, effect of particles concentration on momentum, heat and mass transfer was studied. The experiments in hydraulic transport were performed in a 25.4 mm I.D. cooper tube equipped with a steam jacket, using spherical glass particles of 1.94 mm in diameter and water as a transport fluid. The segment of the transport tube used for mass transfer measurements was inside coated with benzoic acid. In the hydraulic transport two characteristic flow regimes were observed: turbulent and parallel particle flow regime. The transition between two characteristic regimes (γ*=0, occurs at a critical voidage ε≈0.85. The vertical two-phase flow was considered as the pseudofluid, and modified mixture-wall friction coefficient (fw and modified mixture Reynolds number (Rem were introduced for explanation of this system. Experimental data show that the wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer coefficients, in vertical flow of pseudofluid, for the turbulent regime are significantly higher than in parallel regime. Wall-to-bed, mass and heat transfer coefficients in hydraulic transport of particles were much higher then in single-phase flow for lower Reynolds numbers (Re15000, there was not significant difference. The experimental data for wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical flow of pseudofluid in parallel particle flow regime, show existing analogy among these three phenomena. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  5. Turbulent transport of MeV range cyclotron heated minorities as compared to alpha particles

    CERN Document Server

    Pusztai, István; Kazakov, Yevgen O; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    We study the turbulent transport of an ion cyclotron resonance heated (ICRH), MeV range minority ion species in tokamak plasmas. Such highly energetic minorities, which can be produced in the three ion minority heating scheme [Ye. O. Kazakov et al. (2015) Nucl. Fusion 55, 032001], have been proposed to be used to experimentally study the confinement properties of fast ions without the generation of fusion alphas. We compare the turbulent transport properties of ICRH ions with that of fusion born alpha particles. Our results indicate that care must be taken when conclusions are drawn from experimental results: While the effect of turbulence on these particles is similar in terms of transport coefficients, differences in their distribution functions - ultimately their generation processes - make the resulting turbulent fluxes different.

  6. Topics in quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunjin

    In the thesis, we present a series of investigations for quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems. The first topic of the thesis focuses on the fundamental quantum problems which can be studied with electron transport along with the correlations of detectors to measure physical properties. We theoretically describe a generalized ``which-path'' measurement using a pair of coupled electronic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. In the second topic of thesis, we investigate an operational approach to measure the tunneling time based on the Larmor clock. To handle the cases of indirect measurement from the first and second topics, we introduce the contextual values formalism. The form of the contextual values provides direct physical insight into the measurement being performed, providing information about the correlation strength between system and detector, the measurement inefficiency, the proper background removal, and the conditioned average value of the system operator. Additionally, the weak interaction limit of these conditioned averages produces weak values of the system operator and an additional detector dependent disturbance term for both cases. In our treatment of the third topic of the thesis, we propose a three terminal heat engine based on semiconductor superlattices for energy harvesting. The periodicity of the superlattice structure creates an energy miniband, giving an energy window to allow electron transport. We find that this device delivers a large amount of power, nearly twice that produced by the heat engine based on quantum wells, with a small reduction of efficiency. This engine also works as a refrigerator in a different regime of the system's parameters. The thermoelectric performance of the refrigerator is analyzed, including the cooling power and coefficient of performance in the optimized condition. We also calculate phonon heat current through the system and explore the reduction of phonon heat current compared to the bulk

  7. Ocean heat transport into the Arctic in the twentieth and twenty-first century in EC-Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigk, Torben; Brodeau, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    The ocean heat transport into the Arctic and the heat budget of the Barents Sea are analyzed in an ensemble of historical and future climate simulations performed with the global coupled climate model EC-Earth. The zonally integrated northward heat flux in the ocean at 70°N is strongly enhanced and compensates for a reduction of its atmospheric counterpart in the twenty first century. Although an increase in the northward heat transport occurs through all of Fram Strait, Canadian Archipelago, Bering Strait and Barents Sea Opening, it is the latter which dominates the increase in ocean heat transport into the Arctic. Increased temperature of the northward transported Atlantic water masses are the main reason for the enhancement of the ocean heat transport. The natural variability in the heat transport into the Barents Sea is caused to the same extent by variations in temperature and volume transport. Large ocean heat transports lead to reduced ice and higher atmospheric temperature in the Barents Sea area and are related to the positive phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The net ocean heat transport into the Barents Sea grows until about year 2050. Thereafter, both heat and volume fluxes out of the Barents Sea through the section between Franz Josef Land and Novaya Zemlya are strongly enhanced and compensate for all further increase in the inflow through the Barents Sea Opening. Most of the heat transported by the ocean into the Barents Sea is passed to the atmosphere and contributes to warming of the atmosphere and Arctic temperature amplification. Latent and sensible heat fluxes are enhanced. Net surface long-wave and solar radiation are enhanced upward and downward, respectively and are almost compensating each other. We find that the changes in the surface heat fluxes are mainly caused by the vanishing sea ice in the twenty first century. The increasing ocean heat transport leads to enhanced bottom ice melt and to an extension of the area with bottom ice

  8. Uncertainty Updating in the Description of Coupled Heat and Moisture Transport in Heterogeneous Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kucerova, Anna

    2011-01-01

    To assess the durability of structures, heat and moisture transport need to be analyzed. To provide a reliable estimation of heat and moisture distribution in a certain structure, one needs to include all available information about the loading conditions and material parameters. Moreover, the information should be accompanied by a corresponding evaluation of its credibility. Here, the Bayesian inference is applied to combine different sources of information, so as to provide a more accurate estimation of heat and moisture fields [1]. The procedure is demonstrated on the probabilistic description of heterogeneous material where the uncertainties consist of a particular value of individual material characteristic and spatial fluctuations. As for the heat and moisture transfer, it is modelled in coupled setting [2].

  9. Controlling and measuring quantum transport of heat in trapped-ion crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, A; Bruderer, M; Plenio, M B

    2013-07-26

    Measuring heat flow through nanoscale devices poses formidable practical difficulties as there is no "ampere meter" for heat. We propose to overcome this problem in a chain of trapped ions, where laser cooling the chain edges to different temperatures induces a heat current of local vibrations (vibrons). We show how to efficiently control and measure this current, including fluctuations, by coupling vibrons to internal ion states. This demonstrates that ion crystals provide an ideal platform for studying quantum transport, e.g., through thermal analogues of quantum wires and quantum dots. Notably, ion crystals may give access to measurements of the elusive bosonic fluctuations in heat currents and the onset of Fourier's law. Our results are strongly supported by numerical simulations for a realistic implementation with specific ions and system parameters.

  10. Heat of transport study of the superionic conductor Ag/sub 7/I/sub 4/VO/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avasthi, M.N. (Al-Fateh Univ., Tripoli (Lybia). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-06-16

    The heat of transport of the superionic conductor Ag/sub 7/I/sub 4/VO/sub 4/ has been investigated considering the effect of heat treatment of the material and the thermoelectric power as a function of the temperature. It was found that in the case of highly disordered solids like Ag/sub 7/I/sub 4/VO/sub 4/ the ionic heat of transport tends to be equal to its activation energy.

  11. Study of electronic heat transport in plasma through diagnosis based on modulated electron cyclotron heating; Etudes de transport de la chaleur electronique par injection modulee d'ondes a la frequence cyclotronique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemencon, A.; Guivarch, C

    2003-07-01

    In order to make nuclear fusion energetically profitable, it is crucial to heat and confine the plasma efficiently. Studying the behavior of the heat diffusion coefficient is a key issue in this matter. The use of modulated electron cyclotron heating as a diagnostic has suggested the existence of a transport barrier under certain plasma conditions. We have determined the solution to the heat transport equation, for several heat diffusion coefficient profiles. By comparing the analytical solutions with experimental data; we are able to study the heat diffusion coefficient profile. Thus, in certain experiments, we can confirm that the heat diffusion coefficient switches from low to high values at the radius where the electron cyclotron heat deposition is made. (authors)

  12. Heat and water transport in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rod L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ranjan, Devesh [TEXAS A& M UNIV

    2010-01-01

    In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for various applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance limitation in the PEFC comes from liquid water transport and the resulting flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the open pore space in the electrode and the fibrous diffusion layer leading to hindered oxygen transport. The electrode is also the only component in the entire PEFC sandwich which produces waste heat from the electrochemical reaction. The cathode electrode, being the host to several competing transport mechanisms, plays a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance limitation. In this work, an electrode model is presented in order to elucidate the coupled heat and water transport mechanisms. Two scenarios are specifically considered: (1) conventional, Nafion{reg_sign} impregnated, three-phase electrode with the hydrated polymeric membrane phase as the conveyer of protons where local electro-neutrality prevails; and (2) ultra-thin, two-phase, nano-structured electrode without the presence of ionomeric phase where charge accumulation due to electro-statics in the vicinity of the membrane-CL interface becomes important. The electrode model includes a physical description of heat and water balance along with electrochemical performance analysis in order to study the influence of electro-statics/electro-migration and phase change on the PEFC electrode performance.

  13. Gravity Wave and Turbulence Transport of Heat and Na in the Mesopause Region over the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yafang; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    The vertical heat and Na fluxes induced by gravity waves and turbulence are derived based on over 600 hours of observations from the Na wind/temperature lidar located at Andes lidar Observatory (ALO), Cerro Pachón, Chile. In the 85-100 km region, the annual mean vertical fluxes by gravity waves show downward heat transport with a maximum of 0.78K m/s at 90 km, and downward Na transport with a maximum of 210 m/s/cm3 at 94km. The maximum cooing rate reaches -24 K/d at 94km. The vertical fluxes have strong seasonal variations, with large differences in magnitudes and altitudes of maximum fluxes between winter and summer. The vertical fluxes due to turbulence eddies are also derived with a novel method that relates turbulence fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind with photon count fluctuations at very high resolution (25 m, 6 s). The results show that the vertical transports are comparable to those by gravity waves and they both play significant roles in the atmospheric thermal structure and constituent distribution. This direct measure of turbulence transport also enables estimate of the eddy diffusivity for heat and constituent in the mesopause region.

  14. Underlying mechanisms for normal heat transport in one-dimensional anharmonic oscillator systems with a double-well interparticle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Daxing

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested a crossover from superdiffusive to normal heat transport in one-dimensional (1D) anharmonic oscillator systems with a double-well type interatomic interaction like V(ξ )=-{ξ2}/2+{ξ4}/4 , when the system temperature is varied. In order to better understand this unusual manner of thermal transport, here we perform a direct dynamics simulation to examine how the spreading processes of the three physical quantities, i.e. the heat, the total energy and the momentum, would depend on temperature. We find three main points that are worth noting. (i) The crossover from superdiffusive to normal heat transport is well verified from a new perspective of heat spread. (ii) The spreading of the total energy is found to be very distinct from heat diffusion, especially under some temperature regimes, energy is strongly localized, while heat can be superdiffusive. So one should take care to derive a general connection between the heat conduction and energy diffusion. (iii) In a narrow range of temperatures, the spreading of momentum implies clear unusual non-ballistic behaviors; however, such unusual transport of momentum cannot be directly related to the normal transport of heat. An analysis of phonon spectra suggests that one should also take the effects of phonon softening into account. All of these results may provide insights into establishing the connection between the macroscopic heat transport and the underlying dynamics in 1D systems.

  15. Transport phenomena in a sidewall-moving bottom-heated cavity using heatlines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NIRMALENDU BISWAS; NIRMAL K MANNA

    2017-02-01

    The understanding of basic feature of energy transport from a heat source is important from the fundamental point of view as well as from various engineering and technological applications. To enrich the knowledge in this area, this paper presents energy transport phenomena from the heated bottom of an air-filled enclosure using heatfunction and heatlines. Both upward motion and downward motion of sidewalls and the alteration of cooling between sidewalls and top wall are considered, which yields four different cases. All the cases are investigated to identify the proper combination of wall motion and thermal condition for better thermal performance, considering different convection regimes. The highly nonlinear nature of flow is solved numerically using an in-house code, taking into account different speeds of wall motion and relative strength of buoyantflow and shear flow. The results reveal that the case with side cooling and downward translation of sidewalls performs maximum heat transfer compared with other cases. Higher speed of wall translation also causes higher heat transfer. Under natural convection regime, heat transfer is significantly high. Furthermore, the order of thermal mixing in a cavity is analysed and it is found that top cooling causes higher thermal mixing. To demonstrate the vortical flow structure in the cavity, streamfunction and streamlines are used. Evolutions of symmetric and asymmetric flow vortices with centre and saddle points and energy recirculation cells are found in the cavity.

  16. Some aspects of ocean heat transport by the shallow, intermediate and deep overturning circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Lynne D.

    The ocean's overturning circulation can be divided into contributions from: (1) shallow overturning in the subtropical gyres to the base of thermocline, (2) overturning into the intermediate depth layer (500 to 2000 meters) in the North Atlantic, North Pacific and area around Drake Passage, and (3) overturning into the deep layer in the North Atlantic (Nordic Seas overflows) and around Antarctica. The associated water mass structures are briefly reviewed including presentation of a global map of proxy mixed layer depth. Based on the estimated temperature difference between the warm source and colder newly-formed intermediate waters, and the formation rate for each water mass, the net heat transport associated with all intermediate water formation is estimated at 1.0-1.2 PetaWatts (1 PW = 1015 W), which is equivalent in size to that for deep water formation, 0.6-0.8 PW. The heat transport due to shallow overturn, calculated as the residual between published direct estimates of heat transport across subtropical latitudes and these heuristic estimates of the intermediate and deep overturning components, is about 0.5 PW northward for the North Pacific and North Atlantic subtropical gyres and 0.0 to 0.2 PW southward for each of the three southern hemisphere subtropical gyres, exclusive of the shallow overturn in the southern hemisphere gyres which is associated with Antarctic Intermediate Water and Southeast Indian Subantarctic Mode Water formation. Direct estimates of meridional heat transport of 1.18 PW (North Atlantic) and 0.63 PW (North Pacific) at 24°N are calculated from Reid's [1994, 1997] geostrophic velocity analyses and are similar to previously published estimates using other methods. The new direct estimates are decomposed into portions associated with shallow, intermediate and deep overturn, confirming the heuristic estimate for the North Pacific, where the shallow gyre overturning heat transport accounts for about 75% of the total and intermediate water

  17. Ultrafast x-ray diffraction thermometry measures the influence of spin excitations on the heat transport through nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, A.; Reinhardt, M.; von Reppert, A.; Rössle, M.; Leitenberger, W.; Dumesnil, K.; Gaal, P.; Zamponi, F.; Bargheer, M.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the heat transport through a rare earth multilayer system composed of yttrium (Y), dysprosium (Dy), and niobium (Nb) by ultrafast x-ray diffraction. This is an example of a complex heat flow problem on the nanoscale, where several different quasiparticles carry the heat and conserve a nonequilibrium for more than 10 ns. The Bragg peak positions of each layer represent layer-specific thermometers that measure the energy flow through the sample after excitation of the Y top layer with fs-laser pulses. In an experiment-based analytic solution to the nonequilibrium heat transport problem, we derive the individual contributions of the spins and the coupled electron-lattice system to the heat conduction. The full characterization of the spatiotemporal energy flow at different starting temperatures reveals that the spin excitations of antiferromagnetic Dy speed up the heat transport into the Dy layer at low temperatures, whereas the heat transport through this layer and further into the Y and Nb layers underneath is slowed down. The experimental findings are compared to the solution of the heat equation using macroscopic temperature-dependent material parameters without separation of spin and phonon contributions to the heat. We explain why the simulated energy density matches our experiment-based derivation of the heat transport, although the simulated thermoelastic strain in this simulation is not even in qualitative agreement.

  18. Advective Heat Transport in an Unconfined Aquifer Induced by the Field Injection of an Open-Loop Groundwater Heat Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano L. Russo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The increasing diffusion of low-enthalpy geothermal open-loop Groundwater Heat Pumps (GWHP providing buildings air conditioning requires a careful assessment of the overall effects on groundwater system, especially in the urban areas. The impact on the groundwater temperature in the surrounding area of the re-injection well is directly linked to the aquifer properties. Physical processes affecting heat transport within an aquifer include advection (or convection and hydrodynamic thermodispersion (diffusion and mechanical dispersion. If the groundwater flows, the advective components tend to dominate the heat transfer process within the aquifer and the diffusion can be considered negligible. This study illustrates the experimental results derived from the groundwater monitoring in the surrounding area of an injection well connected to an open-loop GWHP plant which has been installed in the "Politecnico di Torino" (NW Italy for cooling some of the university buildings. Groundwater pumping and injection interfere only with the upper unconfined aquifer. Approach: After the description of the hydrogeological setting the authors examined the data deriving from multiparameter probes installed inside the pumping well (P2, the injection well (P4 and a downgradient piezometer (S2. Data refers to the summer 2009. To control the aquifer thermal stratification some multi-temporal temperature logs have been performed in the S2. Results: After the injection of warm water in P4 the plume arrived after 30 days in the S2. That delay is compatible with the calculated plume migration velocity (1.27 m d-1 and their respective distance (35 m. The natural temperature in the aquifer due to the switching-off of the GWHP plant has been reached after two month. The Electrical Conductivity (EC values tend to vary out of phase with the temperature. The temperature logs in the S2 highlighted a thermal stratification in the aquifer due to a low vertical

  19. Strain Modulation of Electronic and Heat Transport Properties of Bilayer Boronitrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Rui-Ning; Zhang, Hang; Tang, Da-Wei

    2017-10-01

    Strain engineering has been proven as an effective approach to modify electronic and thermal properties of materials. Recently, strain effects on two-dimensional materials have become important relevant topics in this field. We performed density functional theory studies on the electronic and heat transport properties of bilayer boronitrene samples under an isotropic strain. We demonstrate that the strain will reduce the band gap width but keep the band gap type robust and direct. The strain will enhance the thermal conductivity of the system because of the increase in specific heat. The thermal conductivity was studied as a function of the phonon mean-free path.

  20. Heat Transport Behaviour in One-Dimensional Lattice Models with Damping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Heng-Jiang; ZHANG Yong; ZHAO Hong

    2004-01-01

    @@ We investigate the heat transport behaviours of two typical lattice models, the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-β model and the φ4 lattice model, in the presence of damping which imitates the effect of the thermal radiation and the thermal diffusion to the surroundings through the sample boundary. It is found that the damping does not affect the thermal conductivity, but can change the heat flux dumped into the lattice chain. We also discuss possible applications under the heuristic guidance of our numerical results. In particular, we suggest a way to measure the thermal conductivity experimentally in the presence of large energy loss arisen from the radiation and the diffusion.

  1. The effects of size, configuration and distribution of continents on the efficiency of heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. M.; Moresi, L. N.; Lenardic, A.

    2011-12-01

    The addition of continents to the surface of a planet alters its interior dynamics; understanding this alteration is critical to understanding the thermal evolution of the Earth. Specifically, the increase in temperature induced by continental insulation can be compensated by an increase in the heat loss through the overturn of the oceanic lithosphere, thus contradicting the predicted reduction of global heat loss due to presence of continents (e.g., Lenardic et al, 2005; Cooper et al, 2006; Lenardic et al, 2011). We reconfirm this counterintuitive result with three-dimensional simulations. In addition, we explore variations in the configuration of continents on the surface. Within simulations with equivalent continental coverage, but varying configuration, there is a competition between the lateral size of the blocks and the natural horizontal scale of the convection pattern which influences the stability of the models over time, and the efficiency of heat transport. Smaller continental blocks tend to induce a stable planform with upwellings permanently avoiding the blocks. However, in cases with larger continental blocks, the imposed scale is larger than the preferred scale of the convection pattern and upwellings are unable to avoid the blocks altogether. The dependency on stability and efficiency of heat transport within the Earth on continental coverage and configuration suggests continents can play a significant role in the Earth's heat budget and thermal history. Cooper, C.M., A. Lenardic, and L.-N. Moresi "Effects of continental insulation and the partioning of heat producing elements on the Earth's heat loss." Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 ,10.1029, 2006; Lenardic, A., C.M. Cooper, and L.-N. Moresi "A note on continents and the Earth's Urey ratio", Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 2011; Lenardic, A., L.-N. Moresi, A.M. Jellinek, and M. Manga "Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents." Earth Planet. Sci

  2. Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Haussener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven thermochemical cycles for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium.

  3. Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussener, Sophia; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2012-01-19

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven thermochemical cycles for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium.

  4. Modeling heat and moisture transport in firefighter protective clothing during flash fire exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitrphiromsri, Patirop; Kuznetsov, Andrey V. [North Carolina State University, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a model of heat and moisture transport in firefighter protective clothing during a flash fire exposure is presented. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of coupled heat and moisture transport on the protective performance of the garment. Computational results show the distribution of temperature and moisture content in the fabric during the exposure to the flash fire as well as during the cool-down period. Moreover, the duration of the exposure during which the garment protects the firefighter from getting second and third degree burns from the flash fire exposure is numerically predicted. A complete model for the fire-fabric-air gap-skin system is presented. (orig.)

  5. Heat stress reduces intestinal barrier integrity and favors intestinal glucose transport in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Sarah C; Mani, Venkatesh; Boddicker, Rebecca L; Johnson, Jay S; Weber, Thomas E; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Gabler, Nicholas K

    2013-01-01

    Excessive heat exposure reduces intestinal integrity and post-absorptive energetics that can inhibit wellbeing and be fatal. Therefore, our objectives were to examine how acute heat stress (HS) alters intestinal integrity and metabolism in growing pigs. Animals were exposed to either thermal neutral (TN, 21°C; 35-50% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (35°C; 24-43% humidity; n=8) for 24 h. Compared to TN, rectal temperatures in HS pigs increased by 1.6°C and respiration rates by 2-fold (Pintestinal integrity was compromised in the HS pigs (ileum and colon TER decreased; PIntestinal permeability was accompanied by an increase in protein expression of myosin light chain kinase (PIntestinal glucose transport and blood glucose were elevated due to HS (Pintestinal integrity and increase intestinal stress and glucose transport.

  6. Electron heat transport in current carrying and currentless thermonuclear plasmas. Tokamaks and stellarators compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, M.

    1996-01-16

    In the first experiment the plasma current in the RTP tokamak is varied. Here the underlying idea was to check whether at a low plasma current, transport in the tokamak resembles transport in stellarators more than at higher currents. Secondly, experiments have been done to study the relation of the diffusivity {chi} to the temperature and its gradient in both W7-AS and RTP. In this case the underlying idea was to find the explanation for the phenomenon observed in both tokamaks and stellarators that the quality of the confinement degrades when more heating is applied. A possible explanation is that the diffusivity increases with the temperature or its gradient. Whereas in standard tokamak and stellarator experiments the temperature and its gradient are strongly correlated, a special capability of the plasma heating system of W7-AS and RTP can force them to decouple. (orig.).

  7. The role of magnetic islands in modifying long range temporal correlations of density fluctuations and local heat transport

    CERN Document Server

    van Milligen, B Ph; Garcia, L; Bruna, D Lopez; Carreras, B A; Xu, Y; Ochando, M; Hidalgo, C; Reynolds-Barredo, J M; Fraguas, A Lopez

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the relation between magnetic islands, long range temporal correlations and heat transport. A low order rational surface ($\\iota/2\\pi = 3/2$) was purposely scanned outward through an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated (ECRH) plasma in the TJ-II stellarator. Density turbulence and the poloidal flow velocity (or radial electric field) were characterized using a two channel Doppler Reflectometer. Simultaneously, the ECRH power was modulated to characterize heat transport, using measurements from a 12 channel Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostic. A systematic variation of the poloidal velocity was found to be associated with the stationary $\\iota/2\\pi = 3/2$ magnetic island. Inside from the rational surface, the Hurst coefficient, quantifying the nature of long-range correlations, was found to be significantly enhanced. Simultaneously, heat transport was enhanced as well, establishing a clear link between density fluctuations and anomalous heat transport. The variation of the Hurst coefficie...

  8. Turbulence-induced pressure fluctuations in snow and their effect on heat and moisture transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwald, H.; Higgins, C. W.; Drake, S.; Nolin, A. W.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurement of the heat and moisture flux components of the energy budget of a snow pack is difficult, and to date no generally satisfying solutions exist. In particular, little quantitative knowledge exists on heat and water vapor exchange associated to dynamically driven air movement in the snow pack as a consequence of atmospheric turbulence. This so-called wind-pumping constitutes a mechanism for forced release of saturated air form the snow pack and thus determines evaporation or sublimation rates from the snow and consequently affects the turbulent latent heat flux. A unique experiment and measurement system has been developed and deployed in the field to investigate and quantify the influence of atmospheric turbulence on heat and moisture transport across the snow-air interface. To this end, high-frequency measurements of 3-dimensional wind components, air temperature, and water vapor fluctuations above the snow surface were taken simultaneously together with differential air pressure fluctuations at several depths in the snow pack. The analysis addresses changes in frequency, amplitude, and penetration depth of the pressure fluctuations with depth, and the relationship of turbulence intensity to attenuation characteristics of the pressure within the snow pack. Finally, the study aims at understanding how turbulence-induced air pressure dynamics within the snow pack impacts on the heat budget of the snow pack and the turbulent sensible and latent heat flux above the snow surface.

  9. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  10. SEAWAT Version 4: A Computer Program for Simulation of Multi-Species Solute and Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D.; Thorne, Daniel T.; Dausman, Alyssa M.; Sukop, Michael C.; Guo, Weixing

    2008-01-01

    The SEAWAT program is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate three-dimensional, variable-density, saturated ground-water flow. Flexible equations were added to the program to allow fluid density to be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species. Fluid density may also be calculated as a function of fluid pressure. The effect of fluid viscosity variations on ground-water flow was included as an option. Fluid viscosity can be calculated as a function of one or more MT3DMS species, and the program includes additional functions for representing the dependence on temperature. Although MT3DMS and SEAWAT are not explicitly designed to simulate heat transport, temperature can be simulated as one of the species by entering appropriate transport coefficients. For example, the process of heat conduction is mathematically analogous to Fickian diffusion. Heat conduction can be represented in SEAWAT by assigning a thermal diffusivity for the temperature species (instead of a molecular diffusion coefficient for a solute species). Heat exchange with the solid matrix can be treated in a similar manner by using the mathematically equivalent process of solute sorption. By combining flexible equations for fluid density and viscosity with multi-species transport, SEAWAT Version 4 represents variable-density ground-water flow coupled with multi-species solute and heat transport. SEAWAT Version 4 is based on MODFLOW-2000 and MT3DMS and retains all of the functionality of SEAWAT-2000. SEAWAT Version 4 also supports new simulation options for coupling flow and transport, and for representing constant-head boundaries. In previous versions of SEAWAT, the flow equation was solved for every transport timestep, regardless of whether or not there was a large change in fluid density. A new option was implemented in SEAWAT Version 4 that allows users to control how often the flow field is updated. New options were also implemented for representing constant

  11. Heat Exchanger Design Options and Tritium Transport Study for the VHTR System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2008-09-01

    This report presents the results of a study conducted to consider heat exchanger options and tritium transport in a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The heat exchanger options include types, arrangements, channel patterns in printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHE), coolant flow direction, and pipe configuration in shell-and-tube designs. Study considerations include: three types of heat exchanger designs (PCHE, shell-and-tube, and helical coil); single- and two-stage unit arrangements; counter-current and cross flow configurations; and straight pipes and U-tube designs in shell-and-tube type heat exchangers. Thermal designs and simple stress analyses were performed to estimate the heat exchanger options, and the Finite Element Method was applied for more detailed calculations, especially for PCHE designs. Results of the options study show that the PCHE design has the smallest volume and heat transfer area, resulting in the least tritium permeation and greatest cost savings. It is theoretically the most reliable mechanically, leading to a longer lifetime. The two-stage heat exchanger arrangement appears to be safer and more cost effective. The recommended separation temperature between first and second stages in a serial configuration is 800oC, at which the high temperature unit is about one-half the size of the total heat exchanger core volume. Based on simplified stress analyses, the high temperature unit will need to be replaced two or three times during the plant’s lifetime. Stress analysis results recommend the off-set channel pattern configuration for the PCHE because stress reduction was estimated at up to 50% in this configuration, resulting in a longer lifetime. The tritium transport study resulted in the development of a tritium behavior analysis code using the MATLAB Simulink code. In parallel, the THYTAN code, previously performed by Ohashi and Sherman (2007) on the Peach Bottom data, was revived

  12. Hyperbolic waveguide for long-distance transport of near-field heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Riccardo; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Guizal, Brahim; Antezza, Mauro; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2016-09-01

    Heat flux exchanged between two hot bodies at subwavelength separation distances can exceed the limit predicted by the blackbody theory. However, this super-Planckian transfer is restricted to these separation distances. Here we demonstrate the possible existence of a super-Planckian transfer at arbitrary large separation distances if the interacting bodies are connected in the near field with weakly dissipating hyperbolic waveguides. This result opens the way to long-distance transport of near-field thermal energy.

  13. Analysis of simulation methodology for calculation of the heat of transport for vacancy thermodiffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, William C.; Schelling, Patrick K., E-mail: patrick.schelling@ucf.edu [Advanced Material Processing and Analysis Center and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    Computation of the heat of transport Q{sub a}{sup *} in monatomic crystalline solids is investigated using the methodology first developed by Gillan [J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 11, 4469 (1978)] and further developed by Grout and coworkers [Philos. Mag. Lett. 74, 217 (1996)], referred to as the Grout-Gillan method. In the case of pair potentials, the hopping of a vacancy results in a heat wave that persists for up to 10 ps, consistent with previous studies. This leads to generally positive values for Q{sub a}{sup *} which can be quite large and are strongly dependent on the specific details of the pair potential. By contrast, when the interactions are described using the embedded atom model, there is no evidence of a heat wave, and Q{sub a}{sup *} is found to be negative. This demonstrates that the dynamics of vacancy hopping depends strongly on the details of the empirical potential. However, the results obtained here are in strong disagreement with experiment. Arguments are presented which demonstrate that there is a fundamental error made in the Grout-Gillan method due to the fact that the ensemble of states only includes successful atom hops and hence does not represent an equilibrium ensemble. This places the interpretation of the quantity computed in the Grout-Gillan method as the heat of transport in doubt. It is demonstrated that trajectories which do not yield hopping events are nevertheless relevant to computation of the heat of transport Q{sub a}{sup *}.

  14. Heat transport in polymer thin films for micro/nano-manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Tsung

    The rapid growth in micro/nanotechnology has opened a great opportunity for polymer thin films and polymer nanocomposites. Thermal management or thermal effects in those applications need to be carefully examined. For example, the local heating in electron-beam lithography, emersion lithography, and scanning near field optical lithography may cause the degradation of photoresists and reduce the resolution. The development of many organic electronics, polymer micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices, and polymer nanocomposites may require the knowledge of heat transport in micro/nano-sized polymers. Thermolithography, a novel lithography, uses controlled localized heating to transfer patterns and requires the thermal conductivity data to control. It is of considerable scientific and technological interests for study heat transport in polymer thin films. Unlike bulk polymers that can be measured using commercially available instruments, polymer thin films are difficult to measure. In this manuscript, we develop the measurement techniques suitable for measuring thermal conductivity of polymer thin films and polymer nanocomposites. Using a microfabricated membrane-based device, we study the heat conduction in photoresists at difference process stages. This data is used in our thermolithography study, where we use microheater to study the kinetic of crosslinking reaction of photoresist. The feasibility of thermolithography and potential three dimensional micro/nano-fabrication is presented. The uniqueness of thermolithography is also demonstrated by patterning amorphous fluoropolymers. A modified hot-wire technique is used to measure the thermal conductivity of graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) reinforced nanocomposites, one of the promising candidates for multifunctional materials. Thermal interface resistance in GNP nanocomposites is investigated, which shows a strong effect on energy transport in the nanocomposites and can be diminished through surface treatment.

  15. The role of radiation transport in the thermal response of semitransparent materials to localized laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvin, Jeffrey [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shestakov, Aleksei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stolken, James [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vignes, Ryan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-03-09

    Lasers are widely used to modify the internal structure of semitransparent materials for a wide variety of applications, including waveguide fabrication and laser glass damage healing. The gray diffusion approximation used in past models to describe radiation cooling is not adequate for these materials, particularly near the heated surface layer. In this paper we describe a computational model based upon solving the radiation transport equation in 1D by the Pn method with ~500 photon energy bands, and by multi-group radiationdiffusion in 2D with fourteen photon energy bands. The model accounts for the temperature-dependent absorption of infrared laser light and subsequent redistribution of the deposited heat by both radiation and conductive transport. We present representative results for fused silica irradiated with 2–12 W of 4.6 or 10.6 µm laser light for 5–10 s pulse durations in a 1 mm spot, which is small compared to the diameter and thickness of the silica slab. Furthermore, we show that, unlike the case for bulk heating, in localized infrared laser heatingradiation transport plays only a very small role in the thermal response of silica.

  16. Experimental assessment of the influence of bedforms on coupled hyporheic flow and heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, F. A.; Chan, W. S.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Hyporheic flow influences both biogeochemical cycling in streambeds as well as streambed ecology. Biogeochemical processes may be temperature dependent, whereas heat transport may also be controlled by hyporheic flow, thereby providing feedback. We separately and experimentally assess the effects of hyporheic flow due to bed topography on thermal dynamics in the sediment using a custom, tilting flume with temperature controls. Diel temperature cycles of 6° C were imposed in the flume and propagation of temperature signals into the sediment was examined for different bed morphologies (plane bed, pool-riffle-pool, and rippled bed), channel flow rates, and sediment grain size. Temperature fields in the sediment were monitored using an array of embedded thermistors, and this data was used to identify zones of upwelling and downwelling within the hyporheic zone. Results suggest that bedforms do induce substantially deeper downwelling upstream and downstream of the bedforms, with upwelling near the crest. This in turn leads to substantial advective heat transport and distinct thermal patterns in the sediment. These results corroborate existing theoretical models of coupled hyporheic exchange and heat transport under bedforms. Hyporheic flow therefore affects thermal patchiness in sediment, which may in turn exert a control on biogeochemical reaction rates, and form thermal refugia for fauna.

  17. Fingerprint of topological Andreev bound states in phase-dependent heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Björn; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that phase-dependent heat currents through superconductor-topological insulator Josephson junctions provide a useful tool to probe the existence of topological Andreev bound states, even for multichannel surface states. We predict that in the tunneling regime topological Andreev bound states lead to a minimum of the thermal conductance for a phase difference ϕ =π , in clear contrast to a maximum of the thermal conductance at ϕ =π that occurs for trivial Andreev bound states in superconductor-normal-metal tunnel junctions. This opens up the possibility that phase-dependent heat transport can distinguish between topologically trivial and nontrivial 4 π modes. Furthermore, we propose a superconducting quantum interference device geometry where phase-dependent heat currents can be measured using available experimental technology.

  18. Nonequilibrium dynamics of a stochastic model of anomalous heat transport: numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfini, L; Lepri, S; Mejia-Monasterio, C; Politi, A [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Livi, R [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1 I-50019, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)], E-mail: antonio.politi@isc.cnr.it

    2010-04-09

    We study heat transport in a chain of harmonic oscillators with random elastic collisions between nearest-neighbours. The equations of motion of the covariance matrix are numerically solved for free and fixed boundary conditions. In the thermodynamic limit, the shape of the temperature profile and the value of the stationary heat flux depend on the choice of boundary conditions. For free boundary conditions, they also depend on the coupling strength with the heat baths. Moreover, we find a strong violation of local equilibrium at the chain edges that determine two boundary layers of size {radical}N (where N is the chain length) that are characterized by a different scaling behaviour from the bulk. Finally, we investigate the relaxation towards the stationary state, finding two long time scales: the first corresponds to the relaxation of the hydrodynamic modes; the second is a manifestation of the finiteness of the system.

  19. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  20. Turbulent transport regimes and the scrape-off layer heat flux width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the responsible mechanisms and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width is important for predicting viable operating regimes in future tokamaks and for seeking possible mitigation schemes. In this paper, we present a qualitative and conceptual framework for understanding various regimes of edge/SOL turbulence and the role of turbulent transport as the mechanism for establishing the SOL heat flux width. Relevant considerations include the type and spectral characteristics of underlying instabilities, the location of the gradient drive relative to the SOL, the nonlinear saturation mechanism, and the parallel heat transport regime. We find a heat flux width scaling with major radius R that is generally positive, consistent with the previous findings [Connor et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 169 (1999)]. The possible relationship of turbulence mechanisms to the neoclassical orbit width or heuristic drift mechanism in core energy confinement regimes known as low (L) mode and high (H) mode is considered, together with implications for the future experiments.

  1. Solute and heat transport model of the Henry and hilleke laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D; Dausman, Alyssa M; Sukop, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    SEAWAT is a coupled version of MODFLOW and MT3DMS designed to simulate variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. The most recent version of SEAWAT, called SEAWAT Version 4, includes new capabilities to represent simultaneous multispecies solute and heat transport. To test the new features in SEAWAT, the laboratory experiment of Henry and Hilleke (1972) was simulated. Henry and Hilleke used warm fresh water to recharge a large sand-filled glass tank. A cold salt water boundary was represented on one side. Adjustable heating pads were used to heat the bottom and left sides of the tank. In the laboratory experiment, Henry and Hilleke observed both salt water and fresh water flow systems separated by a narrow transition zone. After minor tuning of several input parameters with a parameter estimation program, results from the SEAWAT simulation show good agreement with the experiment. SEAWAT results suggest that heat loss to the room was more than expected by Henry and Hilleke, and that multiple thermal convection cells are the likely cause of the widened transition zone near the hot end of the tank. Other computer programs with similar capabilities may benefit from benchmark testing with the Henry and Hilleke laboratory experiment.

  2. Transport coefficients and heat fluxes in non-equilibrium high-temperature flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of electronic excitation on transport processes in non-equilibrium high-temperature ionized mixture flows is studied. Two five-component mixtures, N 2 / N2 + / N / N + / e - and O 2 / O2 + / O / O + / e - , are considered taking into account the electronic degrees of freedom for atomic species as well as the rotational-vibrational-electronic degrees of freedom for molecular species, both neutral and ionized. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity, diffusion and thermal diffusion) are calculated in the temperature range 500-50 000 K. Thermal conductivity and bulk viscosity coefficients are strongly affected by electronic states, especially for neutral atomic species. Shear viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients are not sensible to electronic excitation if the size of excited states is assumed to be constant. The limits of applicability for the Stokes relation are discussed; at high temperatures, this relation is violated not only for molecular species but also for electronically excited atomic gases. Two test cases of strongly non-equilibrium flows behind plane shock waves corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II) are simulated numerically. Fluid-dynamic variables and heat fluxes are evaluated in gases with electronic excitation. In inviscid flows without chemical-radiative coupling, the flow-field is weakly affected by electronic states; however, in viscous flows, their influence can be more important, in particular, on the convective heat flux. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the heat transfer is evaluated as well as the effect of reaction rate coefficients. The competition of diffusion and heat conduction processes reduces the overall effect of electronic excitation on the convective heating, especially for the Fire II test case. It is shown that reliable models of chemical reaction rates are of great

  3. Heat transport in Rayleigh-Bénard convection and angular momentum transport in Taylor-Couette flow: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, Hannes J.; Eckhardt, Bruno; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection and Taylor-Couette flow are two canonical flows that have many properties in common. We here compare the two flows in detail for parameter values where the Nusselt numbers, i.e. the thermal transport and the angular momentum transport normalized by the corresponding laminar values, coincide. We study turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in air at Rayleigh number Ra=107 and Taylor-Couette flow at shear Reynolds number ReS=2×104 for two different mean rotation rates but the same Nusselt numbers. For individual pairwise related fields and convective currents, we compare the probability density functions normalized by the corresponding root mean square values and taken at different distances from the wall. We find one rotation number for which there is very good agreement between the mean profiles of the two corresponding quantities temperature and angular momentum. Similarly, there is good agreement between the fluctuations in temperature and velocity components. For the heat and angular momentum currents, there are differences in the fluctuations outside the boundary layers that increase with overall rotation and can be related to differences in the flow structures in the boundary layer and in the bulk. The study extends the similarities between the two flows from global quantities to local quantities and reveals the effects of rotation on the transport.

  4. The Strong Influence of Magmatic Heat Transport on Terrestrial Planetary Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackley, P. J.; Nakagawa, T.; Armann, M.

    2012-04-01

    On Io, "heat pipe" volcanism is thought to be the major mode of heat loss from the interior. This mechanism can also, however, be important on larger terrestrial planets, particularly at early times, and this is the topic of this presentation. Firstly, we consider planets with stagnant lids. In models of early Mars, Keller and Tackley [2009] found that magmatism has a dramatic buffering effect on early mantle temperature, causing cases with differing initial temperatures to converge to the same value that is much lower than obtained without magmatism, an effect subsequently termed the "thermostat effect" in the martian evolution models of Ogawa and Yanagisawa [2011]. This effect becomes more important with increasing planet size. In numerical models of Venus [Armann and Tackey, 2008], it was found that heat pipe magmatism is the dominant heat loss mechanism over most of the planet's evolution, if there are no episodic lithospheric overturn events interrupting the stagnant lid mode. Secondly, we consider planets with plate tectonics. On present-day Earth, mid-ocean ridge magmatism contributes around 10% of the total heat transport. Early parameterized models of Davies [1990] predicted that magmatism can be important for Earth's heat loss, but it has largely been ignored by the Earth mantle modelling community, with a few exceptions. Xie and Tackley [2004] found magmatic heat transport to be the most important heat loss mechanism at early times in thermo-chemical convection models representing Earth. Here we present new models of the thermo-chemical and magmatic evolution of Earth-like planets [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2012], also finding that magmatism is an important heat loss mechanism throughout much of the planet's history. In a broader context, the importance of magmatic heat loss for both stagnant lid and plate tectonics planets together with its increasing importance with planet size, leads to the prediction that on super-Earths it will be even more important. 1

  5. Advective heat transport associated with regional Earth degassing in central Apennine (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Chiarabba, C.; Frondini, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we show that the main springs of the central Apennine transport a total amount of heat of ˜2.2×109 J s-1. Most of this heat (57%) is the result of geothermal warming while the remaining 43% is due to gravitational potential energy dissipation. This result indicates that a large area of the central Apennines is very hot with heat flux values >300 mW m-2. These values are higher than those measured in the magmatic and famously geothermal provinces of Tuscany and Latium and about 1/3 of the total heat discharged at Yellowstone. This finding is surprising because the central Apennines have been thought to be a relatively cold area. Translated by CO2 rich fluids, this heat anomaly suggests the existence of a thermal source such as a large magmatic intrusion at depth. Recent tomographic images of the area support the presence of such an intrusion visible as a broad negative velocity anomaly in seismic waves. Our results indicate that the thermal regime of tectonically active areas of the Earth, where meteoric waters infiltrate and deeply circulate, should be revised on the basis of mass and energy balances of the groundwater systems.

  6. Evidence for increased latent heat transport during the Cretaceous (Albian) greenhouse warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufnar, David F.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Brenner, Richard L.; Witzke, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of increased heat transfer by atmospheric H 2O vapor during the Albian greenhouse warming suggest that the intensified hydrologic cycle played a greater role in warming high latitudes than at present and thus represents a viable alternative to oceanic heat transport. Sphaerosiderite ??18O values in paleosols of the North American Cretaceous Western Interior Basin are a proxy for meteoric ??18O values, and mass-balance modeling results suggest that Albian precipitation rates exceeded modern rates at both mid and high latitudes. Comparison of modeled Albian and modern precipitation minus evaporation values suggests amplification of the Albian moisture deficit in the tropics and moisture surplus in the mid to high latitudes. The tropical moisture deficit represents an average heat loss of ???75 W/m2 at 10??N paleolatitude (at present, 21 W/m2). The increased precipitation at higher latitudes implies an average heat gain of ???83 W/m2 at 45??N (at present, 23 W/m2) and of 19 W/m2 at 75??N (at present, 4 W/m2). These estimates of increased poleward heat transfer by H2O vapor during the Albian may help to explain the reduced equator-to-pole temperature gradients. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  7. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Hydrate Slurries Transported by Visco-Elastic Fluid in a Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Yamada, Sayaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Hiromoto

    A two dimentional numerical study has been performed to investigate on heat transfer characteristics of a hydrate slurry transported by a visco-elastic fluid flowing between parallel plates with a one-sided cavity. In this study, the cavity length was changed in three steps, while the rib height and rib length were kept constant. Heat flux on the solid wall was set at 20,000W•m-2. The concentration of hydrate particles at inlet was set at 5wt%. From the results, it is found that hydrate particles dispersed with Newtonian fluid (water) flows over the cavity without penetration. On the other hand, hydrate particles dispersed with visco-elastic fluid are observed effectively to penetrate into the cavity and sweep the bottom of cavity by Barus effect. This causes effective heat transfer from the bottom wall of the cavity. Heat transfer difference was observed that the cavity length was changed. Consequently, there exists the optimum geometry for the heat transfer enhancement in a cavity by using Barus effect.

  8. Water and heat transport in hilly red soil of southern China: I. Experiment and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jun; HUANG Zhi-zhen; HAN Xiao-fei

    2005-01-01

    Studies on coupled transfer of soil moisture and heat have been widely carried out for decades. However, little work has been done on red soils, widespread in southern China. The simultaneous transfer of soil moisture and heat depends on soil physical properties and the climate conditions. Red soil is heavy clay and high content of free iron and aluminum oxide. The climate conditions are characterized by the clear four seasons and the serious seasonal drought. The great annual and diurnal air temperature differences result in significant fluctuation in soil temperature in top layer. The closed and evaporating columns experiments with red soil were conducted to simulate the coupled transfer of soil water and heat under the overlaying and opening fields' conditions, and to analyze the effects of soil temperature gradient on the water transfer and the effects of initial soil water contents on the transfer of soil water and heat. The closed and evaporating columns were designed similarly with about 18 ℃ temperatures differences between the top and bottom boundary, except of the upper end closed or exposed to the air, respectively.Results showed that in the closed column, water moved towards the cold end driven by temperature gradient, while the transported water decreased with the increasing initial soil water content until the initial soil water content reached to field capacity equivalent,when almost no changes for the soil moisture profile. In the evaporating column, the net transport of soil water was simultaneously driven by evaporation and temperature gradients, and the drier soil was more influenced by temperature gradient than by evaporation. In drier soil, it took a longer time for the temperature to reach equilibrium, because of more net amount of transported water.

  9. Estimating the health benefits from natural gas use in transport and heating in Santiago, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo; Oliva, Estefania; Saide, Pablo; Spak, Scott N; de la Maza, Cristóbal; Osses, Mauricio; Tolvett, Sebastián; Campbell, J Elliott; Tsao, Tsao Es Chi-Chung; Molina, Luisa T

    2012-07-01

    Chilean law requires the assessment of air pollution control strategies for their costs and benefits. Here we employ an online weather and chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, and a gridded population density map, LANDSCAN, to estimate changes in fine particle pollution exposure, health benefits, and economic valuation for two emission reduction strategies based on increasing the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in Santiago, Chile. The first scenario, switching to a CNG public transportation system, would reduce urban PM2.5 emissions by 229 t/year. The second scenario would reduce wood burning emissions by 671 t/year, with unique hourly emission reductions distributed from daily heating demand. The CNG bus scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 0.33 μg/m³ and up to 2 μg/m³ during winter months, while the residential heating scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 2.07 μg/m³, with peaks exceeding 8 μg/m³ during strong air pollution episodes in winter months. These ambient pollution reductions lead to 36 avoided premature mortalities for the CNG bus scenario, and 229 for the CNG heating scenario. Both policies are shown to be cost-effective ways of reducing air pollution, as they target high-emitting area pollution sources and reduce concentrations over densely populated urban areas as well as less dense areas outside the city limits. Unlike the concentration rollback methods commonly used in public policy analyses, which assume homogeneous reductions across a whole city (including homogeneous population densities), and without accounting for the seasonality of certain emissions, this approach accounts for both seasonality and diurnal emission profiles for both the transportation and residential heating sectors.

  10. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  11. Modeling Coronal Response in Decaying Active Regions with Magnetic Flux Transport and Steady Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Upton, Lisa A.; Young, Peter R.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the dependence of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiance on the total magnetic flux in active regions as obtained from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Using observations of nine active regions tracked along different stages of evolution, we extend the known radiance—magnetic flux power-law relationship (I\\propto {{{Φ }}}α ) to the AIA 335 Å passband, and the Fe xviii 93.93 Å spectral line in the 94 Å passband. We find that the total unsigned magnetic flux divided by the polarity separation ({{Φ }}/D) is a better indicator of radiance for the Fe xviii line with a slope of α =3.22+/- 0.03. We then use these results to test our current understanding of magnetic flux evolution and coronal heating. We use magnetograms from the simulated decay of these active regions produced by the Advective Flux Transport model as boundary conditions for potential extrapolations of the magnetic field in the corona. We then model the hydrodynamics of each individual field line with the Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops model with steady heating scaled as the ratio of the average field strength and the length (\\bar{B}/L) and render the Fe xviii and 335 Å emission. We find that steady heating is able to partially reproduce the magnitudes and slopes of the EUV radiance—magnetic flux relationships and discuss how impulsive heating can help reconcile the discrepancies. This study demonstrates that combined models of magnetic flux transport, magnetic topology, and heating can yield realistic estimates for the decay of active region radiances with time.

  12. An Assessment of Transport Property Estimation Methods for Ammonia–Water Mixtures and Their Influence on Heat Exchanger Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Modi, Anish; Jensen, Jonas Kjær

    2015-01-01

    are considered: a flue-gas-based heat recovery boiler for a combined cycle power plant and a hot-oil-based boiler for a solar thermal power plant. The different transport property methods resulted in larger differences at high pressures and temperatures, and a possible discontinuous first derivative, when using...... the interpolative methods in contrast to the corresponding state methods. Nevertheless, all possible mixture transport property combinations used herein resulted in a heat exchanger size within 4.3 % difference for the flue-gas heat recovery boiler, and within 12.3 % difference for the oil-based boiler.......Transport properties of fluids are indispensable for heat exchanger design. The methods for estimating the transport properties of ammonia–water mixtures are not well established in the literature. The few existent methods are developed from none or limited, sometimes inconsistent experimental...

  13. EFFECT OF SANDSTONE ANISOTROPY ON ITS HEAT AND MOISTURE TRANSPORT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Fořt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Each type of natural stone has its own geological history, formation conditions, different chemical and mineralogical composition, which influence its possible anisotropy. Knowledge in the natural stones anisotropy represents crucial information for the process of stone quarrying, its correct usage and arrangement in building applications. Because of anisotropy, many natural stones exhibit different heat and moisture transport properties in various directions. The main goal of this study is to analyse several anisotropy indices and their effect on heat transport and capillary absorption. For the experimental determination of the anisotropy effect, five types of sandstone coming from different operating quarries in the Czech Republic are chosen. These materials are often used for restoration of culture heritage monuments as well as for other building applications where they are used as facing slabs, facade panels, decoration stones, paving, etc. For basic characterization of studied materials, determination of their bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity is done. Chemical composition of particular sandstones is analysed by X-Ray Fluorescence. Anisotropy is examined by the non-destructive measurement of velocity of ultrasonic wave propagation. On the basis of ultrasound testing data, the relative anisotropy, total anisotropy and anisotropy coefficient are calculated. Then, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in various directions of samples orientation is carried out. The obtained results reveal significant differences between the parameters characterizing the heat transport in various directions, whereas these values are in accordance with the indices of anisotropy. Capillary water transport is described by water absorption coefficient measured using a sorption experiment, which is performed for distilled water and 1M NaCl water solution.  The measured data confirm the effect of anisotropy which is

  14. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) heat transport system dynamics and steam generator control: Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Dynamic modeling of LMFBR heat transport system is discussed. Uncontrolled transient behavior of individual components and of the integrated heat transport system are considered. For each component, results showing specific dynamic features of the component and/or model capability were generated. Controlled dynamic behavior for alternative steam generator control systems during forced and natural sodium coolant circulation was analyzed. Combined free and forced convection of laminar and turbulent vertical pipe flow of liquid metals was investigated.

  15. NON-LINEAR TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION ANALYSIS OF INSULATION WALL OF TANK FOR TRANSPORTATION OF LIQUID ALUMINUM

    OpenAIRE

    Miroslav M Živković; Aleksandar V Nikolić; Radovan B Slavković; Fatima T Živić

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with transient nonlinear heat conduction through the insulation wall of the tank for transportation of liquid aluminum. Tanks designed for this purpose must satisfy certain requirements regarding temperature of loading and unloading, during transport. Basic theoretical equations are presented, which describe the problem of heat conduction finite element (FE) analysis, starting from the differential equation of energy balance, taking into account the initial and boundary condi...

  16. Study on a non-powered heat transporting system; Mudoryoku netsu hanso system ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Y. [Kanto Gakuin University, Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    This paper proposes a non-powered heat transportation (HT) system. The system is composed of an evaporator, condenser, receiver, switching chamber (SC) and 3 check valves which are connected with each other by vapor and liquid tubes. Condensed liquid supercooled in the condenser exists in the receiver forming a saturated condition at a concerned temperature, and condensed liquid is lifted up from the condenser to the receiver by pressure difference between the evaporator and receiver. Generally evaporation pressure is higher by pressure difference between liquid levels in the condenser and receiver. The lifted up amount of condensed liquid increases with evaporation pressure, resulting in an increase in heating surface area of the condenser and amount of condensed liquid. A proper evaporator pressure is thus retained by reduction of evaporation pressure. SC is connected with the receiver and evaporator, and switches high- and low-pressure valves by motion of an inner float to transport heat from the evaporator to condenser. Reverse HT is possible as normal latent HT by installing a bypass. Some problems are also described. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Diffusive-to-ballistic transition of the modulated heat transport in a rarefied air chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Gomez-Heredia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulated heat transfer in air subject to pressures from 760 Torr to 10-4 Torr is experimentally studied by means of a thermal-wave resonant cavity placed in a vacuum chamber. This is done through the analysis of the amplitude and phase delay of the photothermal signal as a function of the cavity length and pressure through of the Knudsen’s number. The viscous, transitional, and free molecular regimes of heat transport are observed for pressures P>1.5 Torr, 25 mTorrheat transport.

  18. Diffusive Heat Transport in Budyko's Energy Balance Climate Model with a Dynamic Ice Line

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, James

    2016-01-01

    M. Budyko and W. Sellers independently introduced seminal energy balance climate models in 1969, each with a goal of investigating the role played by positive ice albedo feedback in climate dynamics. In this paper we replace the relaxation to the mean horizontal heat transport mechanism used in the models of Budyko and Sellers with diffusive heat transport. We couple the resulting surface temperature equation with an equation for movement of the edge of the ice sheet (called the ice line), recently introduced by E. Widiasih. We apply the spectral method to the temperature-ice line system and consider finite approximations. We prove there exists a stable equilibrium solution with a small ice cap, and an unstable equilibrium solution with a large ice cap, for a range of parameter values. If the diffusive transport is too efficient, however, the small ice cap disappears and an ice free Earth becomes a limiting state. In addition, we analyze a variant of the coupled diffusion equations appropriate as a model for ...

  19. Heat Transport in the Precursor of Carbon and Metallic Wire Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jack; Lebedev, Sergey; Bennett, Matthew; Bland, Simon; Burdiak, Guy; Suttle, Lee; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco; Swadling, George; Velikovich, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The complex interplay between the transport of heat and magnetic fields in high- β, magnetised plasmas is crucial to the feasibility of Magnetised Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF). We consider using the precursor plasma in a cylindrical wire array to reach the relevant dimensionless parameters for the initial state of the MagLIF plasma. The precursor is a hot, dense, stable plasma formed on the axis by the collision of material ablated from the wires. Simple models show that an axial magnetic field of ~ 5 T could magnetise the precursor (ωeτe ~ 10) at high-beta (β ~ 10). In this regime, the Nernst term may dominate the transport of the magnetic field, affecting the heat transport. The experiments are conducted on MAGPIE (1.4 MA, 250 ns rise time). Metallic wire arrays are standard, but to reduce radiative losses and the electron-ion thermalisation time, we will also consider carbon in the form of 0.3 mm diameter graphite rods. The axial magnetic field can either be provided by external coils or by the drive current. We study the evolution of the plasma density and temperature using laser interferometry and Schlieren imaging, an optical streak camera and Thomson scattering. The magnetic field can be studied using fibre-based polarimetry.

  20. Study of fast electron transport and ionization in isochorically heated solid foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Pandit, Rishi; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Beg, Farhat; McLean, Harry; Chen, Hui; Park, J.-B.; Patel, Prav; Link, Anthony; Ping, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of a high-power, short-pulse laser with a solid target generates a significant number of relativistic MeV electrons, subsequently heating the target isochorically in the transport process. Fast electron driven ionization of a solid titanium foil was studied by measuring Ti K-alpha x-rays and performing 2-D particle-in-cell simulations. The experiment was performed using the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser at UNR's Nevada Terawatt Facility. The 15 J, 0.35 ps laser was tightly focused on to a various sized, 2- μm thick Ti foil within a 8 μm spot to achieve the peak intensity of 2×1019 W/cm2. The transport of the fast electrons produced 4.51 keV Ti K-alpha x-rays. The yields and 2-D monochromatic images were recorded with a Bragg crystal spectrometer and a spherically bent crystal imager. The ionization degree of the heated foil was determined to be 15 from the ionized K-alpha lines and the missing emission in the images. 2-D PIC simulations using a PICLS code with a radiation transport module were performed to calculate the K-alpha profiles and spectra. Details of the experiment and comparison will be presented.

  1. Heat transport in Rayleigh-Benard convection and angular momentum transport in Taylor-Couette flow: a comparative study

    CERN Document Server

    Brauckmann, Hannes; Schumacher, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Rayleigh-Benard convection and Taylor-Couette flow are two canonical flows that have many properties in common. We here compare the two flows in detail for parameter values where the Nusselt numbers, i.e. the thermal transport and the angular momentum transport normalized by the corresponding laminar values, coincide. We study turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in air at Rayleigh number Ra=1e7 and Taylor-Couette flow at shear Reynolds number Re_S=2e4 for two different mean rotation rates but the same Nusselt numbers. For individual pairwise related fields and convective currents, we compare the probability density functions normalized by the corresponding root mean square values and taken at different distances from the wall. We find one rotation number for which there is very good agreement between the mean profiles of the two corresponding quantities temperature and angular momentum. Similarly, there is good agreement between the fluctuations in temperature and velocity components. For the heat and angula...

  2. Applicability of heat and gas trans-port models in biocover design based on a case study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. A. F.; Binning, Philip John; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . Both models used the heat equation for heat transfer, and the numerical model used advection-diffusion model with dual Monod kinetics for gas transport. The results were validated with data from a Danish landfi The models correlated well with the observed data: the coefficient of determination (R2...

  3. Exact solution of a Lévy walk model for anomalous heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Abhishek; Saito, Keiji; Derrida, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The Lévy walk model is studied in the context of the anomalous heat conduction of one-dimensional systems. In this model, the heat carriers execute Lévy walks instead of normal diffusion as expected in systems where Fourier's law holds. Here we calculate exactly the average heat current, the large deviation function of its fluctuations, and the temperature profile of the Lévy walk model maintained in a steady state by contact with two heat baths (the open geometry). We find that the current is nonlocally connected to the temperature gradient. As observed in recent simulations of mechanical models, all the cumulants of the current fluctuations have the same system-size dependence in the open geometry. For the ring geometry, we argue that a size-dependent cutoff time is necessary for the Lévy walk model to behave like mechanical models. This modification does not affect the results on transport in the open geometry for large enough system sizes.

  4. Modeling of limiter heat loads and impurity transport in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, Florian; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Hoelbe, H.; Koenig, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Bozhenkov, S.; Reiter, D.

    2015-11-01

    The quasi-isodynamic stellarator Wendelstein 7-X starts plasma operation in a limiter configuration. The field consists of closed magnetic flux surfaces avoiding magnetic islands in the plasma boundary. Because of the small size of the limiters and the absence of wall-protecting elements in this phase, limiter heat loads and impurity generation due to plasma surface interaction become a concern. These issues are studied with the 3D fluid plasma edge and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene. It is shown that the 3D SOL consists of three separate helical magnetic flux bundles of different field line connection lengths. A density scan at input power of 4MW reveals a strong modulation of the plasma paramters with the connection length. The limiter peak heat fluxes drop from 14 MWm-2 down to 10 MWm-2 with raising the density from 1 ×1018m-3 to 1.9 ×1019m-3, accompanied by an increase of the heat flux channel widths λq. Radiative power losses can help to avoid thermal overloads of the limiters at the upper margin of the heating power. The power removal feasibility of the intrinsic carbon and other extrinsic light impurities via active gas injection is discussed as a preparation of this method for island divertor operation. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA and by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0013911.

  5. Nanoscale phase engineering of thermal transport with a Josephson heat modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Blanc, Christophe; Bosisio, Riccardo; D'Ambrosio, Sophie; Giazotto, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Macroscopic quantum phase coherence has one of its pivotal expressions in the Josephson effect, which manifests itself both in charge and energy transport. The ability to master the amount of heat transferred through two tunnel-coupled superconductors by tuning their phase difference is the core of coherent caloritronics, and is expected to be a key tool in a number of nanoscience fields, including solid-state cooling, thermal isolation, radiation detection, quantum information and thermal logic. Here, we show the realization of the first balanced Josephson heat modulator designed to offer full control at the nanoscale over the phase-coherent component of thermal currents. Our device provides magnetic-flux-dependent temperature modulations up to 40 mK in amplitude with a maximum of the flux-to-temperature transfer coefficient reaching 200 mK per flux quantum at a bath temperature of 25 mK. Foremost, it demonstrates the exact correspondence in the phase engineering of charge and heat currents, breaking ground for advanced caloritronic nanodevices such as thermal splitters, heat pumps and time-dependent electronic engines.

  6. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects.

  7. Heat Transport Simulation for Atmospheric-Pressure High-Density Microgap Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2006-02-01

    Atmospheric-pressure cw high-density plasma can be produced in a microgap between two knife-edge electrodes by microwave excitation. A possible application of such a plasma is as an excimer light source and for this purpose the gas temperature in the plasma is a particularly important parameter. In this paper we report a fluid dynamic simulation of heat transport in the microgap plasma and compare the results with previously studied experimental gas temperature characteristics (e.g., dependence on the microwave power and the forced gas flow rate). The simulation explains reasonably well the experimental results when the effect of local gas density change on the gas heating process is taken into consideration. Discussion is given that the existence of thermally driven convection in the microgap plasma indicated in a preliminary report is incorrect.

  8. The role of Ekman flow and planetary waves in the oceanic cross-equatorial heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical model is used to mechanistically simulate the oceans' seasonal cross-equatorial heat transport. The basic process of Ekman pumping and drift is able to account for a large amount of the cross-equatorial flux. Increased easterly wind stress in the winter hemisphere causes Ekman surface drift poleward, while decreased easterly stress allows a reduction in the poleward drift in the summer hemisphere. The addition of planetary and gravity waves to this model does not alter the net cross-equatorial flow, although the planetary waves are clearly seen. On comparison with Oort and Vonder Haar (1976), this adiabatic advective redistribution of heat is seen to be plausible up to 10-20 deg N, beyond which other dynamics and thermodynamics are indicated.

  9. Bjerknes Compensation in Meridional Heat Transport under Freshwater Forcing and the Role of Climate Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qin

    2017-04-01

    Using a coupled Earth climate model, freshwater experiments are performed to study the Bjerknes compensation (BJC) between meridional atmosphere heat transport (AHT) and meridional ocean heat transport (OHT). Freshwater hosing in the North Atlantic weakens the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and thus reduces the northward OHT in the Atlantic significantly, leading to a cooling (warming) in surface layer in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. This results in an enhanced Hadley Cell and northward AHT. Meanwhile, the OHT in the Indo-Pacific is increased in response to the Hadley Cell change, partially offsetting the reduced OHT in the Atlantic. Two compensations occur here: compensation between the AHT and the Atlantic OHT, and that between the Indo-Pacific OHT and the Atlantic OHT. The AHT change compensates the OHT change very well in the extratropics, while the former overcompensates the latter in the tropics due to the Indo-Pacific change. The BJC can be understood from the viewpoint of large-scale circulation change. However, the intrinsic mechanism of BJC is related to the climate feedback of Earth system. Our coupled model experiments confirm that the occurrence of BJC is an intrinsic requirement of local energy balance, and local climate feedback determines the extent of BJC, consistent with previous theoretical results. Even during the transient period of climate change in the model, the BJC is well established when the ocean heat storage is slowly varying and its change is weaker than the net heat flux changes at the ocean surface and the top of the atmosphere. The BJC can be deduced from the local climate feedback. Under the freshwater forcing, the overcompensation in the tropics (undercompensation in the extratropics) is mainly caused by the positive longwave feedback related to cloud (negative longwave feedback related to surface temperature change). Different dominant feedbacks determine different BJC scenarios in different regions

  10. Understanding the Atmospheric Response to Ocean Heat Transport: a Model Inter-Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, B.

    2012-12-01

    The oceans' contribution to poleward heat transport (1 to 2 PW) is dwarfed by the atmosphere, and yet ocean heat transport (OHT) exerts a powerful climatic influence by exciting various atmospheric feedbacks. OHT drives polar-amplified greenhouse warming through a dynamical redistribution of tropospheric water vapor, and helps set the strength and position of the ITCZ. These complex responses explicitly couple tropical and extra-tropical processes, and depend on interactions between large-scale dynamics and moist physics. Considerable insights have been drawn from recent idealized experiments with aquaplanet GCMs coupled to slab oceans with prescribed OHT convergence (q-flux). However sensitivity to uncertain model parameterizations pose a barrier to deeper understanding. I will introduce a new multi-institution collaboration called the Q-flux / Aquaplanet Model Inter-comparison Project (QAquMIP), designed to test the robustness of the climatic impact of OHT and its relationship to traditional climate sensitivity. A standardized set of GCM experiments, repeated across a broad range of models, are forced by a few simple analytical q-fluxes. Experimental controls include the meridional scale of poleward OHT, strength of inter-hemispheric OHT, and zonally asymmetric equatorial heating. I will compare robust spatial patterns of temperature and precipitation changes associated with OHT forcing to those driven by CO2, and discuss the underlying spatial pattern of atmospheric feedbacks. A recurring theme is the key role of moist convection in communicating sea surface heating signals throughout the atmosphere, with consequences for clouds, water vapor, radiation, and hydrology. QAquMIP will better constrain the possible role of the oceans in past warm climates, provide a standard framework for testing new parameterizations, and advance our fundamental understanding of the moist processes contributing to present-day climate sensitivity.

  11. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  12. Determination of Heat Transport Mechanism in Aqueous Nanofluids Using Regime Diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.CHANDRASEKAR; S.SURESH

    2009-01-01

    We provide an approximate method to determine the dominant heat transport mechanism responsible for the anomalous enhancement of thermal conductivity in aqueous nanofluids.Due to a large degree of randomness and scatter observed in the published experimental data,limits to nanofluid thermal conductivity are fixed analytically by taking into account the contribution of particle Brownian motion and clustering,and a regime diagram is developed.Experimental data from a range of independent published sources is used for validation of the developed regime diagram.

  13. Saturation of poleward atmospheric heat transport in warm climates and the low-gradient paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, R.; Langen, P.

    2004-12-01

    The equable climates of the deep past featured higher atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, greater global-mean surface temperatures and much weaker equator-to-pole temperature contrasts than today. Climate models readily reproduce the higher mean temperatures, given sufficient increases in greenhouse gases, but they have proved incapable of matching the low meridional gradients indicated by proxy data. A crucial step in resolving this 'low-gradient paradox' is uderstanding why climate models fail to reproduce the correct feedback between global mean temperature and its meridional gradient. Though models do achieve some reduction in temperature gradients, mostly through snow and sea-ice albedo feedback, the remaining discrepancy must be accounted for by either more exotic forms of radiative forcing feedback, which are not represented in current models, or by more efficient oceanic and/or atmospheric poleward heat transports, which the models for some reason do not capture. This latter feature is especially puzzling for the atmosphere, since there are plausible reasons to expect atmospheric energy transport to be be considerably more efficient in a warmer climate. We explore this issue by systematically studying the response of atmospheric heat transpor in a GCM to a very broad range of global mean temperatures and meridional gradients. We find that heat transport increases with global mean temperature when the latter is less than about 15C; above this value, heat transport saturates, becoming insensitive to surface temperature. This behavior has a dynamical origin traceble to changes in the structure of the atmosphere's general circulation. Mean tropospheric static stability increases with surface temperature, reducing baroclinicity and suppressing storm-track eddy activity. Furthermore, as temperature increases the storm-tracks as a whole migrate poleward over cooler waters, and thus do not experience the full global-mean surface temperature increase. These

  14. Practical examples of how knowledge management is addressed in Point Lepreau heat transport ageing management programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slade, J. [NB Power Nuclear, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)], E-mail: JSlade@NBPower.com; Gendron, T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Greenlaw, G. [NB Power Nuclear, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    In the mid-1990s, New Brunswick Power Nuclear implemented a Management System Process Model at the Point Lepreau Generating Station that provides the basic elements of a knowledge management program. As noted by the IAEA, the challenge facing the nuclear industry now is to make improvements in knowledge management in areas that are more difficult to implement. Two of these areas are: increasing the value of existing knowledge, and converting tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge (knowledge acquisition). This paper describes some practical examples of knowledge management improvements in the Point Lepreau heat transport system ageing management program. (author)

  15. Multiresonance of energy transport and absence of heat pump in a force-driven lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Ren, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2011-09-01

    Energy transport control in low dimensional nanoscale systems has attracted much attention in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the energy transport properties of the Frenkel-Kontorova lattice subject to a periodic driving force, in particular, the resonance behavior of the energy current by varying the external driving frequency. It is discovered that, in certain parameter ranges, multiple resonance peaks, instead of a single resonance, emerge. By comparing the nonlinear lattice model with a harmonic chain, we unravel the underlying physical mechanism for such a resonance phenomenon. Other parameter dependencies of the resonance behavior are examined as well. Finally, we demonstrate that heat pumping is actually absent in this force-driven model.

  16. Analytical solutions for transport processes fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Brenn, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book provides analytical solutions to a number of classical problems in transport processes, i.e. in fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. Expanding computing power and more efficient numerical methods have increased the importance of computational tools. However, the interpretation of these results is often difficult and the computational results need to be tested against the analytical results, making analytical solutions a valuable commodity. Furthermore, analytical solutions for transport processes provide a much deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in a given process than do corresponding numerical solutions. Though this book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners, it may also be beneficial for graduate students just entering the field. .

  17. Coupled light transport-heat diffusion model for laser dosimetry with dynamic optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    London, R.A.; Glinsky, M.E.; Zimmerman, G.B.; Eder, D.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Jacques, S.L. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    1995-03-01

    The effect of dynamic optical properties on the spatial distribution of light in laser therapy is studied via numerical simulations. A two-dimensional, time dependent computer program called LATIS is used. Laser light transport is simulated with a Monte Carlo technique including anisotropic scattering and absorption. Thermal heat transport is calculated with a finite difference algorithm. Material properties are specified on a 2-D mesh and can be arbitrary functions of space and time. Arrhenius rate equations are solved for tissue damage caused by elevated temperatures. Optical properties are functions of tissue damage, as determined by previous measurements. Results are presented for the time variation of the light distribution and damage within the tissue as the optical properties of the tissue are altered.

  18. Transmission line model for strained quantum well lasers including carrier transport and carrier heating effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingjun; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports a new model for strained quantum well lasers, which are based on the quantum well transmission line modeling method where effects of both carrier transport and carrier heating have been included. We have applied this new model and studied the effect of carrier transport on the output waveform of a strained quantum well laser both in time and frequency domains. It has been found that the carrier transport increases the turn-on, turn-off delay times and damping of the quantum well laser transient response. Also, analysis in the frequency domain indicates that the carrier transport causes the output spectrum of the quantum well laser in steady state to exhibit a redshift which has a narrower bandwidth and lower magnitude. The simulation results of turning-on transients obtained by the proposed model are compared with those obtained by the rate equation laser model. The new model has also been used to study the effects of pump current spikes on the laser output waveforms properties, and it was found that the presence of current spikes causes (i) wavelength blueshift, (ii) larger bandwidth, and (iii) reduces the magnitude and decreases the side-lobe suppression ratio of the laser output spectrum. Analysis in both frequency and time domains confirms that the new proposed model can accurately predict the temporal and spectral behaviors of strained quantum well lasers.

  19. Modification of argon impurity transport by electron cyclotron heating in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joohwan; Henderson, S. S.; Kim, Kimin; Seon, C. R.; Song, Inwoo; Lee, H. Y.; Jang, Juhyeok; Park, Jae Sun; Lee, S. G.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, Seung Hun; Hong, Suk-Ho; Choe, Wonho

    2017-03-01

    Experiments with a small amount of Ar gas injection as a trace impurity were conducted in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) H-mode plasma ({{B}\\text{T}}   =  2.8 T, {{I}\\text{P}}   =  0.6 MA, and {{P}\\text{NBI}}   =  4.0 MW). 170 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) at 600 and 800 kW was focused along the mid-plane with a fixed major radial position of R   =  1.66 m. The emissivity of the Ar16+ (3.949 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) and Ar15+ (353.860 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) spectral lines were measured by x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) and a vacuum UV (VUV) spectrometer, respectively. ECH reduces the peak Ar15+ emission and increases the Ar16+ emission, an effect largest with 800 kW. The ADAS-SANCO impurity transport code was used to evaluate the Ar transport coefficients. It was found that the inward convective velocity found in the plasma core without ECH was decreased with ECH, while diffusion remained approximately constant resulting in a less-peaked Ar density profile. Theoretical results from the NEO code suggest that neoclassical transport is not responsible for the change in transport, while the microstability analysis using GKW predicts a dominant ITG mode during both ECH and non-ECH plasmas.

  20. Modeling of multiphase transport of multicomponent organic contaminants and heat in the subsurface: Numerical model formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenekan, A. E.; Patzek, T. W.; Pruess, K.

    1993-11-01

    A numerical compositional simulator (Multiphase Multicomponent Nonisothermal Organics Transport Simulator (M2NOTS)) has been developed for modeling transient, three-dimensional, nonisothermal, and multiphase transport of multicomponent organic contaminants in the subsurface. The governing equations include (1) advection of all three phases in response to pressure, capillary, and gravity forces; (2) interphase mass transfer that allows every component to partition into each phase present; (3) diffusion; and (4) transport of sensible and latent heat energy. Two other features distinguish M2NOTS from other simulators reported in the groundwater literature: (1) the simulator allows for any number of chemical components and every component is allowed to partition into all fluid phases present, and (2) each phase is allowed to completely disappear from, or appear in, any region of the domain during a simulation. These features are required to model realistic field problems involving transport of mixtures of nonaqueous phase liquid contaminants, and to quantify performance of existing and emerging remediation methods such as vacuum extraction and steam injection.

  1. A Weakly Non Linear Stability Analysis of Heat Transport in Anisotropic Porous Cavity Under Time PeriodicTemperature Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit kumar Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have analyzed the effect of time periodic temperature modulation on convective stability in anisotropic porous cavity. The cavity is heated from below and cooled from above. A weakly non-linear stability analysis is done to find Nusselt number governing the heat transport. The infinitely small disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of modulation. Analytically the nonautonomous Ginzburg- landau amplitude equation is obtained for the stationary mode of convection. The effects of various parameters like Vadasz number, mechanical and thermal anisotropic parameters, amplitude of oscillations, frequency of modulation and aspect ratio of the cavity on heat transport is studied and plotted graphically. It is observed that the heat transport can also be controlled by suitably adjusting the external and internal parameters of the system.

  2. Measurement of quasi-ballistic heat transport across nanoscale interfaces using ultrafast coherent soft x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemens, M.; Li, Q.; Yang, R.; Nelson, K.; Anderson, E.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.

    2009-03-02

    Understanding heat transport on nanoscale dimensions is important for fundamental advances in nanoscience, as well as for practical applications such as thermal management in nano-electronics, thermoelectric devices, photovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, as well as nanoparticle thermal therapy. Here we report the first time-resolved measurements of heat transport across nanostructured interfaces. We observe the transition from a diffusive to a ballistic thermal transport regime, with a corresponding increase in the interface resistivity for line widths smaller than the phonon mean free path in the substrate. Resistivities more than three times higher than the bulk value are measured for the smallest line widths of 65 nm. Our findings are relevant to the modeling and design of heat transport in nanoscale engineered systems, including nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and thermoelectric devices.

  3. Investigation of inter-ELM ion heat transport in the H-mode pedestal of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezzer, E.; Fable, E.; Cavedon, M.; Angioni, C.; Dux, R.; Laggner, F. M.; Bernert, M.; Burckhart, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Pütterich, T.; Ryter, F.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-02-01

    The ion heat transport in the pedestal of H-mode plasmas is investigated in various H-mode discharges with different pedestal ion collisionalities. Interpretive modelling suggests that in all analyzed discharges the ion heat diffusivity coefficient, {χ\\text{i}} , in the pedestal is close to the neoclassical prediction within the experimental uncertainties. The impact of changing the deposition location of the electron cyclotron resonance heating on the ion heat transport has been studied. The effect on the background profiles is small. The pre-ELM (edge localized modes) edge profiles as well as the behaviour of the electron temperature and density, ion temperature and impurity toroidal rotation during the ELM cycle are very similar in discharges with on- and off-axis ECRH heating. No significant deviation of {χ\\text{i}} from neoclassics is observed when changing the ECRH deposition location to the plasma edge.

  4. Principle of Cross Coupling Between Vertical Heat Turbulent Transport and Vertical Velocity and Determination of Cross Coupling Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It has been proved that there exists a cross coupling between vertical heat turbulent transport and vertical velocity by using linear thermodynamics. This result asserts that the vertical component of heat turbulent transport flux is composed of both the transport of the vertical potential temperature gralient and the coupling transport of the vertical velocity. In this paper, the coupling effect of vertical velocity on vertical heat turbulent transportation is validated by using observed data from the atmospheric boundary layer to determine cross coupling coefficients, and a series of significant properties of turbulent transportation are opened out. These properties indicate that the cross coupling coefficient is a logarithm function of the dimensionless vertical velocity and dimensionless height, and is not only related to the friction velocity u*,but also to the coupling roughness height zwo and the coupling temperature Two of the vertical velocity.In addition, the function relations suggest that only when the vertical velocity magnitude conforms to the limitation |W/u* | ≠ 1, and is above the level zwo, then the vertical velocity leads to the cross coupling effect on the vertical heat turbulent transport flux. The cross coupling theory and experimental results provide a challenge to the traditional turbulent K closure theory and the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory.

  5. Bounds on Heat Transport in Rapidly Rotating Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The heat transport in rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is considered in the limit of rapid rotation (small Ekman number $E$) and strong thermal forcing (large Rayleigh number $Ra$). The analysis proceeds from a set of asymptotically reduced equations appropriate for rotationally constrained dynamics; the conjectured range of validity for these equations is $Ra \\lesssim E^{-8/5}$. A rigorous bound on heat transport of $Nu \\le 20.56Ra^3E^4$ is derived in the limit of infinite Prandtl number using the background method. We demonstrate that the exponent in this bound cannot be improved on using a piece-wise monotonic background temperature profile like the one used here. This is true for finite Prandtl numbers as well, i.e. $Nu \\lesssim Ra^3$ is the best upper bound for this particular setup of the background method. The feature that obstructs the availability of a better bound in this case is the appearance of small-scale thermal plumes emanating from (or entering) the thermal boundary layer.

  6. On the relative influence of heat and water transport on planetary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, John W.; Gérault, Mélanie; O'Connell, Richard J.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of a planet and its evolution are controlled to a large extent by its viscosity. In this study, we demonstrate that the dependence of mantle viscosity on temperature and water concentration introduces strong dynamic feedbacks. We derive a dimensionless parameter to quantitatively evaluate the relative strength of those feedbacks, and show that water and heat transport are equally important in controlling present-day dynamics for the Earth. A simple parameterized evolution model illustrates the strong feedbacks and behavior of the system and agrees well with our analytic results. The analysis identifies characteristic times for changes of viscosity, temperature, and water concentration and demonstrates, for time scales greater than a few hundred million years, that the system should either be degassing while warming or regassing while cooling. This yields a characteristic evolution in which, after an initial period of rapid adjustment, the mantle warms while degassing, and subsequently cools rapidly while regassing. As the planet continues to cool, the entire surface ocean may eventually return to the mantle. Our results suggest that a simple relationship may exist between the rate of change of water concentration and the rate of change of temperature in the mantle. This connection is extended by deriving an explicit equation for the Urey ratio that depends on both heat and water transport.

  7. Evolution of heat transport pathways in the Indonesian Archipelago during last deglaciation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Indonesian Archipelago provides important heat transport pathways of the Western Pacific Warm Pool between the northern Indian Ocean and western equatorial Pacific Ocean, that exert important impacts on global climate change. This study investigated AMS 14C, ?18O, planktonic foraminifer assemblages and sedimentation rates in three piston cores collected in the Indonesian Archipelago. The results indicate that changes in the Indonesian Archipelago heat transport pathways were phase characteristic and in steps during the last deglaciation. In the deglaciation Termination IA, at about 12.5 kaBP, sea level rose rapidly in a short time period, and Makassar and Lombok straits widened suddenly for warm and fresh water from the Pacific to pour into the Java Sea and eastern Indian Ocean. During the Termination IB, about 9.5 kaBP, sea level rose rapidly again, and the South China Sea (SCS) started to connect with the Java Sea. With monsoon actions, a large amount of fresh water from the SCS shelf area flew through the Indonesian Archipelago.

  8. Different spatial discretization methods of fault systems on heat transport processes in hard rock aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Lisa; König, Christoph M.; Becker, Martin; Seidel, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Most hard rock aquifers, which are important for geothermal use, contain fractures of different type and scale. These fault systems are of major significance for heat flow in the groundwater. The hydrogeological characterization of fault systems must therefore be part of any site investigation in hard rock aquifers and hydraulically important fault systems need to be appropriately represented in associated numerical models. This contribution discusses different spatial discretization methods of fault systems in three-dimensional groundwater models and their impact on the simulated groundwater flow field as well as density and viscosity dependent heat transport. The analysis includes a comparison of the convergence behavior and numerical stability of the different discretization methods. To ensure defendable results, the utilized numerical model SPRING was first verified against data from the Hydrocoin Level 1 Case 2 project. After verification, the software was used to evaluate the impact of different discretization strategies on steady-state and transient groundwater flow and transport model results. The results show a significant influence of the spatial discretization strategy on predicted flow rates and subsequent mass fluxes as well as energy balances.

  9. Uncertainty estimation in one-dimensional heat transport model for heterogeneous porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2014-01-01

    In many practical applications, the rates for ground water recharge and discharge are determined based on the analytical solution developed by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos (1965) to the one-dimensional steady-state heat transport equation. Groundwater flow processes are affected by the heterogeneity of subsurface systems; yet, the details of which cannot be anticipated precisely. There exists a great deal of uncertainty (variability) associated with the application of Bredehoeft and Papadopulos' solution (1965) to the field-scale heat transport problems. However, the quantification of uncertainty involved in such application has so far not been addressed, which is the objective of this wok. In addition, the influence of the statistical properties of log hydraulic conductivity field on the variability in temperature field in a heterogeneous aquifer is also investigated. The results of the analysis demonstrate that the variability (or uncertainty) in the temperature field increases with the correlation scale of the log hydraulic conductivity covariance function and the variability of temperature field also depends positively on the position.

  10. Giant suppression of phononic heat transport in a quantum magnet BiCu2PO6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byung-Gu; Koteswararao, B.; Park, C. B.; Shu, G. J.; Riggs, S. C.; Moon, E. G.; Chung, S. B.; Chou, F. C.; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport of quantum magnets has elucidated the nature of low energy elementary excitations and complex interplay between those excited states via strong scattering of thermal carriers. BiCu2PO6 is a unique frustrated spin-ladder compound exhibiting highly anisotropic spin excitations that contain both itinerant and localized dispersion characters along the b- and a-axes respectively. Here, we investigate thermal conductivity κ of BiCu2PO6 under high magnetic fields (H) of up to 30 tesla. A dip-feature in κ, located at ~15 K at zero-H along all crystallographic directions, moves gradually toward lower temperature (T) with increasing H, thus resulting in giant suppression by a factor of ~30 near the critical magnetic field of Hc ≅ 23.5 tesla. The giant H- and T-dependent suppression of κ can be explained by the combined result of resonant scattering of phononic heat carriers with magnetic energy levels and increased phonon scattering due to enhanced spin fluctuation at Hc, unequivocally revealing the existence of strong spin-phonon coupling. Moreover, we find an experimental indication that the remaining magnetic heat transport along the b-axis becomes almost gapless at the magnetic quantum critical point realized at Hc.

  11. Corrosion of carbon steel feeders during dilute chemical decontamination of primary heat transport system of PHWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, H.; Madasamy, P.; Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Krishnamohan, T.V.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC Facilities, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2012-01-15

    Carbon steel feeders in the primary heat transport system of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) show significant wall thinning due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC). This is of great concern, as the wear rate in certain locations exceeds the corrosion allowance by design. This necessitates periodic measurement of wall thickness and in some cases even mid course enmasse replacement of feeders. While analyzing the data on wall thicknesses and in arriving at the wall thinning rate during operation of the reactor, sufficient care has to be taken to account for the wall thinning occurring during full system chemical decontamination campaign which is carried out occasionally to reduce dose rates during reactor shut down. Chemical decontamination of primary heat transport system is carried out using a mixture of organic acids at a total concentration of about 0.1 g/L and at 85 C. The results of experiments carried out under simulated conditions for estimating the wall thinning occurring in carbon steel feeder elbow during dilute chemical decontamination are described in this work. The corrosion rates are quantified. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Characteristics of the pulmonary transport functions for heat and dye in pulmonary edema and orthostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böck, J C; Hoeft, A; Korb, H; Hellige, G

    1989-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether changes in the distribution of pulmonary blood flow and disturbances of the pulmonary microcirculation can be detected by use of inflow-outflow indicator-dilution measurements. In 18 anesthetized (N2O-piritramide) mongrel dogs 221 thermal-indocyanine green dye indicator dilution kinetics were recorded in the pulmonary artery and aorta after central venous indicator injection. The lagged normal density function was used as a model for the pulmonary transport functions for heat and dye. The parameters of the lagged normal density function were computed by a non-linear least squares procedure by iterative convolution. After baseline measurements, in nine dogs, pulmonary edema was induced by central venous application of oleic acid. In nine other dogs, measurements were performed before and after postural changes. Our data show that both the microvascular injury caused by oleic acid edema and the perfusion heterogeneity caused by orthostasis can be detected by the indicator dilution technique since the both relative dispersion and skewness of the transport functions for heat and dye were significantly increased after these interventions.

  13. Effects of heat stress on the gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Zhang, Haichao; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Wang, Yufeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai; Song, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    In broiler chickens, heat stress disrupts nutrient digestion and absorption. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not clearly understood. Hence, to investigate the effects of high ambient temperatures on the expression levels of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens, seventy-two 35-day-old male broiler chickens with similar body weights were randomly allocated into two groups: control (24 ± 1 °C) and heat-stressed (32 ± 1 °C). The chickens in the heat-stressed group were exposed to 10 h of heat daily from 08:00 to 18:00 and then raised at 24 ± 1 °C. The rectal temperature and feed intake of the chickens were recorded daily. After 7 days, nine chickens per group were sacrificed by exsanguination, and the jejunum was collected. The results show that heat exposure significantly decreased the feed intake and increased the rectal temperature of the broiler chickens. The plasma concentrations of uric acid and triglyceride significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in the heat-stressed group. No significant differences in the levels of plasma glucose, total amino acids, and very low-density lipoprotein were observed between the heat-stressed and control groups. However, the plasma concentration of glucose tended to be higher ( P = 0.09) in the heat-stressed group than in the control group. Heat exposure did not significantly affect the mRNA levels of Na+-dependent glucose transporter 1 and amino acid transporters y + LAT1, CAT1, r-BAT, and PePT-1. However, the expression levels of GLUT-2, FABP1, and CD36 were significantly decreased by heat exposure. The results of this study provide new insights into the mechanisms by which heat stress affects nutrient absorption in broiler chickens. Our findings suggest that periodic heat exposure might alter the jejunal glucose and lipid transport rather than amino acid transport. However, intestinal epithelial damage and cell loss should be considered when interpreting the effects of heat

  14. Effects of heat stress on the gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Zhang, Haichao; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Wang, Yufeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai; Song, Zhigang

    2015-02-01

    In broiler chickens, heat stress disrupts nutrient digestion and absorption. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not clearly understood. Hence, to investigate the effects of high ambient temperatures on the expression levels of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of broiler chickens, seventy-two 35-day-old male broiler chickens with similar body weights were randomly allocated into two groups: control (24 ± 1 °C) and heat-stressed (32 ± 1 °C). The chickens in the heat-stressed group were exposed to 10 h of heat daily from 08:00 to 18:00 and then raised at 24 ± 1 °C. The rectal temperature and feed intake of the chickens were recorded daily. After 7 days, nine chickens per group were sacrificed by exsanguination, and the jejunum was collected. The results show that heat exposure significantly decreased the feed intake and increased the rectal temperature of the broiler chickens. The plasma concentrations of uric acid and triglyceride significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in the heat-stressed group. No significant differences in the levels of plasma glucose, total amino acids, and very low-density lipoprotein were observed between the heat-stressed and control groups. However, the plasma concentration of glucose tended to be higher (P = 0.09) in the heat-stressed group than in the control group. Heat exposure did not significantly affect the mRNA levels of Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter 1 and amino acid transporters y + LAT1, CAT1, r-BAT, and PePT-1. However, the expression levels of GLUT-2, FABP1, and CD36 were significantly decreased by heat exposure. The results of this study provide new insights into the mechanisms by which heat stress affects nutrient absorption in broiler chickens. Our findings suggest that periodic heat exposure might alter the jejunal glucose and lipid transport rather than amino acid transport. However, intestinal epithelial damage and cell loss should be considered when interpreting

  15. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  16. Investigations of fluid flow and heat transport related to the strength of the San Andreas fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Patrick M.

    2008-10-01

    The shear strength of faults is an important factor in earthquake hazard assessment, and in understanding the earthquake process and the forces that drive tectonic deformation. However, on the basis of both geomechanical and thermal observations, many plate boundary faults, including the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in California, have been interpreted to slip at shear stresses considerably less than predicted by laboratory-derived friction laws and for hydrostatic fluid pressures. An understanding of whether plate-boundary faults truly are "weak" and the potential causes for such weakness are thus key unknowns in the physics of faulting. In the first section of this thesis, I evaluate whether thermal and hydrologic effects might disturb heat flow data which are used to interpret the strength of the SAF. Using numerical models of coupled fluid flow and heat transport, and by comparing model results with observational constraints, I show that redistribution of heat by groundwater flow is an unlikely explanation for the lack of a near fault increase in heat flow that would be associated with frictional heat generation on a strong fault (i.e. one that supports large shear stresses). I also show that the effects of topographic and subsurface refraction may account for previously unexplained spatial scatter in heat flow data around the fault, but even with these effects the data are most consistent with little or no frictional heat generation. In the second section of this thesis, I evaluate hypotheses invoking regional sources of fluid resulting from metamorphic dehydration reactions within the crust or upper mantle as mechanisms that generate large fluid overpressures within the fault zone required to explain the apparent weakness of the SAF. I calculate reasonable fluid source terms for both crustal and mantle dehydration following the creation of the SAF. I show that crustal dehydration sources are too small and short-lived to generate large overpressures, but it is

  17. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Hiroki, E-mail: matsubara@microheat.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp; Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7T{sub c}) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs.

  18. Pool boiler heat transport system for a 25 kWe advanced Stirling conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. G.; Rosenfeld, J. H.; Saaski, E. L.; Noble, J.; Tower, L.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments to determine alkali metal/enhanced surface combinations that have stable boiling at the temperatures and heat fluxes that occur in the Stirling engine are reported. Two enhanced surfaces and two alkali metal working fluids were evaluated. The enhanced surfaces were an EDM hole covered surface and a sintered-powder-metal porous layer surface. The working fluids tested were potassium and eutectic sodium-potasium alloy (NaK), both with and without undissolved noncondensible gas. Noncondensible gas (He and Xe) was added to the system to provide gas in the nucleation sites, preventing quenching of the sites. The experiments demonstrated the potential of an alkali metal pool boiler heat transport system for use in a solar-powered Stirling engine. The most favorable fluid/surface combination tested was NaK boiling on a -100 +140 mesh 304L stainless steel sintered porous layer with no undissolved noncondensible gas. This combination provided stable, high-performance boiling at the operating temperature of 700 C. Heat fluxes into the system ranged from 10 to 50 W/sq cm. The transition from free convection to nucleate boiling occurred at temperatures near 540 C. Based on these experiments, a pool boiler was designed for a full-scale 25-kWe Stirling system.

  19. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum f. Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C; Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Makita, M, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  20. Investigation of scrape-off layer and divertor heat transport in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieglin, B.; Eich, T.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Scarabosio, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-05-01

    Power exhaust is one of the major challenges for the development of a fusion power plant. Predictions based upon a multimachine database give a scrape-off layer power fall-off length {λq}≤slant 1 mm for large fusion devices such as ITER. The power deposition profile on the target is broadened in the divertor by heat transport perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. This profile broadening is described by the power spreading S. Hence both {λq} and S need to be understood in order to estimate the expected divertor heat load for future fusion devices. For the investigation of S and {λq} L-Mode discharges with stable divertor conditions in hydrogen and deuterium were conducted in ASDEX Upgrade. A strong dependence of S on the divertor electron temperature and density is found which is the result of the competition between parallel electron heat conductivity and perpendicular diffusion in the divertor region. For high divertor temperatures it is found that the ion gyro radius at the divertor target needs to be considered. The dependence of the in/out asymmetry of the divertor power load on the electron density is investigated. The influence of the main ion species on the asymmetric behaviour is shown for hydrogen, deuterium and helium. A possible explanation for the observed asymmetry behaviour based on vertical drifts is proposed.

  1. Energy Transport Effects in Flaring Atmospheres Heated by Mixed Particle Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei; Macrae, Connor; Druett, Malcolm; Scullion, Eamon

    2016-07-01

    We investigate energy and particle transport in the whole flaring atmosphere from the corona to the photosphere and interior for the flaring events on the 1st July 2012, 6 and 7 September 2011 by using the RHESSI and SDO instruments as well as high-resolution observations from the Swedish 1-metre Solar Telescope (SST3) CRISP4 (CRisp Imaging Spectro-polarimeter). The observations include hard and soft X-ray emission, chromospheric emission in both H-alpha 656.3 nm core and continuum, as well as, in the near infra-red triplet Ca II 854.2 nm core and continuum channels and local helioseismic responses (sunquakes). The observations are compared with the simulations of hard X-ray emission and tested by hydrodynamic simulations of flaring atmospheres of the Sun heated by mixed particle beams. The temperature, density and macro-velocity variations of the ambient atmospheres are calculated for heating by mixed beams and the seismic response of the solar interior to generation of supersonic shocks moving into the solar interior. We investigate the termination depths of these shocks beneath the quiet photosphere levels and compare them with the parameters of seismic responses in the interior, or sunquakes (Zharkova and Zharkov, 2015). We also present an investigation of radiative conditions modelled in a full non-LTE approach for hydrogen during flare onsets with particular focus on Balmer and Paschen emission in the visible, near UV and near IR ranges and compare them with observations. The links between different observational features derived from HXR, optical and seismic emission are interpreted by different particle transport models that will allow independent evaluation of the particle transport scenarios.

  2. Effect of heat stress on amino acid digestibility and transporters in meat-type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habashy, W S; Milfort, M C; Adomako, K; Attia, Y A; Rekaya, R; Aggrey, S E

    2017-03-02

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of heat stress (HS) on performance, digestibility, and molecular transporters of amino acids in broilers. Cobb 500 chicks were raised from hatch till 13 d in floor pens. At d 14, 48 birds were randomly and equally divided between a control group (25°C) and a HS treatment group (35°C). Birds in both treatment classes were individually caged and fed ad libitum on a diet containing 18.7% CP and 3,560 Kcal ME/Kg. Five birds per treatment at one and 12 d post treatment were euthanized and the Pectoralis major (P. major) and ileum were sampled for gene expression analysis. At d 33, ileal contents were collected and used for digestibility analysis. Broilers under HS had reduced growth and feed intake compared to controls. Although the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) was consistently higher for all amino acids in the HS group, it was not significant except for hydroxylysine. The amino acid consumption and retention were significantly lower in the HS group when compared to the control group. Meanwhile, the retention of amino acids per BWG was higher in the HS group when compared to the control group except for hydroxylysine and ornithine. The dynamics of amino acid transporters in the P. major and ileum was influenced by HS. In P. major and ileum tissues at d one, transporters SNAT1, SNAT2, SNAT7, TAT1, and b0,+AT, were down-regulated in the HS group. Meanwhile, LAT4 and B0AT were down-regulated only in the P. major in the treatment group. The amino acid transporters B0AT and SNAT7 at d 12 post HS were down-regulated in the P. major and ileum, but SNAT2 was down-regulated only in the ileum and TAT1 was down-regulated only in the P. major compared with the control group. These changes in amino acid transporters may explain the reduced growth in meat type chickens under heat stress.

  3. Relativistic electron beam transport through cold and shock-heated carbon samples from aerogel to diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauland, C. M.; Wei, M.; Zhang, S.; Santos, J.; Nicolai, P.; Theobald, W.; Kim, J.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the transport physics of a relativistic electron beam in various plasma regimes is crucial for many high-energy-density applications, such as fast heating for advanced ICF schemes and ion sources. Most short pulse laser-matter interaction experiments for transport studies have been performed with initially cold targets where the resistivity is far from that in warm dense plasmas. We present three experiments that have been performed on OMEGA EP in order to extend fast electron transport and energy coupling studies in pre-assembled plasmas from different carbon samples. Each experiment has used one 4 ns long pulse UV beam (1014 W/cm2) to drive a shockwave through the target and a 10 ps IR beam (1019 W/cm2) to create an electron beam moving opposite the shock propagation direction. These shots were compared with initially cold target shots without the UV beam. We fielded three different samples including 340 mg/cc CRF foam, vitreous carbon at 1.4 g/cc, and high density carbon at 3.4 g/cc. Electrons were diagnosed via x-ray fluorescence measurements from a buried Cu tracer in the target, as well as bremsstrahlung emission and escaped electrons reaching an electron spectrometer. Proton radiograph was also performed in the foam shots. Details of each experiment, available data and particle-in-cell simulations will be presented. This work is supported by US DOE NLUF Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002728.

  4. 3-D Numerical Modeling of Heat Transport Phenomena in Soil under Climatic Conditions of Southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jompob WAEWSAK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a 3-D numerical modeling of heat transport phenomena in soil due to a change of sensible and latent heat, under the ambient conditions of southern Thailand. The vertical soil temperature profile within 3 m was predicted based on energy balance and 3 modes of heat transfer mechanisms, i.e., conduction, convection, and radiation. Mathematical models for estimation of solar radiation intensity, ambient and sky temperatures, relative humidity, and surface wind velocity were used as model inputs. 3-D numerical implicit finite difference schemes, i.e., forward time, and forward, center, and backward spaces were used for discretizing the set of governing, initial, and boundary condition equations. The set of pseudo-linear equations were then solved using the single step Gauss-Seidel iteration method. Computer code was developed by using MATLAB computer software. The soil physical effects; density, thermal conductivity, emissivity, absorptivity, and latent heat on amplitude of soil temperature variation were investigated. Numerical results were validated in comparison to the experimental results. It was found that 3-D numerical modeling could predict the soil temperature to almost the same degree as results that were obtained by experimentation, especially at a depth of 1 m. The root mean square error at ground surface and at depths of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 m were 0.169, 0.153, 0.097, 0.116, 0.120, 0.115, and 0.098, respectively. Furthermore, it was found that variation of soil temperature occurred within 0.75 m only.

  5. Advective heat transport in the upper carbonate aquifer beneath Winnipeg, Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, G.A.G.; Woodbury, A.D. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Air conditioning and industrial cooling in Winnipeg, Manitoba requires large volumes of groundwater, with the bulk of this water pumped from the Upper Carbonate Aquifer. Pumping takes place at the erosional surface of several dipping Paleozoic carbonate units beneath the city. To prevent excessive drawdown, wastewater from these processes is reinjected into the aquifer. Heat loading from the surface, combined with this practice, leads to the creation of areas of elevated temperature within the Upper Carbonate Aquifer. An industrial area located in eastern Winnipeg is the site of the largest of these anomalies, where the aquifer's permeability is enhanced by the presence of conduits and discrete fractures. The use of numerical modeling showed that the greatest temperature anomalies occur where there are very high permeabilities, especially in the form of conduits and discrete fractures. Groundwater velocities are increased by these factors, and could result in the creation of plumes of heated water. Plumes of heated water are less likely to occur where the aquifer is thicker and conduits are absent, due to advective heat transport becoming focused between the injection well and the production well in lower permeability situations. These areas also correspond to the areas of decreased transmissivity in several parts of the Upper Carbonate Aquifer, and may not be capable of producing the required volumes of groundwater for thermal applications. Taking into account these permeability features in planning and design of non-consumptive groundwater systems in the Upper Carbonate Aquifer helps to minimize both drawdown and changes in aquifer temperature. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  6. The Dependence of Atmospheric Circulation and Heat Transport on the Planetary Rotation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, S.; Richardson, M. I.; Wilson, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    Simplified models of planetary climate require a parameterization for the equator-to-pole transport of heat and its dependence on factors, including the planetary rotation rate. Various such parameterizations exist, including ones based on the theory of baroclinic eddy mixing, and on principles of global entropy generation. However, such parameterizations are difficult to test given the limited available observational opportunities. In this study, we use a numerical model to examine heat flux dependencies, as part of a wider study of circulation regime sensitivity to rotation rates and other parameters. This study makes use of a simplified version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) "Skyhi" General Circulation Model (GCM). All terrestrial hydrological processes have been stripped from the model, which in the form used here, is adapted from the Martian version of Skyhi. The atmosphere has the gas properties of CO2, except that it has been made uncondensible. No aerosols or surface ices are allowed. The model surface is flat, and of uniform albedo and thermal inertia. For the simulations presented in this study, the diurnal, seasonal, and eccentricity cycles have been disabled ({ i.e.} the surface and atmosphere receives constant, daily- and seasonally-averaged incident solar radiation). Radiative heating is treated with a band model for CO2 gas in the thermal and near-infrared bands. The use of a complex model to examine simplified theory of heat transport requires some justification since it is not necessarily clear that these models (GCM's) provide an accurate emulation of the real atmosphere (of any given planet). In this study, we have intentionally removed those aspects of GCM's that are of greatest concern. Especially for terrestrial GCM's, the hydrologic cycle is a major source of uncertainty due to radiative feedbacks, and cloud coupling to small-scale, convective mixing. For other planets, aerosols are important as radiatively and dynamical

  7. Influence of Aerosol Heating on the Stratospheric Transport of the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquila, Valentina; Oman, Luke D.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    On June 15th, 1991 the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (15.1 deg. N, 120.3 Deg. E) in the Philippines injected about 20 Tg of sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere, which was transformed into sulfuric acid aerosol. The large perturbation of the background aerosol caused an increase in temperature in the lower stratosphere of 2-3 K. Even though stratospheric winds climatological]y tend to hinder the air mixing between the two hemispheres, observations have shown that a large part of the SO2 emitted by Mt. Pinatubo have been transported from the Northern to the Southern Hemisphere. We simulate the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) version 5 global climate model, coupled to the aerosol module GOCART and the stratospheric chemistry module StratChem, to investigate the influence of the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo on the stratospheric transport pattern. We perform two ensembles of simulations: the first ensemble consists of runs without coupling between aerosol and radiation. In these simulations the plume of aerosols is treated as a passive tracer and the atmosphere is unperturbed. In the second ensemble of simulations aerosols and radiation are coupled. We show that the set of runs with interactive aerosol produces a larger cross-equatorial transport of the Pinatubo cloud. In our simulations the local heating perturbation caused by the sudden injection of volcanic aerosol changes the pattern of the stratospheric winds causing more intrusion of air from the Northern into the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, we perform simulations changing the injection height of the cloud, and study the transport of the plume resulting from the different scenarios. Comparisons of model results with SAGE II and AVHRR satellite observations will be shown.

  8. Heat transport in the high-pressure ice mantle of large icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choblet, G.; Tobie, G.; Sotin, C.; Kalousová, K.; Grasset, O.

    2017-03-01

    While the existence of a buried ocean sandwiched between surface ice and high-pressure (HP) polymorphs of ice emerges as the most plausible structure for the hundreds-of-kilometers thick hydrospheres within large icy moons of the Solar System (Ganymede, Callisto, Titan), little is known about the thermal structure of the deep HP ice mantle and its dynamics, possibly involving melt production and extraction. This has major implications for the thermal history of these objects as well as on the habitability of their ocean as the HP ice mantle is presumed to limit chemical transport from the rock component to the ocean. Here, we describe 3D spherical simulations of subsolidus thermal convection tailored to the specific structure of the HP ice mantle of large icy moons. Melt production is monitored and melt transport is simplified by assuming instantaneous extraction to the ocean above. The two controlling parameters for these models are the rheology of ice VI and the heat flux from the rock core. Reasonable end-members are considered for both parameters as disagreement remains on the former (especially the pressure effect on viscosity) and as the latter is expected to vary significantly during the moon's history. We show that the heat power produced by radioactive decay within the rock core is mainly transported through the HP ice mantle by melt extraction to the ocean, with most of the melt produced directly above the rock/water interface. While the average temperature in the bulk of the HP ice mantle is always relatively cool when compared to the value at the interface with the rock core (∼ 5 K above the value at the surface of the HP ice mantle), maximum temperatures at all depths are close to the melting point, often leading to the interconnection of a melt path via hot convective plume conduits throughout the HP ice mantle. Overall, we predict long periods of time during these moons' history where water generated in contact with the rock core is transported to

  9. Study of the electron heat transport in Tore-Supra tokamak; Etude du transport de la chaleur electronique dans le Tokamak Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harauchamps, E

    2004-07-01

    This work presents analytical solutions to the electron heat transport equation involving a damping term and a convection term in a cylindrical geometry. These solutions, processed by Matlab, allow the determination of the evolution of the radial profile of electron temperature in tokamaks during heating. The modulated injection of waves around the electron cyclotron frequency is an efficient tool to study heat transport experimentally in tokamaks. The comparison of these analytical solutions with experimental results from Tore-Supra during 2 discharges (30550 and 31165) shows the presence of a sudden change for the diffusion and damping coefficients. The hypothesis of the presence of a pinch spread all along the plasma might explain the shape of the experimental temperature profiles. These analytical solutions could be used to determine the time evolution of plasma density as well or of any parameter whose evolution is governed by a diffusion-convection equation. (A.C.)

  10. Numerical investigation of plasma edge transport and limiter heat fluxes in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas with EMC3-EIRENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, F.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Bozhenkov, S. A.; Hölbe, H.; König, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Reiter, D.; Stephey, L.; W7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The results of a first systematic assessment of plasma edge transport processes for the limiter startup configuration at Wendelstein 7-X are presented. This includes an investigation of transport from intrinsic and externally injected impurities and their impact on the power balance and limiter heat fluxes. The fully 3D coupled plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport Monte Carlo code EMC3-EIRENE is used. The analysis of the magnetic topology shows that the poloidally and toroidally localized limiters cause a 3D helical scrape-off layer (SOL) consisting of magnetic flux tubes of three different connection lengths L C. The transport in the helical SOL is governed by L C as topological scale length for the parallel plasma loss channel to the limiters. A clear modulation of the plasma pressure with L C is seen. The helical flux tube topology results in counter streaming sonic plasma flows. The heterogeneous SOL plasma structure yields an uneven limiter heat load distribution with localized peaking. Assuming spatially constant anomalous transport coefficients, increasing plasma density yields a reduction of the maximum peak heat loads from 12 MWm-2 to 7.5 MWm-2 and a broadening of the deposited heat fluxes. The impact of impurities on the limiter heat loads is studied by assuming intrinsic carbon impurities eroded from the limiter surfaces with a gross chemical sputtering yield of 2 % . The resulting radiative losses account for less than 10% of the input power in the power balance with marginal impact on the limiter heat loads. It is shown that a significant mitigation of peak heat loads, 40-50%, can be achieved with controlled impurity seeding with nitrogen and neon, which is a method of particular interest for the later island divertor phase.

  11. Characterization of Single Phase and Two Phase Heat and Momentum Transport in a Spiraling Radial Inow Microchannel Heat Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Maritza

    Thermal management of systems under high heat fluxes on the order of hundreds of W/cm2 is important for the safety, performance and lifetime of devices, with innovative cooling technologies leading to improved performance of electronics or concentrating solar photovoltaics. A novel, spiraling radial inflow microchannel heat sink for high flux cooling applications, using a single phase or vaporizing coolant, has demonstrated enhanced heat transfer capabilities. The design of the heat sink provides an inward swirl flow between parallel, coaxial disks that form a microchannel of 1 cm radius and 300 micron channel height with a single inlet and a single outlet. The channel is heated on one side through a conducting copper surface, and is essentially adiabatic on the opposite side to simulate a heat sink scenario for electronics or concentrated photovoltaics cooling. Experimental results on the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics in the heat sink, using single phase water as a working fluid, revealed heat transfer enhancements due to flow acceleration and induced secondary flows when compared to unidirectional laminar fully developed flow between parallel plates. Additionally, thermal gradients on the surface are small relative to the bulk fluid temperature gain, a beneficial feature for high heat flux cooling applications. Heat flux levels of 113 W/cm2 at a surface temperature of 77 deg C were reached with a ratio of pumping power to heat rate of 0.03%. Analytical models on single phase flow are used to explore the parametric trends of the flow rate and passage geometry on the streamlines and pressure drop through the device. Flow boiling heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics were obtained for this heat sink using water at near atmospheric pressure as the working fluid for inlet subcooling levels ranging from 20 to 80 deg C and mean mass flux levels ranging from 184-716 kg/m. 2s. Flow enhancements similar to singlephase flow were expected, as well

  12. Output feedback control of heat transport mechanisms in parabolic distributed solar collectors

    KAUST Repository

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed

    2016-08-05

    This paper presents an output feedback control for distributed parabolic solar collectors. The controller aims at forcing the outlet temperature to track a desired reference in order to manage the produced heat despite the external disturbances. The proposed control strategy is derived using the distributed physical model of the system to avoid the loss of information due to model approximation schemes. The system dynamics are driven to follow reference dynamics defined by a transport equation with a constant velocity, which allows to control the transient behavior and the response time of the closed loop. The designed controller depends only on the accessible measured variables which makes it easy for real time implementation and useful for industrial plants. Simulation results show the efficiency of the reference tracking closed loop under different working conditions.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann technique for heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahem, A. M.; El-Amin, M. F.; Mohammadein, A. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process are studied by using the enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The proposed model is a modified version of thermal LB model, where could avoid iteration steps and ensures high accuracy. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with a D1Q2 lattice was used to determine the temperature field for one-dimensional melting by conduction and multi-distribution functions (MDF) with D2Q9 lattice was used to determine the density, velocity and temperature fields for two-dimensional melting by natural convection. Different boundary conditions including Dirichlet, adiabatic and bounce-back boundary conditions were used. The influence of increasing Rayleigh number (from 103 to 105) on temperature distribution and melting process is studied. The obtained results show that a good agreement with the analytical solution for melting by conduction case and with the benchmark solution for melting by convection.

  14. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Berionni, V.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Kosuga, Y.; Vermare, L.

    2013-02-01

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  15. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, California 92093 (United States); Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kosuga, Y. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann technique for heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahem, A. M.; El-Amin, M. F.; Mohammadein, A. A.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the heat transport phenomena coupled with melting process are studied by using the enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The proposed model is a modified version of thermal LB model, where could avoid iteration steps and ensures high accuracy. The Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation with a D1Q2 lattice was used to determine the temperature field for one-dimensional melting by conduction and multi-distribution functions (MDF) with D2Q9 lattice was used to determine the density, velocity and temperature fields for two-dimensional melting by natural convection. Different boundary conditions including Dirichlet, adiabatic and bounce-back boundary conditions were used. The influence of increasing Rayleigh number (from 103 to 105) on temperature distribution and melting process is studied. The obtained results show that a good agreement with the analytical solution for melting by conduction case and with the benchmark solution for melting by convection.

  17. Convective heat transport in stratified atmospheres at low and high Mach number

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, Evan H

    2016-01-01

    Convection in astrophysical systems is stratified and often occurs at high Rayleigh number (Ra) and low Mach number (Ma). Here we study stratified convection in the context of plane-parallel, polytropically stratified atmospheres. We hold the density stratification ($n_{\\rho}$) and Prandtl number (Pr) constant while varying Ma and Ra to determine the behavior of the Nusselt number (Nu), which quantifies the efficiency of convective heat transport. As Ra increases and $\\text{Ma} \\rightarrow 1$, a scaling of Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.45}$ is observed. As Ra increases to a regime where Ma $\\geq 1$, this scaling gives way to a weaker Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.19}$. In the regime of Ma $\\ll 1$, a consistent Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{0.31}$ is retrieved, reminiscent of the Nu $\\propto$ Ra$^{2/7}$ seen in Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection.

  18. Material transport in laser-heated diamond anvil cell melting experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Andrew J.; Heinz, Dion L.; Davis, Andrew M.

    1992-01-01

    A previously undocumented effect in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, namely, the transport of molten species through the sample chamber, over distances large compared to the laser beam diameter, is presented. This effect is exploited to determine the melting behavior of high-pressure silicate assemblages of olivine composition. At pressures where beta-spinel is the phase melted, relative strengths of partitioning can be estimated for the incompatible elements studied. Iron was found to partition into the melt from beta-spinel less strongly than calcium, and slightly more strongly than manganese. At higher pressures, where a silicate perovskite/magnesiowuestite assemblage is melted, it is determined that silicate perovskite is the liquidus phase, with iron-rich magnesiowuestite accumulating at the end of the laser-melted stripe.

  19. Estimation of eddy heat transport in the global ocean from Argo data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhiwei; ZHONG Yisen; TIAN Jiwei; YANG Qingxuan; ZHAO Wei

    2014-01-01

    The Argo data are used to calculate eddy (turbulence) heat transport (EHT) in the global ocean and analyze its horizontal distribution and vertical structure. We calculate the EHT by averaging all the v′, T′ profiles within each 2◦× 2◦ bin. The velocity and temperature anomalies are obtained by removing their clima-tological values from the Argo“instantaneous”values respectively. Through the Student’s t-test and an error evaluation, we obtained a total of 87% Argo bins with significant depth-integrated EHTs (D-EHTs). The results reveal a positive-and-negative alternating D-EHT pattern along the western boundary currents (WBC) and Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The zonally-integrated D-EHT (ZI-EHT) of the global o-cean reaches 0.12 PW in the northern WBC band and-0.38 PW in the ACC band respectively. The strong ZI-EHT across the ACC in the global ocean is mainly caused by the southern Indian Ocean. The ZI-EHT in the above two bands accounts for a large portion of the total oceanic heat transport, which may play an important role in regulating the climate. The analysis of vertical structures of the EHT along the 35◦N and 45◦S section reveals that the oscillating EHT pattern can reach deep in the northern WBC regions and the Agulhas Return Current (ARC) region. It also shows that the strong EHT could reach 600 m in the WBC re-gions and 1 000 m in the ARC region, with the maximum mainly located between 100 and 400 m depth. The results would provide useful information for improving the parameterization scheme in models.

  20. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  1. Heat and hazardous contaminant transports in ventilated high-rise industrial halls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王沨枫; 刘志强; Christoph van Treeck; 王汉青; 唐文武; 寇广孝

    2015-01-01

    Performances and efficiencies of displacement ventilation (DV) and partial ventilation (PV) for industrial halls of different configurations as well as the heat and mass transports within the industrial halls were numerically investigated. Three levels of Rayleigh number(5.8´1010, 1.0´1012 and 2.1´1012) and two values of source contaminant flux (5 mg/s and 50 mg/s) were considered. The inlet Reynolds numbers were 2´104, 5´104, 1.5´105 and 4.5´105 for DV and 5´105, 1´106, 2´106 and 4´106 for PV, respectively. From the results, it is concluded that the above parameters have very complex impacts on the conjugated heat and mass transports. From points of view of acceptable indoor air quality and ventilation efficiency, PV atRe=1´106with side-located sources and 65% of the supply air extracted through floor level outlets is the best choice whenRa=5.8´1010. However, DVs atRe=5´104andRe=1.5´105 with center-located sources and floor-mounted air suppliers are the best choices forRa=1.0´1012 andRa=2.1´1012, respectively. When source contaminant flux reaches 50 mg/s, local extraction as a supplement of general ventilation is recommended. The results can be a first approximation to 3D numerical investigation and preliminary ventilation system design guidelines for high-rise industrial halls.

  2. The Asian monsoon's role in atmospheric heat transport responses to orbital and millennial-scale climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, D.; Green, B.; Donohoe, A.; Marshall, J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have provided a framework for understanding the zonal-mean position of the tropical rain belt by documenting relationships between rain belt latitude and atmospheric heat transport across the equator (Donohoe et al., 2013). Modern seasonal and interannual variability in globally-averaged rain belt position (often referred to as 'ITCZ position') reflects the interhemispheric heat balance, with the rain belt's displacement toward the warmer hemisphere directly proportional to atmospheric heat transport into the cooler hemisphere. Model simulations suggest that rain belt shifts are likely to have obeyed the same relationship with interhemispheric heat transport in response to past changes in orbital parameters, ice sheets, and ocean circulation. This relationship implies that even small (±1 degree) shifts in the mean rain belt require large changes in hemispheric heat budgets, placing tight bounds on mean rain belt shifts in past climates. This work has primarily viewed tropical circulation in two dimensions, as a pair of zonal-mean Hadley cells on either side of the rain belt that are displaced north and south by perturbations in hemispheric energy budgets, causing the atmosphere to transport heat into the cooler hemisphere. Here we attempt to move beyond this zonal-mean perspective, motivated by arguments that the Asian monsoon system, rather than the zonal-mean circulation, plays the dominant role in annual-mean heat transport into the southern hemisphere in the modern climate (Heaviside and Czaja, 2012; Marshall et al., 2014). We explore a range of climate change experiments, including simulations of North Atlantic cooling and mid-Holocene climate, to test whether changes in interhemispheric atmospheric heat transport are primarily driven by the mean Hadley circulation, the Asian monsoon system, or other regional-scale atmospheric circulation changes. The scalings that this work identifies between Asian monsoon changes and atmospheric heat

  3. Onsager heat of transport of carbon dioxide at the surface of aqueous ammonia: The remarkable effect of carbamate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packwood, Daniel M.; Phillips, Leon F.

    2010-11-01

    The Onsager heat of transport Q∗ has been measured for CO 2 at the surface of aqueous ammonia. The heat of transport incorporates the enthalpy of reaction of gaseous CO 2 with ammonia, adsorbed on the liquid surface, to form adsorbed ammonium carbamate, with the result that -Q∗ has the unusually large value of 180 kJ mol -1. Measurement of Q∗ for transfer of a reactive species through a surfactant monolayer is proposed as a new method of studying reactions at liquid and quasi-liquid surfaces.

  4. Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas model with on-site potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas of elastically colliding particles are studied. In the nonequal mass case, due to the presence of on-site potential, the heat conduction of the model obeys the Fourier law and all the transport coefficients asymptotically approach constants in the thermodynamic limit. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT increases slowly with the system length L and is proportional to the height of the potential barriers H in high H regime. These findings may serve as a guide for future theoretical and experimental studies.

  5. Thermal relaxation and heat transport in spin ice Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemke, Bastian; Meissner, M.; Tennant, D.A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Strehlow, P. [Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Institut Berlin (Germany); Kiefer, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Grigera, S.A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Instituto de Fisica de Liquidos y Sistemas Biologicos, CONICET, UNLP, La Plata (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    The thermal properties of single crystalline Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been studied at temperature below 30 K and magnetic fields applied along [110] direction up to 1.5 T. Based on a thermodynamic field theory (TFT) various heat relaxation and thermal transport measurements were analysed. So we were able to present not only the heat capacity of Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, but also for the first time the different contributions of the magnetic excitations and their corresponding relaxation times in the spin ice phase. In addition, the thermal conductivity and the shortest relaxation time were determined by thermodynamic analysis of steady state heat transport measurements. Finally, we were able to reproduce the temperature profiles recorded in heat pulse experiments on the basis of TFT using the previously determined heat capacity and thermal conductivity data without additional parameters. Thus, TFT has been proved to be thermodynamically consistent in describing three thermal transport experiments on different time scales. The observed temperature and field dependencies of heat capacity contributions and relaxation times indicate the magnetic excitations in the spin ice Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} as thermally activated monopole-antimonopole defects.

  6. Electric field and radial transport during ICRF heating in the edge plasma of JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagle, J.A.; Brinkschulte, H.; Bures, M.; De Kock, L. (Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (UK). JET Joint Undertaking); Laux, M. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik (United Kingdom)); Clement, S. (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain)); Erents, S.K. (UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom))

    1990-04-01

    The plasma boundary in front of and outside the JET ICRF antenna Faraday screen has been studied using Langmuir probes. Plasma densities of n{sub e} {approx equal}10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and electron temperatures Tc {approx equal} 20-80 eV have been measured at the Faraday screen. Both n{sub e} and T{sub e} scale almost linearly with total input power (P{sub RF} up to 12 MW). DC electric fields up to 20 V/cm, with a large poloidal component perpendicular to the magnetic field lines were generated during ICRF heating. The total electric field intensity depends on the minority gas (H or {sup 3}He) and is also linearly dependent on the applied RF power. Spatially resolved measurements of the plasma space potential up to 50-100 V at the limiter flux surface were measured. The relevance of these fields to the transport in the scrape off layer (SOL), to the local particle balance at the boundary and to the impurity production during RF heating is discussed. (orig.).

  7. Thermal conductivity and heat transport properties of nitrogen-doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharshadi, Elaheh K; Mahdizadeh, Sayyed Jalil

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the thermal conductivity (TC) and heat transport properties of nitrogen doped graphene (N-graphene) were investigated as a function of temperature (107-400K) and N-doped concentration (0.0-7.0%) using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation based on Green-Kubo method. According to the results, a drastic decline in TC of graphene observed at very low N-doped concentration (0.5 and 1.0%). Substitution of just 1.0% of carbon atoms with nitrogens causes a 77.2, 65.4, 59.2, and 53.7% reduction in TC at 107, 200, 300, and 400K, respectively. The values of TC of N-graphene at different temperatures approach to each other as N-doped concentration increases. The results also indicate that TC of N-graphene is much less sensitive to temperature compared with pristine graphene and the sensitivity decreases as N-doped concentration increases. The phonon-phonon scattering relaxation times and the phonon mean free path of phonons were also calculated. The contribution of high frequency optical phonons for pristine graphene and N-graphene with 7.0% N-doped concentration is 0-2% and 4-8%, respectively. These findings imply that it is potentially feasible to control heat transfer on the nanoscale when designing N-graphene based thermal devices.

  8. Heat and moisture transport in durian fiber based lightweight construction materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoenvai, S.; Khedari, J.; Hirunlabh, J.; Asasutjarit, C. [King Mongkut' s Univ. of Technology, Building Scientific Research Center, Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand); Zeghmati, B. [Perpignan Univ., Centre d' Etudes Fondamentales, Groupe de Mecanique, Acoustique et Instrumentation, Perpignan, 66 (France); Quenard, D.; Pratintong, N. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment (CSTB), Grenoble (France)

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents result on heat and moisture transport in durian (Durio zibethinus) fiber based lightweight construction materials composed of cement, sand and waste fiber from durian peel and the performance of the material was simulated with the surface treatment by using a computational tool. The commercial research software (WUFI 2D) was used to calculate heat and moisture transfer through a durian fiber based lightweight construction material. The materials were exposed to a climate condition similar to the one in Bangkok and the hygrothermal characteristics of the materials were investigated. The investigation reveals that the weekly mean water content on the surface of material was quite low. The effect of moisture on the apparent thermal performance of the composite was found to be higher as water absorbed in the pore structure contributed to higher thermal conductivity than the air it replaced. However, the mean value of thermal conductivity in material is still rather low as the mean value of water content in material is low. Coating the surface reduced the flow of moisture to or from the structure considerably. The results of simulation confirmed that the manufactured composite satisfied the requirement of construction materials. It is then reasonable to conclude that the use of such materials in the design and construction of passive solar buildings is promising. Laboratory investigation is undergoing to validate the simulated performance. (Author)

  9. Water, solute and heat transport in the soil: the Australian connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, John

    2016-04-01

    The interest of Peter Raats in water, solute and heat transport in the soil has led to scientific and/or personal interactions with several Australian scientists such as John Philip, David Smiles, Greg Davis and John Knight. Along with John Philip and Robin Wooding, Peter was an early user of the Gardner (1958) linearised model of soil water flow, which brought him into competition with John Philip. I will discuss some of Peter's solutions relevant to infiltration from line and point sources, cavities and basins. A visit to Canberra, Australia in the early 1980s led to joint work on soil water flow, and on combined water and solute movement with David Smiles and others. In 1983 Peter was on the PhD committee for Greg Davis at the University of Wollongong, and some of the methods in his thesis 'Mathematical modelling of rate-limiting mechanisms of pyritic oxidation in overburden dumps' were later used by Peter's student Sjoerd van der Zee. David Smiles and Peter wrote a survey article 'Hydrology of swelling clay soils' in 2005. In the last decade Peter has been investigating the history of groundwater and vadose zone hydrology, and recently he and I have been bringing to light the largely forgotten work of Lewis Fry Richardson on finite difference solution of the heat equation, drainage theory, soil physics, and the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum.

  10. A numerical study on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in a noncontact glass transportation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Ik Tae; Park, Chan Woo [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang Sun [Korea University of Technology and Education, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Vertical sputtering systems are key equipment in the manufacture of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. During the sputtering process for LCD panels, a glass plate is transported between chambers for various processes, such as deposition of chemicals on the surface. The minimization of surface scratches and damage to the glass, the rate of consumption of gas, and the stability of the floating glass-plate are key considerations in the design of a gas pad. To develop new, non-contact systems of transportation for large, thin glass plates, various shapes of the nozzle of a gas pad unit were considered in this study. In the proposed nozzle design, negative pressure was used to suppress undesirable fluctuations of the glass plate. After the nozzle's shape was varied through numerical simulations in two dimensions, we determined the optimal shape, after which three-dimensional analyses were carried out to verify the results from the two-dimensional analyses. The rate of heat transfer from the glass plate, as a result of the gas jet, was also investigated. The average Nusselt number at the glass surface varied from 22.7 to 26.6 depending on the turbulence model, while the value from the correlation for the jet array was 23.5. It was found that the well-established correlation equation of the Nusselt number for the circular jet array can be applied to the cooling of the glass plates

  11. MHD Mixed Convection Heat Transfer in a Vertical Channel with Temperature-Dependent Transport Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Kerehalli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is carried out to study the effects of temperature-dependent transport properties on the fully developed free and forced MHD convection flow in a vertical channel. In this model, viscous and Ohmic dissipation terms are also included. The governing nonlinear equations (in non-dimensional form are solved numerically by a second order finite difference scheme. A parametric study is performed in order to illustrate the interactive influences of the model parameters; namely, the magnetic parameter, the variable viscosity parameter, the mixed convection parameter, the variable thermal conductivity parameter, the Brinkmann number and the Eckert number. The velocity field, the temperature field, the skin friction and the Nusselt number are evaluated for several sets of values of these parameters. For some special cases, the obtained numerical results are compared with the available results in the literature: Good agreement is found. Of all the parameters, the variable thermo-physical transport property has the strongest effect on the drag, heat transfer characteristics, the stream-wise velocity, and the temperature field.

  12. Climate of Earth-Like Planets With and Without Ocean Heat Transport Orbiting a Range of M and K Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Jablonski, Emma R.; Way, Michael J.; Del Genio, Anthony; Roberge, Aki

    2015-01-01

    The mean surface temperature of a planet is now acknowledged as insufficient to surmise its full potential habitability. Advancing our understanding requires exploration with 3D general circulation models (GCMs), which can take into account how gradients and fluxes across a planet's surface influence the distribution of heat, clouds, and the potential for heterogeneous distribution of liquid water. Here we present 3D GCM simulations of the effects of alternative stellar spectra, instellation, model resolution, and ocean heat transport, on the simulated distribution of heat and moisture of an Earth-like planet (ELP).

  13. Quantitative estimates of past changes in ITCZ position and cross-equatorial atmospheric heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, D.; Donohoe, A.; Marshall, J.; Ferreira, D.

    2012-12-01

    The mean position and seasonal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) govern the intensity, spatial distribution and seasonality of precipitation throughout the tropics as well as the magnitude and direction of interhemispheric atmospheric heat transport (AHT). As a result of these links to global tropical precipitation and hemispheric heat budgets, paleoclimate studies have commonly sought to use reconstructions of local precipitation and surface winds to identify past shifts in the ITCZ's mean position or seasonal extent. Records indicate close ties between ITCZ position and interhemispheric surface temperature gradients in past climates, with the ITCZ shifting toward the warmer hemisphere. This shift would increase AHT into the cooler hemisphere to at least partially compensate for cooling there. Despite widespread qualitative evidence consistent with ITCZ shifts, few proxy records offer quantitative estimates of the distance of these shifts or of the associated changes in AHT. Here we present a strategy for placing quantitative limits on past changes in mean annual ITCZ position and interhemispheric AHT based on explorations of the modern seasonal cycle and models of present and past climates. We use reconstructions of tropical sea surface temperature gradients to place bounds on globally averaged ITCZ position and interhemispheric AHT during the Last Glacial Maximum, Heinrich Stadial 1, and the Mid-Holocene (6 ka). Though limited by the small number of SST records available, our results suggest that past shifts in the global mean ITCZ were small, typically less than 1 degree of latitude. Past changes in interhemispheric AHT may have been substantial, with anomalies approximately equal to the magnitude of modern interhemispheric AHT. Using constraints on the invariance of the total (ocean+atmosphere) heat transport we suggest possible bounds on fluctuations of the OHT and AMOC during Heinrich Stadial 1. We also explore ITCZ shifts in models and

  14. Heat-Pipe Development for Advanced Energy Transport Concepts Final Report Covering the Period January 1999 through September 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.S.Reid; J.F.Sena; A.L.Martinez

    2002-10-01

    This report summarizes work in the Heat-pipe Technology Development for the Advanced Energy Transport Concepts program for the period January 1999 through September 2001. A gas-loaded molybdenum-sodium heat pipe was built to demonstrate the active pressure-control principle applied to a refractory metal heat pipe. Other work during the period included the development of processing procedures for and fabrication and testing of three types of sodium heat pipes using Haynes 230, MA 754, and MA 956 wall materials to assess the compatibility of these materials with sodium. Also during this period, tests were executed to measure the response of a sodium heat pipe to the penetration of water.

  15. Increasing transports of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B.; Larsen, K. M. H.; Hátún, H.; Kristiansen, R.; Mortensen, E.; Østerhus, S.

    2015-06-01

    The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland-Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas - the Atlantic inflow - is split into three separate branches. The most intensive of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes), which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC), which is projected to weaken during the 21 century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport series has made it difficult to identify trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv =106 m3 s-1) with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW =1012 W). Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall trend over the two decades of observation was 9 ± 8% for volume transport and 18 ± 9% for heat transport (95% confidence intervals). During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93) more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the Atlantic inflow

  16. Increasing transports of volume, heat, and salt towards the Arctic in the Faroe Current 1993–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hansen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow of warm and saline water from the Atlantic Ocean, across the Greenland–Scotland Ridge, into the Nordic Seas – the Atlantic inflow – is split into three separate branches. The most intensive of these branches is the inflow between Iceland and the Faroe Islands (Faroes, which is focused into the Faroe Current, north of the Faroes. The Atlantic inflow is an integral part of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC, which is projected to weaken during the 21 century and might conceivably reduce the oceanic heat and salt transports towards the Arctic. Since the mid-1990s, hydrographic properties and current velocities of the Faroe Current have been monitored along a section extending north from the Faroe shelf. From these in situ observations, time series of volume, heat, and salt transport have previously been reported, but the high variability of the transport series has made it difficult to identify trends. Here, we present results from a new analysis of the Faroe Current where the in situ observations have been combined with satellite altimetry. For the period 1993 to 2013, we find the average volume transport of Atlantic water in the Faroe Current to be 3.8 ± 0.5 Sv (1 Sv =106 m3 s−1 with a heat transport relative to 0 °C of 124 ± 15 TW (1 TW =1012 W. Consistent with other results for the Northeast Atlantic component of the THC, we find no indication of weakening. The transports of the Faroe Current, on the contrary, increased. The overall trend over the two decades of observation was 9 ± 8% for volume transport and 18 ± 9% for heat transport (95% confidence intervals. During the same period, the salt transport relative to the salinity of the deep Faroe Bank Channel overflow (34.93 more than doubled, potentially strengthening the feedback on thermohaline intensity. The increased heat and salt transports are partly caused by the increased volume transport and partly by increased temperatures and salinities of the

  17. Heat-transport enhancement in rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    We present new Nusselt-number (Nu) measurements for slowly rotating turbulent thermal convection in cylindrical samples with aspect ratio Γ =1.00 and provide a comprehensive correlation of all available data for that Γ . In the experiment compressed gasses (nitrogen and sulfur hexafluride) as well as the fluorocarbon C6F14 (3M Fluorinert FC72) and isopropanol were used as the convecting fluids. The data span the Prandtl-number (Pr) range 0.74 heat transport Nur(1 /Ro ) ≡Nu (1 /Ro ) /Nu (0 ) as a function of the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1 /Ro at constant Ra is reported. For Pr ≈0.74 and the smallest Ra =3.6 ×108 the maximum enhancement Nur ,max-1 due to rotation is about 0.02. With increasing Ra, Nur ,max-1 decreased further, and for Ra ≳2 ×109 heat-transport enhancement was no longer observed. For larger Pr the dependence of Nur on 1/Ro is qualitatively similar for all Pr. As noted before, there is a very small increase of Nur for small 1/Ro, followed by a decrease by a percent or so, before, at a critical value 1 /Roc , a sharp transition to enhancement by Ekman pumping takes place. While the data revealed no dependence of 1 /Roc on Ra, 1 /Roc decreased with increasing Pr. This dependence could be described by a power law with an exponent α ≃-0.41 . Power-law dependencies on Pr and Ra could be used to describe the slope SRo+=∂ Nur/∂ (1 /Ro ) just above 1 /Roc . The Pr and Ra exponents were β1=-0.16 ±0.08 and β2=-0.04 ±0.06 , respectively. Further increase of 1/Ro led to further increase of Nur until it reached a maximum value Nur ,max. Beyond the maximum, the Taylor-Proudman (TP) effect, which is expected to lead to reduced vertical fluid transport in the bulk region, lowered Nur. Nur ,max was largest for the largest Pr. For Pr =28.9 , for example, we measured an increase of the heat transport by up to 40% (Nur-1 =0.40 ) for the smallest Ra =2.2

  18. Sensitivity of roughness length for heat transport (zoh) on evapotranspiration derived from SEBAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, G.; Gowda, P. H.; Prasad, V.; Howell, T. A.; Aiken, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing has greatly contributed to the development and improvement of remote sensing based evapotranspiration (RS-ET) mapping algorithms. The radiometric temperature derived from the thermal sensors were inherently different than the aerodynamic temperature required for solving the bulk formulation of sensible heat (H) based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity (MOS); this posed a critical problem. The TSM (Two Source Model), SEBS (Surface Energy Balance System) and SEBAL (Surface Energy Balance Algorithm) forms the three most widely applied RS-ET algorithm's differing in their conceptualization and parameterization of the soil-canopy-air heat exchange mechanism addressing the issue arising from aerodynamic-radiometric temperature differences. The scalar roughness length zoh, representing heat transport and described by the dimensionless parameter kB-1, was used as a correction factor to accommodate the discrepancy between radiometric and aerodynamic temperatures. In this study we looked into the sensitivity of zoh on the ET estimates using the SEBAL approach. ET estimates from four approaches namely, (i) zoh derived from constant kB-1 of 2.3, (ii) zoh=0.1, (iii) zoh=0.01, and (iv) zoh from kB-1 parameterization, were compared. SEBAL was executed for 10 high resolution airborne images acquired during BEAREX07-08 (Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote Sensing Experiment) field campaign and validated against large precision weighing lysimeters installed on two irrigated and two dryland fields. Statistical tests revealed no significant differences between the first three approaches, however, the fourth approach of kB-1 parameterization produced significantly different results. Model performance evaluation for all the components of the energy balance was conducted. Percent root mean square error (%RMSE) for instantaneous ET estimates from the four approaches were 33.7, 26.9, 27.7 and 23.2 respectively. Evaluation of the SEBAL

  19. Heat, electricity, or transportation? The optimal use of residual and waste biomass in Europe from an environmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steubing, Bernhard; Zah, Rainer; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-01-03

    The optimal use of forest energy wood, industrial wood residues, waste wood, agricultural residues, animal manure, biowaste, and sewage sludge in 2010 and 2030 was assessed for Europe. An energy system model was developed comprising 13 principal fossil technologies for the production of heat, electricity, and transport and 173 bioenergy conversion routes. The net environmental benefits of substituting fossil energy with bioenergy were calculated for all approximately 1500 combinations based on life cycle assessment (LCA) results. An optimization model determines the best use of biomass for different environmental indicators within the quantified EU-27 context of biomass availability and fossil energy utilization. Key factors determining the optimal use of biomass are the conversion efficiencies of bioenergy technologies and the kind and quantity of fossil energy technologies that can be substituted. Provided that heat can be used efficiently, optimizations for different environmental indicators almost always indicate that woody biomass is best used for combined heat and power generation, if coal, oil, or fuel oil based technologies can be substituted. The benefits of its conversion to SNG or ethanol are significantly lower. For non-woody biomass electricity generation, transportation, and heating yield almost comparable benefits as long as high conversion efficiencies and optimal substitutions are assured. The shares of fossil heat, electricity, and transportation that could be replaced with bioenergy are also provided.

  20. Heat transport variation due to change of North Pacific subtropical gyre interior flow during 1993-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Akira; Kizu, Shoichi; Hanawa, Kimio; Roemmich, Dean

    2016-12-01

    Applying segment-wise altimetry-based gravest empirical mode method to expendable bathythermograph temperature, Argo salinity, and altimetric sea surface height data in March, June, and November from San Francisco to near Japan (30∘ N, 145∘ E) via Honolulu, we estimated the component of the heat transport variation caused by change in the southward interior geostrophic flow of the North Pacific subtropical gyre in the top 700 m layer during 1993-2012. The volume transport-weighted temperature ( T I) is strongly dependent on the season. The anomaly of T I from the mean seasonal variation, whose standard deviation is 0.14∘C, was revealed to be caused mainly by change in the volume transport in a potential density layer of 25.0-25.5 σ 𝜃 . The anomaly of T I was observed to vary on a decadal or shorter, i.e., quasi-decadal (QD), timescale. The QD-scale variation of T I had peaks in 1998 and 2007, equivalent to the reduction in the net heat transport by 6 and 10 TW, respectively, approximately 1 year before those of sea surface temperature (SST) in the warm pool region, east of the Philippines. This suggests that variation in T I affects the warm pool SST through modification of the heat balance owing to the entrainment of southward transported water into the mixed layer.

  1. Weak oceanic heat transport as a cause of the instability of glacial climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin de Verdiere, Alain [Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Laboratoire de Physique des Oceans, Alain Colin de Verdiere, Brest 3 (France); Te Raa, L. [Utrecht University, Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research TNO, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    The stability of the thermohaline circulation of modern and glacial climates is compared with the help of a two dimensional ocean - atmosphere - sea ice coupled model. It turns out to be more unstable as less freshwater forcing is required to induce a polar halocline catastrophy in glacial climates. The large insulation of the ocean by the extensive sea ice cover changes the temperature boundary condition and the deepwater formation regions moves much further South. The nature of the instability is of oceanic origin, identical to that found in ocean models under mixed boundary conditions. With similar strengths of the oceanic circulation and rates of deep water formation for warm and cold climates, the loss of stability of the cold climate is due to the weak thermal stratification caused by the cooling of surface waters, the deep water temperatures being regulated by the temperature of freezing. Weaker stratification with similar overturning leads to a weakening of the meridional oceanic heat transport which is the major negative feedback stabilizing the oceanic circulation. Within the unstable regime periodic millennial oscillations occur spontaneously. The climate oscillates between a strong convective thermally driven oceanic state and a weak one driven by large salinity gradients. Both states are unstable. The atmosphere of low thermal inertia is carried along by the oceanic overturning while the variation of sea ice is out of phase with the oceanic heat content. During the abrupt warming events that punctuate the course of a millennial oscillation, sea ice variations are shown respectively to damp (amplify) the amplitude of the oceanic (atmospheric) response. This sensitivity of the oceanic circulation to a reduced concentration of greenhouse gases and to freshwater forcing adds support to the hypothesis that the millennial oscillations of the last glacial period, the so called Dansgaard - Oeschger events, may be internal instabilities of the climate system

  2. Effects of permeability fields on fluid, heat, and oxygen isotope transport in extensional detachment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardi, RaphaëL.; Kao, Po-Hao; Saar, Martin O.; Teyssier, Christian

    2013-05-01

    Field studies of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes indicate that meteoric fluids permeated the upper crust down to the detachment shear zone and interacted with highly deformed and recrystallized (mylonitic) rocks. The presence of fluids in the brittle/ductile transition zone is recorded in the oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope compositions of the mylonites and may play an important role in the thermomechanical evolution of the detachment shear zone. Geochemical data show that fluid flow in the brittle upper crust is primarily controlled by the large-scale fault-zone architecture. We conduct continuum-scale (i.e., large-scale, partial bounce-back) lattice-Boltzman fluid, heat, and oxygen isotope transport simulations of an idealized cross section of a metamorphic core complex. The simulations investigate the effects of crust and fault permeability fields as well as buoyancy-driven flow on two-way coupled fluid and heat transfer and resultant exchange of oxygen isotopes between meteoric fluid and rock. Results show that fluid migration to middle to lower crustal levels is fault controlled and depends primarily on the permeability contrast between the fault zone and the crustal rocks. High fault/crust permeability ratios lead to channelized flow in the fault and shear zones, while lower ratios allow leakage of the fluids from the fault into the crust. Buoyancy affects mainly flow patterns (more upward directed) and, to a lesser extent, temperature distributions (disturbance of the geothermal field by ~25°C). Channelized fluid flow in the shear zone leads to strong vertical and horizontal thermal gradients, comparable to field observations. The oxygen isotope results show δ18O depletion concentrated along the fault and shear zones, similar to field data.

  3. Heat transport and parametric simulation of a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei David

    2002-09-01

    This study is to generate basic knowledge of heat transport inside a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine combustion environment. This work predicts the peak temperature inside the porous ceramic combustor, which directly affects the combustor life cycle and flame stability characteristics within the ceramic media. The results will help to generate an operating window for the stable operation of the porous ceramic combustor under the operating conditions of a gas turbine. A theoretical model is developed to study the operational characteristics of the combustor. The model used here accounts for both radiative and convective thermal transport between the solid and gas phases. The solid is assumed to absorb, emit, and scatter radiative energy. A one-step global reaction mechanism is used to model the released energy due to combustion. The effects of the properties of the porous material on gas and solid phase temperature distribution, radiative flux distribution, and flame location (as indicated by local temperature) were investigated. The results confirm that radiative heat transfer is a key mechanism in the stable operation of the combustor. For proper functioning of the combustor, the temperature of the porous material (the solid temperature) must be lowered in order to maintain material and structural integrity. Yet, the gas phase temperature has to be high enough so that a stable combustion process can be maintained. A lower value for the porous material temperature of the combustor can be obtained by enhancing the radiative output from the combustor to the downstream sections. This can be achieved by choosing optimized values of porosity and other properties of the porous ceramic matrix. Higher solid phase thermal conductivity enhances the radiative output from the combustor and helps to reduce the porous material's temperature. It is also desirable that the porous layer has an optimized optical thickness so that the radiative output of the combustor is

  4. Transporting industrial waste heat. The potential of using the existing sewer system.

    OpenAIRE

    Niphuis, Sander

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The industry in the Netherlands consumes large amounts of energy for the production of heat. After the industrial processes, a substantial share of this heat is degraded to waste heat. In general, this waste heat is just being discharged to surro

  5. Transporting industrial waste heat. The potential of using the existing sewer system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niphuis, Sander

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The industry in the Netherlands consumes large amounts of energy for the production of heat. After the industrial processes, a substantial share of this heat is degraded to waste heat. In general, this waste heat is just being discharged to surro

  6. Salt tectonics and shallow subseafloor fluid convection: models of coupled fluid-heat-salt transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    Thermohaline convection associated with salt domes has the potential to drive significant fluid flow and mass and heat transport in continental margins, but previous studies of fluid flow associated with salt structures have focused on continental settings or deep flow systems of importance to petroleum exploration. Motivated by recent geophysical and geochemical observations that suggest a convective pattern to near-seafloor pore fluid flow in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoMex), we devise numerical models that fully couple thermal and chemical processes to quantify the effects of salt geometry and seafloor relief on fluid flow beneath the seafloor. Steady-state models that ignore halite dissolution demonstrate that seafloor relief plays an important role in the evolution of shallow geothermal convection cells and that salt at depth can contribute a thermal component to this convection. The inclusion of faults causes significant, but highly localized, increases in flow rates at seafloor discharge zones. Transient models that include halite dissolution show the evolution of flow during brine formation from early salt-driven convection to later geothermal convection, characteristics of which are controlled by the interplay of seafloor relief and salt geometry. Predicted flow rates are on the order of a few millimeters per year or less for homogeneous sediments with a permeability of 10−15 m2, comparable to compaction-driven flow rates. Sediment permeabilities likely fall below 10−15 m2 at depth in the GoMex basin, but such thermohaline convection can drive pervasive mass transport across the seafloor, affecting sediment diagenesis in shallow sediments. In more permeable settings, such flow could affect methane hydrate stability, seafloor chemosynthetic communities, and the longevity of fluid seeps.

  7. Non-Fourier heat transport in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticles under ultrafast laser pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi-Huyeh, M.; Volz, S.; Palpant, B.

    2008-09-01

    Relaxation dynamics of embedded metal nanoparticles after ultrafast laser pulse excitation is driven by thermal phenomena of different origins, the accurate description of which is crucial for interpreting experimental results: hot electron-gas generation, electron-phonon coupling, heat transfer to the particle environment, and heat propagation in the latter. Regarding this last mechanism, it is well known that heat transport in nanoscale structures and/or at ultrashort timescales may deviate from the predictions of the Fourier law. In these cases heat transport may rather be described by the Boltzmann transport equation. We present a numerical model allowing to determine the electron and lattice temperature dynamics in a spherical gold nanoparticle core under subpicosecond pulsed excitation as well as that in the surrounding shell dielectric medium. For this, we have used the electron-phonon coupling equation in the particle with a source term linked with the laser pulse absorption and the ballistic-diffusive equations for heat conduction in the host medium. Either thermalizing or adiabatic boundary conditions have been considered at the shell external surface. Our results show that the heat transfer rate from the particle to the matrix can be significantly smaller than the prediction of Fourier’s law. Consequently, the particle-temperature rise is larger and its cooling dynamics might be slower than that obtained by using Fourier’s law. This difference is attributed to the nonlocal and nonequilibrium heat conductions in the vicinity of the core nanoparticle. These results are expected to be of great importance for analyzing pump-probe experiments performed on single nanoparticles or nanocomposite media.

  8. Heat Transport in a Three-Dimensional Slab Geometry and the Temperature Profile of Ingen-Hausz Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shiladitya; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2013-05-01

    We study the transport of heat in a three-dimensional, harmonic crystal of slab geometry whose boundaries and the intermediate surfaces are connected to stochastic, white noise heat baths at different temperatures. Heat baths at the intermediate surfaces are required to fix the initial state of the slab in respect of its surroundings. We allow the flow of energy fluxes between the intermediate surfaces and the attached baths and impose conditions that relate the widths of Gaussian noises of the intermediate baths. The radiated heat obeys Newton's law of cooling when intermediate baths collectively constitute the environment surrounding the slab. We show that Fourier's law holds in the continuum limit. We obtain an exponentially falling temperature profile from high to low temperature end of the slab and this very nature of the profile was already confirmed by Ingen-Hausz's experiment. Temperature profile of similar nature is also obtained in the one-dimensional version of this model.

  9. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K

    2008-06-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations ( approximately 1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 10(6-7) K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 x 10(5) W/m(2).K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 x 10(6) W/m(2).K, which is approximately 10(3) times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 10(6-7)K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA.

  10. Guide to the Revised Ground-Water Flow and Heat Transport Simulator: HYDROTHERM - Version 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kenneth L.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Charlton, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    The HYDROTHERM computer program simulates multi-phase ground-water flow and associated thermal energy transport in three dimensions. It can handle high fluid pressures, up to 1 ? 109 pascals (104 atmospheres), and high temperatures, up to 1,200 degrees Celsius. This report documents the release of Version 3, which includes various additions, modifications, and corrections that have been made to the original simulator. Primary changes to the simulator include: (1) the ability to simulate unconfined ground-water flow, (2) a precipitation-recharge boundary condition, (3) a seepage-surface boundary condition at the land surface, (4) the removal of the limitation that a specified-pressure boundary also have a specified temperature, (5) a new iterative solver for the linear equations based on a generalized minimum-residual method, (6) the ability to use time- or depth-dependent functions for permeability, (7) the conversion of the program code to Fortran 90 to employ dynamic allocation of arrays, and (8) the incorporation of a graphical user interface (GUI) for input and output. The graphical user interface has been developed for defining a simulation, running the HYDROTHERM simulator interactively, and displaying the results. The combination of the graphical user interface and the HYDROTHERM simulator forms the HYDROTHERM INTERACTIVE (HTI) program. HTI can be used for two-dimensional simulations only. New features in Version 3 of the HYDROTHERM simulator have been verified using four test problems. Three problems come from the published literature and one problem was simulated by another partially saturated flow and thermal transport simulator. The test problems include: transient partially saturated vertical infiltration, transient one-dimensional horizontal infiltration, two-dimensional steady-state drainage with a seepage surface, and two-dimensional drainage with coupled heat transport. An example application to a hypothetical stratovolcano system with unconfined

  11. Development of the universal and simplified soil model coupling heat and water transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is very important to develop a universal soil model with higher simplicity and more accuracy, which can be widely applied to very general cases such as wet or dry soil, frozen or unfrozen soil and homogeneous or heterogeneous soil. Firstly in this study, based on analysis of both magnitude order and the numerical simulation results, the universal and simplified soil model (USSM) coupling heat and mass transport processes is developed. Secondly, in order to avoid the greater uncertainty caused by the phase change term in numerical iteration process for the model solution obtaining, new version of the universal simplified soil model (NUSSM) is further derived through variables transformation, and accordingly a more efficient numerical scheme for the new version is designed well. The simulation results from the NUSSM agree with the results from more complicated and accurate soil model very well, also reasonably reproduce the observed data under widely real conditions. The new version model, because of its simplicity, will match for the development of land surface model.

  12. Technology data for energy plants. Individual heating plants and energy transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-05-15

    The present technology catalogue is published in co-operation between the Danish Energy Agency and Energinet.dk and includes technology descriptions for a number of technologies for individual heat production and energy transport. The primary objective of the technology catalogue is to establish a uniform, commonly accepted and up-to-date basis for the work with energy planning and the development of the energy sector, including future outlooks, scenario analyses and technical/economic analyses. The technology catalogue is thus a valuable tool in connection with energy planning and assessment of climate projects and for evaluating the development opportunities for the energy sector's many technologies, which can be used for the preparation of different support programmes for energy research and development. The publication of the technology catalogue should also be viewed in the light of renewed focus on strategic energy planning in municipalities etc. In that respect, the technology catalogue is considered to be an important tool for the municipalities in their planning efforts. (LN)

  13. Magnons coherent transmission and its heat transport at ultrathin insulating ferromagnetic nanojunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghantous M. Abou

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A model calculation is presented for the magnons coherent transmission and corresponding heat transport at magnetic insulating nanojunctions. The system consists of a ferromagnetically ordered ultrathin insulating junction between two semi-infinite ferromagnetically ordered leads. Spin dynamics are analyzed using the equations of motion for the spin precession displacements, valid for the range of temperatures of interest. Coherent scattering cross-sections at the junction boundary are calculated using the phase field matching theory, for all the incidence angles on the boundary from the lead bands, for arbitrary angles of incidence, at variable temperatures, and for different nano thicknesses of the ultrathin junction. The model is general; it is applied in particular to the Fe/Gd/Fe system with a sandwiched ferromagnetic Gd junction. It yields also the thermal conductivity due to the magnons coherent transmission between the two leads when these are maintained at slightly different temperatures. The calculation is carried out for state of the art values of the exchange constants, and elucidates the relation between the coherent scattering transmission of magnons and their thermal conductivity, for different thicknesses.

  14. Optimization of TCR and heat transport in group-IV multiple-quantum-well microbolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morea, Matthew; Gu, Kevin; Savikhin, Victoria; Fenrich, Colleen S.; Pop, Eric; Harris, James S.

    2016-09-01

    Group-IV semiconductors have the opportunity to have an equivalent or better temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) than other microbolometer thermistor materials. By using multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures, their TCR values can be optimized due to a confinement of carriers. Through two approaches - an activation energy approximation and a custom Monte Carlo transfer matrix method - we simulated this effect for a combination of Group-IV semiconductors and their alloys (e.g., SiGe and GeSn) to find the highest possible TCR, while keeping in mind the critical thicknesses of such layers in a MQW epitaxial stack. We calculated the TCR for a critical-thickness-limited Ge0.8Sn0.2/Ge MQW device to be about -1.9 %/K. Although this TCR is lower than similar SiGe/Si MQW thermistors, GeSn offers possible advantages in terms of fabricating suspended devices with its interesting etch-stop properties shown in previous literature. Furthermore, using finite element modeling of heat transport, we looked at another key bolometer parameter: the thermal time constant. The dimensions of a suspended Ge microbolometer's supporting legs were fine-tuned for a target response time of 5 ms, incorporating estimations for the size effects of the nanowire-like legs on thermal conductivity.

  15. Bimodal Control of Heat Transport at Graphene–Metal Interfaces Using Disorder in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehyeon; Khan, Muhammad Ejaz; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Eui-Sup; Suh, Joonki; Wu, Junqiao; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jeong Young; Lyeo, Ho-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Thermal energy transport across the interfaces of physically and chemically modified graphene with two metals, Al and Cu, was investigated by measuring thermal conductance using the time-domain thermoreflectance method. Graphene was processed using a He2+ ion-beam with a Gaussian distribution or by exposure to ultraviolet/O3, which generates structural or chemical disorder, respectively. Hereby, we could monitor changes in the thermal conductance in response to varying degrees of disorder. We find that the measured conductance increases as the density of the physical disorder increases, but undergoes an abrupt modulation with increasing degrees of chemical modification, which decreases at first and then increases considerably. Moreover, we find that the conductance varies inverse proportionally to the average distance between the structural defects in the graphene, implying a strong in-plane influence of phonon kinetics on interfacial heat flow. We attribute the bimodal results to an interplay between the distinct effects on graphene’s vibrational modes exerted by graphene modification and by the scattering of modes. PMID:27698372

  16. Ductile fracture behaviour of primary heat transport piping material of nuclear reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Tarafder; V R Ranganath; S Sivaprasad; P Johri

    2003-02-01

    Design of primary heat transport (PHT) piping of pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR) has to ensure implementation of leak-before-break concepts. In order to be able to do so, the ductile fracture characteristics of PHT piping material have to be quantified. In this paper, the fracture resistance of SA333, Grade 6 steel — the material used for Indian PHWR — under monotonic and cyclic tearing loading has been documented. An attempt has also been made to understand the mechanism responsible for the high fracture toughness of the steel through determination of the effect of constraint on the fracture behaviour and fractographic observations. From J–R tests over a range of temperatures, it was observed that SA333 steel exhibits embrittlement tendencies in the service temperature regime. The fracture resistance of the steel is inferior in the longitudinal direction with respect to the pipe geometry as compared to that in the circumferential direction. Imposition of cyclic unloading during ductile fracture tests for simulation of response to seismic activities results in a dramatic decrease of fracture resistance. It appears, from the observations of effects of constraint on fracture toughness and fractographic examinations, that fracture resistance of the steel is derived partly from the inability of voids to initiate and grow due to a loss of constraint in the crack-tip stress field.

  17. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HEAT TRANSPORT CAPABILITY OF A TWO PHASE THERMOSYPHON CHARGED WITH DIFFERENT WORKING FLUIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation a two phase thermosyphon has been fabricated to investigate the effect of operating parameters on the heat transport capability. The system consists of evaporator section, adiabatic section and condenser section with thermocouples located on the wall of thermosyphon. Electric heater was fixed on the bottom of the evaporator section and water jacket for cooling the condenser was placed on the top of the condenser section of the thermosyphon. The experiments were conducted with three different thermosyphons with inner diameters of 6.7, 9.5 and 12 mm. The variation of heat transport capability of the thermosyphon was studied for the input heat transfer rate ranging from 0 to 1200 W for various filling ratios and with operating temperature from 30 to 70°C. Water, methanol, ethanol and acetone were used as working fluids. The maximum heat transport capability was found to be high for water compared to other fluids such as ethanol, methanol and acetone at the operating temperatures higher than 40°C.

  18. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  19. Nonlinear heat-transport equation beyond Fourier law: application to heat-wave propagation in isotropic thin layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellitto, A.; Tibullo, V.; Dong, Y.

    2017-03-01

    By means of a nonlinear generalization of the Maxwell-Cattaneo-Vernotte equation, on theoretical grounds we investigate how nonlinear effects may influence the propagation of heat waves in isotropic thin layers which are not laterally isolated from the external environment. A comparison with the approach of the Thermomass Theory is made as well.

  20. Modeling Arctic Ocean heat transport and warming episodes in the 20th century caused by the intruding Atlantic Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia; JIN Mei-bing; Jun Takahashi; Tatsuo Suzuki; Igor V Polyakov; Kohei Mizobata; Moto Ikeda; Fancois J.Saucier; Markus Meier

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the Arctic Ocean warming episodes in the 20th century using both a high-resolution coupled global climate model and historical observations. The model, with no flux adjustment, reproduces well the Atlantic Water core temperature (AWCT) in the Arctic Ocean and shows that four largest decadalscale warming episodes occurred in the 1930's, 70s, 80s, and 90s, in agreement with the hydrographic observational data. The difference is that there was no pre-warming prior to the 1930s episode, while there were two pre-warming episodes in the 1970s and 80s prior to the 1990s, leading the 1990s into the largest and prolonged warming in the 20th century. Over the last century, the simulated heat transport via Fram Strait and the Barents Sea was estimated to be, on average, 31.32 TW and 14.82TW, respectively, while the Bering Strait also provides 15.94 TW heat into the western Arctic Ocean. Heat transport into the Arctic Ocean by the Atlantic Water via Fram Strait and the Barents Sea correlates significantly with AWCT ( C =0.75 ) at Olag. The modeled North Atlantic Oscillation ( NAO ) index has a significant correlation with the heat transport ( C = 0.37 ). The observed AWCT has a significant correlation with both the modeled AWCT (C =0.49) and the heat transport (C =0.41 ).However, the modeled NAO index does not significantly correlate with either the observed AWCT (C =0.03 ) or modeled AWCT (C = 0. 16) at a zero-lag, indicating that the Arctic climate system is far more complex than expected.

  1. The response of electron transport mediated by active NADPH dehydrogenase complexes to heat stress in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA WeiMin; WEI LanZhen; WANG QuanXi

    2008-01-01

    The electron-transport machinery in photosynthetic membranes is known to be very sensitive to heat. In this study, the rate of electron transport (ETR) driven by photosystem Ⅰ (PSI) and photosystem Ⅱ (PSII) during heat stress in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (WT) and its ndh gene inactivation mutants △ndhB (M55) and △ndhD1/ndhD2 (D1/D2) was simultaneously assessed by using the novel Dual-PAM-100 measuring system. The rate of electron transport driven by the photosystems (ETRPSs) in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells incubated at 30℃ and at 55℃ for 10 min was compared. Incubation at 55℃ for 10 min significantly inhibited PSII-driven ETR (ETRPSII) in the WT, M55 and D1/D2 cells, and the extent of inhibition in both the M55 and D1/D2 cells was greater than that in the WT cells. Further, PSI-driven ETR (ETRPSI) was stimulated in both the WT and D1/D2 cells, and this rate was increased to a greater extent in the D1/D2 than in the WT cells. However, ETRPSI was considerably inhibited in the M55 cells. Analysis of the effect of heat stress on ETRPSs with regard to the alterations in the 2 active NDH-1 complexes in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells indicated that the active NDH-1 supercomplex and mediumcomplex are essential for alleviating the heat-induced inhibition of ETRPSII and for accelerating the heat-induced stimulation of ETRPSI, respectively. Further, it is believed that these effects are most likely brought about by the electron transport mediated by each of these 2 active NDH-1 complexes.

  2. The response of electron transport mediated by active NADPH dehydrogenase complexes to heat stress in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The electron-transport machinery in photosynthetic membranes is known to be very sensitive to heat. In this study, the rate of electron transport (ETR) driven by photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) during heat stress in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (WT) and its ndh gene inactiva-tion mutants △ndhB (M55) and △ndhD1/ndhD2 (D1/D2) was simultaneously assessed by using the novel Dual-PAM-100 measuring system. The rate of electron transport driven by the photosystems (ETRPSs) in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells incubated at 30℃ and at 55℃ for 10 min was compared. Incubation at 55 ℃ for 10 min significantly inhibited PSII-driven ETR (ETRPSII) in the WT, M55 and D1/D2 cells, and the ex-tent of inhibition in both the M55 and D1/D2 cells was greater than that in the WT cells. Further, PSI-driven ETR (ETRPSI) was stimulated in both the WT and D1/D2 cells, and this rate was increased to a greater extent in the D1/D2 than in the WT cells. However, ETRPSI was considerably inhibited in the M55 cells. Analysis of the effect of heat stress on ETRPSs with regard to the alterations in the 2 active NDH-1 complexes in the WT, M55, and D1/D2 cells indicated that the active NDH-1 supercomplex and medi-umcomplex are essential for alleviating the heat-induced inhibition of ETRPSII and for accelerating the heat-induced stimulation of ETRPSI, respectively. Further, it is believed that these effects are most likely brought about by the electron transport mediated by each of these 2 active NDH-1 complexes.

  3. NON-LINEAR TRANSIENT HEAT CONDUCTION ANALYSIS OF INSULATION WALL OF TANK FOR TRANSPORTATION OF LIQUID ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M Živković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with transient nonlinear heat conduction through the insulation wall of the tank for transportation of liquid aluminum. Tanks designed for this purpose must satisfy certain requirements regarding temperature of loading and unloading, during transport. Basic theoretical equations are presented, which describe the problem of heat conduction finite element (FE analysis, starting from the differential equation of energy balance, taking into account the initial and boundary conditions of the problem. General 3D problem for heat conduction is considered, from which solutions for two- and one-dimensional heat conduction can be obtained, as special cases. Forming of the finite element matrices using Galerkin method is briefly described. The procedure for solving equations of energy balance is discussed, by methods of resolving iterative processes of nonlinear transient heat conduction. Solution of this problem illustrates possibilities of PAK-T software package, such as materials properties, given as tabular data, or analytical functions. Software also offers the possibility to solve nonlinear and transient problems with incremental methods. Obtained results for different thicknesses of the tank wall insulation materials enable its comparison in regards to given conditions

  4. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  5. Investigation of thermal energy transport from an anisotropic central heating element to the adjacent channels: A multipoint flux approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-02-01

    The problem of heat transfer from a central heating element pressed between two clad plates to cooling channels adjacent and outboard of the plates is investigated numerically. The aim of this work is to highlight the role of thermal conductivity anisotropy of the heating element and/or the encompassing plates on thermal energy transport to the fluid passing through the two channels. When the medium is anisotropic with respect to thermal conductivity; energy transport to the neighboring channels is no longer symmetric. This asymmetry in energy fluxes influence heat transfer to the coolant resulting in different patterns of temperature fields. In particular, it is found that the temperature fields are skewed towards the principal direction of anisotropy. In addition, the heat flux distributions along the edges of the heating element are also different as a manifestation of thermal conductivity anisotropy. Furthermore, the peak temperature at the channel walls change location and magnitude depending on the principal direction of anisotropy. Based on scaling arguments, it is found that, the ratio of width to the height of the heating system is a key parameter which can suggest when one may ignore the effect of the cross-diagonal terms of the full conductivity tensor. To account for anisotropy in thermal conductivity, the method of multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) is employed. Using this technique, it is possible to find a finite difference stencil which can handle full thermal conductivity tensor and in the same time enjoys the simplicity of finite difference approximation. Although the finite difference stencil based on MPFA is quite complex, in this work we apply the recently introduced experimenting field approach which construct the global problem automatically.

  6. Determination of effective heat transport coefficients for wall-cooled packed beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkink, J.G.H.; Borkink, J.G.H.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The influence is studied of several assumptions, often made in literature, on the values for the effective radial heat conductivity, wall heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient, as obtained from experiments in wall-cooled packed beds without a chemical reaction. Especially t

  7. Heat and mass transport during microwave heating of mashed potato in domestic oven--model development, validation, and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajia; Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy; Birla, Sohan; Negahban, Mehrdad; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan

    2014-10-01

    A 3-dimensional finite-element model coupling electromagnetics and heat and mass transfer was developed to understand the interactions between the microwaves and fresh mashed potato in a 500 mL tray. The model was validated by performing heating of mashed potato from 25 °C on a rotating turntable in a microwave oven, rated at 1200 W, for 3 min. The simulated spatial temperature profiles on the top and bottom layer of the mashed potato showed similar hot and cold spots when compared to the thermal images acquired by an infrared camera. Transient temperature profiles at 6 locations collected by fiber-optic sensors showed good agreement with predicted results, with the root mean square error ranging from 1.6 to 11.7 °C. The predicted total moisture loss matched well with the observed result. Several input parameters, such as the evaporation rate constant, the intrinsic permeability of water and gas, and the diffusion coefficient of water and gas, are not readily available for mashed potato, and they cannot be easily measured experimentally. Reported values for raw potato were used as baseline values. A sensitivity analysis of these input parameters on the temperature profiles and the total moisture loss was evaluated by changing the baseline values to their 10% and 1000%. The sensitivity analysis showed that the gas diffusion coefficient, intrinsic water permeability, and the evaporation rate constant greatly influenced the predicted temperature and total moisture loss, while the intrinsic gas permeability and the water diffusion coefficient had little influence. This model can be used by the food product developers to understand microwave heating of food products spatially and temporally. This tool will allow food product developers to design food package systems that would heat more uniformly in various microwave ovens. The sensitivity analysis of this study will help us determine the most significant parameters that need to be measured accurately for reliable

  8. KPNA3-knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak associated with the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) by reducing heat shock factor transport into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wei, Guoqing; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Li, Kedong; Zhang, Congfen; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yu; Liu, Dongran; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2016-01-10

    In this study, we investigated the role of karyopherin alpha 3 in the heat shock response in male silkworm pupae. Karyopherin alpha recognizes the classical nuclear location sequence on proteins and transports them into the nucleus by forming a trimetric complex with karyopherin beta. Three predicted karyopherin alphas (KPNA1, KPNA2 and KPNA3) have been identified from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Pull-down assay result showed that KPNA3 can pull down heat shock transcription factor (HSF) from proteins extracted from tissues using non-denature lysis buffer. After 45 °C heat shock on male B. mori pupae for 30 min, we identified two heat shock protein (HSP) mRNA expression peaks correlating with HSP19.9, HSP20.4 and HSP25.4 at 4 h (peak 1) and 24 h (peak 2). The second peak was eliminated after knockdown of KPNA3. Similar results were obtained following knockdown of HSF, which is the trans-activating factor of heat shock. However, KPNA3 knockdown was not accompanied by the decreased HSF protein levels at 24 h after heat shock which were observed following HSF knockdown. We also expressed recombinant protein GST-KPNA3 and His-HSF in Escherichia coli to perform GST pull-down assay and the result confirmed the interaction between KPNA3 and HSF. We concluded that KPNA3 knockdown eliminates the second heat shock protein peak in the heat shock response of male silkworm pupae by reducing HSF transport into the nucleus.

  9. Asymptotic Behavior of Heat Transport for a Class of Exact Solutions in Rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The non-hydrostatic, quasigeostrophic approximation for rapidly rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection admits a class of exact `single mode' solutions. These solutions correspond to steady laminar convection with a separable structure consisting of a horizontal planform characterized by a single wavenumber multiplied by a vertical amplitude profile, with the latter given as the solution of a nonlinear boundary value problem. The heat transport associated with these solutions is studied in the regime of strong thermal forcing (large reduced Rayleigh number $\\widetilde{Ra}$). It is shown that the Nusselt number $Nu$, a nondimensional measure of the efficiency of heat transport by convection, for this class of solutions is bounded below by $Nu\\gtrsim \\widetilde{Ra}^{3/2}$, independent of the Prandtl number, in the limit of large reduced Rayleigh number. Matching upper bounds include only logarithmic corrections, showing the accuracy of the estimate. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear boundary value problem for ...

  10. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  11. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  12. Ab-initio quantum transport simulation of self-heating in single-layer 2-D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Christian; Szabo, Aron; Bunjaku, Teutë; Luisier, Mathieu

    2017-07-01

    Through advanced quantum mechanical simulations combining electron transport and phonon transport from first-principles, self-heating effects are investigated in n-type transistors with single-layer MoS2, WS2, and black phosphorus as channel materials. The selected 2-D crystals all exhibit different phonon-limited mobility values, as well as electron and phonon properties, which have a direct influence on the increase in their lattice temperature and on the power dissipated inside their channel as a function of the applied gate voltage and electrical current magnitude. This computational study reveals (i) that self-heating plays a much more important role in 2-D materials than in Si nanowires, (ii) that it could severely limit the performance of 2-D devices at high current densities, and (iii) that black phosphorus appears less sensitive to this phenomenon than transition metal dichalcogenides.

  13. Different effects of grain boundary scattering on charge and heat transport in polycrystalline platinum and gold nanofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Wei-Gang; Wang Hai-Dong; Zhang Xing; Takahashi Koji

    2009-01-01

    The in-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of several polycrystalline platinum and gold nanofilms with different thicknesses are measured in a temperature range between the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K) and room temperature by using the direct current heating method. The result shows that both the electrical and thermal conductivities of the nanofilms reduce greatly compared with their corresponding bulk values. However, the electrical conductivity drop is considerably greater than the thermal conductivity drop, which indicates that the influence of the internal grain boundary on heat transport is different from that of charge transport, hence leading to the violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law. We build an electron relaxation model based on Matthieseen's rule to analyse the thermal conductivity and employ the Mayadas & Shatzkes theory to analyse the electrical conductivity. Moreover, a modified Wiedemann-Franz law is provided in this paper, the obtained results from which are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Albedo and heat transport in 3-dimensional model simulations of the early Archean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kienert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the Archean eon (ca. 3.8 billion yr ago, the Earth's climate state was significantly different from today due to the lower solar luminosity, smaller continental fraction, higher rotation rate and, presumably, significantly larger greenhouse gas concentrations. All these aspects play a role in solutions to the "faint young Sun problem" which must explain why the ocean surface was not fully frozen at that time. Here, we present 3-dimensional model simulations of climate states that are consistent with early Archean boundary conditions and have different CO2 concentrations, aiming at an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of the early Archean climate system. We focus on three states: one of them is ice-free, one has the same mean surface air temperature of 288 K as today's Earth and the third one is the coldest stable state in which there is still an area with liquid surface water (i.e. the critical state at the transition to a "snowball Earth". We find a reduction in meridional heat transport compared to today which leads to a steeper latitudinal temperature profile and has atmospheric as well as oceanic contributions. Ocean surface velocities are largely zonal, and the strength of the atmospheric meridional circulation is significantly reduced in all three states. These aspects contribute to the observed relation between global mean temperature and albedo, which we suggest as a parameterisation of the ice-albedo feedback for 1-dimensional model simulations of the early Archean and thus the faint young Sun problem.

  15. Deep Ocean Circulation, Heat Transport and the Timing of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, W. B.; Lynch-Stieglitz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 1960s, changes in the production of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) have been invoked as a way to influence climate changes in the southern hemisphere, to synchronize the changes in both hemispheres or to trigger an early climate response in the southern hemisphere. While not the first to document the role of NADW and changes in heat transport in hemispheric linkages, Tom Crowley's 1992 paper "North Atlantic Deep Water Cools the Southern Hemisphere" was an elegant and influential contribution outlining how changes in NADW production may have caused the early southern hemisphere response seen on orbital time scales by Hays, Imbrie and Shackleton (1976) as well as other researchers studying climate variability in marine sediments and polar ice cores. Our understanding of climate change and ocean circulation has improved greatly since the early 1990s. Modern observations have increased our understanding of processes governing deep water production, mixing and circulation. A dedicated community effort to better reconstruct past changes in ocean circulation has resulted in: 1) longer and more highly-resolved time series of deep water production on orbital time scales; 2) reconstructions of the bathymetric and geographic distribution of nutrients that are affected by circulation and water mass geometry; 3) the development of new ways to determine rates of ocean overturning, especially in the Atlantic; and 4) the development of highly-resolved records of ocean circulation that document variability on centennial and millennial time scales. In this presentation we aim to synthesize the current state of understanding of deep water production and climate change on these longer time scales.

  16. Albedo and heat transport in 3-D model simulations of the early Archean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kienert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the Archean eon (ca. 3.8 billion years ago, the Earth's climate state was significantly different from today due to the lower solar luminosity, smaller continental fraction, higher rotation rate and, presumably, significantly larger greenhouse gas concentrations. All these aspects play a role in solutions to the "faint young Sun paradox" which must explain why the ocean surface was not fully frozen at that time. Here, we present 3-D model simulations of climate states that are consistent with early Archean boundary conditions and have different CO2 concentrations, aiming at an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of the early Archean climate system. In order to do so, we have appropriately modified an intermediate complexity climate model that couples a statistical-dynamical atmosphere model (involving parameterizations of the dynamics to an ocean general circulation model and a thermodynamic-dynamic sea-ice model. We focus on three states: one of them is ice-free, one has the same mean surface air temperature of 288 K as today's Earth and the third one is the coldest stable state in which there is still an area with liquid surface water (i.e. the critical state at the transition to a "snowball Earth". We find a reduction in meridional heat transport compared to today, which leads to a steeper latitudinal temperature profile and has atmospheric as well as oceanic contributions. Ocean surface velocities are largely zonal, and the strength of the atmospheric meridional circulation is significantly reduced in all three states. These aspects contribute to the observed relation between global mean temperature and albedo, which we suggest as a parameterization of the ice-albedo feedback for 1-D model simulations of the early Archean and thus the faint young Sun problem.

  17. Controls on permafrost thaw in a coupled groundwater-flow and heat-transport system: Iqaluit Airport, Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojae Ghias, Masoumeh; Therrien, René; Molson, John; Lemieux, Jean-Michel

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and heat transport are used to provide insight into the interaction between shallow groundwater flow and thermal dynamics related to permafrost thaw and thaw settlement at the Iqaluit Airport taxiway, Nunavut, Canada. A conceptual model is first developed for the site and a corresponding two-dimensional numerical model is calibrated to the observed ground temperatures. Future climate-warming impacts on the thermal regime and flow system are then simulated based on climate scenarios proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Under climate warming, surface snow cover is identified as the leading factor affecting permafrost degradation, including its role in increasing the sensitivity of permafrost degradation to changes in various hydrogeological factors. In this case, advective heat transport plays a relatively minor, but non-negligible, role compared to conductive heat transport, due to the significant extent of low-permeability soil close to surface. Conductive heat transport, which is strongly affected by the surface snow layer, controls the release of unfrozen water and the depth of the active layer as well as the magnitude of thaw settlement and frost heave. Under the warmest climate-warming scenario with an average annual temperature increase of 3.23 °C for the period of 2011-2100, the simulations suggest that the maximum depth of the active layer will increase from 2 m in 2012 to 8.8 m in 2100 and, over the same time period, thaw settlement along the airport taxiway will increase from 0.11 m to at least 0.17 m.

  18. Some properties of strong solutions to nonlinear heat and moisture transport in multi-layer porous structures

    CERN Document Server

    Beneš, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with mathematical models of heat and moisture transport in layered building envelopes. The study of such processes generates a system of two doubly nonlinear evolution partial differential equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The existence of the strong solution in two dimensions on a (short) time interval is proven. The proof rests on regularity results for elliptic transmission problem for composite-like materials.

  19. Controls on permafrost thaw in a coupled groundwater-flow and heat-transport system: Iqaluit Airport, Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojae Ghias, Masoumeh; Therrien, René; Molson, John; Lemieux, Jean-Michel

    2017-05-01

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and heat transport are used to provide insight into the interaction between shallow groundwater flow and thermal dynamics related to permafrost thaw and thaw settlement at the Iqaluit Airport taxiway, Nunavut, Canada. A conceptual model is first developed for the site and a corresponding two-dimensional numerical model is calibrated to the observed ground temperatures. Future climate-warming impacts on the thermal regime and flow system are then simulated based on climate scenarios proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Under climate warming, surface snow cover is identified as the leading factor affecting permafrost degradation, including its role in increasing the sensitivity of permafrost degradation to changes in various hydrogeological factors. In this case, advective heat transport plays a relatively minor, but non-negligible, role compared to conductive heat transport, due to the significant extent of low-permeability soil close to surface. Conductive heat transport, which is strongly affected by the surface snow layer, controls the release of unfrozen water and the depth of the active layer as well as the magnitude of thaw settlement and frost heave. Under the warmest climate-warming scenario with an average annual temperature increase of 3.23 °C for the period of 2011-2100, the simulations suggest that the maximum depth of the active layer will increase from 2 m in 2012 to 8.8 m in 2100 and, over the same time period, thaw settlement along the airport taxiway will increase from 0.11 m to at least 0.17 m.

  20. Confinement and non-universality of anomalous heat transport and superdiffusion of energy in low-dimensional systems

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We provide molecular dynamics simulation of heat transport and thermal energy diffusion in one-dimensional molecular chains with different interparticle pair potentials at zero and non-zero temperature. We model the thermal conductivity (TC) and energy diffusion in the coupled rotator chain and in the Lennard-Jones chain either without or with the confining parabolic interatomic potential. The considered chains without the confining potential have normal TC and energy diffusion, while the cor...

  1. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, P J

    2004-11-03

    The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

  2. Experimental assessment of the influence of bedforms and sediment size on coupled hyporheic flow and heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, F.; Cardenas, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Hyporheic flow influences both biogeochemical cycling in streambeds as well as streambed ecology. Biogeochemical processes may be temperature dependent, whereas heat transport may also be controlled by hyporheic flow, thereby providing feedback. We separately and experimentally assess the effects of hyporheic flow due to bed topography on thermal dynamics in the sediment using a custom flume with temperature controls. Diel temperature cycles of 6° C were imposed in the flume and propagation of temperature signals into the sediment were examined for different bed morphology (plane bed, pool-riffle-pool, and rippled bed), channel flow rates, and sediment grain size. Temperature fields in the sediment were monitored using an array of embedded thermistors, and this data was used to identify zones of upwelling and downwelling within the hyporheic zone. Results suggest that bedforms induce substantially deeper downwelling upstream and downstream of the bedforms, with upwelling near the crest. This in turn leads to substantial advective heat transport and distinct thermal patterns in the sediment. These results corroborate existing theoretical models of coupled hyporheic exchange and heat transport under bedforms. Hyporheic flow therefore affects thermal patchiness in sediment, which may in turn exert a control on biogeochemical reaction rates, and form thermal refugia for fauna.

  3. Confining interparticle potential makes both heat transport and energy diffusion anomalous in one-dimensional phononic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Savin, Alexander V.

    2016-10-01

    We provide molecular dynamics simulation of heat transport and energy diffusion in one-dimensional molecular chains with different interparticle pair potentials at zero and non-zero temperature. We model the thermal conductivity (TC) and energy diffusion (ED) in the chain of coupled rotators and in the Lennard-Jones chain either without or with the confining parabolic interparticle potential. The considered chains without the confining potential have normal TC and ED at non-zero temperature, while the corresponding chains with the confining potential are characterized by anomalous (diverging with the system length) TC and superdiffusion of energy. Similar effect is produced by the anharmonic quartic confining pair potential. We confirm in such a way that, surprisingly, the confining pair potential makes both heat transport and energy diffusion anomalous in one-dimensional phononic systems. We show that the normal TC is always accompanied by the normal ED in the thermalized anharmonic chains, while the superdiffusion of energy occurs in the thermalized chains with only anomalous heat transport.

  4. Low-temperature heat transport in the geometrically frustrated antiferromagnets R2Ti2O7 (R = Gd and Er)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Li, Q. J.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Fan, C.; Li, S. J.; Liu, X. G.; Zhao, X.; Sun, X. F.

    2014-03-01

    We report a systematic study on the low-temperature thermal conductivity (κ) of R2Ti2O7 (R = Gd and Er) single crystals with different directions of magnetic field and heat current. It is found that the magnetic excitations mainly act as phonon scatterers rather than heat carriers, although these two materials have long-range magnetic orders at low temperatures. The low-T κ (H) isotherms of both compounds show rather complicated behaviors and have good correspondences with the magnetic transitions, where the κ (H) curves show drastic dip- or steplike changes. In comparison, the field dependencies of κ are more complicated in Gd2Ti2O7, due to the complexity of its low-T phase diagram and field-induced magnetic transitions. These results demonstrate the significant coupling between spins and phonons in these materials and the ability of heat-transport properties probing the magnetic transitions.

  5. Observational constraints on atmospheric and oceanic cross-equatorial heat transports: revisiting the precipitation asymmetry problem in climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Wang, Hailan; Cheng, Anning; Kato, Seiji; Fasullo, John T.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Allan, Richard P.

    2016-05-01

    Satellite based top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiation budget observations are combined with mass corrected vertically integrated atmospheric energy divergence and tendency from reanalysis to infer the regional distribution of the TOA, atmospheric and surface energy budget terms over the globe. Hemispheric contrasts in the energy budget terms are used to determine the radiative and combined sensible and latent heat contributions to the cross-equatorial heat transports in the atmosphere (AHTEQ) and ocean (OHTEQ). The contrast in net atmospheric radiation implies an AHTEQ from the northern hemisphere (NH) to the southern hemisphere (SH) (0.75 PW), while the hemispheric difference in sensible and latent heat implies an AHTEQ in the opposite direction (0.51 PW), resulting in a net NH to SH AHTEQ (0.24 PW). At the surface, the hemispheric contrast in the radiative component (0.95 PW) dominates, implying a 0.44 PW SH to NH OHTEQ. Coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5) models with excessive net downward surface radiation and surface-to-atmosphere sensible and latent heat transport in the SH relative to the NH exhibit anomalous northward AHTEQ and overestimate SH tropical precipitation. The hemispheric bias in net surface radiative flux is due to too much longwave surface radiative cooling in the NH tropics in both clear and all-sky conditions and excessive shortwave surface radiation in the SH subtropics and extratropics due to an underestimation in reflection by clouds.

  6. Quantum heat transport of a two-qubit system: Interplay between system-bath coherence and qubit-qubit coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Akihito, E-mail: kato@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanimura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    We consider a system consisting of two interacting qubits that are individually coupled to separate heat baths at different temperatures. The quantum effects in heat transport are investigated in a numerically rigorous manner with a hierarchial equations of motion (HEOM) approach for non-perturbative and non-Markovian system-bath coupling cases under non-equilibrium steady-state conditions. For a weak interqubit interaction, the total system is regarded as two individually thermostatted systems, whereas for a strong interqubit interaction, the two-qubit system is regarded as a single system coupled to two baths. The roles of quantum coherence (or entanglement) between the two qubits (q-q coherence) and between the qubit and bath (q-b coherence) are studied through the heat current calculated for various strengths of the system-bath coupling and interqubit coupling for high and low temperatures. The same current is also studied using the time convolutionless (TCL) Redfield equation and using an expression derived from the Fermi golden rule (FGR). We find that the HEOM results exhibit turnover behavior of the heat current as a function of the system-bath coupling strength for all values of the interqubit coupling strength, while the results obtained with the TCL and FGR approaches do not exhibit such behavior, because they do not possess the capability of treating the q-b and q-q coherences. The maximum current is obtained in the case that the q-q coherence and q-b coherence are balanced in such a manner that coherence of the entire heat transport process is realized. We also find that the heat current does not follow Fourier’s law when the temperature difference is very large, due to the non-perturbative system-bath interactions.

  7. Evaluation of moisture and heat transport in the fast-response building-resolving urban transport code QUIC EnvSim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Kevin A.

    QUIC EnvSim (QES) is a complete building-resolving urban microclimate modeling system developed to rapidly compute mass, momentum, and heat transport for the design of sustainable cities. One of the more computationally intensive components of this type of modeling system is the transport and dispersion of scalars. In this paper, we describe and evaluate QESTransport, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) scalar transport model. QESTransport makes use of light-weight methods and modeling techniques. It is parallelized for Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), utilizing NVIDIA's OptiX application programming interfaces (APIs). QESTransport is coupled with the well-validated QUIC Dispersion Modeling system. To couple the models, a new methodology was implemented to efficiently prescribe surface flux boundary conditions on both vertical walls and flat surfaces. In addition, a new internal boundary layer parameterization was introduced into QUIC to enable the representation of momentum advection across changing surface conditions. QESTransport is validated against the following three experimental test cases designed to evaluate the model's performance under idealized conditions: (i) flow over a step change in moisture, roughness, and temperature, (ii) flow over an isolated heated building, and (iii) flow through an array of heated buildings. For all three cases, the model is compared against published simulation results. QESTransport produces velocity, temperature, and moisture fields that are comparable to much more complex numerical models for each case. The code execution time performance is evaluated and demonstrates linear scaling on a single GPU for problem sizes up to 4.5 x 4.5 km at 5 m grid resolution, and is found to produce results at much better than real time for a 1.2 x 1.2 km section of downtown Salt Lake City, Utah.

  8. Explaining the isotope effect on heat transport in L-mode with the collisional electron-ion energy exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P. A.; Bustos, A.; Hennequin, P.; Ryter, F.; Bernert, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M. G.; Fischer, R.; Görler, T.; Happel, T.; Igochine, V.; Kurzan, B.; Lebschy, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Morel, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-06-01

    In ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), the normalised gyroradius {ρ\\star} was varied via a hydrogen isotope scan while keeping other dimensionless parameters constant. This was done in L-mode, to minimise the impact of pedestal stability on confinement. Power balance and perturbative transport analyses reveal that the electron heat transport is unaffected by the differences in isotope mass. Nonlinear simulations with the Gene code suggest that these L-mode discharges are ion temperature gradient (ITG) dominated. The different gyroradii due to the isotope mass do not necessarily result in a change of the predicted heat fluxes. This result is used in simulations with the Astra transport code to match the experimental profiles. In these simulations the experimental profiles and confinement times are reproduced with the same transport coefficients for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. The mass only enters in the energy exchange term between electrons and ions. These numerical observations are supported by additional experiments which show a lower ion energy confinement compared to that of the electrons. Additionally, hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have a similar confinement when the energy exchange time between electrons and ions is matched. This strongly suggests that the observed isotope dependence in L-mode is not dominated by a gyroradius effect, but a consequence of the mass dependence in the collisional energy exchange between electrons and ions.

  9. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewer multilayer insulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulated a 4K liquid helium cryostat. The method described permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included.

  10. Heat and water transport in soils and across the soil-atmosphere interface: 1. Theory and different model concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Fetzer, Thomas; Mosthaf, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Evaporation is an important component of the soil water balance. It is composed of water flow and transport processes in a porous medium that are coupled with heat fluxes and free air flow. This work provides a comprehensive review of model concepts used in different research fields to describe...... flux when available energy and transfer to the free airflow are limiting or by a critical threshold water pressure when soil water availability is limiting. The latter approach corresponds with the classical Richards equation with mixed boundary conditions. We compare the different approaches...... evaporation. Concepts range from nonisothermal two-phase flow, two-component transport in the porous medium that is coupled with one-phase flow, two-component transport in the free air flow to isothermal liquid water flow in the porous medium with upper boundary conditions defined by a potential evaporation...

  11. The effects of heat treatments on the transport properties of Cu/x/S thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmurcik, L.; Allen, L.; Serway, R. A.

    1982-12-01

    The resistivity and Hall effect of Cu(x)S (x = 1.995-2) thin films, which are used in the CdS/Cu(x)S solar cell currently investigated as an alternate source of electrical energy, has been measured as a function of temperature and heat treatment time. It is found that initial heat treatments cause copper in grain boundaries to diffuse irreversibly into the bulk. Further heating in hydrogen causes the resistivity to increase and the charge density and the mobility to decrease as surface oxides break up and free copper diffuses into the copper sulfide. Heating in oxygen reverses this process.

  12. Role of Remote Interfacial Phonon (RIP) Scattering in Heat Transport Across Graphene/SiO2 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Yee Kan; Lyons, Austin S; Bae, Myung-Ho; Huang, Bin; Dorgan, Vincent E; Cahill, David G; Pop, Eric

    2016-10-12

    Heat transfer across interfaces of graphene and polar dielectrics (e.g., SiO2) could be mediated by direct phonon coupling, as well as electronic coupling with remote interfacial phonons (RIPs). To understand the relative contribution of each component, we develop a new pump-probe technique called voltage-modulated thermoreflectance (VMTR) to accurately measure the change of interfacial thermal conductance under an electrostatic field. We employed VMTR on top gates of graphene field-effect transistors and find that the thermal conductance of SiO2/graphene/SiO2 interfaces increases by up to ΔG ≈ 0.8 MW m(-2) K(-1) under electrostatic fields of heat transfer between the charge carriers in graphene and RIPs in SiO2. Second, the increase in heat conduction could be caused by better conformity of graphene interfaces under electrostatic pressure exerted by the induced charge carriers. Regardless of the origins of the observed ΔG, our VMTR measurements establish an upper limit for heat transfer from unbiased graphene to SiO2 substrates via RIP scattering; for example, only heat transport is facilitated by RIP scattering even at a carrier concentration of ∼4 × 10(12) cm(-2).

  13. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  14. Modelling heat and moisture transport in the Andra/SKB temperature buffer test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hukmark, H.; Fulth, B.; Bbrgesson, L. [Clay Technology (Sweden); Ledesma, A. [Technical University of Catalonia (Spain); Lassabatere, T.; Sellali, N.; Semete, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France); Robinet, J.C. [EuroGeomat, 45 - Orleans (France)

    2005-07-01

    For Andra program for thermal nuclear waste geological disposal, there is an interest in improving the understanding of the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical properties and behaviour of bentonite-based buffer materials during the saturation process, in particular in the high temperature range above 100 C. To meet the need for experimental data, a large-scale field test, the Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) has been designed and set up at 420 m depth below ground surface in crystalline rock at the Aspd Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. The test, which is jointly operated by Andra and SKB, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management, is in operation since March 2003. Two heaters, each 3 m long, 0,6 m in diameter and generating 1500 W of thermal power, are stacked on top of each other within a bentonite buffer inside a vertical, 8 m deep and 1,8 m diameter, deposition hole. Ring-shaped blocks of bentonite are directly in contact with the lower heater, while there is a 0,2 m sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite. Cylinder-shaped blocks of bentonite are set below, between and above the heaters. An anchored plug seals the hole and confines the experiment mechanically in the vertical direction. A sand filter is installed between the bentonite buffer and the rock wall to allow for control of the hydraulic boundary. Temperatures, relative humidities, total stresses, pore pressures, water inflow and forces take n up by the plug anchoring are monitored continuously, logged hourly and reported monthly. Prior to finalizing the design, numerical simulations were performed in order to establish the necessary heat output and to get a first estimate of the desaturation / re-saturation time-scale and of the temperature levels. Prior to test start, a program for predictive modelling was defined. Modelling teams organize d by Andra, SKB and Enresa made blind predictions of the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical evolution of the test. A number of codes were

  15. Charge and heat transport in soft nanosystems in the presence of time-dependent perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Nocera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soft nanosystems are electronic nanodevices, such as suspended carbon nanotubes or molecular junctions, whose transport properties are modulated by soft internal degrees of freedom, for example slow vibrational modes. Effects of the electron–vibration coupling on the charge and heat transport of soft nanoscopic systems are theoretically investigated in the presence of time-dependent perturbations, such as a forcing antenna or pumping terms between the leads and the nanosystem. A well-established approach valid for non-equilibrium adiabatic regimes is generalized to the case where external time-dependent perturbations are present. Then, a number of relevant applications of the method are reviewed for systems composed by a quantum dot (or molecule described by a single electronic level coupled to a vibrational mode.Results: Before introducing time-dependent perturbations, the range of validity of the adiabatic approach is discussed showing that a very good agreement with the results of an exact quantum calculation is obtained in the limit of low level occupation. Then, we show that the interplay between the low frequency vibrational modes and the electronic degrees of freedom affects the thermoelectric properties within the linear response regime finding out that the phonon thermal conductance provides an important contribution to the figure of merit at room temperature. Our work has been stimulated by recent experimental results on carbon nanotube electromechanical devices working in the semiclassical regime (resonator frequencies in the megahertz range compared to an electronic hopping frequency of the order of tens of gigahertz with extremely high quality factors. The nonlinear vibrational regime induced by the external antenna in such systems has been discussed within the non-perturbative adiabatic approach reproducing quantitatively the characteristic asymmetric shape of the current–frequency curves. Within the same set-up, we

  16. Decadal Arctic surface atmosphere/ocean heat budgets and mass transport estimates from several atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurin, gennaday; Carton, James

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic is undergoing dramatic changes associated with the loss of seasonal and permanent ice pack. By exposing the surface ocean to the atmosphere these changes dramatically increase surface exchange processes. In contrast, increases in freshwater and heat input decreases turbulent exchanges within the ocean. In this study we present results from an examination of changing ocean heat flux, storage, and transport during the 36 year period 1980-2015. To identify changes in the surface atmosphere we examine three atmospheric reanalyses: MERRA2, ERA-I, and JRA55. Significant differences in fluxes from these reanalyses arise due to the representation of clouds and water vapor. These differences provide an indication of the uncertainties in the historical record. Next we turn to the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation version 3 (SODA3) global ocean/sea ice reanalysis system to allow us to infer the full ocean circulation from the limited set of historical record of ocean observations. SODA3 has 10 km horizontal resolution in the Arctic and assimilates the full suite of historical marine temperature and salinity observations. To account for the uncertainties in atmospheric forcing, we repeat our analysis with each of the three atmospheric reanalyses. In the first part of the talk we review the climatological seasonal surface fluxes resulting from our reanalysis system, modified for consistency with the ocean observations, and the limits of what we can learn from the historical record. Next we compare the seasonal hydrography, heat, and mass transports with direct estimates from moorings. Finally we examine the impact on the Arctic climate of the changes in sea ice cover and variability and trends of ocean/sea ice heat storage and transport and their contributions to changes in the seasonal stratification of the Arctic Ocean.

  17. AN UNCONDITIONALLY STABLE HYBRID FE-FD SCHEME FOR SOLVING A 3-D HEAT TRANSPORT EQUATION IN A CYLINDRICAL THIN FILM WITH SUB-MICROSCALE THICKNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-zhong Dai; Raja Nassar

    2003-01-01

    Heat transport at the microscale is of vital importance in microtechnology applications.The heat transport equation is different from the traditional heat transport equation sincea second order derivative of temperature with respect to time and a third-order mixedderivative of temperature with respect to space and time are introduced. In this study,we develop a hybrid finite element-finite difference (FE-FD) scheme with two levels intime for the three dimensional heat transport equation in a cylindrical thin film with sub-microscale thickness. It is shown that the scheme is unconditionally stable. The scheme isthen employed to obtain the temperature rise in a sub-microscale cylindrical gold film. Themethod can be applied to obtain the temperature rise in any thin films with sub-microscalethickness, where the geometry in the planar direction is arbitrary.

  18. Nd isotopic structure of the Pacific Ocean 70–30 Ma and numerical evidence for vigorous ocean circulation and ocean heat transport in a greenhouse world

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Deborah J; Korty, Robert; Huber, Matthew; Schubert, Jessica A; Haines, Brian

    2014-01-01

    .... Past greenhouse climate intervals present a paradox because their weak equator‐to‐pole temperature gradients imply a weaker MOC, yet increased poleward oceanic heat transport appears to be required to maintain these weak gradients...

  19. Observations and modelling of subglacial discharge and heat transport in Godthåbsfjord (Greenland, 64 °N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Mortensen, John; Rysgaard, Søren

    2017-04-01

    Subglacial discharge from tidewater outlet glaciers forms convective bouyant freshwater plumes ascending close the glacier face, and entrainment of ambient bottom water increases the salinity of the water until the plume reaches its level of neutral buoyancy at sub-surface levels or reaches the surface. Relatively warm bottom water masses characterize many fjords around Greenland and therefore entrainment would also increase the temperature in the plumes and, thereby, impact the heat transport in the fjords. However, relatively few oceanographic measurements have been made in or near plumes from subglacial discharge and, therefore, the potential for subglacial discharge for increasing heat transport towards the tidewater outlet glaciers are poorly understood. We present the first direct hydrographic measurements in a plume from subglacial discharge in Godthåbsfjord (located on the western coast of Greenland) where a XCTD was launched from a helicopter directly into the plume. Measurements of the surface salinity showed that the plume only contained 7% of freshwater at the surface, implying a large entrainment with a mixing ratio of 1:13 between outflowing meltwater and saline fjord water. These observations are analyzed together with seasonal observations of ocean heat transport towards the tidewater outlet glaciers in Godthåbsfjord and we show that subglacial discharge only had modest effects on the overall heat budget in front of the glacier. These results were supported from a high-resolution three-dimensional model of Godthåbsfjord. The model explicitly considered subglacial freshwater discharge from three tidewater outlet glaciers where entrainment of bottom water was taken into account. Model results showed that subglacial discharge only affected the fjord circulation relatively close ( 10 km) to the glaciers. Thus, the main effect on heat transport was due to the freshwater discharge itself whereas the subsurface discharge and associated entrainment only

  20. Harvesting low-grade heat energy using thermo-osmotic vapour transport through nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Anthony P.; Yip, Ngai Yin; Lin, Shihong; Lee, Jongho; Elimelech, Menachem

    2016-07-01

    Low-grade heat from sources below 100 ∘C offers a vast quantity of energy. The ability to extract this energy, however, is limited with existing technologies as they are not well-suited to harvest energy from sources with variable heat output or with a small temperature difference between the source and the environment. Here, we present a process for extracting energy from low-grade heat sources utilizing hydrophobic, nanoporous membranes that trap air within their pores when submerged in a liquid. By driving a thermo-osmotic vapour flux across the membrane from a hot reservoir to a pressurized cold reservoir, heat energy can be converted to mechanical work. We demonstrate operation of air-trapping membranes under hydraulic pressures up to 13 bar, show that power densities as high as 3.53 ± 0.29 W m-2 are achievable with a 60 ∘C heat source and a 20 ∘C heat sink, and estimate the efficiency of a full-scale system. The results demonstrate a promising process to harvest energy from low-temperature differences (<40 ∘C) and fluctuating heat sources.

  1. The Effect of Diffusional Transport and Surface Catalysis on the Aerothermodynamic Heating for Martian Atmospheric Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henline, William D.; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    For the reentry heating of 70-degree blunt sphere-cones entering Mars at velocities in excess of 6 km/sec, a study was performed to determine the magnitude of both convective and catalytic heating on the cone forebody. Case studies of the peak heating conditions for the current NASA Mars Pathfinder entry probe, as well as the peak heating conditions of the proposed NASA Mars 2001 aerobraking orbiter mission were performed. Since the actual behavior of the chemical recombination of Mars atmosphere hypersonic shock layer species on heat shield materials is not known, and no experimental studies of any consequence have been done to determine surface reaction rates for the CO2 system, a parametric analysis of various reaction schemes and surface catalytic mechanistic models was performed. In many cases the actual Mars entry probe will have a heat shield composed of an ablative material which can either partially or completely preclude the existence of catalytic surface recombination phenomena. The extent of this blockage effect has not been examined at this time and is not considered in this effort. Instead only non-ablative computations are performed to separately evaluate the full extent of the surface catalysis and related diffusional phenomena. Parametric studies include peak heating point comparisons of non-catalytic, partially catalytic and fully catalytic total surface heat transfer for three difference surface recombination catalytic mechanisms (with and without simultaneous CO + O and O + O recombination) as well as with different species diffusion models. Diffusion model studies include constant Schmidt number (equal diffusivities) and the bifurcation, approximate multi-component diffusion model. Since the gas phase reaction kinetics for the Mars CO2 based atmosphere have also not been validated, the effect of two different (fast and slow) sets of gas kinetics on heat transfer is presented.

  2. On the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on turbulent heat transport in the edge plasma of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudoin, C.; Tamain, P.; Ciraolo, G.; Futtersack, R.; Gallo, A.; Ghendrih, P.; Nace, N.; Norscini, C. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper we study the impact of electron temperature fluctuations in a two-dimensional turbulent model. This modification adds a second linear instability, known as sheath-driven conducting-wall instability, with respect to the previous isothermal model only driven by the interchange instability. Non-linear simulations, backed up by the linear analysis, show that the additional mechanism can change drastically the dynamics of turbulence (scales, density-potential correlation, and statistical momentum). Moreover, its importance relatively to the interchange instability should be more significant in the private flux region than in the main scrape of layer. Its effect on heat transport is also investigated for different regimes of parameters, results show that both instabilities are at play in the heat transport. Finally, the sheath negative resistance instability could be responsible for the existence of corrugated heat flux profiles in the scrape-off layer leading to a multiple decay length. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Global existence of weak solution to the heat and moisture transport system in fibrous porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Buyang; Wang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with theoretical analysis of a heat and moisture transfer model arising from textile industries, which is described by a degenerate and strongly coupled parabolic system. We prove the global (in time) existence of weak solution by constructing an approximate solution with some standard smoothing. The proof is based on the physcial nature of gas convection, in which the heat (energy) flux in convection is determined by the mass (vapor) flux in convection.

  4. Scalar arguments of the mathematical functions defining molecular and turbulent transport of heat and mass in compressible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.; Argüeso, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The advection-diffusion equations defining control volume conservation laws in micrometeorological research are analysed to resolve discrepancies in their appropriate scalar variables for heat and mass transport. A scalar variable that is conserved during vertical motions enables the interpretation of turbulent mixing as ‘diffusion’. Gas-phase heat advection is shown to depend on gradients in the potential temperature (θ), not the temperature (T). Since conduction and radiation depend on T, advection-diffusion of heat depends on gradients of both θ and T. Conservation of θ (the first Law of Thermodynamics) requires including a pressure covariance term in the definition of the turbulent heat flux. Mass advection and diffusion are universally agreed to depend directly on gradients in the gas ‘concentration’ (c), a nonetheless ambiguous term. Depending upon author, c may be defined either as a dimensionless proportion or as a dimensional density, with non-trivial differences for the gas phase. Analyses of atmospheric law, scalar conservation and similarity theory demonstrate that mass advection-diffusion in gases depends on gradients, not in density but rather in a conserved proportion. Flux-tower researchers are encouraged to respect the meteorological tradition of writing conservation equations in terms of scalar variables that are conserved through simple air motions.

  5. Heat pump without particle transport or external work on the medium achieved by differential thermostatting of the phase space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that enables heat flow from a colder region to a hotter region without necessitating either particle transport or external work on the conductor, thereby bypassing the compressor part of a classical heat pump cycle. Our mechanism relies on thermostatting the kinetic and configurational temperatures of the same particle differently. We keep the two ends of a conductor, which in the present study is a single dimensional ϕ(4) chain, at the same kinetic temperature T(0), but at different configurational temperatures--one end hotter and the other end colder than T(0). While external energy is needed within the thermostatted regions to achieve this differential thermostatting, no external work is performed on the system itself. We show that the mechanism satisfies the statistical form of the second law of thermodynamics (the fluctuation theorem). The proposed mechanism reveals two interesting findings: (i) contrary to traditional thermodynamics where only the kinetic temperature is thought to govern heat conduction, configurational temperature can also play an important role, and (ii) the relative temperature difference between the kinetic and configurational variables governs the direction of heat flow. The challenge, however, is in developing experimental techniques to thermostat the kinetic and configurational variables of the same particle at different values.

  6. Heat pump without particle transport or external work on the medium achieved by differential thermostatting of the phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that enables heat flow from a colder region to a hotter region without necessitating either particle transport or external work on the conductor, thereby bypassing the compressor part of a classical heat pump cycle. Our mechanism relies on thermostatting the kinetic and configurational temperatures of the same particle differently. We keep the two ends of a conductor, which in the present study is a single dimensional ϕ4 chain, at the same kinetic temperature T0, but at different configurational temperatures—one end hotter and the other end colder than T0. While external energy is needed within the thermostatted regions to achieve this differential thermostatting, no external work is performed on the system itself. We show that the mechanism satisfies the statistical form of the second law of thermodynamics (the fluctuation theorem). The proposed mechanism reveals two interesting findings: (i) contrary to traditional thermodynamics where only the kinetic temperature is thought to govern heat conduction, configurational temperature can also play an important role, and (ii) the relative temperature difference between the kinetic and configurational variables governs the direction of heat flow. The challenge, however, is in developing experimental techniques to thermostat the kinetic and configurational variables of the same particle at different values.

  7. From 3D gravity to coupled fluid and heat transport modelling - a case study from the Upper Rhine Graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymark, Jessica; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Bär, Kristian; Stiller, Manfred; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Kracht, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Numerical models that predict and help to understand subsurface hydrothermal conditions are key to reduce the risk of drilling non-productive geothermal wells. Such simulations of coupled fluid and heat transport need a reliable 3D structural model. Therefore, we use an integrated approach of data-based 3D structural, gravity, conductive thermal and thermo-hydraulic coupled modelling. The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) is known for its large potential for deep geothermal energy that is already used in e.g. Soultz-sous-Forêts. In the frame of the EU-funded project "IMAGE" (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, grant agreement no. 608553), we assess the dominant processes and effective physical properties that control the deep thermal field of the URG. Therefore, we have built a lithospheric-scale 3D structural model of the URG by integrating existing data-based 3D models, deep seismic reflection and refraction profiles, as well as receiver function data. 3D gravity modelling was used to assess the internal configuration of the upper crystalline crust in addition to deep seismic lines. The resulting gravity-constrained 3D structural model was then used as base to calculate the 3D conductive thermal field. An analysis of deviations between measured and calculated temperatures revealed that heat transport connected to fluid circulation is probably relevant at depths above 2500 m. To test this hypotheses smaller-scale and higher resolution models for coupled fluid and heat transport were simulated. We present the results from this combined workflow considering 3D gravity and 3D thermal modelling.

  8. Heat Transport of Non-Local Effect with Modulated SMBI on HL-2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hong-Juan; DING Xuan-Tong; YAO Liang-Hua; FENG Bei-Bin; LIU Ze-Tian; GAO Ya-Dong; LI Wei; LI Xue-Hong; DUAN Xu-Ru; YANG Qing-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Modulated supersonic molecular beam (SMB) injection is introduced to study transport features of non-local transport phenomenon on HL-2A.Repetitive non-local effect induced by modulated SMBI allows Fourier transformation of the temperature perturbation,yielding detailed investigation of the pulse propagation. Fourier analysis provides evidence for existence of internal transport barriers.Meanwhile,experimental progress of nonlocal effect was made in the HL-2A Tokamak in 2007.The core electron temperature Te rise increases from 18% to more than 40% and the duration of the Te rise could be prolonged by changing the conditions of SMB injection.

  9. SEAWAT: A Computer Program for Simulation of Variable-Density Groundwater Flow and Multi-Species Solute and Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D.

    2009-01-01

    SEAWAT is a MODFLOW-based computer program designed to simulate variable-density groundwater flow coupled with multi-species solute and heat transport. The program has been used for a wide variety of groundwater studies including saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers, aquifer storage and recovery in brackish limestone aquifers, and brine migration within continental aquifers. SEAWAT is relatively easy to apply because it uses the familiar MODFLOW structure. Thus, most commonly used pre- and post-processors can be used to create datasets and visualize results. SEAWAT is a public domain computer program distributed free of charge by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  10. Overview of improvements in work practices and instrumentation for CANDU primary heat transport feeders in-service inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcotte, O., E-mail: olivier@nucleom.ca [Nucleom Inc., Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Rousseau, G., E-mail: rousseau.gilles.a@hydro.qc.ca [Hydro Quebec, Becancour, Quebec (Canada); Rochefort, E., E-mail: erochfort@zetec.com [Zetec Canada, Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The Canadian nuclear industry has developed many advanced non-destructive inspection techniques to be applied safely in hazardous environments in recent years. Automated systems, manual tooling and specialized software modules have been designed since early 2000s to provide complete and very efficient fitness for service inspection of primary heat transport system carbon steel feeder pipes. These techniques deal with complex geometries, difficult access and, radioactive environment. Complementary NDE techniques, namely Ultrasounds, eddy current, phased-array UT and automated scanners are used. This presentation describes the improvements in inspection practices and the advanced data analysis features. (author)

  11. Transport of heat in caloric vestibular stimulation. Conduction, convection or radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H; Hüttenbrink, K B; Delank, K W

    1991-01-01

    Experiments in temporal bone specimens were carried out under strictly controlled conditions: temperature (37 degrees C) and humidity kept constant; standardized irrigation of the external ear canal by an automated system (in 15 s, 50 ml of water, 11 degrees C above temperature of specimen), thermistor probes of 0.2 mm diameter placed in different parts of the specimens. In the intact temporal bone such an irrigation causes a rise in temperature with a gradient from the external ear canal across the bony bridge to the lateral semicircular canal as expected with heat conduction. After removal of the bony bridge, which is the main route for heat conduction, the rise in temperature in the lateral semicircular canal is greater and faster than in the intact specimen. This effect again is drastically reduced by placing a reflecting shield between tympanic membrane and labyrinth. In the intact middle ear inserting a reflecting shield or filling the cavity with gel also reduces the heat transfer to the labyrinth, although the bony routes for heat conduction are left untouched. The experiments prove that radiation plays an important part in heat transfer in caloric stimulation.

  12. Heat and water transport in soils and across the soil-atmosphere interface: 1. Theory and different model concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Fetzer, Thomas; Mosthaf, Klaus; Smits, Kathleen M.; Helmig, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation is an important component of the soil water balance. It is composed of water flow and transport processes in a porous medium that are coupled with heat fluxes and free air flow. This work provides a comprehensive review of model concepts used in different research fields to describe evaporation. Concepts range from nonisothermal two-phase flow, two-component transport in the porous medium that is coupled with one-phase flow, two-component transport in the free air flow to isothermal liquid water flow in the porous medium with upper boundary conditions defined by a potential evaporation flux when available energy and transfer to the free airflow are limiting or by a critical threshold water pressure when soil water availability is limiting. The latter approach corresponds with the classical Richards equation with mixed boundary conditions. We compare the different approaches on a theoretical level by identifying the underlying simplifications that are made for the different compartments of the system: porous medium, free flow and their interface, and by discussing how processes not explicitly considered are parameterized. Simplifications can be grouped into three sets depending on whether lateral variations in vertical fluxes are considered, whether flow and transport in the air phase in the porous medium are considered, and depending on how the interaction at the interface between the free flow and the porous medium is represented. The consequences of the simplifications are illustrated by numerical simulations in an accompanying paper.

  13. Heat-shock protein 90 promotes nuclear transport of herpes simplex virus 1 capsid protein by interacting with acetylated tubulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meigong Zhong

    Full Text Available Although it is known that inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 can inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection, the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 entry and the antiviral mechanisms of Hsp90 inhibitors remain unclear. In this study, we found that Hsp90 inhibitors have potent antiviral activity against standard or drug-resistant HSV-1 strains and viral gene and protein synthesis are inhibited in an early phase. More detailed studies demonstrated that Hsp90 is upregulated by virus entry and it interacts with virus. Hsp90 knockdown by siRNA or treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors significantly inhibited the nuclear transport of viral capsid protein (ICP5 at the early stage of HSV-1 infection. In contrast, overexpression of Hsp90 restored the nuclear transport that was prevented by the Hsp90 inhibitors, suggesting that Hsp90 is required for nuclear transport of viral capsid protein. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection enhanced acetylation of α-tubulin and Hsp90 interacted with the acetylated α-tubulin, which is suppressed by Hsp90 inhibition. These results demonstrate that Hsp90, by interacting with acetylated α-tubulin, plays a crucial role in viral capsid protein nuclear transport and may provide novel insight into the role of Hsp90 in HSV-1 infection and offer a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance.

  14. CURRENT STATUS OF INSTRUMENTATION FOR A FLUORIDE SALT HEAT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    A small forced convection liquid fluoride salt loop is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK in a heated pebble bed. Loop operation serves several purposes: (1) reestablishing the infrastructure necessary for fluoride salt loop testing, (2) demonstrating a wireless heating technique for simulating pebble type fuel, (3) demonstration of the integration of silicon carbide (SiC) and metallic components into a liquid salt loop, and (4) demonstration of the functionality of distinctive instrumentation required for liquid fluoride salts. Loop operation requires measurement of a broad set of process variables including temperature, flow, pressure, and level. Coolant chemistry measurements (as a corrosion indicator) and component health monitoring are also important for longer-term operation. Two dominating factors in sensor and instrument selection are the high operating temperature of the salt and its chemical environment.

  15. Numerical simulation of seasonal heat storage in a contaminated shallow aquifer - Temperature influence on flow, transport and reaction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Steffi; Beyer, Christof; Dahmke, Andreas; Bauer, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The energy market in Germany currently faces a rapid transition from nuclear power and fossil fuels towards an increased production of energy from renewable resources like wind or solar power. In this context, seasonal heat storage in the shallow subsurface is becoming more and more important, particularly in urban regions with high population densities and thus high energy and heat demand. Besides the effects of increased or decreased groundwater and sediment temperatures on local and large-scale groundwater flow, transport, geochemistry and microbiology, an influence on subsurface contaminations, which may be present in the urban surbsurface, can be expected. Currently, concerns about negative impacts of temperature changes on groundwater quality are the main barrier for the approval of heat storage at or close to contaminated sites. The possible impacts of heat storage on subsurface contamination, however, have not been investigated in detail yet. Therefore, this work investigates the effects of a shallow seasonal heat storage on subsurface groundwater flow, transport and reaction processes in the presence of an organic contamination using numerical scenario simulations. A shallow groundwater aquifer is assumed, which consists of Pleistoscene sandy sediments typical for Northern Germany. The seasonal heat storage in these scenarios is performed through arrays of borehole heat exchangers (BHE), where different setups with 6 and 72 BHE, and temperatures during storage between 2°C and 70°C are analyzed. The developing heat plume in the aquifer interacts with a residual phase of a trichloroethene (TCE) contamination. The plume of dissolved TCE emitted from this source zone is degraded by reductive dechlorination through microbes present in the aquifer, which degrade TCE under anaerobic redox conditions to the degradation products dichloroethene, vinyl chloride and ethene. The temperature dependence of the microbial degradation activity of each degradation step is

  16. Thermal fatigue tests of a radiative heat shield panel for a hypersonic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Granville L.; Clark, Ronald K.; Sharpe, Ellsworth L.

    1985-01-01

    A pair of corrugation stiffened, beaded skin Rene 41 heat shield panels were exposed to 20,000 thermal cycles between room temperature and 1450 F to evaluate the thermal fatigue response of Rene 41 metallic heat shields for hypersonic cruise aircraft applications. At the conclusion of the tests, the panels retained substantial structural integrity; however, there were cracks and excessive wear in the vicinity of fastener holes and there was an 80-percent loss in ductility of the skin. Shrinkage of the panel which caused the cracks and wear must be considered in design of panels for Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) applications.

  17. Solar-heat transport fluids for solar energy collection systems (a collection of quarterly reports)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This document consists of several quarterly reports that cover the progress made by the Houston Chemical Company, who is developing noncorrosive fluid subsystem(s) compatible with closed-loop solar heating and combined heating and hot water systems. The system is also to be compatible with both metallic and non-metallic plumbing systems, and any combination of these. At least 100 gallons of each type of fluid recommended by the contractor will be delivered, and a number of fluids will be performance tested.

  18. Self-consistent mode-coupling approach to one-dimensional heat transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfini, Luca; Lepri, Stefano; Livi, Roberto; Politi, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    In the present Rapid Communication we present an analytical and numerical solution of the self-consistent mode-coupling equations for the problem of heat conductivity in one-dimensional systems. Such a solution leads us to propose a different scenario to accommodate the known results obtained so far for this problem. More precisely, we conjecture that the universality class is determined by the leading order of the nonlinear interaction potential. Moreover, our analysis allows us to determine the memory kernel, whose expression puts on a more firm basis the previously conjectured connection between anomalous heat conductivity and anomalous diffusion.

  19. Advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms in the quantification of shallow geothermal resources and associated environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Mar; García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Velasco, Violeta

    2016-02-01

    Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) are increasingly being used to exploit shallow geothermal energy. This paper presents a new methodology to provide a response to the need for a regional quantification of the geothermal potential that can be extracted by BHEs and the associated environmental impacts. A set of analytical solutions facilitates accurate calculation of the heat exchange of BHEs with the ground and its environmental impacts. For the first time, advection and dispersion heat transport mechanisms and the temporal evolution from the start of operation of the BHE are taken into account in the regional estimation of shallow geothermal resources. This methodology is integrated in a GIS environment, which facilitates the management of input and output data at a regional scale. An example of the methodology's application is presented for Barcelona, in Spain. As a result of the application, it is possible to show the strengths and improvements of this methodology in the development of potential maps of low temperature geothermal energy as well as maps of environmental impacts. The minimum and maximum energy potential values for the study site are 50 and 1800 W/m(2) for a drilled depth of 100 m, proportionally to Darcy velocity. Regarding to thermal impacts, the higher the groundwater velocity and the energy potential, the higher the size of the thermal plume after 6 months of exploitation, whose length ranges from 10 to 27 m long. A sensitivity analysis was carried out in the calculation of heat exchange rate and its impacts for different scenarios and for a wide range of Darcy velocities. The results of this analysis lead to the conclusion that the consideration of dispersion effects and temporal evolution of the exploitation prevent significant differences up to a factor 2.5 in the heat exchange rate accuracy and up to several orders of magnitude in the impacts generated.

  20. Heat transport in cold-wall single-wafer low pressure chemical-vapor-deposition reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasper, A.; Schmitz, J.E.J.; Holleman, J.; Verweij, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    A model is formulated to understand and predict wafer temperatures in a tungsten low pressure chemical‐vapor‐deposition (LPCVD) single‐wafer cold‐wall reactor equipped with hot plate heating. The temperature control is usually carried out on the hot plate temperature. Large differences can occur

  1. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys: Part II. Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasso, D. C.; Evans, J. W.; Wilson, I. J.

    1995-02-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part I (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part I) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  2. Autothermal reforming over a Pt/Gd-doped ceria catalyst: Heat and mass transport limitations in the steam reforming section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sungkwang [Center for Fuel Cell Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Bae, Joongmyeon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

    2010-07-15

    Autothermal reforming (ATR) has several advantages for fuel cell applications, such as a compact reactor structure and fast response. Using oxidation reactions inside the reactor, ATR does not have the external heat transfer limitations associated with steam reforming. However, mass and heat transfer limitations inside and outside the catalyst particles are still anticipated. In this study, transport limitations in the steam reforming section of ATR over a Pt/Gd-doped ceria catalyst are analyzed by numerical simulations based on a reaction rate equation in which parameters are adjusted to measured kinetic data. The simulation results show that significant transport limitations characterize the steam reforming section of packed-bed ATR reactors. The activity per catalyst bed volume is highly dependent on the particle size, and only the thin exterior layer of the particles is involved in catalyzing the reactions. Based on the results, it is shown that an eggshell type catalyst particle could reduce catalyst material significantly without a considerable decline in the activity per catalyst bed volume. (author)

  3. Effects of the poloidal variation of the magnetic field ripple on enhanced heat transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tsang, K.T.; Callen, J.D.

    1976-06-01

    The use of a finite number of coils to generate the toroidal field of a tokamak introduces a magnetic field asymmetry and is responsible for an additional particle trapping that can affect the plasma confinement. The enhanced transport coefficients associated with the ripple-induced drifts have been calculated. The calculations include both the radial and poloidal variation in the magnitude of the field ripple. It is found that the consideration of poloidal variation significantly reduces the ripple-trapped transport but does not affect the banana-drift diffusion. Results relevant to the ORNL Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) reference design are discussed.

  4. Modeling Hydrodynamics and Heat Transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, and Implications for Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Cheng, Ralph T.; Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Hoilman, Gene R.; Lindenberg, Mary K.; Wellman, Roy E.

    2008-01-01

    The three-dimensional numerical model UnTRIM was used to model hydrodynamics and heat transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, between mid-June and mid-September in 2005 and between mid-May and mid-October in 2006. Data from as many as six meteorological stations were used to generate a spatially interpolated wind field to use as a forcing function. Solar radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity data all were available at one or more sites. In general, because the available data for all inflows and outflows did not adequately close the water budget as calculated from lake elevation and stage-capacity information, a residual inflow or outflow was used to assure closure of the water budget. Data used for calibration in 2005 included lake elevation at 3 water-level gages around the lake, water currents at 5 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) sites, and temperature at 16 water-quality monitoring locations. The calibrated model accurately simulated the fluctuations of the surface of the lake caused by daily wind patterns. The use of a spatially variable surface wind interpolated from two sites on the lake and four sites on the shoreline generally resulted in more accurate simulation of the currents than the use of a spatially invariant surface wind as observed at only one site on the lake. The simulation of currents was most accurate at the deepest site (ADCP1, where the velocities were highest) using a spatially variable surface wind; the mean error (ME) and root mean square error (RMSE) for the depth-averaged speed over a 37-day simulation from July 26 to August 31, 2005, were 0.50 centimeter per second (cm/s) and 3.08 cm/s, respectively. Simulated currents at the remaining sites were less accurate and, in general, underestimated the measured currents. The maximum errors in simulated currents were at a site near the southern end of the trench at the mouth of Howard Bay (ADCP7), where the ME and RMSE in the depth-averaged speed were 3.02 and 4.38 cm

  5. Effect of polymer additives on heat transport and large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Hong-Na; Cai, Wei-Hua; Li, Si-Ning; Li, Feng-Chen

    2017-07-01

    The present paper presents direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in an enclosed cell filled with the polymer solution in order to investigate the viscoelastic effect on the characteristics of heat transport and large-scale circulation (LSC) of RBC. To overcome the difficulties in numerically solving a high Weissenberg number (Wi) problem of viscoelastic fluid flow with strong elastic effect, the log-conformation reformulation method was implemented. Numerical results showed that the addition of polymers reduced the heat flux and the amount of heat transfer reduction (HTR) behaves nonmonotonically, which firstly increases but then decreases with Wi. The maximum HTR reaches around 8.7 % at the critical Wi. The nonmonotonic behavior of HTR as a function of Wi was then corroborated with the modifications of the period of LSC and turbulent energy as well as viscous boundary layer thickness. Finally, a standard turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget analysis was done for the whole domain, the boundary layer region, and the bulk region. It showed that the role change of elastic stress contributions to TKE is mainly responsible for this nonmonotonic behavior of HTR.

  6. A reactive transport model for the quantification of risks induced by groundwater heat pump systems in urban aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Epting, Jannis; Ayora, Carlos; Garrido, Eduardo; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Huggenberger, Peter; Gimenez, Ana Cristina

    2016-11-01

    Shallow geothermal resource exploitation through the use of groundwater heat pump systems not only has hydraulic and thermal effects on the environment but also induces physicochemical changes that can compromise the operability of installations. This study focuses on chemical clogging and dissolution subsidence processes observed during the geothermal re-injection of pumped groundwater into an urban aquifer. To explain these phenomena, two transient reactive transport models of a groundwater heat pump installation in an alluvial aquifer were used to reproduce groundwater-solid matrix interactions occurring in a surrounding aquifer environment during system operation. The models couple groundwater flow, heat and solute transport together with chemical reactions. In these models, the permeability distribution in space changes with precipitation-dissolution reactions over time. The simulations allowed us to estimate the calcite precipitation rates and porosity variations over space and time as a function of existent hydraulic gradients in an aquifer as well as the intensity of CO2 exchanges with the atmosphere. The results obtained from the numerical model show how CO2 exolution processes that occur during groundwater reinjection into an aquifer and calcite precipitation are related to hydraulic efficiency losses in exploitation systems. Finally, the performance of reinjection wells was evaluated over time according to different scenarios until the systems were fully obstructed. Our simulations also show a reduction in hydraulic conductivity that forces re-injected water to flow downwards, thereby enhancing the dissolution of evaporitic bedrock and producing subsidence that can ultimately result in a dramatic collapse of the injection well infrastructure.

  7. Technical and economic investigation of the combined transport of district heat and refuse by rail. Final report; Technische und wirtschaftliche Untersuchung des kombinierten Transportes von Fernwaerme und Muell mit der Bahn (KTFM). Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleyer, A. [GEF Ingenieurgesellschaft fuer Energietechnik und Fernwaerme mbH, Leimen (Germany); Krebs, A.W. [Regional- und Energieplanung Andreas W. Krebs, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goeddeke, H. [Ingenieurbuero fuer Rationellen Energieeinsatz und Technologietransfer, Boppard (Germany)

    1993-03-01

    In past years a number of preliminary studies have been done on ``District Heat Transport by Rail``: they have not, however, answered the question of economic viability. The main task of this study is to see if district heat transport by rail (possibily in combination with refuse transport) can be done economically. The aim of the investigation was to assess the chances of realisation of a combination of different technologies which appeared economically and environmentally sound. With this in mind, the technical, economical and ecological aspects of the ``Combined Transport of District Heat and Refuse`` by rail were investigated. The main findings are as follows: The sum of emissions in built-up areas can thus be reuced. Within the present price structure of the German rail system, the combined transport of district offers no price advantage over separate transport. Cheaper transport could be achieved if private rail companies were allowed to transport district heat and refuse on DB and DR track and pay toll. Although the concept is ecologically desirable, we sadly must conclude that heating costs for this concept would greatly exceed acceptable limits. On the other hand, politicak changes, e.g. the compulsion for heat generation from incinerators, mith lead to increased costs for district heat supply. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zum Thema ``Fernwaermetransport mit der Eisenbahn`` sind in den vergangenen Jahren bereits verschiedene Voruntersuchungen durchgefuehrt worden, wobei aber bisher die Frage der Wirtschafftlichkeit unbeantwortet blieb. Vordringliche Aufgabe dieser Studie ist es daher, zu erklaeren, ob der Fernwaermetransport mit der Eisenbahn (evtl. in Verbindung mit Muelltransporten) wirtschaftlich durchgefuehrt werden kann. Ziel dieses Forschungsvorhabens war es, die Realisierungschancen einer gesamtwirtschaftlich sinnvoll und umweltfreundlich erscheinenden Verbindung verschiedener Techniken zu ermitteln. Dazu sollte der ``Kombinierte Transport von Fernwaerme und

  8. On the glacial and inter-glacial thermohaline circulation and the associated transports of heat and freshwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ballarotta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The change of the thermohaline circulation (THC between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ≈ 21 kyr ago and the present day climate are explored using an Ocean General Circulation Model and stream functions projected in various coordinates. Compared to the present day period, the LGM circulation is reorganised in the Atlantic Ocean, in the Southern Ocean and particularly in the abyssal ocean, mainly due to the different haline stratification. Due to stronger wind stress, the LGM tropical circulation is more vigorous than under modern conditions. Consequently, the maximum tropical transport of heat is slightly larger during the LGM. In the North Atlantic basin, the large sea-ice extent during the LGM constrains the Gulf Stream to propagate in a more zonal direction, reducing the transport of heat towards high latitudes and reorganising the freshwater transport. The LGM circulation is represented as a large intrusion of saline Antarctic Bottom Water into the Northern Hemisphere basins. As a result, the North Atlantic Deep Water is shallower in the LGM simulation. The stream functions in latitude-salinity coordinates and thermohaline coordinates point out the different haline regimes between the glacial and interglacial period, as well as a LGM Conveyor Belt circulation largely driven by enhanced salinity contrast between the Atlantic and the Pacific basin. The thermohaline structure in the LGM simulation is the result of an abyssal circulation that lifts and deviates the Conveyor Belt cell from the area of maximum volumetric distribution, resulting in a ventilated upper layer above a deep stagnant layer, and an Atlantic circulation more isolated from the Pacific. An estimation of the turnover times reveal a deep circulation almost sluggish during the LGM, and a Conveyor Belt cell more vigorous due to the combination of stronger wind stress and shortened circulation route.

  9. Applications of Bayesian temperature profile reconstruction to automated comparison with heat transport models and uncertainty quantification of current diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irishkin, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Imbeaux, F., E-mail: frederic.imbeaux@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Aniel, T.; Artaud, J.F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We developed a method for automated comparison of experimental data with models. • A unique platform implements Bayesian analysis and integrated modelling tools. • The method is tokamak-generic and is applied to Tore Supra and JET pulses. • Validation of a heat transport model is carried out. • We quantified the uncertainties due to Te profiles in current diffusion simulations. - Abstract: In the context of present and future long pulse tokamak experiments yielding a growing size of measured data per pulse, automating data consistency analysis and comparisons of measurements with models is a critical matter. To address these issues, the present work describes an expert system that carries out in an integrated and fully automated way (i) a reconstruction of plasma profiles from the measurements, using Bayesian analysis (ii) a prediction of the reconstructed quantities, according to some models and (iii) a comparison of the first two steps. The first application shown is devoted to the development of an automated comparison method between the experimental plasma profiles reconstructed using Bayesian methods and time dependent solutions of the transport equations. The method was applied to model validation of a simple heat transport model with three radial shape options. It has been tested on a database of 21 Tore Supra and 14 JET shots. The second application aims at quantifying uncertainties due to the electron temperature profile in current diffusion simulations. A systematic reconstruction of the Ne, Te, Ti profiles was first carried out for all time slices of the pulse. The Bayesian 95% highest probability intervals on the Te profile reconstruction were then used for (i) data consistency check of the flux consumption and (ii) defining a confidence interval for the current profile simulation. The method has been applied to one Tore Supra pulse and one JET pulse.

  10. Phonon-Magnon Interaction in Low Dimensional Quantum Magnets Observed by Dynamic Heat Transport Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montagnese, Matteo; Otter, Marian; Zotos, Xenophon; Fishman, Dmitry A.; Hlubek, Nikolai; Mityashkin, Oleg; Hess, Christian; Saint-Martin, Romuald; Singh, Surjeet; Revcolevschi, Alexandre; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Thirty-five years ago, Sanders and Walton [Phys. Rev. B 15, 1489 (1977)] proposed a method to measure the phonon-magnon interaction in antiferromagnets through thermal transport which so far has not been verified experimentally. We show that a dynamical variant of this approach allows direct extract

  11. Heat and water transport in soils and across the soil-atmosphere interface: 2. Numerical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetzer, Thomas; Vanderborght, Jan; Mosthaf, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    on how vapor transport in the air phase and the interaction at the interface between the free flow and porous medium were represented or parameterized. However, simulated cumulative evaporation losses from initially wet soil profiles were very similar between model concepts and mainly controlled...

  12. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  13. CFD Analysis of nanofluid forced convection heat transport in laminar flow through a compact pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kitae; Park, Cheol; Kim, Sedon; Song, Heegun; Jeong, Hyomin

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper, developing laminar forced convection flows were numerically investigated by using water-Al2O3 nano-fluid through a circular compact pipe which has 4.5mm diameter. Each model has a steady state and uniform heat flux (UHF) at the wall. The whole numerical experiments were processed under the Re = 1050 and the nano-fluid models were made by the Alumina volume fraction. A single-phase fluid models were defined through nano-fluid physical and thermal properties calculations, Two-phase model(mixture granular model) were processed in 100nm diameter. The results show that Nusselt number and heat transfer rate are improved as the Al2O3 volume fraction increased. All of the numerical flow simulations are processed by the FLUENT. The results show the increment of thermal transfer from the volume fraction concentration.

  14. Local Agenda 21. Settlement pattern and energy for transportation and heating; Lokal agenda 21. Bebyggelsesmoenster og energi til transport og oppvarming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orderud, Geir Inge

    1998-09-01

    This document deals with Local Agenda 21 (LA21) and the relationship between settlement pattern and the consumption of energy in transportation and heating of houses. Local Agenda 21 originates from the Earth Summit held in Rio in 1992 and draws up the strategies by which the local communities should participate in realizing the recommendations of the summit. So far much of the research around LA21 has examined how well the individual countries that ratified the Rio document have fulfilled the recommendations of Article 28 on local responsibility. From the point of view of research, however, the challenge is rather to investigate the conditions for realizing the broad participation of the people. From the administrative point of view, the important issue is the relationship between the representative channels and the direct participation of local people in the decision processes, as well as the delegation of decision-making authority from national to regional or local level. One recommendation in Agenda 21 is to emit less greenhouse gases. In this connection, a central issue is transportation, which is affected by the settlement pattern. A denser settlement within an urban area is supposed to reduce the transportation and the use of private cars. Thus the local development and area policy is a topic of current interest in the study of how LA21 works locally, especially so because sparsely built-up areas with single family houses are considered as the good way of living. Densely populated urban areas may conflict with the need for arable land and green space. LA 21 and the settlement pattern are both parts of a larger social environment and it is important know these relationships when local measures and actions are analysed. The possibility of a sustainable development must be assessed in relation to the fact that more power is gathered in the global flow of capital. 26 refs.

  15. Numerical Modeling of the Vertical Heat Transport Through the Diffusive Layer of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    9 Figure 6. Salt fingers. Warm, salty layer atop a cool, fresh layer results in fingers of salty , cooler water extending downwards...combination of evaporation and radiative heating at the ocean surface results in a layer of warm, salty water overlying a comparatively cooler, 10...layer atop a cool, fresh layer results in fingers of salty , cooler water extending downwards from the layer interface (Image from Garaud Research

  16. Heat flux solutions of the 13-moment approximation transport equations in a multispecies gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Wu [CRIRP, Henan Province (China); Taieb, C. [Centre de Recherche en Physique de l`Environnement (CRPE), Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1993-09-01

    The authors study steady state heat flux equations by means of the 13-moment approximation for situations applicable to aeronomy and space plasmas. They compare their results with Fourier`s law applied to similar problems, to test validity conditions for it. They look at the flux of oxygen and hydrogen ions in the high-latitude ionosphere, and compare calculations with observations from EISCAT radar measurements. These plasma components are observed to have strongly non-Maxwellian distributions.

  17. Heat transport and electron cooling in ballistic normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, Shiro, E-mail: s-kawabata@aist.go.jp [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute (ESPRIT), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Vasenko, Andrey S. [LPMMC, Université Joseph Fourier and CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Ozaeta, Asier [Centro de Física de Materiales (CFM-MPC), Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Manuel de Lardizabal 5, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Bergeret, Sebastian F. [Centro de Física de Materiales (CFM-MPC), Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Manuel de Lardizabal 5, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Manuel de Lardizabal 5, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Hekking, Frank W.J. [LPMMC, Université Joseph Fourier and CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2015-06-01

    We investigate electron cooling based on a clean normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junction. Due to the suppression of the Andreev reflection by the spin-filter effect, the cooling power of the system is found to be extremely higher than that for conventional normal-metal/nonmagnetic-insulator/superconductor coolers. Therefore we can extract large amount of heat from normal metals. Our results strongly indicate the practical usefulness of the spin-filter effect for cooling detectors, sensors, and quantum bits.

  18. Phonon and electron temperature and non-Fourier heat transport in thin layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, I.; Cimmelli, V. A.; Sellitto, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of heat conductor which allows for different temperatures of phonons and electrons. This model is applied to calculate the steady-state radial temperature profile in a circular thin layer. The compatibility of the obtained temperature profiles with the second law of thermodynamics is investigated in view of the requirement of positive entropy production and of a nonlocal constitutive equation for the entropy flux.

  19. Dynamics, Heat Transport, Spectral Composition and Acoustic Signatures of Mesoscale Variability in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    the present thesis research would have been in vain were it not by the invaluable orientation of my advisor, Dr. Timour Radko. His pedagogical skills...streamfunction or any other property after equilibration. The following diagnostics are based on the equilibrated PV fluxes. The parameters βnd and r are...and is likely to apply to different models. The diagnostics are focused on RMS velocity and heat flux since they are computed from a second order

  20. ENERGY AND MASS TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN THE GRANULAR BED OF AN INDIRECTLY HEATED ROTARY KILN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang Klose; Arndt-Peter Schinkel

    2004-01-01

    The transport mechanisms of momentum, mass, species, and energy are investigated in detail for the rotary kiln process. The residence time prediction of the granular bed is well improved by considering different flow patterns in the drum. Introducing a mixed flow pattem of the basic slipping and slumping behaviour has the most important effect on the improvement of the residence time prediction. The granular bed is assumed to behave as a Bingham fluid in the active layer of the bed. The transport mechanisms of momentum, species, and energy are modelled on the basis of this assumption and using the kinetic gas theory. Additionally, a mathematical transformation is presented to save computational time. The model results of the temperature field are in very good agreement with experimental data.

  1. The Role of Thermal Convection in Heat and Mass Transport in the Subarctic Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    vapor diffusion have been developed (Bader et al. 1939, Yosida et al. 1955, Giddings and LaChapelle 1962, Yen 1963, de Quervain 1972, Palm and...not agree, other authors (Yosida et al. 1955, Yen 1963, de Quervain 1972, Palm and Tveitereid 1979, Fedoseeva and Fedoseev 1988) concluded that the...for the diffusion model to produce the measured mass transport. Yen (1963), de Quervain (1972), Palm and Tveitereid (1979), and Fedoseeva and Fedoseev

  2. Predictions on heat transport and plasma rotation from global gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Abiteboul, J.; Allfrey, S.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Latu, G.; Strugarek, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Diamond, P. H.; Ku, S.; Chang, C. S.; McMillan, B. F.; Tran, T. M.; Villard, L.; Jolliet, S.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2011-10-01

    Flux-driven global gyrokinetic codes are now mature enough to make predictions in terms of turbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas. Some of the recent breakthroughs of three such codes, namely GYSELA, ORB5 and XGC1, are reported and compared wherever appropriate. In all three codes, turbulent transport appears to be mediated by avalanche-like events, for a broad range of ρ* = ρi/a values, ratio of the gyro-radius over the minor radius. Still, the radial correlation length scales with ρi, leading to the gyro-Bohm scaling of the effective transport coefficient below ρ* ≈ 1/300. The possible explanation could be due to the fact that avalanches remain meso-scale due to the interaction with zonal flows, whose characteristic radial wavelength appears to be almost independent of the system size. As a result of the radial corrugation of the turbulence driven zonal and mean flows, the shear of the radial electric field can be significantly underestimated if poloidal rotation is assumed to be governed by the neoclassical theory, especially at low collisionality. Indeed, the turbulence contribution to the poloidal rotation increases when collisionality decreases. Finally, the numerical verification of toroidal momentum balance shows that both neoclassical and turbulent contributions to the Reynolds' stress tensor play the dominant role. The phase space analysis further reveals that barely passing supra-thermal particles mostly contribute to the toroidal flow generation, consistently with quasi-linear predictions.

  3. Full-counting statistics of heat transport in harmonic junctions: transient, steady states, and fluctuation theorems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Li, Baowen; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2012-05-01

    We study the statistics of heat transferred in a given time interval t_{M}, through a finite harmonic chain, called the center, which is connected to two heat baths, the left (L) and the right (R), that are maintained at two temperatures. The center atoms are driven by external time-dependent forces. We calculate the cumulant generating function (CGF) for the heat transferred out of the left lead, Q_{L}, based on the two-time quantum measurement concept and using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The CGF can be concisely expressed in terms of Green's functions of the center and an argument-shifted self-energy of the lead. The expression of the CGF is valid in both transient and steady-state regimes. We consider three initial conditions for the density operator and show numerically, for a one-atom junction, how their transient behaviors differ from each other but, finally, approach the same steady state, independent of the initial distributions. We also derive the CGF for the joint probability distribution P(Q_{L},Q_{R}), and discuss the correlations between Q_{L} and Q_{R}. We calculate the CGF for total entropy production in the reservoirs. In the steady state we explicitly show that the CGFs obey steady-state fluctuation theorems. We obtain classical results by taking ℏ→0. We also apply our method to the counting of the electron number and electron energy, for which the associated self-energy is obtained from the usual lead self-energy by multiplying a phase and shifting the contour time, respectively.

  4. Solution of Nonlinear Coupled Heat and Moisture Transport Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Krejčí

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a numerical solution of coupled of heat and moisture transfer using the finite element method. The mathematical model consists of balance equations of mass, energy and linear momentum and of the appropriate constitutive equations. The chosen macroscopic field variables are temperature, capillary pressures, gas pressure and displacement. In contrast with pure mechanical problems, there are several difficulties which require special attention. Systems of algebraic equations arising from coupled problems are generally nonlinear, and the matrices of such systems are nonsymmetric and indefinite. The first experiences of solving complicated coupled problems are mentioned in this paper. 

  5. Two-dimensional analysis of coupled heat and moisture transport in masonry structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejčí, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Reconstruction and maintenance of historical buildings and bridges require good knowledge of temperature and moisture distribution. Sharp changes in the temperature and moisture can lead to damage. This paper describes analysis of coupled heat and moisture transfer in masonry based on two-level approach. Macro-scale level describes the whole structure while meso-scale level takes into account detailed composition of the masonry. The two-level approach is very computationally demanding and it was implemented in parallel. The two-level approach was used in analysis of temperature and moisture distribution in Charles bridge in Prague, Czech Republic.

  6. The annual mean sketches and climatological variability of the volume and heat transports through the inter-basin passages:A study based on 1 400-year spin up of MOM4p1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yaohua; WEI Zexun; WANG Yonggang; GUAN Yuping; WANG Xinyi

    2014-01-01

    The annual mean volume and heat transport sketches through the inter-basin passages and transoceanic sections have been constructed based on 1 400-year spin up results of the MOM4p1. The spin up starts from a state of rest, driven by the monthly climatological mean force from the NOAA World Ocean Atlas (1994). The volume transport sketch reveals the northward transport throughout the Pacific and southward trans-port at all latitudes in the Atlantic. The annual mean strength of the Pacific-Arctic-Atlantic through flow is 0.63×106 m3/s in the Bering Strait. The majority of the northward volume transport in the southern Pacific turns into the Indonesian through flow (ITF) and joins the Indian Ocean equatorial current, which subse-quently flows out southward from the Mozambique Channel, with its majority superimposed on the Ant-arctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). This anti-cyclonic circulation around Australia has a strength of 11×106 m3/s according to the model-produced result. The atmospheric fresh water transport, known as P-E+R (pre-cipitation minus evaporation plus runoff ), constructs a complement to the horizontal volume transport of the ocean. The annual mean heat transport sketch exhibits a northward heat transport in the Atlantic and poleward heat transport in the global ocean. The surface heat flux acts as a complement to the horizontal heat transport of the ocean. The climatological volume transports describe the most important features through the inter-basin passages and in the associated basins, including:the positive P-E+R in the Arctic substantially strengthening the East Greenland Current in summer;semiannual variability of the volume transport in the Drake Passage and the southern Atlantic-Indian Ocean passage;and annual transport vari-ability of the ITF intensifying in the boreal summer. The climatological heat transports show heat storage in July and heat deficit in January in the Arctic;heat storage in January and heat deficit in July in the

  7. Electron-phonon heat transport in degenerate Si at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivinen, P.; Toermae, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Prunnila, M. [VTT Information Technology, P.O. Box 1208, 02044 Espoo (Finland); Savin, A.; Pekola, J.; Ahopelto, J. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, 02015 Espoo (Finland)

    2004-11-01

    The thermal conductance between electrons and phonons in a solid state system becomes comparatively weak at sub-Kelvin temperatures. In this work five batches of thin heavily doped silicon-on-insulator samples with the electron concentration in the range of 2.0-16 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} were studied. Below 1 K all the samples were in the dirty limit of the thermal electron-phonon coupling, where the thermal phonon wavelength exceeds the electron mean free path. The heat flow between electrons and phonons is proportional to (T{sup 6}{sub e}-T{sup 6}{sub ph}), where T{sub e} (T{sub ph}) is the electron (phonon) temperature. The constant of proportionality of the heat flow strongly depends on the electron concentration and its magnitude is roughly two orders of magnitude smaller than in normal metals like Cu. These properties of degenerate Si make it promising material for many low temperature device applications. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Role of Joule heating in dispersive mixing effects in electrophoretic cells: convective-diffusive transport aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, M A; Arce, P

    2000-03-01

    This contribution addresses the problem of solute dispersion in a free convection electrophoretic cell for the batch mode of operation, caused by the Joule heating generation. The problem is analyzed by using the two-problem approach originally proposed by Bosse and Arce (Electrophoresis 2000, 21, 1018-1025). The approach identifies the carrier fluid problem and the solute problem. This contribution is focused on the latter. The strategy uses a sequential coupling between the energy, momentum and mass conservation equations and, based on geometrical and physical assumptions for the system, leads to the derivation of analytical temperature and velocity profiles inside the cell. These results are subsequently used in the derivation of the effective dispersion coefficient for the cell by using the method of area averaging. The result shows the first design equation that relates the Joule heating effect directly to the solute dispersion in the cell. Some illustrative results are presented and discussed and their implication to the operation and design of the device is addressed. Due to the assumptions made, the equation may be viewed as an upper boundary for applications such as free flow electrophoresis.

  9. A techno-economic assessment of primary heat transport system decontamination in support of decommissioning Pickering Nuclear Generating Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, A.; Krasznai, J. [Kinectrics, Inc., Analytical and Waste Services Dept., Toronto, Ontario, (Canada); Vijay, R. [Ontario Power Generation, Nuclear Decommissioning Organization, Toronto, Ontario, (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The operating reactor units at Pickering are expected to be permanently shut down by approximately 2020 (this nominal date is for planning purposes only) and then decommissioned. OPG has adopted the 'Deferred Dismantling' strategy for decommissioning its nuclear plants. In contrast with prompt dismantling, radioactive decay leads to reduced dose expenditure during deferred dismantling. As part of the decommissioning strategy, chemical decontamination of the primary heat transport (PHT) system may be undertaken prior to Safe Storage. Decommissioning costs depend significantly on the chosen deferral period. The overall objective of the present work was to contribute to the optimization of the existing decommissioning plan by assessing the benefits of decontamination. Accordingly, an overall cost-benefit analysis for PHT system decontamination was performed. Details are presented in this paper. (author)

  10. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Atomic-Scale Energy Transport: From Heat Conduction to Thermal Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulation based on a plane wave/pseudopotential implementation of density functional theory is adopted to investigate atomic scale energy transport for semiconductors (silicon and germanium). By imposing thermostats to keep constant temperatures of the nanoscale thin layers, initial thermal non-equilibrium between the neighboring layers is established under the vacuum condition. Models with variable gap distances with an interval of lattice constant increment of the simulated materials are set up and statistical comparisons of temperature evolution curves are made. Moreover, the equilibration time from non-equilibrium state to thermal equilibrium state of different silicon or/and germanium layers combinations are calculated. The results show significant distinctions of heat transfer under different materials and temperatures combinations. Further discussions on the equilibrium time are made to explain the simulation results. As the first work of the atomic scale energy tra...

  11. Effect of heat and moisture transport and storage properties of building stones on the hygrothermal performance of historical building envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    KoÅáková, Dana; Kočí, Václav; Žumár, Jaromír; Keppert, Martin; Holčapek, Ondřej; Vejmelková, Eva; Černý, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The heat and moisture transport and storage parameters of three different natural stones used on the Czech territory since medieval times are determined experimentally, together with the basic physical properties and mechanical parameters. The measured data are applied as input parameters in the computational modeling of hygrothermal performance of building envelopes made of the analyzed stones. Test reference year climatic data of three different locations within the Czech Republic are used as boundary conditions on the exterior side. Using the simulated hygric and thermal performance of particular stone walls, their applicability is assessed in a relation to the geographical and climatic conditions. The obtained results indicate that all three investigated stones are highly resistant to weather conditions, freeze/thaw cycles in particular.

  12. Heat and Water Transport in Soils and Across the Soil-Atmosphere Interface: Comparison of Model Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderborght, Jan; Smits, Kathleen; Mosthaf, Klaus

    Evaporation from the soil surface represents a water flow and transport process in a porous medium that is coupled with free air flow and with heat fluxes in the system. We give an overview of different model concepts that are used to describe this process. These range from non-isothermal two...... lateral and up and downward air flow in the porous medium and vapor diffusion in the pore space play an important role were identified using simulations for a set of scenarios. When comparing cumulative evaporation fluxes from initially wet soil profiles, only small differences between the different...... models were found. The effect of vapor flow in the porous medium on cumulative evaporation could be evaluated using the desorptivity, Sevap, which represents a weighted average of liquid and vapor diffusivity over the range of soil water contents between the soil surface water content and the initial...

  13. Numerical investigation of the transport phenomena occurring in the growth of SiC by the induction heating TSSG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Adkar, Nikhil; Okano, Yasunori; Ujihara, Toru; Dost, Sadik

    2017-09-01

    A numerical simulation study was carried out to examine the transport phenomena occurring during the Top-Seeded Solution Growth (TSSG) process of SiC. The simulation model includes the contributions of radiative and conductive heat transfer in the furnace, mass transfer and fluid flow in the melt, and the induced electric and magnetic fields. Results show that the induced Lorentz force is dominant in the melt compared with that of buoyancy. At the relatively low coil frequencies, the effect of the Lorentz force on the melt flow is significant, and the corresponding flow patterns loose their axisymmetry and become almost fully disturbed. However, at the relatively higher frequency values, the flow is steady and the flow patterns remain axisymmetric.

  14. Resistor-network anomalies in the heat transport of random harmonic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Isaac; de Leeuw, Yaron; Kottos, Tsampikos; Cohen, Doron

    2016-06-01

    We consider thermal transport in low-dimensional disordered harmonic networks of coupled masses. Utilizing known results regarding Anderson localization, we derive the actual dependence of the thermal conductance G on the length L of the sample. This is required by nanotechnology implementations because for such networks Fourier's law G∝1/L^{α} with α=1 is violated. In particular we consider "glassy" disorder in the coupling constants and find an anomaly which is related by duality to the Lifshitz-tail regime in the standard Anderson model.

  15. A numerical model for water and heat transport in freezing soils with nonequilibrium ice-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenyang; Tian, Fuqiang; Wu, Jingwei; Huang, Jiesheng; Hu, Hongchang; Darnault, Christophe J. G.

    2016-09-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model of heat and water transport in freezing soils is developed by assuming that ice-water interfaces are not necessarily in equilibrium. The Clapeyron equation, which is derived from a static ice-water interface using the thermal equilibrium theory, cannot be readily applied to a dynamic system, such as freezing soils. Therefore, we handled the redistribution of liquid water with the Richard's equation. In this application, the sink term is replaced by the freezing rate of pore water, which is proportional to the extent of supercooling and available water content for freezing by a coefficient, β. Three short-term laboratory column simulations show reasonable agreement with observations, with standard error of simulation on water content ranging between 0.007 and 0.011 cm3 cm-3, showing improved accuracy over other models that assume equilibrium ice-water interfaces. Simulation results suggest that when the freezing front is fixed at a specific depth, deviation of the ice-water interface from equilibrium, at this location, will increase with time. However, this deviation tends to weaken when the freezing front slowly penetrates to a greater depth, accompanied with thinner soils of significant deviation. The coefficient, β, plays an important role in the simulation of heat and water transport. A smaller β results in a larger deviation in the ice-water interface from equilibrium, and backward estimation of the freezing front. It also leads to an underestimation of water content in soils that were previously frozen by a rapid freezing rate, and an overestimation of water content in the rest of the soils.

  16. The importance of coupled modelling of variably saturated groundwater flow-heat transport for assessing river-aquifer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeler, I.; Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Müller, R.; Stauffer, F.

    2011-02-01

    SummaryThis paper focuses on the role of heat transport in river-aquifer interactions for the study area Hardhof located in the Limmat valley within the city of Zurich (Switzerland). On site there are drinking water production facilities of Zurich water supply, which pump groundwater and infiltrate bank filtration water from river Limmat. The artificial recharge by basins and by wells creates a hydraulic barrier against the potentially contaminated groundwater flow from the city. A three-dimensional finite element model of the coupled variably saturated groundwater flow and heat transport was developed. The hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and the leakage coefficient of the riverbed were calibrated for isothermal conditions by inverse modelling, using the pilot point method. River-aquifer interaction was modelled using a leakage concept. Coupling was considered by temperature-dependent values for hydraulic conductivity and for leakage coefficients. The quality of the coupled model was tested with the help of head and temperature measurements. Good correspondence between simulated and measured temperatures was found for the three pumping wells and seven piezometers. However, deviations were observed for one pumping well and two piezometers, which are situated in an area, where zones with important hydrogeological heterogeneity are expected. A comparison of simulation results with isothermal leakage coefficients with those of temperature-dependent leakage coefficients shows that the temperature dependence is able to reduce the head residuals close to the river by up to 30%. The largest improvements are found in the zone, where the river stage is considerably higher than the groundwater level, which is in correspondence with the expectations. Additional analyses also showed that the linear leakage concept cannot reproduce the seepage flux in a downstream section during flood events. It was found that infiltration is enhanced during flood events, which is

  17. Mathematical modeling of fluid flow, heat transfer and inclusion transport in a four strand tundish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yufeng Wang; Guanghua Wen; Ping Tang; Mingmei Zhu; Yuanqing Chen; Weizhao Song

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical simulation was used for trouble-shooting and optimization.By the mathematical simulation,fluid flow and heat transfer of molten-steel in a four-strand tundish of a billet caster under different conditions (bare tundish and tundish with flow control device) were analyzed.The results showed that (1) the tundish with flow control device (FCD) has an important effect on the fluid pattern and temperature distribution; (2) the unsteady solving method was used to model the inclusion motions at different time periods,and it showed that the FCD is advantageous to separate the nonmetallic inclusions.According to the simulation results,the main problem existing in the industry production was found,and some helpful measurements were executed.Consequently,the large nonmetallic inclusions were separated,and the content of total oxygen was reduced.The quality of steel was greatly improved.

  18. STAR: The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor System - Encapsulated Fission Heat Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2003-10-31

    OAK-B135 The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) is a novel 125 MWth fast spectrum reactor concept that was selected by the 1999 DOE NERI program as a candidate ''Generation-IV'' reactor. It uses Pb-Bi or other liquid-metal coolant and is intended to be factory manufactured in large numbers to be economically competitive. It is anticipated to be most useful to developing countries. The US team studying the feasibility of the ENHS reactor concept consisted of the University of California, Berkeley, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Westinghouse. Collaborating with the US team were three Korean organizations: Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Korean Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (KAIST) and the University of Seoul, as well as the Central Research Institute of the Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI) of Japan. Unique features of the ENHS include at least 20 years of operation without refueling; no fuel handling in the host country; no pumps and valves; excess reactivity does not exceed 1$; fully passive removal of the decay heat; very small probability of core damaging accidents; autonomous operation and capability of load-following over a wide range; very long plant life. In addition it offers a close match between demand and supply, large tolerance to human errors, is likely to get public acceptance via demonstration of superb safety, lack of need for offsite response, and very good proliferation resistance. The ENHS reactor is designed to meet the requirements of Generation IV reactors including sustainable energy supply, low waste, high level of proliferation resistance, high level of safety and reliability, acceptable risk to capital and, hopefully, also competitive busbar cost of electricity.

  19. Analytic 1D Approximation of the Divertor Broadening S in the Divertor Region for Conductive Heat Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Nille, Dirk; Eich, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Topic is the divertor broadening $S$, being a result of perpendicular transport in the scrape-off layer and resulting in a better distribution of the power load onto the divertor target. Recent studies show a scaling of the divertor broadening with an inverse power law to the target temperature $T_t$, promising its reduction to be a way of distributing the power entering the divertor volume onto a large surface area. It is shown that for pure conductive transport in the divertor region the suggested inverse power law scaling to $T_t$ is only valid for high target electron temperatures. For decreasing target temperatures ($T_t < 20\\,$eV) the increase of $S$ stagnates and the conductive model results in a finite value of $S$ even for zero target temperature. It is concluded that the target temperature is no valid parameter for a power law scaling, as it is not representative for the entire divertor volume. This is shown in simulations solving the 2D heat diffusion equation, which is used as reference for an ...

  20. Modelling Water Flow, Heat Transport, Soil Freezing and Thawing, and Snow Processes in a Clayey, Subsurface Drained Agricultural Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsta, L.; Turunen, M.; Koivusalo, H. J.; Paasonen-Kivekäs, M.; Karvonen, T.; Taskinen, A.

    2012-12-01

    Simulation of hydrological processes for the purposes of agricultural water management and protection in boreal environment requires description of winter time processes, including heat transport, soil freezing and thawing, and snow accumulation and melt. Finland is located north of the latitude of 60 degrees and has one third to one fourth of the total agricultural land area (2.3 milj. ha) on clay soils (> 30% of clay). Most of the clayey fields are subsurface drained to provide efficient drainage and to enable heavy machines to operate on the fields as soon as possible after the spring snowmelt. Generation of drainflow and surface runoff in cultivated fields leads to nutrient and sediment load, which forms the major share of the total load reaching surface waters at the national level. Water, suspended sediment, and soluble nutrients on clayey field surface are conveyed through the soil profile to the subsurface drains via macropore pathways as the clayey soil matrix is almost impermeable. The objective of the study was to develop the missing winter related processes into the FLUSH model, including soil heat transport, snow pack simulation and the effects of soil freezing and thawing on the soil hydraulic conductivity. FLUSH is an open source (MIT license), distributed, process-based model designed to simulate surface runoff and drainflow in clayey, subsurface drained agricultural fields. 2-D overland flow is described with the diffuse wave approximation of the Saint Venant equations and 3-D subsurface flow with a dual-permeability model. Both macropores and soil matrix are simulated with the Richards equation. Soil heat transport is described with a modified 3-D convection-diffusion equation. Runoff and groundwater data was available from different periods from January 1994 to April 1999 measured in a clayey, subsurface drained field section (3.6 ha) in southern Finland. Soil temperature data was collected in two locations (to a depth of 0.8 m) next to the

  1. Two-level system in spin baths: non-adiabatic dynamics and heat transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira

    2014-04-28

    We study the non-adiabatic dynamics of a two-state subsystem in a bath of independent spins using the non-interacting blip approximation, and derive an exact analytic expression for the relevant memory kernel. We show that in the thermodynamic limit, when the subsystem-bath coupling is diluted (uniformly) over many (infinite) degrees of freedom, our expression reduces to known results, corresponding to the harmonic bath with an effective, temperature-dependent, spectral density function. We then proceed and study the heat current characteristics in the out-of-equilibrium spin-spin-bath model, with a two-state subsystem bridging two thermal spin-baths of different temperatures. We compare the behavior of this model to the case of a spin connecting boson baths, and demonstrate pronounced qualitative differences between the two models. Specifically, we focus on the development of the thermal diode effect, and show that the spin-spin-bath model cannot support it at weak (subsystem-bath) coupling, while in the intermediate-strong coupling regime its rectifying performance outplays the spin-boson model.

  2. Heat transport in boiling turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to several mechanisms many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubbles compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much enhanced natural convection. In this paper we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection process. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. We consider a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping the temperature difference constant and changing the liquid pressure we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between $2\\times10^6$ and $5\\times10^9$. We find a...

  3. Carrier and heat transport properties of polycrystalline GeSn films on SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Noriyuki; Maeda, Tatsuro; Lieten, Ruben R.; Okajima, Shingo; Ohishi, Yuji; Takase, Ryohei; Ishimaru, Manabu; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the potential of polycrystalline (poly-) GeSn as channel material for the fabrication of thin film transistors (TFTs) at a low thermal budget (GeSn films with a grain size of ˜50 nm showed a carrier mobility of ˜30 cm2 V-1 s-1 after low-temperature annealing at 475-500 °C. Not only carrier mobility but also thermal conductivity of the films is important in assessing the self-heating effect of the poly-GeSn channel TFT. The thermal conductivity of the poly-GeSn films is 5-9 W m-1 K-1, which is significantly lower compared with 30-60 W m-1 K-1 of bulk Ge; this difference results from phonon scattering at grain boundaries and Sn interstitials. The poly-GeSn films have higher carrier mobility and thermal conductivity than poly-Ge films annealed at 600 °C, because of the improved crystal quality and coarsened grain size resulting from Sn-induced crystallization. Therefore, the poly-GeSn film is well-suited as channel material for TFTs, fabricated with a low thermal budget.

  4. Numerical Studies of the Heat and Mass Transport in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, M. J.; Bodavarsson, G. S.

    1983-06-01

    Numerical simulation techniques are employed in studies of the natural flow of heat and mass through the Cerro Prieto reservoir, Mexico and of the effects of exploitation on the field's behavior. The reservoir model is a two-dimensional vertical east to west-southwest cross section, which is based on a recent hydrogeologic model of this geothermal system. The numerical code MULKOM is used in the simulation studies. The steady state pressure and temperature distributions are computed and compared against observed preproduction pressures and temperatures; a reasonable match is obtained. A natural hot water recharge rate of about 1×10-2 kg/s per meter of field length (measured in a north-south direction) is obtained. The model is then used to simulate the behavior of the field during the 1973-1978 production period. The response of the model to fluid extraction agrees to what has been observed in the field or postulated by other authors. There is a decrease in temperatures and pressures in the produced region. No extensive two-phase zone develops in the reservoir because of the strong fluid recharge. Most of the fluid recharging the system comes from colder regions located above and west of the produced reservoir.

  5. Lower Hybrid Current Drive and Heating for the National Transport Code Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat, D. W.; Jardin, S. C.; McCune, D. C.; Valeo, E. J.

    2000-10-01

    The Lower hybrid Simulation Code LSC was originally written as a subroutine to the Toroidal Simulation Code TSC (Jardin, Pomphrey, Kessel, et al) and subsequently ported to a subroutine of TRANSP. Modifications to simplify the use of the LSC both as a callable module, and also independently of larger transport codes, and improve the documentation have been undertaken with the goal of installing LSC in the NTCC library. The physical model, which includes ray tracing from a Brambilla spectrum, 1D Fokker-Planck development of the electron distribution, the Karney-Fisch treatment of the electric field, heuristic diffusion of current and power and wall scattering, has not been changed. The computational approach is to suppress or remove from the control of the user numerical parameters such as step size and number of iterations while changing some code to be extremely stable in varied conditions. Essential graphics are now output as gnuplot commands and data for off-line post processing, but the original outputs to sglib are retained as an option. Examples of output are shown.

  6. Analysis of Heat Transport in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Afshari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a two-phases, single-domain and non-isothermal model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell has been studied to investigate thermal management effects on fuel cell performance. A set of governing equations, conservation of mass, momentum, species, energy and charge for gas diffusion layers, catalyst layers and the membrane regions are considered. These equations are solved numerically in a single domain, using finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics technique. Also the effects of four critical parameters that are thermal conductivity of gas diffusion layer, relative humidity, operating temperature and current density on the PEM fuel cell performance is investigated. In low operating temperatures the resistance within the membrane increases and this could cause rapid decrease in potential. High operating temperature would also reduce transport losses and it would lead to increase in electrochemical reaction rate. This could virtually result in decreasing the cell potential due to an increasing water vapor partial pressure and the membrane water dehydration. Another significant result is that the temperature distribution in GDL is almost linear but within membrane is highly non-linear. However at low current density the temperature across all regions of the cell dose not change significantly. The cell potential increases with relative humidity and improved hydration which reduces ohmic losses. Also the temperature within the cell is much higher with reduced GDL thermal conductivities. The numerical model which is developed is validated with published experimental data and the results are in good agreement.

  7. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  8. Past and present seafloor age distributions and the temporal evolution of plate tectonic heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Buffett, Bruce; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2009-02-01

    Variations in Earth's rates of seafloor generation and recycling have far-reaching consequences for sea level, ocean chemistry, and climate. However, there is little agreement on the correct parameterization for the time-dependent evolution of plate motions. A strong constraint is given by seafloor age distributions, which are affected by variations in average spreading rate, ridge length, and the age distribution of seafloor being removed by subduction. Using a simplified evolution model, we explore which physical parameterizations of these quantities are compatible with broad trends in the area per seafloor age statistics for the present-day and back to 140 Ma from paleo-age reconstructions. We show that a probability of subduction based on plate buoyancy (slab-pull, or "sqrt(age)") and a time-varying spreading rate fits the observed age distributions as well as, or better than, a subduction probability consistent with an unvarying "triangular" age distribution and age-independent destruction of ocean floor. Instead, we interpret the present near-triangular distribution of ages as a snapshot of a transient state of the evolving oceanic plate system. Current seafloor ages still contain hints of a ˜ 60 Myr periodicity in seafloor production, and using paleoages, we find that a ˜ 250 Myr period variation is consistent with geologically-based reconstructions of production rate variations. These long-period variations also imply a decrease of oceanic heat flow by ˜ - 0.25%/Ma during the last 140 Ma, caused by a 25-50% decrease in the rate of seafloor production. Our study offers an improved understanding of the non-uniformitarian evolution of plate tectonics and the interplay between continental cycles and the self-organization of the oceanic plates.

  9. Coupled Heat and Moisture Transport Simulation on the Re-saturation of Engineered Clay Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W. H.; Chuang, Y. F.

    2014-12-01

    Engineered clay barrier plays a major role for the isolation of radioactive wastes in a underground repository. This paper investigates the resaturation processes of clay barrier, with emphasis on the coupling effects of heat and moisture during the intrusion of groundwater to the repository. A reference bentonite and a locally available clay were adopted in the laboratory program. Soil suction of clay specimens was measured by psychrometers embedded in clay specimens and by vapor equilibrium technique conducted at varying temperatures so as to determine the soil water characteristic curves of the two clays at different temperatures. And water uptake tests were conducted on clay specimens compacted at various densities to simulate the intrusion of groundwater into the clay barrier. Using the soil water characteristic curve, an integration scheme was introduced to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated clay. It was found that soil suction decreases as temperature increases, resulting in a reduction in water retention capability. The finite element method was then employed to carry out the numerical simulation of the saturation process in the near field of a repository. Results of the numerical simulation were validated using the degree of saturation profile obtained from the water uptake tests on the clays. The numerical scheme was then extended to establish a model simulating the resaturation process after the closure of a repository. Finally, the model was then used to evaluate the effect of clay barrier thickness on the time required for groundwater to penetrate the clay barrier and approach saturation. Due to the variation in clay suction and thermal conductivity with temperature of clay barrier material, the calculated temperature field shows a reduction as a result of incorporating the hydro-properties in the calculations.

  10. Heat, Salt, and Mass Transports in the Eastern Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean: an Insight from Two Years of Mooring Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnyushkov, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the recent decade, the Arctic Ocean (AO) has experienced dramatic changes evident in all components of the climate system, e.g., in sea ice cover, thermohaline state, and freshwater budget; and there is no indication that they will discontinue in the near future. The role of deep ocean processes in these changes is still poorly understood. For instance, the peculiarities of Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC) - the topographically-controlled current that carries Atlantic Water (AW) around the AO and transports a vast amount of mass, heat, and salt from the Nordic Seas around the polar basin - may play a crucial role in these changes in the Eurasian Basin (EB). Using observations collected in 2013-15 at six moorings distributed at the continental slope of the Laptev Sea we quantify the volume, heat and salt transports of the AW in the eastern EB of the Arctic Ocean. The utilized moorings were deployed in September 2013 as a part of the Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observational System (NABOS) program along the 125°E meridian, providing a detailed picture of structure and variability of the ACBC in this region. Collected 2013-15 observations suggest that at the central Laptev Sea slope the ACBC carries 5.1 Sv of water in the upper 800 m layer; 3.1 Sv of this volumetric water transport is associated with the AW. The mean heat transport carried by the AW was as high as 9.6±0.4 TW, estimated using a zero degree reference temperature (the lower temperature limit of the AW), and 32.7±1.3 TW relative to the freezing point (-1.8 °C). At the Laptev Sea slope, the AW heat transport constitutes 71% of the net heat transport in the entire layer spanned by NABOS mooring instruments (46.0±1.7 TW), confirming the dominant role of AW heat in the thermal balance of the EB. According to the mooring records, the water, heat and salt transports across the Laptev Sea slope experienced strong annual changes and demonstrated significant negative trends in 2013-15.

  11. A heat transport benchmark problem for predicting the impact of measurements on experimental facility design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cacuci, Dan Gabriel, E-mail: cacuci@cec.sc.edu

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Predictive Modeling of Coupled Multi-Physics Systems (PM-CMPS) methodology is used. • Impact of measurements for reducing predicted uncertainties is highlighted. • Presented thermal-hydraulics benchmark illustrates generally applicable concepts. - Abstract: This work presents the application of the “Predictive Modeling of Coupled Multi-Physics Systems” (PM-CMPS) methodology conceived by Cacuci (2014) to a “test-section benchmark” problem in order to quantify the impact of measurements for reducing the uncertainties in the conceptual design of a proposed experimental facility aimed at investigating the thermal-hydraulics characteristics expected in the conceptual design of the G4M reactor (GEN4ENERGY, 2012). This “test-section benchmark” simulates the conditions experienced by the hottest rod within the conceptual design of the facility's test section, modeling the steady-state conduction in a rod heated internally by a cosinus-like heat source, as typically encountered in nuclear reactors, and cooled by forced convection to a surrounding coolant flowing along the rod. The PM-CMPS methodology constructs a prior distribution using all of the available computational and experimental information, by relying on the maximum entropy principle to maximize the impact of all available information and minimize the impact of ignorance. The PM-CMPS methodology then constructs the posterior distribution using Bayes’ theorem, and subsequently evaluates it via saddle-point methods to obtain explicit formulas for the predicted optimal temperature distributions and predicted optimal values for the thermal-hydraulics model parameters that characterized the test-section benchmark. In addition, the PM-CMPS methodology also yields reduced uncertainties for both the model parameters and responses. As a general rule, it is important to measure a quantity consistently with, and more accurately than, the information extant prior to the measurement. For

  12. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processesin porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas

    2007-01-15

    When hot radioactive waste is placed in subsurface tunnels, a series of complex changes occurs in the surrounding medium. The water in the pore space of the medium undergoes vaporization and boiling. Subsequently, vapor migrates out of the matrix pore space, moving away from the tunnel through the permeable fracture network. This migration is propelled by buoyancy, by the increased vapor pressure caused by heating and boiling, and through local convection. In cooler regions, the vapor condenses on fracture walls, where it drains through the fracture network. Slow imbibition of water thereafter leads to gradual rewetting of the rock matrix. These thermal and hydrological processes also bring about chemical changes in the medium. Amorphous silica precipitates from boiling and evaporation, and calcite from heating and CO2 volatilization. The precipitation of amorphous silica, and to a much lesser extent calcite, results in long-term permeability reduction. Evaporative concentration also results in the precipitation of gypsum (or anhydrite), halite, fluorite and other salts. These evaporative minerals eventually redissolve after the boiling period is over, however, their precipitation results in a significant temporary decrease in permeability. Reduction of permeability is also associated with changes in fracture capillary characteristics. In short, the coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes dynamically alter the hydrological properties of the rock. A model based on the TOUGHREACT reactive transport software is presented here to investigate the impact of THC processes on flow near an emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We show how transient changes in hydrological properties caused by THC processes often lead to local flow channeling and saturation increases above the tunnel. For models that include only permeability changes to fractures, such local flow channeling may lead to seepage relative to models where THC effects are ignored. However

  13. Modeling of coupled heat transfer and reactive transport processesin porous media: Application to seepage studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Spycher, N.

    2007-01-15

    When hot radioactive waste is placed in subsurface tunnels, a series of complex changes occurs in the surrounding medium. The water in the pore space of the medium undergoes vaporization and boiling. Subsequently, vapor migrates out of the matrix pore space, moving away from the tunnel through the permeable fracture network. This migration is propelled by buoyancy, by the increased vapor pressure caused by heating and boiling, and through local convection. In cooler regions, the vapor condenses on fracture walls, where it drains through the fracture network. Slow imbibition of water thereafter leads to gradual rewetting of the rock matrix. These thermal and hydrological processes also bring about chemical changes in the medium. Amorphous silica precipitates from boiling and evaporation, and calcite from heating and CO{sub 2} volatilization. The precipitation of amorphous silica, and to a much lesser extent calcite, results in long-term permeability reduction. Evaporative concentration also results in the precipitation of gypsum (or anhydrite), halite, fluorite and other salts. These evaporative minerals eventually redissolve after the boiling period is over, however, their precipitation results in a significant temporary decrease in permeability. Reduction of permeability is also associated with changes in fracture capillary characteristics. In short, the coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes dynamically alter the hydrological properties of the rock. A model based on the TOUGHREACT reactive transport software is presented here to investigate the impact of THC processes on flow near an emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We show how transient changes in hydrological properties caused by THC processes often lead to local flow channeling and saturation increases above the tunnel. For models that include only permeability changes to fractures, such local flow channeling may lead to seepage relative to models where THC effects are ignored

  14. Suborbital Holocene Climate Variability over Continental Western Eurasia Coupled with Poleward Heat Transport to the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J. L.; Lachniet, M. S.; Asmerom, Y.; Polyak, V. J.

    2016-12-01

    The centennial-scale coupling between the Holocene paleoclimate of Eurasia and ocean-atmosphere dynamics in the North Atlantic sector remains weakly understood, due to a paucity of high-resolution data from the continental interior. To investigate these links, we detrended a composite record of stalagmite δ18O from Kinderlinskaya Cave (southern Urals Mountains), which exhibits long-term warming from 11.7 ka to present. The chronologies of two stalagmites were constrained by 29 U-Th dates obtained through MC-ICP-MS analysis. Stable-isotope analysis at 0.5-mm resolution along the growth axes resulted in an average sampling frequency of 12.5 years. Stalagmite δ18O reflects multidecadal changes in the δ18O of winter half-year precipitation, which is highly sensitive to AO/NAO-like shifts in the strength and position of mid-latitude westerlies. Spectral density and wavelet analysis of the detrended record revealed significant periodicities near 2.4 ka, 1.4 ka, and 1.0 ka, which are common in northern hemispheric paleoclimate records and possibly related to solar and oceanic forcing during the Holocene. Coherent hemispheric coupling of continental and oceanic paleoclimate at suborbital timescales is demonstrated by comparison of our record with reconstructions of sea-surface temperature (SST) and meridional flow strength in the North Atlantic sector. Specifically, SST at cores MD-23258 and LO09-14 in the Barents Sea and Reykjanes Ridge, respectively, exhibit opposite phasing during the Holocene, due to alternating strength between the eastern and western branches of the North Atlantic Current, a major component of AMOC. Estimating the SST gradient between these sites as a proxy for poleward heat transport to the northeastern Atlantic Ocean, we find a strong covariance with detrended stalagmite δ18O. This relationship suggests that persistent strengthening (weakening) of wintertime westerlies, analogous to positive (negative) phases of the AO/NAO, was forced by

  15. An electrohydrodynamics model for non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Li, Nianbei; Yang, Ronggui

    2015-06-01

    The electrons and phonons in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating are in highly non-equilibrium states not only between the electrons and the phonons but also within the electrons. An electrohydrodynamics model consisting of the balance equations of electron density, energy density of electrons, and energy density of phonons is derived from the coupled non-equilibrium electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations to study the nonlinear thermal transport by considering the electron density fluctuation and the transient electric current in metal films, after ultra-short pulse laser heating. The temperature evolution is calculated by the coupled electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations, the electrohydrodynamics model derived in this work, and the two-temperature model. Different laser pulse durations, film thicknesses, and laser fluences are considered. We find that the two-temperature model overestimates the electron temperature at the front surface of the film and underestimates the damage threshold when the nonlinear thermal transport of electrons is important. The electrohydrodynamics model proposed in this work could be a more accurate prediction tool to study the non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport process than the two-temperature model and it is much easier to be solved than the Boltzmann transport equations.

  16. Transport and Application of Heat-Activated Persulfate for In-situ Chemical Oxidation of Residual Trichloroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quig, L.; Johnson, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    characterizing the overall transport behavior and application of persulfate/heat-activated persulfate in a natural porous media for the ISCO of residual nonaqueous phase liquid, this work aids in improving the implementation of persulfate ISCO systems.

  17. Transport and Retention Modelling of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Core Scale Porous Media for Electromagnetic Heating Well-Stimulation Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoso, R. K.; Rachmat, S.; Putra, W. D. K.; Resha, A. H.; Hartowo, H.

    2017-07-01

    Understanding the transport and retention of iron oxide nanoparticles is critical in optimizing electromagnetic heating well stimulation. If the injected concentration or injection rate is too big, nanoparticles can build-up inside the pore throat, which can reduce the permeability of the reservoir. A numerical model has been created to describe the behavior of iron oxide nanoparticles in porous media. The model is coupling material balance equation and fluid flow in porous media equations. There are six parameters to be estimated through matching with experimental data: irreversible attachment rate, reversible attachment rate, irreversible attachment capacity, reversible attachment capacity, reversible detachment rate and permeability. All parameters were obtained directly through coreflooding result in previous study. We add Langmuir static isotherm test to limit the maximum adsorption capacity to provide a better estimation of concentration distribution. We use 1% NaCl solution as the base fluid and 45-50 mesh sand as the porous media. From the Langmuir static isotherm test, the maximum adsorption concentration is determined. Then, coreflooding is conducted using 10 ppm nanofluid and 12 cc/min injection rate. The proposed model is matched with the experimental data and its parameters are consistent with the maximum adsorption capacity provided from the test.

  18. The study of the turbulent characteristics of water, heat, carbon dioxide and methane transport over winter wheat field of North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongxing; Zhang, Hongsheng; Luo, Fan; Cai, Xuhui; Song, Yu; Kang, Ling; Huo, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Based on the turbulent observations obtained from North China during April and May 2012, the statistical atmospheric turbulence characteristics and the behaviors of water, heat, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) transport were investigated, the empirical coefficient used to calculate the flux of CH4 in Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) method was simulated. The results show that, in unstable conditions, the normalized standard deviations of temperature, humility, CO2 and CH4 are related to z/L following the "1/3 power law". The ratios between horizontal transport and vertical transport of heat, water vapor and CO2 are related to z/L, but CH4 do not show similar relation. Sensible heat flux is quite low while latent heat flux is relatively high. CO2 flux is slightly above zero during nighttime and below zero during daytime, indicating that the observed area is a carbon sink. CH4 flux is mainly below zero, indicating that the observed area is a methane sink. The values of the empirical coefficients used to calculate the flux of CO2 and CH4 in relaxed eddy-accumulation method are 0.61 and 0.30.

  19. Stability of Microturbulent Drift Modes during Internal Transport Barrier Formation in the Alcator C-Mod Radio Frequency Heated H-mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.H. Redi; C.L. Fiore; W. Dorland; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; P.T. Bonoli; D.R. Ernst; J.E. Rice; S.J. Wukitch

    2003-11-20

    Recent H-mode experiments on Alcator C-Mod [I.H. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 1 (1994) 1511] which exhibit an internal transport barrier (ITB), have been examined with flux tube geometry gyrokinetic simulations, using the massively parallel code GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88 (1995) 128]. The simulations support the picture of ion/electron temperature gradient (ITG/ETG) microturbulence driving high xi/ xe and that suppressed ITG causes reduced particle transport and improved ci on C-Mod. Nonlinear calculations for C-Mod confirm initial linear simulations, which predicted ITG stability in the barrier region just before ITB formation, without invoking E x B shear suppression of turbulence. Nonlinear fluxes are compared to experiment, which both show low heat transport in the ITB and higher transport within and outside of the barrier region.

  20. A Cytosolic Relay of Heat Shock Proteins HSP70-1A and HSP90β Monitors the Folding Trajectory of the Serotonin Transporter*

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the C terminus of the serotonin transporter (SERT) disrupt folding and export from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we examined the hypothesis that a cytosolic heat shock protein relay was recruited to the C terminus to assist folding of SERT. This conjecture was verified by the following observations. (i) The proximal portion of the SERT C terminus conforms to a canonical binding site for DnaK/heat shock protein of 70 kDa (HSP70). A peptide covering this segment stimulated ATPase...

  1. Effect of Coolant Inventories and Parallel Loop Interconnections on the Natural Circulation in Various Heat Transport Systems of a Nuclear Power Plant during Station Blackout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash J. Gaikwad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Provision of passive means to reactor core decay heat removal enhances the nuclear power plant (NPP safety and availability. In the earlier Indian pressurised heavy water reactors (IPHWRs, like the 220 MWe and the 540 MWe, crash cooldown from the steam generators (SGs is resorted to mitigate consequences of station blackout (SBO. In the 700 MWe PHWR currently being designed an additional passive decay heat removal (PDHR system is also incorporated to condense the steam generated in the boilers during a SBO. The sustainability of natural circulation in the various heat transport systems (i.e., primary heat transport (PHT, SGs, and PDHRs under station blackout depends on the corresponding system's coolant inventories and the coolant circuit configurations (i.e., parallel paths and interconnections. On the primary side, the interconnection between the two primary loops plays an important role to sustain the natural circulation heat removal. On the secondary side, the steam lines interconnections and the initial inventory in the SGs prior to cooldown, that is, hooking up of the PDHRs are very important. This paper attempts to open up discussions on the concept and the core issues associated with passive systems which can provide continued heat sink during such accident scenarios. The discussions would include the criteria for design, and performance of such concepts already implemented and proposes schemes to be implemented in the proposed 700 MWe IPHWR. The designer feedbacks generated, and critical examination of performance analysis results for the added passive system to the existing generation II & III reactors will help ascertaining that these safety systems/inventories in fact perform in sustaining decay heat removal and augmenting safety.

  2. Serotonin transporter binding in the hypothalamus correlates negatively with tonic heat pain ratings in healthy subjects: A [11C]DASB PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    analysis revealed a positive correlation between pain tolerance and SERT binding in the hypothalamus (r = 0.53; p = 0.02) although this was not seen in the parametric analysis. These data extend our earlier observation that cortical 5-HT receptors co-determine responses to tonic but not to phasic pain......There is a large body of evidence that the serotonergic system plays an important role in the transmission and regulation of pain. Here we used positron emission tomography (PET) with the serotonin transporter (SERT) tracer [11C]DASB to study the relationship between SERT binding in the brain...... and responses to noxious heat stimulation in a group of 21 young healthy volunteers. Responses to noxious heat stimuli were assessed in a separate psychophysical experiment and included measurements of pain threshold, pain tolerance, and responses to phasic noxious heat stimuli and to a long lasting (7-minute...

  3. Arctic Ocean stability: The effects of local cooling, oceanic heat transport, freshwater input, and sea ice melt with special emphasis on the Nansen Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudels, Bert

    2016-07-01

    The Arctic loses energy to space and heat is transported northward in the atmosphere and ocean. The largest transport occurs in the atmosphere. The oceanic heat flux is significantly smaller, and the warm water that enters the Arctic Ocean becomes covered by a low-salinity surface layer, which reduces the heat transfer to the sea surface. This upper layer has two distinct regimes. In most of the deep basins it is due to the input of low-salinity shelf water, ultimately conditioned by net precipitation and river runoff. The Nansen Basin is different. Here warm Atlantic water is initially in direct contact with and melts sea ice, its upper part being transformed into less dense surface water. The characteristics and depth of this layer are determined as functions of the temperature of the Atlantic water and for different energy losses using a one-dimensional energy balance model. The amount of transformed Atlantic water is estimated for two different sea ice melt rates and the assumption of a buoyant boundary outflow. To create the upper layer sea ice formed elsewhere has to drift to the Nansen Basin. With reduced ice cover, this ice drift might weaken and the ice could disappear by the end of winter. The surface buoyancy input would disappear, and the upper layer might eventually convect back into the Atlantic water, reducing the formation of less dense Polar water. The created ice-free areas would release more heat to the atmosphere and affect the atmospheric circulation.

  4. Effects of orbital forcing on atmosphere and ocean heat transports in Holocene and Eemian climate simulations with a comprehensive Earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fischer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orbital forcing does not only exert direct insolation effects, but also alters climate indirectly through feedback mechanisms that modify atmosphere and ocean dynamics and meridional heat and moisture transfers. We investigate the regional effects of these changes by detailed analysis of atmosphere and ocean circulation and heat transports in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-biosphere general circulation model (ECHAM5/JSBACH/MPI-OM. We perform long term quasi equilibrium simulations under pre-industrial, mid-Holocene (6000 years before present – yBP, and Eemian (125 000 yBP orbital boundary conditions. Compared to pre-industrial climate, Eemian and Holocene temperatures show generally warmer conditions at higher and cooler conditions at lower latitudes. Changes in sea-ice cover, ocean heat transports, and atmospheric circulation patterns lead to pronounced regional heterogeneity. Over Europe, the warming is most pronounced over the north-eastern part in accordance with recent reconstructions for the Holocene. We attribute this warming to enhanced ocean circulation in the Nordic Seas and enhanced ocean-atmosphere heat flux over the Barents Shelf in conduction with retreat of sea ice and intensified winter storm tracks over northern Europe.

  5. Thermochemical cycles for the heat and cold long-range transport. Final report of the PRI 9.2 Cold transport. Annual report of the PR 2-8; Cycles thermochimiques pour le transport de chaleur et de froid a longue distance. Rapport final du PRI 9.2. Transport de froid. Rapport annuel du PR 2-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, L.; Tondeur, D. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique (LSGC), 54 - Nancy (France); Mazet, N.; Neveu, P.; Stitou, D.; Spinner, B. [Institut de Science et de Genie des Materiaux et Procedes (IMP), 66 - Perpignan (France)

    2004-07-01

    This PRI deals with the use of thermochemical processes, based on solid-gas reversible transformation, to transfer heat of cold at long-range distance (> 10 km), in order to enhance the energy efficiency. Four main aspects have been studied to confirm the process feasibility: the process identification and the operating conditions, the selection of compatible reagents, the design of an auto-thermal reactor and the gas transport impact on the global performances. (A.L.B.)

  6. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic...

  7. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation☆

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations (~1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 106–7 K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid ...

  8. Environmental data book 2011. Estimated emission factors for fuels, electricity, heat and transport in Sweden; Miljoefaktaboken 2011. Uppskattade emissionsfaktorer foer braenslen, el, vaerme och transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gode, Jenny; Martinsson, Fredrik; Hagberg, Linus; Oeman, Andreas; Hoeglund, Jonas; Palm, David

    2011-04-15

    The environmental data book summarizes current and general emission factors for most fuels and sources of Swedish electricity and heat and to power vehicles. Emission data are compiled for wood fuels, energy crops, bio-oils, waste fuels, fossil fuels and peat, biofuels, wind power, hydro power, nuclear power and solar power

  9. Workshop day on ``films and droplets heat transport``; Journee d`etude sur ``le transport de chaleur par films ou gouttelettes``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This workshop day was organized by the French society of thermal engineers (SFT). This compilation of proceedings comprises 9 papers dealing with: the effect of droplets evaporation on a poly-dispersed jet under pressure (application to combustion chambers of diesel engines); effect of two-phase heat exchanges on the performances of a piston engine; heat and mass transfers in the entering region of a laminar liquid film; mass transfer at the interface of a free or sheared turbulent film; measurement of gasoline films thickness using laser induced fluorescence - evaluation of the evaporation quickness using several tracers (application to the intake manifold of port-injected and of indirect injection spark ignition engines); heat transfers and condensation inside ducts for the evacuation of combustion products; evaporation of a climbing film on a wall with discontinuous fins (application to the ebullition in heat exchangers); temperature measurement of droplets in a mono-dispersed jet using IR technique and refractometry; influence of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence on the vaporization of fuel droplets. (J.S.)

  10. Mixed convective heat and mass transfer analysis for peristaltic transport in an asymmetric channel with Soret and Dufour effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F M Abbasi; A Alsaedi; T Hayat

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation addresses the simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer in the mixed convection peristaltic flow of viscous fluid in an asymmetric channel. The channel walls exhibit the convective boundary conditions. In addition, the effects due to Soret and Dufour are taken into consideration. Resulting problems are solved for the series solutions. Numerical values of heat and mass transfer rates are displayed and studied. Results indicate that the concentration and temperature of the fluid increase whereas the mass transfer rate at the wall decreases with increase of the mass transfer Biot number. Furthermore, it is observed that the temperature decreases with the increase of the heat transfer Biot number.

  11. Specific Heat and Electrical Transport Properties of Sn0.8Ag0.2Te Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Yamada, Akira; Higashinaka, Ryuji; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Aoki, Yuji; Miura, Osuke; Nagao, Masanori

    2016-10-01

    Sn0.8Ag0.2Te is a new superconductor with Tc ˜ 2.4 K. The superconducting properties of Sn0.8Ag0.2Te have been investigated by specific heat measurements under magnetic fields. The bulk nature of superconductivity was confirmed from the amplitude of the specific heat jump at the superconducting transition, and the amplitude is consistent with fully gapped superconductivity. The upper critical field was estimated from specific heat and electrical resistivity measurements under magnetic fields. The Hall coefficient was positive, suggesting that Ag acts as a p-type dopant in Sn0.8Ag0.2Te.

  12. Heat stress and the photosynthetic electron transport chain of the lichen Parmelina tiliacea (Hoffm.) Ach. in the dry and the wet state: differences and similarities with the heat stress response of higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Strasser, Reto J; Schansker, Gert

    2012-03-01

    Thalli of the foliose lichen species Parmelina tiliacea were studied to determine responses of the photosynthetic apparatus to high temperatures in the dry and wet state. The speed with which dry thalli were activated by water following a 24 h exposure at different temperatures decreased as the temperature was increased. But even following a 24 h exposure to 50 °C the fluorescence induction kinetics OJIP reflecting the reduction kinetics of the photosynthetic electron transport chain had completely recovered within 128 min. Exposure of dry thalli to 50 °C for 24 h did not induce a K-peak in the fluorescence rise suggesting that the oxygen evolving complex had remained intact. This contrasted strongly with wet thalli were submergence for 40 s in water of 45 °C inactivated most of the photosystem II reaction centres. In wet thalli, following the destruction of the Mn-cluster, the donation rate to photosystem II by alternative donors (e.g. ascorbate) was lower than in higher plants. This is associated with the near absence of a secondary rise peak (~1 s) normally observed in higher plants. Analysing the 820 nm and prompt fluorescence transients suggested that the M-peak (occurs around 2-5 s) in heat-treated wet lichen thalli is related to cyclic electron transport around photosystem I. Normally, heat stress in lichen thalli leads to desiccation and as consequence lichens may lack the heat-stress-tolerance-increasing mechanisms observed in higher plants. Wet lichen thalli may, therefore, represent an attractive reference system for the evaluation of processes related with heat stress in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

  13. The effect of heating power on impurity formation and transport during the holding phase in a Bridgman furnace for directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, Kjerstin; Lindholm, Dag; M`Hamdi, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen and carbon are the most common impurities in multi-crystalline silicon. The general mechanism for formation and transport of O and C in the solidification furnace is as follows: oxygen from the silica crucible comes into the melt and combines with a silicon atom and evaporates at the gas/melt interface in the form of silicon oxide (SiO). Argon inert gas, injected into the furnace chamber, carries the SiO to the hot graphite fixtures, where it reacts with carbon to form carbon monoxide (CO) and silicon carbide (SiC). CO is carried by the gas to the melt free surface, where it dissociates into carbon and oxygen. Finally, during solidification oxygen and carbon are incorporated into the crystal. A global furnace model accounting for heat transfer, melt flow, gas flow and impurity transport has been applied to investigate the oxygen and carbon formation and transport in a vertical Bridgman furnace during the holding phase when the furnace is at its hottest. A case study is performed to investigate the effect of the applied heating power on the carbon and oxygen concentrations in the melt prior to solidification.

  14. Effects of heat treatments on the transport properties of Cu/sub x/S thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hmurcik, L.; Allen, L.; Serway, R.A.

    1982-12-01

    We have studied the effects of heat treatments on three Cu/sub x/S thin films (1.995< or =x< or =2). Our results suggest that initial heat treatments cause copper in grain boundaries to diffuse irreversibly into the Cu/sub x/S crystallites. Subsequent heating in hydrogen causes a reduction in surface oxides while the reverse process occurs in an oxygen atmosphere. At a given elevated temperature, the resistivity rho and charge density P vary with time according to the expressions P = P/sub 0/e/sup( plus-or-minust//tau)/sup 1/2/ and rho = rho/sub 0/e/sup( minus-or-plust//tau)/sup 1/2/ . On the other hand, the mobility is found to be approximately constant at a given temperature during heat treatment.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces using cell-to-cell photon transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, M.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Welty, J.R. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Radiation heat transfer in an array of fixed discrete surfaces is an important problem that is particularly difficult to analyze because of the nonhomogeneous and anisotropic optical properties involved. This article presents an efficient Monte Carlo method for evaluating radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces. This Monte Carlo model has been optimized to take advantage of the regular arrangement of surfaces often encountered in these arrays. Monte Carlo model predictions have been compared with analytical and experimental results.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces using cell-to-cell photon transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Welty, J.R. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Radiation heat transfer in an array of fixed discrete surfaces is an important problem that is particularly difficult to analyze because of the nonhomogeneous and anisotropic optical properties involved. This article presents an efficient Monte Carlo method for evaluating radiation heat transfer in arrays of fixed discrete surfaces. This Monte Carlo model has been optimized to take advantage of the regular arrangement of surfaces often encountered in these arrays. Monte Carlo model predictions have been compared with analytical and experimental results.

  17. Radiative heating rates profiles associated with a springtime case of Bodélé and Sudan dust transport over West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lema^itre

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The radiative heating rate due to mineral dust over West Africa is investigated using the radiative code STREAMER, as well as remote sensing and in situ observations gathered during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special Observing Period (AMMA SOP. We focus on two days (13 and 14 June 2006 of an intense and long lasting episode of dust being lifted in remote sources in Chad and Sudan and transported across West Africa in the African easterly jet region, during which airborne operations were conducted at the regional scale, from the southern fringes of the Sahara to the Gulf of Guinea. Profiles of heating rates are computed from airborne LEANDRE 2 (Lidar Embarqué pour l'étude de l'Atmosphère: Nuages Dynamique, Rayonnement et cycle de l'Eau and space-borne CALIOP (Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations lidar observations using two mineral dust model constrained by airborne in situ data and ground-based sunphotometer obtained during the campaign. Complementary spaceborne observations (from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-MODIS and in-situ observations such as dropsondes are also used to take into account the infrared contribution of the water vapour. We investigate the variability of the heating rate on the vertical within a dust plume, as well as the contribution of both shortwave and longwave radiation to the heating rate and the radiative heating rate profiles of dust during daytime and nighttime. The sensitivity of the so-derived heating rate is also analyzed for some key variables for which the associated uncertainties may be large. During daytime, the warming associated with the presence of dust was found to be between 1.5 K day−1 and 4 K day−1, on average, depending on altitude and latitude. Strong warming (i.e. heating rates as high as 8 K day−1 was also observed locally in some limited part of the dust plumes. The uncertainty on the

  18. The low temperature specific heat and electrical transport, magnetic properties of Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiyong

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic properties, electrical transport properties, and low temperature specific heat of polycrystalline perovskite manganese oxide Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3 have been investigated experimentally. It is found that there exists cluster glass state in the sample at low temperature besides the antiferromagnetic insulating state. With the increase of magnetic field, antiferromagnetic insulating state converts to ferromagnetic metal state and the Debye temperature decreases gradually. In addition, the low temperature electron specific heat in zero magnetic field is obviously larger than that of ordinary rare-earth manganites oxide and this phenomenon is related to the itinerant electrons in ferromagnetic cluster state and the disorder in Pr0.65Ca0.35MnO3.

  19. A Fully-Coupled, Fully-Implicit, Finite Element Model for Solving Multiphase Fluid Flow, Heat Transport and Rock Deformation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Deng, S.; Podgorney, R. K.; Huang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Reliable reservoir performance predictions of enhanced geothermal reservoir systems require accurate and robust modeling for the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes. Conventionally, in order to reduce computational cost, these types of problems are solved using operator splitting method, usually by sequentially coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulator with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. However, such operator splitting approaches are applicable only to loosely coupled problems and usually converge slowly. As in most enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), fluid flow, heat transport, and rock deformation are typically strongly nonlinearly coupled, an alternative is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern the system simultaneously using a fully coupled solution procedure for fluid flow, heat transport, and solid mechanics. This procedure solves for all solution variables (fluid pressure, temperature and rock displacement fields) simultaneously, which leads to one large nonlinear algebraic system that needs to be solved by a strongly convergent nonlinear solver. Development over the past 10 years in the area of physics-based conditioning, strongly convergent nonlinear solvers (such as Jacobian Free Newton methods) and efficient linear solvers (such as GMRES, AMG), makes such an approach competitive. In this presentation, we will introduce a continuum-scaled parallel physics-based, fully coupled, modeling tool for predicting the dynamics of fracture initiation and propagation, fluid flow, rock deformation, and heat transport in a single integrated code named FALCON (Fracturing And Liquid-steam CONvection). FALCON is built upon a parallel computing framework developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for solving coupled systems of nonlinear equations with finite element method with unstructured and adaptively refined/coarsened grids. Currently, FALCON contains poro- and thermal- elastic models

  20. A Galerkin, finite-element analysis of steady-state flow and heat transport in the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area, Imperial Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    A steady-state simulation model was applied to the shallow hydrothermal system in the East Mesa area of Imperial Valley, Calif. The steady-state equations of flow and heat transport were solved by use of a Galerkin, finite-element method. A solution was obtained by iterating between the temperature and pressure equations, using updated densities and viscosities. Temperature and pressure were obtained for each node, and corresponding head values were calculated. The simulated temperature and pressure patterns correlated well with the observed patterns. Additional data, mainly from test drilling, would be required for construction of a similar model of the deep hydrothermal system.

  1. Coupled Chemical and Thermal Processes During Contact Metamorphism: Constraining Rates and Duration with Time-Dependent 3-D Heat and Mass Transport Modeling of Fluid-Rock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrow, B. L.; Henry, D.; Gable, C. W.; Heydari, E.; Travis, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal, metamorphic and metasomatic rocks develop through a complex set of coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical processes that contain non-linear feedbacks. The integrated outcome results in a mineral assemblage with a specific texture that records the rates, magnitude and duration of the controlling processes. However, it is often difficult to extract this coupled information from the rock record due to the competing and time-integrated nature of the final product. A particularly problematic case arises when advective metasomatism accompanies thermal energy transport. Advective transport of reactive components by thermally driven flowing fluids can dramatically alter the original bulk rock chemistry. In some instances, these chemical transformations are slow but in others, these alterations can occur over short time scales (yrs). To facilitate investigations of coupled, complex systems and to constrain the rates, duration and relative importance of governing processes during a thermal event, high-resolution 3-D time dependent computational modeling is used. An example of the integrated effects of thermal and chemical transport is found in subsurface Louisiana. Here, an 11m alkali igneous dike intruded Late Jurassic sandy limestones transforming these into new mineral assemblages rich in alkali, alkaline earth elements and F; hydrogrossular, diopside, pectolite (pct), apophyllite, fluorite, and feldspars. Increased temperatures (Ts) and significant mass transport of components from the dike into the host rocks are required. A series of coupled heat and mass transport calculations constrain the rates and duration of the thermal pulse and provide insights into the time-scale of mass transport within this system. For example, calculations incorporating silica transport indicate that at the pct zone (1.5m), thermal conditions remained above 150oC for 2.8 yrs assuming anisotropic permeability (K) and 4.2 yrs (layered K) reaching Tmax at 0.36 (aniso) or 0.53 yr

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of constitutive and inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 in carp (Cyprinus carpio and trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to transport stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Poltronieri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we investigated by immunohistochemistry the cellular localization of constitutive as well as inducible heat shock protein 70 in several tissues of common carp (Cyprinus carpio and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to transport stress. In carp, the constitutive form (HSC70 was detected only in red skeletal muscle of both control and stressed animals. In the same species, the inducible form (HSP70 was evident in the epithelia of renal tubules, gills and skin of stressed animals, whereas in controls only red skeletal muscle exhibited an immunopositivity to HSP70 antibody. In trout, immunostaining to HSC70 antibody was found mainly in the epithelia of intestine, gills and skin of both control and stressed animals although the reactivity was generally higher in animals exposed to transport stress. In the same species immunostaining to HSP70 antibody was observed only in red skeletal muscle and epidermis of control animals.

  3. Novel anisotropy in the superconducting gap structure of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+delta) probed by quasiparticle heat transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoichi; Takeya, J; Abe, Yasushi; Sun, X F; Lavrov, A N

    2002-04-08

    Since the nature of pairing interactions is manifested in the superconducting gap symmetry, the exact gap structure, particularly any deviation from the simple d(x(2)-y(2)) symmetry, would help in elucidating the pairing mechanism in high- T(c) cuprates. Anisotropic heat transport measurement in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) reveals that the quasiparticle populations are different for the two nodal directions and thus the gap structure must be uniquely anisotropic, suggesting that pairing is governed by interactions with a rather complicated anisotropy. Intriguingly, it is found that the "plateau" in the magnetic-field dependence of the thermal conductivity is observed only in the b-axis transport.

  4. Route Planning and Estimate of Heat Loss of Hot Water Transportation Piping for Fuel Cell Local Energy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Shinya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    The method of supplying the electric power and heat energy for the energy demand of buildings by Centralized system type and distributed system type of fuel cell network is studied. The hot-water piping route planning program of fuel cell network was developed by using genetic algorithm based on the view of TSP ( Traveling salesman problem) . In this program, the piping route planning which minimizes the quantity of heat loss in hot-water piping can be performed. The residential section model of Sapporo city of 74 buildings was analyzed, and the quantity of heat loss from the hot-water piping of both systems was estimated. Consequently, the ratio of the quantity of heat loss of a distributed system to a centralized system was about 50% in the full year average. This program is introduced into the route planning of hot- Water piping system of the fuel cell network, and plan to reduce the quantity of heat loss in a distributed system will be made.

  5. Tokamak electron heat transport by direct numerical simulation of small scale turbulence; Transport de chaleur electronique dans un tokamak par simulation numerique directe d'une turbulence de petite echelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labit, B

    2002-10-01

    In a fusion machine, understanding plasma turbulence, which causes a degradation of the measured energy confinement time, would constitute a major progress in this field. In tokamaks, the measured ion and electron thermal conductivities are of comparable magnitude. The possible sources of turbulence are the temperature and density gradients occurring in a fusion plasma. Whereas the heat losses in the ion channel are reasonably well understood, the origin of the electron losses is more uncertain. In addition to the radial velocity associated to the fluctuations of the electric field, electrons are more affected than ions by the magnetic field fluctuations. In experiments, the confinement time can be conveniently expressed in terms of dimensionless parameters. Although still somewhat too imprecise, these scaling laws exhibit strong dependencies on the normalized pressure {beta} or the normalized Larmor radius, {rho}{sub *}. The present thesis assesses whether a tridimensional, electromagnetic, nonlinear fluid model of plasma turbulence driven by a specific instability can reproduce the dependence of the experimental electron heat losses on the dimensionless parameters {beta} and {rho}{sub *}. The investigated interchange instability is the Electron Temperature Gradient driven one (ETG). The model is built by using the set of Braginskii equations. The developed simulation code is global in the sense that a fixed heat flux is imposed at the inner boundary, leaving the gradients free to evolve. From the nonlinear simulations, we have put in light three characteristics for the ETG turbulence: the turbulent transport is essentially electrostatic; the potential and pressure fluctuations form radially elongated cells called streamers; the transport level is very low compared to the experimental values. The thermal transport dependence study has shown a very small role of the normalized pressure, which is in contradiction with the Ohkama's formula. On the other hand

  6. RNA-Seq reveals expression signatures of genes involved in oxygen transport, protein synthesis, folding, and degradation in response to heat stress in catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shikai; Wang, Xiuli; Sun, Fanyue; Zhang, Jiaren; Feng, Jianbin; Liu, Hong; Rajendran, K V; Sun, Luyang; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Yanliang; Peatman, Eric; Kaltenboeck, Ludmilla; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2013-06-17

    Temperature is one of the most prominent abiotic factors affecting ectotherms. Most fish species, as ectotherms, have extraordinary ability to deal with a wide range of temperature changes. While the molecular mechanism underlying temperature adaptation has long been of interest, it is still largely unexplored with fish. Understanding of the fundamental mechanisms conferring tolerance to temperature fluctuations is a topic of increasing interest as temperature may continue to rise as a result of global climate change. Catfish have a wide natural habitat and possess great plasticity in dealing with environmental variations in temperature. However, no studies have been conducted at the transcriptomic level to determine heat stress-induced gene expression. In the present study, we conducted an RNA-Seq analysis to identify heat stress-induced genes in catfish at the transcriptome level. Expression analysis identified a total of 2,260 differentially expressed genes with a cutoff of twofold change. qRT-PCR validation suggested the high reliability of the RNA-Seq results. Gene ontology, enrichment, and pathway analyses were conducted to gain insight into physiological and gene pathways. Specifically, genes involved in oxygen transport, protein folding and degradation, and metabolic process were highly induced, while general protein synthesis was dramatically repressed in response to the lethal temperature stress. This is the first RNA-Seq-based expression study in catfish in response to heat stress. The candidate genes identified should be valuable for further targeted studies on heat tolerance, thereby assisting the development of heat-tolerant catfish lines for aquaculture.

  7. Cooling the intact loop of primary heat transport system using Shutdown Cooling System in case of LOCA events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icleanu Diana Laura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to model the operation of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS for CANDU 6 nuclear power plants in case of LOCA accidents, using Flowmaster calculation code, by delimiting models and setting calculation assumptions, input data for hydraulic analysis and input data for calculating thermal performance check for heat exchangers that are part of this system.

  8. Heat Transfer Processes for the Thermal Energy Balance of Organisms. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, R. D.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes heat transfer processes involved in the exchange of heat…

  9. Implementation of fully coupled heat and mass transport model to determine the behaviour of timber elements in fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pečenko, Robert; Huč, Sabina; Turk, Goran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present results of numerical analysis of timber beam exposed to fire. The numerical procedure is divided into two physically separated but closely related phases. In the first phase coupled problem of moisture and heat transfer over the timber beam is numerically solved using the...

  10. Thermal-gravitational modeling and scaling of two-phase heat transport systems from micro-gravity to super-gravity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delil, A. A. M.

    2001-02-01

    Earlier publications extensively describe NLR research on thermal-gravitational modeling and scaling of two-phase heat transport systems for spacecraft applications. These publications on mechanically and capillary pumped two-phase loops discuss pure geometric scaling, pure fluid to fluid scaling, and combined (hybrid) scaling of a prototype system by a model at the same gravity level, and of a prototype in micro-gravity environment by a scale-model on earth. More recent publications include the scaling aspects of prototype two-phase loops for Moon or Mars applications by scale-models on earth. Recent work, discussed here, concerns extension of thermal-gravitational scaling to super-g acceleration levels. This turned out to be necessary, since a very promising super-g application for (two-phase) heat transport systems will be cooling of high-power electronics in spinning satellites and in military combat aircraft. In such aircraft, the electronics can be exposed during maneuvres to transient accelerations up to 120 m/s2. The discussions focus on ``conventional'' (capillary) pumped two-phase loops. It can be considered as introduction to the accompanying article, which focuses on pulsating and oscillating devices. .

  11. Effective heat transport of Gulf Stream to subarctic North Atlantic during Miocene cooling: evidence from "Köppen signatures" of fossil plant assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Denk

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Shallowing of the Panama Sill and the closure of the Central American Seaway initiated the modern Loop Current/Gulf Stream circulation pattern during the Miocene but no direct evidence has yet been provided for effective heat transport to the northern North Atlantic during that time. Climatic signals from 11 precisely-dated plant-bearing sedimentary rock formations in Iceland, spanning 15–0.8 million years (Myr, resolve the impacts of the developing Miocene global thermohaline circulation on terrestrial vegetation in the subarctic North Atlantic region. "Köppen signatures" were implemented to express climatic properties of fossil plant taxa and their potential modern analogues using the principal concept of the generic Köppen–Geiger climate system, which is based on plant distribution patterns. Using Köppen signatures and the correlation between Köppen climate zones and major global vegetation zones, fossil assemblages were used to trace major vegetation shifts. This evidence was combined with evidence from tectonics and palaeoceanography. In contrast to the global climatic trend, the vegetation record reveals no cooling between ~ 15 and 12 Myr, whereas periods of climatic deterioration between 12–10 Myr, 8–4 Myr, and in the Pleistocene are in phase with increased pulses of ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere. The observed sequence of climate change in the northern North Atlantic can only be explained by an effective Gulf Stream-mediated heat transport from the middle Miocene onwards.

  12. Numerical Simulation Using Boundary Element Method of the Mechanism to Enhance Heat Transport by Solitary Wave on Falling Thin Liquid Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-QingLu

    1993-01-01

    A boundary element method has been developed for analysing heat transport phenomena in solitary wave on falling thin liquid films at high Reynolds numbers.The divergence theorem is applied to the non-linear convective volume integral of the boundary element formulation with the pressure penalty function.Consequently,velocity and temperature gradients are dliminated.and the complete formulation is written in terms of velocity and temperature,This provides considerable reduction is storage and computational requirements while improving accuracy.The non-linear equation systems of boundary element discretization are solved by the quasi-Nweton iterative scheme with Broyden's update.The streamline maps and the temperature distributions in solitary wave and wavy film flow have been obtained,and the variations of Nusselt numbers along the wall-liquid interface are also given.There are large cross-flow velocities and S-shape temperature distributions in the recirculating region of solitary wave.This special flow and thermal process can be a mechanism to enhance heat transport.

  13. How Irreversible Heat Transport Processes Drive Earth's Interdependent Thermal, Structural, and Chemical Evolution Providing a Strongly Heterogeneous, Layered Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Because magmatism conveys radioactive isotopes plus latent heat rapidly upwards while advecting heat, this process links and controls the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth. We present evidence that the lower mantle-upper mantle boundary is a profound chemical discontinuity, leading to observed heterogeneities in the outermost layers that can be directly sampled, and construct an alternative view of Earth's internal workings. Earth's beginning involved cooling via explosive outgassing of substantial ice (mainly CO) buried with dust during accretion. High carbon content is expected from Solar abundances and ice in comets. Reaction of CO with metal provided a carbide-rich core while converting MgSiO3 to olivine via oxidizing reactions. Because thermodynamic law (and buoyancy of hot particles) indicates that primordial heat from gravitational segregation is neither large nor carried downwards, whereas differentiation forced radioactive elements upwards, formation of the core and lower mantle greatly cooled the Earth. Reference conductive geotherms, calculated using accurate and new thermal diffusivity data, require that heat-producing elements are sequestered above 670 km which limits convection to the upper mantle. These irreversible beginnings limit secular cooling to radioactive wind-down, permiting deduction of Earth's inventory of heat-producing elements from today's heat flux. Coupling our estimate for heat producing elements with meteoritic data indicates that Earth's oxide content has been underestimated. Density sorting segregated a Si-rich, peridotitic upper mantle from a refractory, oxide lower mantle with high Ca, Al and Ti contents, consistent with diamond inclusion mineralogy. Early and rapid differentiation means that internal temperatures have long been buffered by freezing of the inner core, allowing survival of crust as old as ca.4 Ga. Magmatism remains important. Melt escaping though stress-induced fractures in the rigid lithosphere imparts a

  14. Reactive transport modelling of a heating and radiation experiment in the Boom clay (Belgium); Modelo de transporte reactivo de un experimento con calor y radiacion en la arcilla de Boom (Belgica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montenegro, L.; Samper, J.; Delgado, J.

    2003-07-01

    Most countries around the world consider Deep Geological Repositories (DGR) as the most safe option for the final disposal of high level radioactive waste (HLW). DGR is based on adopting a system of multiple barriers between the HLW and the biosphere. Underground laboratories provide information about the behaviour of these barriers at real conditions. Here we present a reactive transport model for the CERBERUS experiment performed at the HADES underground laboratory at Mol (Belgium) in order to characterize the thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H) and geochemical (G) behaviour of the Boon clay. This experiment is unique because it addresses the combined effect of heat and radiation produced by the storage of HLW in a DGR. Reactive transport models which are solved with CORE, are used to perform quantitative predictions of Boom clay thermo-hydro-geochemical (THG) behaviour. Numerical results indicate that heat and radiation cause a slight oxidation near of the radioactive source, pyrite dissolution, a pH decrease and slight changes in the pore water chemical composition of the Boom clay. (Author) 33 refs.

  15. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M. J.; Bég, O. Anwar; Amin, N.

    2014-11-01

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices.

  16. Hydromagnetic transport phenomena from a stretching or shrinking nonlinear nanomaterial sheet with Navier slip and convective heating: A model for bio-nano-materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M.J., E-mail: jashim_74@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, American International University-Bangladesh, Banani Dhaka 1213 (Bangladesh); Bég, O. Anwar [Gort Engovation Research (Propulsion/Biomechanics), Gabriel' s Wing House, 15 Southmere Ave., Bradford, BD7 3NU England (United Kingdom); Amin, N. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-11-15

    Steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic laminar free convective boundary layer slip flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid from a translating stretching/shrinking sheet in a quiescent fluid is studied. A convective heating boundary condition is incorporated. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and following the implementation of a linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg fourth fifth order method from Maple. Validation of the Maple solutions is achieved with previous non-magnetic published results. The effects of the emerging thermophysical parameters; namely, stretching/shrinking, velocity slip, magnetic field, convective heat transfer and buoyancy ratio parameters, on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration (nanoparticle fraction) are depicted graphically and interpreted at length. It is found that velocity increases whilst temperature and concentration reduce with the velocity slip. Magnetic field causes to reduce velocity and enhances temperature and concentration. Velocity, temperature as well as concentration rises with convective heating parameter. The study is relevant to the synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids of potential interest in wound treatments, skin repair and smart coatings for biological devices. - Highlights: • This paper analyses MHD slip flow of nofluid with convective boundary conditions. • Group method is used to transform governing equations into similarity equations. • The Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method is used for numerical computations. • The study is relevant to synthesis of bio-magnetic nanofluids.

  17. 野战低温储运箱散热设计%The Design of Heat Dissipation of the Field Low Temperature Box for Storage and Transportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏建仓; 孙建军; 吴坚

    2013-01-01

    野战低温储运箱的结构设计紧凑,由于压缩机、冷凝器、控制电路、电池及电源部分置于同一狭小空间内,故散热及风场设计对箱体的可靠性和稳定性至关重要.本文采用FLOEFD流体传热分析软件对箱体散热设计的3种方案进行了仿真分析,详细构建了各种方案的温度场分布,并通过实验验证了仿真结果的正确性.根据仿真分析的结果,采用了最佳的散热设计方案,采用此设计方案的箱体长期运行稳定可靠.%Because of the compact structure of the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, which is due to the same small space where the compressor, the condenser, the control circuit, the battery and the power supply device are all placed in, the design for heat dissipation and ventilation is of critical importance for the stability and reliability of the box. Several design schemes of the heat dissipation design of the box were simulated using the FLOEFD hot fluid analysis software in this study. Different distributions of the temperature field in every design scheme were constructed intimately in the present study. It is well concluded that according to the result of the simulation analysis, the optimal heat dissipation design is decent for the field low temperature box for storage and transportation, and the box can operate smoothly for a long time using the results of the design.

  18. A cytosolic relay of heat shock proteins HSP70-1A and HSP90β monitors the folding trajectory of the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kasaby, Ali; Koban, Florian; Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael; Sucic, Sonja

    2014-10-17

    Mutations in the C terminus of the serotonin transporter (SERT) disrupt folding and export from the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we examined the hypothesis that a cytosolic heat shock protein relay was recruited to the C terminus to assist folding of SERT. This conjecture was verified by the following observations. (i) The proximal portion of the SERT C terminus conforms to a canonical binding site for DnaK/heat shock protein of 70 kDa (HSP70). A peptide covering this segment stimulated ATPase activity of purified HSP70-1A. (ii) A GST fusion protein comprising the C terminus of SERT pulled down HSP70-1A. The interaction between HSP70-1A and SERT was visualized in live cells by Förster resonance energy transfer: it was restricted to endoplasmic reticulum-resident transporters and enhanced by an inhibitor that traps HSP70-1A in its closed state. (iv) Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed complex formation of SERT with HSP70-1A and HSP90β. Consistent with an HSP relay, co-chaperones (e.g. HSC70-HSP90-organizing protein) were co-immunoprecipitated with the stalled mutants SERT-R607A/I608A and SERT-P601A/G602A. (v) Depletion of HSP90β by siRNA or its inhibition increased the cell surface expression of wild type SERT and SERT-F604Q. In contrast, SERT-R607A/I608A and SERT-P601A/G602A were only rendered susceptible to inhibition of HSP70 and HSP90 by concomitant pharmacochaperoning with noribogaine. (vi) In JAR cells, inhibition of HSP90 also increased the levels of SERT, indicating that endogenously expressed transporter was also susceptible to control by HSP90β. These findings support the concept that the folding trajectory of SERT is sampled by a cytoplasmic chaperone relay.

  19. Optimisation of the hot conditioning of carbon steel surfaces of primary heat transport system of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran Kumar, M.; Gaonkar, Krishna; Ghosh, Swati; Kain, Vivekanand; Bojinov, Martin; Saario, Timo

    2010-06-01

    Hot conditioning operation of the primary heat transport system is an important step prior to the commissioning of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. One of the major objectives of the operation is to develop a stable and protective magnetite layer on the inner surfaces of carbon steel piping. The correlation between stable magnetite film growth on carbon steel surfaces and the period of exposure to hot conditioning environment is generally established by a combination of weight change measurements and microscopic/morphological observations of the specimens periodically removed during the operation. In the present study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at room temperature is demonstrated as an alternate, quantitative technique to arrive at an optimal duration of the exposure period. Specimens of carbon steel were exposed for 24, 35 and 48 h during hot conditioning of primary heat transport system of two Indian PHWRs. The composition and morphology of oxide films grown during exposure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Further, ex situ electrochemical impedance spectra of magnetite films formed after each exposure were measured, in 1 ppm Li + electrolyte at room temperature as a function of potential in a range of -0.8 to +0.3 VSCE. The defect density of the magnetite films formed after each exposure was estimated by Mott-Schottky analysis of capacitances extracted from the impedance spectra. Further the ionic resistance of the oxide was also extracted from the impedance spectra. Defect density was observed to decrease with increase in exposure time and to saturate after 35 h, indicating stabilisation of the barrier layer part of the magnetite film. The values of the ionic transport resistance start to increase after 35-40 h of exposure. The quantitative ability of EIS technique to assess the film quality demonstrates that it can be used as a supplementary tool to the thickness and morphological characterizations of samples

  20. Optimisation of the hot conditioning of carbon steel surfaces of primary heat transport system of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran Kumar, M., E-mail: mkiran@barc.gov.i [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Gaonkar, Krishna; Ghosh, Swati; Kain, Vivekanand [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bojinov, Martin [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Kl. Ohridski Blvd. 8, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Saario, Timo [VTT Materials and Building, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, Kemistintie 3, FIN-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-06-15

    Hot conditioning operation of the primary heat transport system is an important step prior to the commissioning of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. One of the major objectives of the operation is to develop a stable and protective magnetite layer on the inner surfaces of carbon steel piping. The correlation between stable magnetite film growth on carbon steel surfaces and the period of exposure to hot conditioning environment is generally established by a combination of weight change measurements and microscopic/morphological observations of the specimens periodically removed during the operation. In the present study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at room temperature is demonstrated as an alternate, quantitative technique to arrive at an optimal duration of the exposure period. Specimens of carbon steel were exposed for 24, 35 and 48 h during hot conditioning of primary heat transport system of two Indian PHWRs. The composition and morphology of oxide films grown during exposure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy. Further, ex situ electrochemical impedance spectra of magnetite films formed after each exposure were measured, in 1 ppm Li{sup +} electrolyte at room temperature as a function of potential in a range of