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Sample records for magnitude reversed electroosmotic

  1. Analysis of neutral surfactants by non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis using an electroosmotic flow reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbène, A M; Geulin, L; Morin, C J; Desbène, P L

    2005-03-11

    The separation of KM 20, that is in fact a mixture of non-ionic surfactants, was carried out by non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis. This complex mixture resulting from the condensation of ethylene oxide with fatty alcohols does not have chromophoric moieties. So, we analysed it after derivatization by means of 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl chloride. The proposed approach is based both on the formation of complexes with alkaline or ammonium cations in methanol and on the utilisation of a positively charged capillary. From a comparative study on the capillary treatment procedure, we used hexadimethrine bromide as electroosmotic flow reverser in order to obtain both repeatable analyses and good resolutions of the largest KM 20 oligomers. Then, among the five cations used to form complexes with KM 20, we pointed out that ammonium cation led to the best resolutions. Moreover, we evidenced that the counter-ion of this cation had a great influence on resolution because it modified the magnitude of electroosmotic flow. Ion pair formation that is more or less strong between ammonium and its counter-ion was involved in this variation of electroosmotic flow. So, we calculated the association constants for various ammonium salts in methanol. Then, using ammonium chloride as background electrolyte, we optimised the concentration of this salt, in methanol, in order to reach the optimal separation of KM 20 oligomers. Thus, a baseline separation was obtained by using 6 x 10(-2) mol/L NH4Cl as running electrolyte. In these conditions, we separated, in about 30 min, more than 30 oligomers of KM 20. The distribution of these oligomers that was determined from the optimal separation, appeared consistent with that obtained from HPLC analyses. Indeed, we determined that the mean ethoxylation number was equal to 18 while its real value is equal to 20.

  2. Systematic Underestimation of Earthquake Magnitudes from Large Intracontinental Reverse Faults: Historical Ruptures Break Across Segment Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, C. M.

    1996-01-01

    Because most large-magnitude earthquakes along reverse faults have such irregular and complicated rupture patterns, reverse-fault segments defined on the basis of geometry alone may not be very useful for estimating sizes of future seismic sources. Most modern large ruptures of historical earthquakes generated by intracontinental reverse faults have involved geometrically complex rupture patterns. Ruptures across surficial discontinuities and complexities such as stepovers and cross-faults are common. Specifically, segment boundaries defined on the basis of discontinuities in surficial fault traces, pronounced changes in the geomorphology along strike, or the intersection of active faults commonly have not proven to be major impediments to rupture. Assuming that the seismic rupture will initiate and terminate at adjacent major geometric irregularities will commonly lead to underestimation of magnitudes of future large earthquakes.

  3. Electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil, Dileep; Ende, van den Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We generate and study electroosmotic shear flow in microchannels. By chemically or electrically modifying the surface potential of the channel walls a shear flow component with controllable velocity gradient can be added to the electroosmotic flow caused by double layer effects at the channel walls.

  4. Equilibrium Electro-osmotic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Isaak

    2014-01-01

    Since its prediction fifteen years ago, electro-osmotic instability has been attributed to non-equilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current in the course of concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface. This attribution had a double basis. Firstly, it has been recognized that equilibrium electro-osmosis cannot yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. Secondly, it has been shown that non-equilibrium electro-osmosis can. First theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent numerical studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential in the solid) allows for equilibrium electro-osmotic instability. Moreover, we s...

  5. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  6. Analyses of gibberellins in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) water by partial filling-micellar electrokinetic chromatography-mass spectrometry with reversal of electroosmotic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liya; Yong, Jean Wan Hong; Tan, Swee Ngin; Hua, Lin; Ong, Eng Shi

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of simultaneous screening of eight gibberellins (GAs) in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) water by MEKC directly coupled to ESI-MS detection. During the development of MEKC-MS, partial filling (PF) was used to prevent the micelles from reaching the mass spectrometer as this is detrimental to the MS signal, and a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide, was added to the electrolyte to reverse the EOF. On the basis of the resolution of the neighboring peaks, different parameters (i.e., the pH and concentration of buffer, surfactant concentrations, length of the injected micellar plug, organic modifier, and applied separation voltage) were optimized to achieve a satisfactory PF-MEKC separation of eight GA standards. Under optimum conditions, a baseline separation of GA standards, including GA1, GA3, GA5, GA6, GA7, GA9, GA12, and GA13, was accomplished within 25 min. Satisfactory results were obtained in terms of precision (RSD of migration time below 0.9%), sensitivity (LODs in the range of 0.8-1.9 microM) and linearity (R2 between 0.981 and 0.997). MS/MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection was carried out to obtain sufficient selectivity. PF-MEKC-MS/MS allowed the direct identification and confirmation of the GAs presented in coconut water (CW) sample after SPE, while, the quantitative analysis of GAs was performed by PF-MEKC-MS approach. GA1 and GA3 were successfully detected and quantified in CW. It is anticipated that the current PF-MEKC-MS method can be applicable to analyze GAs in a wide range of biological samples.

  7. Electroosmotic flow rectification in conical nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Laohakunakorn, Nadanai

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental work has suggested that electroosmotic flows (EOF) through conical nanopores exhibit rectification in the opposite sense to the well-studied effect of ionic current rectification. A positive bias voltage generates large EOF and small current, while negative voltages generate small EOF and large current. Here we systematically investigate this effect using finite-element simulations. We find that inside the pore, the electric field and salt concentration are inversely correlated, which leads to the inverse relationship between the magnitudes of EOF and current. Rectification occurs when the pore is driven into states characterized by different salt concentrations depending on the sign of the voltage. The mechanism responsible for this behaviour is concentration polarization, which requires the pore to exhibit the properties of permselectivity and asymmetry.

  8. Electroosmotic flow rectification in conical nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohakunakorn, Nadanai; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2015-07-10

    Recent experimental work has suggested that electroosmotic flows (EOFs) through conical nanopores exhibit rectification in the opposite sense to the well-studied effect of ionic current rectification. A positive bias voltage generates large EOF and small current, while negative voltages generate small EOF and large current. Here we systematically investigate this effect using finite-element simulations. We find that inside the pore, the electric field and salt concentration are inversely correlated, which leads to the inverse relationship between the magnitudes of EOF and current. Rectification occurs when the pore is driven into states characterized by different salt concentrations depending on the sign of the voltage. The mechanism responsible for this behaviour is concentration polarization, which requires the pore to exhibit the properties of permselectivity and asymmetry.

  9. Electroosmotic mobilities of non-Newtonian fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Cunlu

    2010-01-01

    Owing to frequent processing of biofluids in Lab-on-a-chip microfluidic devices, electroosmotic mobilities of non-Newtonian fluids are investigated numerically. The general Cauchy momentum equation governing the electroosmotic velocity is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy-Chapman solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then the finite element method for solving the simplified version of Cauchy momentum equation is validated through comparisons with two exact solutions, i.e., Newtonian fluids and power-law fluids. Analyses shows that different from Newtonian fluids with a constant dimensionless electroosmotic mobility of unit one, dimensionless electroosmotic mobilities for non-Newtonian Carreau fluids are dependent on four dimensionless groups, such as dimensionless surface zeta potential , Weissenberg number Wi, fluid power-law exponent n and transitional parameter {\\beta}. It is found out that with increasing and decreasing of n and {\\beta}, electroosmotic ...

  10. Electroosmotic access resistance of a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sandip; Sherwood, John D.; Mao, Mao

    2014-11-01

    Electroosmotic flow through a nanopore that traverses a dielectric membrane with a fixed surface charge density is considered. In the limit where the surface charge is small and the applied electric field weak, the reciprocal theorem is used to derive an expression for the electroosmotic flux through the pore up to quadratures over the fluid volume. Thus, an ``electroosmotic conductance'' (the fluid flux per unit applied voltage) may be defined in analogy to the corresponding electrical conductance of a hole in an insulating membrane immersed in a uniform conductor. In the limit when the membrane is thick compared to the pore diameter, the usual result for the electroosmotic conductance through long cylindrical channels (which varies inversely as the membrane thickness) is recovered. The electroosmotic conductance is shown to approach a finite value for an infinitely thin membrane: this residual electroosmotic resistance (inverse of conductance) is analogous to the concept of ``access resistance of a pore'' in the corresponding electrical problem. The dependence of the electroosmotic conductance on pore radius, Debye length and membrane thickness is investigated. Reference: Supported by the NIH under Grant 4R01HG004842. SG acknowledges a visiting professorship at Cambridge University funded by the Leverhulme Trust, UK. JDS thanks DAMTP (Cambridge University) and Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse for hospitality.

  11. Magnitude of fluid movement and rates of cementation associated with reverse faults Examples from the Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, R. J.; Boles, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    Magnitude of vertical fluid movement and rates of quartz cementation were studied in three cored intervals where reverse faults cut the Eocene Misoa Fm in the Maracaibo basin, Venezuela. The faults are flower type structures, with slips up to 500 meters, generated by an Eocene inversion of Cretaceous-Paleocene normal displacements. The fault zones extend 2.5 meters away from the slip surface and are characterized by extensive quartz and chert precipitation associated with microfractures and cataclasis. Kinetic modeling of quartz precipitation suggests that the rates of microfracture annealing may have been initially up to 0.25 moles/C, lasting approximately 1 my after faulting started (37.5 mya) and subsequently decreasing during uplifting to less than 0.05 moles/C. Kinetic modeling suggests that quartz cementation along these reverse faults may have occurred in short periods of time and at approximately the same or lower rates than intervals away from faults. Minimum vertical distance of fluid flow along one fault zone was calculated with two different approaches. The first method divides the thermal gradient present during faulting (obtained through a thermal reconstruction of the area) by a difference between the host rock maximum burial temperature and fault cements temperatures (obtained from fluid inclusions). The second method integrates an average-weight function of the thermal gradient along the unknown depth. Both methods suggest that hot fluids, present during cementation, ascended a minimum of 450 to 800 meter along the fault zone.

  12. Electroosmotic Driving Liquid Using Nanosilica Packed Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Xin CHEN; Guo An LUO; Tao WEN

    2005-01-01

    The electroosmotic pump (EOP) using nanosilica particles packed-bed column was experimentally studied. The relationship between flowrate, pressure and applied voltage of the pump, and pressure-flowrate (P-Q) characteristic were investigated.

  13. Electroosmotic flow can generate ion current rectification in nano- and micropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusko, Erik C; An, Ran; Mayer, Michael

    2010-01-26

    This paper introduces a strategy for generating ion current rectification through nano- and micropores. This method generates ion current rectification by electroosmotic-driven flow of liquids of varying viscosity (and hence varying conductance) into or out of the narrowest constriction of a pore. The magnitude of current rectification was described by a rectification factor, R(f), which is defined by the ratio of the current measured at a positive voltage divided by the current measured at a negative voltage. This method achieved rectification factors in the range of 5-15 using pores with diameters ranging from 10 nm to 2.2 microm. These R(f) values are similar to the rectification factors reported in other nanopore-based methods that did not employ segmented surface charges. Interestingly, this work showed that in cylindrical nanopores with diameters of 10 nm and a length of at least 275 nm, electroosmotic flow was present and could generate ion current rectification. Unlike previous methods for generating ion current rectification that require nanopores with diameters comparable to the Debye length, this work demonstrated ion current rectification in micropores with diameters 500 times larger than the Debye length. Thus this method extends the concept of fluidic diodes to the micropore range. Several experiments designed to alter or remove electroosmotic flow through the pore demonstrated that electroosmotic flow was required for the mode of ion current rectification reported here. Consequently, the magnitude of current rectification could be used to indicate the presence of electroosmotic flow and the breakdown of electroosmotic flow with decreasing ionic strength and hence increasing electric double layer overlap inside nanopores.

  14. Electro-osmotic pumping of sodium chloride solutions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schoeman, JJ

    1997-08-20

    Full Text Available Electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) theory and its characteristics (transport numbers, brine concentration, current density, current efficiency, electro-osmotic coefficients, etc.) of Selemion AMV and CMV ion-exchange membranes were studied. The brine...

  15. Electroosmotically controllable multi-flow microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlheyer, D.; Besselink, G.A.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Schlautmann, Stefan; Unnikrishnan, S.; Schasfoort, Richardus B.M.

    2005-01-01

    An adjustable diffusion-based microfluidic reactor is presented here, which is based on electro-osmotic guiding of reagent samples. The device consists of a laminar flow chamber with two separate reagent inlets. The position and the width of the two sample streams in the flow chamber can be controll

  16. Electroosmotic dewatering of dredged sediments: bench-scale investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna R; Urbanek, Adam; Khodadoust, Amid P

    2006-01-01

    The Indiana Harbor (Indiana, USA) has not been dredged since 1972 due to lack of a suitable disposal site for dredged sediment. As a result of this, over a million cubic yards of highly contaminated sediment has accumulated in the harbor. Recently, the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has selected a site for the confined disposal facility (CDF) and is in the process of designing it. Although dredging can be accomplished rapidly, the disposal in the CDF has to be done slowly to allow adequate time for consolidation to occur. The sediment possesses very high moisture content and very low hydraulic conductivity, which cause consolidation to occur slowly. Consolidation of the sediment is essential in order to achieve adequate shear strength of sediments and also to provide enough air space to accommodate the large amount of sediment that requires disposal. Currently, it has been estimated that if a one 3-foot (0.9-m) thick layer of sediment was disposed of at the CDF annually, it would take approximately 10 years to dispose of all the sediment that is to be dredged from the Indiana Harbor. This study investigated the feasibility of using an electroosmotic dewatering technology to accelerate dewatering and consolidation of sediment, thereby allowing more rapid disposal of sediment into the CDF. Electroosmotic dewatering essentially involves applying a small electric potential across the sediment layer, thereby inducing rapid flow as a result of physico-chemical and electrochemical processes. A series of bench-scale electrokinetic experiments were conducted on actual dredged sediment samples from the Indiana Harbor to investigate dewatering rates caused by gravity alone, dewatering rates caused by gravity and electric potential, and the effects of the addition of polymer flocculants on dewatering of the sediments. The results showed that electroosmotic dewatering under an applied electric potential of 1.0VDC/cm could increase the rate of dewatering and

  17. There is more than "more is up": Hand and foot responses reverse the vertical association of number magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Matthias; Gashaj, Venera; Stahnke, Antje; Mast, Fred W

    2014-08-01

    Recent research in cognitive sciences shows a growing interest in spatial-numerical associations. The horizontal SNARC (spatial-numerical association of response codes) effect is defined by faster left-sided responses to small numbers and faster right-sided responses to large numbers in a parity judgment task. In this study we investigated whether there is also a SNARC effect for upper and lower responses. The grounded cognition approach suggests that the universal experience of "more is up" serves as a robust frame of reference for vertical number representation. In line with this view, lower hand responses to small numbers were faster than to large numbers (Experiment 1). Interestingly, the vertical SNARC effect reversed when the lower responses were given by foot instead of the hand (Experiments 2, 3, and 4). We found faster upper (hand) responses to small numbers and faster lower (foot) responses to large numbers. Additional experiments showed that spatial factors cannot account for the reversal of the vertical SNARC effect (Experiments 4 and 5). Our results question the view of "more is up" as a robust frame of reference for spatial-numerical associations. We discuss our results within a hierarchical framework of numerical cognition and point to a possible link between effectors and number representation.

  18. Effect of Electro-Osmotic Flow on Energy Conversion on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Seshadri, Gowrishankar

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that superhydrophobic surfaces, due to the presence of a no-shear zone, can greatly enhance transport of surface charges, leading to a considerable increase in the streaming potential. This could find potential use in micro-energy harvesting devices. In this paper, we show using analytical and numerical methods, that when a streaming potential is generated in such superhydrophobic geometries, the reverse electro-osmotic flow and hence current generated by this, is significant. A decrease in streaming potential compared to what was earlier predicted is expected. We also show that, due to the electro-osmotic streaming-current, a saturation in both the power extracted and efficiency of energy conversion is achieved in such systems for large values of the free surface charge densities. Nevertheless, under realistic conditions, such microstructured devices with superhydrophobic surfaces have the potential to even reach energy conversion efficiencies only achieved in nanostructured devices so ...

  19. Electroosmotic flow in single PDMS nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ran; Li, Dongqing

    2016-06-01

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity in single PDMS nanochannels with dimensions as small as 20 nm is investigated systematically by the current slope method in this paper. A novel method for the fabrication of single nanochannels on PDMS surfaces is developed. The effects of channel size, ionic concentration of the electrolyte solution and electric field on the EOF velocity in single nanochannels are investigated. The results show that the EOF velocity in smaller nanochannels with overlapped electric double layers (EDL) is proportional to the applied electric field but is smaller than the EOF velocity in microchannels under the same applied electric field. The EOF velocity in relatively large nanochannels without the overlap of EDLs is independent of the channel size and is the same as that in microchannels under the same applied electric field. Furthermore, in smaller nanochannels with overlapped EDLs, the EOF velocity depends on the ionic concentration and also on the channel size. The experimental results reported in this paper are valuable for the future studies of electrokinetic nanofluidics.The electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity in single PDMS nanochannels with dimensions as small as 20 nm is investigated systematically by the current slope method in this paper. A novel method for the fabrication of single nanochannels on PDMS surfaces is developed. The effects of channel size, ionic concentration of the electrolyte solution and electric field on the EOF velocity in single nanochannels are investigated. The results show that the EOF velocity in smaller nanochannels with overlapped electric double layers (EDL) is proportional to the applied electric field but is smaller than the EOF velocity in microchannels under the same applied electric field. The EOF velocity in relatively large nanochannels without the overlap of EDLs is independent of the channel size and is the same as that in microchannels under the same applied electric field. Furthermore, in

  20. Electroosmotic flow and injection: application to conductimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; Huber, C O

    1994-10-01

    Electroosmotic solution propulsion and sample injection using fused silica tube was investigated. Capillary tube dimensions were 50-100 microm i.d. by 4-7 cm length with a break in the capillary wall near one end through which electrolytic contact with the capillary solution was established. The applied field was typically 150 V/cm. The voltage at the break in the column was monitored by potentiometry with a bridge configuration. Concentrations ranging from 10 microM to 100 mM were accommodated. The basis for high sensitivity, e.g. 70 mV/microM, together with low cell volume, e.g. 20 nl, was established. Tap water conductivity measurements were made using CaCl(2) reference solution.

  1. Unified theory to evaluate the effect of concentration difference and Peclet number on electroosmotic mobility error of micro electroosmotic flow

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Wentao

    2012-03-01

    Both theoretical analysis and nonlinear 2D numerical simulations are used to study the concentration difference and Peclet number effect on the measurement error of electroosmotic mobility in microchannels. We propose a compact analytical model for this error as a function of normalized concentration difference and Peclet number in micro electroosmotic flow. The analytical predictions of the errors are consistent with the numerical simulations. © 2012 IEEE.

  2. Neotectonics and Paleoseismology of a Previously Unmapped Reverse Fault in Central Philippines―Insights from the Magnitude Mw 7.2 Bohol Earthquake of 15 October 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimando, J. M.; Aurelio, M.; Dianala, J. D. B.; Taguibao, K.

    2015-12-01

    The 2013 Mw 7.2 Bohol earthquake is considered, historically, the strongest to hit the island of Bohol. It is also very significant because it is associated with a previously unmapped fault and because there is a rarity in documented ground rupture associated with earthquakes generated by reverse faulting mechanism in the Philippines. The tentatively 6 km-long ground rupture, now known as the North Bohol Fault (NBF), is situated on the northern sector of the island. The NBF, which trends N40°-60°E and dips approximately 45°SE, is a reverse fault which is is aligned to the ENE-trending foothills in the municipalities of Inabanga and Buenavista, Bohol. The geometry and kinematics of the NBF was examined through documentation of fault trace patterns, analysis of along-strike variations in scarp morphologies and heights, and through observations of fault characteristics from natural exposures. Paleoseismic trenching in Inabanga reveals that at least three large-magnitude earthquakes occurred in the past ~12,000 years. The long return period seems to be consistent with the subtleness of the pre-existing morphotectonic features that are associated with the 2013 ground rupture. Transects constructed from onshore structural readings and analysis of offshore seismic reflection profiles reveal the structural setting of the island and the possible relation of pre-existing offshore fault-fold structures in the western portion of Bohol Island to the still-unmapped SW extent of the NBF. The long return period for earthquakes can be explained by accommodation of slip in the Visayan Sea Basin partially along NE-SW trending folds in Bohol. Several other possibilities are also discussed to explain why the earthquake return period could be even shorter than estimated. Lastly, this study emphasizes the importance of using a wide-array of methods in mapping of tectonic structures to the effective evaluation of seismic hazards in the region.

  3. Electroosmotic oscillatory flow of micropolar fluid in microchannels:application to dynamics of blood flow in microfluidic devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JC MISRA; S CHANDRA; GC SHIT; PK KUNDU

    2014-01-01

    The electroosmotic flow of a micropolar fluid in a microchannel bounded by two parallel porous plates undergoing periodic vibration is studied. The equations for conservation of linear and angular momentums and Gauss’s law of charge distribution are solved within the framework of the Debye-H¨uckel approximation. The fluid velocity and microrotation are assumed to depend linearly on the Reynolds number. The study shows that the amplitude of microrotation is highly sensitive to the changes in the magnitude of the suction velocity and the width of the microchannel. An increase in the micropolar parameter gives rise to a decrease in the amplitude of microrotation. Numerical estimates reveal that the microrotation of the suspended microelements in blood also plays an important role in controlling the electro-osmotically actuated flow dynamics in micro-bio-fluidic devices.

  4. Electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cunlu; Yang, Chun

    2011-03-23

    Electrokinetically driven microfluidic devices are usually used to analyze and process biofluids which can be classified as non-Newtonian fluids. Conventional electrokinetic theories resulting from Newtonian hydrodynamics then fail to describe the behaviors of these fluids. In this study, a theoretical analysis of electro-osmotic mobility of non-Newtonian fluids is reported. The general Cauchy momentum equation is simplified by incorporation of the Gouy-Chapman solution to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Carreau fluid constitutive model. Then a nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the electro-osmotic velocity of Carreau fluids is obtained and solved numerically. The effects of the Weissenberg number (Wi), the surface zeta potential (ψ¯s), the power-law exponent(n), and the transitional parameter (β) on electro-osmotic mobility are examined. It is shown that the results presented in this study for the electro-osmotic mobility of Carreau fluids are quite general so that the electro-osmotic mobility for the Newtonian fluids and the power-law fluids can be obtained as two limiting cases.

  5. Highly efficient electroosmotic flow through functionalized carbon nanotube membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ji; Gerstandt, Karen; Majumder, Mainak; Zhan, Xin; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2011-08-01

    Carbon nanotube membranes with inner diameter ranging from 1.5-7 nm were examined for enhanced electroosmotic flow. After functionalization via electrochemical diazonium grafting and carbodiimide coupling reaction, it was found that neutral caffeine molecules can be efficiently pumped via electroosmosis. An electroosmotic velocity as high as 0.16 cm s-1 V-1 has been observed. Power efficiencies were 25-110 fold improved compared to related nanoporous materials, which has important applications in chemical separations and compact medical devices. Nearly ideal electroosmotic flow was seen in the case where the mobile cation diameter nearly matched the inner diameter of the single-walled carbon nanotube resulting in a condition of using one ion is to pump one neutral molecule at equivalent concentrations.

  6. Electro-osmotic transport in wet processing of textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Electro-osmotic (or electrokinetic) transport is used to efficiently force a solution (or water) through the interior of the fibers or yarns of textile materials for wet processing of textiles. The textile material is passed between electrodes that apply an electric field across the fabric. Used alone or in parallel with conventional hydraulic washing (forced convection), electro-osmotic transport greatly reduces the amount of water used in wet processing. The amount of water required to achieve a fixed level of rinsing of tint can be reduced, for example, to 1-5 lbs water per pound of fabric from an industry benchmark of 20 lbs water/lb fabric.

  7. Electro-osmotically controllable multi-flow microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Besselink, Geert A.J.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Schlautmann, Stefan; Unnikrishnan, Sandeep; Schasfoort, Richard B.M.

    2005-01-01

    An adjustable diffusion-based microfluidic reactor is presented here, which is based on electro-osmotic guiding of reagent samples. The device consists of a laminar flow chamber with two separate reagent inlets. The position and the width of the two sample streams in the flow chamber can be controll

  8. Numerical Simulation of Electroosmotic Flow near Earthworm Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Q. Zu; Y.Y. Yan

    2006-01-01

    The electroosmotic flow near an earthworm surface is simulated numerically to further understand the anti soil adhesion mechanism of earthworm. A lattice Poisson method is employed to solve electric potential and charge distributions in the electric double layer along the earthworm surface. The external electric field is obtained by solving a Laplace equation. The electroosmotic flow controlled by the Navier-Stokes equations with external body force is simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method. A benchmark test shows that accurate electric potential distributions can be obtained by the LPM. The simulation shows that the moving vortices,which probably contribute to anti soil adhesion,are fonned near earthworm body surface by the nonuniform and variational electrical force.

  9. Intravesical electro-osmotic administration of mitomycin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stasi, Savino M; Verri, Cristian; Celestino, Francesco; De Carlo, Francesco; Pagliarulo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-04

    Bladder cancer is very common and most cases are diagnosed as nonmuscle invasive disease, which is characterized by its propensity to recur and progress. Intravesical therapy is used to delay recurrence and progression, while cystectomy is reserved for patients who are refractory to transurethral resection and intravesical therapy. There is an increasing interest in methods to enhance the delivery of intravesical chemotherapeutic agents to improve efficacy. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that electro-osmosis of mitomycin C (MMC) is more effective in delivering this drug into the urothelium, lamina propria, and superficial muscle layers of the bladder wall than is passive transport. Higher MMC tissue concentrations might have a clinical impact in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). In randomized trials, intravesical electro-osmotic MMC was associated with superior response rate in high-risk NMIBC cancer, compared with passive diffusion MMC transport. New strategies such as intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) combined with electro-osmotic MMC as well as intravesical pre-operative electro-osmotic MMC provided promising results in terms of higher remission rates and longer remission times.Device-assisted intravesical chemotherapy may be a useful ancillary procedure in the treatment of NMIBC. Its evaluation must be planned with respect to the technical functioning of equipment and their use for a clear purpose to avoid the financial and human costs associated with incorrect therapies.

  10. Proton and hydride affinities in excited states: magnitude reversals in proton and hydride affinities between the lowest singlet and triplet states of annulenyl and benzannulenyl anions and cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Martin; Ottosson, Henrik; Kilså, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Aromaticity has importance for proton and hydride affinities in the singlet ground state (S(0)) of annulenyl anions and cations so that, e.g., cyclopentadiene is an acidic hydrocarbon. For the lowest pipi* excited triplet state (T(1)), Baird's rule concludes that annulenes with 4n pi-electrons ar......Aromaticity has importance for proton and hydride affinities in the singlet ground state (S(0)) of annulenyl anions and cations so that, e.g., cyclopentadiene is an acidic hydrocarbon. For the lowest pipi* excited triplet state (T(1)), Baird's rule concludes that annulenes with 4n pi......-electrons are aromatic and those with 4n+2 pi-electrons are antiaromatic, opposite to Huckel's rule for aromaticity in S(0). Our hypothesis is now that the relative magnitudes of proton and hydride affinities of annulenyl anions and cations reverts systematically as one goes from S(0) to T(1) as a result of the opposite...... electron counting rules for aromaticity in the two states. Using quantum chemical calculations at the G3(MP2)//(U)B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level we have examined the validity of this hypothesis for eight proton and eight hydride addition reactions of anions and cations, respectively, of annulenyl...

  11. Centrifugal forces within usually-used magnitude elicited a transitory and reversible change in proliferation and gene expression of osteoblastic cells UMR-106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Jiang, Lingyong; Liao, Ga; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Songjiao; Zhao, Zhihe

    2009-02-01

    Centrifugation is an important step in biochemical and molecular biological researches. But the effects of centrifugal stress on cells are still unclear. In this study, osteoblastic cells UMR-106 were subjected to a moderate centrifugal stress at 209 x g for 10 min. Then the cell proliferation and gene transcription after centrifugation were analyzed with flow cytometry and Real-time RT-PCR techniques, respectively. The result showed that the cell proliferation and mRNA expression of Runx2/Cbfa1, Collagen I and osteocalcin changed shortly after centrifugal loading, but recovered to pre-load levels within 24 h. A dose-response study of exposure cells to centrifugal force at 209, 253 and 301 x g showed that the centrifugal forces within usually-used range can rapidly influenced the mRNA expression of the osteoblast-specific genes, but no statistical differences were found among the three centrifugal magnitudes. And the fast regulation in the investigated genes was proved to be related to increased c-fos mRNA levels and subsequent activation of RTK and integrity of cytoskeleton construction. The result showed that the osteoblastic cells displayed a fast auto-regulation to usually-used centrifugal stress through multiple signal pathways.

  12. AC electro-osmotic mixing induced by non-contact external electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Lee, Chia-Yu; Yu, Chun-Ching; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2006-10-15

    We demonstrate efficient mixing in a micro-fluidic reservoir smaller than 10 microL using ac electro-osmosis driven by field-induced polarization. Our mixing device, of that electrodes are outside of the mixing unit, consists of three circular reservoirs (3mm in diameter) connected by a 1 mm x 1 mm channel. Unlike dc electro-osmosis, whose polarization is from charged substrate functional groups, this new mechanism uses the external field to capacitively charge the surface and the surface capacitance becomes the key factor in the electrokinetic mobility. The charging and mixing are enhanced at tailor-designed channel corners by exploiting the high normal fields at geometric singularities. The induced surface dielectric polarization and the resulting electric counter-ion double layer produce an effective Zeta potential in excess of 1 V, over one order of magnitude larger than the channel Zeta potential. The resulting ac electro-osmotic slip velocity scales quadratically with respect to the applied field, in contrast to the linear scaling of dc electro-osmosis and at 1cm/s and larger, exceeds the classical dc values by two orders of magnitude. The polarization is non-uniform at the corners due to field leakage to the dielectric substrate and the inhomogeneous slip velocity produces intense mixing vortices that effectively homogenize solutes in 30s in a 3mm reservoir, in contrast to hour-long mixing by pure diffusion.

  13. Electro-convective versus electroosmotic instability in concentration polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2007-10-31

    Electro-convection is reviewed as a mechanism of mixing in the diffusion layer of a strong electrolyte adjacent to a charge-selective solid, such as an ion exchange (electrodialysis) membrane or an electrode. Two types of electro-convection in strong electrolytes may be distinguished: bulk electro-convection, due to the action of the electric field upon the residual space charge of a quasi-electro-neutral bulk solution, and convection induced by electroosmotic slip, due to electric forces acting in the thin electric double layer of either quasi-equilibrium or non-equilibrium type near the solid/liquid interface. According to recent studies, the latter appears to be the likely source of mixing in the diffusion layer, leading to 'over-limiting' conductance in electrodialysis. Electro-convection near a planar uniform charge selective solid/liquid interface sets on as a result of hydrodynamic instability of one-dimensional steady state electric conduction through such an interface. We compare the results of linear stability analysis obtained for instabilities of this kind appearing in the full electro-convective and limiting non-equilibrium electroosmotic formulations. The short- and long-wave aspects of these instabilities are discussed along with the wave number selection principles.

  14. Debye-H¨uckel solution for steady electro-osmotic flow of micropolar fluid in cylindrical microcapillary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. A. SIDDIQUI; A. LAKHTAKIA

    2013-01-01

    Analytic expressions for speed, flux, microrotation, stress, and couple stress in a micropolar fluid exhibiting a steady, symmetric, and one-dimensional electro-osmotic flow in a uniform cylindrical microcapillary were derived under the constraint of the Debye-H¨uckel approximation, which is applicable when the cross-sectional radius of the microcapillary exceeds the Debye length, provided that the zeta potential is sufficiently small in magnitude. Since the aciculate particles in a micropolar fluid can rotate without translation, micropolarity affects the fluid speed, fluid flux, and one of the two non-zero components of the stress tensor. The axial speed in a micropolar fluid intensifies when the radius increases. The stress tensor is confined to the region near the wall of the mi-crocapillary, while the couple stress tensor is uniform across the cross-section.

  15. Novel elution strategy for monitoring DNA counter-migration in the presence of electroosmotic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabzdyr, Jennifer L; Lillard, Sheri J

    2004-06-25

    The migration behavior of native (i.e., unlabelled) DNA in the presence of electroosmotic flow (EOF) was investigated in bare fused-silica capillaries. Employing a novel elution strategy, the influence of EOF on the net mobility of DNA was assessed by collecting the DNA that migrated anodically (i.e., against EOF) and out of the capillary inlet. Various conditions of pH and buffer-zone continuity were employed to characterize this phenomenon. Tris acid (TA, pH 5.14) and Tris base (TB, pH 9.36) were used as buffers in continuous systems, in which the capillary and the inlet reservoir contain the same buffer, and discontinuous systems, in which the capillary contains either TA or TB, and the inlet reservoir contains water. DNA that was ejected into the inlet vial was subsequently analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence. Both phiX174/HaeIII DNA and the beta-actin product of single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction were used as DNA samples in this study. The mechanism of elution was found to depend on bulk flow, in the case of continuous solutions. However, with the discontinuous system, a localized decrease in EOF generated in the capillary tip appeared to impact elution. These findings serve to introduce an alternative approach for characterizing the mobility of highly charged species.

  16. Mesoscopic Simulations of Electroosmotic Flow and Electrophoresis in Nanochannels

    CERN Document Server

    Smiatek, Jens

    2012-01-01

    We review recent dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of electrolyte flow in nanochannels. A method is presented by which the slip length $delta_B$ at the channel boundaries can be tuned systematically from negative to infinity by introducing suitably adjusted wall-fluid friction forces. Using this method, we study electroosmotic flow (EOF) in nanochannels for varying surface slip conditions and fluids of different ionic strength. Analytic expressions for the flow profiles are derived from the Stokes equation, which are in good agreement with the numerical results. Finally, we investigate the influence of EOF on the effective mobility of polyelectrolytes in nanochannels. The relevant quantity characterizing the effect of slippage is found to be the dimensionless quantity $\\kappa \\delta_B$, where $1/\\kappa$ is an effective electrostatic screening length at the channel boundaries.

  17. Numerical simulation of electroosmotic flow in hydrophobic microchannels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow(EOF) is a promising way for driving and mixing fluids in microfluidics.For the parallel-plate microchannel with the hydrophobic surface, this paper solved the governing equations using the finite element method(FEM), and the effects of microchannel height, electric strength and ionic concentration on EOF were thus investigated.The simulation indicates that the transient characteristics of EOF are similar in hydrophobic and hydrophilic microchannels, the steady time of EOF is proportional to the square of microchannel height, and the scale is microsecond.EOF velocity is proportional to the electric strength and independent of the channel height, and decreases slowly with the ionic concentration, which is lower than that in hydrophilic microchannel due to the presence of slip length in hydrophobic microchannel.The results can provide valuable insights into the optimal design of microchannel surfaces to achieve accurate EOF control in hydrophobic microchannel.

  18. Numerical simulation of electroosmotic flow in hydrophobic microchannels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG DaYong; LIU Ying

    2009-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow(EOF)is a promising way for driving and mixing fluids in microfluidics.For the parallel-plate microchannel with the hydrophobic surface,this paper solved the governing equations using the finite element method(FEM),and the effects of microchannel height,electric strength and ionic concentration on EOF were thus investigated.The simulation indicates that the transient characteristics of EOF are similar in hydrophobic and hydrophilic microchannels,the steady time of EOF is proportional to the square of microchannel height,and the scale is microsecond.EOF velocity is proportional to the electric strength and independent of the channel height,and decreases slowly with the ionic concentration,which is lower than that in hydrophilic rnicrochannel due to the presence of slip length in hydrophobic microchannel.The results can provide valuable insights into the optimal design of microchannel surfaces to achieve accurate EOF control in hydrophobic microchannel.

  19. Fabrication of a Miniature Paper-Based Electroosmotic Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Sritharan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A voltage-controlled hydraulic actuator is presented that employs electroosmotic fluid flow (EOF in paper microchannels within an elastomeric structure. The microfluidic device was fabricated using a new benchtop lamination process. Flexible embedded electrodes were formed from a conductive carbon-silicone composite. The pores in the layer of paper placed between the electrodes served as the microchannels for EOF, and the pumping fluid was propylene carbonate. A sealed fluid-filled chamber was formed by film-casting silicone to lay an actuating membrane over the pumping liquid. Hydraulic force generated by EOF caused the membrane to bulge by hundreds of micrometers within fractions of a second. Potential applications of these actuators include soft robots and biomedical devices.

  20. Electroosmotically enabled Electrorheological Effects in a Planar Nematic Crystal Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Study of electrokinetics of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) with dissolved impurities hold utmost importance in understanding director distribution characteristics and modified flow rheology. However, no concrete theory for the non-uniform potential and ionic species distribution, due to an induced electrical double layer (EDL) at the LC-substrate interface, derived from fundamental principles have been put forward in this regard. In this work, we have developed coupled governing equations from fundamental free energy considerations for the potential distribution and the director configuration of the nematic LC within the induced electrical double layer which is generated due to certain physico-chemical interactions at the LC-substrate interface. With these considerations, an electroosmotically-enabled nematodynamics for a particular LC, namely, MBBA, with strong planar anchoring at the boundaries is studied. We obtained multiple solution for director configuration, which is an integral characteristics of nemat...

  1. Electroosmotic Flow in Mixed Polymer Brush-Grafted Nanochannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Cao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed polymer brush-grafted nanochannels—where two distinct species of polymers are alternately grafted on the inner surface of nanochannels—are an interesting class of nanostructured hybrid materials. By using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation method, we are able to simulate the electrokinetic transport dynamics of the fluid in such nanochannels as well as the conformational behaviors of the mixed polymer brush. We find that (1 the brush adopts vertically-layered and longitudinally-separated structures due to the coupling of electroosmotic flow (EOF and applied electric field; (2 the solvent quality affects the brush conformations and the transport properties of the EOF; (3 the EOF flux non-monotonically depends on the grafting density, although the EOF velocity in the central region of the channel monotonically depends on the grafting density.

  2. Multi-scale simulation method for electroosmotic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-10-01

    Electroosmotic transport in micro-and nano- channels has important applications in biological and engineering systems but is difficult to model because nanoscale structure near surfaces impacts flow throughout the channel. We develop an efficient multi-scale simulation method that treats near-wall and bulk subdomains with different physical descriptions and couples them through a finite overlap region. Molecular dynamics is used in the near-wall subdomain where the ion density is inconsistent with continuum models and the discrete structure of solvent molecules is important. In the bulk region the solvent is treated as a continuum fluid described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with thermal fluctuations. A discrete description of ions is retained because of the low density of ions and the long range of electrostatic interactions. A stochastic Euler-Lagrangian method is used to simulate the dynamics of these ions in the implicit continuum solvent. The overlap region allows free exchange of solvent and ions between the two subdomains. The hybrid approach is validated against full molecular dynamics simulations for different geometries and types of flows.

  3. Analytical and numerical study of the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrás, L L; Afonso, A M; Alves, M A; Nóbrega, J M; Pinho, F T

    2014-04-15

    In this work we present semi-analytical solutions for the electro-osmotic annular flow of viscoelastic fluids modeled by the Linear and Exponential PTT models. The viscoelastic fluid flows in the axial direction between two concentric cylinders under the combined influences of electrokinetic and pressure forcings. The analysis invokes the Debye-Hückel approximation and includes the limit case of pure electro-osmotic flow. The solution is valid for both no slip and slip velocity at the walls and the chosen slip boundary condition is the linear Navier slip velocity model. The combined effects of fluid rheology, electro-osmotic and pressure gradient forcings on the fluid velocity distribution are also discussed.

  4. A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION INTO ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS WITH COMPLEX WAVY SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Her-Terng Yau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the flow characteristics of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with complex wavy surfaces. A general method of coordinate transformation is used to solve the governing equations describing the electroosmotic flow in the microchannel. Numerical simulations are performed to analyze the effects of wave amplitude on the electrical field, flow streamlines, and flow fields in the microchannel. The simulation results show that, compared to a traditional pressure-driven flow, flow recirculation is not developed in the electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with complex wavy surfaces. The simulations also show that the electrical field and velocity profiles change along the channel in the region of wavy surfaces. Non-flat velocity profiles are observed in different cross-sections of the channel in the region of wavy surfaces.

  5. Analytical Solutions of Time Periodic Electroosmotic Flow in a Semicircular Microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The time periodic electroosmotic flow of Newtonian fluids through a semicircular microchannel is studied under the Debye–Hückel approximation. Analytical series of solutions are found, and they consist of a time-dependent oscillating part and a time-dependent generating or transient part. Some new physical phenomena are found. The electroosmotic flow driven by an alternating electric field is not periodic in time, but quasi-periodic. There is a phase shift between voltage and flow, which is only dependent on the frequency of external electric field.

  6. Modulating Electro-osmotic Flow with Polymer Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Owen A.

    Micro- and nano-fluidic devices represent an exciting field with a wide range of possible applications. These devices, typically made of either silica or glass, ionize when placed in contact with water. Upon the application of an electric field parallel to the wall, a flow is produced by the charged walls called the electro-osmotic flow (EOF). Since electric fields are so often used as the driving force in these devices, EOF is an extremely common phenomenon. For this reason it is highly desirable to be able to control EOF in order to optimize the functioning of these devices. One method which is quite common experimentally is the modification of the surface using polymer coatings. These coatings can be either adsorbed or grafted, and charged or neutral. The first part of this thesis looks at the role of neutral adsorbed polymer coatings for the modulation of EOF. Specifically our simulation results show that for adsorbed coatings made from a dilute polymer solution the strongest quenching of EOF is found for an adsorption strength at the phase transition for adsorption of the polymers. Further evidence is presented that shows that by using a high density of polymer solution and a polymer which has a strong attraction to the surface a very thick polymer layer can be created. Next the case of charged grafted polymer coatings is examined. The variation of the EOF with respect to several key parameters which characterize the polymer coating is investigated and compared to theory. The prediction that the electrophoretic velocity of the polymers is the same as the EOF generated by a coating made up of the same polymers is found to be false though the two values are quite close. The last section presents results which show how hydrodynamic interactions in charged polymer systems can be modeled mesoscopically without the use of explicit charges by forcing a slip between monomers and the surrounding fluid. This model is validated by simulating some surprising predictions

  7. Topology and shape optimization of induced-charge electro-osmotic micropumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Okkels, Fridolin; Bazant, M. Z.;

    2009-01-01

    For a dielectric solid surrounded by an electrolyte and positioned inside an externally biased parallel-plate capacitor, we study numerically how the resulting induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flow depends on the topology and shape of the dielectric solid. In particular, we extend existing...

  8. Low voltage electroosmotic pump for high density integration into microfabricated fluidic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuck, F.C.A.; Staufer, U.

    2011-01-01

    A low voltage electroosmotic (eo) pump suitable for high density integration into microfabricated fluidic systems has been developed. The high density integration of the eo pump required a small footprint as well as a specific on-chip design to ventilate the electrolyzed gases emerging at the platin

  9. Effects of surface roughness and electrokinetic heterogeneity on electroosmotic flow in microchannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masilamani, Kannan; Ganguly, Suvankar; Feichtinger, Christian; Bartuschat, Dominik; Rüde, Ulrich, E-mail: suva_112@yahoo.co.in [Department of Computer Science 10 University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr.11 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and finite-difference (LB-FD) model is applied to simulate the effects of three-dimensional surface roughness and electrokinetic heterogeneity on electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a microchannel. The lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method has been employed to obtain the flow field and a finite-difference (FD) method is used to solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for the electrostatic potential distribution. Numerical simulation of flow through a square cross-section microchannel with designed roughness is conducted and the results are critically analysed. The effects of surface heterogeneity on the electroosmotic transport are investigated for different roughness height, width, roughness interval spacing, and roughness surface potential. Numerical simulations reveal that the presence of surface roughness changes the nature of electroosmotic transport through the microchannel. It is found that the electroosmotic velocity decreases with the increase in roughness height and the velocity profile becomes asymmetric. For the same height of the roughness elements, the EOF velocity rises with the increase in roughness width. For the heterogeneously charged rough channel, the velocity profile shows a distinct deviation from the conventional plug-like flow pattern. The simulation results also indicate locally induced flow vortices which can be utilized to enhance the flow and mixing within the microchannel. The present study has important implications towards electrokinetic flow control in the microchannel, and can provide an efficient way to design a microfluidic system of practical interest. (paper)

  10. Evaluation of electroosmotic drag coefficient of water in hydrated sodium perfluorosulfonate electrolyte polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liuming; Shao, Changle; Ji, Xiaobo

    2009-07-15

    The electroosmotic drag coefficient of water molecules in hydrated sodium perfluorosulfonate electrolyte polymer is evaluated on the basis of the velocity distribution functions of the sodium cations and water molecules with an electric field applied using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results indicate that both velocity distribution functions of water molecules and of sodium cations agree well with the classic Maxwellian velocity distribution functions when there is no electric field applied. If an electric field is applied, the distribution functions of velocity component in directions perpendicular to the applied electric field still agree with the Maxwellian velocity distribution functions but with different temperature parameters. In the direction of the applied electric field, the electric drag causes the velocity distribution function to deviate from the Maxwellian velocity distribution function; however, to obey the peak shifted Maxwellian distribution function. The peak shifting velocities coincide with the average transport velocities induced by the electric field, and could be applied to the evaluation of the electroosmotic drag coefficient of water. By evaluation of the transport velocities of water molecules in the first coordination shells of sodium cations, sulfonate anion groups, and in the bulk, it is clearly shown that the water molecules in the first coordination shell of sodium cations are the major contribution to the electroosmotic drag and momentum transfer from water molecules within the first coordination shell to the other water molecules also contributes to the electroosmotic drag.

  11. Feasibility of electro-osmotic belt filter dewatering technology at pilot scale

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Snyman, HG

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available -effective dewatering technologies, electro-osmotic belt filtering was developed by Smollen and Kafaar in 1995. The mechanical equipment resembles a belt filter press but the belts are stainless steel, woven belts, which act as the electrodes. In this study...

  12. Teleseismic magnitude relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Båth

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Using available sets of magnitude determinations, primarily from Uppsala seismological bulletin, various extensions are made of the Zurich magnitude recommendations of 1967. Thus, body-wave magnitude (m and surface-wave magnitudes (M are related to each other for 12 different earthquake regions as well as world-wide. Depth corrections for M are derived for all focal depths. Formulas are developed which permit calculation of M also from vertical component long-period seismographs. Body-wave magnitudes from broad-band and narrow-band short-period seismographs are compared and relations deduced. Applications are made both to underground nuclear explosions and to earthquakes. The possibilities of explosion-earthquake discrimination on the basis of magnitudes are examined, as well as the determination of explosive yield from magnitudes. For earthquakes, relations between magnitudes of main earthquakes and largest aftershocks are investigated. A world-wide station network for more homogeneous magnitude determinations is suggested in order to provide the necessary reference system.

  13. Concentration gradient focusing and separation in a silica nanofluidic channel with a non-uniform electroosmotic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Harvie, Dalton J E; Davidson, Malcolm R; Jeong, Helen; Goldys, Ewa M; Inglis, David W

    2014-09-21

    The simultaneous concentration gradient focusing and separation of proteins in a silica nanofluidic channel of various geometries is investigated experimentally and theoretically. Previous modelling of a similar device [Inglis et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2011, 50, 7546] assumed a uniform velocity profile along the length of the nanochannel. Using detailed numerical analysis incorporating charge regulation and viscoelectric effects, we show that in reality the varying axial electric field and varying electric double layer thickness caused by the concentration gradient, induce a highly non-uniform velocity profile, fundamentally altering the protein trapping mechanism: the direction of the local electroosmotic flow reverses and two local vortices are formed near the centreline of the nanochannel at the low salt concentration end, enhancing trapping efficiency. Simulation results for yellow/red fluorescent protein R-PE concentration enhancement, peak focusing position and peak focusing width are in good agreement with experimental measurements, validating the model. The predicted separation of yellow/red (R-PE) from green (Dyl-Strep) fluorescent proteins mimics that from a previous experiment [Inglis et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2011, 50, 7546] conducted in a slightly different geometry. The results will inform the design of new class of matrix-free particle focusing and separation devices.

  14. Experimental Verification of Overlimiting Current by Surface Conduction and Electro-osmotic Flow in Microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, Sungmin; Heo, Joonseong; Lim, Geunbae; Bazant, Martin Z; Sung, Gunyong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2014-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of overlimiting current in unsupported electrolytes, exceeding diffusion limitation, have been intensely studied for their fundamental significance and applications to desalination, separations, sensing, and energy storage. In bulk membrane systems, the primary physical mechanism is electro-convection, driven by electro-osmotic instability on the membrane surface. It has recently been predicted that confinement by charged surfaces in microchannels or porous media favors two new mechanisms, electro-osmotic flow (EOF) and surface conduction (SC), driven by large electric fields in the depleted region acting on the electric double layers on the sidewalls. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for the transition from SC to EOF above a critical channel height, using in situ particle tracking and current-voltage measurements in a micro/nanofluidic device. The dependence of the over-limiting conductance on channel depth (d) is consistent with theoretical predictions, scaling as d^-1 for SC a...

  15. Theoretical prediction of stationary positions in the rectangular chamber during asymmetric electroosmotic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Most microscopic cell electrophoretic work depends on the theortical prediction of stationary positions by Smoluchowski and Komagata. Their theoretical solutions are based on the assumption that the electroosmotic flow in a chamber is symmetric. Because experiences with the rectangular chamber indicate that symmetric flow occurs during less than 8% of the experiments, the existing theory for stationary position determination is expanded to include the more general case of asymmetric flow. Smoluchowski's equation for symmetric electroosmotic flow in a rectangular chamber having a width much smaller than its height or length is examined. Smoluchowski's approach is used to approximate stationary positions in rectangular chambers with height/width ratios greater than 40. Support for the theoretical prediction of stationary positions using is given by three types of experimental evidence.

  16. Particle Dynamics and Rapid Trapping in Electro-Osmotic Flow Around a Sharp Microchannel Corner

    CERN Document Server

    Zehavi, Matan

    2014-01-01

    We study here the curious particle dynamics resulting from electro-osmotic flow around a microchannel junction corner whose dielectric walls are weakly polarizable. The hydrodynamic velocity field is obtained via superposition of a linear irrotational term associated with the equilibrium zeta potentials of both the microchannel and particle surfaces and the non-linear induced-charge electro-osmotic flow which originates from the interaction of the externally applied electric field on the charge cloud it induces at the solid-liquid interface. The particle dynamics are analyzed by considering dielectrophoretic forces via the addition of a mobility term to the flow field in the limit of Stokes drag law. The former, non-divergence free term is responsible for migration of particles towards the sharp microchannel junction corner, where they can potentially accumulate. Experimental observations of particle trapping for various applied electric fields and microparticle size are rationalized in terms of the growing r...

  17. Adjoint-consistent formulations of slip models for coupled electroosmotic flow systems

    KAUST Repository

    Garg, Vikram V

    2014-09-27

    Background Models based on the Helmholtz `slip\\' approximation are often used for the simulation of electroosmotic flows. The objectives of this paper are to construct adjoint-consistent formulations of such models, and to develop adjoint-based numerical tools for adaptive mesh refinement and parameter sensitivity analysis. Methods We show that the direct formulation of the `slip\\' model is adjoint inconsistent, and leads to an ill-posed adjoint problem. We propose a modified formulation of the coupled `slip\\' model, which is shown to be well-posed, and therefore automatically adjoint-consistent. Results Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the computation and use of the adjoint solution in two-dimensional microfluidics problems. Conclusions An adjoint-consistent formulation for Helmholtz `slip\\' models of electroosmotic flows has been proposed. This formulation provides adjoint solutions that can be reliably used for mesh refinement and sensitivity analysis.

  18. Effect of heat transfer on rotating electroosmotic flow through a micro-vessel: haemodynamical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, A.; Mondal, A.; Shit, G. C.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes the heat transfer characteristics associated with electroosmotic flow of blood through a micro-vessel having permeable walls. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equations are assumed to represent the flow field in a rotating system. The velocity slip condition at the vessel walls is taken into account. The essential features of the rotating electroosmotic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through a micro-vessel are clearly highlighted by the variation in the non-dimensional flow velocity, volumetric flow rate and non-dimensional temperature profiles. Moreover, the effect of Joule heating parameter and Prandtl number on the thermal transport characteristics are discussed thoroughly. The study reveals that the flow of blood is appreciably influenced by the elctroosmotic parameter as well as rotating Reynolds number.

  19. Measuring microchannel electroosmotic mobility and zeta potential by the current monitoring method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chenren; Devoe, Don L

    2013-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) is an electrokinetic flow control technique widely used in microfluidic systems for applications including direct electrokinetic pumping, hydrodynamic pressure generation, and counterflow for microfluidic separations. During EOF, an electric field is applied along the length of a microchannel containing an electrolyte, with mobile ions near the charged microchannel walls experiencing a Coulomb force due to electrostatic interactions with the applied electric field that leads to bulk solution movement. The goal of this laboratory is to experimentally determine the fixed channel surface charge (zeta potential) and electroosmotic mobility associated with a given microchannel substrate material and buffer solution, using a simple current monitoring method to measure the average flow velocity within the microchannel. It is a straightforward experiment designed to help students understand EOF physics while gaining hands-on experience with basic world-to-chip interfacing. It is well suited to a 90-min laboratory session for up to 12 students with minimal infrastructure requirements.

  20. Electroosmotic flow as a result of buccal iontophoresis--buccal mucosa properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscicka-Studzinska, Aleksandra; Kijeńska, Ewa; Ciach, Tomasz

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate and to better understand the properties of buccal mucosa as a semipermeable membrane and a portal for drug administration by iontophoretic and electroosmotic means. In vitro experiments showed that buccal mucosa at the pH of about 7.4 behaved as a cation-exchange membrane and non-linear resistor. It had lower resistance and was more permeable for water than a skin. The electroosmotic volume flow through mucosa depended on current density, mucosa resistance and electrolyte concentration. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (in concentration range 0.001-0.005 mol L(-1)) and urea (in concentration range 0.42-1.67 mol L(-1)) did not promote a water transfer through buccal mucosa, however, both substances enhanced flow through the skin.

  1. Microfluidic analogy of the wheatstone bridge for systematic investigations of electro-osmotic flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plecis, Adrien; Chen, Yong

    2008-05-15

    A microfluidic analogy of the electric Wheatstone Bridge has been developed for electrokinetic study of miscellaneous liquid-solid interfaces. By using an optimized glass-PDMS-glass device technology, microfluidic channels with well-controlled surface properties can be fabricated, forming an "H" shaped fluidic network. After solving a set of linear equations, the electro-osmotic flow rate in the center channel can be deduced from indirect measurement of flow rates in the lateral channels. Experimentally, we demonstrate that the electro-osmotic mobility can be monitored every 30 s with accuracy better than 3% for a large dynamic range of electric fields. The results obtained with a borosilicate glass (D-263) and several standard biological buffers are also shown to illustrate the capability of this high throughput method.

  2. Electroosmotic dewatering of chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.K.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells on four different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material. Casagra......Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells on four different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material....... Casagrande's coefficients were determined for the four materials at different water contents. The experiments in this work showed that chalk could be dewatered from 40% to 79% DM (dry matter), fly ash from 75 to 82% DM, iron hydroxide sludge from 2.7 to 19% DM and biomass from 3 to 33% DM by electroosmosis...

  3. Electroosmotic flow of Eyring fluid in slit microchannel with slip boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭臻; 齐海涛; 蒋晓芸

    2014-01-01

    In consideration of the electroosmotic flow in a slit microchannel, the con-stitutive relationship of the Eyring fluid model is utilized. Navier’s slip condition is used as the boundary condition. The governing equations are solved analytically, yielding the velocity distribution. The approximate expressions of the velocity distribution are also given and discussed. Furthermore, the effects of the dimensionless parameters, the electrokinetic parameter, and the slip length on the flow are studied numerically, and appropriate conclusions are drawn.

  4. Controlled assembly of single colloidal crystals using electro-osmotic micro-pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Ran; Oğuz, Erdal C.; Müller, Hannah; Reinmüller, Alexander; Botin, Denis; Löwen, Hartmut; Palberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We assemble charged colloidal spheres at deliberately chosen locations on a charged unstructured glass substrate utilizing ion exchange based electro-osmotic micro-pumps. Using microscopy, a simple scaling theory and Brownian Dynamics simulations, we systematically explore the control parameters of crystal assembly and the mechanisms through which they depend on the experimental boundary conditions. We demonstrate that crystal quality depends crucially on the assembly distance of the colloids...

  5. A Variational Model for Two-Phase Immiscible Electroosmotic Flow at Solid Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Shao, Sihong

    2012-01-01

    We develop a continuum hydrodynamic model for two-phase immiscible flows that involve electroosmotic effect in an electrolyte and moving contact line at solid surfaces. The model is derived through a variational approach based on the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation. This approach was first presented in the derivation of a continuum hydrodynamic model for moving contact line in neutral two-phase immiscible flows (Qian, Wang, and Sheng, J. Fluid Mech. 564, 333-360 (2006)). Physically, the electroosmotic effect can be formulated by the Onsager principle as well in the linear response regime. Therefore, the same variational approach is applied here to the derivation of the continuum hydrodynamic model for charged two-phase immiscible flows where one fluid component is an electrolyte exhibiting electroosmotic effect on a charged surface. A phase field is employed to model the diffuse interface between two immiscible fluid components, one being the electrolyte and the other a nonconductive fluid, both allowed to slip at solid surfaces. Our model consists of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for momentum transport, the Nernst-Planck equation for ion transport, the Cahn-Hilliard phase-field equation for interface motion, and the Poisson equation for electric potential, along with all the necessary boundary conditions. In particular, all the dynamic boundary conditions at solid surfaces, including the generalized Navier boundary condition for slip, are derived together with the equations of motion in the bulk region. Numerical examples in two-dimensional space, which involve overlapped electric double layer fields, have been presented to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the model, and a few salient features of the two-phase immiscible electroosmotic flows at solid surface. The wall slip in the vicinity of moving contact line and the Smoluchowski slip in the electric double layer are both investigated. © 2012 Global-Science Press.

  6. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  7. Telescopic limiting magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1990-01-01

    The prediction of the magnitude of the faintest star visible through a telescope by a visual observer is a difficult problem in physiology. Many prediction formulas have been advanced over the years, but most do not even consider the magnification used. Here, the prediction algorithm problem is attacked with two complimentary approaches: (1) First, a theoretical algorithm was developed based on physiological data for the sensitivity of the eye. This algorithm also accounts for the transmission of the atmosphere and the telescope, the brightness of the sky, the color of the star, the age of the observer, the aperture, and the magnification. (2) Second, 314 observed values for the limiting magnitude were collected as a test of the formula. It is found that the formula does accurately predict the average observed limiting magnitudes under all conditions.

  8. Electro-osmotic pumping and ionic conductance measurements in porous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajandar, Saumitra K.

    Electro-osmotic (EO) pumps directly convert electrical energy into fluids' kinetic energy, which have many advantages such as a simple and compact structure, no mechanical moving parts, and easy integration. In general, it is easy for EO pumps to generate enough pressure but it has been a challenge for EO pumps to produce a high flowrate. EO pumps have found applications in various micro-/nano-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) and have the potential to impact a variety of engineering fields including microelectronics cooling and bio-analytical systems. This dissertation focuses on the design, fabrication and characterization of EO pumps based on two novel porous membrane materials: SiO2-coated anodic porous alumina and SiNx-coated porous silicon. High quality porous alumina membranes of controllable pore diameters in the range of 30-100 nm and pore lengths of 60-100 mum were fabricated by electrochemical anodization. The pores are straight, uniform and hexagonally close-packed with a high porosity of up to 50%. The inner surface of the pore was coated with a thin layer (˜5 nm) of SiO2 conformally to achieve a high zeta potential. The EO pumping flowrate of the fabricated anodic alumina membranes, coated and uncoated, was experimentally measured. Results indicate that the high zeta potential of the SiO2 coating increases the pumping flowrate even though the coating reduces the porosity of the membrane. The nanostructured SiO2-coated porous anodic alumina membranes can provide a normalized flowrate of 0.125 ml/min/V/cm2 under a low effective applied voltage of 3 V, which sets a record high normalized flowrate under low applied voltage. To realize field effect control of EO pumping, we designed and fabricated SiNx-coated porous silicon membranes with the silicon core as the electrode to apply a transverse gate potential. The gate potential will modulate the zeta potential of the pore wall and thereby provide control over the EO flowrate. The membranes were

  9. Visualizing the transient electroosmotic flow and measuring the zeta potential of microchannels with a micro-PIV technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Deguang; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Yang, Chun; Huang, Xiaoyang

    2006-01-14

    We have demonstrated a transient micro particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) technique to measure the temporal development of electroosmotic flow in microchannels. Synchronization of different trigger signals for the laser, the CCD camera, and the high-voltage switch makes this measurement possible with a conventional micro-PIV setup. Using the transient micro-PIV technique, we have further proposed a method on the basis of inertial decoupling between the particle electrophoretic motion and the fluid electroosmotic flow to determine the electrophoretic component in the particle velocity and the zeta potential of the channel wall. It is shown that using the measured zeta potentials, the theoretical predictions agree well with the transient response of the electroosmotic velocities measured in this work.

  10. Effects of analyte velocity modulation on the electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, T; Guhathakurta, U; Morris, M D

    1992-02-15

    Modulation of the electroosmotic flow in capillary zone electrophoresis by modulation of the driving voltage gives rise to a flow profile that changes between laminar and flat profiles. The changing flow profile induces a radial movement of sample species to and from the capillary surface. The induced sample concentration gradient can be monitored by carefully probing the capillary surface. The resulting signal is a derivative of the normal-shaped peak. Derivative-shaped peaks can be observed with cations, but not with anions. Anions are unable to approach the double-layer region and therefore are unaffected by the modulation process.

  11. Fluid mechanics of electroosmotic flow and its effect on band broadening in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2004-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) usually accompanies electrophoretic migration of charged species in capillary electrophoresis unless special precautions are taken to suppress it. The presence of the EOF provides certain advantages in separations. It is an alternative to mechanical pumps, which are inefficient and difficult to build at small scales, for transporting reagents and analytes on microfluidic chips. The downside is that any imperfection that distorts the EOF profile reduces the separation efficiency. In this paper, the basic facts about EOF are reviewed from the perspective of fluid mechanics and its effect on separations in free solution capillary zone electrophoresis is discussed in the light of recent advances.

  12. Landslide seismic magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. H.; Jan, J. C.; Pu, H. C.; Tu, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Landslides have become one of the most deadly natural disasters on earth, not only due to a significant increase in extreme climate change caused by global warming, but also rapid economic development in topographic relief areas. How to detect landslides using a real-time system has become an important question for reducing possible landslide impacts on human society. However, traditional detection of landslides, either through direct surveys in the field or remote sensing images obtained via aircraft or satellites, is highly time consuming. Here we analyze very long period seismic signals (20-50 s) generated by large landslides such as Typhoon Morakot, which passed though Taiwan in August 2009. In addition to successfully locating 109 large landslides, we define landslide seismic magnitude based on an empirical formula: Lm = log ⁡ (A) + 0.55 log ⁡ (Δ) + 2.44, where A is the maximum displacement (μm) recorded at one seismic station and Δ is its distance (km) from the landslide. We conclude that both the location and seismic magnitude of large landslides can be rapidly estimated from broadband seismic networks for both academic and applied purposes, similar to earthquake monitoring. We suggest a real-time algorithm be set up for routine monitoring of landslides in places where they pose a frequent threat.

  13. Topology and shape optimization of induced-charge electro-osmotic micropumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregersen, M M; Okkels, F; Bruus, H [Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Nanotech, Building 345 East, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Bazant, M Z [Departments of Chemical Engineering and Mathematics, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: Henrik.Bruus@nanotech.dtu.dk

    2009-07-15

    For a dielectric solid surrounded by an electrolyte and positioned inside an externally biased parallel-plate capacitor, we study numerically how the resulting induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flow depends on the topology and shape of the dielectric solid. In particular, we extend existing conventional electrokinetic models with an artificial design field to describe the transition from the liquid electrolyte to the solid dielectric. Using this design field, we have succeeded in applying the method of topology optimization to find system geometries with non-trivial topologies that maximize the net induced electro-osmotic flow rate through the electrolytic capacitor in the direction parallel to the capacitor plates. Once found, the performance of the topology-optimized geometries has been validated by transferring them to conventional electrokinetic models not relying on the artificial design field. Our results show the importance of the topology and shape of the dielectric solid in ICEO systems and point to new designs of ICEO micropumps with significantly improved performance.

  14. Negative differential electrolyte resistance in a solid-state nanopore resulting from electroosmotic flow bistability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Long; Holden, Deric A; White, Henry S

    2014-03-25

    A solid-state nanopore separating two aqueous solutions containing different concentrations of KCl is demonstrated to exhibit negative differential resistance (NDR) when a constant pressure is applied across the nanopore. NDR refers to a decrease in electrical current when the voltage applied across the nanopore is increased. NDR results from the interdependence of solution flow (electroosmotic and pressure-engendered) with the distributions of K+ and Cl- within the nanopore. A switch from a high-conductivity state to a low-conductivity state occurs over a very narrow voltage window (geometry, electrolyte concentration, and nanopore surface charge density. Finite element simulations based on a simultaneous solution of the Navier-Stokes, Poisson, and Nernst-Planck equations demonstrate that NDR results from a positive feedback mechanism between the ion distributions and electroosmotic flow, yielding a true bistability in fluid flow and electrical current at a critical applied voltage, i.e., the NDR "switching potential". Solution pH and Ca2+ were separately employed as chemical stimuli to investigate the dependence of the NDR on the surface charge density. The NDR switching potential is remarkably sensitive to the surface charge density, and thus to pH and the presence of Ca2+, suggesting possible applications in chemical sensing.

  15. Evaluation of the electroosmotic medium pump system for preparative disk gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, M; Hosogi, Y; Takiguchi, H; Saito, S; Shiroza, T; Shibata, Y; Hiratsuka, K; Kiyama-Kishikawa, M; Abiko, Y

    2001-01-15

    This paper describes an improved electroosmotic elution system for preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) based on the epochal idea of H. V. Tan et al. (Nucleic Acids Res. 1988, 16, 1921-1930). In this elution system, a semipermeable membrane, mounted under the gel terminal end, works as the elution pump as well as the partition of the elution chamber. We refer to this system as the "electroosmotic medium pump system." Operation of the constructed apparatus (3.6 cm i.d. disk gel column) and resolution of the protein bands were examined by separation of the model protein mixture (bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin, bovine carbonic anhydrase, soybean trypsin inhibitor) and purification of the membrane protein, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV). The Spectra/Por 7 dialysis membrane provided a better flow profile for the elution buffer. The four model proteins of the protein mixture were able to be completely separated from each other and recovered without dilution. The maximum protein concentration of eluate achieved was 93 mg/ml, when applying a single component, BSA fraction V, as a sample. Furthermore, the multifunctional ectoenzyme, DPP IV, was purified in a single step.

  16. Nonuniform electro-osmotic flow on charged strips and its use in particle trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shui-Jin; Hwang, Shyh-Hong; Wei, Hsien-Hung

    2008-12-02

    In this article, we investigate theoretically electro-osmotic flow set up by charged strips on an otherwise uncharged surface. Starting with a single-strip problem we demonstrate that for simple polynomial surface charge distributions several basic solutions can be derived in closed forms constituted by the analogous idea-flow solutions, which provide a more lucid way of revealing the flow features. These solutions reveal two types of flow topology: simple draining-in/pumping-out streaming and a pair of microvortices for symmetric and antisymmetric surface charge distributions, respectively. For an arbitrary surface charge distribution, more complicated flow structures can be found by the superposition of these basic solutions. We further extend the analysis to two uniformly charged strips and show how the flow characteristics vary with the strips' dimensions and surface zeta potentials. The far-field velocity behavior is also asymptotically identified and indicates that the hydrodynamic nature of the flow is typically long-range. An application to particle trapping with electro-osmotic vortices is also investigated theoretically for the first time. We show that in collaboration with short-range attraction effects the trapping can be facilitated by symmetric vortices with a converging stagnation point, but not by asymmetric vortices.

  17. Analysis of electro-osmotic flow in a microchannel with undulated surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Washizu, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The electro-osmotic flow through a channel between two undulated surfaces induced by an external electric field is investigated. The gap of the channel is very small and comparable to the thickness of the electrical double layers. A lattice Boltzmann simulation is carried out on the model consisting of the Poisson equation for electrical potential, the Nernst--Planck equation for ion concentration, and the Navier--Stokes {\\color{black}equations} for flows of the electrolyte solution. An analytical model that predicts the flow rate is also derived under the assumption that the channel width is very small compared with the characteristic length of the variation along the channel. The analytical results are compared with the numerical results obtained by using the lattice Boltzmann method. In the case of a constant surface charge density along the channel, the variation of the channel width reduces the electro-osmotic flow, and the flow rate is smaller than that of a straight channel. In the case of a surface ch...

  18. Electro-osmotic flow of a second-grade fluid in a porous microchannel subject to an AC electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MISRA J.C.; CHANDRA S.

    2013-01-01

    Studies on electro-osmotic flows of various types of fluids in microcharmel are of great importance owing to their multifold applications in the transport of liquids,particularly when the ionized liquid flows with respect to a charged surface in the presence of an external electric field.In the case of viscoelastic fluids,the volumetric flow rate differs significantly from that of Newtonian fluids,even when the flow takes place under the same pressure gradient and the same electric field.With this end in view,this paper is devoted to a study concerning the flow pattern of an electro-osmotic flow in a porous microchannel,which is under the action of an alternating electric field.The influence of various rheologieal and electro-osmotic parameters,e.g.,the Reynolds number,Debye-Huckel parameter,shape factor and fluid viscoelasticity on the kinematics of the fluid,has been investigated for a second-grade viscoelastic fluid.The problem is first treated by using analytical methods,but the quantitative estimates are obtained numerically with the help of the software MATHEMATICA.The results presented here are applicable to the cases where the channel height is much greater than the thickness of the electrical double layer comprising the Stern and diffuse layers.The study reveals that a larger value of the Debye-Huckel parameter creates sharper profile near the wall and also that the velocity of electro-osmotic flow increases as the permeability of the porous microchannel is enhanced.The study further shows that the electro-osmotic flow dominates at lower values of Reynolds number.The results presented here will be quite useful to validate the observations of experimental investigations on the characteristics of electro-osmotic flows and also the results of complex numerical models that are necessary to deal with more realistic situations,where electro-osmotic flows come into the picture,as in blood flow in the micro-circulatory system subject to an electric field.

  19. Poisson-Fokker-Planck model for biomolecules translocation through nanopore driven by electroosmotic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN XiaoHui; ZHANG ChiBin; GU Jun; JIANG ShuYun; YANG JueKuan

    2014-01-01

    A non-continuous electroosmotic flow model (PFP model) is built based on Poisson equation,Fokker-Planck equation and Navier-Stokse equation,and used to predict the DNA molecule translocation through nanopore.PFP model discards the continuum assumption of ion translocation and considers ions as discrete particles.In addition,this model includes the contributions of Coulomb electrostatic potential between ions,Brownian motion of ions and viscous friction to ion transportation.No ionic diffusion coefficient and other phenomenological parameters are needed in the PFP model.It is worth noting that the PFP model can describe non-equilibrium electroosmotic transportation of ions in a channel of a size comparable with the mean free path of ion.A modified clustering method is proposed for the numerical solution of PFP model,and ion current translocation through nanopore with a radius of 1 nm is simulated using the modified clustering method.The external electric field,wall charge density of nanopore,surface charge density of DNA,as well as ion average number density,influence the electroosmotic velocity profile of electrolyte solution,the velocity of DNA translocation through nanopore and ion current blockade.Results show that the ion average number density of electrolyte and surface charge density of nanopore have a significant effect on the translocation velocity of DNA and the ion current blockade.The translocation velocity of DNA is proportional to the surface charge density of nanopore,and is inversely proportional to ion average number density of electrolyte solution.Thus,the translocation velocity of DNAs can be controlled to improve the accuracy of sequencing by adjusting the external electric field,ion average number density of electrolyte and surface charge density of nanopore.Ion current decreases when the ion average number density is larger than the critical value and increases when the ion average number density is lower than the critical value.Our numerical

  20. Low-voltage electroosmotic pumps fabricated from track-etched polymer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ceming; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Xiaorui; Wang, Yugang; Xue, Jianming

    2012-05-07

    Track-etched polymer membranes are used to realize low-voltage electroosmotic (EO) pumps. The nanopores in polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes were fabricated by the track-etching technique, the pore diameter was controlled in the range of 100 to 250 nm by adjusting the etching time. The results show that these EO pumps can provide high flow rates at low applied voltages (2-5 V). The maximum normalized flow rate is as high as 0.12 ml min(-1) V(-1) cm(-2), which is comparable to the best values of previously demonstrated EO pumps. We attribute this high performance to the unique properties of the track-etched nanopores in the membranes.

  1. Experimental verification of overlimiting current by surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow in microchannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sungmin; Cho, Inhee; Heo, Joonseong; Lim, Geunbae; Bazant, Martin Z; Moon, Dustin Jaesuk; Sung, Gun Yong; Kim, Sung Jae

    2015-03-20

    Direct evidence is provided for the transition from surface conduction (SC) to electro-osmotic flow (EOF) above a critical channel depth (d) of a nanofluidic device. The dependence of the overlimiting conductance (OLC) on d is consistent with theoretical predictions, scaling as d(-1) for SC and d(4/5) for EOF with a minimum around d=8  μm. The propagation of transient deionization shocks is also visualized, revealing complex patterns of EOF vortices and unstable convection with increasing d. This unified picture of surface-driven OLC can guide further advances in electrokinetic theory, as well as engineering applications of ion concentration polarization in microfluidics and porous media.

  2. Design of T-Shaped Micropump Based on Induced Charge Electroosmotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluid-driven efficiency of the micropump based on induced charge electroosmotic was studied by numerical simulation method. In this paper, we propose to make some improvement against the T-shaped piping design of micropump, and we embed a janus cylinder in the junction of the T-shaped pipe for the micropump design. We offer different voltage to the inlet of the pipe and carry out the numerical study of the fluid field induced by the cylinder, and the comparison of the velocity and flux of the outlet in different voltage as carried out. It is found that there are two symmetrical circulations around the polarizable side of the cylinder. And the comparison results show that the flow and the velocity of the outlet were increased with the increasing voltage of the entrance.

  3. Suppression of nano-channel ion conductance by electro-osmotic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yang; Zhu, Xin; Ran, Qiushi; Dutton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This theoretical study concerns a basic understanding of ion transport in nano-channels that have weakly overlapping electric double layers. Numerical simulations reveal that the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) interplays with the concentration-polarization process and drives the ion depletion zone into the channels, thus significantly suppressing the channel conductance. The conductance may be restored at high electrical biases in the presence of recirculating vortices within the channels. Further analysis are conducted based on a 1-D, long channel model, and analytic expressions derived to quantitatively account for the EOF-driven ion depletion process. A limiting-conductance behavior is revealed as intrinsically different from the classical limiting-current behavior.

  4. Transport and reaction of nanoliter samples in a microfluidic reactor using electro-osmotic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumbuliyur Comandur, Kaushik; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Dasgupta, Subhashish; Papautsky, Ian; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2010-03-01

    The primary focus of the paper is to establish both numerical and experimental methods to control the concentration of samples in a microreactor well. The concentration of the reacting samples is controlled by varying the initial sample size and electric field. Further, the paper numerically investigates the feasibility of mixing and reacting nanoliter samples with a wide variation in reaction rates in the microreactor driven by electro-osmotic pumping. Two discrete samples are measured and transported to the microreactor simultaneously by electro-osmotic pinching and switching. The transported samples are mixed in the microreactor and floated for 4.5 s for reaction to occur. It is seen that the normalized concentration of the product increases from 0.25 to 0.45 during that period. Also the effects of sample size and applied electric field on sample concentration during the switching process are studied. It is found that the normalized final sample concentration increases from 0.03 to 0.11 with an increase in sample size from 60 to 150 µm, at a constant electric field. Further, by increasing the electric field from 100 to 1000 V cm-1, at a constant sample size, there is a significant decrease in the final concentration of the sample from 0.14 to 0.04. Our studies also show that the normalized product concentration depends on the reaction rate and increases from 0.28 to 0.48 as the reaction rate increases from 10 L mol-1 s-1 to 105 L mol-1 s-1. However, the increase in the reaction rate beyond 105 L mol-1 s-1 does not influence the product concentration for the present design of the microreactor. Our microreactor with improved mixing can be used for assessing reactions of biological samples. The optimized sample size along with a controlled electric field for sample injection forms the basis for developing a prototype of a microreactor device for high throughput drug screening.

  5. Determination of the Limiting Magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, Aaron; Blaauw, Rhiannon

    2017-01-01

    The limiting magnitude of an optical camera system is an important property to understand since it is used to find the completeness limit of observations. Limiting magnitude depends on the hardware and software of the system, current weather conditions, and the angular speed of the objects observed. If an object exhibits a substantial angular rate during the exposure, its light spreads out over more pixels than the stationary stars. This spreading causes the limiting magnitude to be brighter when compared to the stellar limiting magnitude. The effect, which begins to become important when the object moves a full width at half max during a single exposure or video frame. For targets with high angular speeds or camera systems with narrow field of view or long exposures, this correction can be significant, up to several magnitudes. The stars in an image are often used to measure the limiting magnitude since they are stationary, have known brightness, and are present in large numbers, making the determination of the limiting magnitude fairly simple. In order to transform stellar limiting magnitude to object limiting magnitude, a correction must be applied accounting for the angular velocity. This technique is adopted in meteor and other fast-moving object observations, as the lack of a statistically significant sample of targets makes it virtually impossible to determine the limiting magnitude before the weather conditions change. While the weather is the dominant factor in observing satellites, the limiting magnitude for meteors also changes throughout the night due to the motion of a meteor shower or sporadic source radiant across the sky. This paper presents methods for determining the limiting stellar magnitude and the conversion to the target limiting magnitude.

  6. Electroosmotically enhanced dewatering/deliquoring of fine-particle coal: Final report, January 1--December 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sami, Sedat [Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Davis, P.hilip K. [Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Smith, James G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1989-03-01

    This research is an investigation of the use of electroosmosis to dewater/deliquor ultrafine coal. Post-beneficiation dewatering/deliquoring methods for ultrafine coal are inadequate and generally require subsequent thermal drying. Thermal drying is not only expensive and time consuming, it also does not recover liquids for reuse in beneficiation processes. The degree of difficulty associated with dewatering increases as surface forces become more important than gravimetric forces. Electroosmotic flow has advantages for dewatering because it is much less sensitive to pore size than hydraulic gradient flow for the 1 to 75 ..mu..m ultrafine size range. The first year of this project focused upon preparation of ultrafine coal samples, development of test equipment and test cells, identification of variables affecting electroosmosis, and trial runs. Techniques and procedures not previously used by researchers of electroosmotic dewatering have revealed important information about the dynamics of the electroosmosis process. The identification of the first few millimeters of the cathode region of the cell as the sink for most of the energy input into the process provides the potential for improving efficiency by concentrating the second year effort on intervention in that region. Information gathered about differences in FTIR spectra as a function of location in the dewatering cell will be investigated. Changes in pH with temperature and by the application of electroosmotic current flow will receive attention, as well. 178 refs., 16 figs.

  7. Integrated Circuit Stellar Magnitude Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, James A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an electronic circuit which can be used to demonstrate the stellar magnitude scale. Six rectangular light-emitting diodes with independently adjustable duty cycles represent stars of magnitudes 1 through 6. Experimentally verifies the logarithmic response of the eye. (Author/GA)

  8. Influence of the external solution in the electroosmotic flux induced by realkalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castellote, M.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical repair methods are based on the application of an impressed direct current between the reinforcement and an auxiliary electrode placed at the concrete surface. In the case of realkalisation, the aim of the treatment consists in restoring the alkalinity of the concrete around the rebar to repassivate it. The realkalisation seems to be primarily provided by the generation of OH- at the rebar which is acting as cathode, through the reaction of water hydrolysis. It had been claimed that also carbonate ions penetrate towards the rebar by the electroosmosis; however it was not until very recently that the authors were able to demonstrate and quantify it through hardened carbonated concrete. In the present paper, laboratory trials are reported showing the influence of the external solution in the electroosmotic flux. The experiments have been carried out on normalised carbonated OPC mortars and 4 different solutions have been tested, ranging from 0.1 to 2M in Na2CO3. As a result, it has been proved that the electroosmotic flux is not constant during the experiment. The pH in the anolyte is the determining parameter on the zeta potential and consequently in the electroosmotic flux, reaching its maximum, for the experiments of this research, at the pH of the buffer carbonate/'bicarbonate.

    Los métodos electroquímicos de reparación de estructuras dañadas por corrosión de armaduras se basan en la aplicación de corriente continua entre la armadura y un electrodo auxiliar colocado sobre la superficie del hormigón. En el caso de la realcalinización, el objetivo del tratamiento consiste en restaurar la alcalinidad del hormigón alrededor de la armadura, con lo que se consigue la repasivación de la misma. Esta alcalinización se alcanza por la generación de OH- en la hidrólisis del agua que tiene lugar en el acero que actúa como cátodo, aunque también se postula la penetración de

  9. Magnitude Sensitive Competitive Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Pelayo Campillos, Enrique; Buldain Pérez, David; Orrite Uruñuela, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    En esta Tesis se presentan un conjunto de redes neuronales llamadas Magnitude Sensitive Competitive Neural Networks (MSCNNs). Se trata de un conjunto de algoritmos de Competitive Learning que incluyen un término de magnitud como un factor de modulación de la distancia usada en la competición. Al igual que otros métodos competitivos, MSCNNs realizan la cuantización vectorial de los datos, pero el término de magnitud guía el entrenamiento de los centroides de modo que se representan con alto de...

  10. EOP Current Magnitude and Direction

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data contain shipboard current magnitudes and directions collected in the Pacific, both pelagic and near shore environments. Data is collected using an RD...

  11. Further development of an electroosmotic medium pump system for preparative disk gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Mitsuo; Hosogi, Yumiko; Takiguchi, Hisashi; Shiroza, Teruaki; Shibata, Yasuko; Hiratsuka, Koichi; Kiyama-Kishikawa, Michiko; Hamajima, Susumu; Abiko, Yoshimitsu

    2003-02-01

    A simple and practical 6.8-cm-diameter (36.30-cm(2) cross-sectional-area) preparative disk gel electrophoresis device, based on the design of M. Hayakawa et al. (Anal. Biochem. 288 (2001) 168), in which the elution buffer is driven by an electroosmotic buffer flow through the membrane into the elution chamber from the anode chamber was constructed. We have found that the dialysis membranes employed provide suitable flow rates for the elution buffer, similar to those of an earlier 3.6-cm-diameter device, resulting in the prevention of excess eluate dilution. The efficiency of this device was demonstrated by the fractionation of a bovine serum albumin (BSA) Cohn V fraction into monomer, dimer, and oligomer components using nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE). The maximum protein concentration of the eluate achieved was 133 mg/ml of BSA monomer, which required a dilution of the eluate for subsequent analytical PAGE performance. As a practical example, the two-dimensional fractionation of soluble dipeptidyl peptidase IV (sDPP IV) from 50 ml fetal bovine serum (3.20 g protein) per gel is presented. The sDPP IV enzyme protein was recovered in a relatively short time, utilizing a 6.5% T native-PAGE and subsequential sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE system. This device enhances the possibility of continuous electrophoretic fractionation of complex protein mixtures on a preparative scale.

  12. Mapping alternating current electroosmotic flow at the dielectrophoresis crossover frequency of a colloidal probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Cohen, Joel A; Ou-Yang, H Daniel

    2013-07-01

    AC electroosmotic (ACEO) flow above the gap between coplanar electrodes is mapped by the measurement of Stokes forces on an optically trapped polystyrene colloidal particle. E²-dependent forces on the probe particle are selected by amplitude modulation (AM) of the ACEO electric field (E) and lock-in detection at twice the AM frequency. E²-dependent DEP of the probe is eliminated by driving the ACEO at the probe's DEP crossover frequency. The location-independent DEP crossover frequency is determined, in a separate experiment, as the limiting frequency of zero horizontal force as the probe is moved toward the midpoint between the electrodes. The ACEO velocity field, uncoupled from probe DEP effects, was mapped in the region 1-9 μm above a 28 μm gap between the electrodes. By use of variously sized probes, each at its DEP crossover frequency, the frequency dependence of the ACEO flow was determined at a point 3 μm above the electrode gap and 4 μm from an electrode tip. At this location the ACEO flow was maximal at ∼117 kHz for a low salt solution. This optical trapping method, by eliminating DEP forces on the probe, provides unambiguous mapping of the ACEO velocity field.

  13. Nongassing long-lasting electro-osmotic pump with polyaniline-wrapped aminated graphene electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rudra; Jahan, Kousar; Nagarale, Rajaram K; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2015-01-14

    An efficient nongassing electro-osmotic pump (EOP) with long-lasting electrodes and exceptionally stable operation is developed by using novel flow-through polyaniline (PANI)-wrapped aminated graphene (NH2-G) electrodes. The NH2-G/PANI electrode combines the excellent oxidation/reduction capacity of PANI with the exceptional conductivity and inertness of NH2-G. The flow rate varies linearly with voltage but is highly dependent on the electrode composition. The flow rates at a potential of 5 V for pristine NH2-G and PANI electrodes are 71 and 100 μL min(-1) cm(-2), respectively, which increase substantially by the use of NH2-G/PANI electrode. It increased from 125 to 182 μL min(-1) cm(-2) as the fraction of aniline increased from 66.63 to 90.90%. The maximum flux obtained is 40 μL min(-1) V(-1) cm(-2) with NH2-G/PANI-90.9 electrodes. The assembled EOP remained exceptionally stable until the electrode columbic capacity was fully utilized. The prototype shown here delivered 8.0 μL/min at a constant applied voltage of 2 V for over 7 h of continuous operation. The best EOP produces a maximum stall pressure of 3.5 kPa at 3 V. These characteristics make it suitable for a variety of microfluidic/device applications.

  14. Effects of Micromachining Processes on Electro-Osmotic Flow Mobility of Glass Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Miki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Silica glass is frequently used as a device material for micro/nano fluidic devices due to its excellent properties, such as transparency and chemical resistance. Wet etching by hydrofluoric acid and dry etching by neutral loop discharge (NLD plasma etching are currently used to micromachine glass to form micro/nano fluidic channels. Electro-osmotic flow (EOF is one of the most effective methods to drive liquids into the channels. EOF mobility is affected by a property of the micromachined glass surfaces, which includes surface roughness that is determined by the manufacturing processes. In this paper, we investigate the effect of micromaching processes on the glass surface topography and the EOF mobility. We prepared glass surfaces by either wet etching or by NLD plasma etching, investigated the surface topography using atomic force microscopy, and attempted to correlate it with EOF generated in the micro-channels of the machined glass. Experiments revealed that the EOF mobility strongly depends on the surface roughness, and therefore upon the fabrication process used. A particularly strong dependency was observed when the surface roughness was on the order of the electric double layer thickness or below. We believe that the correlation described in this paper can be of great help in the design of micro/nano fluidic devices.

  15. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  16. Numerical analysis of dynamic electro-osmotic flows of non-Newtonian fluids in rectangular microchannels

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Cunlu

    2010-01-01

    Numerical analyses of transient electro-osmosis of a typical non-Newtonian liquid induced by DC and AC electric fields in a rectangular microchannel are conducted in the framework of continuum fluid mechanics. The famous power-law constitutive model is used to express the fluid dynamic viscosity in terms of the velocity gradient. Transient start-up characteristics of electro-osmotic power-law liquid flow in rectangular microchannels are simulated by using finite element method. Under a DC electric field, it is found out and the fluid is more inert to the external electric field and the steady-state velocity profile becomes more plug-like with decrease of the flow behavior index of the power-law liquids. The numerical calculations also confirm the validity of the generalized Smoluchowski slip velocity which can serve as the counterpart for the classic Smoluchowski slip velocity when dealing with electrokinetic flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids. Under AC electric fields, the fluid is more obviously acceler...

  17. Combining Electro-Osmotic Flow and FTA® Paper for DNA Analysis on Microfluidic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Wimbles

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available FTA® paper can be used to protect a variety of biological samples prior to analysis, facilitating ease-of-transport to laboratories or long-term archive storage. The use of FTA® paper as a solid phase eradicates the need to elute the nucleic acids from the matrix prior to DNA amplification, enabling both DNA purification and polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based DNA amplification to be performed in a single chamber on the microfluidic device. A disc of FTA® paper, containing a biological sample, was placed within the microfluidic device on top of wax-encapsulated DNA amplification reagents. The disc containing the biological sample was then cleaned up using Tris-EDTA (TE buffer, which was passed over the disc, via electro-osmotic flow, in order to remove any potential inhibitors of downstream processes. DNA amplification was successfully performed (from buccal cells, whole blood and semen using a Peltier thermal cycling system, whereupon the stored PCR reagents were released during the initial denaturing step due to the wax barrier melting between the FTA® disc and PCR reagents. Such a system offers advantages in terms of a simple sample introduction interface and the ability to process archived samples in an integrated microfluidic environment with minimal risk of contamination.

  18. Time Periodic Electroosmotic Flow of The Generalized Maxwell Fluids in a Semicircular Microchannel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Li-Ping; JIAN Yong-Jun; CHANG Long; SU Jie; ZHANG Hai-Yan; LIU Quan-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Analytical solutions are presented using method of separation of variables for the time periodic electroosmotic flow (EOF) of linear viscoelastic fluids in semicircular microchannel.The linear viscoelastic fluids used here are described by the general Maxwell model.The solution involves analytically solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (P-B) equation,together with the Cauchy momentum equation and the general Maxwell constitutive equation.By numerical computations,the influences of electric oscillating Reynolds number Re and Deborah number De on velocity amplitude are presented.For small Re,results show that the larger velocity amplitudeis confined to the region near the charged wall when De is small.With the increase of the Deborah number De,the velocity far away the charged wall becomes larger for large Deborah number De.However,for larger Re,the oscillating characteristic of the velocity amplitude occurs and becomes significant with the increase of De,especially for larger Deborah number.

  19. Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells using integrated electroosmotic pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buie, Cullen R.; Posner, Jonathan D.; Fabian, Tibor; Cha, Suk-Won; Kim, Daejoong; Prinz, Fritz B.; Eaton, John K.; Santiago, Juan G.

    Recent experimental and numerical investigations on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) emphasize water management as a critical factor in the design of robust, high efficiency systems. Although various water management strategies have been proposed, water is still typically removed by pumping air into cathode channels at flow rates significantly higher than required by fuel cell stoichiometry. Such methods are thermodynamically unfavorable and constrain cathode flow channel design. We have developed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with integrated planar electroosmotic (EO) pumping structures that actively remove liquid water from cathode flow channels. EO pumps can relieve cathode design barriers and facilitate efficient water management in fuel cells. EO pumps have no moving parts, scale appropriately with fuel cells, operate across a wide range of conditions, and consume a small fraction of fuel cell power. We demonstrate and quantify the efficacy of EO water pumping using controlled experiments in a single channel cathode flow structure. Our results show that, under certain operating conditions, removing water from the cathode using integrated EO pumping structures improves fuel cell performance and stability. The application of EO pumps for liquid water removal from PEMFC cathodes extends their operational range and reduces air flow rates.

  20. Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells using integrated electroosmotic pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buie, Cullen R.; Posner, Jonathan D.; Fabian, Tibor; Cha, Suk-Won; Kim, Daejoong; Prinz, Fritz B.; Eaton, John K.; Santiago, Juan G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2006-10-20

    Recent experimental and numerical investigations on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) emphasize water management as a critical factor in the design of robust, high efficiency systems. Although various water management strategies have been proposed, water is still typically removed by pumping air into cathode channels at flow rates significantly higher than required by fuel cell stoichiometry. Such methods are thermodynamically unfavorable and constrain cathode flow channel design. We have developed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with integrated planar electroosmotic (EO) pumping structures that actively remove liquid water from cathode flow channels. EO pumps can relieve cathode design barriers and facilitate efficient water management in fuel cells. EO pumps have no moving parts, scale appropriately with fuel cells, operate across a wide range of conditions, and consume a small fraction of fuel cell power. We demonstrate and quantify the efficacy of EO water pumping using controlled experiments in a single channel cathode flow structure. Our results show that, under certain operating conditions, removing water from the cathode using integrated EO pumping structures improves fuel cell performance and stability. The application of EO pumps for liquid water removal from PEMFC cathodes extends their operational range and reduces air flow rates. (author)

  1. Interfacial phenomena and dynamic contact angle modulation in microcapillary flows subjected to electroosmotic actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debapriya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2008-09-02

    The dynamic evolution of an incompressible liquid meniscus inside a microcapillary is investigated, under the combined influences of viscous, capillary, intermolecular, pondermotive, and electroosmotic effects. In the limit of small capillary numbers, an advancing meniscus shape is shown to merge smoothly with the precursor film, using matched asymptotic analysis. A scaling relationship is also established for the dynamic contact angle as a nondimensional function of the capillary number and the applied electrical voltage. The analysis is further generalized by invoking a kinetic slip model for overcoming the constraints of meniscus tip singularity. The kinetic slip model is subsequently utilized to analyze the interfacial dynamics from the perspective of the results obtained from the matched asymptotic analysis. A generalization is achieved in this regard, which may provide a sound basis for controlling the topographical features of a dynamically evolving meniscus in a microcapillary subjected to electrokinetic effects. These results are also in excellent agreement with the experimental findings over a wide range of capillary number values.

  2. Deformations of a pre-stretched elastic membrane driven by non-uniform electroosmotic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Moran; Boyko, Evgeniy; Gat, Amir

    2016-11-01

    We study viscous-elastic dynamics of fluid confined between a rigid plate and a pre-stretched elastic membrane subjected to non-uniform electroosmotic flow, and focus on the case of a finite-size membrane clamped at its boundaries. Considering small deformations of a strongly pre-stretched membrane, and applying the lubrication approximation for the flow, we derive a linearized leading-order non-homogenous 4th order diffusion equation governing the deformation and pressure fields. We derive a time-dependent Green's function for a rectangular domain, and use it to obtain several basic solutions for the cases of constant and time varying electric fields. In addition, defining an asymptotic expansion where the small parameter is the ratio of the induced to prescribed tension, we obtain a set of four one-way coupled equations providing a first order correction for the deformation field. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, Grant agreement No. 678734 (MetamorphChip).

  3. Optimizing electroosmotic pumping rates in a rectangular channel with vertical gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Anison K. R.; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2017-08-01

    The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (H-S) velocity is known to be an accurate and useful formula for estimating the electro-osmotic (EO) flow rates in a simple micro-channel with a thin electric-double layer. However, in case the channel cross section is not so simple, the usefulness of H-S velocity could be sharply limited. A case of fundamental interest representing this situation is a rectangular channel (comprising parallel plates) with built-in vertical gratings, in which the surfaces inside the channel may develop different normalized zeta potentials α (on the gratings) and β (on the side walls). In this study, analytical solutions are pursued under the Debye-Hückel approximation to obtain EO pumping rates in a rectangular channel with vertical gratings. In particular, we identify the conditions under which the H-S formula can be properly applied and investigate how the EO flow rates may deviate from those predicted by the H-S velocity with varying physical parameters. Moreover, a diagram of the optimal EO pumping rates on the α-β plane is introduced that accounts for the general features of the analysis, which is consistent with a mathematical model and may serve as a convenient guide for engineering design and applications.

  4. Bidirectional Modulation of Numerical Magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Qadeer; Nigmatullina, Yuliya; Nigmatullin, Ramil; Asavarut, Paladd; Goga, Usman; Khan, Sarah; Sander, Kaija; Siddiqui, Shuaib; Roberts, R E; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Malhotra, Paresh A

    2016-05-01

    Numerical cognition is critical for modern life; however, the precise neural mechanisms underpinning numerical magnitude allocation in humans remain obscure. Based upon previous reports demonstrating the close behavioral and neuro-anatomical relationship between number allocation and spatial attention, we hypothesized that these systems would be subject to similar control mechanisms, namely dynamic interhemispheric competition. We employed a physiological paradigm, combining visual and vestibular stimulation, to induce interhemispheric conflict and subsequent unihemispheric inhibition, as confirmed by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). This allowed us to demonstrate the first systematic bidirectional modulation of numerical magnitude toward either higher or lower numbers, independently of either eye movements or spatial attention mediated biases. We incorporated both our findings and those from the most widely accepted theoretical framework for numerical cognition to present a novel unifying computational model that describes how numerical magnitude allocation is subject to dynamic interhemispheric competition. That is, numerical allocation is continually updated in a contextual manner based upon relative magnitude, with the right hemisphere responsible for smaller magnitudes and the left hemisphere for larger magnitudes.

  5. Reverse Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This thesis was focused on the analysis of the concept of reverse logistics and actual reverse processes which are implemented in mining industry and finding solutions for the optimization of reverse logistics in this sphere. The objective of this paper was the assessment of the development of reverse logistics in mining industry on the example of potash production. The theoretical part was based on reverse logistics and mining waste related literature and provided foundations for further...

  6. Calibration de la magnitude absolue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, A. E.; Mennessier, M. O.

    Les parallaxes mesurées par Hipparcos permettront d'obtenir des magnitudes absolues individuelles meilleures que ±0m4 pour les étoiles placées dans un volume de rayon inférieur à 150 pc environ autour du soleil. Les algorithmes développés dans le cadre de l'exploitation des données d'Hipparcos, basés sur la méthode de maximum de vraisemblance, permettent non seulement de faire une estimation de la magnitude absolue moyenne d'un groupe physiquement homogène d'étoiles, de son comportement cinématique et de sa distribution spatiale mais aussi d'estimer une magnitude absolue individuelle pour chaque étoile de l'échantillon considéré.

  7. Numerical study of active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flows by temperature difference using lattice Boltzmann methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, A; Wang, J K; Pooyan, S; Mirbozorgi, S A; Wang, M

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature difference between inlet flow and walls on the electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional microchannel is investigated. The main objective is to study the effect of temperature variations on the distribution of ions and consequently internal electric potential field, electric body force, and velocity fields in an electro-osmotic flow. We assume constant temperature and zeta potential on walls and use the mean temperature of each cross section to characterize the Boltzmann ion distribution across the channel. Based on these assumptions, the multiphysical transports are still able to be described by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann model. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid flow, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for ion distribution, and the energy equation for heat transfer are solved by a couple lattice Boltzmann method. The modeling results indicate that the temperature difference between walls and the inlet solution may lead to two symmetrical vortices at the entrance region of the microchannel which is appropriate for mixing enhancements. The advantage of this phenomenon for active control of mixing in electro-osmotic flow is the manageability of the vortex scale without extra efforts. For instance, the effective domain of this pattern could broaden by the following modulations: decreasing the external electric potential field, decreasing the electric double layer thickness, or increasing the temperature difference between inlet flow and walls. This work may provide a novel strategy for design or optimization of microsystems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Testability of Maximum Magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, R.; Schorlemmer, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Zoeller, G.; Schneider, M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent disasters caused by earthquakes of unexpectedly large magnitude (such as Tohoku) illustrate the need for reliable assessments of the seismic hazard. Estimates of the maximum possible magnitude M at a given fault or in a particular zone are essential parameters in probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), but their accuracy remains untested. In this study, we discuss the testability of long-term and short-term M estimates and the limitations that arise from testing such rare events. Of considerable importance is whether or not those limitations imply a lack of testability of a useful maximum magnitude estimate, and whether this should have any influence on current PSHA methodology. We use a simple extreme value theory approach to derive a probability distribution for the expected maximum magnitude in a future time interval, and we perform a sensitivity analysis on this distribution to determine if there is a reasonable avenue available for testing M estimates as they are commonly reported today: devoid of an appropriate probability distribution of their own and estimated only for infinite time (or relatively large untestable periods). Our results imply that any attempt at testing such estimates is futile, and that the distribution is highly sensitive to M estimates only under certain optimal conditions that are rarely observed in practice. In the future we suggest that PSHA modelers be brutally honest about the uncertainty of M estimates, or must find a way to decrease its influence on the estimated hazard.

  9. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  10. Suppression of ion conductance by electro-osmotic flow in nano-channels with weakly overlapping electrical double layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Guo, Lingzi; Zhu, Xin; Ran, Qiushi; Dutton, Robert

    2016-08-01

    This theoretical study investigates the nonlinear ionic current-voltage characteristics of nano-channels that have weakly overlapping electrical double layers. Numerical simulations as well as a 1-D mathematical model are developed to reveal that the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) interplays with the concentration-polarization process and depletes the ion concentration inside the channels, thus significantly suppressing the channel conductance. The conductance may be restored at high electrical biases in the presence of recirculating vortices within the channels. As a result of the EOF-driven ion depletion, a limiting-conductance behavior is identified, which is intrinsically different from the classical limiting-current behavior.

  11. Suppression of ion conductance by electro-osmotic flow in nano-channels with weakly overlapping electrical double layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical study investigates the nonlinear ionic current-voltage characteristics of nano-channels that have weakly overlapping electrical double layers. Numerical simulations as well as a 1-D mathematical model are developed to reveal that the electro-osmotic flow (EOF interplays with the concentration-polarization process and depletes the ion concentration inside the channels, thus significantly suppressing the channel conductance. The conductance may be restored at high electrical biases in the presence of recirculating vortices within the channels. As a result of the EOF-driven ion depletion, a limiting-conductance behavior is identified, which is intrinsically different from the classical limiting-current behavior.

  12. Tectonic stress - Models and magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Bergman, E. A.; Richardson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that global data on directions of principal stresses in plate interiors can serve as a test of possible plate tectonic force models. Such tests performed to date favor force models in which ridge pushing forces play a significant role. For such models the general magnitude of regional deviatoric stresses is comparable to the 200-300 bar compressive stress exerted by spreading ridges. An alternative approach to estimating magnitudes of regional deviatoric stresses from stress orientations is to seek regions of local stress either demonstrably smaller than or larger than the regional stresses. The regional stresses in oceanic intraplate regions are larger than the 100-bar compression exerted by the Ninetyeast Ridge and less than the bending stresses (not less than 1 kbar) beneath Hawaii.

  13. Subject position affects EEG magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Justin K; Rorden, Christopher; Little, Jessica S; Parra, Lucas C

    2013-01-01

    EEG (electroencephalography) has been used for decades in thousands of research studies and is today a routine clinical tool despite the small magnitude of measured scalp potentials. It is widely accepted that the currents originating in the brain are strongly influenced by the high resistivity of skull bone, but it is less well known that the thin layer of CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) has perhaps an even more important effect on EEG scalp magnitude by spatially blurring the signals. Here it is shown that brain shift and the resulting small changes in CSF layer thickness, induced by changing the subject's position, have a significant effect on EEG signal magnitudes in several standard visual paradigms. For spatially incoherent high-frequency activity the effect produced by switching from prone to supine can be dramatic, increasing occipital signal power by several times for some subjects (on average 80%). MRI measurements showed that the occipital CSF layer between the brain and skull decreases by approximately 30% in thickness when a subject moves from prone to supine position. A multiple dipole model demonstrated that this can indeed lead to occipital EEG signal power increases in the same direction and order of magnitude as those observed here. These results suggest that future EEG studies should control for subjects' posture, and that some studies may consider placing their subjects into the most favorable position for the experiment. These findings also imply that special consideration should be given to EEG measurements from subjects with brain atrophy due to normal aging or neurodegenerative diseases, since the resulting increase in CSF layer thickness could profoundly decrease scalp potential measurements.

  14. A perturbative thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a slit microchannel based on a Lubrication theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ali; Mendez, Federico; Bautista, Oscar; Lizardi, José

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a new thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a rectangular microchannel. The central idea is very simple: the Debye length that defines the length of the electrical double-layer depends on temperature T. Therefore, if exists any reason to include variable temperature effects, the above length should be utilized with caution because it appears in any electro-osmotic mathematical model. For instance, the presence of the Joule effect is a source that can generate important longitudinal temperature gradients along the microchannel and the isothermal hypothesis is no longer valid. In this manner, the Debye length is altered and as a consequence, new longitudinal temperature gradient terms appear into the resulting governing equations. These terms are enough to change the electric potential and the flow field. Taking into account the above comments, in the present study the momentum equations together with the energy, Poisson and Ohmic current conservation equations are solved by using a regular perturbation technique. For this purpose, we introduce a dimensionless parameter α that measures the temperature deviations of a reference temperature.

  15. The Instructional Dependency of SNARC Effects Reveals Flexibility of the Space-Magnitude Association of Nonsymbolic and Symbolic Magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dasom; Chun, Joohyung; Cho, Soohyun

    2016-05-01

    The Spatial-Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) effect refers to the phenomenon that small versus large numbers are responded to faster in the left versus right side of space, respectively. Using a pairwise comparison task, Shaki et al. found that task instruction influences the pattern of SNARC effects of certain types of magnitudes which are less rigid in their space-magnitude association .The present study examined the generalizability of this instruction effect using pairwise comparison of nonsymbolic and symbolic stimuli within a wide range of magnitudes. We contrasted performance between trials in which subjects were instructed to select the stimulus representing the smaller versus larger magnitude within each pair. We found an instruction-dependent pattern of SNARC effects for both nonsymbolic and symbolic magnitudes. Specifically, we observed a SNARC effect for the "Select Smaller" instruction, but a reverse SNARC effect for the "Select Larger" instruction. Considered together with previous studies, our findings suggest that nonsymbolic magnitudes and relatively large symbolic magnitudes have greater flexibility in their space-magnitude association.

  16. Solar Variability Magnitudes and Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Greg

    2015-08-01

    The Sun’s net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to many millennia. The former are directly observed as part of the on-going 37-year long total solar irradiance climate data record, while the latter are inferred from solar proxy and stellar evolution models. Since the Sun provides nearly all the energy driving the Earth’s climate system, changes in the sunlight reaching our planet can have - and have had - significant impacts on life and civilizations.Total solar irradiance has been measured from space since 1978 by a series of overlapping instruments. These have shown changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy at the top of the Earth’s atmosphere from timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. The Sun’s ~0.01% variations over a few minutes are caused by the superposition of convection and oscillations, and even occasionally by a large flare. Over days to weeks, changing surface activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle has comparable irradiance variations with peaks near solar maxima.Secular variations are harder to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Proxy models of the Sun based on cosmogenic isotope records and inferred from Earth climate signatures indicate solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitude of these variations depends on many assumptions. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities.In this talk I will summarize the Sun’s variability magnitudes over different temporal ranges, showing examples relevant for climate studies as well as detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  17. Reverse logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); S.D.P. Flapper; R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis paper gives an overview of scientific literature that describes and discusses cases of reverse logistics activities in practice. Over sixty case studies are considered. Based on these studies we are able to indicate critical factors for the practice of reverse logistics. In addi

  18. A facile and versatile approach for controlling electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis via mussel inspired polydopamine/polyethyleneimine co-deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qifeng; Li, Xiuju; Zhang, Qihui; Yang, Fengqing; Wei, Weili; Xia, Zhining

    2015-10-16

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF), which reveals the charge property of capillary inner surface, has an important impact on the separation performance and reproducibility of capillary electrophoresis (CE). In this study, a novel, facile and versatile method to achieve diverse and controllable EOF in CE was reported based on the co-deposition of mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) on the capillary inner surface as the hybrid functional coating. After these PDA/PEI co-deposited columns were reinforced by the post-incubation of FeCl3, various magnitude and direction of EOF in CE could be easily achieved by varying a number of preparation parameters, including the mass ratio of DA/PEI and the molecular weight of PEI (including PEI-600, PEI-1800, PEI-10000 and PEI-70000). The separation effectiveness and stability of the hybrid coated columns were verified by the analysis of aromatic acids and aniline derivatives. The results showed that the controllable and diverse EOF was important in enhancing the separation performance of the analytes. The baseline separation of all the five aromatic acids can be achieved in 7 min with high separation efficiency by using the PDA/PEI-600 co-deposited column with the mass ratio of 6:1. On the other hand, with the PDA/PEI-70000 co-deposited column with the mass ratio of 6:1, the aniline compounds were easily baseline separated within 10 min. By contrast, using the bare and PDA coated columns, the migration of the aromatic acids was very slow and the baseline separation of the aniline compounds cannot be obtained. Moreover, the co-deposited columns showed long lifetime and good stability. The relative standard deviations for intra-day, inter-day and capillary-to-capillary repeatability of the PDA/PEI-600 co-deposited column with the mass ratio of 6:1, which was reinforced by the post-incubation of FeCl3, were all lower than 5%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Characteristics of electroosmotic flow in open-tubular capillary electrochromatography with magnetic nanoparticle coating as mixed-mode stationary phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sasa; Zhou, Chaoran; Zhu, Yaxian; Ren, Zhiyu; Zhang, Lingyi; Fu, Honggang; Zhang, Weibing

    2011-09-01

    A novel open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) column with magnetic nanoparticle coating as mixed-mode stationary phase was prepared. The mixed-mode stationary phases were obtained by mixing C18 and amino modified magnetic nanoparticles with different ratios. The mixed modified magnetic nanoparticles as stationary phase were introduced into the capillary by using external magnetic force. The magnetic nanoparticle coating can be easily regenerated by removing the external magnetic field, and applied to other separation modes. The characteristics of electroosmotic flow (EOF) were theoretically investigated through the effect of physicochemical properties of different stationary phases on EOF. The experiment was conducted under different ratios of mixed-mode stationary phases and coating lengths, and it was verified that the theoretical conclusions accorded with the experimental results. It was shown that the EOF can be easily adjusted by changing the ratio of stationary phases or the number of permanent magnets.

  20. Influence of electroosmotic flow on the ionic current rectification in a pH-regulated, conical nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dong-Huei; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tseng, Shiojenn; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2015-09-01

    The ionic current rectification (ICR) is studied theoretically by considering a pH-regulated, conical nanopore. In particular, the effect of electroosmotic flow (EOF), which was often neglected in previous studies, is investigated by solving a set of coupled Poisson, Nernst-Planck, and Navier-Stokes equations. The behaviors of ICR under various conditions are examined by varying solution pH, bulk ionic concentration, and applied electric potential bias. We show that the EOF effect is significant when the bulk ionic concentration is medium high, the pH is far away from the iso-electric point, and the electric potential bias is high. The percentage deviation in the current rectification ratio arising from neglecting the EOF effect can be on the order of 100%. In addition, the behavior of the current rectification ratio at a high pH taking account of EOF is different both qualitatively and quantitatively from that without taking account of EOF.

  1. Astronomical Limiting Magnitude at Langkawi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Mohd. Zambri; Loon, Chin Wei; Harun, Saedah

    2010-07-01

    Astronomical limiting magnitude is an indicator for astronomer to conduct astronomical measurement at a particular site. It gives an idea to astronomer of that site what magnitude of celestial object can be measured. Langkawi National Observatory (LNO) is situated at Bukit Malut with latitude 6°18' 25'' North and longitude 99°46' 52'' East in Langkawi Island. Sky brightness measurement has been performed at this site using the standard astronomical technique. The value of the limiting magnitude measured is V = 18.6+/-1.0 magnitude. This will indicate that astronomical measurement at Langkawi observatory can only be done for celestial objects having magnitude less than V = 18.6 magnitudes.

  2. Ion conductivity and mass spectrometry of methanol diffusion and electroosmotic drag on proton-conducting membranes for the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC); Ionische Leitfaehigkeit und massenspektrometrische Bestimmung der Methanol-Diffusion und des 'Electroosmotic Drag' an protonenleitenden Membranen fuer die Direkt-Methanol-Brennstoffzelle (DMFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeztuerk, N.

    2001-07-01

    The methanol permeability of the nafion membrane is one reason why the DMFC is not marketable as yet. As a result of diffusion, permeation and electroosmotic drag, methanol is transferred to the kation side where it will reduce the fuel cell performance. Research is going on world-wide to develop new materials that will prevent methanol crossover. The report describes the development of a measuring cell that will provide the necessary information on diffusion, permeation, electroosmotic drag and conductivity. [German] Ein wesentlicher Grund, der die Einfuehrung der DMFC noch verhindert, ist die Methanoldurchlaessigkeit der Nafion-Membran. Durch Diffusion und Permeation und durch den Electroosmotic Drag gelangt Methanol auf die Kathodenseite und fuehrt dann zu einem Leistungsabfall der Brennstoffzelle. Daher werden weltweit neue Materialien entwickelt, die bei guter lonenleitfaehigkeit den Methanol-crossover unterdruecken. Zur Beurteilung und Weiterentwicklung der neuen Materialien werden Informationen zur Diffusion, Permeation, zum Electroosmotic Drag und zur Leitfaehigkeit benoetigt. Um diese Parameter schnell und einfach zu bestimmen, wurde im Rahmen der vorliegenden Arbeit eine Messzelle weiter entwickelt. Diese Messzelle erlaubt die schnelle Bestimmung aller vier wichtigen Parameter. (orig.)

  3. Theory and design method for electro-osmotic consolidation%电渗排水固结的设计理论和方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄艳峰

    2016-01-01

    探讨了电渗法处理大面积深厚软土地基的若干问题,包括:电极材料、能耗、电源功率、设计理论和方法。EKG材料的出现解决了电极腐蚀和电渗能耗过高的问题,现在电渗法在大面积应用中面临的是电源功率要求过高的问题,该问题可以通过轮询通电的方法解决。依据电渗能级梯度理论提出了电渗排水固结的设计方法。时间因子和流量系数是电渗设计方法中的两个关键参数,其中流量系数具有较明显的模型尺寸效应,设计时需要进行修正。%The problems of electro-osmotic consolidation for large scale deep soft ground, including electrode, energy consumption, electric power, theory and design method, are discussed. Innovation of EKG materials has solved the problems of electrode corrosion and high energy consumption in electro-osmotic consolidation. High electric power demand is currently a new challenge for large scale application of electro-osmotic consolidation, and the solution will be the roll polling program embedded in novel designed electric power source. The design method based on the energy level gradient theory of electro-osmotic consolidation is proposed. The time factor and flow coefficient are the key parameters of the design method. The flow coefficient has distinct scale effect, and it needs to be corrected before applied in the design.

  4. The discovery and comparison of symbolic magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dawn; Lu, Hongjing; Holyoak, Keith J

    2014-06-01

    Humans and other primates are able to make relative magnitude comparisons, both with perceptual stimuli and with symbolic inputs that convey magnitude information. Although numerous models of magnitude comparison have been proposed, the basic question of how symbolic magnitudes (e.g., size or intelligence of animals) are derived and represented in memory has received little attention. We argue that symbolic magnitudes often will not correspond directly to elementary features of individual concepts. Rather, magnitudes may be formed in working memory based on computations over more basic features stored in long-term memory. We present a model of how magnitudes can be acquired and compared based on BARTlet, a representationally simpler version of Bayesian Analogy with Relational Transformations (BART; Lu, Chen, & Holyoak, 2012). BARTlet operates on distributions of magnitude variables created by applying dimension-specific weights (learned with the aid of empirical priors derived from pre-categorical comparisons) to more primitive features of objects. The resulting magnitude distributions, formed and maintained in working memory, are sensitive to contextual influences such as the range of stimuli and polarity of the question. By incorporating psychological reference points that control the precision of magnitudes in working memory and applying the tools of signal detection theory, BARTlet is able to account for a wide range of empirical phenomena involving magnitude comparisons, including the symbolic distance effect and the semantic congruity effect. We discuss the role of reference points in cognitive and social decision-making, and implications for the evolution of relational representations.

  5. Determination of the meteor limiting magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingery, A.; Blaauw, R. C.

    2017-09-01

    We present our method to calculate the meteor limiting magnitude. The limiting meteor magnitude defines the faintest magnitude at which all meteors are still detected by a given system. An accurate measurement of the limiting magnitude is important in order to calculate the meteoroid flux from a meteor shower or sporadic source. Since meteor brightness is linked to meteor mass, the limiting magnitude is needed to calculate the limiting mass of the meteor flux measurement. The mass distribution of meteoroids is thought to follow a power law, thus being slightly off in the limiting magnitude can have a significant effect on the measured flux. Sky conditions can change on fairly short timescales; therefore one must monitor the meteor limiting magnitude at regular intervals throughout the night, rather than just measuring it once. We use the stellar limiting magnitude as a proxy of the meteor limiting magnitude. Our method for determining the stellar limiting magnitude and how we transform it into the meteor limiting magnitude is presented. These methods are currently applied to NASA's wide-field meteor camera network to determine nightly fluxes, but are applicable to other camera networks.

  6. Reversible Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  7. Extreme value distribution of earthquake magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Jun Gan; Tung, C. C.

    1983-07-01

    Probability distribution of maximum earthquake magnitude is first derived for an unspecified probability distribution of earthquake magnitude. A model for energy release of large earthquakes, similar to that of Adler-Lomnitz and Lomnitz, is introduced from which the probability distribution of earthquake magnitude is obtained. An extensive set of world data for shallow earthquakes, covering the period from 1904 to 1980, is used to determine the parameters of the probability distribution of maximum earthquake magnitude. Because of the special form of probability distribution of earthquake magnitude, a simple iterative scheme is devised to facilitate the estimation of these parameters by the method of least-squares. The agreement between the empirical and derived probability distributions of maximum earthquake magnitude is excellent.

  8. Instantaneous velocity measurement of AC electroosmotic flows by laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer with high temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Qiao, Rui; Wang, Guiren; Rui Qiao Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the instantaneous response of flows to applied AC electric fields may help understand some unsolved issues in induced-charge electrokinetics and enhance performance of microfluidic devices. Since currently available velocimeters have difficulty in measuring velocity fluctuations with frequency higher than 1 kHz, most experimental studies so far focus only on the average velocity measurement in AC electrokinetic flows. Here, we present measurements of AC electroosmotic flow (AC-EOF) response time in microchannels by a novel velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, i.e. laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA). Several parameters affecting the AC-EOF response time to the applied electric signal were investigated, i.e. channel length, transverse position and solution conductivity. The experimental results show that the EOF response time under a pulsed electric field decreases with the reduction of the microchannel length, distance between the detection position to the wall and the conductivity of the solution. This work could provide a new powerful tool to measure AC electrokinetics and enhance our understanding of AC electrokinetic flows.

  9. Dispersion in oscillatory electro-osmotic flow through a parallel-plate channel with kinetic sorptive exchange at walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝安

    2014-01-01

    Dispersion in time-oscillatory electro-osmotic flows in a slit micro-channel under the effect of kinetic sorptive exchange at walls is theoretically investigated using the homogenization method. The two walls of the channel are considered to be made up of different materials, and therefore have different zeta potentials and sorption coefficients. A general expression for the Taylor disper-sion coefficient under different zeta potentials as well as various sorption conditions at the walls is derived analytically. The disper-sion coefficient is found to be dependent on the oscillation frequency, the Debye parameter, the species partition coefficient, the rea-ction kinetics and the ratio of the wall potentials. The results demonstrate that the presence of wall sorption tends to enhance the dispersion when the oscillation frequency is low, but the effect is negligible in high-frequency oscillatory flows. Moreover, it is found that the dispersion coefficient could be significantly changed by adjusting the relative wall potentials for low-frequency flows.

  10. Relating perturbation magnitude to temporal gene expression in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfrender Michael E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most transcriptional activity is a result of environmental variability. This cause (environment and effect (gene expression relationship is essential to survival in any changing environment. The specific relationship between environmental perturbation and gene expression – and stability of the response – has yet to be measured in detail. We describe a method to quantitatively relate perturbation magnitude to response at the level of gene expression. We test our method using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism and osmotic stress as an environmental stress. Results Patterns of gene expression were measured in response to increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 1.2 M for sixty genes impacted by osmotic shock. Expression of these genes was quantified over five time points using reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. Magnitudes of cumulative response for specific pathways, and the set of all genes, were obtained by combining the temporal response envelopes for genes exhibiting significant changes in expression with time. A linear relationship between perturbation magnitude and response was observed for the range of concentrations studied. Conclusion This study develops a quantitative approach to describe the stability of gene response and pathways to environmental perturbation and illustrates the utility of this approach. The approach should be applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms via the magnitude of response and stability of the transcriptome to environmental change.

  11. Signal Estimation from Short-Time Spectral Magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    magnitude time-scale modification noise reduction 20. ABSTRACT (Continue an reverse aide II necessary and Idtitfy by block number) see other side DO...splendidly. This not only required her pstince and understanding, but also her aid in drafting many of the figures in this theis. .4. TABLE OF CONTENTS...ypeof :st~i~o (0M€ nx()( vih 8 tez~o -30- The sip ambiguity in this equation can be resolved since Conditions 3.1 specify the sip of the first non-zero

  12. Magnitude Anomalies and Propagation of Local Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-31

    statistically significant variation of magnitude anomalies versus one of this above parameters. A contrario, we observed a significant dependance between...enough to demand a more detailed analysis. III - Local dependance of magnitude anomalies. A smoothing of our data on all quakes originating in the same

  13. Reward Magnitude Effects on Temporal Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtress, Tiffany; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Changes in reward magnitude or value have been reported to produce effects on timing behavior, which have been attributed to changes in the speed of an internal pacemaker in some instances and to attentional factors in other cases. The present experiments therefore aimed to clarify the effects of reward magnitude on timing processes. In Experiment…

  14. Local magnitudes of small contained explosions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chael, Eric Paul

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between explosive yield and seismic magnitude has been extensively studied for underground nuclear tests larger than about 1 kt. For monitoring smaller tests over local ranges (within 200 km), we need to know whether the available formulas can be extrapolated to much lower yields. Here, we review published information on amplitude decay with distance, and on the seismic magnitudes of industrial blasts and refraction explosions in the western U. S. Next we measure the magnitudes of some similar shots in the northeast. We find that local magnitudes ML of small, contained explosions are reasonably consistent with the magnitude-yield formulas developed for nuclear tests. These results are useful for estimating the detection performance of proposed local seismic networks.

  15. A Study of LFE Magnitudes in Northern Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostock, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    We have compiled a comprehensive suite of ~250 low-frequency-earthquake (LFE) templates representing spatially distinct tremor sources on or near the plate boundary in northern Cascadia from northern Vancouver Island to southern Washington. Each template is assembled from 100's to 1000's of individual LFEs, representing a total of over 200,000 independent detections spanning a selection of episodic-tremor-and-slip (ETS) events between 2003 and 2013. On the basis of empirical evidence and analytical arguments, these templates can be considered as band-limited, empirical Green's functions excited from shallow-thrust point sources to station locations corresponding to a collection of temporary and permanent network sites. The high fidelity of template match-filtered detections enables precise alignment of individual LFE time series and analysis of LFE amplitudes. Upon correction for geometrical spreading, attenuation, free-surface magnification and radiation pattern, we solve for station-channel amplification factors and LFE magnitudes for all detections corresponding to a given ETS episode. We will present a spatio-temporal analysis of LFE magnitudes including their variability across different ETS events, their dependence in along-dip location, and their expression in different rupture modes, i.e. main front versus rapid tremor reversals of Houston [2011] versus small scale reversals of Rubin and Armbruster [2013].

  16. Discounting Behaviour and the Magnitude Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the claim that individuals exhibit a magnitude effect in their discounting behaviour, where higher discount rates are inferred from choices made with lower principals, all else being equal. If the magnitude effect is quantitatively significant, it is not appropriate to use one discount...... rate that is independent of the scale of the project for cost–benefit analysis and capital budgeting. Using data from a field experiment in Denmark, we find statistically significant evidence of a magnitude effect that is much smaller than is claimed. This evidence surfaces only if one controls...

  17. Low-Power, Low-Voltage Electroosmotic Actuator for an Implantable Micropumping System Intended for Drug Delivery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getpreecharsawas, Jirachai

    An electroosmotic (EO) actuator offers a low-power, low-voltage alternative in a diaphragm-based periodic displacement micropump intended for an implantable drug delivery system. The actuator utilizes an electroosmosis mechanism to transport liquid across a membrane to deflect the pumping diaphragms in a reciprocating manner. In the study, the membrane made of porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) tens of nanometers in thickness was used as the promising EO generator with low power consumption and small package size. This ultrathin membrane provides the opportunity for electrode integration such that the very high electric field can be generated across the membrane with the applied potential under 1 volt for low flow rate applications like drug delivery. Due to such a low applied voltage, the challenge, however, imposes on the capability of generating the pumping pressure high enough to deflect the pumping diaphragms and overcome the back pressure normally encountered in the biological tissue and organ. This research identified the cause of weak pumping pressure that the electric field inside the orifice-like nanopores of the ultrathin membrane is weaker than conventional theory would predict. It no longer scales uniformly with the thickness of membrane, but with the pore length-to-diameter aspect ratio for each nanopore. To enhance the pumping performance, the pnc-Si membrane was coated with an ultrathin Nafion film. As a result, the induced concentration difference across the Nafion film generates the osmotic pressure against the back pressure allowing the EO actuator to maintain the target pumping flow rate under 1 volt.

  18. A New Method to Measure Electroosmotic Flow Mobility of Capillary Electrophoresis by Abrupt Change of Current De-noising via Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Qian-Feng; ZHANG,Xiao-Yun; ZHANG,Hong-Yi; CHEN,Xing-Guo; LIU,Man-Cang; HU,Zhi-De

    2001-01-01

    The electroosmotic flow mobility has been measured by the combination of monitoring the change in electric current dur ing electrophoretic run and operating the wavelet transform. Once the sample solvent zone with different ionic stenggth from background electrolyte migrated from the capillary, a sudden change in current could be observed from the ekectric current record of time history. The exact time (in the middle of abrupt range) corresponding to the abrupt change in cur rent was determined by wavelet transform. This work showed posed method was in a good agreement with the neutral mark er method commonly used.

  19. Reversible Statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tryggestad, Kjell

    2004-01-01

    The study aims is to describe how the inclusion and exclusion of materials and calculative devices construct the boundaries and distinctions between statistical facts and artifacts in economics. My methodological approach is inspired by John Graunt's (1667) Political arithmetic and more recent work...... within constructivism and the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). The result of this approach is here termed reversible statistics, reconstructing the findings of a statistical study within economics in three different ways. It is argued that all three accounts are quite normal, albeit...... in different ways. The presence and absence of diverse materials, both natural and political, is what distinguishes them from each other. Arguments are presented for a more symmetric relation between the scientific statistical text and the reader. I will argue that a more symmetric relation can be achieved...

  20. Seismic hazard in Greece. I. Magnitude recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makropoulos, Kostas C.; Burton, Paul W.

    1985-08-01

    Two different methods are applied to the earthquake catalogue for Greece (Makropoulos and Burton, 1981), MB catalogue, to evaluate Greek seismic hazard in terms of magnitude: earthquake strain energy release and Gumbel's third asymptotic distribution of extreme values. It is found that there is a close relationship between results from the two methods. In places where the cumulative strain energy release graphs include at least one well defined cycle of periodicity of strain release, then the parameters of the third type asymptote are well defined with small uncertainties. In almost all cases the magnitude distribution shows a remarkably good third type asymptotic behaviour. The results are presented in the form of graphs and contour maps of annual and 80-year modes, and magnitudes with 70% probability of not being exceeded in the next 50 and 100 years. For six of the most heavily industrial and highly populated centres of Greece magnitude hazard parameters are also derived and examined in more detail, thereby illustrating the direct applicability of the methods in terms of zoning. The close agreement between observed and predicted extreme magnitudes shows that the sample period considered (1900-1978), is long enough to obtain statistically stable estimates. For Athens the upper bound magnitude is found to be 6.7 ± 0.3 (within 100 km) and 6.8 ± 0.4 (100 km) from the two methods respectively, whereas for Corinth an earthquake of magnitude 6.5 has a mean return period of 43 years. Greece as a whole has an upper bound magnitude 8.7 ± 0.6 and earthquakes of a size similar to the 1903 Kithira event ( M ≈ 8.0) have a mean return period of about 200 years. The significantly different maps contouring magnitudes of the annual and 80-year modes result from the fact that each place has its own distribution curvature for magnitude occurrence, and thus they are not a linear extrapolation of each other. However, as longer return periods are considered, these differences

  1. Relating Perturbation Magnitude to Temporal Gene Expression in Biological Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callister, Stephen J.; Parnell, John J.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Hashsham, Syed

    2009-03-19

    A method to quantitatively relate stress to response at the level of gene expression is described using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Stress was defined as the magnitude of perturbation and strain was defined as the magnitude of cumulative response in terms of gene expression. Expression patterns of sixty genes previously reported to be significantly impacted by osmotic shock or belonging to the high-osmotic glycerol, glycerolipid metabolism, and glycolysis pathways were determined following perturbations of increasing sodium chloride concentrations (0, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, and 1.4 M). Expression of these genes was quantified temporally using reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction. The magnitude of cumulative response was obtained by calculating the total moment of area of the temporal response envelope for all the 60 genes, either together or for the set of genes related to each pathway. A non-linear relationship between stress and response was observed for the range of stress studied. This study examines a quantitative approach to quantify the strain at the level of gene expression to relate stress to strain in biological systems. The approach should be generally applicable to quantitatively evaluate the response of organisms to environmental change.

  2. Magnitude M w in metropolitan France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cara, Michel; Denieul, Marylin; Sèbe, Olivier; Delouis, Bertrand; Cansi, Yves; Schlupp, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    The recent seismicity catalogue of metropolitan France Sismicité Instrumentale de l'Hexagone (SI-Hex) covers the period 1962-2009. It is the outcome of a multipartner project conducted between 2010 and 2013. In this catalogue, moment magnitudes (M w) are mainly determined from short-period velocimetric records, the same records as those used by the Laboratoire de Détection Géophysique (LDG) for issuing local magnitudes (M L) since 1962. Two distinct procedures are used, whether M L-LDG is larger or smaller than 4. For M L-LDG >4, M w is computed by fitting the coda-wave amplitude on the raw records. Station corrections and regional properties of coda-wave attenuation are taken into account in the computations. For M L-LDG ≤4, M w is converted from M L-LDG through linear regression rules. In the smallest magnitude range M L-LDG French networks or LDG duration magnitude (M D) are first converted into M L-LDG before applying the conversion rules. This paper shows how the different sources of information and the different magnitude ranges are combined in order to determine an unbiased set of M w for the whole 38,027 events of the catalogue.

  3. Local magnitude estimate at Mt. Etna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Maiolino

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to verify the duration magnitude MD we calculated local magnitude ML values of 288 earthquakes occurring from October 2002 to April 2003 at Mt. Etna. The analysis was computed at three digital stations of the permanent seismic network of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia of Catania, using the relationship ML = logA+alog?-b, where A is maximum half-amplitude of the horizontal component of the seismic recording measured in mm and the term «+alog?-b» takes the place of the term «-logA0» of Richter relationship. In particular, a = 0.15 for ?<200 km, b=0.16 for ?<200 km. Duration magnitude MD values, moment magnitude MW values and other local magnitude values were compared. Differences between ML and MD were obtained for the strong seismic swarms occurring on October 27, during the onset of 2002-2003 Mt. Etna eruption, characterized by a high earthquake rate, with very strong events (seismogram results clipped in amplitude on drum recorder trace and high level of volcanic tremor, which not permit us to estimate the duration of the earthquakes correctly. ML and MD relationships were related and therefore a new relationship for MD is proposed. Cumulative strain release calculated after the eruption using ML values is about 1.75E+06 J1/2 higher than the one calculated using MD values.

  4. Cortisol extraction through human skin by reverse iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Stephanie A; Heikenfeld, Jason; Brooks, Tiffany; Esfandiari, Leyla; Boyce, Steven; Park, Yoonjee; Kasting, Gerald B

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of cortisol at the surface of the skin would advance the diagnosis and treatment of cortisol-related diseases, or of elevated cortisol levels related to stress in otherwise healthy populations. Reliable and accurate detection of cortisol at the skin surface remains a limiting factor in real-time monitoring of cortisol. To address this limitation, cortisol extraction through excised human skin by reverse iontophoresis was studied in vitro in side-by-side diffusion cells using a radiolabeled probe. The skin was subjected to four direct current regimens (0, 28, 56, 113μAcm(-2)) with the anode in the donor chamber and the cumulative cortisol concentrations recorded in the receiver chamber. The 56 and 113μAcm(-2) regimens significantly increased transport of (3)H-cortisol through the skin, and current density correlated directly with transcutaneous transport of (3)H-cortisol. The threshold of detection of electroosmotic versus passive diffusion of cortisol through the skin was between 28 and 56μAcm(-2). The results of this study are significant in examining how lipophilic analytes found in the bloodstream respond to reverse iontophoresis across the skin. In addition, a device integration technique is presented which illustrates how continuous cortisol extraction and sensing could potentially be achieved in a conventional wearable format.

  5. Representations of the magnitudes of fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael; Siegler, Robert S

    2010-10-01

    We tested whether adults can use integrated, analog, magnitude representations to compare the values of fractions. The only previous study on this question concluded that even college students cannot form such representations and instead compare fraction magnitudes by representing numerators and denominators as separate whole numbers. However, atypical characteristics of the presented fractions might have provoked the use of atypical comparison strategies in that study. In our 3 experiments, university and community college students compared more balanced sets of single-digit and multi-digit fractions and consistently exhibited a logarithmic distance effect. Thus, adults used integrated, analog representations, akin to a mental number line, to compare fraction magnitudes. We interpret differences between the past and present findings in terms of different stimuli eliciting different solution strategies.

  6. Achieving continuity: a story of stellar magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael S.

    2010-03-01

    Scientists tell a story of 2,000 years of stellar magnitude research that traces back to Hipparchus. This story of continuity in practices serves an important role in scientific education and outreach. STS scholars point out many ways that stories of continuity, like many narratives about science, are disconnected from practices. Yet the story of continuity in stellar magnitude is a powerful scientific achievement precisely because of its connection to practice. The historical development of star catalogues shows how specific recording practices connected past and present in a useful way. The narrative of continuity in stellar magnitude, however else it might be subject to STS critique of narrative, maintains its power because of its connection to practice. I suggest that more attention be paid to connections between practice and narrative in STS, and in particular to the ways that historical practices sustain narratives by connecting past and present.

  7. Saccadic compression of symbolic numerical magnitude.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Binda

    Full Text Available Stimuli flashed briefly around the time of saccadic eye movements are subject to complex distortions: compression of space and time; underestimate of numerosity. Here we show that saccadic distortions extend to abstract quantities, affecting the representation of symbolic numerical magnitude. Subjects consistently underestimated the results of rapidly computed mental additions and subtractions, when the operands were briefly displayed before a saccade. However, the recognition of the number symbols was unimpaired. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of a common, abstract metric encoding magnitude along multiple dimensions. They suggest that a surprising link exists between the preparation of action and the representation of abstract quantities.

  8. Axiomatic approaches to Stevens' magnitude scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, Karin; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    In 1996, Narens showed that Stevens’ methods of magnitude scaling are based on but a few qualitative assumptions that are straightforward to evaluate empirically. Two crucial assumptions are commutativity (the outcome of a sequence of two assessments does not depend on their order) and multiplica......In 1996, Narens showed that Stevens’ methods of magnitude scaling are based on but a few qualitative assumptions that are straightforward to evaluate empirically. Two crucial assumptions are commutativity (the outcome of a sequence of two assessments does not depend on their order...

  9. Argument on the magnitude-frequencyrelation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈时军; 王丽凤; 马丽; 张红军

    2002-01-01

    The complexity of seismicity and the relation of magnitude and frequency are discussed in this paper on the basis of nonlinear dynamics and multifractal theory. We argue that seismic active systems normally have multifractal characteristics, either for the spatial-temporal distribution or the intensity distribution of events. In the view of multifractal theory the nonlinear characteristics of the magnitude-frequency relation are discussed and the formulation is revised. Also, one example of the variance of bq estimated based on the recent New Zealand catalogue is enumerated.

  10. Absolute-Magnitude Distributions of Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Maddox, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M_B -15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of -19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at -16.75.

  11. Determinants of Magnitude of Pseudohyperkalemia in Thrombocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Jung; Chung, Choon-Hae; Moon, Chul-Oong; Park, Chan-Gook; Hong, Soon-Pyo; Oh, Man Seok; Carroll, Hugh J.

    1990-01-01

    The release of potassium from platelets is a well-known cause of pseudohyperkalemia in thrombocytosis. In predicting the magnitude of pseudohyperkalemia associated with thrombocytosis, previous investigations considered only the amount of potassium released from platelets during blood clotting, although the increment in serum potassium during blood clotting depends on the quantity of potassium released from platelets as well as the volume of distribution of the released potassium, which is inversely proportionate to the hematocrit. The present study proposes a new mathematical formula to predict the magnitude of increase in serum potassium during blood clotting, and accuracy of this formula has been tested in a patient with thrombocytosis. PMID:2098099

  12. Sol-gel modified poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices with high electroosmotic mobilities and hydrophilic channel wall characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Gregory T; Hlaus, Tyler; Bass, Kevin J; Seelhammer, Todd G; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2005-03-01

    Using a sol-gel method, we have fabricated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchips with SiO2 particles homogeneously distributed within the PDMS polymer matrix. These particles are approximately 10 nm in diameter. To fabricate such devices, PDMS (Sylgard 184) was cast against SU-8 molds. After curing, the chips were carefully removed from the mold and sealed against flat, cured pieces of PDMS to form enclosed channel manifolds. These chips were then solvated in tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), causing them to expand. Subsequently, the chips were placed in an aqueous solution containing 2.8% ethylamine and heated to form nanometer-sized SiO2 particles within the cross-linked PDMS polymer. The water contact angle for the PDMS-SiO2 chips was approximately 90.2 degrees compared to a water contact angle for Sylgard 184 of approximately 108.5 degrees . More importantly, the SiO2 modified PDMS chips showed no rhodamine B absorption after 4 h, indicating a substantially more hydrophilic and nonabsorptive surface than native PDMS. Initial electroosmotic mobilities (EOM) of (8.3+/-0.2)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=2.6% (RSD is relative standard deviation); n=10) were measured. This value was approximately twice that of native Sylgard 184 PDMS chips (4.21+/-0.09)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=2.2%; n=10) and 55% greater than glass chips (5.3+/-0.4)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=7.7%; n=5). After 60 days of dry storage, the EOM was (7.6+/-0.3)x10(-4) cm2/(V.s) (RSD=3.9%; n=3), a decrease of only 8% below that of the initially measured value. Separations performed on these devices generated 80,000-100,000 theoretical plates in 6-14 s for both tetramethylrhodamine succidimidyl ester and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate derivatized amino acids. The separation distance was 3.5 cm. Plots of peak variance vs analyte migration times gave diffusion coefficients which indicate that the separation efficiencies are within 15% of the diffusion limit.

  13. Test of time reversal invariance with TRINE

    CERN Document Server

    Soldner, T; Schreckenbach, K; Bussière, A; Kossakowski, R; Liaud, P; Zimmer, O

    2000-01-01

    The new detector TRINE (time reversal invariance neutron experiment) was developed to test the time reversal invariance in the neutron decay. The precision of former experiments can be improved by one order of magnitude with an improved proton detection, a better background suppression and an angular resolving measurement using multiwire proportional chambers in coincidence with plastic scintillators, and the higher neutron flux and polarization available today. The concept of the detector and the status of the project is discussed.

  14. Test of time reversal invariance with TRINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldner, T.; Beck, L.; Schreckenbach, K.; Bussiere, A.; Kossakowski, R.; Liaud, P.; Zimmer, O

    2000-02-11

    The new detector TRINE (time reversal invariance neutron experiment) was developed to test the time reversal invariance in the neutron decay. The precision of former experiments can be improved by one order of magnitude with an improved proton detection, a better background suppression and an angular resolving measurement using multiwire proportional chambers in coincidence with plastic scintillators, and the higher neutron flux and polarization available today. The concept of the detector and the status of the project is discussed.

  15. Improving Children's Knowledge of Fraction Magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Lisa K.; Kennedy, Casey A.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether playing a computerized fraction game, based on the integrated theory of numerical development and on the Common Core State Standards' suggestions for teaching fractions, would improve children's fraction magnitude understanding. Fourth and fifth-graders were given brief instruction about unit fractions and played "Catch…

  16. Historical revision of the exposure magnitude and the dosimetric magnitudes used in radiological protection; Revision historica de la magnitud exposicion y las magnitudes dosimetricas empleadas en proteccion radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez J, F. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work a historical revision of the exposure magnitude development and their roentgen unit (1905 - 2011) is made, noting that it had their origin in the electric methods for the detection of the ionizing radiation in the period of 1895 at 1937. However, the ionization is not who better characterizes the physical, chemical and biological effects of the ionizing radiations, but is the energy deposited by this radiation in the interest bodies, which led historically to the development of dosimetric magnitudes in energy terms like they are: the absorbed dose D (1950), the kerma K (1958) and the equivalent dose H (1962). These dosimetric magnitudes culminated with the definition of the effective equivalent dose or effective dose which is not measurable and should be considered with the operative magnitudes ICRU: H environmental equivalent dose and/or H directional equivalent dose, which can be determined by means of a conversion coefficient that is applied to the exposure, kerma in air, fluence, etc. (Author)

  17. Fast Regional Magnitude Determination at INGV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, A.; Lomax, A.; Bono, A.; Amato, A.

    2006-12-01

    The recent, very large earthquakes in the Indian Ocean and Indonesia have shown the importance of rapid magnitude determination for tsunami warning. In the Mediterranean region, destructive tsunamis have occurred repeatedly in the past; however, because of the proximity of the tsunami sources to populated coasts, very rapid analysis is necessary for effective warning. Reliable estimates of the earthquake location and size should be available within tens of seconds after the first arriving P-waves are recorded at local and regional distances. Currently in Europe there is no centralized agency such as the PTWC for the Pacific Ocean dedicated to issue tsunami warnings, though, recent initiatives, such as the NEAMTWS (North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System), aim toward the establishment of such an agency. Thus established seismic monitoring centers, such as INGV, Rome, are currently relied upon for rapid earthquake analysis and information dissemination. In this study, we describe the recent, experimental implementation at the INGV seismic center of a procedure for rapid magnitude determination at regional distances based on the Mwp methodology (Tsuboi et al., 1995), which exploits information in the P-wave train. For our Mwp determinations, we have implemented an automatic procedure that windows the relevant part of the seismograms and picks the amplitudes of the first two largest peaks, providing within seconds after each P arrival an estimate of earthquake size. Manual revision is completed using interactive software that presents an analysis with the seismograms, amplitude picks and magnitude estimates. We have compared our Mwp magnitudes for recent earthquakes within the Mediterranean region with Mw determined through the Harvard CMT procedure. For the majority of the events, the Mwp and Mw magnitudes agree closely, indicating that the rapid Mwp estimates forms a useful tool for effective tsunami warning on a regional scale.

  18. From 'sense of number' to 'sense of magnitude' - The role of continuous magnitudes in numerical cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovich, Tali; Katzin, Naama; Harel, Maayan; Henik, Avishai

    2016-08-17

    In this review, we are pitting two theories against each other: the more accepted theory-the 'number sense' theory-suggesting that a sense of number is innate and non-symbolic numerosity is being processed independently of continuous magnitudes (e.g., size, area, density); and the newly emerging theory suggesting that (1) both numerosities and continuous magnitudes are processed holistically when comparing numerosities, and (2) a sense of number might not be innate. In the first part of this review, we discuss the 'number sense' theory. Against this background, we demonstrate how the natural correlation between numerosities and continuous magnitudes makes it nearly impossible to study non-symbolic numerosity processing in isolation from continuous magnitudes, and therefore the results of behavioral and imaging studies with infants, adults and animals can be explained, at least in part, by relying on continuous magnitudes. In the second part, we explain the 'sense of magnitude' theory and review studies that directly demonstrate that continuous magnitudes are more automatic and basic than numerosities. Finally, we present outstanding questions. Our conclusion is that there is not enough convincing evidence to support the number sense theory anymore. Therefore, we encourage researchers not to assume that number sense is simply innate, but to put this hypothesis to the test, and to consider if such an assumption is even testable in light of the correlation of numerosity and continuous magnitudes.

  19. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  20. The Ml Magnitude Scale In Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, P.; Lolli, B.; Filippucci, M.; de Simoni, B.

    To improve the reliability of Ml magnitude estimates in Italy, we have updated the database of real Wood-Anderson (WA) and of simulated Wood Anderson (SWA) am- plitudes recently revised by Gasperini (2002). This was done by the re-reading of orig- inal WA seismograms, made available by the SISMOS Project of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (INGV), as well as by the analysis of further Very Broad Band (VBB) recordings of the MEDNET network of INGV for the period from 1996 to 1998. The full operability, in the last five years, of a VBB station located exactly at the same site (TRI) of a former WA instrument allowed us to reliably infer a new attenuation function from the joined WA and SWA dataset. We found a significant deviation of the attenuation law from the standard Richter table at distances larger than 400 km where the latter overestimates the magnitude up to about 0.3 units. We also computed regionalized attenuation functions accounting for the differences in the propagation properties of seismic waves between the Adriatic (less attenuating) and Tyrrhenian (more attenuating) sides of the Italian peninsula. Using this improved Ml magnitude database we were also able to further improve the computation of duration (Md) and amplitude (Ma) magnitudes computed from short period vertical seismometers of the INGV as well as to analyze the time variation of the station calibrations. We found that the absolute amplification of INGV stations is underestimated almost exactly by a factor 2 starting from the entering upon in operation of the digital acquisition system at INGV in middle 1984.

  1. Toward Order-of-Magnitude Cascade Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Ruocheng; Shaabani, Elham; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; Shakarian, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    When a piece of information (microblog, photograph, video, link, etc.) starts to spread in a social network, an important question arises: will it spread to "viral" proportions -- where "viral" is defined as an order-of-magnitude increase. However, several previous studies have established that cascade size and frequency are related through a power-law - which leads to a severe imbalance in this classification problem. In this paper, we devise a suite of measurements based on "structural dive...

  2. Log-scaling magnitude modulated watermarking scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING HeFei; YUAN WuGang; ZOU FuHao; LU ZhengDing

    2007-01-01

    A real-time watermarking scheme with high robustness and security has been proposed based on modulating the log-scaling magnitudes of DCT coefficients,which is most suitable for JPEG images and MPEG streams. The watermark bit is encoded as the sign of the difference between the individual log-scaling magnitude of a group-region and the average one of all group-regions. The log-scaling magnitude can be modulated by modifying the low and middle frequency DCT coefficients imperceptibly. The robustness of scheme is not only dependent on those largest coefficients, but also on the other coefficients with the same proportion. It can embed 512 bits into an image with a size of 512×512, which can satisfy the payload requirement of most video watermarking applications. Moreover, the watermark embedding process only requires one-sixth of the time consumed during normal playing of video, and the watermark detection only requires one-twelfth of that, which can meet the real-time requirements of most video watermarking applications. Furthermore, the experimental results show that the presented scheme is transparent and robust to significant valumetric distortions (including additive noise, low-pass filtering, lossy compression and valumetric scaling) and a part of geometric distortions. It performs much better than the EMW algorithm in resisting all kinds of distortions except Gaussian noise with a larger deviation.

  3. Subsidence crack closure: rate, magnitude and sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Graff, J.V.; Romesburg, H.C.

    1981-06-01

    Tension cracks are a major surface disturbance resulting from subsidence and differential settlement above underground coal mines. Recent engineering studies of subsidence indicate that cracks may close where tensile stresses causing the cracks are reduced or relaxed. This stress reduction occurs as mining in the area is completed. Crack closure was confirmed by a study in the Wasatch Plateau coal field of central Utah. Cracks occurred in both exposed bedrock and regolith in an area with maximum subsidence of 3 m. Mean closure rate was 0.3 cm per week with individual crack closure rates between 0.2 cm and 1.0 cm per week. The mean crack closure magnitude was 80% with closure magnitudes varying between 31% and 100%. Actual magnitude values ranged from 0.6 cm to 6.5 cm with a mean value of 3.8 cm. Statistical analysis compared width change status among cracks over time. It was found that: 1) a 41% probability existed that a crack would exhibit decreasing width per weekly measurement, 2) closure state sequences seem random over time, and 3) real differences in closure state sequence existed among different cracks. (6 refs.) (In English)

  4. Maximum magnitude earthquakes induced by fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, Arthur F.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of numerous case histories of earthquake sequences induced by fluid injection at depth reveals that the maximum magnitude appears to be limited according to the total volume of fluid injected. Similarly, the maximum seismic moment seems to have an upper bound proportional to the total volume of injected fluid. Activities involving fluid injection include (1) hydraulic fracturing of shale formations or coal seams to extract gas and oil, (2) disposal of wastewater from these gas and oil activities by injection into deep aquifers, and (3) the development of enhanced geothermal systems by injecting water into hot, low-permeability rock. Of these three operations, wastewater disposal is observed to be associated with the largest earthquakes, with maximum magnitudes sometimes exceeding 5. To estimate the maximum earthquake that could be induced by a given fluid injection project, the rock mass is assumed to be fully saturated, brittle, to respond to injection with a sequence of earthquakes localized to the region weakened by the pore pressure increase of the injection operation and to have a Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution with a b value of 1. If these assumptions correctly describe the circumstances of the largest earthquake, then the maximum seismic moment is limited to the volume of injected liquid times the modulus of rigidity. Observations from the available case histories of earthquakes induced by fluid injection are consistent with this bound on seismic moment. In view of the uncertainties in this analysis, however, this should not be regarded as an absolute physical limit.

  5. Maximum magnitude earthquakes induced by fluid injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, A.

    2014-02-01

    Analysis of numerous case histories of earthquake sequences induced by fluid injection at depth reveals that the maximum magnitude appears to be limited according to the total volume of fluid injected. Similarly, the maximum seismic moment seems to have an upper bound proportional to the total volume of injected fluid. Activities involving fluid injection include (1) hydraulic fracturing of shale formations or coal seams to extract gas and oil, (2) disposal of wastewater from these gas and oil activities by injection into deep aquifers, and (3) the development of enhanced geothermal systems by injecting water into hot, low-permeability rock. Of these three operations, wastewater disposal is observed to be associated with the largest earthquakes, with maximum magnitudes sometimes exceeding 5. To estimate the maximum earthquake that could be induced by a given fluid injection project, the rock mass is assumed to be fully saturated, brittle, to respond to injection with a sequence of earthquakes localized to the region weakened by the pore pressure increase of the injection operation and to have a Gutenberg-Richter magnitude distribution with a b value of 1. If these assumptions correctly describe the circumstances of the largest earthquake, then the maximum seismic moment is limited to the volume of injected liquid times the modulus of rigidity. Observations from the available case histories of earthquakes induced by fluid injection are consistent with this bound on seismic moment. In view of the uncertainties in this analysis, however, this should not be regarded as an absolute physical limit.

  6. Magnitude-frequency of sea cliff instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. S. F. Marques

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude-frequency relationship of sea cliff failures in strong, low retreat rate cliffs, was studied using systematic historical inventories carried out in the coasts of Portugal and Morocco, in different geological and geomorphological settings, covering a wide size scale, from small to comparatively large rockslides, topples and rockfalls, at different time and spatial scales. The magnitude-frequency expressed in terms of volume displaced and of horizontal area lost at the cliff top showed good fit by inverse power laws of the type p=a.x−b, with a values from 0.2 to 0.3, and exponents b close to 1.0, similar to those proposed for rockfall inventories. The proposed power laws address the magnitude-frequency for sea cliff failures, which is an important component of hazard assessment, to be completed with adequate models for space and time hazard components. Maximum local retreat at the cliff top provided acceptable fitting to inverse power laws only for failures wider than 2m, with a = 4.0, and exponent b = 2.3, which may be useful to assess the cliff retreat hazard for the use of areas located near the cliff top.

  7. Local magnitude scale for earthquakes in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, T.; Ottemöller, L.; Havskov, J.; Yanık, K.; Kılıçarslan, Ö.; Alver, F.; Özyazıcıoğlu, M.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the earthquake event data accumulated by the Turkish National Seismic Network between 2007 and 2013, the local magnitude (Richter, Ml) scale is calibrated for Turkey and the close neighborhood. A total of 137 earthquakes (Mw > 3.5) are used for the Ml inversion for the whole country. Three Ml scales, whole country, East, and West Turkey, are developed, and the scales also include the station correction terms. Since the scales for the two parts of the country are very similar, it is concluded that a single Ml scale is suitable for the whole country. Available data indicate the new scale to suffer from saturation beyond magnitude 6.5. For this data set, the horizontal amplitudes are on average larger than vertical amplitudes by a factor of 1.8. The recommendation made is to measure Ml amplitudes on the vertical channels and then add the logarithm scale factor to have a measure of maximum amplitude on the horizontal. The new Ml is compared to Mw from EMSC, and there is almost a 1:1 relationship, indicating that the new scale gives reliable magnitudes for Turkey.

  8. Scaling Relations of Local Magnitude versus Moment Magnitude for Sequences of Similar Earthquakes in Switzerland

    KAUST Repository

    Bethmann, F.

    2011-03-22

    Theoretical considerations and empirical regressions show that, in the magnitude range between 3 and 5, local magnitude, ML, and moment magnitude, Mw, scale 1:1. Previous studies suggest that for smaller magnitudes this 1:1 scaling breaks down. However, the scatter between ML and Mw at small magnitudes is usually large and the resulting scaling relations are therefore uncertain. In an attempt to reduce these uncertainties, we first analyze the ML versus Mw relation based on 195 events, induced by the stimulation of a geothermal reservoir below the city of Basel, Switzerland. Values of ML range from 0.7 to 3.4. From these data we derive a scaling of ML ~ 1:5Mw over the given magnitude range. We then compare peak Wood-Anderson amplitudes to the low-frequency plateau of the displacement spectra for six sequences of similar earthquakes in Switzerland in the range of 0:5 ≤ ML ≤ 4:1. Because effects due to the radiation pattern and to the propagation path between source and receiver are nearly identical at a particular station for all events in a given sequence, the scatter in the data is substantially reduced. Again we obtain a scaling equivalent to ML ~ 1:5Mw. Based on simulations using synthetic source time functions for different magnitudes and Q values estimated from spectral ratios between downhole and surface recordings, we conclude that the observed scaling can be explained by attenuation and scattering along the path. Other effects that could explain the observed magnitude scaling, such as a possible systematic increase of stress drop or rupture velocity with moment magnitude, are masked by attenuation along the path.

  9. Flow of Power-Law Liquids in a Hele-Shaw Cell Driven by Non-Uniform Electroosmotic Slip in the Case of Strong Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran; Gat, Amir

    2016-11-01

    We analyze flow of a non-Newtonian fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell, subjected to spatially non-uniform electroosmotic flow. We specifically focus on power-law fluids with wall depletion properties and derive a p-Poisson equation governing the pressure field, as well as a set of linearized equations representing its asymptotic approximation for weakly non-Newtonian behavior. To investigate the effect of non-Newtonian properties on the resulting fluidic pressure and velocity, we consider several configurations in one and two dimensions, and calculate both exact and approximate solutions. We show that the asymptotic approximation is in good agreement with exact solutions even for fluids with significant non-Newtonian behavior. The asymptotic model thus enables prediction of the flow and pressure fields for non-Newtonian fluids, and may be particularly useful for the analysis and design of microfluidic systems involving electro-kinetic transport of such fluids.

  10. Flow of Power-Law Liquids in a Hele-Shaw Cell Driven by Non-Uniform Electroosmotic Slip in the Case of Strong Depletion

    CERN Document Server

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Gat, Amir D

    2016-01-01

    We analyze flow of non-Newtonian fluids in a Hele-Shaw cell, subjected to spatially non-uniform electroosmotic slip. Motivated by their potential use for increasing the characteristic pressure fields, we specifically focus on power-law fluids with wall depletion properties. We derive a p-Poisson equation governing the pressure field, as well as a set of linearized equations representing its asymptotic approximation for weakly non-Newtonian behavior. To investigate the effect of non-Newtonian properties on the resulting fluidic pressure and velocity, we consider several configurations in one- and two-dimensions, and calculate both exact and approximate solutions. We show that the asymptotic approximation is in good agreement with exact solutions even for fluids with significant non-Newtonian behavior, allowing its use in the analysis and design of microfluidic systems involving electro-kinetic transport of such fluids.

  11. A simple method for assessment and minimization of errors in determination of electrophoretic or electroosmotic mobilities and velocities associated with the axial electric field distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Paweł Mateusz; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2015-12-01

    It is commonly accepted that the modern CE instruments equipped with efficient cooling system enable accurate determination of electrophoretic or electroosmotic mobilities. It is also often assumed that velocity of migration in a given buffer is constant throughout the capillary length. It is simultaneously neglected that the noncooled parts of capillary produce extensive Joule heating leading to an axial electric field distortion, which contributes to a difference between the effective and nominal electric field potentials and between velocities in the cooled and noncooled parts of capillary. This simplification introduces systematic errors, which so far were however not investigated experimentally. There was also no method proposed for their elimination. We show a simple and fast method allowing for estimation and elimination of these errors that is based on combination of a long-end and short-end injections. We use it to study the effects caused by variation of temperature, electric field, capillary length, and pH.

  12. Apparent magnitude of earthshine: a simple calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Dulli Chandra

    2016-05-01

    The Sun illuminates both the Moon and the Earth with practically the same luminous fluxes which are in turn reflected by them. The Moon provides a dim light to the Earth whereas the Earth illuminates the Moon with somewhat brighter light which can be seen from the Earth and is called earthshine. As the amount of light reflected from the Earth depends on part of the Earth and the cloud cover, the strength of earthshine varies throughout the year. The measure of the earthshine light is luminance, which is defined in photometry as the total luminous flux of light hitting or passing through a surface. The expression for the earthshine light in terms of the apparent magnitude has been derived for the first time and evaluated for two extreme cases; firstly, when the Sun’s rays are reflected by the water of the oceans and secondly when the reflector is either thick clouds or snow. The corresponding values are -1.30 and -3.69, respectively. The earthshine value -3.22 reported by Jackson lies within these apparent magnitudes. This paper will motivate the students and teachers of physics to look for the illuminated Moon by earthlight during the waning or waxing crescent phase of the Moon and to reproduce the expressions derived here by making use of the inverse-square law of radiation, Planck’s expression for the power in electromagnetic radiation, photopic spectral luminous efficiency function and expression for the apparent magnitude of a body in terms of luminous fluxes.

  13. Strong motion duration and earthquake magnitude relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, M.W.; Short, S.A. [EQE International, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Kennedy, R.P. [RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting, Yorba Linda, CA (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Earthquake duration is the total time of ground shaking from the arrival of seismic waves until the return to ambient conditions. Much of this time is at relatively low shaking levels which have little effect on seismic structural response and on earthquake damage potential. As a result, a parameter termed ``strong motion duration`` has been defined by a number of investigators to be used for the purpose of evaluating seismic response and assessing the potential for structural damage due to earthquakes. This report presents methods for determining strong motion duration and a time history envelope function appropriate for various evaluation purposes, for earthquake magnitude and distance, and for site soil properties. There are numerous definitions of strong motion duration. For most of these definitions, empirical studies have been completed which relate duration to earthquake magnitude and distance and to site soil properties. Each of these definitions recognizes that only the portion of an earthquake record which has sufficiently high acceleration amplitude, energy content, or some other parameters significantly affects seismic response. Studies have been performed which indicate that the portion of an earthquake record in which the power (average rate of energy input) is maximum correlates most closely with potential damage to stiff nuclear power plant structures. Hence, this report will concentrate on energy based strong motion duration definitions.

  14. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse logistics. The thesis brings insights on reverse logistics decision-making and it lays down theoretical principles for reverse logistics as a research field.In particular it puts together a framework ...

  15. Violence against women: global scope and magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Charlotte; Zimmerman, Cathy

    2002-04-06

    An increasing amount of research is beginning to offer a global overview of the extent of violence against women. In this paper we discuss the magnitude of some of the most common and most severe forms of violence against women: intimate partner violence; sexual abuse by non-intimate partners; trafficking, forced prostitution, exploitation of labour, and debt bondage of women and girls; physical and sexual violence against prostitutes; sex selective abortion, female infanticide, and the deliberate neglect of girls; and rape in war. There are many potential perpetrators, including spouses and partners, parents, other family members, neighbours, and men in positions of power or influence. Most forms of violence are not unique incidents but are ongoing, and can even continue for decades. Because of the sensitivity of the subject, violence is almost universally under-reported. Nevertheless, the prevalence of such violence suggests that globally, millions of women are experiencing violence or living with its consequences.

  16. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficko, Bradley W., E-mail: Bradley.W.Ficko@Dartmouth.edu; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-03-15

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R{sup 2}=0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R{sup 2}>0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. - Highlights: • Development of a nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging model • Demonstration of nonlinear SMI with primary and harmonic frequencies • Demonstration of nonlinear SMI with primary and intermodulation

  17. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse

  18. Managing Reverse Logistics or Reversing Logistics Management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the past, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics from raw material to the end customer. Today an increasing flow of products is going back in the chain. Thus, companies have to manage reverse logistics as well.This thesis contributes to a better understanding of reverse log

  19. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  20. Extended arrays for nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2016-01-01

    This study implements nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) with multifrequency intermodulation and phase encoding. An imaging grid was constructed of cylindrical wells of 3.5-mm diameter and 4.2-mm height on a hexagonal two-dimensional 61-voxel pattern with 5-mm spacing. Patterns of sample wells were filled with 40-μl volumes of Fe3O4 starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm and a concentration of 25 mg/ml. The imaging hardware was configured with three excitation coils and three detection coils in anticipation that a larger imaging system will have arrays of excitation and detection coils. Hexagonal and bar patterns of mNP were successfully imaged (R2 > 0.9) at several orientations. This SMI demonstration extends our prior work to feature a larger coil array, enlarged field-of-view, effective phase encoding scheme, reduced mNP sample size, and more complex imaging patterns to test the feasibility of extending the method beyond the pilot scale. The results presented in this study show that nonlinear SMI holds promise for further development into a practical imaging system for medical applications. PMID:26124044

  1. Childhood Cataract: Magnitude, Management, Economics and Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BR Shamanna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of blindness among children in different regions varies from 0.2/1000 children to over 1.5/1000 children with a global figure estimated at 0.7/1000. This means that there are an estimated 1.4 million blind children worldwide.1 The proportion of blindness in children due to cataract varies considerably between regions from 10%-30% with a global average estimated at 14%, giving 190,000 children blind from cataract. 2 While the magnitude of childhood cataracts varies from place to place, it is a priority within all blindness control programmes for children. Children who are blind have to overcome a lifetime of emotional, social and economic difficulties which affect the child, the family and society.3 Loss of vision in children influences their education, employment and social life. The numbers blind with cataract do not reflect the years of disability and lost quality of life. Childhood blindness is second only to adult cataract as a cause of blind-person years. Approximately 70 million blind-person years are caused by childhood blindness of which about 10 million blind-person years (14% is due to childhood cataract. Timely recognition and intervention can eliminate blind-years due to childhood cataract, as the condition is treatable.

  2. Evolution and Magnitudes of Candidate Planet Nine

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, Esther F

    2016-01-01

    Context. Given the recently renewed interest in a possible additional major body in the outer Solar System, the thermodynamic evolution of such an object was studied, assuming that it is a smaller version of Uranus and Neptune. Aims. We have modeled the temporal evolution of the radius, temperature, intrinsic luminosity, and the black body spectrum of distant ice giants. The aim is to provide also estimates of the magnitudes in different bands to assess the object's detectability. Methods. Simulations of the cooling and contraction were conducted for ice giants with masses of 5, 10, 20, and 50 Mearth containing 10, 14, 21, and 37 % H/He in mass that are located at 280, 700, and 1120 AU from the Sun. The core composition was varied from purely rocky to purely icy as well as 50% rock and 50% ice. The atmospheric opacity was set to 1, 50, and 100 times solar metallicity. Results. We find for the nominal 10 Mearth planet at 700 AU at the current age of the Solar System an effective temperature of 47 K, much more ...

  3. Reverse logistics - a framework

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Marisa; Dekker, Rommert

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we define and compare Reverse Logistics definitions. We start by giving an understanding framework of Reverse Logistics: the why-what-how. By this means, we put in context the driving forces for Reverse Logistics, a typology of return reasons, a classification of products, processes and actors. In addition we provide a decision framework for Reverse Logistics and we present it according to long, medium and short term decisions, i.e. strategic-tactic-operational decis...

  4. Reverse cholesterol transport revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Astrid; E; van; der; Velde

    2010-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport was originally described as the high-density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol flux from the periphery via the hepatobiliary tract to the intestinal lumen, leading to fecal excretion. Since the introduction of reverse cholesterol transport in the 1970s, this pathway has been intensively investigated. In this topic highlight, the classical reverse cholesterol transport concepts are discussed and the subject reverse cholesterol transport is revisited.

  5. Reverse logistics - a framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we define and compare Reverse Logistics definitions. We start by giving an understanding framework of Reverse Logistics: the why-what-how. By this means, we put in context the driving forces for Reverse Logistics, a typology of return reasons, a classification of product

  6. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2=0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2>0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI.

  7. The moment magnitude M w and the energy magnitude M e: common roots and differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Peter; di Giacomo, Domenico

    2011-04-01

    Starting from the classical empirical magnitude-energy relationships, in this article, the derivation of the modern scales for moment magnitude M w and energy magnitude M e is outlined and critically discussed. The formulas for M w and M e calculation are presented in a way that reveals, besides the contributions of the physically defined measurement parameters seismic moment M 0 and radiated seismic energy E S, the role of the constants in the classical Gutenberg-Richter magnitude-energy relationship. Further, it is shown that M w and M e are linked via the parameter Θ = log( E S/ M 0), and the formula for M e can be written as M e = M w + (Θ + 4.7)/1.5. This relationship directly links M e with M w via their common scaling to classical magnitudes and, at the same time, highlights the reason why M w and M e can significantly differ. In fact, Θ is assumed to be constant when calculating M w. However, variations over three to four orders of magnitude in stress drop Δ σ (as well as related variations in rupture velocity V R and seismic wave radiation efficiency η R) are responsible for the large variability of actual Θ values of earthquakes. As a result, for the same earthquake, M e may sometimes differ by more than one magnitude unit from M w. Such a difference is highly relevant when assessing the actual damage potential associated with a given earthquake, because it expresses rather different static and dynamic source properties. While M w is most appropriate for estimating the earthquake size (i.e., the product of rupture area times average displacement) and thus the potential tsunami hazard posed by strong and great earthquakes in marine environs, M e is more suitable than M w for assessing the potential hazard of damage due to strong ground shaking, i.e., the earthquake strength. Therefore, whenever possible, these two magnitudes should be both independently determined and jointly considered. Usually, only M w is taken as a unified magnitude in many

  8. Comparison between different earthquake magnitudes determined by China Seismograph Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-feng; CHEN Yun-tai; REN Xiao; XU Zhi-guo; SUN Li; YANG Hui; LIANG Jian-hong; REN Ke-xin

    2007-01-01

    By linear regression and orthogonal regression methods, comparisons are made between different magnitudes (local magnitude ML, surface wave magnitudes MS and MS7, long-period body wave magnitude mB and short-period body wave magnitude mb) determined by Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, on the basis of observation data collected by China Seismograph Network between 1983 and 2004. Empirical relations between different magnitudes have been obtained. The result shows that: ①As different magnitude scales reflect radiated energy by seismic waves within different periods, earthquake magnitudes can be described more objectively by using different scales for earthquakes of different magnitudes. When the epicentral distance is less than 1 000 km, local magnitude ML can be a preferable scale; In case MMS, i.e., MS underestimates magnitudes of such events, therefore, mB can be a better choice; In case M>6.0, MS>mB>mb, both mB and mb underestimate the magnitudes, so MS is a preferable scale for determining magnitudes of such events (6.08.5, a saturation phenomenon appears in MS, which cannot give an accurate reflection of the magnitudes of such large events; ②In China, when the epicentral distance is less than 1 000 km, there is almost no difference between ML and MS, and thus there is no need to convert between the two magnitudes in practice; ③Although MS and MS7 are both surface wave magnitudes, MS is in general greater than MS7 by 0.2~0.3 magnitude, because different instruments and calculation formulae are used; ④mB is almost equal to mb for earthquakes around mB4.0, but mB is larger than mb for those of mB(4.5, because the periods of seismic waves used for measuring mB and mb are different though the calculation formulae are the same.

  9. Pico-force optical exchange (pico-FOX): utilizing optical forces applied to an orthogonal electroosmotic flow for particulate enrichment from mixed sample streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Sarah J R; Kim, Soo Y; Hart, Sean J; Collins, Greg E; Terray, Alex

    2013-09-17

    Results are reported from a combined optical force and electrokinetic microfluidic device that separates individual particulates from molecular components in a mixed sample stream. A pico-Newton optical force was applied to an orthogonal electroosmotic flow carrying a hydrodynamically pinched, mixed sample, resulting in the separation of the various particles from the sample stream. Different combinations of polystyrene, PMMA, and silica particles with a commercially available dye were utilized to test the different separation modes available, from purely optical force to combined optical and electrophoretic forces. The impact of various particle properties on particle separation and separation efficiency were explored, including size (2, 6, 10 μm), refractive index, and electrophoretic mobility. Particle addressability was achieved by moving particles to different outlets on the basis of particle size, refractive index, and electrophoretic differences. Separations of 6 and 10 μm polystyrene particles led to only 3% particle contamination in the original sample stream and interparticle type enrichment levels >80%. The unique addressability of three different particle materials (polystyrene, PMMA, and silica) of the same size (2 μm) led to each being separated into a unique outlet without measurable contamination of the other particle types using optical force and electrophoretic mobility. In addition to particle separation, the device was able to minimize dye diffusion, leading to >95% dye recovery. This combined platform would have applications for noninvasive sample preparation of mixed molecular/particulate systems for mating with traditional analytics as well as efficient removal of harmful, degrading components from complex mixtures.

  10. Electro-osmotic flow of power-law fluid and heat transfer in a micro-channel with effects of Joule heating and thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shit, G. C.; Mondal, A.; Sinha, A.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for studying the electro-osmotic flow and heat transfer of bio-fluids in a micro-channel in the presence of Joule heating effects. The flow of bio-fluid is governed by the non-Newtonian power-law fluid model. The effects of thermal radiation and velocity slip condition have been examined in the case of hydrophobic channel. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation governing the electrical double layer field and a body force generated by the applied electric potential field are taken into consideration. The results presented here pertain to the case where the height of the channel is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer comprising the Stern and diffuse layers. The expressions for flow characteristics such as velocity, temperature, shear stress and Nusselt number have been derived analytically under the purview of the present model. The results estimated on the basis of the data available in the existing scientific literatures are presented graphically. The effects of thermal radiation have an important bearing on the therapeutic procedure of hyperthermia, particularly in understanding the heat transfer in micro-channel in the presence of electric potential. The dimensionless Joule heating parameter has a reducing impact on Nusselt number for both pseudo-plastic and dilatant fluids, nevertheless its impact on Nusselt number is more pronounced for dilatant fluid. Furthermore, the effect of viscous dissipation has a significant role in controlling heat transfer and should not be neglected.

  11. Development of a bi-functional silica monolith for electro-osmotic pumping and DNA clean-up/extraction using gel-supported reagents in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Jennifer A; Shaw, Kirsty J; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Greenman, John; Greenway, Gillian M; Haswell, Stephen J

    2009-06-07

    A silica monolith used to support both electro-osmotic pumping (EOP) and the extraction/elution of DNA coupled with gel-supported reagents is described. The benefits of the combined EOP extraction/elution system were illustrated by combining DNA extraction and gene amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process. All the reagents necessary for both processes were supported within pre-loaded gels that allow the reagents to be stored at 4 degrees C for up to four weeks in the microfluidic device. When carrying out an analysis the crude sample only needed to be hydrodynamically introduced into the device which was connected to an external computer controlled power supply via platinum wire electrodes. DNA was extracted with 65% efficiency after loading lysed cells onto a silica monolith. Ethanol contained within an agarose gel matrix was then used to wash unwanted debris away from the sample by EOP (100 V cm(-1) for 5 min). The retained DNA was subsequently eluted from the monolith by water contained in a second agarose gel, again by EOP using an electric field of 100 V cm(-1) for 5 min, and transferred into the PCR reagent containing gel. The eluted DNA in solution was successfully amplified by PCR, confirming that the concept of a complete self-contained microfluidic device could be realised for DNA sample clean up and amplification, using a simple pumping and on-chip reagent storage methodology.

  12. Effect of interfacial Maxwell stress on time periodic electro-osmotic flow in a thin liquid film with a flat interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayur, Manik; Amiroudine, Sakir; Lasseux, Didier; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    Electro-osmotic flows (EOF) have seen remarkable applications in lab-on-a-chip based microdevices owing to their lack of moving components, durability, and nondispersive nature of the flow profiles under specifically designed conditions. However, such flows may typically suffer from classical Faradaic artifacts like electrolysis of the solvent, which affects the flow rate control. Such a problem has been seen to be overcome by employing time periodic EOFs. Electric field induced transport of a conductive liquid is another nontrivial problem that requires careful study of interfacial dynamics in response to such an oscillatory flow actuation. The present study highlights the role of electric field generated Maxwell stress and free surface potential along with the electric double layer thickness and forcing frequency, toward influencing the interfacial transport and fluid flow in free-surface electro-osmosis under a periodically varying external electric field, in a semi-analytical formalism. Our results reveal interesting regimes over which the pertinent interfacial phenomena as well as bulk transport characteristics may be favorably tuned by employing time varying electrical fields.

  13. Exploring the relationship between the magnitudes of seismic events

    CERN Document Server

    Spassiani, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of the magnitudes of seismic events is generally assumed to be independent on past seismicity. However, by considering events in causal relation, for example mother-daughter, it seems natural to assume that the magnitude of a daughter event is conditionally dependent on the one of the corresponding mother event. In order to find experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis, we analyze different catalogs, both real and simulated, in two different ways. From each catalog, we obtain the law of triggered events' magnitude by kernel density. The results obtained show that the distribution density of triggered events' magnitude varies with the magnitude of their corresponding mother events. As the intuition suggests, an increase of mother events' magnitude induces an increase of the probability of having "high" values of triggered events' magnitude. In addition, we see a statistically significant increasing linear dependence of the magnitude means.

  14. Numerical Magnitude Processing in Children with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquiere, Pol; De Smedt, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated numerical magnitude processing in children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and examined whether these children have difficulties in the ability to represent numerical magnitudes and/or difficulties in the ability to access numerical magnitudes from formal symbols. We compared the performance of 26 children…

  15. Symbolic Magnitude Modulates Perceptual Strength in Binocular Rivalry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffen, Chris L. E.; Plukaard, Sarah; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Basic aspects of magnitude (such as luminance contrast) are directly represented by sensory representations in early visual areas. However, it is unclear how symbolic magnitudes (such as Arabic numerals) are represented in the brain. Here we show that symbolic magnitude affects binocular rivalry: perceptual dominance of numbers and objects of…

  16. 48 CFR 1852.236-74 - Magnitude of requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Magnitude of requirement... 1852.236-74 Magnitude of requirement. As prescribed in 1836.570(d), insert the following provision: Magnitude of Requirement (DEC 1988) The Government estimated price range of this project is...

  17. Reversible cortical blindness: posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Das, Somnath; Gupta, Anindya; Biswas, Jaya; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Biswas, Gautam

    2010-11-01

    Cortical blindness is defined as visual failure with preserved pupillary reflexes in structurally intact eyes due to bilateral lesions affecting occipital cortex. Bilateral oedema and infarction of the posterior and middle cerebral arterial territory, trauma, glioma and meningioma of the occipital cortex are the main causes of cortical blindness. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) refers to the reversible subtype of cortical blindness and is usually associated with hypertension, diabetes, immunosuppression, puerperium with or without eclampsia. Here, 3 cases of PRES with complete or partial visual recovery following treatment in 6-month follow-up are reported.

  18. Introduction to reversible computing

    CERN Document Server

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Few books comprehensively cover the software and programming aspects of reversible computing. Filling this gap, Introduction to Reversible Computing offers an expanded view of the field that includes the traditional energy-motivated hardware viewpoint as well as the emerging application-motivated software approach. Collecting scattered knowledge into one coherent account, the book provides a compendium of both classical and recently developed results on reversible computing. It explores up-and-coming theories, techniques, and tools for the application of rever

  19. Reversible Logic Circuit Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Shende, V V; Markov, I L; Prasad, A K; Hayes, John P.; Markov, Igor L.; Prasad, Aditya K.; Shende, Vivek V.

    2002-01-01

    Reversible, or information-lossless, circuits have applications in digital signal processing, communication, computer graphics and cryptography. They are also a fundamental requirement for quantum computation. We investigate the synthesis of reversible circuits that employ a minimum number of gates and contain no redundant input-output line-pairs (temporary storage channels). We propose new constructions for reversible circuits composed of NOT, Controlled-NOT, and TOFFOLI gates (the CNT gate library) based on permutation theory. A new algorithm is given to synthesize optimal reversible circuits using an arbitrary gate library. We also describe much faster heuristic algorithms. We also pursue applications of the proposed techniques to the synthesis of quantum circuits.

  20. Reverse Core Engine with Thrust Reverser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An engine system has a gas generator, a bi-fi wall surrounding at least a portion of the gas generator, a casing surrounding a fan, and the casing having first and second thrust reverser doors which in a deployed position abut each other and the bi-fi wall.

  1. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubitt, Toby [Department of Computer Science, University College London, London, United Kingdom and Centre for Quantum Information and Foundations, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kastoryano, Michael [NBIA, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Montanaro, Ashley [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Temme, Kristan [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  2. Clocked Thrust Reversers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An aircraft includes a fuselage including a propulsion system supported within an aft portion. A thrust reverser is mounted proximate to the propulsion system for directing thrust in a direction to slow the aircraft. The thrust reverser directs thrust at an angle relative to a vertical plane to reduce interference on control surfaces and reduce generation of underbody lift.

  3. Atrioventricular Pacemaker Lead Reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet K Aktas, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During cardiac surgery temporary epicardial atrial and ventricular leads are placed in case cardiac pacing is required postoperatively. We present the first reported series of patients with reversal of atrioventricular electrodes in the temporary pacemaker without any consequent deleterious hemodynamic effect. We review the electrocardiographic findings and discuss the findings that lead to the discovery of atrioventricular lead reversal.

  4. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Monica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes (RCVS are a group of disorders that have in common an acute presentation with headache, reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, with or without neurological signs and symptoms. In contrast to primary central nervous system vasculitis, they have a relatively benign course. We describe here a patient who was diagnosed with RCVS.

  5. Towards Reversible Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tiezzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we incorporate reversibility into structured communication-based programming, to allow parties of a session to automatically undo, in a rollback fashion, the effect of previously executed interactions. This permits taking different computation paths along the same session, as well as reverting the whole session and starting a new one. Our aim is to define a theoretical basis for examining the interplay in concurrent systems between reversible computation and session-based interaction. We thus enrich a session-based variant of pi-calculus with memory devices, dedicated to keep track of the computation history of sessions in order to reverse it. We discuss our initial investigation concerning the definition of a session type discipline for the proposed reversible calculus, and its practical advantages for static verification of safe composition in communication-centric distributed software performing reversible computations.

  6. Study of the electroosmotic flow as a means to propel the mobile phase in capillary electrochromatography in view of further miniaturization of capillary electrochromatography systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Laszlo; Freitag, Ruth

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phenomenon of electroosmosis as a means to propel a mobile phase, in particular in view of an application in microfluidic systems, which are characterized by significantly smaller volumes of the reservoirs and the separation channels compared to conventional instrumentation. In the microfluidic chip, pH changes due to water electrolysis quickly showed an effect on the electroosmotic flow (EOF), which could be counteracted by either regularly exchanging or buffering the mobile phase. Surface treatment was of no effect in regard to EOF stabilization in empty channels but may have an influence in channels filled with a charged monolith. In fused-silica capillaries the EOF was generally found to decrease from 'naked' to surface-treated to monolith-filled capillaries. The EOF tended to be higher when an organic solvent (acetonitrile) was added to the mobile phase and could be further increased by substituting the water with equal amounts of methanol. In addition, the hydrostatic pressure exerted by the EOF was investigated. In a microfluidic chip with empty (cross-)channels such an effect could be responsible for a redirection of the flow. In capillaries partially filled with a noncharged (non-EOF-generating) monolith, a linear relationship could be established between the EOF created in the empty section of the capillary (apparent mobility) and the length of the monolith (backpressure). In capillaries partially filled with a charged (EOF-producing) monolith, flow inhomogeneities must be expected as a consequence of a superimposition of hydrodynamic pressure and EOF as mobile phase driving force.

  7. Analysis of metal ions migration to determine electro-osmotic flow for the in-situ cleanup of a tar-contaminated site

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2012-03-01

    An electro-osmosis experiment was set up on a former asphalt factory site, which is currently contaminated by tar, in Olst, the Netherlands. The main goal of this experiment was to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from a contaminated clay layer by applying an electric gradient. But before calculating PAH removal, the direction and intensity of electro-osmosis have to be estimated. In field situations, tracers are used to get information about the water flow. In the present study, the inorganic elements concentration oscillations during electro-osmosis application are used as tracers. The experiment was set up in a clay layer, with the configuration 1m×1m×0.3m, at a depth of 4m below soil surface. Al, Ca, Cl, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, S, Si, Ti and Zn concentrations were determined in 28 measurements and were performed during the experimental period of 159days. Then they were used in a first evaluation where auto and cross-correlations were analyzed to aid in the geochemical interpretation and select the most conservative elements. The second part of this study is devoted to estimate the migration of water based on the concentrations development of Cl - at the anode and Na + at the cathode. Electro-osmotic flow was estimated to be intense (2.9 -10 -9-2.18 -10 -8m -s -1) during the first 10 to 50days of experiment and to cease after this period. © 2012.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Electroosmotic Flow in Alternating Electric Field of Microchannels%微通道内交变电场电渗流有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊

    2015-01-01

    基于有限元方法,以粘性不可压缩流体N-S方程和双电层P-B方程为基础,建立交变电场驱动微通道电渗流模型,并进行数值模拟,分析溶液浓度、电场强度和微通道高度对电渗流的影响。结果表明,微通道内双电层滑移速度与电场强度成正比,受微通道高度影响较小,随溶液浓度的增大非线性减小。同时,微通道高度和溶液浓度的增加使双电层相对厚度减小,交变电场电渗流瞬时速度的波峰更加尖锐。该结论为微通道内交变电场电渗流精确控制提供了理论参考。%The mathematical models of electroosmotic flow in the alternating electric field is established based on the N-S e-quation for viscous incompressible fluid and the P-B equation for electric double layer, and numerical simulation of electroos-motic flow in microchannels is also completed based on the finite element method.The influence to EOF by the solution con-centration, the electric field intensity and the microchannel height are analyzed.The simulation results show that the slip ve-locity of electric double layer in microchannel is proportional to the electric field intensity, and it is less affected by the micro-channel height, and nonlinearly decreases with the increasing of solution concentration.Besides, the thickness of electric double layer is decreasing with increases of the microchannel height and solution concentration, and the wave crest of transient velocity distribution is more spiculate.The conclusion provides theoretical reference for accurately controlling the electroosmot-ic flow of the alternating electric field in microchannels.

  9. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M.; Lerman, Dorothea C; Call, Nathan A; Addison, Laura R; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relations among reinforcer magnitude, preference, and efficacy by drawing on the procedures and results of basic experimenta...

  10. Relationship between the magnitude of singular value and nonlinear stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆穆; 郭欢; 王佳峰; 李勇

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the magnitude of singular value and nonlinear stability or instability of the basic flow is investigated. The results show that there is a good corresponding relationship between them. The magnitude of singular value decreases as the stability (or instability) of the basic flow increases (or decreases). In the stable case, the magnitude of the maximum singular value is much smaller than in the unstable case.

  11. Realization of Quadrature Signal Generator Using Accurate Magnitude Integrator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Zhen; Yoon, Changwoo; Zhao, Rende

    2016-01-01

    -signal parameters, espically when a fast resonse is required for usages such as grid synchronization. As a result, the parameters design of the SOGI-QSG becomes complicated. Theoretical analysis shows that it is caused by the inaccurate magnitude-integration characteristic of the SOGI-QSG. To solve this problem......, an Accurate-Magnitude-Integrator based QSG (AMI-QSG) is proposed. The AMI has an accurate magnitude-integration characteristic for the sinusoidal signal, which makes the AMI-QSG possess an accurate First-Order-System (FOS) characteristic in terms of magnitude than the SOGI-QSG. The parameter design process...

  12. An algebra of reversible computation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules, basic reversible processes algebra (BRPA), algebra of reversible communicating processes (ARCP), recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  13. An Algebra of Reversible Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Yong WANG

    2014-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules, basic reversible processes algebra (BRPA), algebra of reversible communicating processes (ARCP), recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  14. An algebra of reversible computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We design an axiomatization for reversible computation called reversible ACP (RACP). It has four extendible modules: basic reversible processes algebra, algebra of reversible communicating processes, recursion and abstraction. Just like process algebra ACP in classical computing, RACP can be treated as an axiomatization foundation for reversible computation.

  15. An empirical evolutionary magnitude estimation for earthquake early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yih-Min; Chen, Da-Yi

    2016-04-01

    For earthquake early warning (EEW) system, it is a difficult mission to accurately estimate earthquake magnitude in the early nucleation stage of an earthquake occurrence because only few stations are triggered and the recorded seismic waveforms are short. One of the feasible methods to measure the size of earthquakes is to extract amplitude parameters within the initial portion of waveform after P-wave arrival. However, a large-magnitude earthquake (Mw > 7.0) may take longer time to complete the whole ruptures of the causative fault. Instead of adopting amplitude contents in fixed-length time window, that may underestimate magnitude for large-magnitude events, we suppose a fast, robust and unsaturated approach to estimate earthquake magnitudes. In this new method, the EEW system can initially give a bottom-bund magnitude in a few second time window and then update magnitude without saturation by extending the time window. Here we compared two kinds of time windows for adopting amplitudes. One is pure P-wave time widow (PTW); the other is whole-wave time window after P-wave arrival (WTW). The peak displacement amplitude in vertical component were adopted from 1- to 10-s length PTW and WTW, respectively. Linear regression analysis were implemented to find the empirical relationships between peak displacement, hypocentral distances, and magnitudes using the earthquake records from 1993 to 2012 with magnitude greater than 5.5 and focal depth less than 30 km. The result shows that using WTW to estimate magnitudes accompanies with smaller standard deviation. In addition, large uncertainties exist in the 1-second time widow. Therefore, for magnitude estimations we suggest the EEW system need to progressively adopt peak displacement amplitudes form 2- to 10-s WTW.

  16. Reversible Data Hiding Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Yadav

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reversible data hiding is a technique that is used to hide data inside an image. The data is hidden in such a way that the exact or original data is not visible. The hidden data can be retrieved as and when required. There are several methods that are used in reversible data hiding techniques like Watermarking, Lossless embedding and encryption. In this paper we present a review of reversible watermarking techniques and show different methods that are used to get reversible data hiding technique with higher embedding capacity and invisible objects. Watermark need not be hidden. Watermarking can be applied to 1. Images, 2. Text, 3. Audio/video, 4. Software.

  17. Reversible flowchart languages and the structured reversible program theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Many irreversible computation models have reversible counterparts, but these are poorly understood at present. We introduce reversible flowcharts with an assertion operator and show that any reversible flowchart can be simulated by a structured reversible flowchart using only three control flow o...... justification for low-level machine code for reversible microprocessors as well as high-level block-structured reversible languages. We give examples for both such languages and illustrate them with a lossless encoder for permutations given by Dijkstra....

  18. Adaptive Pairing Reversible Watermarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-05-01

    This letter revisits the pairwise reversible watermarking scheme of Ou et al., 2013. An adaptive pixel pairing that considers only pixels with similar prediction errors is introduced. This adaptive approach provides an increased number of pixel pairs where both pixels are embedded and decreases the number of shifted pixels. The adaptive pairwise reversible watermarking outperforms the state-of-the-art low embedding bit-rate schemes proposed so far.

  19. Number Games, Magnitude Representation, and Basic Number Skills in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Jemma Catherine; Bull, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 3 intervention board games (linear number, linear color, and nonlinear number) on young children's (mean age = 3.8 years) counting abilities, number naming, magnitude comprehension, accuracy in number-to-position estimation tasks, and best-fit numerical magnitude representations was examined. Pre- and posttest performance was…

  20. Magnitude Knowledge: The Common Core of Numerical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The integrated theory of numerical development posits that a central theme of numerical development from infancy to adulthood is progressive broadening of the types and ranges of numbers whose magnitudes are accurately represented. The process includes four overlapping trends: 1) representing increasingly precisely the magnitudes of non-symbolic…

  1. Some Effects of Magnitude of Reinforcement on Persistence of Responding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Jennifer J.; Hartman, Ellie C.; Jimenez, Angel

    2008-01-01

    The influence of magnitude of reinforcement was examined on both response rate and behavioral persistence. During Phase 1, a multiple schedule of concurrent reinforcement was implemented in which reinforcement for one response option was held constant at VI 30 s across both components, while magnitude of reinforcement for the other response option…

  2. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan A.; Addison, Laura R.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current…

  3. Number Games, Magnitude Representation, and Basic Number Skills in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Jemma Catherine; Bull, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 3 intervention board games (linear number, linear color, and nonlinear number) on young children's (mean age = 3.8 years) counting abilities, number naming, magnitude comprehension, accuracy in number-to-position estimation tasks, and best-fit numerical magnitude representations was examined. Pre- and posttest performance was…

  4. Rapid Earthquake Magnitude Estimation for Early Warning Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Dara; Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2017-04-01

    Earthquake magnitude is a concise metric that provides invaluable information about the destructive potential of a seismic event. Rapid estimation of magnitude for earthquake and tsunami early warning purposes requires reliance on near-field instrumentation. For large magnitude events, ground motions can exceed the dynamic range of near-field broadband seismic instrumentation (clipping). Strong motion accelerometers are designed with low gains to better capture strong shaking. Estimating earthquake magnitude rapidly from near-source strong-motion data requires integration of acceleration waveforms to displacement. However, integration amplifies small errors, creating unphysical drift that must be eliminated with a high pass filter. The loss of the long period information due to filtering is an impediment to magnitude estimation in real-time; the relation between ground motion measured with strong-motion instrumentation and magnitude saturates, leading to underestimation of earthquake magnitude. Using station displacements from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations, we can supplement the high frequency information recorded by traditional seismic systems with long-period observations to better inform rapid response. Unlike seismic-only instrumentation, ground motions measured with GNSS scale with magnitude without saturation [Crowell et al., 2013; Melgar et al., 2015]. We refine the current magnitude scaling relations using peak ground displacement (PGD) by adding a large GNSS dataset of earthquakes in Japan. Because it does not suffer from saturation, GNSS alone has significant advantages over seismic-only instrumentation for rapid magnitude estimation of large events. The earthquake's magnitude can be estimated within 2-3 minutes of earthquake onset time [Melgar et al., 2013]. We demonstrate that seismogeodesy, the optimal combination of GNSS and seismic data at collocated stations, provides the added benefit of improving the sensitivity of

  5. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  6. An empirical evolutionary magnitude estimation for early warning of earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-Yi; Wu, Yih-Min; Chin, Tai-Lin

    2017-03-01

    The earthquake early warning (EEW) system is difficult to provide consistent magnitude estimate in the early stage of an earthquake occurrence because only few stations are triggered and few seismic signals are recorded. One of the feasible methods to measure the size of earthquakes is to extract amplitude parameters using the initial portion of the recorded waveforms after P-wave arrival. However, for a large-magnitude earthquake (Mw > 7.0), the time to complete the whole ruptures resulted from the corresponding fault may be very long. The magnitude estimations may not be correctly predicted by the initial portion of the seismograms. To estimate the magnitude of a large earthquake in real-time, the amplitude parameters should be updated with ongoing waveforms instead of adopting amplitude contents in a predefined fixed-length time window, since it may underestimate magnitude for large-magnitude events. In this paper, we propose a fast, robust and less-saturated approach to estimate earthquake magnitudes. The EEW system will initially give a lower-bound of the magnitude in a time window with a few seconds and then update magnitude with less saturation by extending the time window. Here we compared two kinds of time windows for measuring amplitudes. One is P-wave time window (PTW) after P-wave arrival; the other is whole-wave time window after P-wave arrival (WTW), which may include both P and S wave. One to ten second time windows for both PTW and WTW are considered to measure the peak ground displacement from the vertical component of the waveforms. Linear regression analysis are run at each time step (1- to 10-s time interval) to find the empirical relationships among peak ground displacement, hypocentral distances, and magnitudes using the earthquake records from 1993 to 2012 in Taiwan with magnitude greater than 5.5 and focal depth less than 30 km. The result shows that considering WTW to estimate magnitudes has smaller standard deviation than PTW. The

  7. Discussion on the Relationship between Different Earthquake Magnitude Scales and the Effect of Seismic Station Sites on Magnitude Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hongzhi; Diao Guiling; Zhao Mingchun; Wang Qincai; Zhang Xiao; Huang Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the earthquake catalog reported by the Chinese digital seismic network in recent years, we select the earthquakes with both surface wave magnitude and local magnitude and fit them into a relationship between the two magnitudes. The systematic difference is found from the formula which has been used for 30 years. Because of a large dynamic range and wide frequency range of the current digital observation system, in addition to a larger number of stations and earthquakes being used compared to before, the relation obtained in this paper seems more reliable. Our calculation shows that there is no significant difference before and after magnitude conversion so we suggest the abandonment of magnitude conversion. The site response of a station consists of amplification at different frequencies. The amplification is equal to about 1 and changes little with frequency at stations located on basement rock, and it is greater than 1 at low frequency ranges and less than 1 at high frequency ranges at stations located on sediment layers. The difference between magnitudes from single station located on sediment layer and the average magnitude from the whole network increases from negative to positive with period. It seems that there is no fixed station correction factor and the station correction method does not work to improve the accuracy and magnitude estimates.

  8. Adolescents with Developmental Dyscalculia Do Not Have a Generalized Magnitude Deficit – Processing of Discrete and Continuous Magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaskey, Ursina; von Aster, Michael; O’Gorman Tuura, Ruth; Kucian, Karin

    2017-01-01

    The link between number and space has been discussed in the literature for some time, resulting in the theory that number, space and time might be part of a generalized magnitude system. To date, several behavioral and neuroimaging findings support the notion of a generalized magnitude system, although contradictory results showing a partial overlap or separate magnitude systems are also found. The possible existence of a generalized magnitude processing area leads to the question how individuals with developmental dyscalculia (DD), known for deficits in numerical-arithmetical abilities, process magnitudes. By means of neuropsychological tests and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we aimed to examine the relationship between number and space in typical and atypical development. Participants were 16 adolescents with DD (14.1 years) and 14 typically developing (TD) peers (13.8 years). In the fMRI paradigm participants had to perform discrete (arrays of dots) and continuous magnitude (angles) comparisons as well as a mental rotation task. In the neuropsychological tests, adolescents with dyscalculia performed significantly worse in numerical and complex visuo-spatial tasks. However, they showed similar results to TD peers when making discrete and continuous magnitude decisions during the neuropsychological tests and the fMRI paradigm. A conjunction analysis of the fMRI data revealed commonly activated higher order visual (inferior and middle occipital gyrus) and parietal (inferior and superior parietal lobe) magnitude areas for the discrete and continuous magnitude tasks. Moreover, no differences were found when contrasting both magnitude processing conditions, favoring the possibility of a generalized magnitude system. Group comparisons further revealed that dyscalculic subjects showed increased activation in domain general regions, whilst TD peers activate domain specific areas to a greater extent. In conclusion, our results point to the existence of a

  9. Quantifying Heartbeat Dynamics by Magnitude and Sign Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2003-05-01

    We review a recently developed approach for analyzing time series with long-range correlations by decomposing the signal increment series into magnitude and sign series and analyzing their scaling properties. We show that time series with identical long-range correlations can exhibit different time organization for the magnitude and sign. We apply our approach to series of time intervals between consecutive heartbeats. Using the detrended fluctuation analysis method we find that the magnitude series is long-range correlated, while the sign series is anticorrelated and that both magnitude and sign series may have clinical applications. Further, we study the heartbeat magnitude and sign series during different sleep stages — light sleep, deep sleep, and REM sleep. For the heartbeat sign time series we find short-range anticorrelations, which are strong during deep sleep, weaker during light sleep and even weaker during REM sleep. In contrast, for the heartbeat magnitude time series we find long-range positive correlations, which are strong during REM sleep and weaker during light sleep. Thus, the sign and the magnitude series provide information which is also useful for distinguishing between different sleep stages.

  10. Does residual force enhancement increase with increasing stretch magnitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisey, Brandon; Leonard, Tim R; Herzog, Walter

    2009-07-22

    It is generally accepted that force enhancement in skeletal muscles increases with increasing stretch magnitudes. However, this property has not been tested across supra-physiological stretch magnitudes and different muscle lengths, thus it is not known whether this is a generic property of skeletal muscle, or merely a property that holds for small stretch magnitudes within the physiological range. Six cat soleus muscles were actively stretched with magnitudes varying from 3 to 24 mm at three different parts of the force-length relationship to test the hypothesis that force enhancement increases with increasing stretch magnitude, independent of muscle length. Residual force enhancement increased consistently with stretch amplitudes on the descending limb of the force-length relationship up to a threshold value, after which it reached a plateau. Force enhancement did not increase with stretch amplitude on the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. Passive force enhancement was observed for all test conditions, and paralleled the behavior of the residual force enhancement. Force enhancement increased with stretch magnitude when stretching occurred at lengths where there was natural passive force within the muscle. These results suggest that force enhancement does not increase unconditionally with increasing stretch magnitude, as is generally accepted, and that increasing force enhancement with stretch appears to be tightly linked to that part of the force-length relationship where there is naturally occurring passive force.

  11. Derivation of Johnson-Cousins Magnitudes from DSLR Camera Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woojin; Pak, Soojong; Shim, Hyunjin; Le, Huynh Anh N.; Im, Myungshin; Chang, Seunghyuk; Yu, Joonkyu

    2016-01-01

    The RGB Bayer filter system consists of a mosaic of R, G, and B filters on the grid of the photo sensors which typical commercial DSLR (Digital Single Lens Reflex) cameras and CCD cameras are equipped with. Lot of unique astronomical data obtained using an RGB Bayer filter system are available, including transient objects, e.g. supernovae, variable stars, and solar system bodies. The utilization of such data in scientific research requires that reliable photometric transformation methods are available between the systems. In this work, we develop a series of equations to convert the observed magnitudes in the RGB Bayer filter system (RB, GB, and BB) into the Johnson-Cousins BVR filter system (BJ, VJ, and RC). The new transformation equations derive the calculated magnitudes in the Johnson-Cousins filters (BJcal, VJcal, and RCcal) as functions of RGB magnitudes and colors. The mean differences between the transformed magnitudes and original magnitudes, i.e. the residuals, are (BJ - BJcal) = 0.064 mag, (VJ - VJcal) = 0.041 mag, and (RC - RCcal) = 0.039 mag. The calculated Johnson-Cousins magnitudes from the transformation equations show a good linear correlation with the observed Johnson-Cousins magnitudes.

  12. Reversible Communicating Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Brown

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reversible distributed programs have the ability to abort unproductive computation paths and backtrack, while unwinding communication that occurred in the aborted paths. While it is natural to assume that reversibility implies full state recovery (as with traditional roll-back recovery protocols, an interesting alternative is to separate backtracking from local state recovery. For example, such a model could be used to create complex transactions out of nested compensable transactions where a programmer-supplied compensation defines the work required to "unwind" a transaction. Reversible distributed computing has received considerable theoretical attention, but little reduction to practice; the few published implementations of languages supporting reversibility depend upon a high degree of central control. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a practical reversible distributed language can be efficiently implemented in a fully distributed manner. We discuss such a language, supporting CSP-style synchronous communication, embedded in Scala. While this language provided the motivation for the work described in this paper, our focus is upon the distributed implementation. In particular, we demonstrate that a "high-level" semantic model can be implemented using a simple point-to-point protocol.

  13. Regression between earthquake magnitudes having errors with known variances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Recent publications on the regression between earthquake magnitudes assume that both magnitudes are affected by error and that only the ratio of error variances is known. If X and Y represent observed magnitudes, and x and y represent the corresponding theoretical values, the problem is to find the a and b of the best-fit line y = a x + b. This problem has a closed solution only for homoscedastic errors (their variances are all equal for each of the two variables). The published solution was derived using a method that cannot provide a sum of squares of residuals. Therefore, it is not possible to compare the goodness of fit for different pairs of magnitudes. Furthermore, the method does not provide expressions for the x and y. The least-squares method introduced here does not have these drawbacks. The two methods of solution result in the same equations for a and b. General properties of a discussed in the literature but not proved, or proved for particular cases, are derived here. A comparison of different expressions for the variances of a and b is provided. The paper also considers the statistical aspects of the ongoing debate regarding the prediction of y given X. Analysis of actual data from the literature shows that a new approach produces an average improvement of less than 0.1 magnitude units over the standard approach when applied to Mw vs. mb and Mw vs. MS regressions. This improvement is minor, within the typical error of Mw. Moreover, a test subset of 100 predicted magnitudes shows that the new approach results in magnitudes closer to the theoretically true magnitudes for only 65 % of them. For the remaining 35 %, the standard approach produces closer values. Therefore, the new approach does not always give the most accurate magnitude estimates.

  14. Transport Physics in Reversed Shear Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beer, M.A.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Von Goeler, S.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton University, NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Laboratory; Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reversed magnetic shear is considered a good candidate for improving the tokamak concept because it has the potential to stabilize MHD instabilities and reduce particle and energy transport. With reduced transport the high pressure gradient would generate a strong off-axis bootstrap current and could sustain a hollow current density profile. Such a combination of favorable conditions could lead to an attractive steady-state tokamak configuration. Indeed, a new tokamak confinement regime with reversed magnetic shear has been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) where the particle, momentum, and ion thermal diffusivities drop precipitously, by over an order of magnitude. The particle diffusivity drops to the neoclassical level and the ion thermal diffusivity drops to much less than the neoclassical value in the region with reversed shear. This enhanced reversed shear (ERS) confinement mode is characterized by an abrupt transition with a large rate of rise of the density in the reversed shear region during neutral beam injection, resulting in nearly a factor of three increase in the central density to 1.2 X 10(exp 20) cube m. At the same time the density fluctuation level in the reversed shear region dramatically decreases. The ion and electron temperatures, which are about 20 keV and 7 keV respectively, change little during the ERS mode. The transport and transition into and out of the ERS mode have been studied on TFTR with plasma currents in the range 0.9-2.2 MA, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.7-4.6 T, and the radius of the q(r) minimum, q{sub min}, has been varied from r/a = 0.35 to 0.55. Toroidal field and co/counter neutral beam injection toroidal rotation variations have been used to elucidate the underlying physics of the transition mechanism and power threshold of the ERS mode.

  15. Comparison of magnetic probe calibration at nano and millitesla magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Ryan A; Rovey, Joshua L; Pommerenke, David J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field probes are invaluable diagnostics for pulsed inductive plasma devices where field magnitudes on the order of tenths of tesla or larger are common. Typical methods of providing a broadband calibration of [Formula: see text] probes involve either a Helmholtz coil driven by a function generator or a network analyzer. Both calibration methods typically produce field magnitudes of tens of microtesla or less, at least three and as many as six orders of magnitude lower than their intended use. This calibration factor is then assumed constant regardless of magnetic field magnitude and the effects of experimental setup are ignored. This work quantifies the variation in calibration factor observed when calibrating magnetic field probes in low field magnitudes. Calibration of two [Formula: see text] probe designs as functions of frequency and field magnitude are presented. The first [Formula: see text] probe design is the most commonly used design and is constructed from two hand-wound inductors in a differential configuration. The second probe uses surface mounted inductors in a differential configuration with balanced shielding to further reduce common mode noise. Calibration factors are determined experimentally using an 80.4 mm radius Helmholtz coil in two separate configurations over a frequency range of 100-1000 kHz. A conventional low magnitude calibration using a vector network analyzer produced a field magnitude of 158 nT and yielded calibration factors of 15 663 ± 1.7% and 4920 ± 0.6% [Formula: see text] at 457 kHz for the surface mounted and hand-wound probes, respectively. A relevant magnitude calibration using a pulsed-power setup with field magnitudes of 8.7-354 mT yielded calibration factors of 14 615 ± 0.3% and 4507 ± 0.4% [Formula: see text] at 457 kHz for the surface mounted inductor and hand-wound probe, respectively. Low-magnitude calibration resulted in a larger calibration factor, with an average difference of 9.7% for the surface

  16. OCEAN-WIDE TSUNAMIS, MAGNITUDE THRESHOLDS, AND 1946 TYPE EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Walker

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of magnitudes and runups in Hawaii for more than 200 tsunamigenic earthquakes along the margins of the Pacific reveals that all of the earthquakes with moment magnitudes of 8.6 or greater produced significant Pacific-wide tsunamis. Such findings can be used as a basis for early warnings of significant ocean-wide tsunamis as a supplement to, or in the absence of, more comprehensive data from other sources. Additional analysis of magnitude and runup data suggests that 1946 type earthquakes and tsunamis may be more common than previously believed.

  17. Radiation controlling reversible window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, H.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A coated glass glazing system is presented including a transparent glass substrate having one surface coated with a radiation absorptive film which is overcoated with a radiation reflective film by a technique which renders the radiation reflective film radiation absorptive at the surface contracting the radiating absorptive film. The coated glass system is used as glazing for storm windows which are adapted to be reversible so that the radiation reflective surface may be exposed to the outside of the dwelling during the warm seasons to prevent excessive solar radiation from entering a dwelling and reversed during cold seasons to absorb solar radiation and utilize it to aid in keeping the dwelling interior warm.

  18. Estimating magnitude and frequency of floods for Wisconsin urban streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Equations for estimating magnitude and frequency of floods for Wisconsin streams with drainage basins containing various amounts of existing or projected urban development were developed by flood-frequency and multiple-regression analyses.

  19. magnitude and pattern of injury in jimma university

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2011-11-03

    Nov 3, 2011 ... CONCLUSION: The magnitude of injury in the hospital was considerably high. Age and ... 1Jimma University, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Department of ..... conducted in Canadian hospitals reported more.

  20. Numerical and physical magnitudes are mapped into time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Meir, Shachar; Ganor-Stern, Dana; Tzelgov, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments we investigated mapping of numerical and physical magnitudes with temporal order. Pairs of digits were presented sequentially for a size comparison task. An advantage for numbers presented in ascending order was found when participants were comparing the numbers' physical and numerical magnitudes. The effect was more robust for comparisons of physical size, as it was found using both select larger and select smaller instructions, while for numerical comparisons it was found only for select larger instructions. Varying both the digits' numerical and physical sizes resulted in a size congruity effect, indicating automatic processing of the irrelevant magnitude dimension. Temporal order and the congruency between numerical and physical magnitudes affected comparisons in an additive manner, thus suggesting that they affect different stages of the comparison process.

  1. Validity of electrical stimulus magnitude matching in chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Ann L; Westermark, Sofia; Merrick, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the validity of the PainMatcher in chronic pain. DESIGN: Comparison of parallel pain estimates from visual analogue scales with electrical stimulus magnitude matching. PATIENTS: Thirty-one patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: Twice a day ongoing pain was rated...... on a standard 100-mm visual analogue scale, and thereafter magnitude matching was performed using a PainMatcher. The sensory threshold to electrical stimulation was tested twice on separate occasions. RESULTS: In 438 observations visual analogue scale ranged from 3 to 95 (median 41) mm, and Pain......Matcher magnitudes from 2.67 to 27.67 (median 6.67; mean 7.78) steps. There was little correlation between visual analogue scale and magnitude data (r = 0.29; p

  2. When Should Zero Be Included on a Scale Showing Magnitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Marcin

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses an important problem of graphing quantitative data: should one include zero on the scale showing magnitude? Based on a real time series example, the problem is discussed and some recommendations are proposed.

  3. Reverse genetics in ecological research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Schwachtje

    Full Text Available By precisely manipulating the expression of individual genetic elements thought to be important for ecological performance, reverse genetics has the potential to revolutionize plant ecology. However, untested concerns about possible side-effects of the transformation technique, caused by Agrobacterium infection and tissue culture, on plant performance have stymied research by requiring onerous sample sizes. We compare 5 independently transformed Nicotiana attenuata lines harboring empty vector control (EVC T-DNA lacking silencing information with isogenic wild types (WT, and measured a battery of ecologically relevant traits, known to be important in plant-herbivore interactions: phytohormones, secondary metabolites, growth and fitness parameters under stringent competitive conditions, and transcriptional regulation with microarrays. As a positive control, we included a line silenced in trypsin proteinase inhibitor gene (TPI expression, a potent anti-herbivore defense known to exact fitness costs in its expression, in the analysis. The experiment was conducted twice, with 10 and 20 biological replicates per genotype. For all parameters, we detected no difference between any EVC and WT lines, but could readily detect a fitness benefit of silencing TPI production. A statistical power analyses revealed that the minimum sample sizes required for detecting significant fitness differences between EVC and WT was 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the 10 replicates required to detect a fitness effect of TPI silencing. We conclude that possible side-effects of transformation are far too low to obfuscate the study of ecologically relevant phenotypes.

  4. I love my baffling, backward, counterintuitive, overly complicated magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirola, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    All professions have their jargon. But astronomy goes the extra parsec. Here's an example. Vega, one of the brighter stars in the night sky, has an apparent magnitude (i.e., an apparent brightness) of approximately zero. Polaris, the North Star, has an apparent magnitude of about +2. Despite this, Vega appears brighter than Polaris, and not by two, but by a factor of about six times.

  5. Some explicit expressions for the probability distribution of force magnitude

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saralees Nadarajah

    2008-08-01

    Recently, empirical investigations have suggested that the components of contact forces follow the exponential distribution. However, explicit expressions for the probability distribution of the corresponding force magnitude have not been known and only approximations have been used in the literature. In this note, for the first time, I provide explicit expressions for the probability distribution of the force magnitude. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases are considered.

  6. An Overview of the Study on Stress Magnitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Shuzhong; Wan Yongge

    2009-01-01

    Crustal stress field holds an important position in geodynamics research, such as in plate motion simulations, uplift of the Qinghai-Xizang (Tibet) Plateau and earthquake preparation and occurrence. However, most of the crustal stress studies emphasize particularly on the determination of stress direction, with little study being done on stress magnitude at present. After reviewing ideas on a stress magnitude study from geological, geophysical and various other aspects, a method to estimate the stress magnitude in the source region according to the deflection of stress direction before and after large earthquakes and the stress drop tensor of earthquake rupture has been developed. The proposed method can also be supplemented by the average apparent stress before and after large earthquakes. The stress direction deflection before and after large earthquakes can be inverted by massive focal mechanisms of foreshocks and aftershocks and the stress drop field generated by the seismic source can be calculated by the detailed distribution of the earthquake's rupture. The mathematical relationship can then be constructed between the stress drop field, where its magnitude and direction are known and the stress tensor before and after large earthquakes, where its direction is known but magnitude is unknown, thereby obtaining the stress magnitude. The average apparent stress before and after large earthquakes can be obtained by using the catalog of broadband radiated energy and seismic moment tensor of foreshocks and aftershocks and the different responses to stress drops. This relationship leads to another estimation of stress magnitude before a large earthquake. The stress magnitude and its error are constrained by combining the two methods, which provide new constraints for the geodyuamics study.

  7. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  8. The color-magnitude distribution of small Jupiter Trojans

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of survey observations targeting the leading L4 Jupiter Trojan cloud near opposition using the wide-field Suprime-Cam CCD camera on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The survey covered about 38 deg$^2$ of sky and imaged 147 fields spread across a wide region of the L4 cloud. Each field was imaged in both the $g'$ and the $i'$ band, allowing for the measurement of $g-i$ color. We detected 557 Trojans in the observed fields, ranging in absolute magnitude from $H=10.0$ to $H = 20.3$. We fit the total magnitude distribution to a broken power law and show that the power-law slope rolls over from $0.45\\pm 0.05$ to $0.36^{+0.05}_{-0.09}$ at a break magnitude of $H_{b}=14.93^{+0.73}_{-0.88}$. Combining the best-fit magnitude distribution of faint objects from our survey with an analysis of the magnitude distribution of bright objects listed in the Minor Planet Center catalog, we obtain the absolute magnitude distribution of Trojans over the entire range from $H=7.2$ to $H=16.4$. We show that the $g-i...

  9. The magnitude of innovation and its evolution in social animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbilly, Michal; Laland, Kevin N

    2017-02-08

    Innovative behaviour in animals, ranging from invertebrates to humans, is increasingly recognized as an important topic for investigation by behavioural researchers. However, what constitutes an innovation remains controversial, and difficult to quantify. Drawing on a broad definition whereby any behaviour with a new component to it is an innovation, we propose a quantitative measure, which we call the magnitude of innovation, to describe the extent to which an innovative behaviour is novel. This allows us to distinguish between innovations that are a slight change to existing behaviours (low magnitude), and innovations that are substantially different (high magnitude). Using mathematical modelling and evolutionary computer simulations, we explored how aspects of social interaction, cognition and natural selection affect the frequency and magnitude of innovation. We show that high-magnitude innovations are likely to arise regularly even if the frequency of innovation is low, as long as this frequency is relatively constant, and that the selectivity of social learning and the existence of social rewards, such as prestige and royalties, are crucial for innovative behaviour to evolve. We suggest that consideration of the magnitude of innovation may prove a useful tool in the study of the evolution of cognition and of culture.

  10. Magnitude knowledge: the common core of numerical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S

    2016-05-01

    The integrated theory of numerical development posits that a central theme of numerical development from infancy to adulthood is progressive broadening of the types and ranges of numbers whose magnitudes are accurately represented. The process includes four overlapping trends: (1) representing increasingly precisely the magnitudes of non-symbolic numbers, (2) connecting small symbolic numbers to their non-symbolic referents, (3) extending understanding from smaller to larger whole numbers, and (4) accurately representing the magnitudes of rational numbers. The present review identifies substantial commonalities, as well as differences, in these four aspects of numerical development. With both whole and rational numbers, numerical magnitude knowledge is concurrently correlated with, longitudinally predictive of, and causally related to multiple aspects of mathematical understanding, including arithmetic and overall math achievement. Moreover, interventions focused on increasing numerical magnitude knowledge often generalize to other aspects of mathematics. The cognitive processes of association and analogy seem to play especially large roles in this development. Thus, acquisition of numerical magnitude knowledge can be seen as the common core of numerical development.

  11. Numerical magnitude processing in children with mild intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquière, Pol; De Smedt, Bert

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated numerical magnitude processing in children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and examined whether these children have difficulties in the ability to represent numerical magnitudes and/or difficulties in the ability to access numerical magnitudes from formal symbols. We compared the performance of 26 children with MID on a symbolic (digits) and a non-symbolic (dot-arrays) comparison task with the performance of two control groups of typically developing children: one group matched on chronological age and one group matched on mathematical ability level. Findings revealed that children with MID performed more poorly than their typically developing chronological age-matched peers on both the symbolic and non-symbolic comparison tasks, while their performance did not substantially differ from the ability-matched control group. These findings suggest that the development of numerical magnitude representation in children with MID is marked by a delay. This performance pattern was observed for both symbolic and non-symbolic comparison tasks, although difficulties on the former task were more prominent. Interventions in children with MID should therefore foster both the development of magnitude representations and the connections between symbols and the magnitudes they represent.

  12. Time reversal communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  13. Engineering Encounters: Reverse Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Veronica Cassone; Ventura, Marcia; Bell, Philip

    2017-01-01

    This column presents ideas and techniques to enhance your science teaching. This month's issue shares information on how students' everyday experiences can support science learning through engineering design. In this article, the authors outline a reverse-engineering model of instruction and describe one example of how it looked in our fifth-grade…

  14. Reverse Coherent Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  15. Reversed extension flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2008-01-01

    Afilament stretching rheometer (FSR) was used for measuring the start-up of uni-axial elongational flow followed by reversed bi-axial flow, both with a constant elongational rate. A narrow molecular mass distribution linear polystyrene with a molecular weight of 145 kg / mole wis subjected to the...

  16. REVERSE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DOMAGAŁA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the presentation of the reverse supply chain, of which the role in the modern business grows along with the increasing number of environmental regulations and possibilities of reducing an operating cost. The paper also describes main problems in developing the profitable chain and possibilities to take an action in order to overcome them.

  17. On reverse hypercontractivity

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan; Sen, Arnab

    2011-01-01

    We study the notion of reverse hypercontractivity. We show that reverse hypercontractive inequalities are implied by standard hypercontractive inequalities as well as by the modified log-Sobolev inequality. Our proof is based on a new comparison lemma for Dirichlet forms and an extension of the Strook-Varapolos inequality. A consequence of our analysis is that {\\em all} simple operators $L=Id-\\E$ as well as their tensors satisfy uniform reverse hypercontractive inequalities. That is, for all $qreverse hypercontractive inequalities established here imply new mixing and isoperimetric results for short random walks in product spaces, for certain card-shufflings, for Glauber dynamics in high-temperat...

  18. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  19. Probable Maximum Earthquake Magnitudes for the Cascadia Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Y.; Jackson, D. D.; Magistrale, H.; Goldfinger, C.

    2013-12-01

    The concept of maximum earthquake magnitude (mx) is widely used in seismic hazard and risk analysis. However, absolute mx lacks a precise definition and cannot be determined from a finite earthquake history. The surprising magnitudes of the 2004 Sumatra and the 2011 Tohoku earthquakes showed that most methods for estimating mx underestimate the true maximum if it exists. Thus, we introduced the alternate concept of mp(T), probable maximum magnitude within a time interval T. The mp(T) can be solved using theoretical magnitude-frequency distributions such as Tapered Gutenberg-Richter (TGR) distribution. The two TGR parameters, β-value (which equals 2/3 b-value in the GR distribution) and corner magnitude (mc), can be obtained by applying maximum likelihood method to earthquake catalogs with additional constraint from tectonic moment rate. Here, we integrate the paleoseismic data in the Cascadia subduction zone to estimate mp. The Cascadia subduction zone has been seismically quiescent since at least 1900. Fortunately, turbidite studies have unearthed a 10,000 year record of great earthquakes along the subduction zone. We thoroughly investigate the earthquake magnitude-frequency distribution of the region by combining instrumental and paleoseismic data, and using the tectonic moment rate information. To use the paleoseismic data, we first estimate event magnitudes, which we achieve by using the time interval between events, rupture extent of the events, and turbidite thickness. We estimate three sets of TGR parameters: for the first two sets, we consider a geographically large Cascadia region that includes the subduction zone, and the Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda plates; for the third set, we consider a narrow geographic region straddling the subduction zone. In the first set, the β-value is derived using the GCMT catalog. In the second and third sets, the β-value is derived using both the GCMT and paleoseismic data. Next, we calculate the corresponding mc

  20. Comparison between earthquake magnitudes determined by China seismograph network and US seismograph networks (Ⅰ): Body wave magnitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-feng; CHEN Yun-tai; Peter Bormann; REN Xiao; HOU Jian-min; ZOU Li-ye; YANG Hui

    2005-01-01

    By using orthogonal regression method, a systematic comparison is made between body wave magnitudes determined by Institute of Geophysics of China Earthquake Administration (IGCEA) and National Earthquake Information Center of US Geological Survey (USGS/NEIC) on the basis of observation data from China and US seismograph networks between 1983 and 2004. The result of orthogonal regression shows no systematic error between body wave magnitude mb determined by IGCEA and mb (NEIC). Provided that mb (NEIC) is taken as the benchmark, body wave magnitude determined by IGCEA is greater by 0.2~0.1 than the magnitude determined by NEIC for M=3.5~4.5 earthquakes; for M=5.0~5.5 earthquakes, there is no difference; and for M≥6.0 earthquakes, it is smaller by no more than 0.2. This is consistent with the result of comparison by IDC (International Data Center).

  1. Effect of the shape and lateral dimensions on the magnetization reversal in permalloy nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomareva, A.K. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi 141700 (Russian Federation); Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Egorov, S.V. [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation); Uspenskaya, L.S., E-mail: uspenska@bk.ru [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-01

    Kinetics of magnetization reversal in patterned permalloy films with nanometer thickness is studied by means of magneto-optic visualization technique, Bitter technique and micromagnetic simulations. The reversal modes and critical dimensions at which a change of the magnetization scenario in the structures takes place are determined. The experimentally observed critical dimensions are shown to differ from the calculated ones by two orders of magnitude. The crucial influence of the ferro-fluid on magnetic patterns and magnetization reversal parameters is found.

  2. Zero Magnitude Effect for the Productivity of Triggered Tsunami Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model is applied to tsunami events to explain previously observed temporal clustering of tsunami sources. Tsunami events are defined by National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) tsunami database. For the ETAS analysis, the earthquake magnitude associated with each tsunami event in the NGDC database is replaced by the primary magnitude listed in the Centennial catalog up until 1976 and in the Global CMT catalog from 1976 through 2010. Tsunamis with a submarine landslide or volcanic component are included if they are accompanied by an earthquake, which is most often the case. Tsunami size is used as a mark for determining a tsunami-generating event, according to a minimum completeness level. The tsunami catalog is estimated to be complete for tsunami sizes greater than 1 m since 1900 and greater than 0.1 m since 1960. Of the five parameters in the temporal ETAS model (Ogata, 1988), the parameter that scales the magnitude dependence in the productivity of triggered events is the one that is most different from ETAS parameters derived from similar earthquake catalogs. Maximum likelihood estimates of this magnitude effect parameter is essentially zero, within 95% confidence, for both the 0.1 m and 1.0 m tsunami completeness levels. To explain this result, parameter estimates are determined for the Global CMT catalog under three tsunamigenic conditions: (1) M≥7 and focal depth ≤50 km, (2) submarine location, and (3) dominant component of dip slip. Successive subcatalogs are formed from the Global CMT catalog according to each of these conditions. The high magnitude threshold for tsunamigenesis alone (subcatalog 1) does not explain the zero magnitude effect. The zero magnitude effect also does not appear to be caused the smaller number of tsunamigenic events analyzed in comparison to earthquake catalogs with a similar magnitude threshold. ETAS parameter estimates from the subcatalog (3) with all three tsunamigenic conditions

  3. Magnitude Characterization Using Complex Networks in Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasten, D.; Comte, D.; Munoz, V.

    2013-12-01

    Studies using complex networks are applied to many systems, like traffic, social networks, internet and earth science. In this work we make an analysis using complex networks applied to magnitude of seismicity in the central zone of Chile, we use the preferential attachment in order to construct a seismic network using local magnitudes and the hypocenters of a seismic data set in central Chile. In order to work with a complete catalogue in magnitude, the data associated with the linear part of the Gutenberg-Richter law, with magnitudes greater than 2.7, were taken. We then make a grid in space, so that each seismic event falls into a certain cell, depending on the location of its hypocenter. Now the network is constructed: the first node corresponds to the cell where the first seismic event occurs. The node has an associated number which is the magnitude of the event which occured in it, and a probability is assigned to the node. The probability is a nonlinear mapping of the magnitude (a Gaussian function was taken), so that nodes with lower magnitude events are more likely to be attached to. Each time a new node is added to the network, it is attached to the previous node which has the larger probability; the link is directed from the previous node to the new node. In this way, a directed network is constructed, with a ``preferential attachment''-like growth model, using the magnitudes as the parameter to determine the probability of attachment to future nodes. Several events could occur in the same node. In this case, the probability is calculated using the average of the magnitudes of the events occuring in that node. Once the directed network is finished, the corresponding undirected network is constructed, by making all links symmetric, and eliminating the loops which may appear when two events occur in the same cell. The resulting directed network is found to be scale free (with very low values of the power-law distribution exponent), whereas the undirected

  4. Effects of reinforcer magnitude on responding under differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedules of rats and pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Adam H; Richards, Jerry B

    2002-07-01

    Experiment I investigated the effects of reinforcer magnitude on differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) schedule performance in three phases. In Phase 1, two groups of rats (n = 6 and 5) responded under a DRI. 72-s schedule with reinforcer magnitudes of either 30 or 300 microl of water. After acquisition, the water amounts were reversed for each rat. In Phase 2, the effects of the same reinforcer magnitudes on DRL 18-s schedule performance were examined across conditions. In Phase 3, each rat responded unider a DR1. 18-s schedule in which the water amotnts alternated between 30 and 300 microl daily. Throughout each phase of Experiment 1, the larger reinforcer magnitude resulted in higher response rates and lower reinforcement rates. The peak of the interresponse-time distributions was at a lower value tinder the larger reinforcer magnitude. In Experiment 2, 3 pigeons responded under a DRL 20-s schedule in which reinforcer magnitude (1-s or 6-s access to grain) varied iron session to session. Higher response rates and lower reinforcement rates occurred tinder the longer hopper duration. These results demonstrate that larger reinforcer magnitudes engender less efficient DRL schedule performance in both rats and pigeons, and when reinforcer magnitude was held constant between sessions or was varied daily. The present results are consistent with previous research demonstrating a decrease in efficiency as a function of increased reinforcer magnituide tinder procedures that require a period of time without a specified response. These findings also support the claim that DRI. schedule performance is not governed solely by a timing process.

  5. Reversible quantum cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Schumacher, B

    2004-01-01

    We define quantum cellular automata as infinite quantum lattice systems with discrete time dynamics, such that the time step commutes with lattice translations and has strictly finite propagation speed. In contrast to earlier definitions this allows us to give an explicit characterization of all local rules generating such automata. The same local rules also generate the global time step for automata with periodic boundary conditions. Our main structure theorem asserts that any quantum cellular automaton is structurally reversible, i.e., that it can be obtained by applying two blockwise unitary operations in a generalized Margolus partitioning scheme. This implies that, in contrast to the classical case, the inverse of a nearest neighbor quantum cellular automaton is again a nearest neighbor automaton. We present several construction methods for quantum cellular automata, based on unitaries commuting with their translates, on the quantization of (arbitrary) reversible classical cellular automata, on quantum c...

  6. Robust Computation of Error Vector Magnitude for Wireless Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    The modulation accuracy described by an error vector magnitude is a critical parameter in modern communication systems — defined originally as a performance metric for transmitters but now also used in receiver design and for more general signal analysis. The modulation accuracy is a measure of how...... far a test signal is from a reference signal at the symbol values when some parameters in a reconstruction model are optimized for best agreement. This paper provides an approach to computation of error vector magnitude as described in several standards from measured or simulated data. It is shown...... that the error vector magnitude optimization problem is generally non-convex. Robust estimation of the initial conditions for the optimizer is suggested, which is particularly important for a non-convex problem. A Bender decomposition approach is used to separate convex and non-convex parts of the problem...

  7. Task difficulty in mental arithmetic affects microsaccadic rates and magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegenthaler, Eva; Costela, Francisco M; McCamy, Michael B; Di Stasi, Leandro L; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Sonderegger, Andreas; Groner, Rudolf; Macknik, Stephen; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Microsaccades are involuntary, small-magnitude saccadic eye movements that occur during attempted visual fixation. Recent research has found that attention can modulate microsaccade dynamics, but few studies have addressed the effects of task difficulty on microsaccade parameters, and those have obtained contradictory results. Further, no study to date has investigated the influence of task difficulty on microsaccade production during the performance of non-visual tasks. Thus, the effects of task difficulty on microsaccades, isolated from sensory modality, remain unclear. Here we investigated the effects of task difficulty on microsaccades during the performance of a non-visual, mental arithmetic task with two levels of complexity. We found that microsaccade rates decreased and microsaccade magnitudes increased with increased task difficulty. We propose that changes in microsaccade rates and magnitudes with task difficulty are mediated by the effects of varying attentional inputs on the rostral superior colliculus activity map.

  8. Newmark design spectra considering earthquake magnitudes and site categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Xie, Wei-Chau; Pandey, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Newmark design spectra have been implemented in many building codes, especially in building codes for critical structures. Previous studies show that Newmark design spectra exhibit lower amplitudes at high frequencies and larger amplitudes at low frequencies in comparison with spectra developed by statistical methods. To resolve this problem, this study considers three suites of ground motions recorded at three types of sites. Using these ground motions, influences of the shear-wave velocity, earthquake magnitudes, source-to-site distances on the ratios of ground motion parameters are studied, and spectrum amplification factors are statistically calculated. Spectral bounds for combinations of three site categories and two cases of earthquake magnitudes are estimated. Site design spectrum coefficients for the three site categories considering earthquake magnitudes are established. The problems of Newmark design spectra could be resolved by using the site design spectrum coefficients to modify the spectral values of Newmark design spectra in the acceleration sensitive, velocity sensitive, and displacement sensitive regions.

  9. Partial Reversible Gates(PRG) for Reversible BCD Arithmetic

    CERN Document Server

    Thapliyal, Himanshu; Bajpai, Rajnish; Sharma, Kamal K

    2007-01-01

    IEEE 754r is the ongoing revision to the IEEE 754 floating point standard and a major enhancement to the standard is the addition of decimal format. Furthermore, in the recent years reversible logic has emerged as a promising computing paradigm having its applications in low power CMOS, quantum computing, nanotechnology, and optical computing. The major goal in reversible logic is to minimize the number of reversible gates and garbage outputs. Thus, this paper proposes the novel concept of partial reversible gates that will satisfy the reversibility criteria for specific cases in BCD arithmetic. The partial reversible gate is proposed to minimize the number of reversible gates and garbage outputs, while designing the reversible BCD arithmetic circuits.

  10. Aftershock Hazard Magnitude, Time, and Location Probability Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Pao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study combines branching aftershock sequence (BASS and modified _ law to develop a predictive model for forecasting the magnitude, time, and location of aftershocks of magnitude Mw ≥ 5.00 in large earthquakes. The developed model is presented and applied to the 17:47 20 September 1999 Mw 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake Taiwan, 09:32 5 November 2009 (UTC Nantou Mw 6.19, 00:18 4 March 2010 (UTC Jiashian Mw 6.49 earthquake sequences, Taiwan, and 05:46 11 March 2011 (UTC Tohoku Mw 9.00 earthquake, Japan. The estimated peak ground acceleration (PGA results are remarkably similar to calculations from the recorded magnitudes in both trend and level. This study proposes an empirical equation to improve the aftershock occurrence forecast time. The forecast time results were greatly improved. The magnitude of aftershocks generally decreases with time. It was found that the aftershock forecast probability of Mw ≥ 5.00 is high in the first six days after the main shock. The results will be of interest to seismic mitigation specialists. Spatial and temporal seismicity parameters to the aftershock sequence investigation into the 17:47 20 September 1999 (UTC Mw 7.45 Chi-Chi earthquake, Taiwan found that immediately after the earthquake the area closest to the epicenter had a lower b value. This pattern suggests that at the time of the Chi-Chi earthquake, the area closest to the epicenter remained prone to large magnitude aftershocks and strong shaking. With time, however, the b value increased, indicating a reduced likelihood for large magnitude aftershocks.

  11. Magnitude comparison with different types of rational numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Melissa; Grounds, Margaret A; Bassok, Miriam; Holyoak, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    An important issue in understanding mathematical cognition involves the similarities and differences between the magnitude representations associated with various types of rational numbers. For single-digit integers, evidence indicates that magnitudes are represented as analog values on a mental number line, such that magnitude comparisons are made more quickly and accurately as the numerical distance between numbers increases (the distance effect). Evidence concerning a distance effect for compositional numbers (e.g., multidigit whole numbers, fractions and decimals) is mixed. We compared the patterns of response times and errors for college students in magnitude comparison tasks across closely matched sets of rational numbers (e.g., 22/37, 0.595, 595). In Experiment 1, a distance effect was found for both fractions and decimals, but response times were dramatically slower for fractions than for decimals. Experiments 2 and 3 compared performance across fractions, decimals, and 3-digit integers. Response patterns for decimals and integers were extremely similar but, as in Experiment 1, magnitude comparisons based on fractions were dramatically slower, even when the decimals varied in precision (i.e., number of place digits) and could not be compared in the same way as multidigit integers (Experiment 3). Our findings indicate that comparisons of all three types of numbers exhibit a distance effect, but that processing often involves strategic focus on components of numbers. Fractions impose an especially high processing burden due to their bipartite (a/b) structure. In contrast to the other number types, the magnitude values associated with fractions appear to be less precise, and more dependent on explicit calculation.

  12. A catalog of observed nuclear magnitudes of Jupiter family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, G.; Fernández, J. A.; Rickman, H.; Licandro, J.

    2000-10-01

    A catalog of a sample of 105 Jupiter family (JF) comets (defined as those with Tisserand constants T > 2 and orbital periods P nuclear magnitudes H_N = V(1,0,0). The catalog includes all the nuclear magnitudes reported after 1950 until August 1998 that appear in the International Comet Quarterly Archive of Cometary Photometric Data, the Minor Planet Center (MPC) data base, IAU Circulars, International Comet Quarterly, and a few papers devoted to some particular comets, together with our own observations. Photometric data previous to 1990 have mainly been taken from the Comet Light Curve Catalogue (CLICC) compiled by Kamél (\\cite{kamel}). We discuss the reliability of the reported nuclear magnitudes in relation to the inherent sources of errors and uncertainties, in particular the coma contamination often present even at large heliocentric distances. A large fraction of the JF comets of our sample indeed shows various degrees of activity at large heliocentric distances, which is correlated with recent downward jumps in their perihelion distances. The reliability of coma subtraction methods to compute the nuclear magnitude is also discussed. Most absolute nuclear magnitudes are found in the range 15 - 18, with no magnitudes fainter than H_N ~ 19.5. The catalog can be found at: http://www.fisica.edu.uy/ ~ gonzalo/catalog/. Table 2 and Appendix B are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org Table 5 is also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  13. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  14. Reversible multi-head finite automata characterize reversible logarithmic space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic and non-deterministic multi-head finite automata are known to characterize the deterministic and non- deterministic logarithmic space complexity classes, respectively. Recently, Morita introduced reversible multi-head finite automata (RMFAs), and posed the question of whether RMFAs...... characterize reversible logarithmic space as well. Here, we resolve the question affirmatively, by exhibiting a clean RMFA simulation of logarithmic space reversible Turing machines. Indirectly, this also proves that reversible and deterministic multi-head finite automata recognize the same languages....

  15. [Reverse Chaddock sign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Kunio

    2011-08-01

    It is widely accepted that the Babinski reflex is the most well-known and important pathological reflex in clinical neurology. Among many other pathological reflexes that elicit an upgoing great toe, such as Chaddock, Oppenheim, Gordon, Schaefer, and Stransky, only the Chaddock reflex is said to be as sensitive as the Babinski reflex. The optimal receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes are the lateral plantar surface and the external inframalleolar area of the dorsum, respectively. It has been said that the Babinski reflex, obtained by stroking the sole, is by far the best and most reliable method of eliciting an upgoing great toe. However, the Chaddock reflex, the external malleolar sign, is also considered sensitive and reliable according to the literature and everyday neurological practice. The major problems in eliciting the Babinski reflex by stroking the lateral part of the sole are false positive or negative responses due to foot withdrawal, tonic foot response, or some equivocal movements. On the other hand, according to my clinical experience, the external inframalleolar area, which is the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex, is definitely suitable for eliciting the upgoing great toe. In fact, the newly proposed method to stimulate the dorsum of the foot from the medial to the lateral side, which I term the "reversed Chaddock method," is equally sensitive to demonstrate pyramidal tract involvement. With the "reversed Chaddock method", the receptive field of the Chaddock reflex may be postulated to be in the territory of the sural nerve, which could be supported by the better response obtained on stimulation of the postero-lateral calf than the anterior shin. With regard to the receptive fields of the Babinski and Chaddock reflexes, the first sacral dermatome (S1) is also considered a reflexogenous zone, but since the dermatome shows marked overlapping, the zones vary among individuals. As upgoing toe responses are consistently observed in

  16. Comparison between earthquake magnitudes determined by China seismograph network and US seismograph network (Ⅱ):Surface wave magnitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    By using orthogonal regression method, a systematic comparison is made between surface wave magnitudes determined by Institute of Geophysics of China Earthquake Administration (IGCEA) and National Earthquake Information Center of US Geological Survey (USGS/NEIC) on the basis of observation data collected by the two institutions between 1983 and 2004. A formula is obtained which reveals the relationship between surface wave magnitudes determined by China seismograph network and US seismograph network. The result shows that, as different calculation formulae and observational instruments are used, surface wave magnitude determined by IGCEA is generally greater by 0.2 than that determined by NEIC: for M=3.5~4.5 earthquakes, it is greater by 0.3;for M=5.0~6.5 earthquakes, it is greater by 0.2;and for M≥7.0 earthquakes, it is greater by no more than 0.1.

  17. The Magnitude Distribution of Earthquakes Near Southern California Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Lindh , 1985; Jackson and Kagan, 2006]. We do not consider time dependence in this study, but focus instead on the magnitude distribution for this fault...90032-7. Bakun, W. H., and A. G. Lindh (1985), The Parkfield, California, earth- quake prediction experiment, Science, 229(4714), 619–624, doi:10.1126

  18. Magnitude estimation with noisy integrators linked by an adaptive reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay eThurley

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Judgments of physical stimuli show characteristic biases; relatively small stimuli are overestimated whereas relatively large stimuli are underestimated (regression effect. Such biases likely result from a strategy that seeks to minimize errors given noisy estimates about stimuli that itself are drawn from a distribution, i.e., the statistics of the environment. While being conceptually well described, it is unclear how such a strategy could be implemented neurally. The present paper aims towards answering this question. A theoretical approach is introduced that describes magnitude estimation as two successive stages of noisy (neural integration. Both stages are linked by a reference memory that is updated with every new stimulus. The model reproduces the behavioral characteristics of magnitude estimation and makes several experimentally testable predictions. Moreover, the model identifies the regression effect as a means of minimizing estimation errors and explains how this optimality strategy depends on the subject's discrimination abilities and on the stimulus statistics. The latter influence predicts another property of magnitude estimation, the so-called range effect. Beyond being successful in describing decision-making, the present work suggests that noisy integration may also be important in processing magnitudes.

  19. Absolute magnitudes and phase coefficients of trans-Neptunian objects

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Candal, A; Ortiz, J L; Duffard, R; Morales, N; Santos-Sanz, P; Thirouin, A; Silva, J S

    2015-01-01

    Context: Accurate measurements of diameters of trans-Neptunian objects are extremely complicated to obtain. Thermal modeling can provide good results, but accurate absolute magnitudes are needed to constrain the thermal models and derive diameters and geometric albedos. The absolute magnitude, Hv, is defined as the magnitude of the object reduced to unit helio- and geocentric distances and a zero solar phase angle and is determined using phase curves. Phase coefficients can also be obtained from phase curves. These are related to surface properties, yet not many are known. Aims: Our objective is to measure accurate V band absolute magnitudes and phase coefficients for a sample of trans-Neptunian objects, many of which have been observed, and modeled, within the 'TNOs are cool' program, one of Herschel Space Observatory key projects. Methods: We observed 56 objects using the V and R filters. These data, along with those available in the literature, were used to obtain phase curves and measure V band absolute m...

  20. Extremal Regions Detection Guided by Maxima of Gradient Magnitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faraji, Mehdi; Shambezadeh, Jamshid; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    boundaries we introduce Maxima of Gradient Magnitudes (MGMs) which are shown to be points that are mostly around the boundaries of the regions. Having found the MGMs, the method obtains a Global Criterion (GC) for each level of the input image which is used to find Extremum Levels (ELs). The found ELs...

  1. DIGITAL FILTER PROCESS DURING THE DISCRETE MAGNITUDE DATA GATHERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚天忠; 邹丽新; 胡冶

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the reason that causes the error during the discrete magnitude data gathering.A method,dealing with data by means of second-order low-pass digital filter,is brought out,which will improve both the smooth degree and the reponse of the data into a quite good state.

  2. Asteroid magnitudes, UBV colors, and IRAS albedos and diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper lists absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for known asteroids numbered through 3318. The values presented are those used in reducing asteroid IR flux data obtained with the IRAS. U-B colors are given for 938 asteroids, and B-V colors are given for 945 asteroids. The IRAS albedos and diameters are tabulated for 1790 asteroids.

  3. Milli-Magnitude Time-Resolved Photometry with BEST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Rauer, H.; Erikson, E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparative test of different photometry algorithms. The test has been made in order to optimize the number of stars for which light curves with milli-magnitude precision can be achieved in observations made by the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST), a small wide-angle telescope...

  4. Milli-Magnitude Time-Resolved Photometry with BEST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Rauer, H.; Erikson, E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparative test of different photometry algorithms. The test has been made in order to optimize the number of stars for which light curves with milli-magnitude precision can be achieved in observations made by the Berlin Exoplanet Search Telescope (BEST), a small wide-angle telescope...

  5. Fraction Development in Children: Importance of Building Numerical Magnitude Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Carrique, Jessica; Hansen, Nicole; Resnick, Ilyse

    2016-01-01

    This chapter situates fraction learning within the integrated theory of numerical development. We argue that the understanding of numerical magnitudes for whole numbers as well as for fractions is critical to fraction learning in particular and mathematics achievement more generally. Results from the Delaware Longitudinal Study, which examined…

  6. Estimating the magnitude of food waste generated in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the developed world, food is treated as a disposable commodity. Between one third and half of all food produced for human consumption globally is estimated to be wasted. However, attempts to quantify the actual magnitude of food wasted...

  7. Neural representations of magnitude for natural and rational numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Melissa; Chiang, Jeffrey N; Bassok, Miriam; Holyoak, Keith J; Monti, Martin M

    2016-11-01

    Humans have developed multiple symbolic representations for numbers, including natural numbers (positive integers) as well as rational numbers (both fractions and decimals). Despite a considerable body of behavioral and neuroimaging research, it is currently unknown whether different notations map onto a single, fully abstract, magnitude code, or whether separate representations exist for specific number types (e.g., natural versus rational) or number representations (e.g., base-10 versus fractions). We address this question by comparing brain metabolic response during a magnitude comparison task involving (on different trials) integers, decimals, and fractions. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that the strength and pattern of activation for fractions differed systematically, within the intraparietal sulcus, from that of both decimals and integers, while the latter two number representations appeared virtually indistinguishable. These results demonstrate that the two major notations formats for rational numbers, fractions and decimals, evoke distinct neural representations of magnitude, with decimals representations being more closely linked to those of integers than to those of magnitude-equivalent fractions. Our findings thus suggest that number representation (base-10 versus fractions) is an important organizational principle for the neural substrate underlying mathematical cognition.

  8. Passive seismic monitoring at the ketzin CCS site -Magnitude estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, B.F.; Steeghs, T.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    In order to allow quantification of the strength of local micro-seismic events recorded at the CCS pilot site in Ketzin in terms of local magnitude, earthquake data recorded by standardized seismometers were used. Earthquakes were selected that occurred in Poland and Czech Republic and that were det

  9. Bayesian Predictive Distribution for the Magnitude of the Largest Aftershock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, R.

    2014-12-01

    Aftershock sequences, which follow large earthquakes, last hundreds of days and are characterized by well defined frequency-magnitude and spatio-temporal distributions. The largest aftershocks in a sequence constitute significant hazard and can inflict additional damage to infrastructure. Therefore, the estimation of the magnitude of possible largest aftershocks in a sequence is of high importance. In this work, we propose a statistical model based on Bayesian analysis and extreme value statistics to describe the distribution of magnitudes of the largest aftershocks in a sequence. We derive an analytical expression for a Bayesian predictive distribution function for the magnitude of the largest expected aftershock and compute the corresponding confidence intervals. We assume that the occurrence of aftershocks can be modeled, to a good approximation, by a non-homogeneous Poisson process with a temporal event rate given by the modified Omori law. We also assume that the frequency-magnitude statistics of aftershocks can be approximated by Gutenberg-Richter scaling. We apply our analysis to 19 prominent aftershock sequences, which occurred in the last 30 years, in order to compute the Bayesian predictive distributions and the corresponding confidence intervals. In the analysis, we use the information of the early aftershocks in the sequences (in the first 1, 10, and 30 days after the main shock) to estimate retrospectively the confidence intervals for the magnitude of the expected largest aftershocks. We demonstrate by analysing 19 past sequences that in many cases we are able to constrain the magnitudes of the largest aftershocks. For example, this includes the analysis of the Darfield (Christchurch) aftershock sequence. The proposed analysis can be used for the earthquake hazard assessment and forecasting associated with the occurrence of large aftershocks. The improvement in instrumental data associated with early aftershocks can greatly enhance the analysis and

  10. Effect of the polarity reversal frequency in the electrokinetic-biological remediation of oxyfluorfen polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Silvia; Villaseñor, José; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Cañizares, Pablo

    2017-06-01

    This work studies the feasibility of the periodic polarity reversal strategy (PRS) in a combined electrokinetic-biological process for the remediation of clayey soil polluted with a herbicide. Five two-weeks duration electrobioremediation batch experiments were performed in a bench scale set-up using spiked clay soil polluted with oxyfluorfen (20 mg kg(-1)) under potentiostatic conditions applying an electric field between the electrodes of 1.0 V cm(-1) (20.0 V) and using PRS with five frequencies (f) ranging from 0 to 6 d(-1). Additionally, two complementary reference tests were done: single bioremediation and single electrokinetic. The microbial consortium used was obtained from an oil refinery wastewater treatment plant and acclimated to oxyfluorfen degradation. Main soil conditions (temperature, pH, moisture and conductivity) were correctly controlled using PRS. On the contrary, the electroosmotic flow clearly decreased as f increased. The uniform soil microbial distribution at the end of the experiments indicated that the microbial activity remained in every parts of the soil after two weeks when applying PRS. Despite the adapted microbial culture was capable of degrade 100% of oxyfluorfen in water, the remediation efficiency in soil in a reference test, without the application of electric current, was negligible. However, under the low voltage gradients and polarity reversal, removal efficiencies between 5% and 15% were obtained, and it suggested that oxyfluorfen had difficulties to interact with the microbial culture or nutrients and that PRS promoted transport of species, which caused a positive influence on remediation. An optimal f value was observed between 2 and 3 d(-1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Earthquake Early Warning with Seismogeodesy: Detection, Location, and Magnitude Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, D.; Bock, Y.; Melgar, D.

    2016-12-01

    Earthquake early warning is critical to reducing injuries and casualties in case of a large magnitude earthquake. The system must rely on near-source data to minimize the time between event onset and issuance of a warning. Early warning systems typically use seismic instruments (seismometers and accelerometers), but these instruments experience difficulty maintaining reliable data in the near-source region and undergo magnitude saturation for large events. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) instruments capture the long period motions and have been shown to produce robust estimates of the true size of the earthquake source. However, GNSS is often overlooked in this context in part because it is not precise enough to record the first seismic wave arrivals (P-wave detection), an important consideration for issuing an early warning. GNSS instruments are becoming integrated into early warning, but are not yet fully exploited. Our approach involves the combination of direct measurements from collocated GNSS and accelerometer stations to estimate broadband coseismic displacement and velocity waveforms [Bock et al., 2011], a method known as seismogeodesy. We present the prototype seismogeodetic early warning system developed at Scripps and demonstrate that the seismogeodetic dataset can be used for P-wave detection, hypocenter location, and shaking onset determination. We discuss uncertainties in each of these estimates and include discussion of the sensitivity of our estimates as a function of the azimuthal distribution of monitoring stations. The seismogeodetic combination has previously been shown to be immune to magnitude saturation [Crowell et al., 2013; Melgar et al., 2015]. Rapid magnitude estimation is an important product in earthquake early warning, and is the critical metric in current tsunami hazard warnings. Using the seismogeodetic approach, we refine earthquake magnitude scaling using P-wave amplitudes (Pd) and peak ground displacements (PGD) for a

  12. Reverse Engineering of RFID devices

    OpenAIRE

    Bokslag, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the relevance and potential impact of both RFID and reverse engineering of RFID technology, followed by a discussion of common protocols and internals of RFID technology. The focus of the paper is on providing an overview of the different approaches to reverse engineering RFID technology and possible countermeasures that could limit the potential of such reverse engineering attempts.

  13. Reverse Engineering Malicious Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Cristian Iacob

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Detecting new and unknown malware is a major challenge in today’s software. Security profession. A lot of approaches for the detection of malware using data mining techniques have already been proposed. Majority of the works used static features of malware. However, static detection methods fall short of detecting present day complex malware. Although some researchers proposed dynamic detection methods, the methods did not use all the malware features. In this work, an approach for the detection of new and unknown malware was proposed and implemented. Each sample was reverse engineered for analyzing its effect on the operating environment and to extract the static and behavioral features. 

  14. Suitability of rapid energy magnitude determinations for emergency response purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Domenico; Parolai, Stefano; Bormann, Peter; Grosser, Helmut; Saul, Joachim; Wang, Rongjiang; Zschau, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    It is common practice in the seismological community to use, especially for large earthquakes, the moment magnitude Mw as a unique magnitude parameter to evaluate the earthquake's damage potential. However, as a static measure of earthquake size, Mw does not provide direct information about the released seismic wave energy and its high frequency content, which is the more interesting information both for engineering purposes and for a rapid assessment of the earthquake's shaking potential. Therefore, we recommend to provide to disaster management organizations besides Mw also sufficiently accurate energy magnitude determinations as soon as possible after large earthquakes. We developed and extensively tested a rapid method for calculating the energy magnitude Me within about 10-15 min after an earthquake's occurrence. The method is based on pre-calculated spectral amplitude decay functions obtained from numerical simulations of Green's functions. After empirical validation, the procedure has been applied offline to a large data set of 767 shallow earthquakes that have been grouped according to their type of mechanism (strike-slip, normal faulting, thrust faulting, etc.). The suitability of the proposed approach is discussed by comparing our rapid Me estimates with Mw published by GCMT as well as with Mw and Me reported by the USGS. Mw is on average slightly larger than our Me for all types of mechanisms. No clear dependence on source mechanism is observed for our Me estimates. In contrast, Me from the USGS is generally larger than Mw for strike-slip earthquakes and generally smaller for the other source types. For ~67 per cent of the event data set our Me differs events. A reason of that may be the overcorrection of the energy flux applied by the USGS for this type of earthquakes. We follow the original definition of magnitude scales, which does not apply a priori mechanism corrections to measured amplitudes, also since reliable fault-plane solutions are hardly

  15. Behavior of induced microseismic events with large magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, H.; Nozaki, H.; Niitsuma, H.; Wyborn, D.; Baria, R.

    2006-12-01

    Hydraulic stimulation of geothermal and oil/gas reservoir is one of the conventional techniques used for enhancing the productivity from reservoirs. In most cases, the stimulation process induces microseismic events. Based on the activity, location, magnitude and source mechanism of such events, the 3D localization and characterization of the reservoir can be carried out with practical resolution. Typically, microseismic events from a reservoir have moment magnitudes of less than zero, and most of them are detectable only by downhole sensors with high sensitivity. However, it is known that some of these events have higher magnitudes and can be felt at the surface. These large events can be hazardous from an environmental point of view, while resulting in enhanced permeability in the reservoir at the same time. The authors have analyzed the spatio-temporal distribution, and source mechanism of such microseismic events having large magnitudes (big events) observed during the hydraulic stimulations at Australian hot fractured rock (HFR) site in the Cooper Basin (Asanuma et al., SEG Exp. Abst., 2004) and also at the European hot dry rock (HDR) site in Soultz, France (Asanuma et al., Trans. GRC, 2004). A comparison between the origin time of these big events and the hydraulic records showed that many of the big events occurred after the shut-ins at both the sites. Besides, during pumping, most of these events did not show a clear correlation to the wellhead pressure and the rate of pumping. In most cases, the source mechanism of the big events were consistent with the shear slip of a preexisting fracture. We have also found that some of the big events at the Australian site brought very clear extension of the seismic cloud into zones that were seismically silent before, suggesting that some kind of hydraulic barrier was overcome by these big events. The observational data also showed that the microseismic events at those sites originated mainly from a slip of asperities

  16. Reversibly Bistable Flexible Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Alfaraj, Nasir

    2015-05-01

    Introducing the notion of transformational silicon electronics has paved the way for integrating various applications with silicon-based, modern, high-performance electronic circuits that are mechanically flexible and optically semitransparent. While maintaining large-scale production and prototyping rapidity, this flexible and translucent scheme demonstrates the potential to transform conventionally stiff electronic devices into thin and foldable ones without compromising long-term performance and reliability. In this work, we report on the fabrication and characterization of reversibly bistable flexible electronic switches that utilize flexible n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors. The transistors are fabricated initially on rigid (100) silicon substrates before they are peeled off. They can be used to control flexible batches of light-emitting diodes, demonstrating both the relative ease of scaling at minimum cost and maximum reliability and the feasibility of integration. The peeled-off silicon fabric is about 25 µm thick. The fabricated devices are transferred to a reversibly bistable flexible platform through which, for example, a flexible smartphone can be wrapped around a user’s wrist and can also be set back to its original mechanical position. Buckling and cyclic bending of such host platforms brings a completely new dimension to the development of flexible electronics, especially rollable displays.

  17. Fundamentals of reversible flowchart languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2016-01-01

    . Although reversible flowcharts are superficially similar to classical flowcharts, there are crucial differences: atomic steps are limited to locally invertible operations, and join points require an explicit orthogonalizing conditional expression. Despite these constraints, we show that reversible......Abstract This paper presents the fundamentals of reversible flowcharts. They are intended to naturally represent the structure and control flow of reversible (imperative) programming languages in a simple computation model, in the same way classical flowcharts do for conventional languages......, structured reversible flowcharts are as expressive as unstructured ones, as shown by a reversible version of the classic Structured Program Theorem. We illustrate how reversible flowcharts can be concretized with two example programming languages, complete with syntax and semantics: a low-level unstructured...

  18. How are number words mapped to approximate magnitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jessica; Barner, David

    2013-01-01

    How do we map number words to the magnitudes they represent? While much is known about the developmental trajectory of number word learning, the acquisition of the counting routine, and the academic correlates of estimation ability, previous studies have yet to describe the mechanisms that link number words to nonverbal representations of number. We investigated two mechanisms: associative mapping and structure mapping. Four dot array estimation tasks found that adults' ability to match a number word to one of two discriminably different sets declined as a function of set size and that participants' estimates of relatively large, but not small, set sizes were influenced by misleading feedback during an estimation task. We propose that subjects employ structure mappings for linking relatively large number words to set sizes, but rely chiefly on item-by-item associative mappings for smaller sets. These results indicate that both inference and association play important roles in mapping number words to approximate magnitudes.

  19. EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DEFORMATION STRUCTURES AND RELATED TO EARTHQUAKE MAGNITUDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş TOPAL

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake-induced deformation structures which are called seismites may helpful to clasify the paleoseismic history of a location and to estimate the magnitudes of the potention earthquakes in the future. In this paper, seismites were investigated according to the types formed in deep and shallow lake sediments. Seismites are observed forms of sand dikes, introduced and fractured gravels and pillow structures in shallow lakes and pseudonodules, mushroom-like silts protruding laminites, mixed layers, disturbed varved lamination and loop bedding in deep lake sediments. Earthquake-induced deformation structures, by benefiting from previous studies, were ordered according to their formations and earthquake magnitudes. In this order, the lowest eartquake's record is loop bedding and the highest one is introduced and fractured gravels in lacustrine deposits.

  20. Sensori-motor spatial training of number magnitude representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ursula; Moeller, Korbinian; Bientzle, Martina; Cress, Ulrike; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2011-02-01

    An adequately developed spatial representation of number magnitude is associated with children's general arithmetic achievement. Therefore, a new spatial-numerical training program for kindergarten children was developed in which presentation and response were associated with a congruent spatial numerical representation. In particular, children responded by a full-body spatial movement on a digital dance mat in a magnitude comparison task. This spatial-numerical training was more effective than a non-spatial control training in enhancing children's performance on a number line estimation task and a subtest of a standardized mathematical achievement battery (TEDI-MATH). A mediation analysis suggested that these improvements were driven by an improvement of children's mental number line representation and not only by unspecific factors such as attention or motivation. These results suggest a benefit of spatial numerical associations. Rather than being a merely associated covariate, they work as an independently manipulated variable which is functional for numerical development.

  1. Resistance to change as a function of concurrent reinforcer magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, J C; Pickering, L D; McLean, A P

    1996-12-01

    Six pigeons responded on two keys in each of three signalled multiple-schedule components, and resistance to disruption of responding on one (target) key by extinction and by response-independent food presented during inter-component blackouts was studied. Alternative reinforcement of different magnitudes was contingent on pecking a non-target key in two components, and in the third only the target response was reinforced. Resistance to change varied with the overall quantity of reinforcement in the component, regardless of whether reinforcers were contingent on the target or non-target response, but did not differ across the two key locations. These results using different magnitudes of reinforcement confirm previous findings using rate of reinforcement as the variable, and suggest that resistance to change is dependent on stimulus-reinforcer rather than response-reinforcer contingencies.

  2. Estimation of continuous object distributions from limited Fourier magnitude measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Charles L.; Fiddy, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    From finite complex spectral data one can construct a continuous object with a given support that is consistent with the data. Given Fourier magnitude data only, one can choose the phases arbitrarily in the above construction. The energy in the extrapolated spectrum is phase-dependent and provides a cost function to be used in phase retrieval. The minimization process is performed iteratively, using an algorithm that can be viewed as a combination of Gerchberg-Papoulis and Fienup error reduction.

  3. Magnitude and influencing factors of parasomnia in schoolchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury Habibur Rasul; Khan Golam Mostafa; Nitya Nanda Baruri; Jakia Sultana

    2013-01-01

    Background Parasomnias are undesirable events occurring in the sleep-wake transition period. Several predisposing factors are reported to induce parasomnia in preschool children. Objective To estimate the magnitude of parasomnia in school children and to evaluate its relationship with possible predisposing factors. Methods Five hundred children aged 5-16 years from a boys’ school and a girls’ school in Khulna City, Bangladesh, were randomly selected for the study conducted from July t...

  4. Magnitude and influencing factors of parasomnia in schoolchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury Habibur Rasul; Khan Golam Mostafa; Nitya Nanda Baruri; Jakia Sultana

    2013-01-01

    Background Parasomnias are undesirable events occurring in the sleep-wake transition period. Several predisposing factors are reported to induce parasomnia in preschool children. Objective To es timate the magnitude of parasomnia in school children and to evaluate its relationship with possible predisposing factors . Methods Five hundred children aged 5- 16 years from a boys' school and a girls' school in Khulna City, Ban gladesh, were randomly selected for the study c...

  5. The Absolute Magnitudes of Type Ia Supernovae in the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Milne, Peter; Bufano, Filomena; Ciardullo, Robin; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Foley, Ryan J.; Gehrels, Neil; Gronwall, Caryl; Hicken, Malcolm; Holland, Stephen T.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Immler, Stefan; Kirshner, Robert P.; Li, Weidong; Mazzali, Paolo; Phillips, Mark M.; Pritchard, Tyler; Still, Martin; Turatto, Massimo; Vanden Berk, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby (redshift z = 0.004-0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1 rc covering ~2600-3300 Å after removing optical light, and u ≈ 3000-4000 Å) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 ≈2000-2400 Å). The uvw1 rc - b colors show a scatter of ~0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2 - uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 Å. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, ~1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.

  6. Modeling the Color Magnitude Relation for Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Noelia; Castelli, Analia Smith; Bassino, Lilia P

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR) observed in cluster galaxies by using a combination of a cosmological N-body simulation of a cluster of galaxies and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The departure of galaxies in the bright end of the CMR with respect to the trend denoted by less luminous galaxies could be explained by the influence of minor mergers

  7. Understanding the timing and magnitude of advertising spending patterns.

    OpenAIRE

    Gijsenberg, Maarten; van Heerde, Harald J.; Dekimpe, Marnik; Jan-Benedict E M Steenkamp; Nijs, Vincent R.

    2009-01-01

    Notwithstanding the fact that advertising is one of the most used marketing tools, little is known about what is driving (i) the timing and (ii) the magnitude of advertising actions. Building on normative theory, the authors develop a parsimonious model that captures this dual investment process. They explain advertising spending patterns as observed in the market, and investigate the impact of company, competitive, and category-related factors on these decisions, thereby introducing the nove...

  8. Age influences magnitude but not duration of response to levodopa.

    OpenAIRE

    Durso, R; Isaac, K; Perry, L; Saint-Hilaire, M; Feldman, R G

    1993-01-01

    Following an all-night fast, 45 patients with Parkinson's disease were examined using certain motor items present in the United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. All were given a single tablet of carbidopa 25 mg and levodopa 250 mg and re-examined 90 minutes later. In addition to this evaluation, 23 of these patients underwent further scoring over a 4-hour period. A significant negative correlation was found between age and one important aspect of drug-derived benefit: magnitude of response. ...

  9. Spatial patterns of landslide dimension: A tool for magnitude mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Filippo; Tofani, Veronica; Lagomarsino, Daniela

    2016-11-01

    The magnitude of mass movements, which may be expressed by their dimension in terms of area or volume, is an important component of intensity together with velocity. In the case of slow-moving deep-seated landslides, the expected magnitude is the prevalent parameter for defining intensity when assessed as a spatially distributed variable in a given area. In particular, the frequency-volume statistics of past landslides may be used to understand and predict the magnitude of new landslides and reactivations. In this paper we study the spatial properties of volume frequency distributions in the Arno river basin (Central Italy, about 9100 km2). The overall landslide inventory taken into account (around 27,500 events) shows a power-law scaling of volumes for values greater than a cutoff value of about 2 × 104 m3. We explore the variability of the power-law exponent in the geographic space by setting up local subsets of the inventory based on neighbourhoods with radii between 5 and 50 km. We found that the power-law exponent α varies according to geographic position and that the exponent itself can be treated as a random space variable with autocorrelation properties both at local and regional scale. We use this finding to devise a simple method to map the magnitude frequency distribution in space and to create maps of exceeding probability of landslide volume for risk analysis. We also study the causes of spatial variation of α by analysing the dependence of power-law properties on geological and geomorphological factors, and we find that structural settings and valley density exert a strong influence on mass movement dimensions.

  10. Typical magnitude and spatial extent of crowding in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyberg, Jan; Robertson, Caroline E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced spatial processing of local visual details has been reported in individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC), and crowding is postulated to be a mechanism that may produce this ability. However, evidence for atypical crowding in ASC is mixed, with some studies reporting a complete lack of crowding in autism and others reporting a typical magnitude of crowding between individuals with and without ASC. Here, we aim to disambiguate these conflicting results by testing both the magnitude and the spatial extent of crowding in individuals with ASC (N = 25) and age- and IQ-matched controls (N = 23) during an orientation discrimination task. We find a strong crowding effect in individuals with and without ASC, which falls off as the distance between target and flanker is increased. Both the magnitude and the spatial range of this effect were comparable between individuals with and without ASC. We also find typical (uncrowded) orientation discrimination thresholds in individuals with ASC. These findings suggest that the spatial extent of crowding is unremarkable in ASC, and is therefore unlikely to account for the visual symptoms reported in individuals with the diagnosis.

  11. The Absolute Magnitude Distribution of Kuiper Belt Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Wesley C; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Parker, Alex; Batygin, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Here we measure the absolute magnitude distributions (H-distribution) of the dynamically excited and quiescent (hot and cold) Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), and test if they share the same H-distribution as the Jupiter Trojans. From a compilation of all useable ecliptic surveys, we find that the KBO H-distributions are well described by broken power-laws. The cold population has a bright-end slope, $\\alpha_{\\textrm{1}}=1.5_{-0.2}^{+0.4}$, and break magnitude, $H_{\\textrm{B}}=6.9_{-0.2}^{+0.1}$ (r'-band). The hot population has a shallower bright-end slope of, $\\alpha_{\\textrm{1}}=0.87_{-0.2}^{+0.07}$, and break magnitude $H_{\\textrm{B}}=7.7_{-0.5}^{+1.0}$. Both populations share similar faint end slopes of $\\alpha_2\\sim0.2$. We estimate the masses of the hot and cold populations are $\\sim0.01$ and $\\sim3\\times10^{-4} \\mbox{ M$_{\\bigoplus}$}$. The broken power-law fit to the Trojan H-distribution has $\\alpha_\\textrm{1}=1.0\\pm0.2$, $\\alpha_\\textrm{2}=0.36\\pm0.01$, and $H_{\\textrm{B}}=8.3$. The KS test reveals that...

  12. Magnitudes and timescales of total solar irradiance variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Greg

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to gigayears. Direct measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) show changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy on timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. Variations of ~0.01% over a few minutes are caused by the ever-present superposition of convection and oscillations with very large solar flares on rare occasion causing slightly-larger measurable signals. On timescales of days to weeks, changing photospheric magnetic activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle shows variations of comparable magnitude with irradiances peaking near solar maximum. Secular variations are more difficult to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Historical reconstructions of the Sun's irradiance based on indicators of solar-surface magnetic activity, such as sunspots, faculae, and cosmogenic isotope records, suggest solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitudes of these variations have high uncertainties due to the indirect historical records on which they rely. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities. In this manuscript I summarize the Sun's variability magnitudes over different temporal regimes and discuss the irradiance record's relevance for solar and climate studies as well as for detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  13. The Absolute Magnitudes of Type Ia Supernovae in the Ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter J; Milne, Peter; Bufano, Filomena; Ciardullo, Robin; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V; Foley, Ryan J; Gehrels, Neil; Gronwall, Caryl; Hicken, Malcolm; Holland, Stephen T; Hoversten, Erik A; Immler, Stefan; Kirshner, Robert P; Li, Weidong; Mazzali, Paolo; Phillips, Mark M; Pritchard, Tyler; Still, Martin; Turatto, Massimo; Berk, Daniel Vanden

    2010-01-01

    We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby(redshift z = 0.004--0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way (MW) extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1_rc covering ~2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u ~3000--4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 ~2000-2400 A). The uvw1_rc-b colors show a scatter of ~0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2-uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with ...

  14. The absolute infrared magnitudes of type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Meikle, W P S

    2000-01-01

    The absolute luminosities and homogeneity of early-time infrared (IR) light curves of type Ia supernovae are examined. Eight supernovae are considered. These are selected to have accurately known epochs of maximum blue light as well as having reliable distance estimates and/or good light curve coverage. Two approaches to extinction correction are considered. Owing to the low extinction in the IR, the differences in the corrections via the two methods are small. Absolute magnitude light curves in the J, H and K-bands are derived. Six of the events, including five established ``Branch-normal'' supernovae show similar coeval magnitudes. Two of these, SNe 1989B and 1998bu, were observed near maximum infrared light. This occurs about 5 days {\\it before} maximum blue light. Absolute peak magnitudes of about -19.0, -18.7 and -18.8 in J, H & K respectively were obtained. The two spectroscopically peculiar supernovae in the sample, SNe 1986G and 1991T, also show atypical IR behaviour. The light curves of the six s...

  15. Magnitude Uncertainties Impact Seismic Rate Estimates, Forecasts and Predictability Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Werner, M J

    2007-01-01

    The Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) aims to prospectively test time-dependent earthquake probability forecasts on their consistency with observations. To compete, time-dependent seismicity models are calibrated on earthquake catalog data. But catalogs contain much observational uncertainty. We study the impact of magnitude uncertainties on rate estimates in clustering models, on their forecasts and on their evaluation by CSEP's consistency tests. First, we quantify magnitude uncertainties. We find that magnitude uncertainty is more heavy-tailed than a Gaussian, such as a double-sided exponential distribution, with scale parameter nu_c=0.1 - 0.3. Second, we study the impact of such noise on the forecasts of a simple clustering model which captures the main ingredients of popular short term models. We prove that the deviations of noisy forecasts from an exact forecast are power law distributed in the tail with exponent alpha=1/(a*nu_c), where a is the exponent of the productivity...

  16. The Road to Convergence in Earthquake Frequency-Magnitude Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, M.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter frequency-magnitude relation is a fundamental empirical law of seismology, but its form remains uncertain for rare extreme events. Convergence trends can be diagnostic of the nature of an underlying distribution and its sampling even before convergence has occurred. We examine the evolution of an information criteria metric applied to earthquake magnitude time series, in order to test whether the Gutenberg-Richter law can be rejecting in various earthquake catalogues. This would imply that the catalogue is starting to sample roll-off in the tail though it cannot yet identify the form of the roll-off. We compare bootstrapped synthetic Gutenberg-Richter and synthetic modified Gutenberg-Richter catalogues with the convergence trends observed in real earthquake data e.g. the global CMT catalogue, Southern California and mining/geothermal data. Whilst convergence in the tail remains some way off, we show that the temporal evolution of model likelihoods and parameters for the frequency-magnitude distribution of the global Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor catalogue is inconsistent with an unbounded GR relation, despite it being the preferred model at the current time. Bell, A. F., M. Naylor, and I. G. Main (2013), Convergence of the frequency-size distribution of global earthquakes, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 2585-2589, doi:10.1002/grl.50416.

  17. Mid-IR period-magnitude relations for AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Glass, I S; Blommaert, J A D L; Sahai, R; Stute, M; Uttenthaler, S

    2009-01-01

    Asymptotic Giant Branch variables are found to obey period-luminosity relations in the mid-IR similar to those seen at K_S (2.14 microns), even at 24 microns where emission from circumstellar dust is expected to be dominant. Their loci in the M, logP diagrams are essentially the same for the LMC and for NGC6522 in spite of different ages and metallicities. There is no systematic trend of slope with wavelength. The offsets of the apparent magnitude vs. logP relations imply a difference between the two fields of 3.8 in distance modulus. The colours of the variables confirm that a principal period with log P > 1.75 is a necessary condition for detectable mass-loss. At the longest observed wavelength, 24 microns, many semi-regular variables have dust shells comparable in luminosity to those around Miras. There is a clear bifurcation in LMC colour-magnitude diagrams involving 24 micron magnitudes.

  18. Magnitude and valence of outcomes as determinants of causal judgments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Delgado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este proyecto es examinar si el modelo de bloqueo predice la atribución de juicios causales al variar la valencia y la magnitud de las consecuencias. El arreglo experimental consiste en la presentación de reportes sobre los efectos positivos y negativos que producen diferentes sustancias al ser consumidas solas o en conjunto con otras. Los participantes del primer grupo estuvieron expuestos a consecuencias de alta magnitud y los del segundo grupo, a consecuencias de baja magnitud. Se evaluó si la atribución de causalidad es consistente con las predicciones del efecto bloqueo mediante dos tipos de pregunta: una pregunta acerca si la sustancia X produce o no el efecto, y una pregunta sobre la probabilidad de que X produzca el efecto. Se examinaron las diferencias en los juicios causales cuando las atribuciones son producto del razonamiento lógico o intuitivo. Si bien no se observó evidencia del efecto bloqueo, se obtuvieron efectos de interacción entre los factores valencia y condición experimental (sustancias bloqueo y control. Se discuten los hallazgos en términos de las diferencias entre el aprendizaje asociativo en humanos y animales no humanos, y en términos de las implicaciones sobre las diferencias teóricas entre el condicionamiento evaluativo y el condicionamiento predictivo.

  19. Correlating precursory declines in groundwater radon with earthquake magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, T

    2014-01-01

    Both studies at the Antung hot spring in eastern Taiwan and at the Paihe spring in southern Taiwan confirm that groundwater radon can be a consistent tracer for strain changes in the crust preceding an earthquake when observed in a low-porosity fractured aquifer surrounded by a ductile formation. Recurrent anomalous declines in groundwater radon were observed at the Antung D1 monitoring well in eastern Taiwan prior to the five earthquakes of magnitude (Mw ): 6.8, 6.1, 5.9, 5.4, and 5.0 that occurred on December 10, 2003; April 1, 2006; April 15, 2006; February 17, 2008; and July 12, 2011, respectively. For earthquakes occurring on the longitudinal valley fault in eastern Taiwan, the observed radon minima decrease as the earthquake magnitude increases. The above correlation has been proven to be useful for early warning local large earthquakes. In southern Taiwan, radon anomalous declines prior to the 2010 Mw 6.3 Jiasian, 2012 Mw 5.9 Wutai, and 2012 ML 5.4 Kaohsiung earthquakes were also recorded at the Paihe spring. For earthquakes occurring on different faults in southern Taiwan, the correlation between the observed radon minima and the earthquake magnitude is not yet possible. © 2013, National Ground Water Association.

  20. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ja; Yu, Won Jong; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Yeon Soo; Kim, Ji Chang; Kang, Si Won [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chang Joon [Chungnam National Univ. School of Medicine, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Soon-Young; Koo, Ja Hong [Kwandong Univ. College of Medicine, Myungji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Deuk [College of Medicine Pochon CHA Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To review reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. We reviewed 22 patients (M:F=3:19; age, 17-46 years) with the characteristic clinical and imaging features of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. All underwent brain MRI, and in three cases both CT and MRI were performed. In one, MRA was obtained, and in eleven, follow-up MR images were obtained. We evaluated the causes of this syndrome, its clinical manifestations, and MR findings including the locations of lesions, the presence or absence of contrast enhancement, and the changes seen at follow-up MRI. Of the 22 patients, 13 had eclampsia (six during pregnancy and seven during puerperium). Four were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (three, cyclosporine ; one, FK 506). Four suffered renal failure and one had complicated migraine. The clinical manifestations included headache (n=12), visual disturbance (n=13), seizure (n=15), focal neurologic sign (n=3), and altered mental status (n=2). Fifteen patients had hypertension and the others normotension. MRI revealed that lesions were bilateral (n=20) or unilateral (n=2). In all patients the lesion was found in the cortical and subcortical areas of the parieto-occipital lobes ; other locations were the basal ganglia (n=9), posterior temporal lobe (n=8), frontal lobe (n=5), cerebellum (n=5), pons (n=2), and thalamus (n=1). All lesions were of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and of iso to low intensity on T1-weighted images. One was combined with acute hematoma in the left basal ganglia. In eight of 11 patients who underwent postcontrast T1-weighted MRI, there was no definite enhancement ; in one, enhancement was mild, and in tow, patchy. CT studies showed low attenuation, and MRA revealed mild vasospasm. The symptoms of all patients improved. Follow-up MRI in nine of 11 patients depicted complete resolution of the lesions ; in two, small infarctions remained but the extent of the lesions had decreased. Reversible posterior

  1. Does low magnitude earthquake ground shaking cause landslides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, Matthew; Rosser, Nick; Vann Jones, Emma; Tunstall, Neil

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the magnitude of coseismic landslide strain accumulation at both local and regional scales is a key goal in understanding earthquake-triggered landslide distributions and landscape evolution, and in undertaking seismic risk assessment. Research in this field has primarily been carried out using the 'Newmark sliding block method' to model landslide behaviour; downslope movement of the landslide mass occurs when seismic ground accelerations are sufficient to overcome shear resistance at the landslide shear surface. The Newmark method has the advantage of simplicity, requiring only limited information on material strength properties, landslide geometry and coseismic ground motion. However, the underlying conceptual model assumes that shear strength characteristics (friction angle and cohesion) calculated using conventional strain-controlled monotonic shear tests are valid under dynamic conditions, and that values describing shear strength do not change as landslide shear strain accumulates. Recent experimental work has begun to question these assumptions, highlighting, for example, the importance of shear strain rate and changes in shear strength properties following seismic loading. However, such studies typically focus on a single earthquake event that is of sufficient magnitude to cause permanent strain accumulation; by doing so, they do not consider the potential effects that multiple low-magnitude ground shaking events can have on material strength. Since such events are more common in nature relative to high-magnitude shaking events, it is important to constrain their geomorphic effectiveness. Using an experimental laboratory approach, we present results that address this key question. We used a bespoke geotechnical testing apparatus, the Dynamic Back-Pressured Shear Box (DynBPS), that uniquely permits more realistic simulation of earthquake ground-shaking conditions within a hillslope. We tested both cohesive and granular materials, both of which

  2. Automated Determination of Magnitude and Source Extent of Large Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dun

    2017-04-01

    Rapid determination of earthquake magnitude is of importance for estimating shaking damages, and tsunami hazards. However, due to the complexity of source process, accurately estimating magnitude for great earthquakes in minutes after origin time is still a challenge. Mw is an accurate estimate for large earthquakes. However, calculating Mw requires the whole wave trains including P, S, and surface phases, which takes tens of minutes to reach stations at tele-seismic distances. To speed up the calculation, methods using W phase and body wave are developed for fast estimating earthquake sizes. Besides these methods that involve Green's Functions and inversions, there are other approaches that use empirically simulated relations to estimate earthquake magnitudes, usually for large earthquakes. The nature of simple implementation and straightforward calculation made these approaches widely applied at many institutions such as the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center, the Japan Meteorological Agency, and the USGS. Here we developed an approach that was originated from Hara [2007], estimating magnitude by considering P-wave displacement and source duration. We introduced a back-projection technique [Wang et al., 2016] instead to estimate source duration using array data from a high-sensitive seismograph network (Hi-net). The introduction of back-projection improves the method in two ways. Firstly, the source duration could be accurately determined by seismic array. Secondly, the results can be more rapidly calculated, and data derived from farther stations are not required. We purpose to develop an automated system for determining fast and reliable source information of large shallow seismic events based on real time data of a dense regional array and global data, for earthquakes that occur at distance of roughly 30°- 85° from the array center. This system can offer fast and robust estimates of magnitudes and rupture extensions of large earthquakes in 6 to 13 min (plus

  3. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Senesac, Lawrence R [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  4. Is Computation Reversible?

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, M C; Parker, Michael C.; Walker, Stuart D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent investigations into the physical nature of information and fundamental limits to information transmission have revealed questions such as the possibility of superluminal data transfer or not; and whether reversible computation (information processing) is feasible. In some respects these uncertainties stem from the determination of whether information is inherent in points of non-analyticity (discontinuities) or smoother functions. The close relationship between information and entropy is also well known, e.g. Brillouin's concept of negentropy (negative entropy) as a measure for information. Since the leading edge of a step-discontinuity propagates in any dispersive medium at the speed of light in vacuum as a precursor to the main body of the dispersed pulse, we propose in this paper to treat information as being intrinsic to points of non-analyticity (discontinuities). This allows us to construct a theory addressing these dilemmas in a fashion consistent with causality, and the fundamental laws of ther...

  5. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  6. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  7. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  8. A Reversible Processor Architecture and its Reversible Logic Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design of a purely reversible computing architecture, Bob, and its instruction set, BobISA. The special features of the design include a simple, yet expressive, locally-invertible instruction set, and fully reversible control logic and address calculation. We have designed...... an architecture with an ISA that is expressive enough to serve as the target for a compiler from a high-level structured reversible programming language. All-in-all, this paper demonstrates that the design of a complete reversible computing architecture is possible and can serve as the core of a programmable...

  9. Distance protection of multiple-circuit shared tower transmission lines with different voltages. Part I: Fault current magnitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2017-01-01

    Multiple-circuit transmission lines combining different voltage levels in one tower present extra challenges when setting a protection philosophy, as faults between voltage levels are possible. This paper presents a detailed theoretical analysis of such combined faults, including the development...... of a formula for estimating the magnitude of the short-circuit current. It is demonstrated that if the faulted phase from the higher voltage level leads the faulted phase from the lower voltage level, a distance relay at the higher voltage level sees the fault in the forward direction, whereas a distance relay...... at the lower voltage level sees the fault in the reverse direction. The opposite happens if the lower voltage level leads the higher voltage level. It is also demonstrated that the magnitude of fault currents of combined faults is normally slightly larger than of equivalent single-phase-to-ground fault...

  10. A spin reversal system for polarized epithermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.D. [Los Alamos Nat. Lab., NM (United States); Penttilae, S.I. [Los Alamos Nat. Lab., NM (United States); Tippens, W.B. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    1996-01-21

    The design and construction of a spin-reversal system for longitudinally polarized epithermal neutrons are presented. The design uses a static magnetic field parallel to the momentum of the neutron. The longitudinal field changes the direction at its midpoint. A transverse magnetic field is turned off to control the spin direction at the end of the spin flipper. The neutron spin is reversed with respect to both the neutron momentum and the static longitudinal field at the exit of the spin flipper. In the transverse field-on state the spin adiabatically follows the field direction and the spin direction is reversed. In the transverse field-off state the spin passes rapidly through the region where the solenoidal field reverses the sign and the spin direction is not reversed. With this design, the spins of an 8-cm-diameter beam of longitudinally polarized neutrons can be reversed with an efficiency greater than 88% over a range of neutron energies of more than four orders of magnitude. (orig.).

  11. A spin reversal system for polarized epithermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, J. D.; Penttilä, S. I.; Tippens, W. B.

    1996-02-01

    The design and construction of a spin-reversal system for longitudinally polarized epithermal neutrons are presented. The design uses a static magnetic field parallel to the momentum of the neutron. The longitudinal field changes the direction at its midpoint. A transverse magnetic field is turned off to control the spin direction at the end of the spin flipper. The neutron spin is reversed with respect to both the neutron momentum and the static longitudinal field at the exit of the spin flipper. In the transverse field-on state the spin adiabatically follows the field direction and the spin direction is reversed. In the transverse field-off state the spin passes rapidly through the region where the solenoidal field reverses the sign and the spin direction is not reversed. With this design, the spins of an 8-cm-diameter beam of longitudinally polarized neutrons can be reversed with an efficiency greater than 88% over a range of neutron energies of more than four orders of magnitude.

  12. Time reversal for a single spherical scatterer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D H; Gautesen, A K

    2001-06-01

    We show that the time reversal operator for a planar time reversal mirror (TRM) can have up to four distinct eigenvalues with a small spherical acoustic scatterer. Each eigenstate represents a resonance between the TRM and an induced scattering moment of the sphere. Their amplitude distributions on the TRM are orthogonal superpositions of the radiation patterns from a monopole and up to three orthogonal dipoles. The induced monopole moment is associated with the compressibility contrast between the sphere and the medium, while the dipole moments are associated with density contrast. The number of eigenstates is related to the number of orthogonal orientations of each induced multipole. For hard spheres (glass, metals) the contribution of the monopole moment to the eigenvalues is much greater than that of the dipole moments, leading to a single dominant eigenvalue. The other eigenvalues are much smaller, making it unlikely multiple eigenvalues could have been observed in previous experiments using hard materials. However, for soft materials such as wood, plastic, or air bubbles the eigenvalues are comparable in magnitude and should be observable. The presence of multiple eigenstates breaks the one-to-one correspondence between eigenstates and distinguishable scatterers discussed previously by Prada and Fink [Wave Motion 20, 151-163 (1994)]. However, eigenfunctions from separate scatterers would have different phases for their eigenfunctions, potentially restoring the ability to distinguish separate scatterers. Since relative magnitudes of the eigenvalues for a single scatterer are governed by the ratio of the compressibility contrast to the density contrast, measurement of the eigenvalue spectrum would provide information on the composition of the scatterer.

  13. Study of the global and regional climatic impacts of ENSO magnitude using SPEEDY AGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogar, Muhammad Mubashar; Kucharski, Fred; Azharuddin, Syed

    2017-03-01

    over the tropical Atlantic and the Indian Ocean through Walker circulation. ENSO-induced negative (positive) NAO-like response and associated changes over Southern Europe and North Africa get significantly strong following increased intensity of El Niño (La Niña) in the northern (southern) hemisphere in the boreal winter (summer) season. We further find that ENSO magnitude significantly impacts Hadley and Walker circulations. The positive phase of ENSO (El Niño) overall strengthens Hadley cell and a reverse is true for the La Niña phase. ENSO-induced strengthening and weakening of Hadley cell induces significant impact over South Asian and African ITCZ convective regions through modification of ITCZ/monsoon circulation system.

  14. Study of the global and regional climatic impacts of ENSO magnitude using SPEEDY AGCM

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muhammad Mubashar Dogar; Fred Kucharski; Syed Azharuddin

    2017-03-01

    impact over the tropical Atlantic and the Indian Ocean through Walker circulation. ENSO-induced negative (positive) NAO-like response and associated changes over Southern Europe and North Africa get significantly strong following increased intensity of El Ni˜no (La Ni˜na) in the northern (southern) hemisphere in the boreal winter (summer)season. We further find that ENSO magnitude significantly impacts Hadley and Walker circulations. The positive phase of ENSO (El Ni˜no) overall strengthens Hadley cell and a reverse is true for the La Ni˜na phase. ENSO-induced strengthening and weakening of Hadley cell induces significant impact over SouthAsian and African ITCZ convective regions through modification of ITCZ/ monsoon circulation system.

  15. Study of the global and regional climatic impacts of ENSO magnitude using SPEEDY AGCM

    KAUST Repository

    Dogar, Muhammad Mubashar

    2017-03-09

    impact over the tropical Atlantic and the Indian Ocean through Walker circulation. ENSO-induced negative (positive) NAO-like response and associated changes over Southern Europe and North Africa get significantly strong following increased intensity of El Niño (La Niña) in the northern (southern) hemisphere in the boreal winter (summer) season. We further find that ENSO magnitude significantly impacts Hadley and Walker circulations. The positive phase of ENSO (El Niño) overall strengthens Hadley cell and a reverse is true for the La Niña phase. ENSO-induced strengthening and weakening of Hadley cell induces significant impact over South Asian and African ITCZ convective regions through modification of ITCZ/monsoon circulation system.

  16. Understanding high magnitude flood risk: evidence from the past

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, N.

    2009-04-01

    The average length of gauged river flow records in the UK is ~25 years, which presents a problem in determining flood risk for high-magnitude flood events. Severe floods have been recorded in many UK catchments during the past 10 years, increasing the uncertainty in conventional flood risk estimates based on river flow records. Current uncertainty in flood risk has implications for society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and water resource managers (flood/drought risk). An alternative approach is required which can improve current understanding of the flood frequency/magnitude relationship. Historical documentary accounts are now recognised as a valuable resource when considering the flood frequency/magnitude relationship, but little consideration has been given to the temporal and spatial distribution of these records. Building on previous research based on British rivers (urban centre): Ouse (York), Trent (Nottingham), Tay (Perth), Severn (Shrewsbury), Dee (Chester), Great Ouse (Cambridge), Sussex Ouse (Lewes), Thames (Oxford), Tweed (Kelso) and Tyne (Hexham), this work considers the spatial and temporal distribution of historical flooding. The selected sites provide a network covering many of the largest river catchments in Britain, based on urban centres with long detailed documentary flood histories. The chronologies offer an opportunity to assess long-term patterns of flooding, indirectly determining periods of climatic variability and potentially increased geomorphic activity. This research represents the first coherent large scale analysis undertaken of historical multi-catchment flood chronologies, providing an unparalleled network of sites, permitting analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of historical flood patterns on a national scale.

  17. Estimating station noise thresholds for seismic magnitude bias elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Sheila

    2014-05-01

    To eliminate the upward bias of seismic magnitude caused by censoring of signal hidden by noise, noise level at each station in a network must be estimated. Where noise levels are not measured directly, the method of Kelly and Lacoss (1969) has been used to infer them from bulletin data (Lilwall and Douglas 1984). To verify this estimate of noise level, noise thresholds of International Monitoring System (IMS) stations inferred from the International Data Centre (IDC) Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) by the Kelly and Lacoss method for 2005-2013 are compared with direct measurements on (i) noise preceding first arrivals in filtered (0.8-4.5 Hz) IMS seismic data, and (ii) noise preceding the expected time of arrival of signals from events, where signal was not actually seen (values gathered by the IDC for maximum-likelihood magnitude calculation). For most stations the direct pre-signal noise measurements are ~0.25 units of log A/T lower than the Kelly&Lacoss thresholds; because the IDC automatic system declares a detection only when the short-term-average-to-long-term-average ratio threshold, which varies with station and frequency band between ~3-6, is exceeded. The noise values at expected times of non-observed signal arrival are ~0.15 units lower than the Kelly and Lacoss thresholds. Exceptions are caused by faulty channels being used for the direct noise or body-wave magnitude (mb) measurements or, for station ARCES and possibly FINES, SPITS and HFS, the wider filter used for signal amplitude than for signal detection admitting noise that swamped the signal. Abrupt changes in thresholds might show mis-documented sensor sensitivity changes at individual stations.

  18. Study on High-Speed Magnitude Approximation for Complex Vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建春; 杨万海; 许少英

    2003-01-01

    High-speed magnitude approximation algorithms for complex vectors are discussed intensively. The performance and the convergence speed of these approximation algorithms are analyzed. For the polygon fitting algorithms, the approximation formula under the least mean square error criterion is derived. For the iterative algorithms, a modified CORDIC (coordinate rotation digital computer) algorithm is developed. This modified CORDIC algorithm is proved to be with a maximum relative error about one half that of the original CORDIC algorithm. Finally, the effects of the finite register length on these algorithms are also concerned, which shows that 9 to 12-bit coefficients are sufficient for practical applications.

  19. An inverse method to interpret colour-magnitude diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Vergely, J L; Egret, D; Bienaymé, O; Vergely, Jean-Luc; Koeppen, Joachim; Egret, Daniel; Bienayme, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    An inverse method is developed to determine the star formation history, the age-metallicity relation, and the IMF slope from a colour-magnitude diagram. The method is applied to the Hipparcos HR diagram. We found that the thin disk of our Galaxy shows a peak of stellar formation 1.6 Gyr ago. The stars close to the Sun have a solar metallicity and a mean IMF index equal to 3.2. However, the model and the evolutionary tracks do not correctly reproduce the horizontal giant branch.

  20. Evaluation of the magnitude of EBT Gafchromic film polarization effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butson, M J; Cheung, T; Yu, P K N

    2009-03-01

    Gafchromic EBT film, has become a main dosimetric tools for quantitative evaluation of radiation doses in radiation therapy application. One aspect of variability using EBT Gafchromic film is the magnitude of the orientation effect when analysing the film in landscape or portrait mode. This work has utilized a > 99% plane polarized light source and a non-polarized diffuse light source to investigate the absolute magnitude of EBT Gafchromic films polarization or orientation effects. Results have shown that using a non-polarized light source produces a negligible orientation effect for EBT Gafchromic film and thus the angle of orientation is not important. However, the film exhibits a significant variation in transmitted optical density with angle of orientation to polarized light producing more than 100% increase, or over a doubling of measured OD for films irradiated with x-rays up to dose levels of 5 Gy. The maximum optical density was found to be in a plane at an angle of 14 degrees +/- 7 degrees (2 SD) when the polarizing sheet is turned clockwise with respect to the film. As the magnitude of the orientation effect follows a sinusoidal shape it becomes more critical for alignment accuracy of the film with respect to the polarizing direction in the anticlockwise direction as this will place the alignment of the polarizing axes on the steeper gradient section of the sinusoidal pattern. An average change of 4.5% per 5 degrees is seen for an anticlockwise polarizer rotation where as the effect is 1.2% per 5 degrees for an clockwise polarizer rotation. This may have consequences to the positional accuracy of placement of the EBT Gafchromic film on a scanner as even a 1 degree alignment error can cause an approximate 1% error in analysis. The magnitude of the orientation effect is therefore dependant on the degree of polarization of the scanning light source and can range from negligible (diffuse LED light source) through to more than 100% or doubling of OD variation

  1. Roughness analysis for textured surfaces over several orders of magnitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vepsäläinen, Laura, E-mail: laura.vepsalainen@uef.fi [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Stenberg, Petri, E-mail: petri.stenberg@uef.fi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Pääkkönen, Pertti, E-mail: pertti.paakkonen@uef.fi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Kuittinen, Markku, E-mail: markku.kuittinen@uef.fi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Suvanto, Mika, E-mail: mika.suvanto@uef.fi [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland); Pakkanen, Tapani A., E-mail: tapani.pakkanen@uef.fi [Department of Chemistry, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu Campus, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2013-11-01

    Multiscale structured surfaces have roughness distributions at various spatial frequencies that affect surface properties of materials. A recently developed filtered power spectral density (FPSD) method for surface roughness characterization was generalized to comprise structures from micro- to nanoscale. Furthermore, a uniform analysis method for micro- and nanoscale characterization over five orders of magnitudes was found by combining optical profilometry data, at the microscale level and atomic force microscopy data, at the nanoscale level. The FPSD method was also combined with structure simulation for multiscales, thus the roughness distributions can be designed and studied without the fabrication of structures. Furthermore, the FPSD simulation offers a design tool for structure–property correlations.

  2. On the magnitude and frequency of Karakoram Glacier surges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Quincey

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The return periods of Karakoram glacier surges are almost entirely unknown. Here, we present evidence of an historic surge of the Khurdopin Glacier that began in the mid-1970s and peaked in 1979. Measured surface displacements reached > 5 km yr–1, two orders of magnitude faster than during quiescence and twice as large as any previously recorded velocity in the region. The Khurdopin Glacier next surged in the late-1990s, equating to a return period of 20 yr. Surge activity in the region needs to be better understood if accurate mass balance assessments of Hindu-Kush–Karakoram–Himalaya glaciers are to be made.

  3. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Branko; Kostić, Vladimir; Sternić, Nadezda; Kolar, Jovo; Tasić, Nebojsa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome was introduced into clinical practice in 1996 in order to describe unique syndrome, clinically expressed during hypertensive and uremic encephalopathy, eclampsia and during immunosuppressive therapy [1]. First clinical investigations showed that leucoencephalopathy is major characteristic of the syndrome, but further investigations showed no significant destruction in white cerebral tissue [2, 3, 4]. In majority of cases changes are localise in posterior irrigation area of the brain and in the most severe cases anterior region is also involved. Taking into consideration all above mentioned facts, the suggested term was Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) for the syndrome clinically expressed by neurological manifestations derived from cortical and subcortical changes localised in posterior regions of cerebral hemispheres, cerebral trunk and cerebellum [5]. Patient, aged 53 years, was re-hospitalized in Cardiovascular Institute "Dediwe" two months after successful aorto-coronary bypass performed in June 2001 due to the chest bone infection. During the treatment of the infection (according to the antibiogram) in September 2001, patient in evening hours developed headache and blurred vision. The recorded blood pressure was 210/120 mmHg so antihypertensive treatment was applied (Nifedipin and Furosemid). After this therapy there was no improvement and intensive headache with fatigue and loss of vision developed. Neurological examination revealed cortical blindness and left hemiparesis. Manitol (20%, 60 ccm every 3 hours) and i.v. Nytroglicerin (high blood pressure). Brain CT revealed oedema of parieto-occipital regions of both hemispheres, more emphasized on the right. (Figure 1a, b, c). There was no sign of focal ischemia even in deeper sections (Figure 1d, e, f). Following three days enormous high blood pressure values were registered. On the fourth day the significant clinical improvement occurred

  4. Mechanism Study of Reversible Resistivity Change in Oxide Thin Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.; Chang, S. H.; Phatak, C.; Magyari-Kope, Blanka; Nishi, Y; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Kim, Jung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Here we present our findings related to the mechanism of reversible resistivity in Pt/TiO2/Pt cells and in Ta2O5 thin films. Our findings for Pt/TiO2/Pt cells indicate that there exists a photovoltaic-like effect, which modulates the resistance reversibly by a few orders of magnitude, depending on the intensity of impinging x-rays. We found that this effect, combined with the x-ray irradiation induced phase transition confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, triggers a non-volatile reversible resistance change. For Ta2O5 thin films, we found that there are strong correlations among oxygen vacancy number and positions and energy gaps. Ab initio band structure calculations explain the evolution of the electronic excitation spectrum as a function of oxygen vacancy number and positions and importantly provide a predictive description of the oxygen deficient Ta oxide that may improve the desired performance based on atomic level design.

  5. Brief communication "The magnitude 7.2 Bohol earthquake, Philippines"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. F. Lagmay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A devastating earthquake struck Bohol, Philippines on 15 October 2013. The earthquake originated at 12 km depth from an unmapped reverse fault, which manifested on the surface for several kilometers and with maximum vertical displacement of 3 m. The earthquake resulted in 222 fatalities with damage to infrastructure estimated at US52.06 million. Widespread landslides and sinkholes formed in the predominantly limestone region during the earthquake. These remain a significant threat to communities as destabilized hillside slopes, landslide-dammed rivers and incipient sinkholes are still vulnerable to collapse, triggered possibly by aftershocks and heavy rains in the upcoming months of November and December.

  6. Brief communication "The magnitude 7.2 Bohol earthquake, Philippines"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagmay, A. M. F.; Eco, R.

    2014-03-01

    A devastating earthquake struck Bohol, Philippines on 15 October 2013. The earthquake originated at 12 km depth from an unmapped reverse fault, which manifested on the surface for several kilometers and with maximum vertical displacement of 3 m. The earthquake resulted in 222 fatalities with damage to infrastructure estimated at US52.06 million. Widespread landslides and sinkholes formed in the predominantly limestone region during the earthquake. These remain a significant threat to communities as destabilized hillside slopes, landslide-dammed rivers and incipient sinkholes are still vulnerable to collapse, triggered possibly by aftershocks and heavy rains in the upcoming months of November and December.

  7. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  8. Aspiration Level and the Reversal of the Preference Reversal Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    American Economic Review , 69, 623- 638...Grether, D. M., & Plott, C. R. (1982). Economic theory of choice and the preference reversal phenomenon: Reply. The American Economic Review , 72, 575. Har...34 - . • . ...... ., .. . -. -.,- ... , .. ... - ., . . . . .. . ... . . . . . . . *~~~7 T, W.. 1 d~ I t Y ~ VVW ~ Page 26 1 loomes, G., & Sugden, R. (1983). A rationale for preference reversal. The American Economic Review ,

  9. Design of Reversible Sequential Circuit Using Reversible Logic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Belayet Ali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Reversible logic is one of the most vital issue at present time and it has different areas for its application,those are low power CMOS, quantum computing, nanotechnology, cryptography, optical computing, DNA computing, digital signal processing (DSP, quantum dot cellular auto meta, communication, computer graphics. It is not possible to realize quantum computing without implementation of reversible logic. The main purposes of designing reversible logic are to decrease quantum cost, depth of the circuits and the number of garbage outputs. In this paper, we have proposed a new reversible gate. And we have designed RS flip flop and D flip flop by using our proposed gate and Peres gate. The proposed designs are better than the existing proposed ones in terms of number of reversible gates and garbage outputs. So, this realization is more efficient and less costly than other realizations.

  10. Design of Reversible Sequential Circuit Using Reversible Logic Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mosharof Hossin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible logic is one of the most vital issue at present time and it has different areas for its application, those are low power CMOS, quantum computing, nanotechnology, cryptography, optical computing, DNA computing, digital signal processing (DSP, quantum dot cellular automata, communication, computer graphics. It is not possible to realize quantum computing without implementation of reversible logic. The main purposes of designing reversible logic are to decrease quantum cost, depth of the circuits and the number of garbage outputs. In this paper, we have proposed a new reversible gate. And we have designedRS flip flop and D flip flop by using our proposed gate and Peres gate. The proposed designs are better than the existing proposed ones in terms of number of reversible gates and garbage outputs. So, this realization is more efficient and less costly than other realizations.

  11. Influence of storm magnitude and watershed size on runoff nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Tun; Huang, Jen-Kuo

    2016-06-01

    The inherent nonlinear characteristics of the watershed runoff process related to storm magnitude and watershed size are discussed in detail in this study. The first type of nonlinearity is referred to rainfall-runoff dynamic process and the second type is with respect to a Power-law relation between peak discharge and upstream drainage area. The dynamic nonlinearity induced by storm magnitude was first demonstrated by inspecting rainfall-runoff records at three watersheds in Taiwan. Then the derivation of the watershed unit hydrograph (UH) using two linear hydrological models shows that the peak discharge and time to peak discharge that characterize the shape of UH vary event-to-event. Hence, the intention of deriving a unique and universal UH for all rainfall-runoff simulation cases is questionable. In contrast, the UHs by the other two adopted nonlinear hydrological models were responsive to rainfall intensity without relying on linear proportion principle, and are excellent in presenting dynamic nonlinearity. Based on the two-segment regression, the scaling nonlinearity between peak discharge and drainage area was investigated by analyzing the variation of Power-law exponent. The results demonstrate that the scaling nonlinearity is particularly significant for a watershed having larger area and subjecting to a small-size of storm. For three study watersheds, a large tributary that contributes relatively great drainage area or inflow is found to cause a transition break in scaling relationship and convert the scaling relationship from linearity to nonlinearity.

  12. Dependence of the aftershock flow on the main shock magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, A. V.; Zavyalov, A. D.; Zotov, O. D.; Lavrov, I. P.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we predicted and then observed in practice the property of aftershocks which consists in the statistically regular clustering of events in time during the first hours after the main shock. The characteristic quasi-period of clustering is three hours. This property is associated with the cumulative action of the surface waves converging to the epicenter, whereas the quasi-period is mainly determined by the time delay of the round-the-world seismic echo. The quasi-period varies from case to case. In the attempt to find the cause of this variability, we have statistically explored the probable dependence of quasi-period on the magnitude of the main shock. In this paper, we present the corresponding result of analyzing global seismicity from the USGS/NEIC earthquake catalog. We succeeded in finding a significant reduction in the quasiperiod of the strong earthquakes clustering with growth in the magnitude of the main shock. We suggest the interpretation of this regularity from the standpoint of the phenomenological theory of explosive instability. It is noted that the phenomenon of explosive instability is fairly common in the geophysical media. The examples of explosive instability in the radiation belt and magnetospheric tail are presented. The search for the parallels in the evolution of explosive instability in the lithosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth will enrich both the physics of the earthquakes and physics of the magnetospheric pulsations.

  13. Optimal temperature range for determining magnetocaloric magnitudes from heat capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ramírez, L. M.; Blázquez, J. S.; Law, J. Y.; Franco, V.; Conde, A.

    2016-12-01

    The determination of the magnetocaloric magnitudes (specific magnetic entropy change, Δs M, and adiabatic temperature change, ΔT ad) from heat capacity (c H) measurements requires measurements performed at very low temperatures (~0 K) or data extrapolation when the low temperature range is unavailable. In this work we analyze the influence on the calculated Δs M and ΔT ad of the usually employed linear extrapolation of c H from the initial measured temperature down to 0 K. Numerical simulations have been performed using the Brillouin equation of state, the Debye model and the Fermi electron statistics to reproduce the magnetic, lattice and electronic subsystems, respectively. It is demonstrated that it is not necessary to reach experimentally temperatures very close to 0 K due to the existence of certain starting temperatures of the experiments, the same for Δs M and ΔT ad, that minimize the error of the results. A procedure is proposed to obtain the experimental magnitudes of Δs M and ΔT ad with a minimum error from c H data limited in temperature. It has been successfully applied to a GdZn alloy and results are compared to those derived from magnetization measurements.

  14. The magnitude-redshift relation in a realistic inhomogeneous universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hada, Ryuichiro

    2014-01-01

    The light rays from a source are subject to a local inhomogeneous geometry generated by inhomogeneous matter distribution as well as the existence of collapsed objects. In this paper we investigate the effect of inhomogeneities and the existence of collapsed objects on the propagation of light rays and evaluate changes in the magnitude-redshift relation from the standard relationship found in a homogeneous FRW universe. We give the expression of the correlation function and the variance for the perturbation of apparent magnitude, and calculate it numerically by using the non-linear matter power spectrum. We use the lognormal probability distribution function for the density contrast and spherical collapse model to truncate the power spectrum in order to estimate the blocking effect by collapsed objects. We find that the uncertainties in $\\Omega_m$ is $\\sim 0.02$, and that of $w$ is $\\sim 0.04$. We also discuss a possible method to extract these effects from real data which contains intrinsic ambiguities assoc...

  15. High-magnitude flooding across Britain since AD 1750

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Neil; Sangster, Heather

    2017-03-01

    The last decade has witnessed severe flooding across much of the globe, but have these floods really been exceptional? Globally, relatively few instrumental river flow series extend beyond 50 years, with short records presenting significant challenges in determining flood risk from high-magnitude floods. A perceived increase in extreme floods in recent years has decreased public confidence in conventional flood risk estimates; the results affect society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and companies (e.g. water resource managers). Here, we show how historical records from Britain have improved understanding of high-magnitude floods, by examining past spatial and temporal variability. The findings identify that whilst recent floods are notable, several comparable periods of increased flooding are identifiable historically, with periods of greater frequency (flood-rich periods). Statistically significant relationships between the British flood index, the Atlantic Meridional Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation Index are identified. The use of historical records identifies that the largest floods often transcend single catchments affecting regions and that the current flood-rich period is not unprecedented.

  16. Influence of storm magnitude and watershed size on runoff nonlinearity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kwan Tun Lee; Jen-Kuo Huang

    2016-06-01

    The inherent nonlinear characteristics of the watershed runoff process related to storm magnitude andwatershed size are discussed in detail in this study. The first type of nonlinearity is referred to rainfallrunoffdynamic process and the second type is with respect to a Power-law relation between peakdischarge and upstream drainage area. The dynamic nonlinearity induced by storm magnitude was firstdemonstrated by inspecting rainfall-runoff records at three watersheds in Taiwan. Then the derivation ofthe watershed unit hydrograph (UH) using two linear hydrological models shows that the peak dischargeand time to peak discharge that characterize the shape of UH vary event-to-event. Hence, the intentionof deriving a unique and universal UH for all rainfall-runoff simulation cases is questionable. In contrast,the UHs by the other two adopted nonlinear hydrological models were responsive to rainfall intensitywithout relying on linear proportion principle, and are excellent in presenting dynamic nonlinearity.Based on the two-segment regression, the scaling nonlinearity between peak discharge and drainagearea was investigated by analyzing the variation of Power-law exponent. The results demonstrate thatthe scaling nonlinearity is particularly significant for a watershed having larger area and subjecting toa small-size of storm. For three study watersheds, a large tributary that contributes relatively greatdrainage area or inflow is found to cause a transition break in scaling relationship and convert the scalingrelationship from linearity to nonlinearity.

  17. Magnitude-dependent response of osteoblasts regulated by compressive stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-qing; Geng, Yuan-ming; Liu, Ping; Huang, Xiang-yu; Li, Shu-yi; Liu, Chun-dong; Zhou, Zheng; Xu, Ping-ping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of magnitude in adaptive response of osteoblasts exposed to compressive stress. Murine primary osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells were exposed to compressive stress (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 g/cm2) in 3D culture. Cell viability was evaluated, and expression levels of Runx2, Alp, Ocn, Rankl, and Opg were examined. ALP activity in osteoblasts and TRAP activity in RAW264.7 cells co-cultured with MC3T3-E1 cells were assayed. Results showed that compressive stress within 5.0 g/cm2 did not influence cell viability. Both osteoblastic and osteoblast-regulated osteoclastic differentiation were enhanced at 2 g/cm2. An increase in stress above 2 g/cm2 did not enhance osteoblastic differentiation further but significantly inhibited osteoblast-regualted osteoclastic differentiation. This study suggested that compressive stress regulates osteoblastic and osteoclastic differentiation through osteoblasts in a magnitude-dependent manner. PMID:28317941

  18. Millennial scale variability in high magnitude flooding across Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, N.

    2014-09-01

    The last decade has witnessed severe flooding across much of the globe, but have these floods really been exceptional? Globally, relatively few instrumental river flow series extend beyond 50 years, with short records presenting significant challenges in determining flood risk from high-magnitude floods. A perceived increase in extreme floods in recent years has decreased public confidence in conventional flood risk estimates; the results affect society (insurance costs), individuals (personal vulnerability) and companies (e.g. water resource managers - flood/drought risk). Here we show how historical records from Britain have improved understanding of high magnitude floods, by examining past spatial and temporal variability. The findings identify that whilst recent floods are notable, several comparable periods of increased flooding are identifiable historically, with periods of greater frequency (flood-rich periods) or/and larger floods. The use of historical records identifies that the largest floods often transcend single catchments affecting regions and that the current flood rich period is not exceptional.

  19. The Absolute Magnitude of RRc Variables From Statistical Parallax

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmeier, Juna A; Burns, Christopher R; Gould, Andrew; Thompson, Ian B; Preston, George W; Sneden, Christopher; Crane, Jeffrey D; Dong, Subo; Madore, Barry F; Morrell, Nidia; Prieto, Jose L; Shectman, Stephen; Simon, Joshua D; Villanueva, Edward

    2012-01-01

    We present the first definitive measurement of the absolute magnitude of RR Lyrae c-type variable stars (RRc) determined purely from statistical parallax. We use a sample of 247 RRc selected from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) for which high-quality light curves, photometry and proper motions are available. We obtain high-resolution echelle spectra for these objects to determine radial velocities and abundances as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Survey (CARRS). We find that M_(V,RRc) = 0.52 +/- 0.11 at a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.59. This is to be compared with previous estimates for RRab stars (M_(V,RRab) = 0.75 +/- 0.13 and the only direct measurement of an RRc absolute magnitude (RZ Cephei, M_(V, RRc) = 0.27 +/- 0.17). We find the bulk velocity of the halo to be (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (10.9,34.9,7.2) km/s in the radial, rotational and vertical directions with dispersions (sigma_(W_pi), sigma_(W_theta), sigma_(W_z)) = (154.7, 103.6, 93.8) km/s. For the disk, we find (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (8.5, 213...

  20. On the Real Magnitude of Psychological Sex Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Del Giudice

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive evolutionary theory of sex differences will benefit from an accurate assessment of their magnitude across different psychological domains. This article shows that mainstream research has severely underestimated the magnitude of psychological sex differences; the reason lies in the common practice of measuring multidimensional differences one dimension at a time, without integrating them into a proper multivariate effect size (ES. Employing the Mahalanobis distance D (the multivariate generalization of Cohen's d results in more accurate, and predictably larger, estimates of overall sex differences in multidimensional constructs. Two real-world examples are presented: (1 In a published dataset on Big Five personality traits, sex differences on individual scales averaged d = .27, a typical ES conventionally regarded as “small.” However, the overall difference was D = .84 (disattenuated D = .98, implying considerable statistical separation between male and female distributions. (2 In a recent meta-analytic summary of sex differences in aggression, the individual ESs averaged d = .34. However, the overall difference was estimated at D = .75 – .80 (disattenuated D = .89–1.01. In many psychological domains, sex differences may be substantially larger than previously acknowledged.

  1. Estimating the magnitude of food waste generated in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelofse, Suzan Hh; Nahman, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the developed world, food is treated as a disposable commodity. Between a third and half of all food produced for human consumption globally is estimated to be wasted. However, attempts to quantify the actual magnitude of food wasted globally are constrained by limited data, particularly from developing countries. This article attempts to quantify total food waste generation (including both pre-consumer food losses, as well as post-consumer food waste) in South Africa. The estimates are based on available food supply data for South Africa and on estimates of average food waste generation at each step of the food supply chain for sub-Saharan Africa. The preliminary estimate of the magnitude of food waste generation in South Africa is in the order of 9.04 million tonnes per annum. On a per capita basis, overall food waste in South Africa in 2007 is estimated at 177 kg/capita/annum and consumption waste at 7 kg/capita/annum. However, these preliminary figures should be used with caution and are subject to verification through ongoing research.

  2. Time Reversal Violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  3. Enzymatic reactions in reversed micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    It has been recognised that enzymes in reversed micelles have potential for application in chemical synthesis. Before these expectations will be realised many problems must be overcome. This thesis deals with some of them.In Chapter 1 the present knowledge about reversed micelles and micellar enzymo

  4. Enzyme recovery using reversed micelles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a liquid-liquid extraction process for the recovery of extracellular enzymes. The potentials of reaching this goal by using reversed micelles in an organic solvent have been investigated.Reversed micelles are aggregates of surfactant molecules containing an

  5. The absolute magnitude distribution of Kuiper Belt objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Wesley C. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Brown, Michael E. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Morbidelli, Alessandro [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France); Parker, Alex [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Batygin, Konstantin, E-mail: wesley.fraser@nrc.ca [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    Here we measure the absolute magnitude distributions (H-distribution) of the dynamically excited and quiescent (hot and cold) Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), and test if they share the same H-distribution as the Jupiter Trojans. From a compilation of all useable ecliptic surveys, we find that the KBO H-distributions are well described by broken power laws. The cold population has a bright-end slope, α{sub 1}=1.5{sub −0.2}{sup +0.4}, and break magnitude, H{sub B}=6.9{sub −0.2}{sup +0.1} (r'-band). The hot population has a shallower bright-end slope of, α{sub 1}=0.87{sub −0.2}{sup +0.07}, and break magnitude H{sub B}=7.7{sub −0.5}{sup +1.0}. Both populations share similar faint-end slopes of α{sub 2} ∼ 0.2. We estimate the masses of the hot and cold populations are ∼0.01 and ∼3 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ⊕}. The broken power-law fit to the Trojan H-distribution has α{sub 1} = 1.0 ± 0.2, α{sub 2} = 0.36 ± 0.01, and H {sub B} = 8.3. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test reveals that the probability that the Trojans and cold KBOs share the same parent H-distribution is less than 1 in 1000. When the bimodal albedo distribution of the hot objects is accounted for, there is no evidence that the H-distributions of the Trojans and hot KBOs differ. Our findings are in agreement with the predictions of the Nice model in terms of both mass and H-distribution of the hot and Trojan populations. Wide-field survey data suggest that the brightest few hot objects, with H{sub r{sup ′}}≲3, do not fall on the steep power-law slope of fainter hot objects. Under the standard hierarchical model of planetesimal formation, it is difficult to account for the similar break diameters of the hot and cold populations given the low mass of the cold belt.

  6. What do reversible programs compute?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Reversible computing is the study of computation models that exhibit both forward and backward determinism. Understanding the fundamental properties of such models is not only relevant for reversible programming, but has also been found important in other fields, e.g., bidirectional model...... transformation, program transformations such as inversion, and general static prediction of program properties. Historically, work on reversible computing has focussed on reversible simulations of irreversible computations. Here, we take the viewpoint that the property of reversibility itself should...... are not strictly classically universal, but that they support another notion of universality; we call this RTM-universality. Thus, even though the RTMs are sub-universal in the classical sense, they are powerful enough as to include a self-interpreter. Lifting this to other computation models, we propose r...

  7. Optimization of reversible sequential circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Sayem, Abu Sadat Md

    2010-01-01

    In recent years reversible logic has been considered as an important issue for designing low power digital circuits. It has voluminous applications in the present rising nanotechnology such as DNA computing, Quantum Computing, low power VLSI and quantum dot automata. In this paper we have proposed optimized design of reversible sequential circuits in terms of number of gates, delay and hardware complexity. We have designed the latches with a new reversible gate and reduced the required number of gates, garbage outputs, and delay and hardware complexity. As the number of gates and garbage outputs increase the complexity of reversible circuits, this design will significantly enhance the performance. We have proposed reversible D-latch and JK latch which are better than the existing designs available in literature.

  8. Temporal and spatial variations in the magnitude of completeness for homogenized moment magnitude catalogue for northeast India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjit Das; H R Wason; M L Sharma

    2012-02-01

    Northeast India region is one of the most seismically active areas in the world. Events data for the period 1897–2010, used in this study has been largely compiled from global ISC, NEIC and GCMT databases. Historical seismicity catalogue of Gupta et al (1986) and some events data from the bulletins of India Meteorological Department are also used. Orthogonal regression relations for conversion of body and surface wave magnitudes to w,HRVD based on events data for the period 1978–2006 have been derived. An Orthogonal Standard Regression (OSR) relationship has also been obtained for scaling of intensity estimates to w,NEIC using 126 global intensity events with intensity VI or greater during the period 1975–2010. Magnitude of completeness and Gutenberg–Richter (GR) recurrence parameter values have been determined for the declustered homogenized catalogue pertaining to four different time periods namely, 1897–1963, 1964–1990, 1964–2000 and 1964–2010. The c and `' values are observed to decrease and increase, respectively, with addition of newer data with time. The study region has been subdivided into nine seismogenic zones keeping in view the spatial variations in earthquake occurrence and prevalent tectonics. c, `' and `' values have been estimated with respect to each zone, and the variations in the values of these parameters have been analysed.

  9. Magnitudes and Timescales of Total Solar Irradiance Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Kopp, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The Sun's net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to gigayears. Direct measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) show changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy on timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. Variations of ~0.01 % over a few minutes are caused by the ever-present superposition of convection and oscillations with very large solar flares on rare occasion causing slightly-larger measureable signals. On timescales of days to weeks, changing photospheric magnetic activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1 % level. The 11-year solar cycle shows variations of comparable magnitude with irradiances peaking near solar maximum. Secular variations are more difficult to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Historical reconstructions of the Sun's irradiance based on indicators of solar-surface magnetic activity, such as sunspots, faculae, and cosmogenic isotope records, sugge...

  10. Aerogel Antennas Communications Study Using Error Vector Magnitude Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses an aerogel antennas communication study using error vector magnitude (EVM) measurements. The study was performed using 4x2 element polyimide (PI) aerogel-based phased arrays designed for operation at 5 GHz as transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) antennas separated by a line of sight (LOS) distance of 8.5 meters. The results of the EVM measurements demonstrate that polyimide aerogel antennas work appropriately to support digital communication links with typically used modulation schemes such as QPSK and pi/4 DQPSK. As such, PI aerogel antennas with higher gain, larger bandwidth and lower mass than typically used microwave laminates could be suitable to enable aerospace-to-ground communication links with enough channel capacity to support voice, data and video links from cubesats, unmanned air vehicles (UAV), and commercial aircraft.

  11. The Extragalactic Distance Database: Color-Magnitude Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Tully, R. Brent; Shaya, Edward J.; Makarov, Dmitry I.; Makarova, Lidia

    2009-08-01

    The color-magnitude diagrams/tip of the red giant branch (CMDs/TRGB) section of the Extragalactic Distance Database contains a compilation of observations of nearby galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope. Approximately 250 (and increasing) galaxies in the Local Volume have CMDs and the stellar photometry tables used to produce them available through the Web. Various stellar populations that make up a galaxy are visible in the CMDs, but our primary purpose for collecting and analyzing these galaxy images is to measure the TRGB in each. We can estimate the distance to a galaxy by using stars at the TRGB as standard candles. In this paper, we describe the process of constructing the CMDs and make the results available to the public.

  12. Aerogel Antennas Communications Study Using Error Vector Magnitude Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Mueller, Carl H.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation discusses an aerogel antennas communication study using error vector magnitude (EVM) measurements. The study was performed using 2x4 element polyimide (PI) aerogel-based phased arrays designed for operation at 5 GHz as transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) antennas separated by a line of sight (LOS) distance of 8.5 meters. The results of the EVM measurements demonstrate that polyimide aerogel antennas work appropriately to support digital communication links with typically used modulation schemes such as QPSK and 4 DQPSK. As such, PI aerogel antennas with higher gain, larger bandwidth and lower mass than typically used microwave laminates could be suitable to enable aerospace-to- ground communication links with enough channel capacity to support voice, data and video links from CubeSats, unmanned air vehicles (UAV), and commercial aircraft.

  13. Origin of the colour-magnitude relation of elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kodama, T; Kodama, Tadayuki; Arimoto, Nobuo

    1996-01-01

    Evolutionary models of elliptical galaxies are constructed by using a new population synthesis code. Model parameters are calibrated to reproduce the observed colour-magnitude (CM) relation of Coma ellipticals in $V-K$ vs. $M_{V}$ diagram. The SEDs are degenerated in stellar age and metallicity. An attempt is performed to break this degeneracy, by simulating evolution of the CM relation of elliptical galaxies, based on the two alternative interpretations; i.e., the CM relation reflects different mean stellar age or various stellar metallicity. A confrontation with the CM diagrams of E/S0 galaxies in the two distant clusters Abell 2390 ($z=0.228$) and Abell 851 ($z=0.407$) reinsures previous contentions that the CM relation is primarily a metallicity effect. This conclusion does not depend either on the model parameters, or on the cosmological parameters adopted.

  14. Reversed polarity patches at the CMB and geomagnetic field reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Wenyao(徐文耀); WEI; Zigang(魏自刚)

    2002-01-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field models (IGRF) for 1900-2000 are used to calculate the geomagnetic field distribution in the Earth' interior from the ground surface to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) under the assumption of insulated mantle. Four reversed polarity patches, as one of the most important features of the CMB field, are revealed. Two patches with +Z polarity (downward) at the southern African and the southern American regions stand out against the background of -Z polarity (upward) in the southern hemisphere, and two patches of -Z polarity at the North Polar and the northern Pacific regions stand out against the +Z background in the northern hemisphere. During the 1900-2000 period the southern African (SAF) patch has quickly drifted westward at a speed of 0.2-0.3°/a; meanwhile its area has expanded 5 times, and the magnetic flux crossing the area has intensified 30 times. On the other hand, other three patches show little if any change during this 100-year period. Extending upward, each of the reversed polarity patches at the CMB forms a chimney-shaped "reversed polarity column" in the mantle with the bottom at the CMB. The height of the SAF column has grown rapidly from 200km in 1900 to 900km in 2000. If the column grows steadily at the same rate in the future, its top will reach to the ground surface in 600-700 years. And then a reversed polarity patch will be observed at the Earth's surface, which will be an indicator of the beginning of a magnetic field reversal. On the basis of this study, one can describe the process of a geomagnetic polarity reversal, the polarity reversal may be observed firstly in one or several local regions; then the areas of these regions expand, and at the same time, other new reversed polarity regions may appear. Thus several poles may exist during a polarity reversal.

  15. Magnitude 8.1 Earthquake off the Solomon Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    On April 1, 2007, a magnitude 8.1 earthquake rattled the Solomon Islands, 2,145 kilometers (1,330 miles) northeast of Brisbane, Australia. Centered less than ten kilometers beneath the Earth's surface, the earthquake displaced enough water in the ocean above to trigger a small tsunami. Though officials were still assessing damage to remote island communities on April 3, Reuters reported that the earthquake and the tsunami killed an estimated 22 people and left as many as 5,409 homeless. The most serious damage occurred on the island of Gizo, northwest of the earthquake epicenter, where the tsunami damaged the hospital, schools, and hundreds of houses, said Reuters. This image, captured by the Landsat-7 satellite, shows the location of the earthquake epicenter in relation to the nearest islands in the Solomon Island group. Gizo is beyond the left edge of the image, but its triangular fringing coral reefs are shown in the upper left corner. Though dense rain forest hides volcanic features from view, the very shape of the islands testifies to the geologic activity of the region. The circular Kolombangara Island is the tip of a dormant volcano, and other circular volcanic peaks are visible in the image. The image also shows that the Solomon Islands run on a northwest-southeast axis parallel to the edge of the Pacific plate, the section of the Earth's crust that carries the Pacific Ocean and its islands. The earthquake occurred along the plate boundary, where the Australia/Woodlark/Solomon Sea plates slide beneath the denser Pacific plate. Friction between the sinking (subducting) plates and the overriding Pacific plate led to the large earthquake on April 1, said the United States Geological Survey (USGS) summary of the earthquake. Large earthquakes are common in the region, though the section of the plate that produced the April 1 earthquake had not caused any quakes of magnitude 7 or larger since the early 20th century, said the USGS.

  16. Optimized reversible BCD adder using new reversible logic gates

    CERN Document Server

    Bhagyalakshmi, H R

    2010-01-01

    Reversible logic has received great attention in the recent years due to their ability to reduce the power dissipation which is the main requirement in low power digital design. It has wide applications advanced computing, low power CMOS design, Optical information processing, DNA computing, bio information, quantum computation and nanotechnology. This paper presents an optimized reversible BCD adder using a new reversible gate. A comparative result is presented which shows that the proposed design is more optimized in terms of number of gates, number of garbage outputs and quantum cost than the existing designs.

  17. ON THE ANALYSIS OF IMPEDANCE-DRIVEN REVERSE FLOW DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE V. C.-C.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Impedance pump is a simple valve-less pumping mechanism, where an elastic tube is joined to a more rigid tube, at both ends. By inducing a periodic asymmetrical compression on the elastic tube will produce a unidirectional flow within the system. This pumping concept offers a low energy, low noise alternative, which makes it an effective driving mechanism, especially for micro-fluidic systems. In addition, the wave-based mechanism through which pumping occurs infers many benefits in terms of simplicity of design and manufacturing. Adjustment of simple parameters such as the excitation frequencies or compression locations will reverse the direction of flow, providing a very versatile range of flow outputs. This paper describes the experimental analysis of such impedance-driven flow with emphasis on the dynamical study of the reverse flow in open-loop environment. In this study, tapered section with converging steps is introduced at both ends of the elastic tube to amplify the magnitude of reverse flow. Study conducted shows that the reverse peak flow is rather significant with estimate of 23% lower than the forward peak flow. The flow dynamics on the other hand has shown to exhibit different characteristics as per the forward peak flow. The flow characteristics is then studied and showed that the tapered sections altered the impedance within the system and hence induce a higher flow in the reverse direction.

  18. NOVEL REVERSIBLE VARIABLE PRECISION MULTIPLIER USING REVERSIBLE LOGIC GATES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Saravanan; K. Suresh Manic

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study a reversible logic gate based design of variable precision multiplier is proposed which have the greater efficiency in power consumption and speed since the partial products received...

  19. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  20. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  1. NOVEL REVERSIBLE VARIABLE PRECISION MULTIPLIER USING REVERSIBLE LOGIC GATES

    OpenAIRE

    M. Saravanan; K. Suresh Manic

    2014-01-01

    Multipliers play a vital role in digital systems especially in digital processors. There are many algorithms and designs were proposed in the earlier works, but still there is a need and a greater interest in designing a less complex, low power consuming, fastest multipliers. Reversible logic design became the promising technologies gaining greater interest due to less dissipation of heat and low power consumption. In this study a reversible logic gate based design of variable precision multi...

  2. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDE OF RRc VARIABLES FROM STATISTICAL PARALLAX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Burns, Christopher R.; Thompson, Ian B.; Preston, George W.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Madore, Barry F.; Morrell, Nidia; Prieto, José L.; Shectman, Stephen; Simon, Joshua D.; Villanueva, Edward [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Szczygieł, Dorota M.; Gould, Andrew [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 4051 McPherson Laboratory, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Dong, Subo [Institute for Advanced Study, 500 Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We present the first definitive measurement of the absolute magnitude of RR Lyrae c-type variable stars (RRc) determined purely from statistical parallax. We use a sample of 242 RRc variables selected from the All Sky Automated Survey for which high-quality light curves, photometry, and proper motions are available. We obtain high-resolution echelle spectra for these objects to determine radial velocities and abundances as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Survey. We find that M{sub V,RRc} = 0.59 ± 0.10 at a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = –1.59. This is to be compared with previous estimates for RRab stars (M{sub V,RRab} = 0.76 ± 0.12) and the only direct measurement of an RRc absolute magnitude (RZ Cephei, M{sub V,RRc} = 0.27 ± 0.17). We find the bulk velocity of the halo relative to the Sun to be (W{sub π}, W{sub θ}, W{sub z} ) = (12.0, –209.9, 3.0) km s{sup –1} in the radial, rotational, and vertical directions with dispersions (σ{sub W{sub π}},σ{sub W{sub θ}},σ{sub W{sub z}}) = (150.4, 106.1, 96.0) km s{sup -1}. For the disk, we find (W{sub π}, W{sub θ}, W{sub z} ) = (13.0, –42.0, –27.3) km s{sup –1} relative to the Sun with dispersions (σ{sub W{sub π}},σ{sub W{sub θ}},σ{sub W{sub z}}) = (67.7,59.2,54.9) km s{sup -1}. Finally, as a byproduct of our statistical framework, we are able to demonstrate that UCAC2 proper-motion errors are significantly overestimated as verified by UCAC4.

  3. Is Fish Response related to Velocity and Turbulence Magnitudes? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. A.; Hockley, F. A.; Cable, J.

    2013-12-01

    Riverine fish are subject to heterogeneous velocities and turbulence, and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions which balance energy expenditure for station holding whilst maximising energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in terms of the three-dimensional velocity structure generated by idealised boulders in an experimental flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced intra-species variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the high velocity and low turbulence region, whereas smaller guppies preferred the low velocity and high shear stress region directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the region of low velocity, indicating a possible reduced swimming ability due to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing parasite (Gyrodactylus turnbulli) burden, fish preferentially selected the region of moderate velocity which had the lowest bulk measure of turbulence of all regions and was also the most spatially homogeneous velocity and turbulence region. Overall the least amount of time was spent in the recirculation zone which had the highest magnitude of shear stresses and mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio. Shear stresses were a factor of two greater than in the most frequented moderate velocity region, while mean vertical turbulent length scale to fish length ratio were six times greater. Indeed the mean longitudinal turbulent scale was 2-6 times greater than the fish length in all regions. While it is impossible to discriminate between these two turbulence parameters (shear stress and turbulent length to fish length ratio) in influencing the fish preference, our study infers that there is a bias towards fish spending more time in a region where both the bulk

  4. Order of Magnitude Smaller Limit on the Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron

    CERN Document Server

    Baron, Jacob; DeMille, David; Doyle, John M; Gabrielse, Gerald; Gurevich, Yulia V; Hess, Paul W; Hutzler, Nicholas R; Kirilov, Emil; Kozyryev, Ivan; O'Leary, Brendon R; Panda, Cristian D; Petrik, Elizabeth S; Spaun, Ben; Vutha, Amar C; West, Adam D

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model (SM) of particle physics is known to be incomplete. It fails to explain dark matter, and why matter survived annihilation with antimatter following the Big Bang. Proposed extensions to the SM, such as weak-scale Supersymmetry (SUSY), may explain these phenomena by positing the existence of new particles and new interactions that are not symmetric under the time-reversal (T) transformation. These same theories nearly always predict a small, yet potentially measurable, asymmetric charge distribution directed along the spin ($\\vec{S}$) of the electron, an electric dipole moment (EDM, $\\vec{d_e}=d_e \\vec{S}/(\\hbar/2)$), which is also asymmetric under T. The predicted value of $d_e$ in these SM extensions is typically in the range of $10^{-27}$-$10^{-30}$ $e$ cm, orders of magnitude larger than is predicted by the SM. Here, we report a new search for the electron EDM using the polar molecule thorium monoxide (ThO). Our result, $d_e = (-2.1 \\pm 3.7_\\mathrm{stat} \\pm 2.5_\\mathrm{syst})\\times 10^{-...

  5. Inverse method for the instantaneous measure of wall shear rate magnitude and direction using electrodiffusion probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche-Gagnon, Marc-Etienne; Vetel, Jerome

    2016-11-01

    Several methods can be used when one needs to measure wall shear stress in a fluid flow. Yet, it is known that a precise shear measurement is seldom met, mostly when both time and space resolutions are required. The electrodiffusion method lies on the mass transfer between a redox couple contained in an electrolyte and an electrode flush mounted to a wall. Similarly to the heat transfer measured by a hot wire anemometer, the mass transfer can be related to the fluid's wall shear rate. When coupled with a numerical post-treatment by the so-called inverse method, precise instantaneous wall shear rate measurements can be obtained. With further improvements, it has the potential to be effective in highly fluctuating three-dimensional flows. We present developments of the inverse method to two-component shear rate measurements, that is shear magnitude and direction. This is achieved with the use of a three-segment electrodiffusion probe. Validation tests of the inverse method are performed in an oscillating plane Poiseuille flow at moderate pulse frequencies, which also includes reverse flow phases, and in the vicinity of a separation point where the wall shear stress experiences local inversion in a controlled separated flow.

  6. Near-infrared absolute magnitudes of Type Ia Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, Arturo; Friedman, Andrew S.; Mandel, Kaisey; Kirshner, Robert; Challis, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia Supernovae light curves (SN Ia) in the near infrared (NIR) exhibit low dispersion in their peak luminosities and are less vulnerable to extinction by interstellar dust in their host galaxies. The increasing number of high quality NIR SNe Ia light curves, including the recent CfAIR2 sample obtained with PAIRITEL, provides updated evidence for their utility as standard candles for cosmology. Using NIR YJHKs light curves of ~150 nearby SNe Ia from the CfAIR2 and CSP samples, and from the literature, we determine the mean value and dispersion of the absolute magnitude in the range between -10 to 50 rest-frame days after the maximum luminosity in B band. We present the mean light-curve templates and Hubble diagram for YJHKs bands. This work contributes to a firm local anchor for supernova cosmology studies in the NIR which will help to reduce the systematic uncertainties due to host galaxy dust present in optical-only studies. This research is supported by NSF grants AST-156854, AST-1211196, Fundacion Mexico en Harvard, and CONACyT.

  7. FPGA-specific decimal sign-magnitude addition and subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Martín; Todorovich, Elías

    2016-07-01

    The interest in sign-magnitude (SM) representation in decimal numbers lies in the IEEE 754-2008 standard, where the significand in floating-point numbers is coded as SM. However, software implementations do not meet performance constraints in some applications and more development is required in programmable logic, a key technology for hardware acceleration. Thus, in this work, two strategies for SM decimal adder/subtractors are studied and six new Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-specific circuits are derived from these strategies. The first strategy is based on ten's complement (C10) adder/subtractors and the second one is based on parallel computation of an unsigned adder and an unsigned subtractor. Four of these alternative circuits are useful for at least one area-time-trade-off and specific operand size. For example, the fastest SM adder/subtractor for operand sizes of 7 and 16 decimal digits is based on the second proposed strategy with delays of 3.43 and 4.33 ns, respectively, but the fastest circuit for 34-digit operands is one of the three specific implementations based on C10 adder/subtractors with a delay of 4.65 ns.

  8. Magnitude of negative interpretation bias depends on severity of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Mathews, Andrew; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the hypothesis that the magnitude of negative interpretation bias displayed by those with depression is related to the degree of depression they experience. Seventy one depressed participants (scoring 14 and above on the Beck Depression Inventory II) completed tasks spanning three domains of possible negative interpretations: semantic ambiguity; nonverbal ambiguity and situational ambiguity. Regression analyses revealed that just under half of the variance in depressive symptom severity was explained by the combination of negative interpretation bias tasks, with the strongest predictor of depressive symptom severity being negative interpretation of semantic ambiguity when reading ambiguous text descriptions. Subsidiary group analyses confirmed that severely depressed individuals interpreted emotionally ambiguous information in a more negative way than did their mildly or moderately depressed counterparts. These findings indicate that the degree of negative interpretive bias is closely related to depression severity and that bias manifests especially strongly at the most severe levels of depression. Our findings may help us to refine cognitive theories of depression and be helpful in guiding therapy.

  9. Southern-Tyrrhenian seismicity in space-time-magnitude domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Luzio

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is conducted on a catalogue containing more than 2000 seismic events occurred in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea between 1988 and October 2002, as an attempt to characterise the main seismogenetic processes active in the area in space, time and magnitude domain by means of the parameters of phenomenological laws. We chose to adopt simple phenomenological models, since the low number of data did not allow to use more complex laws. The two main seismogenetic volumes present in the area were considered for the purpose of this work. The first includes a nearly homogeneous distribution of hypocentres in a NW steeply dipping layer as far as about 400 km depth. This is probably the seismological expression of the Ionian lithospheric slab subducting beneath the Calabrian Arc. The second contains hypocentres concentrated about a sub-horizontal plane lying at an average depth of about 10 km. It is characterised by a background seismicity spread all over the area and by clusters of events that generally show a direction of maximum elongation. The parameters of the models describing seismogenetically homogeneous subsets of the earthquake catalogue in the three analysis domains, along with their confidence intervals, are estimated and analysed to establish whether they can be regarded as representative of a particular subset.

  10. On the frequency-magnitude distribution of converging boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, W.; Laura, S.; Heuret, A.; Funiciello, F.

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of the last mega-thrust earthquake in Japan has clearly remarked the high risk posed to society by such events in terms of social and economic losses even at large spatial scale. The primary component for a balanced and objective mitigation of the impact of these earthquakes is the correct forecast of where such kind of events may occur in the future. To date, there is a wide range of opinions about where mega-thrust earthquakes can occur. Here, we aim at presenting some detailed statistical analysis of a database of worldwide interplate earthquakes occurring at current subduction zones. The database has been recently published in the framework of the EURYI Project 'Convergent margins and seismogenesis: defining the risk of great earthquakes by using statistical data and modelling', and it provides a unique opportunity to explore in detail the seismogenic process in subducting lithosphere. In particular, the statistical analysis of this database allows us to explore many interesting scientific issues such as the existence of different frequency-magnitude distributions across the trenches, the quantitative characterization of subduction zones that are able to produce more likely mega-thrust earthquakes, the prominent features that characterize converging boundaries with different seismic activity and so on. Besides the scientific importance, such issues may lead to improve our mega-thrust earthquake forecasting capability.

  11. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Hazmin Sabri, Nor; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  12. Effects of magnitude, depth, and time on cellular seismology forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Steven Wolf

    This study finds that, in most cases analyzed to date, past seismicity tends to delineate zones where future earthquakes are likely to occur. Network seismicity catalogs for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), Australia (AUS), California (CA), and Alaska (AK) are analyzed using modified versions of the Cellular Seismology (CS) method of Kafka (2002, 2007). The percentage of later occurring earthquakes located near earlier occurring earthquakes typically exceeds the expected percentage for randomly distributed later occurring earthquakes, and the specific percentage is influenced by several variables, including magnitude, depth, time, and tectonic setting. At 33% map area coverage, hit percents are typically 85-95% in the NMSZ, 50-60% in AUS, 75-85% in CA, and 75-85% in AK. Statistical significance testing is performed on trials analyzing the same variables so that the overall regions can be compared, although some tests are inconclusive due to the small number of earthquake sample sizes. These results offer useful insights into understanding the capabilities and limits of CS studies, which can provide guidance for improving the seismicity-based components of seismic hazard assessments.

  13. Hippocampal vulnerability and subacute response following varied blast magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Ereifej, Evon S; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-06-06

    Clinical outcomes from blast neurotrauma are associated with higher order cognitive functions such as memory, problem solving skills and attention. Current literature is limited to a single overpressure exposure or repeated exposures at the same level of overpressure and is focused on the acute response (magnitudes (low, moderate and high) were used to evaluate molecular injury thresholds. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated increased cleaved caspase-3 levels and loss of neuronal population (NeuN+) within the hippocampus of all pressure groups. On the contrary, selective activation of microglia was observed in the low blast group. In addition, increased astrocytes (GFAP), membrane signal transduction protein (Map2k1) and calcium regulator mechanosensitive protein (Piezo 2) were observed in the moderate blast group. Results from gene expression analysis suggested ongoing neuroprotection, as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and Mn and CuZn superoxide dismutases (SOD) all increased in the low and moderate blast groups. Ongoing neuroprotection was further supported by increased SOD levels observed in the moderate group using immunohistochemistry. The gene expression level of glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) was upregulated in the low, but downregulated in the high blast group, while no changes were found in the moderate group. Overall, the data shown here provides evidence of a diverse neuroprotective and glial response to various levels of blast exposure. This mechanistic role of neuroprotection is vital in understanding ongoing cellular stress, both at the gene and protein levels, in order to develop interventional studies for the prognosis of injury.

  14. A note on the magnitude of the flux superpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicoli, Michele [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Abdus Salam ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Conlon, Joseph P. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Kebble St, Oxford (United Kingdom); Maharana, Anshuman [Harish Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Jhusi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Quevedo, Fernando [Abdus Salam ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); DAMTP, University of Cambridge,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-08

    The magnitude of the flux superpotential W{sub flux} plays a crucial role in determining the scales of IIB string compactifications after moduli stabilisation. It has been argued that values of W{sub flux}≪1 are preferred, and even required for physical and consistency reasons. This note revisits these arguments. We establish that the couplings of heavy Kaluza-Klein modes to light states scale with the internal volume as g∼M{sub KK}/M{sub P}∼V{sup −2/3}≪1 and argue that consistency of the superspace derivative expansion requires gF/M{sup 2}∼m{sub 3/2}/M{sub KK}≪1, where F is the auxiliary field of the light fields and M the ultraviolet cutoff. This gives only a mild constraint on the flux superpotential, W{sub flux}≪V{sup 1/3}, which can be easily satisfied for O(1) values of W{sub flux}. This regime is also statistically favoured and makes the Bousso-Polchinski mechanism for the vacuum energy hierarchically more efficient.

  15. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Sabri, Nor Hazmin; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  16. Magnitude Squared of Coherence to Detect Imaginary Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sady Antônio Santos Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the Magnitude Squared of Coherence (MSC for detection of Event Related Potentials (ERPs related to left-hand index finger movement. Initially, ERP presence was examined in different brain areas. To accomplish that, 20 EEG channels were used, positioned according to the 10–20 international system. The grand average, resulting from 10 normal subjects showed, as expected, responses at frontal, central, and parietal areas, particularly evident at the central area (C3, C4, Cz. The MSC, applied to movement imagination related EEG signals, detected a consistent response in frequencies around 0.3–1 Hz (delta band, mainly at central area (C3, Cz, and C4. Ability differences in control imagination among subjects produced different detection performance. Some subjects needed up to 45 events for a detectable response, while for some others only 10 events proved sufficient. Some subjects also required two or three experimental sessions in order to achieve detectable responses. For one subject, response detection was not possible at all. However, due to brain plasticity, it is plausible to expect that training sessions (to practice movement imagination improve signal-noise ratio and lead to better detection using MSC. Results are sufficiently encouraging as to suggest further exploration of MSC for future BCI application.

  17. A Note on the Magnitude of the Flux Superpotential

    CERN Document Server

    Cicoli, Michele; Maharana, Anshuman; Quevedo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The magnitude of the flux superpotential $W_{flux}$ plays a crucial role in determining the scales of IIB string compactifications after moduli stabilisation. It has been argued that values of $W_{flux}$ much less than one are preferred, and even required for physical and consistency reasons. This note revisits these arguments. We establish that the coupling (g) of heavy Kaluza-Klein modes to light states scales as ${M_{KK} / M_{Pl}}$ (hence is suppressed by two third powers of the inverse volume of compactification) and argue that consistency of the superspace derivative expansion requires $gF/M^2 \\sim m_{3/2}/ M_{KK} << 1$, where $F$ is the auxiliary field of the light fields and $M$ the ultraviolet cutoff. This gives only a mild constraint on the flux superpotential, $W_{flux} << V^{1/3}$ (where V is the volume of the compactification), which can be easily satisfied for order one values of $W_{flux}$. This regime is also statistically favoured and makes the Bousso-Polchinski mechanism for the v...

  18. Physics-based estimates of maximum magnitude of induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Galis, Martin; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present new findings when integrating earthquake physics and rupture dynamics into estimates of maximum magnitude of induced seismicity (Mmax). Existing empirical relations for Mmax lack a physics-based relation between earthquake size and the characteristics of the triggering stress perturbation. To fill this gap, we extend our recent work on the nucleation and arrest of dynamic ruptures derived from fracture mechanics theory. There, we derived theoretical relations between the area and overstress of overstressed asperity and the ability of ruptures to either stop spontaneously (sub-critical ruptures) or runaway (super-critical ruptures). These relations were verified by comparison with simulation and laboratory results, namely 3D dynamic rupture simulations on faults governed by slip-weakening friction, and laboratory experiments of frictional sliding nucleated by localized stresses. Here, we apply and extend these results to situations that are representative for the induced seismicity environment. We present physics-based predictions of Mmax on a fault intersecting cylindrical reservoir. We investigate Mmax dependence on pore-pressure variations (by varying reservoir parameters), frictional parameters and stress conditions of the fault. We also derive Mmax as a function of injected volume. Our approach provides results that are consistent with observations but suggests different scaling with injected volume than that of empirical relation by McGarr, 2014.

  19. Microlensing optical depth as a function of source apparent magnitude

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the microlensing optical depth, tau, towards the Galactic bulge appear to depend on the method used to obtain them. Those values based on the lensing of red clump giants (RCGs) appear to be significantly lower than those based on the lensing of all stars along the line of sight. This discrepancy is still not understood. Through Monte Carlo simulations, it is found that the discrepancy cannot be explained by a dependance on the flux limits of the two methods. The optical depth is expected to be generally constant as a function of source apparent magnitude for I_0 >~ 13.0, except in the range 13.5 <~ I_0 <~ 15.5. Here many RCGs are detected, causing a significant oscillation in tau. The amplitude of this oscillation is a function of the inclination angle of the Galactic bar, theta_bar, which may thus be constrained. A further constraint comes from a similar dependance of tau with theta_bar: combining the predicted trends with the measured values provides 1-sigma upper limits, which exclude...

  20. Magnitude of bacteraemia predicts one-year mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim; Schønheyder, Henrik; Søgaard, Mette

    Objectives: All hospitals in our region use the BacT/Alert® blood culture (BC) system with a 3-bottle BC set for adults. We hypothesized that the magnitude of bacteremia (i.e., number of positive bottles in the initial BC set) predicted one-year mortality. Methods In a population-based study we...... with a BC index of 1 (i.e., one positive bottle) were chosen as the reference group. We computed Kaplan-Meier curves and performed Cox regression analyses to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95 % confidence intervals [CIs] 30 and 365 days after the initial BC sampling date, first in crude analyses...... of monomicrobial bacteremia, among which one-year follow-up was possible for 8108 (99.5 %). Of these, 2539, 1511, and 4058 episodes had a BC index of 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In crude analyses, 30-day MRRs were 0.98 [0.85-1.14] and 1.20 [1.07-1.34] for BC indices 2 and 3, respectively, and similar MRRs were...

  1. The absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars from Hipparcos parallaxes

    CERN Document Server

    Groenewegen, M A T

    1999-01-01

    Using the method of ``reduced parallaxes'' for the Halo RR Lyrae stars in the Hipparcos catalogue we derive a zero point of 0.77 $\\pm$ 0.26 mag for an assumed slope of 0.18 in the $M_{\\rm V}$-[Fe/H] relation. This is 0.28 magnitude brighter than the value Fernley et al. (1998a) derived by employing the method of statistical parallax for the {\\it identical} sample and using the same slope. We point out that a similar difference exists between the ``reduced parallaxes'' method and the statistical parallax method for the Cepheids in the Hipparcos catalogue. We also determine the zero point for the $M_{\\rm K}$-$\\log P_{0}$ relation, and obtain a value of -1.16 $\\pm$ 0.27 mag (for a slope of -2.33). The distance moduli to the Hipparcos RR Lyrae stars derived from the two relations agree well. The derived distance scale is in good agreement with the results from the Main Sequence fitting distances of Galactic globular clusters and with the results of theoretical Horizontal Branch models, and implies a distance modu...

  2. Magnitude Squared of Coherence to Detect Imaginary Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Filho, Sady Antônio; Tierra-Criollo, Carlos Julio; Souza, Ana Paula; Silva Pinto, Marcos Antonio; Cunha Lima, Maria Luiza; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2009-12-01

    This work investigates the Magnitude Squared of Coherence (MSC) for detection of Event Related Potentials (ERPs) related to left-hand index finger movement. Initially, ERP presence was examined in different brain areas. To accomplish that, 20 EEG channels were used, positioned according to the 10-20 international system. The grand average, resulting from 10 normal subjects showed, as expected, responses at frontal, central, and parietal areas, particularly evident at the central area (C3, C4, Cz). The MSC, applied to movement imagination related EEG signals, detected a consistent response in frequencies around 0.3-1 Hz (delta band), mainly at central area (C3, Cz, and C4). Ability differences in control imagination among subjects produced different detection performance. Some subjects needed up to 45 events for a detectable response, while for some others only 10 events proved sufficient. Some subjects also required two or three experimental sessions in order to achieve detectable responses. For one subject, response detection was not possible at all. However, due to brain plasticity, it is plausible to expect that training sessions (to practice movement imagination) improve signal-noise ratio and lead to better detection using MSC. Results are sufficiently encouraging as to suggest further exploration of MSC for future BCI application.

  3. A Typology of Reverse Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Zedtwitz, Max; Corsi, Simone; Søberg, Peder Veng

    2015-01-01

    taking place in an emerging country. This analytical framework allows recasting of current research at the intersection between innovation and international business. Of the 10 reverse innovation flows, six are new and have not been covered in the literature to date. The study addresses questions......Reverse innovation commonly refers to an innovation initially launched in a developing country and later introduced to an advanced country. Adopting a linear innovation model with the four sequential phases of concept ideation, product development, primary target market introduction, and subsequent......, the paper then introduces a typology of global innovation with 16 different types of innovation flows between advanced and emerging countries, 10 of which are reverse innovation flows. The latter are further differentiated into weak and strong reverse innovation, depending on the number of innovation phases...

  4. Designing the Reverse Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobbi, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    for the reverse supply chain. Design/methodology/approach – In order to identify the relevance of the Fisher model, the model needs to be recast in terms of PRV, which, in this context, is considered the independent variable in the reverse logistics arena. Products defined as innovative in Fisher's taxonomy...... is associated with first-class recovery options (reconditioning and remarketing). When the recovery option is recycling, time is not relevant, the primary objective is cost reduction (efficiency), the chain is centralized, and actors and phases of the reverse chain are determined by the specificity...... of the recycling process. When the recovery option is reconditioning, time is primarily relevant, tradeoffs between costs and time efficiency are necessary, the chain presents a centralized structure, and the presence of other types of actors and phases influences the structure of the reverse supply chain...

  5. Towards a reversible functional language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Axelsen, Holger Bock; Glück, Robert

    2012-01-01

    first-match policy for case expressions, we can write overlapping patterns in case branches, as is customary in ordinary functional languages, and also in leaf expressions, unlike existing inverse interpreter methods, which enables concise programs. In patterns, the use of a duplication......We identify concepts of reversibility for a functional language by means of a set of semantic rules with specific properties. These properties include injectivity along with local backward determinism, an important operational property for an efficient reversible language. We define a concise...... reversible first-order functional language in which access to the backward semantics is provided to the programmer by inverse function calls. Reversibility guarantees that in this language a backward run (inverse interpretation) is as fast as the corresponding forward run itself. By adopting a symmetric...

  6. An Overview of Reverse Logistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jia-xiang; HE Xin

    2005-01-01

    Until recently, investment in logistics has focused mainly on the flows from companies to markets. Growing concerns for the environment and conserving resources have created new logistical approaches to more effectively manage the distribution function, and make better use of the resources available to an organization. One such approach is reverse logistics, which uses various methods to give scope for a back-load of finished products, components, waste, reusable packing, etc. from consumer to manufacturer. Back-loads allow manufacturers to reduce costs by using the distribution vehicle's return journey to create income or added value. This basic concept is now being developed to create novel solutions to the problems of reducing pollution, costs and vehicle movements, whilst maintaining high customer service levels. In this paper, the idea of reverse logistics is presented; motivations for it are analyzed, several successful practices are demonstrated and some important truths regarding successful reverse logistics are identified, trend of reverse logistics is provided.

  7. CONCEPTUAL ISSUES REGARDING REVERSE LOGISTICS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ioana Olariu

    2014-01-01

    ... of reverse logistics in companies. Many firms attracted by the value available in the flow, have proactively participated in handling returned products at the end of their usefulness or from other parts of the product life cycle...

  8. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Peter Olsen; Bulut, Orhan; Jess, Per

    2010-01-01

    A change in procedure from open to laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's colostomy was implemented at our department between May 2005 and December 2008. The aim of the study was to investigate if this change was beneficial for the patients.......A change in procedure from open to laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's colostomy was implemented at our department between May 2005 and December 2008. The aim of the study was to investigate if this change was beneficial for the patients....

  9. Magnitude and influencing factors of parasomnia in schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhury Habibur Rasul

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Parasomnias are undesirable events occurring in the sleep-wake transition period. Several predisposing factors are reported to induce parasomnia in preschool children. Objective To estimate the magnitude of parasomnia in school children and to evaluate its relationship with possible predisposing factors. Methods Five hundred children aged 5-16 years from a boys’ school and a girls’ school in Khulna City, Bangladesh, were randomly selected for the study conducted from July to December 2011. The survey was done in two steps: self-administered questionnaire and clinical interviews of affected students and their parents. Apart from demographic features, questionnaires included details of perinatal and personal factors as well as familial and socioeconomic factors. The diagnoses of variants of parasomnias was based on the criteria for category-based classification by the American Academy of Sleep Mmedicine. Results Seven hundred thirteen filled questionnaires revealed parasomnia in 187 (26.2% children. Most parasomnias were accompanied by other sleep disorders, in which 23 (12.3% having primary dyssomnias including 18 (9.3% obstructive sleep apnea, and 10 (5.3% parasomnias with hypersomnias. Nightmares (7.4% were highest among the parasomnias followed by nocturnal enuresis (4.1% and sleep terrors (3.4%. More girls experienced parasomnias than boys (107/360 vs. 80/353, respectively; P=0.039. Perinatal factors such as problems during pregnancy (17.1% or eventful delivery (25.7%, and socioeconomic factors such as familial disharmony (11.8% and low socioeconomic level (31.6% had positive associations with parasomnia. Conclusion One-quarter of school children experience parasomnia. We found perinatal factors particularly problem during pregnancy, and socioeconomic factors particularly familial disharmony have significant influences on this condition. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:339-45.].

  10. The absolute magnitude distribution of cold classical Kuiper belt objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Jean-Marc; Bannister, Michele T.; Alexandersen, Mike; Chen, Ying-Tung; Gladman, Brett; Gwyn, Stephen; Kavelaars, JJ; Volk, Kathryn

    2016-10-01

    We report measurements of the low inclination component of the main Kuiper Belt showing a size freqency distribution very steep for sizes larger than H_r ~ 6.5-7.0 and then a flattening to shallower slope that is still steeper than the collisional equilibrium slope.The Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS) is ongoing and is expected to detect over 500 TNOs in a precisely calibrated and characterized survey. Combining our current sample with CFEPS and the Alexandersen et al. (2015) survey, we analyse a sample of ~180 low inclination main classical (cold) TNOs, with absolute magnitude H_r (SDSS r' like flter) in the range 5 to 8.8. We confirm that the H_r distribution can be approximated by an exponential with a very steep slope (>1) at the bright end of the distribution, as has been recognized long ago. A transition to a shallower slope occurs around H_r ~ 6.5 - 7.0, an H_r mag identified by Fraster et al (2014). Faintward of this transition, we find a second exponential to be a good approximation at least until H_r ~ 8.5, but with a slope significantly steeper than the one proposed by Fraser et al. (2014) or even the collisional equilibrium value of 0.5.The transition in the cold TNO H_r distribution thus appears to occur at larger sizes than is observed in the high inclination main classical (hot) belt, an important indicator of a different cosmogony for these two sub-components of the main classical Kuiper belt. Given the largish slope faintward of the transition, the cold population with ~100 km diameter may dominate the mass of the Kuiper belt in the 40 AU < a < 47 au region.

  11. Magnitude do aborto inseguro em Pernambuco, Brasil, 1996 a 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maria Bezerra de Mello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo estima a magnitude e a razão de abortos inseguros segundo os nascidos vivos, em Pernambuco, Brasil, e nas microrregionais de saúde do estado, entre 1996 e 2006. Realizou-se um estudo descritivo, ecológico, de tendência temporal, com análise espaço-temporal da razão de abortos inseguros. Obteve-se o número de internações hospitalares de mulheres por complicações de aborto do Sistema de Informação Hospitalar (SIH/SUS; utilizou-se a metodologia empregada pelo Instituto Alan Guttmacher para estimar o número de abortos inseguros. Verificou-se que a maioria das internações e das estimativas de aborto inseguro ocorreu nas GERES I e IV. Em relação à razão das estimativas de aborto inseguro por nascidos vivos, houve tendência de crescimento nas GERES II, IV, VII, IX, X e XI e redução nas GERES I, III, V, VI e VIII, mas apenas as GERES I, V, X e XI têm relação estatisticamente significante. Conclui-se que Pernambuco apresentou uma alta taxa de internação por aborto entre 1996 e 2007. A estimativa de abortos inseguros se apresenta elevada, com de média de 56.457 ao ano, 4.705 por mês e 157 por dia.

  12. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha [Department of Education and Training, Elekta, Maryland Heights, MO (United States); Goddu, S. Murty [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  13. Denitrification in upland of China: Magnitude and influencing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinyang; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    A better understanding of influencing factors and accurate estimate of soil denitrification is a global concern. Here we present a synthesis of 300 observations of denitrification in Chinese upland soils from 39 field and laboratory studies using the acetylene inhibition technique. The results of a linear mixed model analysis showed that the rates of soil denitrification were significantly affected by crop type, soil organic carbon, soil pH, the measurement period, and the rate of N application. The emission factor (EF) and N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio for soil denitrification were on average 2.11 ± 0.17% and 0.508 ± 0.020, respectively. Our meta-analysis indicated that N fertilization increased soil denitrification by 311% (95% CI: 279-346%) and 112% (95% CI: 66-171%) in the field and laboratory studies, respectively. Substantial interactive effects between soil properties and N fertilization on soil denitrification were found. Although the highest values of both the rate of denitrification and the EF were found in vegetable fields, the size of the stimulating effect of N fertilization on soil denitrification was lower in vegetable fields than in maize and wheat fields. These results suggest that the crop-specific effect is important and that vegetable fields are potential hot spots of denitrification in Chinese uplands. Based on either the EF or the N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio obtained, the estimated amount of total denitrification from the upland soils was an order of magnitude lower than that from budget calculations, suggesting that the acetylene inhibition technique may significantly underestimate denitrification in Chinese upland soils.

  14. Performance of external cavity mode-locked semiconductor lasers employing reverse biased saturable absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Skovgaard, P.M.W.; Mørk, Jesper;

    2002-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the performance of external cavity mode-locked semiconductor lasers employing reverse biased saturable absorbers. We have measured the magnitude of trailing pulses when varying the chip length and studied the pulse quality when changing the driving conditions...

  15. Variation of SEP event occurrence with heliospheric magnetic field magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.

    2009-05-01

    Recent work based on nitrate abundances in polar ice cores has shown that large fluence solar energetic (E>30MeV) particle (LSEP) events during the spacecraft era of observations (1960-present) are diminished in comparison with those of some preceding eras detected in the ice cores dating back to 1561. McCracken et al. [McCracken, K.G., Dreschhoff, G.A.M., Smart, D.F., Shea, M.A. A study of the frequency of occurrence of large-fluence solar proton events and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field, Sol. Phys., 224, 359-372, 2004] have reported an inverse correlation between LSEP events and the magnitudes of the associated reconstructed heliospheric magnetic fields (HMF). A physical working model by McCracken [McCracken, K.G. Changes in the cosmic ray and heliomagnetic components of space climate, 1428-2005, including the variable occurrence of solar energetic particle events, Adv. Space Res., 40, 1070-1077, 2007a; McCracken, K.G. High frequency of occurrence of large solar energetic particle events prior to 1958 and a possible repetition in the near future, Space Weather, 5, S07004, 2007b] is that the lower HMF and coronal magnetic field B imply that fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce shocks with enhanced Alfvenic Mach numbers MA and higher compression ratios r, leading to shock production of more numerous and energetic LSEP events. From a possible decline of the HMF over the next several solar cycles he has urged a watch for a return to the environment of high-frequency, high-fluence LSEP events preceding the current spacecraft era. His LSEP event watch involves three independent questions about (1) the physical model, (2) the prediction of decreasing solar-cycle sunspot numbers and heliomagnetic fields, and (3) the inferred anti-correlation between LSEP events and HMFs. Here we discuss observational evidence bearing on the last question and find little support for the claimed LSEP-HMF anticorrelation.

  16. Magnitude and Carbon Consequences of Forest Management in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek, J.; Kurz, W.; de Jong, B. H.

    2009-12-01

    The carbon balance of forests depends on the type, frequency and severity of recent disturbances (carbon source) and the rate of recovery from past disturbance (carbon sink). Harvest and land cover conversion represent significant forest disturbance agents over much of North America. For example, pine forests in the southeastern US are typically harvested at ~20 year intervals, and may occupy about half the regional landscape, resulting in regional landscape turnover rates of 2-3% per year. Inventory data are the primary source for quantifying information on harvest and conversion in the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Recent inventory data from these countries indicate timber production of 424 million cu m, 163 million cu m, and 7 million cu m, respectively, with significant year-to-year variability associated with wood products demand and timber price. Areas affected by harvest activity vary as well, with 3.97 Mha (million hectares) and 1.04 Mha affected by harvest in the US and Canada, respectively. Forest cover conversion (deforestation) is thought to be relatively minor in the US and Canada, but recent estimates suggest that forest and woodland cover in Mexico declined by 300-500 Kha/yr during the 1990’s. Recently, satellite remote sensing data products on forest change have been generated that complement the traditional inventory approach. These products are particularly useful for “wall-to-wall” estimates of forest conversion and tracking small disturbances. The type and severity of disturbance cannot be easily determined using satellite observations, however, and therefore some care must be taken to reconcile these products with ground-based data. In this talk we review available resources for characterizing “carbon relevant” information on the magnitude (area, type of activity) of forest management in North America, and attempt a first-order comparison between remote sensing and inventory estimates. We also discuss strategies that might be employed to

  17. REVERSE LOGISTICS RETAIL LEVEL RETURN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Bajor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Conducting scientific research regarding reverse logistics systems includes certain difficulties. Developed logistics systems are aimed at analysing reverse logistics issues and tend to continuously detect differences and oscillations in the flow of returned products and their characteristics. Developing logistics systems, as Croatian, find reverse logistics issues, regarding product returns, significantly complex and very often these issues are not observed as issues of priority. As distributive flow, reverse logistics systems fundaments should be also based on detailed analysis. Analysis in this flow presents amounts, reasons, process flows and quality of returned items. Because of complex product evaluation on individual level, reverse logistics procedures should be implemented as a methodology individually developed for every supply chain subject. This paper presents a research of retail level returns on the Croatian market, where the analysis implicated that the majority of products in return for this level is directed from final consumers and presents noncurrent inventories of distribution chain. The paper will present conducted research regarding characteristics of returns and routing these products from the retail level.

  18. Cylindrical air flow reversal barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woznica, C.; Rodziewicz, M.

    1988-06-01

    Describes an innovative design introduced in the ZMP mine in Zory for quick reversal of ventilation air flow. Geologic mining conditions at the 705 m deep horizon, where the barrier was built, are described. According to the design used until now, a reversal system consisted of safety barriers, ventilation air locks, a ventilation bridge and stopping needed in case of a fire when air flow direction must be reversed. Nine air locks and an expensive concrete ventilation bridge were needed and the air locks had to be operated at 8 points of the region to effect reversal. The new design consists of a 2-storey cylindrical barrier which also fulfills the function of a ventilation bridge. It can be manually or remotely operated by a mechanical or pneumatic system. Tests showed that the new barrier permits immediate air flow reversal while retaining 60% of the original air, which is important in the case of fire and methane hazards. It permits improved seam panelling and splitting of pillars and brings an economy of about 40 million zlotys in construction cost. Design and operation of the barrier is illustrated and ventilation air circulation is explained. 7 figs.

  19. Are all reversible computations tidy?

    CERN Document Server

    Maroney, O J E

    2004-01-01

    It has long been known that to minimise the heat emitted by a deterministic computer during it's operation it is necessary to make the computation act in a logically reversible manner\\cite{Lan61}. Such logically reversible operations require a number of auxiliary bits to be stored, maintaining a history of the computation, and which allows the initial state to be reconstructed by running the computation in reverse. These auxiliary bits are wasteful of resources and may require a dissipation of energy for them to be reused. A simple procedure due to Bennett\\cite{Ben73} allows these auxiliary bits to be "tidied", without dissipating energy, on a classical computer. All reversible classical computations can be made tidy in this way. However, this procedure depends upon a classical operation ("cloning") that cannot be generalised to quantum computers\\cite{WZ82}. Quantum computations must be logically reversible, and therefore produce auxiliary qbits during their operation. We show that there are classes of quantu...

  20. Low Cost Reversible Signed Comparator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Sharmin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays exponential advancement in reversible comp utation has lead to better fabrication and integration process. It has become very popular ove r the last few years since reversible logic circuit s dramatically reduce energy loss. It consumes less p ower by recovering bit loss from its unique input-o utput mapping. This paper presents two new gates called RC-I and RC-II to design an n-bit signed binary comparator where simulation results show that the p roposed circuit works correctly and gives significa ntly better performance than the existing counterparts. An algorithm has been presented in this paper for constructing an optimized reversible n-bit signed c omparator circuit. Moreover some lower bounds have been proposed on the quantum cost, the numbers of g ates used and the number of garbage outputs generated for designing a low cost reversible sign ed comparator. The comparative study shows that the proposed design exhibits superior performance consi dering all the efficiency parameters of reversible logic design which includes number of gates used, quantum cost, garbage output and constant inputs. This proposed design has certainly outperformed all the other existing approaches.

  1. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek P Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery.

  2. Availability of electro-osmotic process for treating contaminated clays with gasoline; Viabiliadade do processo eletro-osmotico para remediacao de solo argiloso contaminado com gasolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Veronica E.; Neri, Katya D. [Universidade Estadual da Paraiba (UEPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Vilar, Eudesio O. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The electrochemical mobilization of organic compounds occurs through simultaneously drag with the interstitial fluid (electrosmosis). For this study of electroremediation it was used a rectangular reactor filled with 1700 g of clay mixture (47% fine sand, 48% bentonite and 5% vermiculite) previously contaminated with gasoline. DSA - electrodes were inserted directly into the soil. The results of efficiency of mobilization to several initial soil moisture content (20-50%), time of experiment (48 - 72 h) and intensity of electric field (1-3 V/Cm) were confronted with the changes of pH, resulting from electrosmosis process. It was observed that the mobilization of the contaminant increased by increasing the time and intensity of electric field, in lower initial moisture. The tests results show that the best conditions for processing are 72 hours, 20% humidity and 3V/cm. In those circumstances it was possible to mobilize 46% of the initial concentration of gasoline, percentage found near the anode. The electrolysis provided soil acidification. It was found soil pH values above 11 near the cathode and below 2 neighbour to the anode, a factor that contributed to produce an electrosmosis reverse flow (cathode-anode flow direction). It is concluded that the mobilization by electrochemistry phenomena of gasoline in clay soil is possible, its efficiency, however depends on the proper control of the conditions of the process including pH (author)

  3. 线性堆载下软黏土一维电渗固结理论与试验分析%ANALYSES OF ONE DIMENSIONAL ELECTRO-OSMOTIC CONSOLIDATION THEORY AND TEST OF SOFT CLAY UNDER LINEAR LOAD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军; 符洪涛; 蔡袁强; 曾芳金; 申矫健

    2014-01-01

    Taking into account the interaction between water flows and electrical currents as well as the pore pressure dissipation under the linear load,one dimensional electro-osmotic consolidation equation under linear load was established based on the extending consolidation process of the general seepage equation to the electro-osmotic field. The analytical solutions of the pole pressure and average degree of consolidation were given under two conditions of the cathode opened and anode closed and two poles opened. The effects of the maximum load and loading rate on the dissipation of pore pressure and the effect of supply voltage on theoretical consolidation degree and experimental consolidation degree were investigated by the method of parametric analysis and test analysis. The pore pressure dissipation curves in single and double drainage under different maximum loads and loading rates , and the curves of theoretical consolidation degree and experimental consolidation degree under different supply voltages were drawn. The results show that the greater maximum load and loading rate are,the faster dissipation speed of pore pressure is. At the same time,the effects of maximum load and loading rate on double drainage is greater than that on unilateral drainage. The greater supply voltage is,the higher the growth rate of theoretical consolidation degree and the experimental consolidation degree are,as well as the variable amplitude of theoretical consolidation degree is weaker than the variable amplitude of experimental consolidation degree in the period of time.%考虑线性堆载下水流和电流的相互作用以及孔隙水压力的消散情况,通过将单向渗流固结过程的普遍方程推广到电渗领域,建立线性堆载下软黏土一维电渗固结方程,并给出阴极排水、阳极不排水和阴阳极都排水2种情况下孔隙水压力和平均固结度的解析解。通过参数和试验分析,研究最大堆载和加载速率对孔隙水

  4. Study on influence factors of the flux for strong cation-exchange monolithic electroosmotic pump%强阳离子交换整体电渗泵流量影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔瑞红; 尤慧艳

    2011-01-01

    采用丙烯酸,2-丙烯酰胺-2-甲基丙磺酸为功能单体,N,N’-亚甲基双丙烯酰胺为交联剂,正十二醇、1,4-丁二醇及二甲基亚砜为致孔剂,偶氮二异丁腈为引发剂在原位聚合,制备出了以丙烯酰胺类强阳离子交换整体柱为核心的电渗泵.在乙腈-磷酸盐二元流动相体系下,考察了驱动电压,有机调节剂,盐浓度,pH对该泵流量的影响.流量与驱动电压呈线性关系(0.9991);当有机调节剂乙腈的浓度低于70%时,固定相溶胀为主要因素,流量随乙腈浓度的增加而有下降的趋势,但随着有机调节剂浓度的增加(>70%),此时粘度起主要作用,流量开始缓慢地增加;随着磷酸盐浓度逐渐增加,流量随之降低;在pH 3~9范围内,流量基本上保持恒定.%A strong cation-exchange monolithic electroosmotic column was prepared inside the fused-silica capillary bypolymerization. The solution was consisted of acrylanide, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-l -propanesulfonicacid as a functional monomer, N, N' -methylenebisacrylanide as a cross-linking agent, dimethyl sulphoxide and dodecanol, 1, 4-Butanediol as organic porogenic reagents and azobisisobutyronitrile as an initiator. The monolithic column was severed as a key part of electroosmotic pump. Effects of applied voltage, the concentrations of organic modifier and salt solution, pH value on the flux were investigated. A good linear relationship between the applied voltage and the flux was obtained (0. 9991 ). The concentration of the organic modifier (CAN)was less than 70%. The swelling degree of stationary phase played a main role, and the flux decreased with increase of the concentration of CAN. However, its concentration was more than 70% , at this time the viscosity of mobile phase was the main influence factor, the flux began to increase slightly. The flux decreased as the concentration of phosphate increased. pH value was in the range of 3 ~ 9, it did not exert a significant change in

  5. Reversible large amplitude planar extension of soft elastomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Krog; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    The newly developed planar elongation fixture, designed as an add-on to the filament stretch rheometer, is used to measure reversible large amplitude planar elongation on soft elastomers. The concept of the new fixture is to elongate an annulus by keeping the perimeter constant. The deformation....... In particular it is observed that this new approximation reproduces the order of magnitude of the deformation on the cylindrical probe. In fact it is demonstrated that the deviation from an ideal planar extension of the cylindrical probe is highly sensitive towards the choice of strain tensor. When analyzing...

  6. Simultaneous separation of five major ribonucleic acids by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence in the presence of electroosmotic flow: application to the rapid screening of 5S rRNA from ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chu; Liao, Ching-Ru; Chung, I-Che; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Po-Ling

    2014-10-17

    RNA integrity is important in RNA studies because poor RNA quality may impact downstream methodologies. This study proposes a rapid and cost-effective method for the determination of RNA integrity based on CE-LIF in the presence of electroosmotic flow. The proposed method uses poly(ethylene) oxide (Mavg=4,000,000 Da) as a sieving matrix for total RNA separation. Ethidium bromide (μg mL(-1)) was dissolved in a polymer solution as an interchelating dye for on-column fluorescent labeling. The 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA from the total human RNA extracted from the cells were fully separated using the proposed method. The lowest detectable concentration of total RNA achieved was 100 pg μL(-1) with a 6 min sample injection followed by on-column concentration. In addition, the temperature-induced degradation of total RNA was observed by CE-LIF. The electropherograms revealed more fragmentation of 28S and 18S rRNAs by temperature-induced hydrolysis compared with the 5.8S rRNA, 5S rRNA and tRNA. Therefore, the results indicated that RNA degradation should be considered for long-term, high-temperature incubations in RNA-related experiments involving RNA hybridization. The proposed method is furthermore, applied to the determination of 5S rRNA overexpressed in ovarian cancer cells as compared to the cervical cancer cells. Overall, CE-LIF is highly promising for rapid screening of ovarian cancers without tedious pre-amplification steps. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Peter Olsen; Bulut, Orhan; Jess, Per

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A change in procedure from open to laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's colostomy was implemented at our department between May 2005 and December 2008. The aim of the study was to investigate if this change was beneficial for the patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The medical records...... of all patients who underwent reversal of a colostomy after a primary Hartmann's procedure during the period May 2005 to December 2008 were reviewed retrospectively in a case-control study. RESULTS: A total of 43 patients were included. Twenty-one had a laparoscopic and 22 an open procedure. The two...

  8. Reversible Switching of Cooperating Replicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urtel, Georg C.; Rind, Thomas; Braun, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    How can molecules with short lifetimes preserve their information over millions of years? For evolution to occur, information-carrying molecules have to replicate before they degrade. Our experiments reveal a robust, reversible cooperation mechanism in oligonucleotide replication. Two inherently slow replicating hairpin molecules can transfer their information to fast crossbreed replicators that outgrow the hairpins. The reverse is also possible. When one replication initiation site is missing, single hairpins reemerge from the crossbreed. With this mechanism, interacting replicators can switch between the hairpin and crossbreed mode, revealing a flexible adaptation to different boundary conditions.

  9. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-06-22

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  10. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Maria Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  11. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  12. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, N.; Yamanashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2014-09-01

    Reversible computing has been studied since Rolf Landauer advanced the argument that has come to be known as Landauer's principle. This principle states that there is no minimum energy dissipation for logic operations in reversible computing, because it is not accompanied by reductions in information entropy. However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices. Another difficulty is that reversible logic gates must be both logically and physically reversible. Here we propose the first practical reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices and experimentally demonstrate the logical and physical reversibility of the gate. Additionally, we estimate the energy dissipation of the gate, and discuss the minimum energy dissipation required for reversible logic operations. It is expected that the results of this study will enable reversible computing to move from the theoretical stage into practical usage.

  13. [Death by homicide in Colombia and Mexico: magnitude and trends, 2000-2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Cervantes, Claudio Alberto; Pardo-Montaño, Ana Melisa

    2014-07-01

    To quantify the magnitude and explain the trends and impact of death by homicide in Colombia and Mexico between 2000 and 2011 at the national level and by sex. Data were obtained from national homicide statistics (Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística [DANE], Colombia; and Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía [INEGI], Mexico). Standardized death rates and years of life lost (YLL) were calculated (the latter assuming zero mortality) in people 15–49 years old. In Colombia, between 2000 and 2002, deaths by homicide increased from 71.3 to 76.7 per 100 000 (7.5%); by 2011 this figure had fallen to 36.1. YLL in the same period increased to 0.58 years overall, reducing temporary life expectancy by one year in men and 0.1 years in women. Between 2002 and 2011, YLL was 0.45 years in both sexes: 0.83 in men and 0.07 in women. This decline occurred mainly in persons over 45 years of age. In Mexico, between 2000 and 2007, homicide rates fell from 10.8 to 8.2 per 100,000 and YLL dropped by 24%. Between 2008 and 2011, mortality and YLL increased significantly in both sexes (191.2% and 164.5%, respectively), reducing life expectancy by 0.39 years in men and 0.04 years in women. It was corroborated that there has been a decline in deaths by homicide in Colombia and a significant rise in Mexico after a period of continuous reduction. Numerous actions should be taken to continue reducing homicides in Colombia and to reverse the current trend in Mexico.

  14. Dynamic, Large-Magnitude CCD Changes in the Atlantic During the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, W.; Bohaty, S. M.; Palike, H.; Wilson, P. A.; Edgar, K. M.; Agnini, C.; Westerhold, T.; Roehl, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (MECO; ~40.1 Ma) is a transient global warming event that abruptly reversed the long-term Eocene cooling trend. The primary driving mechanism(s) must be linked to a CO2 increase; however, geochemical modeling experiments show that prevailing hypotheses are incompatible with the paleoclimate record. To further examine changes in deep-sea carbonate burial, we identify the MECO for the first time at ODP Site 929 (Equatorial Atlantic; ~3935 m paleodepth) and present new lithological and geochemical data for this site, including benthic foraminiferal stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C), XRF scanning data, and an orbitally tuned age model. We combine these records with data from a suite of Atlantic sites to form a depth transect between ~2-4 km (DSDP Site 523, ODP Site 1260 and 1263, IODP Site U1404) representing the first detailed record of carbonate dissolution in the Atlantic spanning the MECO. This compilation reveals dissolution at water depths as shallow as ~2 km (>1 km shallower than previous estimates) with multiple and discrete short-lived (<100 kyr) phases of carbonate compensation depth (CCD) shoaling during and after the event. Careful reevaluation of the Pacific CCD records combined with new results suggests similar short-term variability and magnitude of shoaling globally. These data provide new constraints on carbon release history during the MECO and, potentially, the forcing mechanisms for warming. The transient CCD shoaling events indicate multiple pulses of carbon input and acidification decoupled from deep-sea δ18O and δ13C records, indicating that these events must not have been driven directly by changes in temperature or carbon burial/storage - potentially reconciling some of the data-model discrepancies.

  15. Singular statistics to model the distribution of large and small magnitude earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Maslov, Lev A

    2014-01-01

    The solution of the Generalized Logistic Equation is obtained to study earthquake statistics for large and small magnitudes. It is shown that the same solution fits the distribution of small magnitude earthquakes, m3, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The Gutenberg-Richter cumulative frequency-magnitude empirical formula is derived from the solution of this equation.

  16. The Effects of Numerical Magnitude, Size, and Color Saturation on Perceived Interval Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alards-Tomalin, Doug; Leboe-McGowan, Jason P.; Shaw, Joshua D. M.; Leboe-McGowan, Launa C.

    2014-01-01

    The relative magnitude (or intensity) of an event can have direct implications on timing estimation. Previous studies have found that greater magnitude stimuli are often reported as longer in duration than lesser magnitudes, including Arabic digits (Xuan, Zhang, He, & Chen, 2007). One explanation for these findings is that different…

  17. The Effects of Reinforcement Magnitude on Skill Acquisition for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, Amber R.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of reinforcement magnitude on skill acquisition during discrete-trial training. After conducting a magnitude preference assessment, we compared acquisition during conditions with large and small magnitudes of edible reinforcement to a praise-only condition. Although all participants showed a preference for the…

  18. Vasectomy reversal : a clinical update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Patel (Abhishek); R.P. Smith (Ryan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractVasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage,

  19. CAPSULE REPORT: REVERSE OSMOSIS PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A failure analysis has been completed for the reverse osmosis (RO) process. The focus was on process failures that result in releases of liquids and vapors to the environment. The report includes the following: 1) A description of RO and coverage of the principles behind the proc...

  20. CAPSULE REPORT: REVERSE OSMOSIS PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A failure analysis has been completed for the reverse osmosis (RO) process. The focus was on process failures that result in releases of liquids and vapors to the environment. The report includes the following: 1) A description of RO and coverage of the principles behind the proc...

  1. A Framework for Reverse Logistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. de Brito (Marisa); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractReverse Logistics has been stretching out worldwide, involving all the layers of supply chains in various industry sectors. While some actors in the chain have been forced to take products back, others have pro-actively done so, attracted by the value in used products One way or the othe

  2. Time-reversible Hamiltonian systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaft, Arjan van der

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that transfer matrices satisfying G(-s) = G(s) = G^T(-s) have a minimal Hamiltonian realization with an energy which is the sum of potential and kinetic energy, yielding the time reversibility of the equations. Furthermore connections are made with an associated gradient system. The

  3. Reversible colour change in Arthropoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbers, Kate D L; Fabricant, Scott A; Gawryszewski, Felipe M; Seago, Ainsley E; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms and functions of reversible colour change in arthropods are highly diverse despite, or perhaps due to, the presence of an exoskeleton. Physiological colour changes, which have been recorded in 90 arthropod species, are rapid and are the result of changes in the positioning of microstructures or pigments, or in the refractive index of layers in the integument. By contrast, morphological colour changes, documented in 31 species, involve the anabolism or catabolism of components (e.g. pigments) directly related to the observable colour. In this review we highlight the diversity of mechanisms by which reversible colour change occurs and the evolutionary context and diversity of arthropod taxa in which it has been observed. Further, we discuss the functions of reversible colour change so far proposed, review the limited behavioural and ecological data, and argue that the field requires phylogenetically controlled approaches to understanding the evolution of reversible colour change. Finally, we encourage biologists to explore new model systems for colour change and to engage scientists from other disciplines; continued cross-disciplinary collaboration is the most promising approach to this nexus of biology, physics, and chemistry.

  4. Reverse Knowledge Transfer in MNEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mudambi, Ram; Piscitello, Lucia; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    , and that the curvilinearity is greater for greenfield entries relative to acquisition entries. The U-shaped relationship between subsidiary innovativeness and reverse knowledge transfers, as well as the sensitivity of this result to entry mode are important new findings in the literature on the role of subsidiaries...

  5. Aspect-ratio dependence of magnetization reversal in cylindrical ferromagnetic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Musaab S.; Atkinson, Del

    2016-05-01

    The magnetization reversal behavior in isolated cylindrical and square cross-section Ni81Fe19 nanowires was systematically studied as a function of nanowire cross-section dimensions from 10 up to 200 nm using micromagnetic simulations. This approach provides access to the switching field, remanence ratio and most significantly the magnetization structures during reversal, which allows the evolution of magnetization processes to be studied with scaling of the cross-sectional dimensions. The dimensional trends in reversal behavior for both square and circular cross-section were comparable throughout the range of dimensions studied. The thinnest nanowires showed simple square switching and 100% remanence. With increasing diameter the switching field reduces and above 40 nm the reversal behavior shows an increasing rotational component prior to sharp switching of the magnetization. The magnitude of the reversible component increases with increasing dimensions up to 150 nm, above which the magnetization reversal process is more complicated and the hysteresis loops are no longer bistable. The micromagnetic structures evolve from simple uniform parallel single domain states in the thinnest wires through the formation of vortex-like end states in thicker wires to complex multidomain structures during the reversal of the thickest wires. In the later cases the reversal is not simple curling-like behavior, although the angular switching field dependence was comparable with curling.

  6. Model parameter estimation bias induced by earthquake magnitude cut-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, D. S.

    2016-02-01

    We evaluate the bias in parameter estimates of the ETAS model. We show that when a simulated catalogue is magnitude-truncated there is considerable bias, whereas when it is not truncated there is no discernible bias. We also discuss two further implied assumptions in the ETAS and other self-exciting models. First, that the triggering boundary magnitude is equivalent to the catalogue completeness magnitude. Secondly, the assumption in the Gutenberg-Richter relationship that numbers of events increase exponentially as magnitude decreases. These two assumptions are confounded with the magnitude truncation effect. We discuss the effect of these problems on analyses of real earthquake catalogues.

  7. Variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects in novel versus familiar environments in two Drosophila species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitabh Joshi

    2004-08-01

    Models of competitor coevolution, especially the genetic feedback hypothesis, suggest that a negative correlation between intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects may be important in sustaining competitor coexistence, and can give rise to oscillatory dynamics with repeated reversals of competitive superiority. I reanalyzed previously published census data from an experiment in which populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans underwent competitive coevolution in one familiar and two novel environments, to specifically look for any evidence of a negative relationship between intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects on population growth rates, and for any indication of short period cycling in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects. While there was considerable variation in the relative magnitude of intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects over generations, among both populations and environments, there was no clear evidence supporting the genetic feedback hypothesis. Intraspecific and interspecific competitive effects on population growth rates were strongly positively correlated in novel environments, and uncorrelated in the familiar environment. Data from the familiar environment indicated that indices of competition of populations of the initially superior competitor, D. melanogaster, might be showing some cyclic behaviour, but I argue that this is likely to be transient, and not suggestive of sustained oscillatory dynamics predicted by the genetic feedback model. I discuss the results in the context of the importance of the genetic architecture of intraspecific and interspecific competitive abilities in determining the coevolutionary trajectory of competitive interactions.

  8. One tamed at a time: A new approach for controlling continuous magnitudes in numerical comparison tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salti, Moti; Katzin, Naama; Katzin, David; Leibovich, Tali; Henik, Avishai

    2016-07-20

    Non-symbolic stimuli (i.e., dot arrays) are commonly used to study numerical cognition. However, in addition to numerosity, non-symbolic stimuli entail continuous magnitudes (e.g., total surface area, convex-hull, etc.) that correlate with numerosity. Several methods for controlling for continuous magnitudes have been suggested, all with the same underlying rationale: disassociating numerosity from continuous magnitudes. However, the different continuous magnitudes do not fully correlate; therefore, it is impossible to disassociate them completely from numerosity. Moreover, relying on a specific continuous magnitude in order to create this disassociation may end up in increasing or decreasing numerosity saliency, pushing subjects to rely on it more or less, respectively. Here, we put forward a taxonomy depicting the relations between the different continuous magnitudes. We use this taxonomy to introduce a new method with a complimentary Matlab toolbox that allows disassociating numerosity from continuous magnitudes and equating the ratio of the continuous magnitudes to the ratio of the numerosity in order to balance the saliency of numerosity and continuous magnitudes. A dot array comparison experiment in the subitizing range showed the utility of this method. Equating different continuous magnitudes yielded different results. Importantly, equating the convex hull ratio to the numerical ratio resulted in similar interference of numerical and continuous magnitudes.

  9. Investigating reinforcer magnitude and reinforcer delay: a contingency management analog study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Robert R; Howell, Donelle N; McPherson, Sterling; Roll, John M

    2012-08-01

    The influence of reinforcer magnitude and reinforcer delay on smoking abstinence was studied using an analog model of contingency management. Participants (N = 103, 74% men) visited our laboratory 3 times daily for 5 days and received money for providing a breath sample that indicated smoking abstinence (carbon monoxide level ≤6 parts per million). Using a factorial design, we assigned participants randomly to 1 of 4 groups that could earn a total of either $207.50 (high-magnitude condition) or $70.00 (low-magnitude condition), and received earnings either at each visit (no-delay condition) or in a single lump sum 1 week following the study (delay condition). High-magnitude reinforcement, regardless of delay, was associated with higher rates of abstinence than was low-magnitude reinforcement. High magnitude of reinforcement provided immediately but in incremental amounts was associated with longer intervals to relapse during treatment in comparison with high-magnitude reinforcement provided in a single lump sum after a delay. Low rates of responding in the low-magnitude conditions made interpretation of the impact of delay in those conditions difficult. These findings further demonstrate that high magnitude of reinforcement results in better outcomes than does low magnitude of reinforcement, and that a delay to reinforcement can be detrimental-even when a high magnitude of reinforcement is provided.

  10. Representation of abstract quantitative rules applied to spatial and numerical magnitudes in primate prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiselt, Anne-Kathrin; Nieder, Andreas

    2013-04-24

    Processing quantity information based on abstract principles is central to intelligent behavior. Neural correlates of quantitative rule selectivity have been identified previously in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, whether individual neurons represent rules applied to multiple magnitude types is unknown. We recorded from PFC neurons while monkeys switched between "greater than/less than" rules applied to spatial and numerical magnitudes. A majority of rule-selective neurons responded only to the quantitative rules applied to one specific magnitude type. However, another population of neurons generalized the magnitude principle and represented the quantitative rules related to both magnitudes. This indicates that the primate brain uses rule-selective neurons specialized in guiding decisions related to a specific magnitude type only, as well as generalizing neurons that respond abstractly to the overarching concept "magnitude rules."

  11. Calculation of Calibration Functions and Explosive Aftershock Magnitudes in the Near Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xuezheng; Wang Haijun; Lei Jun

    2003-01-01

    The current calibration function used in calculating the magnitude of natural earthquakes within 5km is a constant; a fact that causes several serious difficulties for the calculation of the magnitude of small and shallow-focus earthquakes. According to the attenuation law of explosions and the propagation theory of elastic waves, the calibration function is calculated for near field quakes from 0km to 5km. Magnitudes of two aftershock sequences are calculated.The magnitudes of most explosion earthquakes are small, ranging mainly from magnitude 0.5 to 1.0. The M-t chart of the explosive aftershocks is completely different from that of strong earthquake aftershocks. It not only shows positive columnar lines indicating large magnitudes but also short negative columnar lines indicating small magnitudes.

  12. A reversible nanoconfined chemical reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Thomas K; Bösenberg, Ulrike; Gosalawit, Rapee; Dornheim, Martin; Cerenius, Yngve; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2010-07-27

    Hydrogen is recognized as a potential, extremely interesting energy carrier system, which can facilitate efficient utilization of unevenly distributed renewable energy. A major challenge in a future "hydrogen economy" is the development of a safe, compact, robust, and efficient means of hydrogen storage, in particular, for mobile applications. Here we report on a new concept for hydrogen storage using nanoconfined reversible chemical reactions. LiBH4 and MgH2 nanoparticles are embedded in a nanoporous carbon aerogel scaffold with pore size Dmax approximately 21 nm and react during release of hydrogen and form MgB2. The hydrogen desorption kinetics is significantly improved compared to bulk conditions, and the nanoconfined system has a high degree of reversibility and stability and possibly also improved thermodynamic properties. This new scheme of nanoconfined chemistry may have a wide range of interesting applications in the future, for example, within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy.

  13. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  14. Reversible Watermarking Using Statistical Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurugollu Fatih

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In most reversible watermarking methods, a compressed location map is exploited in order to ensure reversibility. Besides, in some methods, a header containing critical information is appended to the payload for the extraction and recovery process. Such schemes have a highly fragile nature; that is, changing a single bit in watermarked data may prohibit recovery of the original host as well as the embedded watermark. In this paper, we propose a new scheme in which utilizing a compressed location map is completely removed. In addition, the amount of auxiliary data is decreased by employing the adjacent pixels information. Therefore, in addition to quality improvement, independent authentication of different regions of a watermarked image is possible.

  15. Molecular Simulation of Reverse Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Janamejaya; Ladanyi, Branka

    2009-03-01

    Reverse micelles (RM) are surfactant assemblies containing a nanosized water pool dissolved in a hydrophobic solvent. Understanding their properties is crucial for insight into the effect of confinement on aqueous structure, dynamics as well as physical processes associated with solutes in confinement. We perform molecular dynamics simulations for the RM formed by the surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) in isooctane (2,2,4-trimethyl pentane) in order to study the effect of reverse micelle size on the aqueous phase. The structure of the RM is quantified in terms of the radial and pair density distributions. Dynamics are studied in terms of the mean squared displacements and various orientational time correlation functions in different parts of the RM so as to understand the effect of proximity to the interface on aqueous dynamics. Shape fluctuations of the RM are also analyzed.

  16. Reverse current reduction of Ge photodiodes on Si without post-growth annealing Invited Paper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sungbong Park; Shinya Takita; Yasuhiko; Ishikawa; Jiro Osaka; Kazumi Wada

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to reduce the reverse current of Ge pin photodiodes on Si is presented, in which an i-Si layer is inserted between Ge and top Si layers to reduce the electric field in the Ge layer. Without post- growth annealing, the reverse current density is reduced to ~10 mA/cm2 at -1 V, i.e., over one order of magnitude lower than that of the reference photodiode without i-Si layer. However, the responsivity of the photodiodes is not severely compromised. This lowered-reverse-current is explained by band-pinning at the i-Si/i-Ge interface. Barrier lowering mechanism induced by E-field is also discussed. The presented "non-thermal" approach to reduce reverse current should accelerate electronics-photonics convergence by using Ge on the Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) platform.

  17. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Pani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice.

  18. CONCEPTUAL ISSUES REGARDING REVERSE LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the power of consumers is growing, the product return for customer service and customer retention has become a common practice in the competitive market, which propels the recent practice of reverse logistics in companies. Many firms attracted by the value available in the flow, have proactively participated in handling returned products at the end of their usefulness or from other parts of the product life cycle. Reverse logistics is the flow and management of products, packaging, components and information from the point of consumption to the point of origin. It is a collection of practices similar to those of supply chain management, but in the opposite direction, from downstream to upstream. It involves activities such as reuse, repair, remanufacture, refurbish, reclaim and recycle. For the conventional forward logistics systems, the flow starts upstream as raw materials, later as manufactured parts and components to be assembled and continues downstream to reach customers as final products to be disposed once they reach their economic or useful lives. In reverse logistics, the disposed products are pushed upstream to be repaired, remanufactured, refurbished, and disassembled into components to be reused or as raw material to be recycled for later use.

  19. Reversible Simulations of Elastic Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Consider a system of N identical hard spherical particles moving in a d-dimensional box and undergoing elastic, possibly multi-particle, collisions. We develop a new algorithm that recovers the pre-collision state from the post-collision state of the system, across a series of consecutive collisions, with essentially no memory overhead. The challenge in achieving reversibility for an n-particle collision (where, n << N) arises from the presence of nd-d-1 degrees of freedom during each collision, and from the complex geometrical constraints placed on the colliding particles. To reverse the collisions in a traditional simulation setting, all of the particular realizations of these degrees of freedom during the forward simulation must be saved. This limitation is addressed here by first performing a pseudo-randomization of angles, ensuring determinism in the reverse path for any values of n and d. To address the more difficult problem of geometrical and dynamic constraints, a new approach is developed whic...

  20. Reversible Oxidative Addition at Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Antonius F; Fuchs, Sonja; Flock, Marco; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2017-04-07

    The reactivity of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and cyclic alkyl amino carbenes (cAACs) with arylboronate esters is reported. The reaction with NHCs leads to the reversible formation of thermally stable Lewis acid/base adducts Ar-B(OR)2 ⋅NHC (Add1-Add6). Addition of cAAC(Me) to the catecholboronate esters 4-R-C6 H4 -Bcat (R=Me, OMe) also afforded the adducts 4-R-C6 H4 Bcat⋅cAAC(Me) (Add7, R=Me and Add8, R=OMe), which react further at room temperature to give the cAAC(Me) ring-expanded products RER1 and RER2. The boronate esters Ar-B(OR)2 of pinacol, neopentylglycol, and ethyleneglycol react with cAAC at RT via reversible B-C oxidative addition to the carbene carbon atom to afford cAAC(Me) (B{OR}2 )(Ar) (BCA1-BCA6). NMR studies of cAAC(Me) (Bneop)(4-Me-C6 H4 ) (BCA4) demonstrate the reversible nature of this oxidative addition process.

  1. Improved rapid magnitude estimation for a community-based, low-cost MEMS accelerometer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Angela I.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Kaiser, Anna E.; Christensen, Carl M.; Yildirim, Battalgazi; Lawrence, Jesse F.

    2015-01-01

    Immediately following the Mw 7.2 Darfield, New Zealand, earthquake, over 180 Quake‐Catcher Network (QCN) low‐cost micro‐electro‐mechanical systems accelerometers were deployed in the Canterbury region. Using data recorded by this dense network from 2010 to 2013, we significantly improved the QCN rapid magnitude estimation relationship. The previous scaling relationship (Lawrence et al., 2014) did not accurately estimate the magnitudes of nearby (estimates earthquake magnitudes within 1 magnitude unit of the GNS Science GeoNet earthquake catalog magnitudes for 99% of the events tested, within 0.5 magnitude units for 90% of the events, and within 0.25 magnitude units for 57% of the events. These magnitudes are reliably estimated within 3 s of the initial trigger recorded on at least seven stations. In this report, we present the methods used to calculate a new scaling relationship and demonstrate the accuracy of the revised magnitude estimates using a program that is able to retrospectively estimate event magnitudes using archived data.

  2. The association between symbolic and nonsymbolic numerical magnitude processing and mental versus algorithmic subtraction in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsen, Sarah; Torbeyns, Joke; Verschaffel, Lieven; Reynvoet, Bert; De Smedt, Bert

    2016-03-01

    There are two well-known computation methods for solving multi-digit subtraction items, namely mental and algorithmic computation. It has been contended that mental and algorithmic computation differentially rely on numerical magnitude processing, an assumption that has already been examined in children, but not yet in adults. Therefore, in this study, we examined how numerical magnitude processing was associated with mental and algorithmic computation, and whether this association with numerical magnitude processing was different for mental versus algorithmic computation. We also investigated whether the association between numerical magnitude processing and mental and algorithmic computation differed for measures of symbolic versus nonsymbolic numerical magnitude processing. Results showed that symbolic, and not nonsymbolic, numerical magnitude processing was associated with mental computation, but not with algorithmic computation. Additional analyses showed, however, that the size of this association with symbolic numerical magnitude processing was not significantly different for mental and algorithmic computation. We also tried to further clarify the association between numerical magnitude processing and complex calculation by also including relevant arithmetical subskills, i.e. arithmetic facts, needed for complex calculation that are also known to be dependent on numerical magnitude processing. Results showed that the associations between symbolic numerical magnitude processing and mental and algorithmic computation were fully explained by individual differences in elementary arithmetic fact knowledge.

  3. Reinforcer magnitude and rate dependency: evaluation of resistance-to-change mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C; Lamb, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Under many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitudes rate dependency is attenuated compared with behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple FI schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined. All three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine; however, these effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. In addition, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest that a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable.

  4. EVALUATION REINFORCER MAGNITUDE AND RATE DEPENDENCY OF RESISTANCE TO CHANGE MECHANIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Ginsburg, Brett C.; Lamb, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs, such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitude, rate dependency is attenuated compared to behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple fixed-interval schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined: all three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine, but those effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. Additionally, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable. PMID:25115595

  5. Garbageless reversible implementation of integer linear transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burignat, Stéphane; Vermeirsch, Kenneth; De Vos, Alexis;

    2013-01-01

    Discrete linear transformations are important tools in information processing. Many such transforms are injective and therefore prime candidates for a physically reversible implementation into hardware. We present here reversible digital implementations of different integer transformations on fou...

  6. Ancient Magnetic Reversals: Clues to the Geodynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the question posed by some that the earth's magnetic field may reverse. States that rocks magnetized by ancient fields may offer clues to the underlying reversal mechanism in the earth's core. (TW)

  7. Reversible logic gate using adiabatic superconducting devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takeuchi, N; Yamanashi, Y; Yoshikawa, N

    2014-01-01

    .... However, until now, no practical reversible logic gates have been demonstrated. One of the problems is that reversible logic gates must be built by using extremely energy-efficient logic devices...

  8. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If the engine incorporates a reverser, the endurance calibration, operation, and vibration tests prescribed...

  9. SELECTED PROBLEMS OF REVERSE LOGISTICS IN POLAND

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Mesjasz-Lech

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the essence of reverse logistics and directions of physical and information flows between logistic network partners. It also analyses effects of implementation of the principles of reverse logistics in Poland in the years 2004-2007

  10. Design of a High Performance Reversible Multiplier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md.Belayet Ali

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Reversible logic circuits are increasingly used in power minimization having applications such as low power CMOS design, optical information processing, DNA computing, bioinformatics, quantum computing and nanotechnology. The problem of minimizing the number of garbage outputs is an important issue in reversible logic design. In this paper we propose a new 44 universal reversible logic gate. The proposed reversible gate can be used to synthesize any given Boolean functions. The proposed reversible gate also can be used as a full adder circuit. In this paper we have used Peres gate and the proposed Modified HNG (MHNG gate to construct the reversible fault tolerant multiplier circuit. We show that the proposed 44 reversible multiplier circuit has lower hardware complexity and it is much better and optimized in terms of number of reversible gates and number of garbage outputs with compared to the existing counterparts.

  11. Applicability of P/S amplitude ratios for the discrimination of low magnitude seismic events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Chang-zhou; JIN Ping; WANG Hong-chun

    2007-01-01

    Applicability of regional P/S amplitude ratios for the discrimination of low-magnitude seismic events was tested and proved using earthquakes and explosions in Central Asia. Results obtained show that regional P/S amplitude ratios which may discriminate medium or large magnitude events well, are also applicable to low magnitude events. Their performances for low magnitude events are almost as good as that for medium or large events. Statistical comparisons based on 25 P/S discriminate from the four seismic stations WMQ, BLK, MUL and MAK showed that the average misclassification rate for low-magnitude seismic events averagely was only 2 percent higher than that for medium and large magnitude seismic events.

  12. The impact of emotion on the perception of graded magnitudes of respiratory resistive loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Wen; Chan, Pei-Ying; von Leupoldt, Andreas; Davenport, Paul W

    2013-04-01

    Emotional state can modulate the perception of respiratory loads but the range of respiratory load magnitudes affected by emotional state is unknown. We hypothesized that viewing pleasant, neutral and unpleasant affective pictures would modulate the perception of respiratory loads of different load magnitudes. Twenty-four healthy adults participated in the study. Five inspiratory resistive loads of increasing magnitude (5, 10, 15, 20, 45 cm H(2)O/L/s) were repeatedly presented for one inspiration while participants viewed pleasant, neutral and unpleasant affective picture series. Participants rated how difficult it was to breathe against the load immediately after each presentation. Only at the lowest load, magnitude estimation ratings were greater when subjects viewed the unpleasant series compared to the neutral and pleasant series. These results suggest that negative emotional state increases the sense of respiratory effort for single presentations of a low magnitude resistive load but high magnitude loads are not further modulated by emotional state.

  13. Fast characterization of moment magnitude and focal mechanism in the context of tsunami warning in the NEAM region : W-phase and PDFM2 algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelé, François; Roch, Julien; Duperray, Pierre; Reymond, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Over past centuries, several large earthquakes (Mw ≥ 7.5) have been reported in the North East Atlantic and Mediterranenan sea (NEAM) region. Most of the tsunami potential seismic sources in the NEAM region, however, are in a magnitude range of 6.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.5 (e.g. tsunami triggered by the earthquake of Boumerdes in 2003 of Mw = 6.9). The CENALT (CENtre d'ALerte aux Tsunamis) in operation since 2012 as the French National Tsunami Warning Centre (NTWC) and Candidate Tsunami Service Provider (CTSP) has to issue warning messages within 15 minutes of the earthquake origin time. The warning level is currently based on a decision matrix depending on the magnitude, and the location of the hypocenter. Two seismic source inversion methods are implemented at CENALT: the W-phase algorithm, based on the so-called W-phase and PDFM2 algorithm , based on the surface waves and first P wave motions. They both give accurate moment magnitude and focal magnitude respectively in 10 min and 20 min. The results of the Mw magnitude, focal depth and type of fault (reverse, normal, strike-slip) are the most relevant parameters used to issue tsunami warnings. In this context, we assess the W-phase and PDFM2 methods with 29 events of magnitude Mw ≥ 5.8 for the period 2010-2015 in the NEAM region. Results with 10 and 20 min for the W-phase algorithm and with 20 and 30 min for the PDFM2 algorithm are compared to the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog. The W-phase and PDFM2 methods gives accurate results respectively in 10 min and 20 min. This work is funded by project ASTARTE -- Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839

  14. Design of High speed Low Power Reversible Vedic multiplier and Reversible Divider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth G Department of Electronics & Communication Engineerig, Indur Institute of Engineering & Technology, Siddipet, Medak, JNTUH University, Telangana, India.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper bring out a 32X32 bit reversible Vedic multiplier using "Urdhva Tiryakabhayam" sutra meaning vertical and crosswise, is designed using reversible logic gates, which is the first of its kind. Also in this paper we propose a new reversible unsigned division circuit. This circuit is designed using reversible components like reversible parallel adder, reversible left-shift register, reversible multiplexer, reversible n-bit register with parallel load line. The reversible vedic multiplier and reversible divider modules have been written in Verilog HDL and then synthesized and simulated using Xilinx ISE 9.2i. This reversible vedic multiplier results shows less delay and less power consumption by comparing with array multiplier.

  15. Are Earthquakes Predictable? A Study on Magnitude Correlations in Earthquake Catalog and Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrianaki, K.; Ross, G.; Sammonds, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The clustering of earthquakes in time and space is widely accepted, however the existence of correlations in earthquake magnitudes is more questionable. In standard models of seismic activity, it is usually assumed that magnitudes are independent and therefore in principle unpredictable. Our work seeks to test this assumption by analysing magnitude correlation between earthquakes and their aftershocks. To separate mainshocks from aftershocks, we perform stochastic declustering based on the widely used Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model, which allows us to then compare the average magnitudes of aftershock sequences to that of their mainshock. The results of earthquake magnitude correlations were compared with acoustic emissions (AE) from laboratory analog experiments, as fracturing generates both AE at the laboratory scale and earthquakes on a crustal scale. Constant stress and constant strain rate experiments were done on Darley Dale sandstone under confining pressure to simulate depth of burial. Microcracking activity inside the rock volume was analyzed by the AE technique as a proxy for earthquakes. Applying the ETAS model to experimental data allowed us to validate our results and provide for the first time a holistic view on the correlation of earthquake magnitudes. Additionally we search the relationship between the conditional intensity estimates of the ETAS model and the earthquake magnitudes. A positive relation would suggest the existence of magnitude correlations. The aim of this study is to observe any trends of dependency between the magnitudes of aftershock earthquakes and the earthquakes that trigger them.

  16. Magnitude Estimation for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Based on Ground Motion Prediction Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Attieh; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Ghofrani, Hadi; Atkinson, Gail M.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates whether real-time strong ground motion data from seismic stations could have been used to provide an accurate estimate of the magnitude of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake in Japan. Ultimately, such an estimate could be used as input data for a tsunami forecast and would lead to more robust earthquake and tsunami early warning. We collected the strong motion accelerograms recorded by borehole and free-field (surface) Kiban Kyoshin network stations that registered this mega-thrust earthquake in order to perform an off-line test to estimate the magnitude based on ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). GMPEs for peak ground acceleration and peak ground velocity (PGV) from a previous study by Eshaghi et al. in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America 103. (2013) derived using events with moment magnitude ( M) ≥ 5.0, 1998-2010, were used to estimate the magnitude of this event. We developed new GMPEs using a more complete database (1998-2011), which added only 1 year but approximately twice as much data to the initial catalog (including important large events), to improve the determination of attenuation parameters and magnitude scaling. These new GMPEs were used to estimate the magnitude of the Tohoku-Oki event. The estimates obtained were compared with real time magnitude estimates provided by the existing earthquake early warning system in Japan. Unlike the current operational magnitude estimation methods, our method did not saturate and can provide robust estimates of moment magnitude within ~100 s after earthquake onset for both catalogs. It was found that correcting for average shear-wave velocity in the uppermost 30 m () improved the accuracy of magnitude estimates from surface recordings, particularly for magnitude estimates of PGV (Mpgv). The new GMPEs also were used to estimate the magnitude of all earthquakes in the new catalog with at least 20 records. Results show that the magnitude estimate from PGV values using

  17. Asymmetric Processing of Numerical and Nonnumerical Magnitudes in the Brain: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovich, Tali; Vogel, Stephan E; Henik, Avishai; Ansari, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that, when comparing nonsymbolic magnitudes (e.g., dot arrays), adults can use both numerical (i.e., the number of items) and nonnumerical (density, total surface areas, etc.) magnitudes. It is less clear which of these magnitudes is more salient or processed more automatically. In this fMRI study, we used a nonsymbolic comparison task to ask if different brain areas are responsible for the automatic processing of numerical and nonnumerical magnitudes, when participants were instructed to attend to either the numerical or the nonnumerical magnitudes of the same stimuli. An interaction of task (numerical vs. nonnumerical) and congruity (congruent vs. incongruent) was found in the right TPJ. Specifically, this brain region was more strongly activated during numerical processing when the nonnumerical magnitudes were negatively correlated with numerosity (incongruent trials). In contrast, such an interference effect was not evident during nonnumerical processing when the task-irrelevant numerical magnitude was incongruent. In view of the role of the right TPJ in the control of stimulus-driven attention, we argue that these data demonstrate that the processing of nonnumerical magnitudes is more automatic than that of numerical magnitudes and that, therefore, the influence of numerical and nonnumerical variables on each other is asymmetrical.

  18. Design of Second Order Recursive Digital Integrators with Matching Phase and Magnitude Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Garg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Location of poles and zeroes greatly affect phase response and magnitude response of a system. Recently, pole-zero optimization emerged as an effective approach to approximately match magnitude response of a system with that of an ideal one. In this brief, a methodology for the design of linear phase integrators and ones with constant phase of -90 degree is proposed. The aim of this method is to simultaneously attain multiple objectives of magnitude and phase optimization. In this method, magnitude response error is minimized under the constraint that the maximum passband phase-response error is below a prescribed level. Examples are included to illustrate the proposed design technique.

  19. Statistical Learning, Letter Reversals, and Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Rebecca; Gordon, Jessica; Boada, Richard; Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2014-01-01

    Reversal errors play a prominent role in theories of reading disability. We examined reversal errors in the writing of letters by 5- to 6-year-old children. Of the 130 children, 92 had a history of difficulty in producing speech sounds, a risk factor for reading problems. Children were more likely to reverse letter forms that face left, such as…

  20. Garbage collection for reversible functional languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2015-01-01

    Reversible languages are programming languages where all programs can run both forwards and backwards. Reversible functional languages have been proposed that use symmetric pattern matching and data construction. To be reversible, these languages require linearity: Every variable must be used exa...

  1. A functional language for describing reversible logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal

    2012-01-01

    . Reversibility of descriptions is guaranteed with a type system based on linear types. The language is applied to three examples of reversible computations (ALU, linear cosine transformation, and binary adder). The paper also outlines a design flow that ensures garbage- free translation to reversible logic...

  2. THEORETICAL FRAMES FOR DESIGNING REVERSE LOGISTICS PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Grabara, Janusz K.; Sebastian Kot

    2009-01-01

    Logistics processes of return flow became more and more important in present business practice. Because of better customer satisfaction, environmental and financial aspects many enterprises deal with reverse logistics performance. The paper is a literature review focused on the design principles of reverse logistics processes Keywords: reverse logistics, designing.

  3. Dynamic Reverse Code Generation for Backward Execution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jooyong

    2007-01-01

    . In this paper, we present a method to generate reverse code, so that backtracking can be performed by executing reverse code. The novelty of our work is that we generate reverse code on-the-fly, while running a debugger, which makes it possible to apply the method even to debugging multi-threaded programs....

  4. Cleaning Our World through Reverse Graffiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, Gabe; LaJevic, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade artists have begun to experiment with "reverse pollution" techniques, such as reverse graffiti, which focuses on cleaning environmental surfaces. Having recently been introduced to the works of Moose, the artist known for inventing the reverse graffiti technique, the authors decided to design a curriculum to increase…

  5. REVERSE ENGINEERING AND ITS REALISTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Nikita Bakshi; Shruti Gujral

    2014-01-01

    Reverse-engineering is used for many purposes like as a learning tool, as a way to make compatible products that are cheaper than what is currently on the market. This paper discusses what is software, its type, reverse engineering, applications of reverse engineering and their tools.

  6. REVERSE ENGINEERING AND ITS REALISTIC APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Bakshi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reverse-engineering is used for many purposes like as a learning tool, as a way to make compatible products that are cheaper than what is currently on the market. This paper discusses what is software, its type, reverse engineering, applications of reverse engineering and their tools.

  7. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  8. Reverse Triangle Inequalities for Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Pritsker, I. E.; Saff, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    We study the reverse triangle inequalities for suprema of logarithmic potentials on compact sets of the plane. This research is motivated by the inequalities for products of supremum norms of polynomials. We find sharp additive constants in the inequalities for potentials, and give applications of our results to the generalized polynomials. We also obtain sharp inequalities for products of norms of the weighted polynomials $w^nP_n, deg(P_n)\\le n,$ and for sums of suprema of potentials with ex...

  9. Presbycusis: reversible with anesthesia drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Carl A

    2009-02-01

    Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is a degenerative condition not currently treatable by medication. It is therefore significant that the author, as a patient, experienced a reversal of high-frequency hearing loss during a 2-day period following abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. This report documents the surgery and the subsequent restoration of hearing, which was bilateral and is estimated to have exceeded 50dB at 4kHz. A possible role is noted for anesthetic agents such as lidocaine, propofol, or fentanyl. This experience may hold a clue for research toward the development of medical treatments for presbycusis.

  10. How to play Reverse Hex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Bjarne; Hayward, Ryan B.; Henderson, Philip

    2012-01-01

    We present new results on how to play Reverse Hex, also known as Rex, or Misère Hex, on n × n boards. We give new proofs – and strengthened versions – of Lagarias and Sleator’s theorem (for n × n boards, each player can prolong the game until the board is full, so the first/second player can always......, we find second-player winning replies. Finally, in response to comments by Martin Gardner, for each n ≤ 5, we give a simple winning strategy for the n × n board....

  11. Fast Moment Magnitude Determination from P-wave Trains for Bucharest Rapid Early Warning System (BREWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizurek, Grzegorz; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Wiszniowski, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Bucharest, with a population of approximately 2 million people, has suffered damage from earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone, which is located about 170 km from Bucharest, at a depth of 80-200 km. Consequently, an earthquake early warning system (Bucharest Rapid earthquake Early Warning System or BREWS) was constructed to provide some warning about impending shaking from large earthquakes in the Vrancea zone. In order to provide quick estimates of magnitude, seismic moment was first determined from P-waves and then a moment magnitude was determined from the moment. However, this magnitude may not be consistent with previous estimates of magnitude from the Romanian Seismic Network. This paper introduces the algorithm using P-wave spectral levels and compares them with catalog estimates. The testing procedure used waveforms from about 90 events with catalog magnitudes from 3.5 to 5.4. Corrections to the P-wave determined magnitudes according to dominant intermediate depth events mechanism were tested for November 22, 2014, M5.6 and October 17, M6 events. The corrections worked well, but unveiled overestimation of the average magnitude result of about 0.2 magnitude unit in the case of shallow depth event ( H < 60 km). The P-wave spectral approach allows for the relatively fast estimates of magnitude for use in BREWS. The average correction taking into account the most common focal mechanism for radiation pattern coefficient may lead to overestimation of the magnitude for shallow events of about 0.2 magnitude unit. However, in case of events of intermediate depth of M6 the resulting M w is underestimated at about 0.1-0.2. We conclude that our P-wave spectral approach is sufficiently robust for the needs of BREWS for both shallow and intermediate depth events.

  12. A Monte Carlo Method for Making the SDSS u-Band Magnitude More Accurate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiayin; Du, Cuihua; Zuo, Wenbo; Jing, Yingjie; Wu, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu

    2016-10-01

    We develop a new Monte Carlo-based method to convert the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u-band magnitude to the south Galactic Cap of the u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS) u-band magnitude. Due to the increased accuracy of SCUSS u-band measurements, the converted u-band magnitude becomes more accurate compared with the original SDSS u-band magnitude, in particular at the faint end. The average u-magnitude error (for both SDSS and SCUSS) of numerous main-sequence stars with 0.2\\lt g-r\\lt 0.8 increases as the g-band magnitude becomes fainter. When g = 19.5, the average magnitude error of the SDSS u is 0.11. When g = 20.5, the average SDSS u error rises to 0.22. However, at this magnitude, the average magnitude error of the SCUSS u is just half as much as that of the SDSS u. The SDSS u-band magnitudes of main-sequence stars with 0.2\\lt g-r\\lt 0.8 and 18.5\\lt g\\lt 20.5 are converted, therefore the maximum average error of the converted u-band magnitudes is 0.11. The potential application of this conversion is to derive a more accurate photometric metallicity calibration from SDSS observations, especially for the more distant stars. Thus, we can explore stellar metallicity distributions either in the Galactic halo or some stream stars.

  13. Optimized reversible binary-coded decimal adders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Glück, Robert

    2008-01-01

    their design. The optimized 1-decimal BCD full-adder, a 13 × 13 reversible logic circuit, is faster, and has lower circuit cost and less garbage bits. It can be used to build a fast reversible m-decimal BCD full-adder that has a delay of only m + 17 low-power reversible CMOS gates. For a 32-decimal (128-bit...... in reversible logic design by drastically reducing the number of garbage bits. Specialized designs benefit from support by reversible logic synthesis. All circuit components required for optimizing the original design could also be synthesized successfully by an implementation of an existing synthesis algorithm...

  14. Reversing invasion in bistable systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ebraheem O; Davidson, Fordyce A; Dodds, Niall

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss a class of bistable reaction-diffusion systems used to model the competitive interaction of two species. The interactions are assumed to be of classic "Lotka-Volterra" type and we will consider a particular problem with relevance to applications in population dynamics: essentially, we study under what conditions the interplay of relative motility (diffusion) and competitive strength can cause waves of invasion to be halted and reversed. By establishing rigorous results concerning related degenerate and near-degenerate systems, we build a picture of the dependence of the wave speed on system parameters. Our results lead us to conjecture that this class of competition model has three "zones of response". In the central zone, varying the motility can slow, halt and reverse invasion. However, in the two outer zones, the direction of invasion is independent of the relative motility and is entirely determined by the relative competitive strengths. Furthermore, we conjecture that for a large class of competition models of the type studied here, the wave speed is an increasing function of the relative motility.

  15. Reverse Genetic Approaches in Zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Huang; Zuoyan Zhu; Shuo Lin; Bo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a well-established vertebrate animal model.A comprehensive collection of reverse genetics tools has been developed for studying gene function in this useful organism.Morpholino is the most widely used reagent to knock down target gene expression post-transcriptionally.For a long time,targeted genome modification has been heavily relied on large-scale traditional forward genetic screens,such as ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis derived TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes)strategy and pseudo-typed retrovirus mediated insertional mutagenesis.Recently,engineered endonucleases,including ZFNs (zinc finger nucleases) and TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases),provide new and efficient strategies to directly generate sitespecific indel mutations by inducing double strand breaks in target genes.Here we summarize the major reverse genetic approaches for loss-of-function studies used and emerging in zebrafish,including strategies based on genome-wide mutagenesis and methods for sitespecific gene targeting.Future directions and expectations will also be discussed.

  16. Online Testable Decoder using Reversible Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha. K. N. Manjula B. B. Girija. S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The project proposes to design and test 2 to 4 reversible Decoder circuit with arbitrary number of gates to an online testable reversible one and is independent of the type of reversible gate used. The constructed circuit can detect any single bit errors and to convert a decoder circuit that is designed by reversible gates to an online testable reversible decoder circuit. Conventional digital circuits dissipate a significant amount of energy because bits of information are erased during the logic operations. Thus if logic gates are designed such that the information bits are not destroyed, the power consumption can be reduced. The information bits are not lost in case of a reversible computation. Reversible logic can be used to implement any Boolean logic function.

  17. The magnitude-frequency relationship of Andalusian region; La relacion magnitud-frecuencia para los estudios de riesgo sismico en Andalucia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justo Alpanes, J. L. de; Carrasco Romero, R.; Martin Martin, A. J.

    1999-08-01

    An usual procedure in seismic hazard studies is to associate the potential sources of earthquakes with relatively broad zones, called seismogenetic zones, with homogeneous seismic and tectonic characteristics. The process of tremors generation is, in each zone, homogeneous in space and time. Seventeen zones are supposed to affect the Andalusian region, associated with the main tectonic structures of the Ibero-Maghrebian region. Both log-linear and log-quadratic magnitude-frequency laws have been considered. This last relationship has usually a better fit with the magnitude data, although in some zones a linear relationship is clearly established. (Author) 9 refs.

  18. Dealing with Big Numbers: Representation and Understanding of Magnitudes outside of Human Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Ilyse; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Being able to estimate quantity is important in everyday life and for success in the STEM disciplines. However, people have difficulty reasoning about magnitudes outside of human perception (e.g., nanoseconds, geologic time). This study examines patterns of estimation errors across temporal and spatial magnitudes at large scales. We evaluated the…

  19. Involvement of Working Memory in Longitudinal Development of Number-Magnitude Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkman, Meijke E.; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Leseman, Paul P. M.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to connect numbers and magnitudes is an important prerequisite for math learning, here referred to as number-magnitude skills. It has been proposed that working memory plays an important role in constructing these connections. The aim of the current study was to examine if working memory accounts for constructing these connections by…

  20. THE RELATION BETWEEN MAGNITUDE AND FREQUENCY IN ROCKBURST AND ITS APPLICATION IN FORECASTIONG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘一山; 刘建军; 仲玉; 徐方军; 徐秉业; 关杰

    1998-01-01

    The rockburst data of Huafeng and Da'anshan Mine were analysised in this paper. From the statistical results, we know that the relation between magnitude and frequency in rockburst is linear. Using this relation, the maximum magnitude and tendency of rockburst can be predicted.The theory can improve the quantitive prediction level in rockburst.