WorldWideScience

Sample records for magnetopause current layer

  1. Variations in the magnetopause current layer

    Laakso, H. E.; Middleton, H. R.

    2017-12-01

    We use multi-point observations from the Cluster spacecraft to investigate the variations in the magnetopause current layer. With help of the curlometer technique one can determine the magnetopause current and its variability. Most of the time the magnetopause location is moving back and forth, so during any given pass the current layer is crossed several times. We use such crossings to investigate the characteristics of the current layer as the solar wind pressure varies (and the magnetopause moves accordingly). In addition we take an advantage of the ambient electron measurements from the EDI experiment which have been calibrated against the PEACE electron spectrometer data. These data can be used to detect fast variations of 1 keV electrons at resolution of 1-100 ms. Overall, Cluster observations are highly complimentary to the MMS observations due to the polar orbit of the Cluster spacecraft which provide fast vertical profiles of the magnetopause current layer.

  2. Structure of the magnetopause current layer at the subsolar point

    Okuda, H.

    1991-12-01

    A one-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation model developed for the magnetopause current layer between the shocked solar wind and the dipole magnetic field at the subsolar point has been extended to include the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the solar wind. Interaction of the solar wind with the vacuum dipole field as well as the dipole field filled with a low density magnetospheric plasma are studied. It is found that the width and the structure of the magnetopause current layer differ markedly depending on the direction of the IMF. When the IMF is pointing southward, the current layer between the solar wind and the dipole field is narrow and the magnetic field has a single ramp structure caused by the reflection of the solar wind at that point. The current layer becomes several times wider and the magnetic field developes a multiple ramp structure when the IMF is northward. This broadening of the current layer is caused by the multiple reflection of the solar wind by the magnetic field. For the northward IMF, the magnetic field does not change its sign across the current layer so that the E x B drift of the solar wind electrons remains the same direction while for the southward IMF, it reverses the sign. This results in a single reflection of the solar wind for the southward IMF and multiple reflections for the northward IMF. When a low density mangetospheric plasma is present in the dipole magnetic field, a small fraction of the solar wind ions are found to penetrate into the dipole magnetic field beyond the reflection point of the solar wind electrons. The width of the ion current layer is of the order of the solar wind ion gyroradius, however, the current associated with the ions remains much smaller than the electron current so long as the density of the magnetospheric plasma is much smaller than the density of the solar wind. Comparisons of our simulation results with the magnetopause crossing near the subsolar point are provided

  3. Ion Demagnetization in the Magnetopause Current Layer Observed by MMS

    Wang, Shan; Chen, Li-Jen; Hesse, Michael; Gershman, Daniel J.; Dorelli, John; Giles, Barbara; Torbert, Roy B.; Pollock, Craig J.; Lavraud, Benoit; Strangeway, Robert; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report ion velocity distribution functions (VDfs) observed by Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) and present evidence for demagnetized ion Speiser motion during magnetopause reconnection. The demagnetization is observed in the vicinity of the X llne, as well as near the current sheet midlplane about tens of ion skin depths (d(sub 1)) away from the X line. Close to the X line before the outflow is built up, the VDFs are elongated, and the elongated part of VDFs rotates from the out-of-plane current direction toward the outflow directions downstream from the X line. Farther downstream, demagnetized ions exhibit a characteristic half-ring structure in the VDFs, as a result of the mixture of ions that have experienced different amounts of cyclotron turning around the magnetic field normal to the current sheet. Signatures of acceleration by electric fields are more pronounced in the VDFs near the X line than downstream.

  4. Numerical simulation of the subsolar magnetopause current layer in the sun-earth meridian plane

    Okuda, H.

    1993-01-01

    The formation and stability of the magnetopause current layer near the subsolar point in the sun-earth meridian plane are examined using a 2D electromagnetic particle simulation. For the case of zero IMF, the simulation results show that the current layer remains stable and is essentially the same as in the 1D simulation. The width of the current layer is given by the electron-ion hybrid gyroradius which is much smaller than the ion gyroradius. The current layer is found to remain stable for the northward IMF as well. As in the 1D simulation, the jump of the magnetic field at the current layer for the northward IMF remains small. For the southward IMF, collisionless magnetic reconnection is found to develop, leading to the formation of magnetic islands and density peaking within the current layer.

  5. Theory and observations of upward field-aligned currents at the magnetopause boundary layer.

    Wing, Simon; Johnson, Jay R

    2015-11-16

    The dependence of the upward field-aligned current density ( J ‖ ) at the dayside magnetopause boundary layer is well described by a simple analytic model based on a velocity shear generator. A previous observational survey confirmed that the scaling properties predicted by the analytical model are applicable between 11 and 17 MLT. We utilize the analytic model to predict field-aligned currents using solar wind and ionospheric parameters and compare with direct observations. The calculated and observed parallel currents are in excellent agreement, suggesting that the model may be useful to infer boundary layer structures. However, near noon, where velocity shear is small, the kinetic pressure gradients and thermal currents, which are not included in the model, could make a small but significant contribution to J ‖ . Excluding data from noon, our least squares fit returns log( J ‖,max_cal ) = (0.96 ± 0.04) log( J ‖_obs ) + (0.03 ± 0.01) where J ‖,max_cal = calculated J ‖,max and J ‖_obs = observed J ‖ .

  6. Characteristics of the magnetospheric boundary layer and magnetopause layer as observed by Imp 6

    Eastman, T.E.; Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Imp 6 observations of the low-latitude magnetospheric boundary layer indicate that the plasma within it is supplied primarily by direct entry of magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause layer. We define the magnetopause layer as the current layer (separating the magnetosheath from the boundary layer) through which the magnetic field shifts in direction. High temporal resolution (3-s average) data reveal that in a majority of Imp 6 magnetopause crossing, no distinct changes in electron density or energry spectra are observed at the magne opause layer. In all Imp 6 crossings, some magnetosheathlike plasma is observed earthward of the magnetopause layer, implying the existence of a boundary layer. Boundary layer electron energy spectra are often virtually indistinguishable from the adjacent magnetosheath spectra. Low-latitude boundary layer bulk plasma flow as observed by Imp 6 almost always has an antisunward component and often has a significant cross-field component. The boundary layer thickness is highly variable and is generally much larger than the magnetopause layer thickness. Energetic electron pitch angle distributions indicate that the low-latitude boundary layers is normally on closed field lines. We conclude that diffusive as well as nondiffusive processes probably contribute to the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the boundary layer

  7. Diffusion processes in the magnetopause boundary layer

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Thorne, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Anomalous cross-field diffusion of magnetosheath ions and electrons is a direct consequence of cyclotron-resonant scattering by electrostatic and electromagnetic emissions which are continuously present within the magnetopause boundary layer. Expressions for the rate of cross-field diffusion involving either type of wave are developed and expressed in terms of the absolute upper limit referred to as Bohm diffusion. For the typical average intensity of waves observed in the boundary layer, resonant electron cross-field diffusion is always insignificant. However, magnetosheath ions, resonant with low frequency electrostatic waves, may be transported inward at a rate approaching one tenth the Bohm rate (D/sub perpendiculartsperpendicular/roughly-equal10 3 km 2 /s). While this is not the only mechanism capable of explaining the presence of the low latitude boundary layer it is adequate to account for the typical boundary layer thickness and it should occur at all local times and under all interplanetary conditions. It consequently provides a continuous mechanism for significant mass and momentum transfer across the magnetopause under conditions when field merging is inoperative

  8. Characterization of Alfvenic fluctuations in the magnetopause boundary layer

    Rezeau, L.; Morane, A.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.; Schmidt, R.

    1989-01-01

    The European Space Agency GEOS 2 spacecraft happened to cross the magnetopause several times, at various local times. Intense electric and magnetic fluctuations, in the ultralow-frequency (ULF) range (0-10 Hz) have been detected during each such crossing, with a peak at the magnetopause and still large amplitudes in the adjacent magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layer. By applying spectral analysis and correlations to the electric and magnetic fluctuations, and a minimum variance analysis to the magnetic fluctuations, the authors investigate the nature of these fluctuations which appear as short-lasting bursts in the spacecraft frame. Having reviewed possible interpretations, they show that the observed electric and magnetic signatures are consistent with small-scale (L ∼ ion Larmor radius) Alfvenic field-aligned structures passing by the spacecraft at high speed. It is suggested that these structures correspond to nonlinear Alfvenic structures

  9. Global Hybrid Simulations of The Magnetopause Boundary Layers In Low- and High-latitude Magnetic Reconnections

    Lin, Y.; Perez, J. D.

    A 2-D global hybrid simulation is carried out to study the structure of the dayside mag- netopause in the noon-midnight meridian plane associated with magnetic reconnec- tion. In the simulation the bow shock, magnetosheath, and magnetopause are formed self-consistently by supersonic solar wind passing the geomagnetic field. The recon- nection events at high- and low-latitudes are simulated for various IMF conditions. The following results will be presented. (1) Large-amplitude rotational discontinuities and Alfvén waves are present in the quasi-steady reconnection layer. (2) The rotational discontinuity possesses an electron sense, or right-hand polarization in the magnetic field as the discontinuity forms from the X line. Later, however, the rotational dis- continuity tends to evolve to a structure with a smallest field rotational angle and thus may reverse its sense of the field rotation. The Walén relation is tested for elec- tron and ion flows in the magnetopause rotational discontinuities with left-hand and right-hand polarizations. (3) The structure of the magnetopause discontinuities and that of the accelerated/decelerated flows are modified significantly by the presence of the local magnetosheath flow. (4) Field-aligned currents are generated in the magne- topause rotational discontinuities. Part of the magnetopause currents propagate with Alfvén waves along the field lines into the polar ionosphere, contributing to the field- aligned current system in the high latitudes. The generation of the parallel currents under northward and southward IMF conditions is investigated. (5) Finally, typical ion velocity distributions will be shown at various locations across the magnetopause northward and southward of the X lines. The ion distributions associated with single or multiple X lines will be discussed.

  10. Statistical survey of day-side magnetospheric current flow using Cluster observations: magnetopause

    E. Liebert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical survey of current structures observed by the Cluster spacecraft at high-latitude day-side magnetopause encounters in the close vicinity of the polar cusps. Making use of the curlometer technique and the fluxgate magnetometer data, we calculate the 3-D current densities and investigate the magnetopause current direction, location, and magnitude during varying solar wind conditions. We find that the orientation of the day-side current structures is in accordance with existing magnetopause current models. Based on the ambient plasma properties, we distinguish five different transition regions at the magnetopause surface and observe distinctive current properties for each region. Additionally, we find that the location of currents varies with respect to the onset of the changes in the plasma environment during magnetopause crossings.

  11. Method for confining the magnetic field of the cross-tail current inside the magnetopause

    Sotirelis, T.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Stern, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented for analytically representing the magnetic field due to the cross-tail current and its closure on the magnetopause. It is an extension of a method used by Tsyganenko (1989b) to confine the dipole field inside an ellipsoidal magnetopause using a scalar potential. Given a model of the cross-tail current, the implied net magnetic field is obtained by adding to the cross-tail current field a potential field B = - del gamma, which makes all field lines divide into two disjoint groups, separated by the magnetopause (i.e., the combined field is made to have zero normal component with the magnetopause). The magnetopause is assumed to be an ellipsoid of revolution (a prolate spheroid) as an approximation to observations (Sibeck et al., 1991). This assumption permits the potential gamma to be expressed in spheroidal coordinates, expanded in spheroidal harmonics and its terms evaluated by performing inversion integrals. Finally, the field outside the magnetopause is replaced by zero, resulting in a consistent current closure along the magnetopause. This procedure can also be used to confine the modeled field of any other interior magnetic source, though the model current must always flow in closed circuits. The method is demonstrated on the T87 cross-tail current, examples illustrate the effect of changing the size and shape of the prescribed magnetopause and a comparison is made to an independent numerical scheme based on the Biot-Savart equation.

  12. HEOS-2 observations of the boundary layer from the magnetopause to the ionosphere

    Formisano, V.

    1980-01-01

    HEOS-2 low energy electron data (10 eV - 3.7 keV) from the LPS Frascati plasma experiment have been used to identify three different magnetospheric electron populations. Magnetosheath-like electron energy spectra (35-50 eV) are characteristic of the plasma mantle, entry layer and cusps from the magnetopause down to 2-3 Rsub(E). Plasma sheet electrons (energy > 1 keV) are found at all local times, with strong intensities in the early morning quadrant and weaker intensities in the afternoon quadrant. The plasma sheet shows a well defined inner edge at all local times and latitudes, the inner edge coinciding probably with the plasmapause. The plasma sheet does not reach the magnetopause, but it is separated from it by a boundary layer electron population that is very distinct from the other two electron populations, most electrons having energies 100-300 eV. These three electron populations are mapped from the magnetopause down to the high latitude near earth regions. The boundary layer extends along the magnetopause up to 5-7 Rsub(E) above the equator; at higher latitudes it follows the magnetic lines of force and it is found closer and closer to the earth. (author)

  13. Coupling of magnetopause-boundary layer to the polar ionosphere

    Wei, C.Q.; Lee, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors develop a model which seeks to explain ultraviolet auroral images from the Viking satellite which show periodic bright regions which resemble open-quotes beadsclose quotes or open-quotes pearlsclose quotes aligned along the postnoon auroral oval. ULF geomagnetic pulsations observed in the cusp region are also addressed by this model. The model addresses plasma dynamics in the low-latitude boundary layer and interactions with the polar ionosphere by means of field-aligned current. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can develop in the presence of driven plasma flow, which can lead to the formation and growth of plasma vortices in the boundary layer. The finite conductivity of the earth ionosphere causes these vortices to decay. However regions of enhanced field-aligned power density in the postnoon auroral oval can be associated with field-aligned current filaments and boundary layer vortices. These structures may explain the observed bright spots. The authors also discuss the frequency spectrum and the polarization state of the pulsations

  14. Thick Escaping Magnetospheric Ion Layer in Magnetopause Reconnection with MMS Observations

    Nagai, T.; Kitamura, N.; Hasagawa, H.; Shinohara, I.; Yokota, S.; Saito, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Moore, T. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The structure of asymmetric magnetopause reconnection is explored with multiple point and high-time-resolution ion velocity distribution observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. On 9 September 2015, reconnection took place at the magnetopause, which separated the magnetosheath and the magnetosphere with a density ratio of 25:2. The magnetic field intensity was rather constant, even higher in the asymptotic magnetosheath. The reconnected field line region had a width of approximately 540 km. In this region, streaming and gyrating ions are discriminated. The large extension of the reconnected field line region toward the magnetosheath can be identified where a thick layer of escaping magnetospheric ions was formed. The scale of the magnetosheath side of the reconnected field line region relative to the scale of its magnetospheric side was 4.5:1.

  15. Electrons in the boundary layers near the dayside magnetopause

    Hall, D.S.; Chaloner, C.P.; Bryant, D.A.; Lepine, D.R.; Tritakis, V.P.

    1990-10-01

    Entry of heated solar-wind plasma into the magnetosphere is examined using electron distributions. In particular, the angular structure of the electron distributions is studied within the transition region separating the magnetosheath from the inner magnetosphere. The measurements suggest that electrons in the outer part of the transition region originate in the magnetosheath, whilst the population closer to the Earth consists of electrons from the magnetosphere combined with an energized magnetosheath component. This energized component contains ''counterstreaming'' electrons, which are confined to directions closely parallel and anti-parallel to the magnetic field direction. The possibilities, that the energization of the counterstreaming electrons is cumulatively gained from either waves, electric fields perpendicular to the magnetic field, or quasi-Fermi acceleration, are discussed. It is not possible to identify the topology of the magnetic fields of the outer part of the region, but there is strong evidence that the inner part is on closed magnetic field lines, which map to the dayside auroral zone. The outer part of the transition region is a plasma depletion/magnetic-field compression layer. The structure of the transition region is similar to that surrounding flux transfer events, which leads to the deduction that the plasma and field signatures of flux transfer events may be the result of displacement of the transition region earthwards. Cases where the displacement is such that the field maximum of the depletion/compression region is encountered, may well explain ''crater'' flux transfer event signatures. (author)

  16. Inductive electric field at the magnetopause

    Heikkila, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The electric field data for two crossings of the magnetopause by ISEE-1 on November 20, 1977, have been analyzed with high time resolution. In both cases the electric field has a negative dawn-dusk component in the boundary layer, so it must reverse somewhere within the current layer to the positive value outside. If there is a component parallel to the moving magnetopause current it is small, and by no means obvious. In the case of the exit crossing from the boundary layer to the magnetosheath the data show that the electric field vector is turning for about two seconds at roughly the satellite spin rate; this changing direction suggests that the electric field has a curl. Such a curl could be caused by a travelling localized perturbation of the magnetopause surface current associated with impulsive plasma transport through the magnetopause

  17. Polar spacecraft observations of the turbulent outer cusp/magnetopause boundary layer of Earth

    J. S. Pickett

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The orbit of the Polar spacecraft has been ideally suited for studying the turbulent region of the cusp that is located near or just outside the magnetopause current sheet at 7-9 RE. The wave data obtained in this region show that electromagnetic turbulence is dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz. The waves responsible for this turbulence usually propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and have an index of refraction that generally falls between the estimated cold plasma theoretical values of the electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler modes and may be composed of both modes in concert with kinetic Alfvén waves and/or fast magnetosonic waves. Fourier spectra of the higher frequency wave data also show the electromagnetic turbulence at frequencies up to and near the electron cyclotron frequency. This higher frequency electromagnetic turbulence is most likely associated with whistler mode waves. The lower hybrid drift and current gradient instabilities are suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the turbulence. The plasma and field environment of this turbulent region is examined and found to be extremely complex. Some of the wave activity is associated with processes occurring locally, such as changes in the DC magnetic field, while others are associated with solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field changes.

  18. Polar Spacecraft Observations of the Turbulent Outer Cusp/Magnetopause Boundary Layer of Earth

    Pickett, J. S.; Menietti, J. D.; Dowell, J. H.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scudder, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The orbit of the Polar spacecraft has been ideally suited for studying the turbulent region of the cusp that is located near or just outside the magnetopause current sheet at 7-9 R(sub E). The wave data obtained in this region show that electromagnetic turbulence is dominant in the frequency range 1-10 Hz. The waves responsible for this turbulence usually propagate perpendicular to the local magnetic field and have an index of refraction that generally falls between the estimated cold plasma theoretical values of the electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler modes and may be composed of both modes in concert with kinetic Alfven waves and/or fast magnetosonic waves. Fourier spectra of the higher frequency wave data also show the electromagnetic turbulence at frequencies up to and near the electron cyclotron frequency. This higher frequency electromagnetic turbulence is most likely associated with whistler mode waves. The lower hybrid drift and current gradient instabilities are suggested as possible mechanisms for producing the turbulence. The plasma and field environment of this turbulent region is examined and found to be extremely complex. Some of the wave activity is associated with processes occurring locally, such as changes in the DC magnetic field, while others are associated with solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field changes.

  19. ISEE observations of the magnetopause: Reconnection and the energy balance

    Paschmann, G.; Papamastorakis, I.; Sckopke, N.; Sonnerup, B.U.O.; Bame, S.J.; Russell, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    According to the usual magnetopause reconnection model, plasma flows across the magnetopause current sheet, which is a rotational discontinuity with a nonzero normal magnetic field component B/sub n/, from the magnetosheath into the magnetospheric boundary layer. As the plasma crosses the sheet, which has net current I, it is accelerated by the I x B/sub n/ force and flows toward the poles with speeds up to twice the Alfven speed

  20. Energetic particle observations at the subsolar magnetopause

    A. A. Eccles

    Full Text Available The pitch-angle distributions (PAD of energetic particles are examined as the ISEE-1 satellite crosses the Earth’s magnetopause near the subsolar point. The investigation focuses on the possible existence of a particular type of distribution that would be associated with a source of energetic particles in the high-latitude magnetosphere. PADs, demonstrating broad, persistent field-aligned fluxes filling a single hemisphere (upper/northern or lower/southern, were observed just sunward of the magnetopause current layer for an extended period of many minutes. These distributions are a direct prediction of a possible source of energetic particles located in the high altitude dayside cusp and we present five examples in detail of the three-dimensional particle distributions to demonstrate their existence. From these results, other possible causes of such PADs are examined.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating; magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  1. Ion distributions at the dayside magnetopause

    Smith, M.F.; Rodgers, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present ion phase space distributions, from the AMPTE UKS ion instrument, for a crossing of the dayside magnetopause on October 2, 1984, during typical southward IMF conditions. They observed D-shaped field-aligned phase space distributions of magnetosheath plasma earthward of and hot magnetospheric ions sunward of the magnetopause current layer. The existence of such D-shaped magnetosheath plasma distributions has been predicted as a signature of reconnection. In addition, the observed ion distributions are in stress balance across the magnetopause, and the de Hoffman-Teller frame velocity obtained from the stress balance calculation is in agreement with the observed distribution function cutoff speed. These new observations thus provide further evidence that, at least for southward IMF conditions, reconnection is an important mechanism by which solar wind plasma penetrates into the magnetosphere

  2. ISEE-magnetopause observations - workshop results

    Paschmann, G.

    1982-01-01

    A brief history of ISEE magnetopause workshops held during 1977-1981 is presented, and an assessment of the activity of these workshops is made. Workshop results are surveyed, with attention given to magnetopause thickness and speed, large-scale reconnection, small-scale reconnection, magnetic field topology, plasma waves, boundary layer structure, surface waves, plasma origin, and the relationship between magnetopause and particle boundaries. Finally, a few topics that require particular attention in the future are mentioned

  3. Auroral and magnetic variations in the polar cusp and cleft. Signatures of magnetopause boundary layer dynamics

    Sandholt, P.E.; Egeland, A.

    1987-10-01

    By combining continous ground-based observations of polar cleft/cusp auroras and local magnetic variations with electromagnetic parameters obtained from satellites in polar orbit (low-altitude cleft/cusp) and in the magnetosheath/interplanetary space, different electrodynamic processes in the polar cleft/cusp have been investigated. One of the more controversial questions in this field is related to the observed shifts in latitude of cleft/cusp auroras and the relationships with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation, local magnetic disturbances (DP2 and DPY modes) and magnetospheric substorms. A new approach which may contribute to clarifying these complicated relationships, simultaneous groundbased observations of the midday and evening-midnight sectors of the auroral oval, is illustrated. A related topic is the spatial relationship between the cleft/cusp auroras and the ionospheric convection currents. A characteristic feature of the polar cusp and cleft regions during negative IMF B z is repeated occurrence of certain short-lived auroral structures moving in accordance with the local convection pattern. Satellite measurements of particle precipitation, magnetic field and ion drift components permit detailed investigations of the electrodynamics of these cusp/cleft structures. Information on electric field components, Birkeland currents, Poynting flux, height-integrated Pedersen conductivity and Joule heat dissipation rate has been derived. These observations are discussed in relation to existing models of temporal plasma injections from the magnetosheath

  4. Azimuthal magnetic fields in Saturn’s magnetosphere: effects associated with plasma sub-corotation and the magnetopause-tail current system

    E. J. Bunce

    Full Text Available We calculate the azimuthal magnetic fields expected to be present in Saturn’s magnetosphere associated with two physical effects, and compare them with the fields observed during the flybys of the two Voyager spacecraft. The first effect is associated with the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents which result from the sub-corotation of the magnetospheric plasma. This is calculated from empirical models of the plasma flow and magnetic field based on Voyager data, with the effective Pedersen conductivity of Saturn’s ionosphere being treated as an essentially free parameter. This mechanism results in a ‘lagging’ field configuration at all local times. The second effect is due to the day-night asymmetric confinement of the magnetosphere by the solar wind (i.e. the magnetopause and tail current system, which we have estimated empirically by scaling a model of the Earth’s magnetosphere to Saturn. This effect produces ‘leading’ fields in the dusk magnetosphere, and ‘lagging’ fields at dawn. Our results show that the azimuthal fields observed in the inner regions can be reasonably well accounted for by plasma sub-corotation, given a value of the effective ionospheric Pedersen conductivity of ~ 1–2 mho. This statement applies to field lines mapping to the equator within ~ 8 RS (1 RS is taken to be 60 330 km of the planet on the dayside inbound passes, where the plasma distribution is dominated by a thin equatorial heavy-ion plasma sheet, and to field lines mapping to the equator within ~ 15 RS on the dawn side outbound passes. The contributions of the magnetopause-tail currents are estimated to be much smaller than the observed fields in these regions. If, however, we assume that the azimuthal fields observed in these regions are not due to sub-corotation but to some other process, then the above effective conductivities define an upper limit, such that values above ~ 2 mho can definitely be

  5. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  6. Comment on Lockwood and Davis, "On the longitudinal extent of magnetopause reconnection pulses"

    W. J. Heikkila

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Lockwood and Davis (1996 present a concise description of magnetopause reconnection pulses, with the claimed support of three types of observations: (1 flux transfer events (FTE, (2 poleward-moving auroral forms on the dayside, and (3 steps in cusp ion dispersion characteristics. However, there are a number of errors and misconceptions in the paper that make their conclusions untenable. They do not properly take account of the fact that the relevant processes operate in the presence of a plasma. They fail to notice that the source of energy (a dynamo with E · J<0 must be close to the region of dissipation (the electrical load with E · J>0 in transient phenomena, since energy (or information cannot travel faster than the group velocity of waves in the medium (here the Alfvén velocity VA. In short, Lockwood and Davis use the wrong contour in their attempt to evaluate the electromotive force (emf. This criticism goes beyond their article: a dynamo is not included in the usual definition of reconnection, only the reconnection load. Without an explicit source of energy in the assumed model, the idea of magnetic reconnection is improperly posed. Recent research has carried out a superposed epoch analysis of conditions near the dayside magnetopause and has found the dynamo and the load, both within the magnetopause current sheet. Since the magnetopause current is from dawn to dusk, the sign of E · J reflects the sign of the electric field. The electric field reverses, within the magnetopause; this can be discovered by an application of Lenz's law using the concept of erosion of the magnetopause. The net result is plasma transfer across the magnetopause to feed the low latitude boundary layer, at least partly on closed field lines, and viscous interaction as the mechanism by which solar wind plasma couples to the magnetosphere.

  7. Four-spacecraft determination of magnetopause orientation, motion and thickness: comparison with results from single-spacecraft methods

    S. E. Haaland

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we use Cluster data from one magnetopause event on 5 July 2001 to compare predictions from various methods for determination of the velocity, orientation, and thickness of the magnetopause current layer. We employ established as well as new multi-spacecraft techniques, in which time differences between the crossings by the four spacecraft, along with the duration of each crossing, are used to calculate magnetopause speed, normal vector, and width. The timing is based on data from either the Cluster Magnetic Field Experiment (FGM or the Electric Field Experiment (EFW instruments. The multi-spacecraft results are compared with those derived from various single-spacecraft techniques, including minimum-variance analysis of the magnetic field and deHoffmann-Teller, as well as Minimum-Faraday-Residue analysis of plasma velocities and magnetic fields measured during the crossings. In order to improve the overall consistency between multi- and single-spacecraft results, we have also explored the use of hybrid techniques, in which timing information from the four spacecraft is combined with certain limited results from single-spacecraft methods, the remaining results being left for consistency checks. The results show good agreement between magnetopause orientations derived from appropriately chosen single-spacecraft techniques and those obtained from multi-spacecraft timing. The agreement between magnetopause speeds derived from single- and multi-spacecraft methods is quantitatively somewhat less good but it is evident that the speed can change substantially from one crossing to the next within an event. The magnetopause thickness varied substantially from one crossing to the next, within an event. It ranged from 5 to 10 ion gyroradii. The density profile was sharper than the magnetic profile: most of the density change occured in the earthward half of the magnetopause.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and

  8. Particle signatures of magnetic topology at the magnetopause: AMPTE/CCE observations

    Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Onsager, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Electron distributions at energies above 50 eV have been found to be a sensitive indicator of magnetic topology for magnetopause crossings of the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft. Progressing from the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere two abrupt transitions occur. First, the magnetosheath electron population directed either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field is replaced by a streaming, heated magnetosheath electron population. The other half of the distribution is unchanged. The region with unidirectional, heated magnetosheath electrons is identified as the magnetosheath boundary layer (MSBL). Second, the unheated magnetosheath electron population is replaced by a heated population nearly identical to the population encountered in the MSBL, resulting in a symmetric counterstreaming distribution. The region populated by the bidirectional heated magnetosheath electrons is identified as the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL). The MSBL and LLBL identified by the electron transitions are the same as the regions identified using ion composition measurements. The magnetosheath-MSBL transition reflects a change in magnetic topology from a solar wind field line to one that threads the magnetopause, and the existence of a magnetosheath-MSBL transition implies that the magnetopause is open. When the current layer is easily identified, the MSBL-LLBL transition coincides with the magnetopause current layer, indicating that the magnetosheath electrons are heated in the current layer. Both magnetosheath-MSBL and MSBL-LLBL transitions are observed for low as well as high magnetic shears. Moreover, the transitions are particularly clear for low shear implying that magnetic topology boundaries are sharp even when abrupt changes in the field and other plasma parameters are absent. Furthermore, for low magnetic shear, solar wind ions with low parallel drift speeds make up the majority of the LLBL population indicating that the magnetosheath plasma has convected directly across the

  9. Evidence for magnetic field reconnection at the earth's magnetopause

    Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Paschmann, G.; Papamastorakis, I.; Sckopke, N.; Haerendel, G.; Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Gosling, J. T.; Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    Eleven Northern Hemisphere crossings of the dayside magnetopause by the ISEE spacecraft are examined to test the hypothesis that the large plasma flow speeds observed in the magnetopause and boundary layer are the result of the plasma acceleration intrinsic to the magnetic field reconnection process. In several cases energetic magnetospheric particles with the proper flow anisotropy, and in one case, reflected magnetosheath particles, were observed outside the magnetopause but adjacent to it. All results support the reconnection hypothesis. The energetic particles were also used to identify the outer separatrix surface, in one case of which is was possible to conclude from its location relative to the magnetopause that the reconnection site was in the vicinity of the equatorial plane rather than in the cusp. The electric field tangential to the magnetopause is inferred to be in the 0.4-2.8 mV/m range.

  10. Collisionless tearing mode reconnection at the dayside magnetopause of the earth's magnetosphere

    Quest, K.B.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to determine if the collisionless tearing mode, a plasma instability, is a viable mechanism for interconnecting field lines at the dayside magnetopause. More generally, it was wished to test theoretically the assertion that collisionless tearing is a probable first step in cosmical reconnection. The procedure was to model the magnetopause as a local one-dimensional Vlasov equilibrium, and then calculate the linear and nonlinear stability properties of tearing and tearing-like oscillations. Quantitative estimates of the range of plasma parameter space over which significant growth occurs were obtained. Assuming that significant tearing mode growth implies significant reconnection, conditions were determined for which tearing will be important to dayside reconnection. Linearly it was found that the growth rate is relatively insensitive to the temperature of the species, but depends sensitively on (1) the thickness of the magnetopause current, (2) the number density at the location of the singular layer, and (3) the magnitude of the magnetic shear. For significant linear growth the magnetopause half-sheet thickness was required to be on the order of or less than a thermal ion gyroradius, the number density was required to be no more than 100 cm - 3 , and the magnetosheath field was required to be locally antialigned with the magnetospheric field. If the above conditions are met, which are stringent but not impossible, the mode will linearly amplify. Another topic examined is the question of the structure of the tearing eigenmodes at the dayside magnetopause. By considering finite transit time effects on electron Landau resonance it was concluded that magnetopause tearing turbulence probably occurs in spatially bounded wave packets

  11. Reconnection at the earth's magnetopause - Magnetic field observations and flux transfer events

    Russell, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical models of plasma acceleration by magnetic-field-line reconnection at the earth magnetopause and the high-resolution three-dimensional plasma measurements obtained with the ISEE satellites are compared and illustrated with diagrams, graphs, drawings, and histograms. The history of reconnection theory and the results of early satellite observations are summarized; the thickness of the magnetopause current layer is discussed; problems in analyzing the polarization of current-layer rotation are considered; and the flux-transfer events responsible for periods of patchy reconnection are characterized in detail. The need for further observations and refinements of the theory to explain the initiation of reconnection and identify the mechanism determining whether it is patchy or steady-state is indicated.

  12. Coordinated polar spacecraft, geosynchronous spacecraft, and ground-based observations of magnetopause processes and their coupling to the ionosphere

    G. Le

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present in-situ observations of processes occurring at the magnetopause and vicinity, including surface waves, oscillatory magnetospheric field lines, and flux transfer events, and coordinated observations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft, and on the ground by CANOPUS and 210° Magnetic Meridian (210MM magnetometer arrays. On 7 February 2002, during a high-speed solar wind stream, the Polar spacecraft was skimming the magnetopause in a post-noon meridian plane for ~3h. During this interval, it made two short excursions and a few partial crossings into the magnetosheath and observed quasi-periodic cold ion bursts in the region adjacent to the magnetopause current layer. The multiple magnetopause crossings, as well as the velocity of the cold ion bursts, indicate that the magnetopause was oscillating with an ~6-min period. Simultaneous observations of Pc5 waves at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES spacecraft and on the ground by the CANOPUS magnetometer array reveal that these magnetospheric pulsations were forced oscillations of magnetic field lines directly driven by the magnetopause oscillations. The magnetospheric pulsations occurred only in a limited longitudinal region in the post-noon dayside sector, and were not a global phenomenon, as one would expect for global field line resonance. Thus, the magnetopause oscillations at the source were also limited to a localized region spanning ~4h in local time. These observations suggest that it is unlikely that the Kelvin-Helmholz instability and/or fluctuations in the solar wind dynamic pressure were the direct driving mechanisms for the observed boundary oscillations. Instead, the likely mechanism for the localized boundary oscillations was pulsed reconnection at the magnetopause occurring along the X-line extending over the same 4-h region. The Pc5 band pressure fluctuations commonly seen in high-speed solar wind streams may modulate the reconnection rate as an

  13. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    J. M. Bosqued

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of relevant CIS plasma

  14. Cluster observations of the high-latitude magnetopause and cusp: initial results from the CIS ion instruments

    J. M. Bosqued

    Full Text Available Launched on an elliptical high inclination orbit (apogee: 19.6 RE since January 2001 the Cluster satellites have been conducting the first detailed three-dimensional studies of the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere, including the exterior cusp, neighbouring boundary layers and magnetopause regions. Cluster satellites carry the CIS ion spectrometers that provide high-precision, 3D distributions of low-energy (<35 keV/e ions every 4 s. This paper presents the first two observations of the cusp and/or magnetopause behaviour made under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. Flow directions, 3D distribution functions, density profiles and ion composition profiles are analyzed to demonstrate the high variability of high-latitude regions. In the first crossing analyzed (26 January 2001, dusk side, IMF-BZ < 0, multiple, isolated boundary layer, magnetopause and magnetosheath encounters clearly occurred on a quasi-steady basis for ~ 2 hours. CIS ion instruments show systematic accelerated flows in the current layer and adjacent boundary layers on the Earthward side of the magnetopause. Multi-point analysis of the magnetopause, combining magnetic and plasma data from the four Cluster spacecraft, demonstrates that oscillatory outward-inward motions occur with a normal speed of the order of ± 40 km/s; the thickness of the high-latitude current layer is evaluated to be of the order of 900–1000 km. Alfvénic accelerated flows and D-shaped distributions are convincing signatures of a magnetic reconnection occurring equatorward of the Cluster satellites. Moreover, the internal magnetic and plasma structure of a flux transfer event (FTE is analyzed in detail; its size along the magnetopause surface is ~ 12 000 km and it convects with a velocity of ~ 200 km/s. The second event analyzed (2 February 2001 corresponds to the first Cluster pass within the cusp when the IMF-BZ component was northward directed. The analysis of

  15. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the magnetopause

    Kivelson, M.G.; California Univ., Los Angeles; Pu, Z.-Y.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions for the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) waves on the magnetopause have been known for more than 15 years; more recently, spacecraft observations have stimulated further examination of the properties of K-H waves. For a magnetopause with no boundary layer, two different modes of surface waves have been identified and their properties have been investigated for various assumed orientations of magnetic field and flow velocity vectors. The power radiated into the magnetosphere from the velocity shear at the boundary has been estimated. Other calculations have focused on the consequences of finite thickness boundary layers, both uniform and non-uniform. The boundary layer is found to modify the wave modes present at the magnetopause and to yield a criterion for the wavelength of the fastest growing surface waves. The paper concludes by questioning the extent to which the inferences from boundary layer models are model dependent and identifies areas where further work is needed or anticipated. (author)

  16. Turbulent current layer equilibrium and current layer of the Earth magnetotail

    Antonova, E.E.; Ovchinnikov, I.L.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of distribution of plasma and magnetic field concentration in the unidimensional current layer under the condition of equality of the current inflowing into the layer and the counter diffusion current by various dependences of the regular velocity and the turbulent diffusion coefficient on the magnetic field. Corresponding two-dimensional solutions are obtained in the tail approximation. Comparison of the model turbulent current layer with characteristics of the plasma layer of the Earth magnetosphere tail is carried out. 16 refs., 3 figs

  17. Dynamics and local boundary properties of the dawn-side magnetopause under conditions observed by Equator-S

    M. W. Dunlop

    are analysed to confirm boundary orientation and motion. These further show evidence of an anti-sunward moving depression on the magnetopause (which is much smaller at Equator-S. The Tsyganenko model field is used routinely to assist in categorising the crossings and some comparison of models is carried out. We note that typically the T87 model fits the data better than the T89 model during conditions of low to intermediate KP index near the magnetopause and also near the dawn-side tail current sheet in the dawnside region.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; magnetosheath; magneto- spheric configuration and dynamics.

  18. Surface waves on the tailward flanks of the Earth's magnetopause

    Seon, J.; Frank, L. A.; Lazarus, A. J.; Lepping, R. P.

    1995-01-01

    Forty-three examples of ISEE 1 tailward flank side magnetopause crossings are examined and directly compared with upstream solar wind parameters. The crossings are classified into two groups. In the first group, a few sudden magnetopause crossings are observed, whereas repeated magnetopause crossings and oscillatory motions, often with boundary layer signatures, are observed in the second group. These distinctive characteristics of the two groups are interpreted in terms of the surface waves due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. It is found that low solar wind speed tends to favor characteristics of the first group, whereas high solar wind speed yields those of the second group. However, no evident correlations between the groups and the interplanetary magnetic field directions are found.

  19. Cluster observations of surface waves on the dawn flank magnetopause

    C. J. Owen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available On 14 June 2001 the four Cluster spacecraft recorded multiple encounters of the dawn-side flank magnetopause. The characteristics of the observed electron populations varied between a cold, dense magnetosheath population and warmer, more rarified boundary layer population on a quasi-periodic basis. The demarcation between these two populations can be readily identified by gradients in the scalar temperature of the electrons. An analysis of the differences in the observed timings of the boundary at each spacecraft indicates that these magnetopause crossings are consistent with a surface wave moving across the flank magnetopause. When compared to the orientation of the magnetopause expected from models, we find that the leading edges of these waves are approximately 45° steeper than the trailing edges, consistent with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH driving mechanism. A stability analysis of this interval suggests that the magnetopause is marginally stable to this mechanism during this event. Periods in which the analysis predicts that the magnetopause is unstable correspond to observations of greater wave steepening. Analysis of the pulses suggests that the waves have an average wavelength of approximately 3.4 RE and move at an average speed of ~65km s-1 in an anti-sunward and northward direction, despite the spacecraft location somewhat south of the GSE Z=0 plane. This wave propagation direction lies close to perpendicular to the average magnetic field direction in the external magnetosheath, suggesting that these waves may preferentially propagate in the direction that requires no bending of these external field lines

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and unstabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  20. Kinetic Alfven Waves at the Magnetopause-Mode Conversion, Transport and Formation of LLBL; TOPICAL

    Jay R. Johnson; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-01-01

    At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in the Alfven velocity[Johnson and Cheng, Geophys. Res. Lett. 24 (1997) 1423]. The mode-conversion process can explain the following wave observations typically found during satellite crossings of the magnetopause: (1) a dramatic change in wave polarization from compressional in the magnetosheath to transverse at the magnetopause, (2) an amplification of wave amplitude at the magnetopause, (3) a change in Poynting flux from cross-field in the magnetosheath to field-aligned at the magnetopause, and (4) a steepening in the wave power spectrum at the magnetopause. We examine magnetic field data from a set of ISEE1, ISEE2, and WIND magnetopause crossings and compare with the predictions of theoretical wave solutions based on the kinetic-fluid model with particular attention to the role of magnetic field rotation across the magnetopause. The results of the study suggest a good qualitative agreement between the observations and the theory of mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. Because mode-converted kinetic Alfven waves readily decouple particles from the magnetic field lines, efficient quasilinear transport (D(approx) 109m2/s) can occur. Moreover, if the wave amplitude is sufficiently large (Bwave/B0 and gt; 0.2) stochastic particle transport also occurs. This wave-induced transport can lead to significant heating and particle entry into the low latitude boundary layer across closed field lines.At the magnetopause, large amplitude, low-frequency (ULF), transverse MHD waves are nearly always observed. These waves likely result from mode conversion of compressional MHD waves observed in the magnetosheath to kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause where there is a steep gradient in

  1. Morphology of magnetic merging at the magnetopause

    Crooker, N.U.

    1990-01-01

    To illustrate the basic features of magnetospheric topology, the development of a global model is traced from the superposition of dipole and uniform fields to the effects of adding, in turn, diffusion regions, surface currents, and a magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause. The subsolar, antiparallel, tearing, and patchy merging geometries proposed in the past all emerge under various conditions, but models tht deduce merging geometry from global boundary conditions are lacking. An exception is a model in which the external field merges wherever it falls tangent to the magnetopause. The result is a subsolar merging line that has all the characteristics of early sketches based on local arguments. Magnetosheath plasma beta affects magnetospheric topology and, consequently, merging geometry. Low, high, and variable beta favor subsolar, tearing, and patchy merging, respectively. Proposed flux transfer event models of burst reconnection from a single merging line, flux ropes from multiple merging lines, and flux tube elbows from patches can also be categorized by plasma beta in the same respective order. The topological modeling reviewed here may prove to be most useful for interpreting merging results from MHD simulations. (author)

  2. Revisiting a magnetopause Kelvin-Helmholtz event seen by the MMS spacecraft on 8 September 2015: Large-scale context and wave properties

    Hasegawa, H.; Nakamura, T.; Kitamura, N.; Hoshi, Y.; Saito, Y.; Figueroa-Vinas, A.; Giles, B. L.; Lavraud, B.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Ergun, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability is known to grow along the Earth's magnetopause, but its role in transporting solar wind mass and energy into the magnetosphere is not fully understood. On 8 September 2015, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft, located at the postnoon, southern-hemisphere magnetopause, encountered thin low-shear current sheets at the trailing edge of the KH waves, where KH-induced reconnection, one of the plasma transport processes, was occurring [Eriksson et al., GRL, 2016; Li et al., GRL, 2016]. The event was observed during a prolonged period of northward interplanetary magnetic field, and was characterized by an extended region of the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) immediately earthward of the KH unstable magnetopause, which appeared to have been formed through magnetopause reconnection poleward of the cusp. In this LLBL, MMS observed plasma turbulence, another agent for the plasma transport [Stawarz et al., JGR, 2016]. Key features are that (i) significant magnetic shears were seen only at the trailing edges of the KH surface waves, (ii) for both the leading and trailing edge traversals, both field-aligned and anti-field-aligned streaming D-shaped ion populations, which are consistent with reconnection on the southward and northward sides, respectively, of MMS, were observed on either the magnetosheath or LLBL side of the magnetopause, though not always simultaneously, and (iii) the field-aligned Poynting flux was positive in some parts of the LLBL but was negative in other parts. Based on these observations and further wave analysis, we address the questions of how the current sheets at the KH wave trailing edges were generated, and what could have been the driver of the turbulent fluctuations observed within the KH vortices.

  3. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause.

    Korth, Haje; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Johnson, Catherine L; Philpott, Lydia C; Anderson, Brian J; Al Asad, Manar M; Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT R M 3 , where R M is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is described by a disk-shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5  R M ) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause.

  4. Rotational discontinuities and the structure of the magnetopause

    Swift, D.W.; Lee, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Symmetric and asymmetric rotational discontinuities are studied by means of a one-dimensional computer simulation and by single-particle trajectory calculations. The numerical simulations show the symmetric rotation to be stable for both ion and electron senses of rotation with a thickness of the order of a few ion gyroradii when the rotation angle of the tangential field is 180 0 or less. Larger rotation angles tend to be unstable. In an expansive discontinuity, when the magnetic field on the downstream side of the discontinuity is larger, an expanding transition layer separating the high-field from a low-field region develops on the downstream side, and a symmetric rotational discontinuity forms at the upstream edge. The implication of these results for magnetopause structure and energy flow through the magnetopause is described

  5. Escape of high-energy oxygen ions through magnetopause reconnection under northward IMF

    S. Kasahara

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available During a storm recovery phase on 15 May 2005, the Geotail spacecraft repeatedly observed high-energy (>180 keV oxygen ions in the dayside magnetosheath near the equatorial plane. We focused on the time period from 11:20 UT to 13:00 UT, when Geotail observed the oxygen ions and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF was constantly northward. The magnetic reconnection occurrence northward and duskward of Geotail is indicated by the Walén analysis and convective flows in the magnetopause boundary layer. Anisotropic pitch angle distributions of ions suggest that high-energy oxygen ions escaped from the northward of Geotail along the reconnected magnetic field lines. From the low-energy particle precipitation in the polar cap observed by DMSP, which is consistent with magnetic reconnection occurring between the magnetosheath field lines and the magnetospheric closed field lines, we conclude that these oxygen ions are of ring current origin. Our results thus suggest a new escape route of oxygen ions during northward IMF. In the present event, this escape mechanism is more dominant than the leakage via the finite Larmor radius effect across the dayside equatorial magnetopause.

  6. Turbulence in Three Dimensional Simulations of Magnetopause Reconnection

    Drake, J. F.; Price, L.; Swisdak, M.; Burch, J. L.; Cassak, P.; Dahlin, J. T.; Ergun, R.

    2017-12-01

    We present two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the 16 October 2015 MMS magnetopause reconnection event. While the two-dimensional simulation is laminar, turbulence develops at both the x-line and along the magnetic separatrices in the three-dimensional simulation. This turbulence is electromagnetic in nature, is characterized by a wavevector k given by kρ e ˜(m_e/m_i)0.25 with ρ e the electron Larmor radius, and appears to have the ion pressure gradient as its source of free energy. Taken together, these results suggest the instability is a variant of the lower-hybrid drift instability. The turbulence produces electric field fluctuations in the out-of-plane direction (the direction of the reconnection electric field) with an amplitude of around ± 10 mV/m, which is much greater than the reconnection electric field of around 0.1 mV/m. Such large values of the out-of-plane electric field have been identified in the MMS data. The turbulence in the simulation controls the scale lengths of the density profile and current layers in asymmetric reconnection, driving them closer to √ {ρ eρ_i } than the ρ e or de scalings seen in 2D reconnection simulations, where de is the electron inertial length. The turbulence is strong enough to make the magnetic field around the reconnection island chaotic and produces both anomalous resistivity and anomalous viscosity. Each contribute significantly to breaking the frozen-in condition in the electron diffusion region. The crescent-shaped features in velocity space seen both in MMS observations and in two-dimensional simulations survive, even in the turbulent environment of the three-dimensional system. We compare and contrast these results to a three-dimensional simulation of the 8 December 2015 MMS magnetopause reconnection event in which the reconnecting and out-of-plane guide fields are comparable. LHDI is still present in this event, although its appearance is modified by the presence of the guide

  7. Energetic particle perspective of the magnetopause

    Williams, D.J.; Fritz, T.A.; Wilken, B.; Keppler, E.

    1979-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of energetic (>24 keV) particle data obtained from the Isee satellites during a series of magnetopause crossings which occurred at 0000--0400 hours UT (approx.1030 hours LT) on November 20, 1977. The primary energetic particle data used are the three-dimensional distributions obtained from the Isee A satellite. Correlative magnetic field measurements are used to relate the particle behavior to magnetic field characteristics at and earthward of the magnetopause. We find that to first order the magnetopause can be regarded as a perfectly absorbing boundary for trapped >24-keV particles, that it is nearly alway in motion, and that boundary waves are often present. We find that the observed dayside magnetopause motion is consistent with a large-scale radial motion having an approx.10-min period plus superimposed boundary waves with a 90- to 150-s period. More qualitatively, we find that the data require a third and longer period (approx. 30 min) magnetopause motion upon which the above, shorter-period motions are superimposed. Consistent with the picture of absorbing boundary, we find no evidence of microturbulent processes at the magnetopause which significantly affect the directional trapped particle flux to within 9--36 km of the boundary. We therefore conclude that the radial gradient to the magnetopause observed in the directional, >24-keV, dayside, near-equatorial, magnetospherically trapped particle flux is due to internal magnetospheric processes. Just outside the magnetopause in the magnetosheath we observe a broad (approximately hemispherical) field-aligned flow of >24-keV ions away from the magnetosphere. The absolute intensity and spectral characteristics of this flow and its relation to the magnetopause and the trapped particle population indicate that it is formed by the leakage of trapped particles from the radiation belts

  8. Particle Acceleration and Heating Processes at the Dayside Magnetopause

    Berchem, J.; Lapenta, G.; Richard, R. L.; El-Alaoui, M.; Walker, R. J.; Schriver, D.

    2017-12-01

    It is well established that electrons and ions are accelerated and heated during magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. However, a detailed description of the actual physical mechanisms driving these processes and where they are operating is still incomplete. Many basic mechanisms are known to accelerate particles, including resonant wave-particle interactions as well as stochastic, Fermi, and betatron acceleration. In addition, acceleration and heating processes can occur over different scales. We have carried out kinetic simulations to investigate the mechanisms by which electrons and ions are accelerated and heated at the dayside magnetopause. The simulation model uses the results of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to set the initial state and the evolving boundary conditions of fully kinetic implicit particle-in-cell (iPic3D) simulations for different solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field conditions. This approach allows us to include large domains both in space and energy. In particular, some of these regional simulations include both the magnetopause and bow shock in the kinetic domain, encompassing range of particle energies from a few eV in the solar wind to keV in the magnetospheric boundary layer. We analyze the results of the iPic3D simulations by discussing wave spectra and particle velocity distribution functions observed in the different regions of the simulation domain, as well as using large-scale kinetic (LSK) computations to follow particles' time histories. We discuss the relevance of our results by comparing them with local observations by the MMS spacecraft.

  9. On microscopic stress nonequilibrium: Application to the magnetopause

    Wu, Z.J.

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to propose the concept of microscopic stress nonequilibrium (or simply micro-nonequilibrium) in plasma physics. This concept arises as a consequence of the insolubility of the steady-state Vlasov-Maxwell equations (or the kinetic-field equations in general) under certain conditions. In what follows: (1) A general stress equilibrium condition for tangential plasma discontinuities is derived from the Maxwell tensor and the plasma stress tensor. (2) An equivalent equilibrium condition, which takes the form of equations of motion of a ''fictitious particle'', is also derived from the above condition. (3) A general solution of the distribution functions is derived according to Jeans's theorem or Liouville's theorem for the solar wind particles in a tangential magnetopause. (4) This solution is applied to the equilibrium condition to investigate the equilibrium state of the tangential magnetopause. Both Parker's tail-region and Wu's dawn-side ''nonequilibria''are confirmed to be micro-nonequilibria because of the violation of the above equilibrium condition. (5) The effects of various factors in micro-nonequilibria are discussed. It is found that randomly trapped particles and inwards electric field in the magnetopause layer generally cannot relieve the dawn-side or tail-region micro-nonequilibria; and that a northward magnetic field in the solar wind generally can suppress the dawn-side nonequilibrium, while a southward field can jeopardize a dusk-side Vlasov equilibrium. (6) Discussion: The concept of ''micro-nonequilibrium'' may become of importance in basic plasma dynamics. It is also possible that the micro-nonequilibrium may play a fundamental role in solar wind particles entering the magnetopause and in magnetospheric substorms

  10. Dayside magnetopause transients correlated with changes of the magnetosheath magnetic field orientation

    O. Tkachenko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses one long-term pass (26 August 2007 of the THEMIS spacecraft across the dayside low-latitude magnetopause. THEMIS B, serving partly as a magnetosheath monitor, observed several changes of the magnetic field that were accompanied by dynamic changes of the magnetopause location and/or the structure of magnetopause layers observed by THEMIS C, D, and E, whereas THEMIS A scanned the inner magnetosphere. We discuss the plasma and the magnetic field data with motivation to identify sources of observed quasiperiodic plasma transients. Such events at the magnetopause are usually attributed to pressure pulses coming from the solar wind, foreshock fluctuations, flux transfer events or surface waves. The presented transient events differ in nature (the magnetopause surface deformation, the low-latitude boundary layer thickening, the crossing of the reconnection site, but we found that all of them are associated with changes of the magnetosheath magnetic field orientation and with enhancements or depressions of the plasma density. Since these features are not observed in the data of upstream monitors, the study emphasizes the role of magnetosheath fluctuations in the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling.

  11. Comparative review of bow shocks and magnetopauses

    Lepping, R.P.

    1984-04-01

    Bow shock and magnetopauses formation is discussed. Plasma and magnetic field environments of all the planets from Mercury to Saturn were measured. It was found that all the planets have bow shocks and almost all have a magnetopause. Venus is the only planet with no measurable intrinsic magnetic field and the solar wind interacts directly with Venus ionosphere. The bow shock characteristics depend on the changing solar wind conditions. The shape of a magnetopause or any obstacle to flow depends on the three dimensional pressure profile that it presents to the solar wind. Jupiter is unusual because of the considerable amount of plasma which is contained in its magnetosphere. Magentopause boundaries in ecliptic plane projection are modelled by segments of ellipses, matched to straight lines for the magnetotool boundaries or parabolas. Specific properties of known planetary bow shocks and magnetopauses are reviewed

  12. Dark current of organic heterostructure devices with insulating spacer layers

    Yin, Sun; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl L.; Ruden, P. Paul

    2015-03-01

    The dark current density at fixed voltage bias in donor/acceptor organic planar heterostructure devices can either increase or decrease when an insulating spacer layer is added between the donor and acceptor layers. The dominant current flow process in these systems involves the formation and subsequent recombination of an interfacial exciplex state. If the exciplex formation rate limits current flow, the insulating interface layer can increase dark current whereas, if the exciplex recombination rate limits current flow, the insulating interface layer decreases dark current. We present a device model to describe this behavior and illustrate it experimentally for various donor/acceptor systems, e.g. P3HT/LiF/C60.

  13. A new technique for determining orientation and motion of a 2-D, non-planar magnetopause

    A. Blagau

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available For a four-point mission like Cluster, the differences in position and time when the satellites detect the magnetopause or any other discontinuity, can be used to infer the discontinuity local orientation, thickness and motion. This timing technique, commonly assuming a planar geometry, offers an independent check for various single-spacecraft techniques. In the present paper we propose an extension of the timing method, capable of determining in a self-consistent way the macroscopic parameters of a two-dimensional, non-planar discontinuity. Such a configuration can be produced by a local bulge or indentation in the magnetopause, or by a large amplitude wave traveling on this surface, and is recognized in Cluster data when the single spacecraft techniques provide different individual normals contained roughly in the same plane. The model we adopted for the magnetopause assumes a layer of constant thickness of either cylindrical or parabolic shape, which has one or two degrees of freedom for the motion in the plane of the individual normals. The method was further improved by incorporating in a self-consistent way the requirement of minimum magnetic field variance along the magnetopause normal. An additional assumption, required in a previously proposed non-planar technique, i.e. that the non-planarity has negligible effects on the minimum variance analysis, is thus avoided. We applied the method to a magnetopause transition for which the various planar techniques provided inconsistent results. By contrast, the solutions obtained from the different implementations of the new 2-D method were consistent and stable, indicating a convex shape for the magnetopause. These solutions perform better than the planar solutions from the normal magnetic field variance perspective. The magnetopause dynamics and the presence of a non-zero normal magnetic field component in the analyzed event are discussed.

  14. Solar wind energy transfer regions inside the dayside magnetopause

    Lundin, R.; Dubinin, E.

    1984-01-01

    PROGNOZ-7 high temporal resolution measurements of the ion composition and hot plasma distribution in the dayside high latitude boundary layer near noon have revealed that magnetosheath plasma may penetrate the dayside magnetopause and form high density, high β, magnetosheath-like regions inside the magnetopause. From these measurements it is demonstrated that the magnetosheath injection regions most probably play an important role in transferring solar wind energy into the magnetosphere. The transfer regions are characterized by a strong perpendicular flow towards dawn or dusk (depending on local time) but are also observed to expand rapidly along the boundary field lines. This increased flow component transverse to the local magnetic field corresponds to a predominantly radial electric field of up to several mV m -1 , which indicates that the injected magnetosheath plasma causes an enhanced polarization of the boundary layer. Polarization of the boundary layer can therefore be considered a result of a local MHD-process where magnetosheath plasma excess momentum is converted into electromagnetic energy (electric field), i.e. there is an MHD-generator. It was observed that the boundary layer is charged up to tens of kilovolts, a potential which may be highly variable on e.g. the presence of a momentum exchange by the energy transfer regions. (author)

  15. Structure and properties of the subsolar magnetopause for northward IMF: ISEE observations

    Song, P.; Russell, C.T.; Elphic, R.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Cattell, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed magnetopause structure and properties for the magnetic field, electric field and plasma are examined for an ISEE 1 magnetopause crossing which occurred near the subsolar point when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was strongly northward. Because the crossing is slow, the spatial variations in the plasma are clearly resolved. This example illustrates the nature of the steady state interface of two magnetized thermal plasma populations with parallel fields and can serve as a guide to theoretical modeling and simulations. The authors have found that the magnetopause is composed of three layers, a sheath transition layer, an outer boundary layer and an inner boundary layer. In the sheath transition layer, there is a gradual density decrease without a change in temperature. The transition layer occurs totally within the magnetosheath plasma. The outer boundary layer and the inner boundary layer are dominated by magnetosheath and magnetospheric particles, respectively. In each of the boundary layers, the plasma can be interpreted as simple mixtures of the magnetosheath and magnetospheric populations. No significant heating or cooling is seen across the magnetopause during this crossing. The plasma within each of these layers is quite uniform and their boundaries are sharp, suggesting that there is very little diffusion present. The sharp boundaries between the transition layer, the boundary layers and the magnetosphere are all thinner than an ion gyroradius. Transverse waves with right hand or linear polarization near the ion gyrofrequency are observed in the transition layer. These appear to be generated in the transition layer and to be a common feature of this layer when the IMF is northward

  16. Limiting velocity of reconnection in a current layer

    Podgornyj, A.N.; Syrovatskij, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Formation of a plasma current layer from a strong perturbation wave with the Mach magnetic number Msub(a)=1 is investigated numerically within the framework of magnetic hydrodynamics. It is shown that velocity of plasma flowing into the layer is established as small one as compared with the Alfven velocity. At the current layer boundary the Mach magnetic number Msub(a, c)=0.14-0.2. A great decrease in plasma velocity to the current layer results from the counterpressure of a magnetic field, intensity of which near the layer increases due to the storage of magnetic force lines which do not yet reconnect. Calculational results demonstrate the existence of limiting velocity of magnetic reconnection constituting tenth shares of the Mach magnetic number. Influence of this phenomenon on a character of reconnection in the Earth magnetosphere is discussed

  17. Spreading Speed of Magnetopause Reconnection X-Lines Using Ground-Satellite Coordination

    Zou, Ying; Walsh, Brian M.; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ruohoniemi, J. Michael; McWilliams, Kathryn A.; Nishitani, Nozomu

    2018-01-01

    Conceptual and numerical models predict that magnetic reconnection starts at a localized region and then spreads out of the reconnection plane. At the Earth's magnetopause this spreading would occur primarily in local time along the boundary. Different simulations have found the spreading to occur at different speeds such as the Alfvén speed and speed of the current carriers. We use conjugate Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar measurements to observationally determine the X-line spreading speed at the magnetopause. THEMIS probes the reconnection parameters locally, and SuperDARN tracks the reconnection development remotely. Spreading speeds under different magnetopause boundary conditions are obtained and compared with model predictions. We find that while spreading under weak guide field could be explained by either the current carriers or the Alfvén waves, spreading under strong guide field is consistent only with the current carriers.

  18. Current transfer between superconductor and normal layer in coated conductors

    Takacs, S

    2007-01-01

    The current transfer between superconducting stripes coated with normal layer is examined in detail. It is shown that, in present YBCO coated conductors with striations, a considerable amount of the current flowing in the normal layer is not transferred into the superconducting stripes. This effect also influences the eddy currents and the coupling currents between the stripes. The effective resistance for the coupling currents is calculated. The maximum allowable twist length of such a striated structure is given, which ensures lower losses than in the corresponding normal conductor of the same volume as the total YBCO cable (including substrate, buffer layer, superconductor and normal coating). In addition, a new simple method for determining the transfer resistance between superconducting and normal parts is proposed

  19. Dependence of the dayside magnetopause reconnection rate on local conditions

    Wang, Shan; Kistler, Lynn M.; Mouikis, Christopher G.; Petrinec, Steven M.

    2015-08-01

    We estimate the reconnection rates for eight dayside magnetopause reconnection events observed by the Cluster spacecraft and compare them with the predictions of the Cassak-Shay Formula (Rcs) Cassak and Shay (2007). The measured reconnection rate is determined by calculating the product of the inflow velocity and magnetic field in the magnetosheath inflow region. The predicted reconnection rate is calculated using the plasma parameters on both sides of the current layer, including the contributions of magnetosheath H+, magnetospheric hot H+ and O+, and magnetospheric cold ions. The measured reconnection rates show clear correlations with Rcs with an aspect ratio of 0.07. The O+ and cold ions can contribute up to ~30% of the mass density, which may reduce the reconnection rate for individual events. However, the variation of the reconnection rate is dominated by the variation of the magnetosheath parameters. In addition, we calculated the predicted reconnection rate using only magnetosheath parameters (Rsh). The correlation of the measured rate with Rsh was better than the correlation with Rcs, with an aspect ratio of 0.09. This might indicate deviations from the Cassak-Shay theory caused by the asymmetric reconnection structure and kinetic effects of different inflow populations. A better aspect ratio is expected to be between the ones determined using Rcs and Rsh. The aspect ratio does not show a clear dependence on the O+ concentration, likely because the O+ contribution is too small in these events. The aspect ratio also does not show a clear correlation with density asymmetry or guide field.

  20. Prognoz 4 observations of electrons accelerated up to energies <=2 MeV and of the cold plasma between the magnetopause and the bow shock

    Mineev, Yu.V.; Spir'kova, E.S.

    1980-05-01

    The experimental data from Prognoz 4 satellite obtained on a layer of electrons with energies <=2 MeV in the magnetosheath adjacent to magnetopause at different latitudes are given. At moderate latitudes the data are in favour of the leakage of electrons from the outer radiation belt as a source of the layer considered. At high latitudes these electrons apparently arrive along magnetosheath magnetic field lines trapping the magnetopause. (author)

  1. Magnetic field reconnection at the dayside magnetopause

    Rijnbeek, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic field reconnection is a fundamental energy conversion process, and the energy liberated during this process gives rise to phenomena which can be observed in space and laboratory plasmas. At the dayside magnetopause reconnection results in a coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. Manifestations of this include large disturbances in the magnetic field known as flux transfer events, and accelerated plasma flows along the magnetopause. Progress has been made in the development of a physical model incorporating such phenomena, aided by experimental data from various spacecraft missions

  2. Reflection of Alfven waves at an open magnetopause

    Cao, F.; Kan, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Reflection of an Alfven wave incident on an open magnetopause form the magnetospheric side is examined. An open magnetopause, whose structure is different from the standard rotational discontinuity, is assumed to be a parameterized discontinuity with a nonzero normal field component. When an Alfven wave is incident on the open magnetopause, reflected and transmitted waves are generated. The emanating waves can be analyzed using linearized MHD conservation relations across the magnetopause, together with Snell's law. Under the assumption that the magnetic fields on the two sides of the open magnetopause are coplanar with the normal direction of the magnetopause, the governing equations are solved numerically. The results show that the electric fields of emanating Alfven waves depend mainly on the number density and the magnetic field jumps across the magnetopause. Under conditions representing the open magnetopause, it turns out that the open magnetopause behaves like a near perfect reflector. The corresponding reflection coefficient for the wave electric field can be approximated by R E = E r /E i ∼ -1 as has been deduced by Kan and Sun (1985) based on physical arguments. In other words, the solar wind flow is more or less unchanged by the loading effect of the Alfven wave incident on the magnetopause from the magnetospheric side. Therefore, under the assumptions of the model, the open magnetopause can be viewed as a constant voltage source

  3. Observations of propagating double layers in a high current discharge

    Lindberg, L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of current disruptions and strong electric fields along the magnetic field in a high-density (2 x 10 19 m - 3 , highly-ionized, moving, and expanding plasma column are reported. The electric field is interpreted in terms of propagating, strong electric double layers (3-5kV). An initial plasma column is formed in an axial magnetic field (0.1T) by means of a conical theta-pinch plasma gun. When an axial current (max 5kA, 3-5 kV) is drawn through the column spontaneous disruptions and double-layer formation occur within a few microseconds. Floating, secondary emitting Langmuir probes are used. They often indicate very high positive potential peaks (1-2 kV above the anode potential during a few μs) in the plasma on the positive side of the double layer. Short, intense bursts of HF radiation are detected at the disruptions

  4. Spontaneous layering of porous silicon layers formed at high current densities

    Parkhutik, Vitali; Curiel-Esparza, Jorge; Millan, Mari-Carmen [R and D Center MTM, Technical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Albella, Jose [Institute of Materials Science (ICMM CSIC) Madrid (Spain)

    2005-06-01

    We report here a curious effect of spontaneous fracturing of the silicon layers formed in galvanostatic conditions at medium and high current densities. Instead of formation of homogeneous p-Si layer as at low currents, a stack of thin layers is formed. Each layer is nearly separated from others and possesses rather flat interfaces. The effects is observed using p{sup +}-Si wafers for the p-Si formation and starts being noticeable at above 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. We interpret these results in terms of the porous silicon growth model where generation of dynamic mechanical stress during the p-Si growth causes sharp changes in Si dissolution mechanism from anisotropic etching of individual needle-like pores in silicon to their branching and isotropic etching. At this moment p-Si layer loses its adhesion to the surface of Si wafer and another p-Si layer starts growing. One of the mechanisms triggering on the separation of p-Si layers from one another is a fluctuation of local anodic current in the pore bottoms associated with gas bubble evolution during the p-Si formation. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Heavy-ion induced current through an oxide layer

    Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Nagasawa, Takaharu; Nakajima, Yasuhito; Kawanabe, Ryu; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Hirao, Toshio; Onoda, Shinobu; Mishima, Kenta; Kawano, Katsuyasu; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the heavy-ion induced current in MOS structure is investigated. We have measured the transient gate current in a MOS capacitor and a MOSFET induced by single heavy-ions, and found that a transient current can be observed when the semiconductor surface is under depletion condition. In the case of MOSFET, a transient gate current with both positive and negative peaks is observed if the ion hits the gate area, and that the total integrated charge is almost zero within 100-200 ns after irradiation. From these results, we conclude that the radiation-induced gate current is dominated by a displacement current. We also discuss the generation mechanism of the radiation-induced current through the oxide layer by device simulation

  6. Structure and dynamics of the magnetopause

    Wang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis addresses several topics concerning the structure and dynamics of the magnetopause. These topics include the role of the magnetopause in global convection, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability, which accounts for momentum transport at the magnetopause, the formation of flux ropes by the tearing and twisting modes and particle diffusion across the magnetopause resulting from the destruction of magnetic surfaces. The author establishs an analytic electric field model for an open magnetosphere and introduce a magnetopause to control the reconnection rate and momentum transport. A realistic magnetospheric configuration is realized by 'stretch transformation'. The role of magnetic nulls in the electric field is approached with a technique for direct calculation of electric fields along field lines. Results indicate that electric fields associated with A-type or B-type nulls are generally singular. Then the author considers kinetic effects on the K-H instability. Contrary to the logical assumption that Landau damping damps the instability, it can instead enhance the growth and increase the spatial extent of the instability because the heating of resonance particles enhances the pressure perturbation. A gravitational analogy is used to determine the effect of curvature on K-H instability and it is found that the critical Richardson number for stability increases from 1/4 for incompressible fluids to 1/2 for compressible fluids. The flux rope, which accounts for flux transfer events (FTE), can be formed by a tearing or twisting mode. The tearing mode is self excited by the free energy associated with the magnetic configuration, while the twisting mode must be externally driven. The shear flow generates the twisting mode and reduces the growth rate of the tearing mode. The flux ropes resulting from the twisting mode closely resemble FTE's which have a longer pitch length than that from tearing mode

  7. AC over-current characteristics of YBCO coated conductor with copper stabilizer layer considering insulation layer

    Du, H.-I.; Kim, M.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, D.-H.; Han, B.-S.; Song, S.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Compared with the first-generation BSCCO wire, the YBCO thin-film wire boasts low material costs and high J c and superior magnetic-field properties, among other strengths. Meanwhile, the previous BSCCO wire material for superconducting cables has been researched on considerably with regard to its post-wire quenching characteristics during the application of an alternating over-current. In this regard, the promising YBCO thin-film wire has yet to be further researched on. Moreover, still lacking is research on the YBCO thin-film wire with insulating layers, which is essential in the manufacture of superconducting cables, along with the testing of the application of an alternating over-current to the wire. In this study, YBCO thin-film wires with copper-stabilizing layers were used in testing alternating over-current application according to the presence or absence of insulating layers and to the thickness of such layers, to examine the post-quenching wire resistance increase and quenching trends. The YBCO thin-film wire with copper-stabilizing layers has a critical temperature of 90 K and a critical current of 85 A rms . Moreover, its current application cycle is 5.5 cycles, and its applied currents are 354, 517, 712, and 915 A peak . These figures enabled the YBCO thin-film wires with copper-stabilizing layers to reach 90, 180, 250, and 300 K, respectively, in this study. These temperatures serve as a relative reference to examine the post-quenching wire properties following the application of an alternating over-current.

  8. Wave properties near the subsolar magnetopause - Pc 3-4 energy coupling for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    Song, P.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Anderson, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Strong slow mode waves in the Pc 3-4 frequency range are found in the magnetosheath close to the magnetopause. We have studied these waves at one of the ISEE subsolar magnetopause crossings using the magnetic field, electric field, and plasma measurements. We use the pressure balance at the magnetopause to calibrate the Fast Plasma Experiment data versus the magnetometer data. When we perform such a calibration and renormalization, we find that the slow mode structures are not in pressure balance and small scale fluctuations in the total pressure still remain in the Pc 3-4 range. Energy in the total pressure fluctuations can be transmitted through the magnetopause by boundary motions. The Poynting flux calculated from the electric and magnetic field measurements suggests that a net Poynting flux is transmitted into the magnetopause. The two independent measurements show a similar energy transmission coefficient. The transmitted energy flux is about 18 percent of the magnetic energy flux of the waves in the magnetosheath. Part of this transmitted energy is lost in the sheath transition layer before it enters the closed field line region. The waves reaching the boundary layer decay rapidly. Little wave power is transmitted into the magnetosphere.

  9. Accretion onto magnetized neutron stars: Normal mode analysis of the interchange instability at the magnetopause

    Arons, J.; Lea, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    We describe the results of a linearized hydromagnetic stability analysis of the magnetopause of an accreting neutron star. The magnetosphere is assumed to be slowly rotating, and the plasma just outside of the magnetopause is assumed to be weakly magnetized. The plasma layer is assumed to be bounded above by a shock wave, and to be thin compared with the radius of the magnetosphere. Under these circumstances, the growing modes are shown to be localized in the direction parallel to the zero-order magnetic field. The structure of the modes is still similar to the flute mode, however. The growth rate at each magnetic latitude is lambda given by γ 2 =g/sub n/kα/sub eff/(lambda) tanh [kz/sub s/(lambda)] where g/sub n/ is the magnitude of the gravitational acceleration normal to the surface, kapprox. =vertical-barmvertical-bar/R (lambda)cos lambda, vertical-barmvertical-bar is the azimuthal mode number, R (lambda) is the radius of the magnetosphere, z/sub s/ is the height of the shock above the magnetopause, and α/sub eff/(lambda) <1 is the effective Atwood number which embodies the stabilizing effects of favorable curvature and magnetic tension. We calculate α/sub eff/(lambda), and also discuss the stabilizing effects of viscosity and of aligned flow parallel to the magnetopause

  10. Magnetosheath density fluctuations and magnetopause motion

    Sibeck, D.G. [Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Lab., Laurel, MD (United States); Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation controls foreshock densities and modulates the fraction of the solar wind dynamic pressure applied to the magnetosphere. Such pressure variations produce bow shock and magnetopause motion and cause the radial profiles for various magnetosheath parameters to sweep inward and outward past nearly stationary satellites. The authors report ISEE 2 observations of correlated density and speed fluctuations, and anticorrelated density and temperature fluctuations, on an outbound pass through the northern dawnside magnetosheath. Densities decreased when the magnetic field rotated southward and draped about the magnetopause. In the absence of any significant solar wind density or dynamic pressure variations, they interpret the magnetosheath fluctuations as evidence for radial magnetosheath motion induced by variations in the IMF orientation. 41 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Solar cycle variations of magnetopause locations

    Němeček, Z.; Šafránková, J.; Lopez, R. E.; Dušík, Š.; Nouzák, L.; Přech, J.; Šimůnek, Jiří; Shue, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2016), s. 240-248 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19376S Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : magnetopause location * F-10.7 flux * solar cycle * solar wind velocity Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.401, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0273117715007115

  12. Radio Emissions from Magnetopause Reconnection Events

    Fung, S. F.; Kunze, J.

    2017-12-01

    A new terrestrial radio emission has recently been identified and attributed to a source connected to the magnetopause magnetic reconnection process [Fung et al., 2013]. Known as the terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB), the new emission was observed by both the IMAGE and Geotail spacecraft during a period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz >0) as a temporal and isolated burst of emission with perhaps well-defined or directed emission cones. Spectral and spin-modulation analyses showed that both the intensity and source direction of the emission are sensitive to the variability of the IMF. The strong control of the emission by the IMF suggests that the emission is connected to the magnetopause reconnection process. A number of potential TMRB events have now been identified by surveying all the dynamic spectrogram data obtained by the IMAGE, Geotail, Cluster, and Wind spacecraft in 5/2000-12/2005. This paper will present our analyses of how the spectral signatures and beaming characteristics of the emissions might depend on the IMF orientations, and thus their likelihood of being TMRBs. Special emphasis will be on events associated with northward and southward IMF in order to determine if TMRBs might be generally produced from magnetopause reconnection processes. Fung, S. F., K. Hashimoto, H. Kojima, S. A. Boardsen, L. N. Garcia, H. Matsumoto, J. L. Green, and B. W. Reinisch (2013), Terrestrial myriametric radio burst observed by IMAGE and Geotail satellites, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, doi:10.1002/jgra.50149.

  13. Spatial distribution of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices at Earth's dayside and flank magnetopause

    Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Hasegawa, H.; Lavraud, B.; Phan, T.; Escoubet, C. P.; Dunlop, M. W.; Bogdanova, Y.V.; Borg, A. L.; Volwerk, M.; Berchem, J.; Constantinescu, O. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; Masson, A.; Laakso, H.; Souček, Jan; Fazakerley, A. N.; Frey, H. U.; Panov, E.V.; Shen, C.; Shi, J. K.; Sibeck, D. G.; Pu, Z. Y.; Wang, J.; Wild, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 6 (2012), s. 1025-1035 ISSN 0992-7689 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Magnetospheric physics * Magnetopause, cusp, and boundary layers * Plasma waves and instabilities * Solar wind-magnetosphere interactions Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.518, year: 2012 http://www.ann-geophys.net/30/1025/2012/angeo-30-1025-2012.pdf

  14. Magnetopause boundary structure deduced from the high-time resolution particle experiment on the Equator-S spacecraft

    G. K. Parks

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available An electrostatic analyser (ESA onboard the Equator-S spacecraft operating in coordination with a potential control device (PCD has obtained the first accurate electron energy spectrum with energies ≈7 eV–100 eV in the vicinity of the magnetopause. On 8 January, 1998, a solar wind pressure increase pushed the magnetopause inward, leaving the Equator-S spacecraft in the magnetosheath. On the return into the magnetosphere approximately 80 min later, the magnetopause was observed by the ESA and the solid state telescopes (the SSTs detected electrons and ions with energies ≈20–300 keV. The high time resolution (3 s data from ESA and SST show the boundary region contains of multiple plasma sources that appear to evolve in space and time. We show that electrons with energies ≈7 eV–100 eV permeate the outer regions of the magnetosphere, from the magnetopause to ≈6Re. Pitch-angle distributions of ≈20–300 keV electrons show the electrons travel in both directions along the magnetic field with a peak at 90° indicating a trapped configuration. The IMF during this interval was dominated by Bx and By components with a small Bz.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; solar wind · magnetosphere interactions

  15. On a role of the Bsub(z) component of interplanetary magnetic field in a force balance in the day time magnetopause

    Kuznetsova, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    The role of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in the force balance in the day time magnetopause is discussed. The effect of the circular DR-current on the balance of pressures in the magnetopause is taken into account in the calculations. It is shown that IMF plays a significant role in the balance of forces in the day time magnetopause. The ratio of magnetic pressure to the thermal pressure of solar wind in subsolar point is k=0.5. The field observed in magnetosphere near the neutral line is lower by the value of transition region field. All the conclusions are obtained for Bsub(z) [ru

  16. Switching a Perpendicular Ferromagnetic Layer by Competing Spin Currents

    Ma, Qinli; Li, Yufan; Gopman, D. B.; Kabanov, Yu. P.; Shull, R. D.; Chien, C. L.

    2018-03-01

    An ultimate goal of spintronics is to control magnetism via electrical means. One promising way is to utilize a current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling in heavy metals and their interfaces to switch a single perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnetic layer at room temperature. However, experimental realization of SOT switching to date requires an additional in-plane magnetic field, or other more complex measures, thus severely limiting its prospects. Here we present a novel structure consisting of two heavy metals that delivers competing spin currents of opposite spin indices. Instead of just canceling the pure spin current and the associated SOTs as one expects and corroborated by the widely accepted SOTs, such devices manifest the ability to switch the perpendicular CoFeB magnetization solely with an in-plane current without any magnetic field. Magnetic domain imaging reveals selective asymmetrical domain wall motion under a current. Our discovery not only paves the way for the application of SOT in nonvolatile technologies, but also poses questions on the underlying mechanism of the commonly believed SOT-induced switching phenomenon.

  17. Suppression of the dayside magnetopause surface modes

    Pilipenko V.A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetopause surface eigenmodes were suggested as a potential source of dayside high-latitude broadband pulsations in the Pc5-6 band (frequency about 1–2 mHz. However, the search for a ground signature of these modes has not provided encouraging results. The comparison of multi-instrument data from Svalbard with the latitudinal structure of Pc5-6 pulsations, recorded by magnetometers covering near-cusp latitudes, has shown that often the latitudinal maximum of pulsation power occurs about 2–3° deeper in the magnetosphere than the dayside open-closed field line boundary (OCB. The OCB proxy was determined from SuperDARN radar data as the equatorward boundary of enhanced width of a return radio signal. The OCB-ULF correspondence is further examined by comparing the latitudinal profile of the near-noon pulsation power with the equatorward edge of the auroral red emission from the meridian scanning photometer. In most analyzed events, the “epicenter” of Pc5-6 power is at 1–2° lower latitude than the optical OCB proxy. Therefore, the dayside Pc5-6 pulsations cannot be associated with the ground image of the magnetopause surface modes or with oscillations of the last field line. A lack of ground response to these modes beneath the ionospheric projection of OCB seems puzzling. As a possible explanation, we suggest that a high variability of the outer magnetosphere near the magnetopause region may suppress the excitation efficiency. To quantify this hypothesis, we consider a driven field line resonator terminated by conjugate ionospheres with stochastic fluctuations of its eigenfrequency. A solution of this problem predicts a substantial deterioration of resonant properties of MHD resonator even under a relatively low level of background fluctuations. This effect may explain why there is no ground response to magnetopause surface modes or oscillations of the last field line at the OCB latitude, but it can be seen at somewhat lower latitudes

  18. Collaborative Research: Dynamics of Electrostatic Solitary Waves on Current Layers

    Pickett, Jolene S.

    2012-10-31

    The research carried out under the subject grant has provided insight into the generation of Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs), which are nonlinear structures observed in space plasma data. These ESWs, appearing as pulses in the electric field time series data, represent the presence of several hundred meters to kilometer size positive potential structures, similar to champagne bubbles, where the electrons have been depleted, and which travel along Earth's magnetic field lines. The laboratory experiments carried out at the UCLA LAPD under the grant allowed us the opportunity to change various plasma and field conditions within the plasma device, and experiment with injection of suprathermal electron beams, in order to create ESWs. This then allowed us to determine the most likely method of generation of the ESWs. By comparing the properties of the ESWs observed in the LAPD to those observed in space and the plasma and field conditions under which those ESWs were observed in both locations, we were able to evaluate various ESW generation mechanisms. The findings of the laboratory experiments are that ESWs are generated through a lower hybrid instability. The ESWs observed in Earth's auroral current regions have similar characteristics to those generated by the laboratory when referenced to basic plasma and field characteristics, leading us to the conclusion that the lower hybrid drift instability is certainly a possibility for generation of the ESWs, at least in the auroral (northern/southern lights) regions. Due to space instrumentation insufficiencies and the limitations on telemetry, and thus poor time resolution, it is not possible to determine absolutely what generates these bubbles in space, but the laboratory experiments and supporting simulations have helped us to further our understanding of the processes under which they are generated. The public benefits from the findings of this research because the research is focused on current layers

  19. The ionospheric footprint of antiparallel merging regions on the dayside magnetopause

    I. J. Coleman

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The antiparallel merging hypothesis states that reconnection takes place on the dayside magnetopause where the solar and geomagnetic fields are oppositely directed. With this criterion, we have mapped the predicted merging regions to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko 96 magnetic field model, distinguishing between regions of sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic magnetosheath flow, and identifying the day-night terminator. We present the resulting shape, width and latitude of the ionospheric dayside merging regions in both hemispheres, showing their dependence on the Earth's dipole tilt. The resulting seasonal variation of the longitudinal width is consistent with the conjugate electric fields in the northern and southern cusps, as measured by the SuperDARN HF radars, for example. We also find a seasonal shift in latitude similar to that observed in satellite cusp data.Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp and boundary layers; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  20. MMS Examination of FTEs at the Earth's Subsolar Magnetopause

    Akhavan-Tafti, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Le, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Gershman, D. J.; Burch, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    Determining the magnetic field structure, electric currents, and plasma distributions within flux transfer event (FTE)-type flux ropes is critical to the understanding of their origin, evolution, and dynamics. Here the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission's high-resolution magnetic field and plasma measurements are used to identify FTEs in the vicinity of the subsolar magnetopause. The constant-α flux rope model is used to identify quasi-force free flux ropes and to infer the size, the core magnetic field strength, the magnetic flux content, and the spacecraft trajectories through these structures. Our statistical analysis determines a mean diameter of 1,700 ± 400 km ( 30 ± 9 di) and an average magnetic flux content of 100 ± 30 kWb for the quasi-force free FTEs at the Earth's subsolar magnetopause which are smaller than values reported by Cluster at high latitudes. These observed nonlinear size and magnetic flux content distributions of FTEs appear consistent with the plasmoid instability theory, which relies on the merging of neighboring, small-scale FTEs to generate larger structures. The ratio of the perpendicular to parallel components of current density, RJ, indicates that our FTEs are magnetically force-free, defined as RJ < 1, in their core regions (<0.6 Rflux rope). Plasma density is shown to be larger in smaller, newly formed FTEs and dropping with increasing FTE size. It is also shown that parallel ion velocity dominates inside FTEs with largest plasma density. Field-aligned flow facilitates the evacuation of plasma inside newly formed FTEs, while their core magnetic field strengthens with increasing FTE size.

  1. Modeling the Earth's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a realistic magnetopause

    Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    Empirical data-based models of the magnetosphereic magnetic field have been widely used during recent years. However, the existing models (Tsyganenko, 1987, 1989a) have three serious deficiencies: (1) an unstable de facto magnetopause, (2) a crude parametrization by the K(sub p) index, and (3) inaccuracies in the equatorial magnetotail B(sub z) values. This paper describes a new approach to the problem; the essential new features are (1) a realistic shape and size of the magnetopause, based on fits to a large number of observed crossing (allowing a parametrization by the solar wind pressure), (2) fully controlled shielding of the magnetic field produced by all magnetospheric current systems, (3) new flexible representations for the tail and ring currents, and (4) a new directional criterion for fitting the model field to spacecraft data, providing improved accuracy for field line mapping. Results are presented from initial efforts to create models assembled from these modules and calibrated against spacecraft data sets.

  2. Plasma and magnetic field characteristics of the distant polar cusp near local noon: The entry layer

    Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sckopke, N.; Rosenbauer, H.; Hedgecock, P.C.

    1976-01-01

    Heos 2 plasma and magnetic field measurements in the distant polar cusp region reveal the existence of a plasma layer on day side field lines just inside the magnetopause. Density and temperature in this layer are nearly the same as they are in the adjacent magnetosheath, but the flow lacks the order existing both in the magnetosheath and in the plasma mantle. Flow directions toward and away from the sun but, in general, parallel to the field lines have been found. The magnetopause (as defined by a sudden rotation of the magnetic field vector) mostly coincides with the transition to ordered magnetosheath flow. The inner boundary of the layer is located just within the outer boundary of the hot ring current plasma. In the region of overlap the hot electrons have the signature of trapped particles, though often at reduced intensity. The magnetic field is strongly fluctuating in magnitude, while its orientation is more stable, consistent with a connection to the earth, but is systematically distorted out of the meridian plane. The layer is thought to be a consequence of the entry of magnetosheath plasma, which does not appear to be unobstructed, as has been claimed in the concept of a magnetospheric cleft. The magnetopause has a cusplike indentation which is elongated in local time. The existence of field-aligned currents (total strength approx. =10 6 A) and their location of flow in the inner part of the entry layer (into the ionosphere before noon and out of it after noon) are inferred from the systematic bending of field lines. It is proposed that the dynamo of the related current system is provided by the transfer of perpendicular momentum resulting from the plasma entry into the layer. The essential features of the entry layer might be compatible with the model of plasma flow through the magnetopause of Levy et al. (1964) if a 'dam' effect caused by the cusp geometry were added

  3. Intermittent thermal plasma acceleration linked to sporadic motions of the magnetopause, first Cluster results

    J.-A. Sauvaud

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first observations with Cluster of a very dense population of thermal ionospheric ions (H+, He+, O+ locally "accelerated" perpendicularly to the local magnetic field in a region adjacent to the magnetopause and on its magnetospheric side. The observation periods follow a long period of very weak magnetic activity. Recurrent motions of the magnetopause are, in the presented cases, unexpectedly associated with the appearance inside closed field lines of recurrent energy structures of ionospheric ions with energies in the 5 eV to  ~1000 eV range. The heaviest ions were detected with the highest energies. Here, the ion behaviour is interpreted as resulting from local electric field enhancements/decreases which adiabatically enhance/lower the bulk energy of a local dense thermal ion population. This drift effect, which is directly linked to magnetopause motions caused by pressure changes, allows for the thermal ions to overcome the satellite potential and be detected by the suprathermal CIS Cluster experiment. When fast flowing, i.e. when detectable, the density (~ 1 cm-3 of these ions from a terrestrial origin is (in the cases presented here largely higher than the local density of ions from magnetospheric/plasma sheet origin which poses again the question of the relative importance of solar and ionospheric sources for the magnetospheric plasma even during very quiet magnetic conditions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (planetary ionosphere; plasma convection Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers

  4. Ion-Scale Secondary Flux Ropes Generated by Magnetopause Reconnection as Resolved by MMS

    Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T. D.; Cassak, P. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Haggerty, C.; Malakit, K.; Shay, M. A.; Mistry, R.; Oieroset, M.; Russell, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    New Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observations of small-scale (approx. 7 ion inertial length radius) flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are reported. The 1O km MMS tetrahedron size enables their structure and properties to be calculated using a variety of multispacecraft techniques, allowing them to be identified as flux ropes, whose flux content is small (approx. 22 kWb).The current density, calculated using plasma and magnetic field measurements independently, is found to be filamentary. lntercomparison of the plasma moments with electric and magnetic field measurements reveals structured non-frozen-in ion behavior. The data are further compared with a particle-in-cell simulation. It is concluded that these small-scale flux ropes, which are not seen to be growing, represent a distinct class of FTE which is generated on the magnetopause by secondary reconnection.

  5. Geometric corrections due to inhomogeneous field in the magnetospheric double current layer

    Callebaut, D.K.; Van den Buys, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The case of oblique incidence and of a slope in the magnetic field for plane parallel models of the magnetospheric double layer is considered. The two models are the Magnetospheric Double Layer (MDL) and the Magnetospheric Double Current Layer (MDCL). The latter is more appropriate but due to some approximations it gives sometimes incorrect results. An improved model uses a triple current layer. (R.P.)

  6. A flux transfer event observed at the magnetopause by the Equator-S spacecraft and in the ionosphere by the CUTLASS HF radar

    D. A. Neudegg

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of a flux transfer event (FTE have been made simultaneously by the Equator-S spacecraft near the dayside magnetopause whilst corresponding transient plasma flows were seen in the near-conjugate polar ionosphere by the CUTLASS Finland HF radar. Prior to the occurrence of the FTE, the magnetometer on the WIND spacecraft ~226 RE upstream of the Earth in the solar wind detected a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF which is estimated to have reached the subsolar magnetopause ~77 min later. Shortly afterwards the Equator-S magnetometer observed a typical bipolar FTE signature in the magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause, just inside the magnetosphere. Almost simultaneously the CUTLASS Finland radar observed a strong transient flow in the F region plasma between 78° and 83° magnetic latitude, near the ionospheric region predicted to map along geomagnetic field lines to the spacecraft. The flow signature (and the data set as a whole is found to be fully consistent with the view that the FTE was formed by a burst of magnetopause reconnection.Key words. Interplanetary physics (ionosphere-magnetosphere interaction · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  7. The Shape of Mercury's Magnetopause: What Can BepiColombo Tell Us?

    Philpott, L. C.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Winslow, R. M.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate how limitations in MESSENGER magnetic field data coverage affect our ability to establish asymmetries in Mercury’s magnetopause and examine how BepiColombo observations will improve our understanding of the magnetopause shape.

  8. Turbidity Currents With Equilibrium Basal Driving Layers: A Mechanism for Long Runout

    Luchi, R.; Balachandar, S.; Seminara, G.; Parker, G.

    2018-02-01

    Turbidity currents run out over 100 km in lakes and reservoirs, and over 1,000 km in the ocean. They do so without dissipating themselves via excess entrainment of ambient water. Existing layer-averaged formulations cannot capture this. We use a numerical model to describe the temporal evolution of a turbidity current toward steady state under condition of zero net sediment flux at the bed. The flow self-partitions itself into two layers. The lower "driving layer" approaches an invariant flow thickness, velocity profile, and suspended sediment concentration profile that sequesters nearly all of the suspended sediment. This layer can continue indefinitely at steady state over a constant bed slope. The upper "driven layer" contains a small fraction of the suspended sediment. The devolution of the flow into these two layers likely allows the driving layer to run out long distances.

  9. High temporal resolution energetic particle soundings at the magnetopause on November 8, 1977, using ISEE 2

    Fritz, T.A.; Fahnenstiel, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of >24 keV ion data obtained from the ISEE 2 satellite on an inbound crossing of the magnetopause at 1130 LT on November 8, 1977, from 0200 to 0330 UT. Based on the technique presented by Williams (1979) of sounding the position of the magnetopause using energetic particle azimuthal asymmetries, we exploit the four second time resolution available on the ISEE 2 satellite to determine the location, structure, orientation, and temporal variation of the magnetopause region. We find that the trapping boundary for energetic ions is sharp and well defined for approx.35 keV ions and that it corresponds most of the time to the time to earthward edge of the plasma boundary layer. Usually magnetosheath plasma penetrated the trapping boundary only up to distances approximately that of the plasma (1 keV) ion gyroradius (approx.100 km). On some occasions magnetosheath-like plasma was observed up to 800 km inside the trapping boundary but these occurrences were usually associated with rapid trapping boundary movement with velocities exceeding 50 km/s. If the trapping boundary determines the position of the last closed field line, the occasional occurrence of magnetosheath plasma deep inside the trapping boundary is inconsistent with accepted merging theories. The determination of the position of the trapping boundary using five separate ion energy channels from 24 to 70 keV was internally consistent for the lowest three channels although the higher energy channels consistently indicated somewhat smaller values. Radial motion was present affecting the position of the trapping boundary on two scales; a wave-like oscillation with a period of approx.105 s superimposed on a larger scale irregular 'breathing' motion. We argue that the wave nature of the trapping boundary was the cause of the slight difference between the higher and lower energy ion trapping boundary locations

  10. Combined Wave and Current Bottom Boundary Layers: A Review

    2016-03-01

    transport, (3) the process of wave transition in shallow water in the presence of strong alongshore currents, (4) the interaction between oblique...conducted in relatively deep water with bottom sediment comprised mostly of silt. One of the earlier studies for a wide shallow shelf was conducted off...wave asymmetry in combined flows and how this drives mass transport, (3) the process of wave transition in shallow water in the presence of strong

  11. Critical current density for spin transfer torque switching with composite free layer structure

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2009-01-01

    Critical current density of composite free layer (CFL) in magnetic tunneling junction is investigated. CFL consists of two exchange coupled ferromagnetic layers, where the coupling is parallel or anti-parallel. Instability condition of the CFL under the spin transfer torque, which is related with critical current density, is obtained by analytic spin wave excitation model and confirmed by macro-spin Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The critical current densities for the coupled two identical...

  12. Evaluation of Current Planetary Boundary Layer Retrieval Capabilities from Space

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Schaefer, Alexander J.; Blaisdell, John; Yorks, John

    2016-01-01

    The PBL over land remains a significant gap in our water and energy cycle understanding from space. This work combines unique NASA satellite and model products to demonstrate the ability of current sensors (advanced IR sounding and lidar) to retrieve PBL properties and in turn their potential to be used globally to evaluate and improve weather and climate prediction models. While incremental progress has been made in recent AIRS retrieval versions, insufficient vertical resolution remains in terms of detecting PBL properties. Lidar shows promise in terms of detecting vertical gradients (and PBLh) in the lower troposphere, but daytime conditions over land remain a challenge due to noise, and their coverage is limited to approximately 2 weeks or longer return times.

  13. Current carrying properties of double layers and low frequency auroral fluctuations

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical simulations showed recurring interruption and recovery of electron and ion currents through double layers. The time period tau of the recurring phenomena is governed by the ion dynamics; for ions with a drift V/sub i/ entering the simulation plasma such that V/sub i/ V/sub ti/ ion-acoustic modes also appear in the electron- and ion-current fluctuations. The electron current fluctuations are governed by the ion current through the Langmuir criterion. It is suggested that some low frequency auroral fluctuations could possibly be explained by current fluctuations through double layers

  14. Single-layer skull approximations perform well in transcranial direct current stimulation modeling

    Rampersad, S.M.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2013-01-01

    In modeling the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation, the representation of the skull is an important factor. In a spherical model, we compared a realistic skull modeling approach, in which the skull consisted of three isotropic layers, to anisotropic and isotropic single-layer

  15. Current Spreading Layer with High Transparency and Conductivity for near-ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    Lin, Li; Jensen, Flemming; Herstrøm, Berit

    Transparent conductive aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) layer was deposited on GaN-based near-ultraviolet (NUV) light emitting epitaxial wafers as current spreading layer by a sputtering process. Efforts were made to improve the electrical properties of AZO in order to produce ohmic contact....

  16. Current limitation by an electric double layer in ion laser discharges

    Torven, S.

    1977-12-01

    A theory for current limitation in ion laser discharges is investigated. The basic mechanism considered is saturation of the positive ion flux at an electric double layer by the limited flux of neutral atoms. The result is compared with a recently published synthesis of a large number of experimental data which agree well with those predicted by the double layer model

  17. Diffusion Region's Structure at the Subsolar Magnetopause with MMS Data

    Cozzani, G.; Retino, A.; Califano, F.; Alexandrova, A.; Catapano, F.; Fu, H.; Le Contel, O.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Ahmadi, N.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Breuillard, H.; Mirioni, L.; Ergun, R.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Russell, C. T.; Nakamura, R.; Moore, T. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Mauk, B.; Burch, J.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in the magnetosphere in thin current sheets, where a change in the magneticfield topology leads to rapid conversion of magnetic energy into ion and electron energy. To allow for magneticfield reconfiguration, both ions and electrons have to become demagnetized in the ion and electron diffusionregions, respectively. MMS spacecraft observations at inter-spacecraft separation ˜ 10 km (correspondingto ˜ 5 d_e at the magnetopause) allow, for the first time, to make multi-point studies of the structure of theelectron diffusion region (EDR). We present MMS observations on January,27th 2017 of one magnetopausecrossing close to the subsolar point showing several signatures consistent with an EDR encounter nearbya magnetic field minimum. The proximity to the reconnection site is further substantiated by the FirstOrder Taylor Expansion (FOTE) method applied to the magnetic field data. Observations suggest that allspacecraft passed through the EDR. Despite of the small inter-spacecraft separation (7 km), the observationsshow important differences among spacecraft. We focus on the comparison between MMS3 and MMS4 sincethey show the most striking differences. MMS3 measures a stronger parallel electron heating and highercurrent densities than MMS4. Both satellites observe crescent-shaped electron distribution functions on themagnetospheric side but MMS4 observes them over a longer time interval. These observations suggest thatMMS3 is passing closer to the reconnection site than MMS4. The differences between the observations by thetwo spacecraft indicate that the EDR is rather structured over scales of a few electron inertial lengths. Wealso evaluate the Generalized Ohm's law and find that the electric field is mainly balanced by the divergenceof the electron pressure tensor while the electron inertia term is negligible.

  18. Long-term stability of a one-dimensional current-driven double layer

    Hori, N.; Yamamoto, T.

    1988-01-01

    Long-term (>an electron transit time over the system) stability of a one-dimensional current-driven double layer is studied by numerical experiments using particles. In these experiments, the potential difference across the system is self-consistently determined by the space charge distributions inside the system. Each boundary of the system supplies a nondrifting half-Maxwellian plasma. The current density is increased by increasing the number density of the source plasma at the injection (right) boundary. A double layer can be developed by injection of a sufficiently high current density. For a fixed level of current injection, plasmas carrying no current with various densities (n/sup ts/ 0 ) are loaded on the left side of the system. Whether or not the generated double layer can maintain its potential drop for a long period depends on the density (n/sup ts/ 0 ) relative to the initial density (n/sup */ 0 ) near the injection boundary: (1) the double layer is found to grow when n/sup ts/ 0 = n/sup */ 0 ; (2) the steady double layer is seen for a long period when n/sup ts/ 0 approx. >n/sup */ 0 ; (3) the double layer is found to decay when n/sup ts/ 0 is even higher than n/sup */ 0 . A new concept of the current polarizability P/sub c/ = J/n/sup number/ is introduced for understanding these results, where J is the current density flowing through the double layer and n/sup number/ is the plasma density at the injection front, i.e., the low-potential edge of the double layer

  19. Extended theory of main ion and impurity rotation and bootstrap current in a shear layer

    Kim, Y.B.; Hinton, F.L.; St. John, H.; Taylor, T.S.; Wroblewski, D.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper, standard neoclassical theory has been extended into the shear layer. Main ion and impurity ion rotation velocity and bootstrap current within shear layer in H-mode are discussed. Inside the H-mode shear layer, standard neoclassical theory is not valid since the ion poloidal gyroradius becomes comparable to pressure gradient and electric field gradient scale length. To allow for arbitrary ratio of ρθi/L n and ρθi/L Er a new kinetic theory of main ion species within electric field shear layer has been developed with the assumption that ρθi/R o is still small. As a consequence, both impurity flows and bootstrap current have to be modified. We present modified expressions of impurity flows and bootstrap current are presented neglecting ion temperature gradient. Comparisons with DIII-D measurements are also discussed

  20. Particle-bearing currents in uniform density and two-layer fluids

    Sutherland, Bruce R.; Gingras, Murray K.; Knudson, Calla; Steverango, Luke; Surma, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Lock-release gravity current experiments are performed to examine the evolution of a particle bearing flow that propagates either in a uniform-density fluid or in a two-layer fluid. In all cases, the current is composed of fresh water plus micrometer-scale particles, the ambient fluid is saline, and the current advances initially either over the surface as a hypopycnal current or at the interface of the two-layer fluid as a mesopycnal current. In most cases the tank is tilted so that the ambient fluid becomes deeper with distance from the lock. For hypopycnal currents advancing in a uniform density fluid, the current typically slows as particles rain out of the current. While the loss of particles alone from the current should increase the current's buoyancy and speed, in practice the current's speed decreases because the particles carry with them interstitial fluid from the current. Meanwhile, rather than settling on the sloping bottom of the tank, the particles form a hyperpycnal (turbidity) current that advances until enough particles rain out that the relatively less dense interstitial fluid returns to the surface, carrying some particles back upward. When a hypopycnal current runs over the surface of a two-layer fluid, the particles that rain out temporarily halt their descent as they reach the interface, eventually passing through it and again forming a hyperpycnal current. Dramatically, a mesopycnal current in a two-layer fluid first advances along the interface and then reverses direction as particles rain out below and fresh interstitial fluid rises above.

  1. A high-latitude, low-latitude boundary layer model of the convection current system

    Siscoe, G.L.; Lotko, W.; Sonnerup, B.U.O.

    1991-01-01

    Observations suggest that both the high- and low-latitude boundary layers contribute to magnetospheric convection, and that their contributions are linked. In the interpretation pursued here, the high-latitude boundary layer (HBL) generates the voltage while the low-latitude boundary layer (LBL) generates the current for the part of the convection electric circuit that closes through the ionosphere. This paper gives a model that joins the high- and low-latitude boundary layers consistently with the ionospheric Ohm's law. It describes an electric circuit linking both boundary layers, the region 1 Birkeland currents, and the ionospheric Pedersen closure currents. The model works by using the convection electric field that the ionosphere receives from the HBL to determine two boundary conditions to the equations that govern viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling. The result provides the needed self-consistent coupling between the two boundary layers and fully specifies the solution for the viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling equations. The solution shows that in providing the current required by the ionospheric Ohm's law, the LBL needs only a tenth of the voltage that spans the HBL. The solution also gives the latitude profiles of the ionospheric electric field, parallel currents, and parallel potential. It predicts that the plasma in the inner part of the LBL moves sunward instead of antisunward and that, as the transpolar potential decreases below about 40 kV, reverse polarity (region 0) currents appear at the poleward border of the region 1 currents. A possible problem with the model is its prediction of a thin boundary layer (∼1000 km), whereas thicknesses inferred from satellite data tend to be greater

  2. One kind of atmosphere-ocean three layer model for calculating the velocity of ocean current

    Jing, Z; Xi, P

    1979-10-01

    A three-layer atmosphere-ocean model is given in this paper to calcuate the velocity of ocean current, particularly the function of the vertical coordinate, taking into consideratiln (1) the atmospheric effect on the generation of ocean current, (2) a calculated coefficient of the eddy viscosity instead of an assumed one, and (3) the sea which actually varies in depth.

  3. Current limitation and formation of plasma double layers in a non-uniform magnetic field

    Plamondon, R.; Teichmann, J.; Torven, S.

    1986-07-01

    Formation of strong double layers has been observed experimentally in a magnetised plasma column maintained by a plasma source. The magnetic field is approximately axially homogenous except in a region at the anode where the electric current flows into a magnetic mirror. The double layer has a stationary position only in the region of non-uniform magnetic field or at the aperture separating the source and the plasma column. It is characterized by a negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic of the device. The parameter space,where the double layer exists, has been studied as well as the corresponding potential profiles and fluctuation spectra. The electric current and the axial electric field are oppositely directed between the plasma source and a potential minimum which is formed in the region of inhomogeneous magnetic field. Electron reflection by the resulting potential barrier is found to be an important current limitation mechanism. (authors)

  4. Harmonic current layer method for the design of superconducting quadrupole magnetic field

    Zizek, F.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field of a superconducting quadrupole is investigated by the method of harmonic current layers of cylindrical shape. The superconducting winding is replaced by a system of thin current layers with a harmonically distributed density of the surface current along the circumference. The effect of the outer ferromagnetic circuit with an arbitrary constant permeability over the cross section is replaced analogically. The resultant magnetic field is then given by the superposition of the contributions from the individual current layers. The calculation method can be modified for the selection of the geometry of the winding for the latter to meet the demand for the high homogeneity of the gradient of magnetic induction in the working space of the superconducting quadrupole. (author)

  5. Shift of the Magnetopause Reconnection Line to the Winter Hemisphere Under Southward IMF Conditions: Geotail and MMS Observations

    Kitamura, N.; Hasegawa, H.; Saito, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Yokota, S.; Nagai, T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Dorelli, J. C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    At 02:13 UT on 18 November 2015 when the geomagnetic dipole was tilted by -27deg, the MMS spacecraft observed southward reconnection jets near the subsolar magnetopause under southward and dawnward interplanetary magnetic field conditions. Based on four-spacecraft estimations of the magnetic field direction near the separatrix and the motion and direction of the current sheet, the location of the reconnection line was estimated to be approx.1.8 R(sub E) or further northward of MMS. The Geotail spacecraft at GSM Z approx. 1.4 R(sub E) also observed southward reconnection jets at the dawnside magnetopause 30-40 min later. The estimated reconnection line location was northward of GSM Z approx.2 R(sub E). This crossing occurred when MMS observed purely southward magnetic fields in the magnetosheath. The simultaneous observations are thus consistent with the hypothesis that the dayside magnetopause reconnection line shifts from the subsolar point toward the northem (winter) hemisphere due to the effect of geomagnetic dipole tilt.

  6. Observation of negative potential depression on double layer during a phase of current disruption

    Fujita, H.; Matsuo, K.; Yagura, S.

    1984-01-01

    The negative potential depression with a depth of approximately electron temperature is observed on the low potential tail of the double layer just at the moment when the electron current passing through the layer is disrupted. The depression is confirmed to serve as an electron thermal barrier and form an ion hole from phase-space measurements of electrons and ions, respectively. The depth of the depression becomes maximum when the density around the depression becomes most inhomogeneous. (author)

  7. Transient events at the magnetopause and bipolar magnetic signatures

    Krupařová, Oksana; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Přech, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, September (2015), s. 19-26 ISSN 0032-0633 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19376S; GA ČR GP13-37174P Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : flux transfer events * magnetopause deformation * magnetosheath * fluctuations * magnetic reconnection * foreshock bubbles Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.942, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0032063315000434#

  8. MHD waves, reconnection, and plasma transport at the dayside magnetopause

    Johnson, J.R.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth creates a huge cavity in the solar wind known as the magnetosphere. The transition region between the solar wind plasma and magnetosphere plasma is of substantial interest because many magnetospheric processes are governed by the transport of particles, momentum and energy across that boundary. At this boundary, the magnetopause, there is an abrupt decrease in plasma bulk flow, density and pressure, and large increase in temperature and magnetic field. Throughout this region the plasmas is large. Large amplitude compressional waves are nearly always found in the region just outside of the magnetopause. These waves are either intrinsic solar wind fluctuations or they may be global mirror modes which are generated in a localized region of large pressure anisotropy just outside the magnetopause. The substantial background gradients observed at the magnetopause strongly couple the compressional waves with kinetic Alfven waves near the Alfven resonance location, leading to substantial particle transport. Moreover, for a sheared background magnetic field, as is found at times of southward interplanetary magnetic field, the mode converted kinetic Alfven waves can propagate to the location where k parallel = 0 and generate islands in phase space. We present a solution of the kinetic-MHD wave equations for the magnetic field structure based on a realistic steady state profile which includes: a sheared magnetic field; magnetic curvature; and gradients in the background density, pressure and magnetic field. We incorporate wave-particle resonance interactions for electrons and ions to obtain the dissipation. The background magnetic Keld curvature and gradient give rise to drifts which alter the resonance condition for the various particle species (ω - k circ V d - k parallel v parallel ) and reduces the Landau damping of the kinetic Alfven wave, allowing it to propagate to the k parallel = 0 location

  9. Large-Scale Survey of the Structure of the Dayside Magnetopause by MMS

    Paschmann, G.; Haaland, S. E.; Phan, T. D.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Saito, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes the generation and initial utilization of a database containing 80 vector and scalar quantities, for a total of 8,670 magnetopause and magnetosheath current sheet crossings by MMS1, using plasma and magnetic field data from the Fast Plasma Investigation, Fluxgate Magnetometer, and Hot Plasma Composition Analyzer instruments, augmented by solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data from CDAWeb. Based on a determination of the current sheet width, measured and calculated vector and scalar quantities are stored for the two sides of the current sheet and for selected times within the current sheet. The only manual operations were the classification of the current sheets according to the type of boundary, the character of the magnetic field transition, and the quality of the current sheet fit. To characterize the database, histograms of selected key quantities are presented. We then give the statistics for the duration, motion, and thicknesses of the magnetopause current sheet, using single-spacecraft techniques for the determination of the normal velocities, obtaining median results of 12.9 s, 38.5 km/s, and 705.4 km, respectively. When scaled to the ion inertial length, the median thickness became 12.6; there were no thicknesses less than one. Next, we apply the Walén relation to find crossings that are rotational discontinuities and thus may indicate ongoing magnetic reconnection. For crossings where the velocities in the outflow region exceed the velocity on the magnetosheath side by at least 250 km/s, 47% meet our rotational discontinuity criteria. If we require the outflow to exceed 250 km/s along the L direction, then the percentage rises to 68%.

  10. Patterns of magnetic field merging sites on the magnetopause

    Luhmann, J.G.; Walker, R.J.; Russell, C.T.; Crooker, N.U.; Spreiter, J.R.; Stahara, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Several years ago, Crooker presented a qualitative picture of the merging sites on the magnetopause defined as the points where the magnetospheric and magnetosheath field are antiparallel. However, Cowley pointed out that merging can also occur where these fields are not exactly antiparallel, but merely have antiparallel components. Using realistic models of the magnetosphere and magnetosheath magnetic fields, the angles between the fields at the magnetopause boundary were determined for different interplanetary field orientations, including radial field and Parker spiral field. The results are summarized in Figure 1, which displays contours on the dayside magnetopause (viewed from the sun, i.e., the GSE Y-Z plane projection) of equal value of the cosine of the angle between the magnetospheric and magnetosheath model fields. Only contours with negative values, implying some antiparallel component, are shown. Values at the contours, starting with the contour filled with shading, are -.98, -.95, -.9, -.8, -.7, -.6, -.5, -.4, -.3, -.2, -.1, -.0. The interplanetary field orientations are indicated in vector notation in the lower right corners. In particular, the pattern for a 45 0 cone angle is shown in the fourth diagram in the right hand column and patterns for northward and southward fields occupy the first position in the first column and the second position in the right hand column. These results can be used for comparisons with observed distribution of flux transfer events and for studies of magnetospheric particle leakage

  11. Archaeal S-Layers: Overview and Current State of the Art

    Thiago Rodrigues-Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to bacteria, all archaea possess cell walls lacking peptidoglycan and a number of different cell envelope components have also been described. A paracrystalline protein surface layer, commonly referred to as S-layer, is present in nearly all archaea described to date. S-layers are composed of only one or two proteins and form different lattice structures. In this review, we summarize current understanding of archaeal S-layer proteins, discussing topics such as structure, lattice type distribution among archaeal phyla and glycosylation. The hexagonal lattice type is dominant within the phylum Euryarchaeota, while in the Crenarchaeota this feature is mainly associated with specific orders. S-layers exclusive to the Crenarchaeota have also been described, which are composed of two proteins. Information regarding S-layers in the remaining archaeal phyla is limited, mainly due to organism description through only culture-independent methods. Despite the numerous applied studies using bacterial S-layers, few reports have employed archaea as a study model. As such, archaeal S-layers represent an area for exploration in both basic and applied research.

  12. Ultrathin silicon dioxide layers with a low leakage current density formed by chemical oxidation of Si

    Asuha,; Kobayashi, Takuya; Maida, Osamu; Inoue, Morio; Takahashi, Masao; Todokoro, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2002-10-01

    Chemical oxidation of Si by use of azeotrope of nitric acid and water can form 1.4-nm-thick silicon dioxide layers with a leakage current density as low as those of thermally grown SiO2 layers. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves for these ultrathin chemical SiO2 layers have been measured due to the low leakage current density. The leakage current density is further decreased to approx1/5 (cf. 0.4 A/cm2 at the forward gate bias of 1 V) by post-metallization annealing at 200 degC in hydrogen. Photoelectron spectroscopy and C-V measurements show that this decrease results from (i) increase in the energy discontinuity at the Si/SiO2 interface, and (ii) elimination of Si/SiO2 interface states and SiO2 gap states.

  13. Comparison of dayside current layers in Venus' ionosphere and earth's equatorial electrojet

    Cole, Keith D.

    1993-01-01

    The major physical aspects of the equatorial electrojet of Earth and the dayside ionospheric current layers of Venus are compared, viz., the electric current intensity and total current, roles of electric field, pressure and gravity, diffusion time scales, and the Bernouille effect. The largest potential differences, of the order of 10 volts, horizontally across the dayside ionosphere of Venus, have important implications for possible dynamo action in the Venus ionosphere and the application of an electric field from the lower atmosphere or from the solar wind. An upper limit to the horizontal scale of vertical magnetic fields in the Venus ionosphere is estimated thereby for the first time. New upper limits on the velocity in, and thickness of, a possible S layer at Venus are presented. If an S layer exists, it is only for extreme conditions of the solar wind. A mechanism for formation of magnetic ropes in the Venus ionosphere is also proposed.

  14. Cluster observations of continuous reconnection at the magnetopause under steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    T. D. Phan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available On 26 January 2001, the Cluster spacecraft detected high-speed plasma jets at multiple crossings of the high-latitude duskside magnetopause (MP and boundary layer (BL over a period of more than 2h. The 4 spacecraft combined spent more than half of this time in the MP/BL and jets were observed whenever a spacecraft was in the MP. These observations were made under steady southward and dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF conditions. The magnetic shear across the local MP was ~100° and β~1 in the adjacent magnetosheath. The jet velocity is in remarkable agreement with reconnection prediction throughout the entire interval, except for one crossing that had no ion measurements inside the current layer. The flow speed measured in the deHoffmann Teller frame is 90% of the Alfvén speed on average for the 10 complete MP current layer crossings that are resolved by the ion measurements. These findings strongly suggest that reconnection was continuously active for more than two hours. The jets were directed persistently in the same northward and anti-sunward direction, implying that the X-line was always below the spacecraft. This feature is inconsistent with patchy and random reconnection or convecting multiple X-lines. The majority of MP/BL crossings in this two-hour interval were partial crossings, implying that they are caused by bulges sliding along the MP, not by inward-outward motion of a uniformly thin MP/BL. The presence of the bulges suggests that, although reconnection is continuously active under steady IMF conditions, its rate may be modulated. The present investigation also reveals that (1 the predicted ion D-shaped distributions are absent in all reconnection jets on this day, (2 the electric field fluctuations are larger in the reconnecting MP than in the magnetosheath proper, but their amplitudes never exceed 20mV/m, (3 the ion-electron differential motion is ~20km/s for the observed MP current density of ~50nA/m2 (∇× B, thus

  15. Self-consistent model of the low-latitude boundary layer

    Phan, T.D.; Sonnerup, B.U.Oe.; Lotko, W.

    1989-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional, steady state, viscous model of the dawnside and duskside low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) has been developed. It incorporates coupling to the ionosphere via field-aligned currents and associated field-aligned potential drops, governed by a simple conductance law, and it describes boundary layer currents, magnetic fields, and plasma flow in a self-consistent manner. The magnetic field induced by these currents leads to two effects: (1) a diamagnetic depression of the magnetic field in the equatorial region and (2) bending of the field lines into parabolas in the xz plane with their vertices in the equatorial plane, at z = 0, and pointing in the flow direction, i.e., tailward. Both effects are strongest at the magnetopause edge of the boundary layer and vanish at the magnetospheric edge. The diamagnetic depression corresponds to an excess of plasma pressure in the equatorial boundary layer near the magnetopause. The boundary layer structure is governed by a fourth-order, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation in which one nondimensional parameter, the Hartmann number M, appears. A second parameter, introduced via the boundary conditions, is a nondimensional flow velocity v 0 * at the magnetopause. Numerical results from the model are presented and the possible use of observations to determine the model parameters is discussed. The main new contribution of the study is to provide a better description of the field and plasma configuration in the LLBL itself and to clarify in quantitative terms the circumstances in which induced magnetic fields become important

  16. Flux pinning and critical current in layered type-II superconductors in parallel magnetic fields

    Prokic, V.; Davidovic, D.; Dobrosavljevic-Grujic, L.

    1995-01-01

    We have shown, within the Ginzburg-Landau theory, that the interaction between vortices and normal-metal layers in high-T c superconductor--normal-metal superlattices can cause high critical-current densities j c . The interaction is primarily magnetic, except at very low temperatures T, where the core interaction is dominant. For a lattice of vortices commensurate with an array of normal-metal layers in a parallel magnetic field H, strong magnetic pinning is obtained, with a nonmonotonic critical-current dependence on H, and with j c of the order of 10 7 --10 8 A/cm 2

  17. Cross-Field Current Instabilities in Thin Ionization Layers and the Enhanced Aurora

    Johnson, Jay R.; Okuda, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    Nearly half of the time, auroral displays exhibit thin, bright layers known as 'enhanced aurora'. There is a substantial body of evidence that connects these displays with thin, dense, heavy ion layers in the E-region. Based on the spectral characteristics of the enhanced layers, it is believed that they result when wave-particle interaction heats ambient electrons to energies at or just above the 17 eV ionization energy of N2. While there are several possible instabilities that could produce suprathermal electrons in thin layers, there has been no clear theoretical investigation which examines in detail how wave instabilities in the thin ionization layers could develop and produce the suprathermal electrons. We examine instabilities which would occur in thin, dense, heavy ion layers using extensive analytical analysis combined with particle simulations. We analyze a cross field current instability that is found to be strongly unstable in the heavy ion layers. Electrostatic simulations show that substantial heating of the ambient electrons occurs with energization at or above the N2 ionization energy.

  18. Limiting diffusion current at rotating disk electrode with dense particle layer.

    Weroński, P; Nosek, M; Batys, P

    2013-09-28

    Exploiting the concept of diffusion permeability of multilayer gel membrane and porous multilayer we have derived a simple analytical equation for the limiting diffusion current at rotating disk electrode (RDE) covered by a thin layer with variable tortuosity and porosity, under the assumption of negligible convection in the porous film. The variation of limiting diffusion current with the porosity and tortuosity of the film can be described in terms of the equivalent thickness of stagnant solution layer, i.e., the average ratio of squared tortuosity to porosity. In case of monolayer of monodisperse spherical particles, the equivalent layer thickness is an algebraic function of the surface coverage. Thus, by means of cyclic voltammetry of RDE with a deposited particle monolayer we can determine the monolayer surface coverage. The effect of particle layer adsorbed on the surface of RDE increases non-linearly with surface coverage. We have tested our theoretical results experimentally by means of cyclic voltammetry measurements of limiting diffusion current at the glassy carbon RDE covered with a monolayer of 3 μm silica particles. The theoretical and experimental results are in a good agreement at the surface coverage higher than 0.7. This result suggests that convection in a monolayer of 3 μm monodisperse spherical particles is negligibly small, in the context of the coverage determination, in the range of very dense particle layers.

  19. Graphene as current spreading layer on AlGaInP light emitting diodes

    Guo, Xia; Feng, Yajie; Liu, Qiaoli; Hu, Anqi; He, Xiaoying; Hu, Zonghai

    2018-05-01

    Due to high transmittance and high mobility, graphene is one of the promising candidates for a current spreading layer, which is crucial to light emitting diode (LED) performance. In this paper, improved AlGaInP LED performance was reported after graphene was applied on the GaP surface. Due to its lowered work function difference than with the GaN material, the electrical properties remain the same without additional voltage bias. The light output power is enhanced by about 40% under the current injection of 5 mA at room temperature, which was confirmed by the light emission profile analysis in this study. Such results indicate that raphene is a promising candidate as a current spreading layer under low current injection.

  20. Observation of a current-limited double layer in a linear turbulent-heating device

    Inuzuka, H.; Torii, Y.; Nagatsu, M.; Tsukishima, T.

    1985-01-01

    Time- and space-resolved measurements of strong double layers (DLs) have been carried out for the first time on a linear turbulent-heating device, together with those of fluctuation spectra and precise current measurements. A stable stong DL is formed even when the electric current through the DL is less than the so-called Bohm value. Discussion of the formation and decay processes is given, indicating a transition from an ion-acoustic DL to a monotonic DL

  1. Net currents in the wave bottom boundary layer: on waveshape streaming and progressive wave streaming

    Kranenburg, Wouter; Ribberink, Jan S.; Uittenbogaard, R.E.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The net current (streaming) in a turbulent bottom boundary layer under waves above a flat bed, identified as potentially relevant for sediment transport, is mainly determined by two competing mechanisms: an onshore streaming resulting from the horizontal non-uniformity of the velocity field under

  2. Sinking of armour layer around a cylinder exposed to a current

    Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    The flow processes in a scour protection around a monopile in steady current are described in relation to transport of sediment in the scour protection based on physical model tests. The scour protection consisted of uniformly distributed coarse stones without filter layer. Transport of sediment ...

  3. Modification of critical current in HTSC tape conductors by a ferromagnetic layer

    Goemoery, F; Souc, J; Seiler, E; Vojenciak, M; Granados, X

    2008-01-01

    In some applications of tape conductors from high temperature superconductors (HTSC) the magnetic field is created by the transported current itself. This is e.g. the case of power transmission cables or current leads. Quite complex distribution of local magnetic field determines then the ability of the superconducting element to carry electrical current. We have investigated how much the critical current of a tape conductor can be changed by putting a ferromagnetic layer in the vicinity of the HTSC material. Numerical procedure has been developed to resolve the current and field distribution in such superconductor-ferromagnet composite tape. Theoretical predictions have been confirmed by experiments on sample made from Bi-2223/Ag composite tape. The critical current of such tape can be improved by placing a soft ferromagnetic material at the tape's edges. On the other hand, the calculations show that the ferromagnetic substrate of YBCO coated tape reduces its self-field critical current

  4. Low and middle altitude cusp particle signatures for general magnetopause reconnection rate variations. 1: Theory

    Lockwood, M.; Smith, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    We present predictions of the signatures of magnetosheath particle precipitation (in the regions classified as open low-latitude boundary layer, cusp, mantle and polar cap) for periods when the interplanetary magnetic field has a southward component. These are made using the 'pulsating cusp' model of the effects of time-varying magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. Predictions are made for both low-altitude satellites in the topside ionosphere and for midaltitude spacecraft in the magnetosphere. Low-altitude cusp signatures, which show a continuous ion dispersion signature, reveal 'quasi-steady reconnection' (one limit of the pulsating cusp model), which persists for a period of at least 10 min. We estimate that 'quasi-steady' in this context corresponds to fluctuations in the reconnection rate of a factor of 2 or less. The other limit of the pulsating cusp model explains the instantaneous jumps in the precipitating ion spectrum that have been observed at low altitudes. Such jumps are produced by isolated pulses of reconnection: that is, they are separated by intervals when the reconnection rate is zero. These also generate convecting patches on the magnetopause in which the field lines thread the boundary via a rotational discontinuity separated by more extensive regions of tangential discontinuity. Predictions of the corresponding ion precipitation signatures seen by midaltitude spacecraft are presented. We resolve the apparent contradiction between estimates of the width of the injection region from midaltitude data and the concept of continuous entry of solar wind plasma along open field lines. In addition, we reevaluate the use of pitch angle-energy dispersion to estimate the injection distance.

  5. Wind effect on currents in a thin surface layer of coastal waters faced open-sea

    Nakano, Masanao; Isozaki, Hisaaki; Isozaki, Tokuju; Nemoto, Masashi; Hasunuma, Keiichi; Kitamura, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Two-years of continuous observation of wind and current were carried out to investigate the relationship between them in the coastal waters off Tokai-mura, Ibaraki prefecture. Three instruments to measure the current were set in a thin surface layer of 3 m above the strong pycnocline, which is a common feature in coastal waters. Both of the power spectra of wind and currents showed very similar features, an outstanding high peak at 24-hour period and a range of high peaks longer than several-days period. The long term variation of the wind field always contained north-wind component, which contributed to forming the southward current along the shore throughout the year. A high correlation coefficient (0.64) was obtained between the wind and the current at a depth of 0.5 m on the basis of the two-year observation. Harmonic analysis revealed that an outstanding current with 24-hour period was the S 1 component (meteorological tide), and was driven by land and sea breezes. These breezes also contained solar tidal components such as K 1 , P 1 and S 2 . These wind components added their own wind driven currents on the original tidal currents. This meant that land and sea breezes generated wind driven currents with solar tidal periods which behaved like astronomical tidal currents. As result, coastal currents contained pseudo tidal currents which behaved like astronomical tidal currents. (author)

  6. Mechanisms of Current Transfer in Electrodeposited Layers of Submicron Semiconductor Particles

    Zhukov, N. D.; Mosiyash, D. S.; Sinev, I. V.; Khazanov, A. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Lapshin, I. V.

    2017-12-01

    Current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics of conductance in multigrain layers of submicron particles of silicon, gallium arsenide, indium arsenide, and indium antimonide have been studied. Nanoparticles of all semiconductors were obtained by processing initial single crystals in a ball mill and applied after sedimentation onto substrates by means of electrodeposition. Detailed analysis of the I- V curves of electrodeposited layers shows that their behavior is determined by the mechanism of intergranular tunneling emission from near-surface electron states of submicron particles. Parameters of this emission process have been determined. The proposed multigrain semiconductor structures can be used in gas sensors, optical detectors, IR imagers, etc.

  7. Duality of the magnetic flux tube and electric current descriptions magnetospheric plasma and energy flow

    Atkinson, G.

    1981-01-01

    The duality between electric current and magnetic flux tubes is outlined for the magnetosphere. Magnetic flux tubes are regarded as fluid elements subjected to various stresses. Current closure then becomes the dual of stress balance, and Poynting vector energy flow a dual of J x E dissipation. The stresses acting on a flux tube are magnetic stresses, which correspond to currents at a distance, and plasma stresses, which correspond to local currents. The duality between current and stress is traced for ionospheric ion drag forces, solar wind stresses at the magnetopause, inertial effects, and the effects of energetic plasma on flux tubes. The stress balance and dual current systems are outlined for idealized magnetospheres of increasing complexity. For a simple magnetosphere with no convective flow, the balance stresses are solar wind pressure and neutral sheet plasma pressure. The corresponding current systems are the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents and the magetotail current system. The introduction of convective flow introduces further stresses: ionospheric ion drag. Alfven layer shielding, and an imbalance in day-night magnetic stresses due to transport of flux tubes to the nightside by the solar wind. These stresses balance, and hence the corresponding additional currents (the ionospheric Pedersen current and the electrojets, the partial ring current, and two other current systems from the magnetopause and tail) must form a closed current system and do so by the region I and II field-aligned currents of Iijima and Potemra. The energy flow in the above models is described in terms of both Poynting vectors and the above current systems. Temporal variations examined are (1) an increase in dayside merging and/or nightside reconnection, (2) an increase in the energy density of plasma in the plasma sheet, (3) an increase in ionospheric conductivity, and (4) an increase in solar wind pressure

  8. Nowcasting and forecasting of the magnetopause and bow shock—A status update

    Petrinec, S. M.; Redmon, R. J.; Rastaetter, L.

    2017-01-01

    There has long been interest in knowing the shape and location of the Earth's magnetopause and of the standing fast-mode bow shock upstream of the Earth's magnetosphere. This quest for knowledge spans both the research and operations arenas. Pertinent to the latter, nowcasting and near-term forecasting are important for determining the extent to which the magnetosphere is compressed or expanded due to the influence of the solar wind bulk plasma and fields and the coupling to other magnetosphere-ionosphere processes with possible effects on assets. This article provides an update to a previous article on the same topic published 15 years earlier, with focus on studies that have been conducted, the current status of nowcasting and forecasting of geophysical boundaries, and future endeavors.

  9. Localized Oscillatory Energy Conversion in Magnetopause Reconnection

    Burch, J. L.; Ergun, R. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Webster, J. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Dorelli, J. C.; Rager, A. C.; Hwang, K.-J.; Phan, T. D.; Genestreti, K. J.; Allen, R. C.; Chen, L.-J.; Wang, S.; Gershman, D.; Le Contel, O.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Wilder, F. D.; Graham, D. B.; Hesse, M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Price, L. M.; Shay, M. A.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Pollock, C. J.; Denton, R. E.; Newman, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    Data from the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission are used to investigate asymmetric magnetic reconnection at the dayside boundary between the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind. High-resolution measurements of plasmas and fields are used to identify highly localized ( 15 electron Debye lengths) standing wave structures with large electric field amplitudes (up to 100 mV/m). These wave structures are associated with spatially oscillatory energy conversion, which appears as alternatingly positive and negative values of J · E. For small guide magnetic fields the wave structures occur in the electron stagnation region at the magnetosphere edge of the electron diffusion region. For larger guide fields the structures also occur near the reconnection X-line. This difference is explained in terms of channels for the out-of-plane current (agyrotropic electrons at the stagnation point and guide field-aligned electrons at the X-line).

  10. Current density redistribution from no current crowding to current crowding in Pb-free solder joints with an extremely thick Cu layer

    Han, Jung Kyu; Choi, Daechul; Fujiyoshi, Masaru; Chiwata, Nobuhiko; Tu, King-Ning

    2012-01-01

    In order to remove the effect of current crowding on electromigration, thick Cu under-bump metallization has been widely adopted in the electronics industry. Three-dimensional (3-D) integrated circuits, using through Si via Cu column interconnects, is being developed, and it seems that current crowding may not be a reliability issue. However, statistical experiments and 3-D finite element simulation indicate that there is a transition from no current crowding to current crowding, caused by void growth at the cathode. An analysis of the electromigration-induced failure mechanism in solder joints having a very thick Cu layer is presented. It is a unique failure mechanism, different from that in flip chip technology. Moreover, the study of marker displacement shows two different stages of drift velocity, which clearly demonstrates the back-stress effect and the development of compressive stress.

  11. Formation of presheath and current-free double layer in a two-electron-temperature plasma

    Sato, Kunihiro; Miyawaki, Fujio

    1992-02-01

    Development of the steady-state potential in a two-temperature-electron plasma in contact with the wall is investigated analytically. It is shown that if the hot- to cold electron temperature ratio is greater than ten, the potential drop in the presheath, which is allowed to have either a small value characterized by the cold electrons or a large value by the hot electrons, discontinuously changes at a critical value for the hot- to total electron density ratio. It is also found that the monotonically decreasing potential structure which consists of the first presheath, a current-free double layer, the second presheath, and the sheath can be steadily formed in a lower range of the hot- to total electron density ratio around the critical value. The current-free double layer is set up due to existence of the two electron species and cold ions generated by ionization so as to connect two presheath potentials at different levels. (author)

  12. Studies of low current back-discharge in point-plane geometry with dielectric layer

    Jaworek, A.; Rajch, E.; Czech, T.; Lackowski, M

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents results of spectroscopic investigations of back-discharge generated in the point-plane electrode geometry in air at atmospheric pressure, with the plane covered with fly ash layer. Four forms of the discharges were studied: onset streamers, glow, breakdown streamers and low-current back-arc discharge. Both polarities of the active discharge electrode, positive and negative, were tested. The back discharge is a type of DC electrical discharge, which take place when the passive plane electrode is covered with a dielectric layer. The layer can be made of solid material or a packed bed of dust or powder of low conductivity. The charge produced due to ionisation processes in the vicinity of the active point electrode is accumulated on the dielectric surface, and generates high electric field through this layer. When critical electric field through the layer is attained an electrical breakdown of the layer take place. The point of breakdown becomes a new source of ions of polarity opposite to those generated by the active electrode. The dielectric layer on the passive electrode causes that gaseous discharges such as breakdown streamers or arc start at lower voltages than they could in the case of normal corona discharge. The visual forms of the discharge were recorded and correlated with the current-voltage characteristics and optical emission spectra. Emission spectra of the discharge were measured in the light wavelength range of 200 to 600 nm to get information about excitation and ionisation processes. The light spectra were analysed by monochromator SPM-2 Karl-Zeiss-Jena with diffraction grating of 1302 grooves/mm and photomultiplier R375 (Hamamatsu) and signal preamplifier unit C7319 (Hamamatsu). The spectral analysis showed that the nitrogen molecular bands were dominant, but the emission of negative ions from the dielectric layer material were also detected. The most noticeable light emission in the range from 280 to 490 nm due to second

  13. CANDU fuel sheath integrity and oxide layer thickness determination by Eddy current technique

    Gheorghe, Gabriela; Man, Ion; Parvan, Marcel; Valeca, Serban

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results concerning the integrity assessment of the fuel elements cladding and measurements of the oxide layer on sheaths, using the eddy current technique. Flaw detection using eddy current provides information about the integrity of fuel element sheath or presence of defects in the sheath produced by irradiation. The control equipment consists of a flaw detector with eddy currents, operable in the frequency range 10 Hz to 10 MHz, and a differential probe. The calibration of the flaw detector is done using artificial defects (longitudinal, transversal, external and internal notches, bored and unbored holes) obtained on Zircaloy-4 tubes identical to those out of which the sheath of the CANDU fuel element is manufactured (having a diameter of 13.08 mm and a wall thickness of 0.4 mm). When analyzing the behavior of the fuel elements' cladding facing the corrosion is important to know the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer. The calibration of the device measuring the thickness of the oxide layer is done using a Zircaloy-4 tube identical to that which the cladding of the CANDU fuel element is manufactured of, and calibration foils, as well. (authors)

  14. Ion-Scale Structure in Mercury's Magnetopause Reconnection Diffusion Region

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Dorelli, John C.; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Raines, Jim M.; Slavin, James A.; Poh, Gangkai; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and time dependence of the electric field in a magnetopause diffusion region relate to the rate of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and a planetary magnetic field. Here we use approximately 150 milliseconds measurements of energetic electrons from the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft observed over Mercury's dayside polar cap boundary (PCB) to infer such small-scale changes in magnetic topology and reconnection rates. We provide the first direct measurement of open magnetic topology in flux transfer events at Mercury, structures thought to account for a significant portion of the open magnetic flux transport throughout the magnetosphere. In addition, variations in PCB latitude likely correspond to intermittent bursts of approximately 0.3 to 3 millivolts per meter reconnection electric fields separated by approximately 5 to10 seconds, resulting in average and peak normalized dayside reconnection rates of approximately 0.02 and approximately 0.2, respectively. These data demonstrate that structure in the magnetopause diffusion region at Mercury occurs at the smallest ion scales relevant to reconnection physics.

  15. Reconstruction of propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices at Mercury's magnetopause

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Blomberg, Lars G.; Cumnock, Judy A.; Solomon, Sean C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje

    2011-12-01

    A series of quasi-periodic magnetopause crossings were recorded by the MESSENGER spacecraft during its third flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, likely caused by a train of propagating Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices. We here revisit the observations to study the internal structure of the waves. Exploiting MESSENGER's rapid traversal of the magnetopause, we show that the observations permit a reconstruction of the structure of a rolled-up KH vortex directly from the spacecraft's magnetic field measurements. The derived geometry is consistent with all large-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field data, establishes the non-linear nature of the waves, and shows their vortex-like structure. In several of the wave passages, a reduction in magnetic field strength is observed in the middle of the wave, which is characteristic of rolled-up vortices and is related to the increase in magnetic pressure required to balance the centrifugal force on the plasma in the outer regions of a vortex, previously reported in computer simulations. As the KH wave starts to roll up, the reconstructed geometry suggests that the vortices develop two gradual transition regions in the magnetic field, possibly related to the mixing of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma, situated at the leading edges from the perspectives of both the magnetosphere and the magnetosheath.

  16. Proxy and in-situ studies of dayside magnetopause reconnection

    Scurry, L.; Russell, C.T. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics; Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The functional dependence of magnetic reconnection on solar wind parameters is examined utilizing the am geomagnetic index and satellite observations at the magnetopause. Several parameters in the solar wind are found to control geomagnetic activity. Reconnection is found to be most efficient when the interplanetary magnetic field is southward, although some activity remains when the IMF is horizontal and slightly northward. The reconnection efficiency increases with the solar wind dynamic pressure but decreases when the Mach number is greater than 7.5. These results are compared with the functional dependencies found by correlating solar wind and magnetosheath measurements with observations of accelerated tows at the magnetopause. Accelerated tows are found to occur most often when the interplanetary magnetic field is directed southward. However, accelerated flows do occur when the IMF is horizontal and northward. Accelerated flows are also affected by the magnetosheath beta such that higher beta inhibits their occurrence. The location of accelerated tows indicates that reconnection occurs mainly at the subsolar point.

  17. Energy transfer by magnetopause reconnection and the substorm parameter epsilon

    Gonzalez-Alarcon, W.D.; Gonzalez, A.L.C. de.

    1983-01-01

    An expression for the magnetopause reconnection power based on the dawn-dusk component of the reconnection electric field, that reduces to the substorm parameter epsilon for the limit that involves equal geomagnetic (B sub(G)) and magnetosheath (B sub(M)) magnetic field amplitudes at the magnetopause, is contrasted with the expression based on the whole reconnection electric field vector obtained by Gonzalez. The correlation examples of this report show that this (more general) expression for the reconnection power seems to correlate with the empirical dissipation parameter U sub(T) from Akasofu, with slightly better correlation coefficients than those obtained from similar correlations between the parameter epsilon and U sub(T). Thus, these (better) correlations show up for the more familiar values of the ratio B sub(G) / B sub(M) > 1. Nevertheless, the (expected) relatively small difference that seems to exist between these correlation coefficients suggests that, for practical purposes, the parameter epsilon could be used as well (instead of the more general expression) in similar correlation studies due to its impler format. On the other hand, studies that refer mainly to the difference in the magnitudes of epsilon and of the more general expression are expected to give results with less negligible differences. (Author) [pt

  18. Collaborative research: Dynamics of electrostatic solitary waves and their effects on current layers

    Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The project has accomplished the following achievements including the goals outlined in the original proposal. Generation and measurements of Debye-scale electron holes in laboratory: We have generated by beam injections electron solitary waves in the LAPD experiments. The measurements were made possible by the fabrication of the state-of-the-art microprobes at UCLA to measure Debye-scale electric fields [Chiang et al., 2011]. We obtained a result that challenged the state of knowledge about electron hole generation. We found that the electron holes were not due to two-stream instability, but generated by a current-driven instability that also generated whistler-mode waves [Lefebvre et al., 2011, 2010b]. Most of the grant supported a young research scientist Bertrand Lefebvre who led the dissemination of the laboratory experimental results. In addition to two publications, our work relevant to the laboratory experiments on electron holes has resulted in 7 invited talks [Chen, 2007, 2009; Pickett et al., 2009a; Lefebvre et al., 2010a; Pickett et al., 2010; Chen et al., 2011c, b] (including those given by the co-I Jolene Pickett) and 2 contributed talks [Lefebvre et al., 2009b, a]. Discovery of elecctron phase-space-hole structure in the reconnection electron layer: Our theoretical analyses and simulations under this project led to the discovery of an inversion electric field layer whose phase-space signature is an electron hole within the electron diffusion layer in 2D anti-parallel reconnection [Chen et al., 2011a]. We carried out particle tracing studies to understand the electron orbits that result in the phase-space hole structure. Most importantly, we showed that the current density in the electron layer is limited in collisionless reconnection with negligible guide field by the cyclotron turning of meandering electrons. Comparison of electrostatic solitary waves in current layers observed by Cluster and in LAPD: We compared the ESWs observed in a supersubstorm

  19. Diffuse layer effects on the current in galvanic cells containing supporting electrolyte

    Soestbergen, M. van, E-mail: m.vansoestbergen@tudelft.n [Materials Innovation Institute, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Precision and Microsystems Engineering, University of Technology Delft, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-02-01

    We study the effect of an inert supporting electrolyte on the steady-state ionic current through galvanic cells by solving the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck transport equation coupled to the generalized Frumkin-Butler-Volmer boundary equation for the electrochemical charge transfer at the electrodes. Consequently, the model presented here allows for non-zero space charge densities locally at the electrodes, thus extending the frequently used models based on the local electroneutrality condition by including diffuse layer (DL) effects. This extension is necessary since the DLs determine the ion concentration and electrical field at the reaction planes, which uniquely determine the charge transfer at the electrodes. In this work we present numerical results for systems which contain added inert supporting electrolyte using finite element discretization and compare those with semi-analytical results obtained using singular perturbation theory (limit of negligibly thin DLs). In case of negligibly thin DLs the presence of supporting electrolyte will introduce a limiting current below the classical diffusion-limiting current. Just as for systems without supporting electrolyte, the supporting electrolyte induced limiting current formally does not occur for systems having non-negligibly thin double DLs. For thin, however still finite, double layers this limit can still be seen as a steepening of the polarization curve for current vs. voltage.

  20. Diffuse layer effects on the current in galvanic cells containing supporting electrolyte

    Soestbergen, M. van

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of an inert supporting electrolyte on the steady-state ionic current through galvanic cells by solving the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck transport equation coupled to the generalized Frumkin-Butler-Volmer boundary equation for the electrochemical charge transfer at the electrodes. Consequently, the model presented here allows for non-zero space charge densities locally at the electrodes, thus extending the frequently used models based on the local electroneutrality condition by including diffuse layer (DL) effects. This extension is necessary since the DLs determine the ion concentration and electrical field at the reaction planes, which uniquely determine the charge transfer at the electrodes. In this work we present numerical results for systems which contain added inert supporting electrolyte using finite element discretization and compare those with semi-analytical results obtained using singular perturbation theory (limit of negligibly thin DLs). In case of negligibly thin DLs the presence of supporting electrolyte will introduce a limiting current below the classical diffusion-limiting current. Just as for systems without supporting electrolyte, the supporting electrolyte induced limiting current formally does not occur for systems having non-negligibly thin double DLs. For thin, however still finite, double layers this limit can still be seen as a steepening of the polarization curve for current vs. voltage.

  1. Eddy current imaging for electrical characterization of silicon solar cells and TCO layers

    Hwang, Byungguk; Hillmann, Susanne; Schulze, Martin; Klein, Marcus; Heuer, Henning

    2015-03-01

    Eddy Current Testing has been mainly used to determine defects of conductive materials and wall thicknesses in heavy industries such as construction or aerospace. Recently, high frequency Eddy Current imaging technology was developed. This enables the acquirement of information of different depth level in conductive thin-film structures by realizing proper standard penetration depth. In this paper, we summarize the state of the art applications focusing on PV industry and extend the analysis implementing achievements by applying spatially resolved Eddy Current Testing. The specific state of frequency and complex phase angle rotation demonstrates diverse defects from front to back side of silicon solar cells and characterizes homogeneity of sheet resistance in Transparent Conductive Oxide (TCO) layers. In order to verify technical feasibility, measurement results from the Multi Parameter Eddy Current Scanner, MPECS are compared to the results from Electroluminescence.

  2. Critical current survival in the YBCO superconducting layer of a delaminated coated conductor

    Feng, Feng; Fu, Qishu; Qu, Timing; Mu, Hui; Gu, Chen; Yue, Yubin; Wang, Linli; Yang, Zhirong; Han, Zhenghe; Feng, Pingfa

    2018-04-01

    A high-temperature superconducting coated conductor can be practically applied in electric equipment due to its favorable mechanical properties and critical current (I c) performance. However, the coated conductor can easily delaminate because of its poor stress tolerance along the thickness direction. It would be interesting to investigate whether the I c of the delaminated YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) layer can be preserved. In this study, coated conductor samples manufactured through the metal organic deposition route were delaminated by liquid nitrogen immersion. Delaminated samples, including the YBCO layer and silver stabilizer, were obtained. Delamination occurred inside the YBCO layer and near the YBCO-CeO2 interface, as suggested by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction. A scanning Hall probe system was employed to measure the I c distribution of the original sample and the delaminated sample. It was found that approximately 50% of the I c can be preserved after delamination, which was verified by I c measurements using the four-probe method. Dense and crack-free morphologies of the delaminated surfaces were observed by SEM, which accounts for the I c survival of the delaminated YBCO layer. The potential application of the delaminated sample in superconducting joints was discussed based on the oxygen diffusion estimation.

  3. MMS observations of guide field reconnection at the interface between colliding reconnection jets inside flux rope-like structures at the magnetopause

    Oieroset, M.; Phan, T.; Haggerty, C. C.; Shay, M.; Eastwood, J. P.; Gershman, D. J.; Drake, J. F.; Fujimoto, M.; Ergun, R.; Mozer, F.; Oka, M.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Wang, S.; Chen, L. J.; Swisdak, M.; Pollock, C. J.; Dorelli, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Lavraud, B.; Kacem, I.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Saito, Y.; Avanov, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Schwartz, S. J.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Malakit, K.

    2017-12-01

    The formation and evolution of magnetic flux ropes is of critical importance for a number of collisionless plasma phenomena. At the dayside magnetopause flux rope-like structures can form between two X-lines. The two X-lines produce converging plasma jets. At the interface between the colliding jets a compressed current sheet can form, which in turn can undergo reconnection. We present MMS observations of the exhaust and diffusion region of such reconnection.

  4. Four-point probe measurements of a direct current potential drop on layered conductive cylinders

    Lu, Yi; Bowler, John R

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the steady state electric field due to direct current flowing via point contacts at the cylindrical surface of a uniformly layered conductive rod of finite length. The solution allows one to use four-point probe potential drop measurements to estimate the conductivity or thickness of the layer assuming that the other parameters are known. The electrical potential in the rod has a zero radial derivative at its surface except at the injection and extractions points. This means that the required solution can be expressed in terms of a Green’s function satisfying a Neumann boundary condition. Four-point measurements have been made to demonstrate the validity of theoretical results. (paper)

  5. Four-point probe measurements of a direct current potential drop on layered conductive cylinders

    Lu, Yi; Bowler, John R.

    2012-11-01

    We have determined the steady state electric field due to direct current flowing via point contacts at the cylindrical surface of a uniformly layered conductive rod of finite length. The solution allows one to use four-point probe potential drop measurements to estimate the conductivity or thickness of the layer assuming that the other parameters are known. The electrical potential in the rod has a zero radial derivative at its surface except at the injection and extractions points. This means that the required solution can be expressed in terms of a Green’s function satisfying a Neumann boundary condition. Four-point measurements have been made to demonstrate the validity of theoretical results.

  6. Space charge limitation of the current in implanted SiO2 layers

    Szydlo, N.; Poirier, R.

    1974-01-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors were studied where the metal is a semitransparent gold layer of 5mm diameter, the oxide is thermal silica whose, thickness depends on the nature of the implant, and the semiconductor is N-type silicon of 5 ohms/cm. The SiO 2 thickness was chosen in such a way that the maximum of the profile of the implanted substance is in the medium of the oxide layer. In the case of virgin silica, the oscillations in the photocurrent versus energy and exponential variations versus the applied voltage show that the photoconduction obeys the model of injection limited current. In the case of the oxide after ion bombardment, the photocurrent similarity, independent of the direction of the electric field in silica, shows that volume transport phenomena become preponderent [fr

  7. Subattoampere current induced by single ions in silicon oxide layers of nonvolatile memory cells

    Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Larcher, L.; Visconti, A.; Bonanomi, M.

    2006-01-01

    A single ion impinging on a thin silicon dioxide layer generates a number of electron/hole pairs proportional to its linear energy transfer coefficient. Defects generated by recombination can act as a conductive path for electrons that cross the oxide barrier, thanks to a multitrap-assisted mechanism. We present data on the dependence of this phenomenon on the oxide thickness by using floating gate memory arrays. The tiny number of excess electrons stored in these devices allows for extremely high sensitivity, impossible with any direct measurement of oxide leakage current. Results are of particular interest for next generation devices

  8. Bursty, Broadband Electromagnetic Waves Associated with Thin Current Layers and Turbulent Magnetosheath Reconnection

    Adrian, M. L.; Wendel, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate observations of intense bursts of electromagnetic wave energy in association with the thin current layers of turbulent magnetosheath reconnection. These observed emissions form two distinct types: (i) broadband emissions that extend continuously to lOs of Hertz; and (ii) structured bursts of emitted energy that occur above 80-Hz, often displaying features reminiscent of absorption bands and are observed at local minima in the magnetic field. We present detailed analyses of these intense bursts of electromagnetic energy and quantify their proximity to X- and O-nulls, as well as their correlation to the amount of magnetic energy converted by the process of magnetic reconnection.

  9. Electron and ion distribution functions in magnetopause reconnection

    Wang, S.; Chen, L. J.; Bessho, N.; Hesse, M.; Kistler, L. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Mouikis, C.; Pollock, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate electron and ion velocity distribution functions in dayside magnetopause reconnection events observed by the Cluster and MMS spacecraft. The goal is to build a spatial map of electron and ion distribution features to enable the indication of the spacecraft location in the reconnection structure, and to understand plasma energization processes. Distribution functions, together with electromagnetic field structures, plasma densities, and bulk velocities, are organized and compared with particle-in-cell simulation results to indicate the proximities to the reconnection X-line. Anisotropic features in the distributions of magnetospheric- and magnetosheath- origin electrons at different locations in the reconnection inflow and exhaust are identified. In particular, parallel electron heating is observed in both the magnetosheath and magnetosphere inflow regions. Possible effects of the guide field strength, waves, and upstream density and temperature asymmetries on the distribution features will be discussed.

  10. Magnetosheath excursion and the relevant transport process at the magnetopause

    C. L. Cai

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A large-amplitude excursion of the magnetosheath (MS in quiet solar wind conditions on 17 March 2004 was recorded simultaneously by the Cluster and TC-1 spacecraft. During this period, the IMF Bz was entirely northward. The coherence between the bow shock motion and magnetopause (MP motion is revealed and the excursion velocities of the bow shock motion are analyzed. In addition, the relevant plasma transport phenomenon in the form of flux fluctuations below the ion gyrofrequency at the MP is exposed and is interpreted as manifestation of the drift instability. Correlated observations on charge accumulation and electrostatic potential perturbation are recorded by electron measurements in high energy regime, and also the eventual cross-field vortex motion in the nonlinear stage and the consequential mass exchange are exhibited. The present investigation gives some new insight into the MS plasma transport mechanism across the subsolar MP region in quiet solar wind conditions during a period of northward IMF.

  11. Production of ultrahigh ion current densities at skin-layer subrelativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Badziak, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Glowacz, S [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Jablonski, S [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Parys, P [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Wolowski, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Hora, H [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Krasa, J [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Laska, L [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Rohlena, K [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2004-12-01

    Some applications of fast ions driven by a short ({<=}1 ps) laser pulse (e.g. fast ignition of ICF targets, x-ray laser pumping, laboratory astrophysics research or some nuclear physics experiments) require ion beams of picosecond (or shorter) time durations and of very high ion current densities ({approx}10{sup 10} A cm{sup -2} or higher). A possible way of producing ion beams with such extreme parameters is ballistic focusing of fast ions generated by a target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism at relativistic laser intensities. In this paper we discuss another method, where the production of short-pulse ion beams of ultrahigh current densities is possible in a planar geometry at subrelativistic laser intensities and at a low energy ({<=}1 J) of the laser pulse. This method-referred to as skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (S-LPA)-uses strong ponderomotive forces induced at the skin-layer interaction of a short laser pulse with a proper preplasma layer in front of a solid target. The basic features of the high-current ion generation by S-LPA were investigated using a simplified theory, numerical hydrodynamic simulations and measurements. The experiments were performed with subjoule 1 ps laser pulses interacting with massive or thin foil targets at intensities of up to 2 x 10{sup 17} W cm{sup -2}. It was found that both in the backward and forward directions highly collimated high-density ion beams (plasma blocks) with current densities at the ion source (close to the target) approaching 10{sup 10} A cm{sup -2} are produced, in accordance with the theory and numerical calculations. These ion current densities were found to be comparable to (or even higher than) those estimated from recent short-pulse TNSA experiments with relativistic laser intensities. Apart from the simpler physics of the laser-plasma interaction, the advantage of the considered method is the low energy of the driving laser pulses allowing the production of ultrahigh-current

  12. Influence of the anodic etching current density on the morphology of the porous SiC layer

    Anh Tuan Cao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we fabricated a porous layer in amorphous SiC thin films by using constant-current anodic etching in an electrolyte of aqueous diluted hydrofluoric acid. The morphology of the porous amorphous SiC layer changed as the anodic current density changed: At low current density, the porous layer had a low pore density and consisted of small pores that branched downward. At moderate current density, the pore size and depth increased, and the pores grew perpendicular to the surface, creating a columnar pore structure. At high current density, the porous structure remained perpendicular, the pore size increased, and the pore depth decreased. We explained the changes in pore size and depth at high current density by the growth of a silicon oxide layer during etching at the tips of the pores.

  13. Observational Test of the Dayside Magnetopause Reconnection Rate

    Wang, S.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C.

    2014-12-01

    In asymmetric reconnection, the reconnection rate (R) is expected to follow the Cassak-Shay formula with an aspect ratio of around 0.1. At the magnetopause, reconnection is asymmetric, with the dense shocked solar wind population on the magnetosheath side, and a normally hot and tenuous population on the magnetospheric side. However, the hot magnetospheric population can contain a significant O+ component that increases the mass density, and the magnetospheric population may also include a cold dense population of plasmaspheric origin. We perform a statistical study of 13 magnetopause reconnection events observed by Cluster to determine how the reconnection rate depends on these different populations. The events are mainly at high latitudes, due to the Cluster orbit. Our results show that the measured R generally follows the Cassak-Shay prediction when all populations are included. However, the predicted rate only considering the magnetosheath contribution also correlates well with the measured R. For individual events, cold ions can make a comparable contribution to the magnetosheath H+ when there are plasmaspheric drainage plumes; the contribution of the magnetospheric hot O+ can be up to ~30%. However, the variation of solar wind conditions has a larger effect on the variation in the reconnection rate. The aspect ratio does not vary systematically with the O+ content, and 0.1 is a reasonable estimation. The outflow velocity is around the hybrid Alfven speed, but there is not a strong correlation. This may be due to motion of the x-line, or effects of the magnetosheath shear flow.

  14. The Effect of Image Potential on the Current-Voltage Characteristics of a Ferritin-layer

    Eunjung Bang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Considering for the concept of power storage systems, such as those used to supply power to microelectronic devices, ferritins have aroused a lot of interests for applications in bioelectrochemical devices. And electron transfer rates from the proteins to electrode surface are key determinants of overall performance and efficiency of the ferritin-based devices. Here we have investigated the electron transport mechanism of ferritin layer which was immobilized on an Au electrode. The current-voltage (I-V curves are obtained by a conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM as a function of contact area between AFM tip and the ferritin layer. In the low voltage region, I-V curves are affected by both Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and image force. On the other hand, the experimental results are consistent with a Simmons model in a high voltage region, indicating that, as the voltage increases, the image potential has a dominant effect on the electron transport mechanism. These results are attributed to the film-like character of the ferritin layer, which generates an image potential to lower the barrier height in proportion to the voltage increment.

  15. Influence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reflective layer under phosphor layer on luminance and luminous efficiency characteristics in alternating-current plasma display panel

    Park, Choon-Sang [School of Electronics Engineering, College of IT Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Tae, Heung-Sik, E-mail: hstae@ee.knu.ac.kr [School of Electronics Engineering, College of IT Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Eun Young [Core Technology Lab., Corporate R and D Center, Samsung SDI Company Ltd., Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-29

    This paper examines the optical and discharge characteristics of alternating-current plasma display panel when adopting the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reflective layer. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reflective layer is deposited under the phosphor layer by using the screen-printing method. The resulting changes in the optical and discharge characteristics, including the power consumption, color temperature, luminance, luminous efficiency, scanning electron microscopy image, and reflectance, are then compared for both cases with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reflective layer. As a result of optimizing the thicknesses between the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and phosphor layers, the luminance and luminous efficiency are improved by about 17% and 7%, respectively. - Highlights: • We examine characteristics of plasma display panel when adopting reflective layer. • Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reflective layer was deposited under the phosphor layer. • Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reflective layer with flaky shape is very effective in enhancing luminance.

  16. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    Fadin, V. V., E-mail: fvv@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Aleutdinova, M. I., E-mail: aleut@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Seversk Technological Institute, Branch of State Autonomous Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education “National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”, Seversk, 636036 (Russian Federation); Rubtsov, V. Ye., E-mail: rvy@ispms.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Aleutdinova, V. A., E-mail: valery-aleut@yandex.ru [National Research St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm{sup 2} are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  17. Signatures of mode conversion and kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause

    Johnson, Jay R.; Cheng, C. Z.

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that resonant mode conversion of compressional MHD waves into kinetic Alfven waves at the magnetopause can explain the abrupt transition in wave polarization from compressional to transverse commonly observed during magnetopause crossings. The authors analyze magnetic field data for magnetopause crossings as a function of magnetic shear angle (defined as the angle between the magnetic fields in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere) and compare with the theory of resonant mode conversion. The data suggest that amplification in the transverse magnetic field component at the magnetopause is not significant up to a threshold magnetic shear angle. Above the threshold angle significant amplification results, but with weak dependence on magnetic shear angle. Waves with higher frequency are less amplified and have a higher threshold angle. These observations are qualitatively consistent with theoretical results obtained from the kinetic-fluid wave equations

  18. Coupled Kelvin-Helmholtz and Tearing Mode Instabilities at the Mercury's Magnetopause

    Ivanovski, S. L.; Milillo, A.; Kartalev, M.; Massetti, S.

    2018-05-01

    A MHD approach for numerical simulations of coupled Kelvin-Helmholtz and tearing mode instabilities has been applied to Mercury’s magnetopause and used to perform a physical parameters study constrained by the MESSENGER data.

  19. Traveling magnetopause distortion related to a large-scale magnetosheath plasma jet: THEMIS and ground-based observations

    Dmitriev, A. V.; Suvorova, A. V.

    2012-08-01

    Here, we present a case study of THEMIS and ground-based observations of the perturbed dayside magnetopause and the geomagnetic field in relation to the interaction of an interplanetary directional discontinuity (DD) with the magnetosphere on 16 June 2007. The interaction resulted in a large-scale local magnetopause distortion of an "expansion - compression - expansion" (ECE) sequence that lasted for ˜15 min. The compression was caused by a very dense, cold, and fast high-βmagnetosheath plasma flow, a so-called plasma jet, whose kinetic energy was approximately three times higher than the energy of the incident solar wind. The plasma jet resulted in the effective penetration of magnetosheath plasma inside the magnetosphere. A strong distortion of the Chapman-Ferraro current in the ECE sequence generated a tripolar magnetic pulse "decrease - peak- decrease" (DPD) that was observed at low and middle latitudes by some ground-based magnetometers of the INTERMAGNET network. The characteristics of the ECE sequence and the spatial-temporal dynamics of the DPD pulse were found to be very different from any reported patterns of DD interactions with the magnetosphere. The observed features only partially resembled structures such as FTE, hot flow anomalies, and transient density events. Thus, it is difficult to explain them in the context of existing models.

  20. Energization and Transport in 3D Kinetic Simulations of MMS Magnetopause Reconnection Site Encounters with Varying Guide Fields

    Le, A.; Daughton, W. S.; Ohia, O.; Chen, L. J.; Liu, Y. H.

    2017-12-01

    We present 3D fully kinetic simulations of asymmetric reconnection with plasma parameters matching MMS magnetopause diffusion region crossings with varying guide fields of 0.1 [Burch et al., Science (2016)], 0.4 [Chen et al. JGR (2017)], and 1 [Burch and Phan, GRL (2016] of the reconnecting sheath field. Strong diamagnetic drifts across the magnetopause current sheet drive lower-hybrid drift instabilities (LHDI) over a range of wavelengths [Daughton, PoP (2003); Roytershteyn et al., PRL (2012)] that develop into a turbulent state. Magnetic field tracing diagnostics are employed to characterize the turbulent magnetic geometry and to evaluate the global reconnection rate. The contributions to Ohm's law are evaluated field line by field line, including time-averaged diagnostics that allow the quantification of anomalous resistivity and viscosity. We examine how fluctuating electric fields and chaotic magnetic field lines contribute to particle mixing across the separatrix, and we characterize the accelerated electron distributions that form under varying magnetic shear or guide field. The LHDI turbulence is found to strongly enhance transport and parallel electron heating in 3D compared to 2D, particularly along the magnetospheric separatrix [Le et al., GRL (2017)]. The PIC simulation results are compared to MMS observations.

  1. Electron Energization and Mixing Observed by MMS in the Vicinity of an Electron Diffusion Region During Magnetopause Reconnection

    Chen, Li-Jen; Hesse, Michael; Wang, Shan; Gershman, Daniel; Ergun, Robert; Pollock, Craig; Torbert, Roy; Bessho, Naoki; Daughton, William; Dorelli, John; hide

    2016-01-01

    Measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission are reported to show distinct features of electron energization and mixing in the diffusion region of the terrestrial magnetopause reconnection. At the ion jet and magnetic field reversals, distribution functions exhibiting signatures of accelerated meandering electrons are observed at an electron out-of-plane flow peak. The meandering signatures manifested as triangular and crescent structures are established features of the electron diffusion region (EDR). Effects of meandering electrons on the electric field normal to the reconnection layer are detected. Parallel acceleration and mixing of the inflowing electrons with exhaust electrons shape the exhaust flow pattern. In the EDR vicinity, the measured distribution functions indicate that locally, the electron energization and mixing physics is captured by two-dimensional reconnection, yet to account for the simultaneous four-point measurements, translational invariant in the third dimension must be violated on the ion-skin-depth scale.

  2. Numerical simulation of current-free double layers created in a helicon plasma device

    Rao, Sathyanarayan; Singh, Nagendra

    2012-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations reveal that when radially confined source plasma with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions expands into diverging magnetic field B, a current-free double layer (CFDL) embedded in a conical density structure forms, as experimentally measured in the Australian helicon plasma device (HPD). The magnetized electrons follow the diverging B while the unmagnetized ions tend to flow directly downstream of the source, resulting in a radial electric field (E⊥) structure, which couples the ion and electron flows. Ions are transversely (radially) accelerated by E⊥ on the high potential side of the double layer in the CFDL. The accelerated ions are trapped near the conical surface, where E⊥ reverses direction. The potential structure of the CFDL is U-shaped and the plasma density is enhanced on the conical surface. The plasma density is severely depleted downstream of the parallel potential drop (φ||o) in the CFDL; the density depletion and the potential drop are related by quasi-neutrality condition, including the divergence in the magnetic field and in the plasma flow in the conical structure. The potential and density structures, the CFDL spatial size, its electric field strengths and the electron and ion velocities and energy distributions in the CFDL are found to be in good agreements with those measured in the Australian experiment. The applicability of our results to measured axial potential profiles in magnetic nozzle experiments in HPDs is discussed.

  3. The effect of a thin silver layer on the critical current of epitaxial YBCO films

    Polturak, E.; Koren, G.; Cohen, D.; Cohen, D.; Snapiro, I.

    1992-01-01

    We compare measurements of the critical current density of an epitaxial YBCO film with that of an identical film overlaid by a thin silver layer. We find that the presence of the silver lowers Tc of the film by about 1.5 K, which is two orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the theory of the proximity effect for our experimental conditions. In addition, J c of the Ag/YBCO film near Tc is also significantly lower than that of the bare YBCO film. We propose two alternate interpretations of this effect, one in terms of destabilization of the flux distribution in the film and the other making use of the effect of the silver on the Bean-Livingston surface barrier for the initial penetration of flux. The latter seems the more plausible explanation of our results. (orig.)

  4. Inducted circulation current in a conductor consisting of strands coated with a high resistive layer

    Koizumi, Norikiyo; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Kato, Takashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Shimamoto, Susumu

    2000-01-01

    Nonuniform current distribution is generated in a conductor consisting of strands coated by a high resistive layer, such as chromium plating, as a result of superimposition of transport and induce circulation currents. The characteristics of the induced circulation current are analytically studied by using a distributed model circuit. The parameters mostly used in this calculation are those of US-DPC coil, which at first exhibited instability and so-called ramp rate limitation (RRL) because of current imbalance in the conductor consisting of chrome-plated strands. Thus the conductance along strands and the inductance of unit length loop and length of the conductor are mostly assumed to be 10 kS/m, 0.5 μH/m and 150 m, respectively. The analysis results indicate that the induced circulation current can be classified into the boundary and interstrand-induce circulation currents hereafter referred to as BICC an IICC. BICC is induced only across the joint at the ends of the conductor, resulting in a constant along the conductor axis, when the total leakage magnetic flux of the loop is not zero. Its decay time constant is quite long, more than a few hours. In contrast, when the leakage magnetic flux distributes along the conductor axis, IICC is induced among strands in the conductor to eliminate this flux. Since the leakage magnetic flux normally becomes largest where the magnetic field is highest, it becomes larger where the time variation of the magnetic field is larger. Its decay time contrast is much less than that of BICC. If the leakage magnetic flux linearly changes along the US-DPC conductor, it is evaluated to be about 10 s. This IICC therefore becomes dominate in a pulse charge, whose ramping tine is less than 10 s. Moreover, it is found that the variation of the leakage a magnetic flux with the relatively long cycle, such as more than a few 10-meter lengths, causes IICC with a decay-time constant of more than several hundred milliseconds. Such and IICC can

  5. Circular electrodes to reduce the current variation of OTFTs with the drop-casted semiconducting layer

    Dipu Kabir, H. M.; Ahmed, Zubair; Kariyadan, Remashan; Zhang, Lining; Chan, Mansun

    2018-06-01

    Circular organic thin film transistor (OTFT) structures are proposed to reduce the impact of variable grain alignment on the drive current of the polycrystalline organic thin film transistor (OTFT). As the circular structure is planar symmetric, the orientation of the grain cannot affect the drive current of the circular OTFT. Thus, circular electrodes expected to provide a lower variation. Top-gate, bottom-contact circular and conventional OTFTs with drop-casted polycrystalline 6,13-Bis(triisopropyl-silylethynyl) (TIPS)-Pentacene organic semiconducting layer (OSC) are fabricated to verify the theoretical variation reduction. The relative standard deviation (RSD), defined as the ratio of standard deviation and the average of drive current is used as the degree of variations in different structures. According to our fabrication result, circular transistors have a significantly lower variation (20% RSD), compared to the variation of conventional OTFTs (61% RSD). His research interests include Organic Electronics, VLSI Design, Embedded System, Neural Networks, and Solid-state devices. Between July 2001 and December 2002, he was a Visiting Professor at University of California at Berkeley and the Co-director of the BSIM program. He is currently still consulting on the development of the next generation compact models. He has been actively contributing to the professional community and hold many positions. He was a Board of Governor, Chair of the Education Committee, the Chair of the Region 10 subcommittee and a Distinguished lecturer of the IEEE Electron Device Society. He has also chaired many international conferences and acting as editors for a number of technical journals. In addition, he has received many awards including the UC Regents Fellowship, Golden Keys Scholarship for Academic Excellence, SRC Inventor Recognition Award, Rockwell Research Fellowship, R&D 100 award (for the BSIM3v3 project), Distinguished Teaching Award, the Shenzhen Science and Technology

  6. Ni/Ni-YSZ current collector/anode dual layer hollow fibers for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    Kanawka, K.; Othman, M.H.D.; Droushiotis, N.; Wu, Z.; Kelsall, G.; Li, K. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    A co-extrusion technique was employed to fabricate a novel dual layer NiO/NiO-YSZ hollow fiber (HF) precursor which was then co-sintered at 1,400 C and reduced at 700 C to form, respectively, a meshed porous inner Ni current collector and outer Ni-YSZ anode layers for SOFC applications. The inner thin and highly porous ''mesh-like'' pure Ni layer of approximately 50 {mu}m in thickness functions as a current collector in micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), aiming at highly efficient current collection with low fuel diffusion resistance, while the thicker outer Ni-YSZ layer of 260 {mu}m acts as an anode, providing also major mechanical strength to the dual-layer HF. Achieved morphology consisted of short finger-like voids originating from the inner lumen of the HF, and a sponge-like structure filling most of the Ni-YSZ anode layer, which is considered to be suitable macrostructure for anode SOFC system. The electrical conductivity of the meshed porous inner Ni layer is measured to be 77.5 x 10{sup 5} S m{sup -1}. This result is significantly higher than previous reported results on single layer Ni-YSZ HFs, which performs not only as a catalyst for the oxidation reaction, but also as a current collector. These results highlight the advantages of this novel dual-layer HF design as a new and highly efficient way of collecting current from the lumen of micro-tubular SOFC. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. MMS Observations of Electron-Scale Filamentary Currents in the Reconnection Exhaust and Near the X Line

    Phan, T. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; Cassak, P. A.; Oieroset, M.; Gosling, J. T.; Gershman, D. J.; Mozer, F. S.; Shay, M. A.; Fujimoto, M.; Daughton, W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report Magnetospheric Multiscale observations of macroscopic and electron-scale current layers in asymmetric reconnection. By intercomparing plasma, magnetic, and electric field data at multiple crossings of a reconnecting magnetopause on 22 October 2015, when the average interspacecraft separation was approximately 10 km, we demonstrate that the ion and electron moments are sufficiently accurate to provide reliable current density measurements at 30ms cadence. These measurements, which resolve current layers narrower than the interspacecraft separation, reveal electron-scale filamentary Hall currents and electron vorticity within the reconnection exhaust far downstream of the X line and even in the magnetosheath. Slightly downstream of the X line, intense (up to 3 µA/m2) electron currents, a super-Alfvenic outflowing electron jet, and nongyrotropic crescent shape electron distributions were observed deep inside the ion-scale magnetopause current sheet and embedded in the ion diffusion region. These characteristics are similar to those attributed to the electron dissipation/diffusion region around the X line.

  8. Effects of alternating and direct electrical current application on the odontoblastic layer in human teeth : an in vitro study

    Alwas-Danowska, HM; Huysmans, MCDNJM; Verdonschot, EH

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a low intensity alternating current on the odontoblasts and odontoblast layer and compare this with the effects of a direct current. Methodology Teeth extracted for orthodontic were immersed in physiological saline stabilized with thymol

  9. A survey of flux transfer events observed in the dayside magnetopause

    Silveira, M. D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Lee, S. H.; Gonzalez, W.; Koga, D.

    2017-12-01

    Flux transfer events (FTE) have been interpreted to be results from transient magnetic reconnection and can be observed in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetopause, as well in other planets. FTE acts as a flux tube connecting the magnetosheath to the magnetosphere allowing the transference of particles, energy and momentum in both sides magnetopause. Their main signatures in satellite data are bipolar variation in the magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause, centered in an enhanced magnetic field strength. Other signatures such as pressure imbalance, bulk flow jets, and particle anisotropy distribution can be observed inside the those structures. We surveyed FTEs observed by MMS on the vicinity of the magnetopause (from x = 0 to 13Re and y = -12 to 12Re). Taking advantage of the MMS tetrahedron configuration we will employed timing analysis to determine the FTEs direction of motion and scale lengths. We will present information about occurrence related with IMF clock angle and other parameters, amplitude of the perturbations induced by the FTEs in the environment magnetic field and plasma; characteristic time and structure scale size. Using data from ACE, Wind and Artemis we can evaluate which is the best solar wind monitor for each FTE observed and then employ the appropriated lag time corresponding to FTE location and magnetic field orientation. The objective is to investigate the mechanisms of generation of FTEs comparing characteristics of the events observed on the dayside region and on the magnetopause flanks determining the motion and speed of FTEs.

  10. Determining the Thickness and the Sub-Structure Details of the Magnetopause from MMS Data

    Manuzzo, R.; Belmont, G.; Rezeau, L.

    2017-12-01

    The magnetopause thickness, like its mean location, is a notion that can have different meanings depending which parameters are considered (magnetic field or plasma properties). In any case, all the determinations have been done, up to now, considering the magnetopause boundary as a structure strictly stationary and 1D (or with a simple curvature). These determinations have shown to be very sensitive to the accuracy of the normal direction, because it affects the projection of the quantities of interest in studying geometrical sensitive phenomena such as the magnetic reconnection. Furthermore, the 1D stationary assumptions are likely to be rarely verified at the real magnetopause. The high quality measurements of MMS and their high time resolution now allow investigating the magnetopause structure in its more delicate features and with an unequal spatio-temporal accuracy. We make use here of the MDD tool developed by [Shi et al., 2005], which gives the dimensionality of the gradients from the four-point measurements of MMS and allows estimating the direction of the local normal when defined. Extending this method to various quantities, we can draw their profiles as functions of a physical abscissa (length instead of time) along a sensible normal. This procedure allows answering quantitatively the questions concerning the locations and the thicknesses of the different sub-structures encountered inside the "global magnetopause" [Rezeau, 2017, paper submitted to JGR-Space Physics].

  11. Euler potentials for two layers with non-constant current densities in the ambient magnetic field aligned to the layers

    Vandas, Marek; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2016), s. 1165-1173 ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19376S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : magnetospheric physics * scale birkeland currents * charged particles Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2016

  12. Strengthening effect of nano-scaled precipitates in Ta alloying layer induced by high current pulsed electron beam

    Tang, Guangze; Luo, Dian; Fan, Guohua [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin, E-mail: maxin@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Ta alloying layer are fabricated by magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam. • Nano-scaled TaC precipitates forms within the δ-Fe grain after tempering treatment. • The mean diameter of TaC particles is about 5–8 nm. • The hardness of alloying layer increased by over 50% after formation of nano-scaled TaC particle. - Abstract: In this study, the combination of magnetron sputtering and high current pulsed electron beam are used for surface alloying treatment of Ta film on high speed steel. And the Ta alloying layer is about 6 μm. After tempering treatment, TaC phase forms in Ta alloying layer when the treated temperature is over 823 K. Through the TEM and HRTEM observation, a large amount of nano-scaled precipitates (mean diameter 5–8 nm) form within the δ-Fe grain in Ta alloying layer after tempering treatment and these nano-scaled precipitates are confirmed as TaC particles, which contribute to the strengthening effect of the surface alloying layer. The hardness of tempered alloying layer can reach to 18.1 GPa when the treated temperature is 823 K which increase by 50% comparing with the untreated steel sample before surface alloying treatment.

  13. Direct Current Sputter Epitaxy of Heavily Doped p+ Layer for Monocrystalline Si Solar Cells

    Wenchang Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sputter epitaxy of p+ layer for fabrication of Si solar cells (SCs was demonstrated. Hall carrier concentration of p+ layer was 2.6 × 1020 cm−3 owing to cosputtering of B with Si at low temperature, which had enabled heavy and shallow p+ dope layer. p+nn+ SCs were fabricated and influence of p+ and n+ layers was investigated. Internal quantum efficiency (IQE of p+nn+ SCs was 95% at visible light and was larger than 60% at ultraviolet (UV light when the p+ layer was thinner than 30 nm. At near infrared (NIR, extra increment on IQE was achieved by rear n+ back surface field (BSF layer with a thickness thinner than 100 nm.

  14. The current-voltage characteristic and potential oscillations of a double layer in a triple plasma device

    Carpenter, R.T.; Torven, S.

    1986-07-01

    The properties of a strong double layer in a current circuit with a capacitance and an inductance are investigated in a triple plasma device. The double layer gives rise to a region of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic of the device, and this gives non-linear oscillations in the current and the potential drop over the double layer (PhiDL). For a sufficiently large circuit inductance PhiDL reaches an amplitude given by the induced voltage (-LdI/dt) which is much larger than the circuit EMF due to the rapid current decrease when PhiDL increases. A variable potential minimum exists in the plasma on the low potential side of the double layer, and the depth of the minimum increases when PhiDL increases. An increasing fraction of the electrons incident at the double layer are then reflected, and this is found to be the main process giving rise to the negative differential resistance. A qualitative model for the variation of the minimum potential with PhiDL is also proposed. It is based on the condition that the minimum potential must adjust itself self-consistentely so that quasi-neutrality is maintained in the plasma region where the minimum is assumed. (authors)

  15. Small scale observation of magnetopause motion: preliminary results of the INTERBALL project

    J. Safrankova

    Full Text Available Two satellites of the INTERBALL project were launched on 3 August 1995. The main goals of the present paper are (1 to give a brief information about the VDP plasma device onboard the INTERBALL-1 satellite, (2 to present the Faradays cup data taken in different magnetospheric regions and (3 to expose first results of the two satellite measurements of the magnetopause motion. The presented data illustrate magnetopause crossings as seen by two satellites when separated by about ~ 1000 km. This separation combined with the Faraday's cup time resolution allows to estimate the velocity of the magnetopause and to reconstruct a possible structure of the boundary. Simultaneous measurement of the magnetic field supports the interpretation of the observed ion fluxes as a signature of the wavy motion of the boundary.

  16. Diffusion at the Earth magnetopause: enhancement by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    R. Smets

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Using hybrid simulations, we examine how particles can diffuse across the Earth's magnetopause because of finite Larmor radius effects. We focus on tangential discontinuities and consider a reversal of the magnetic field that closely models the magnetopause under southward interplanetary magnetic field. When the Larmor radius is on the order of the field reversal thickness, we show that particles can cross the discontinuity. We also show that with a realistic initial shear flow, a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability develops that increases the efficiency of the crossing process. We investigate the distribution functions of the transmitted ions and demonstrate that they are structured according to a D-shape. It accordingly appears that magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause is not the only process that leads to such specific distribution functions. A simple analytical model that describes the built-up of these functions is proposed.

  17. Contributions for the modelling of submarine cables – current density and simplified modelling of wired layers

    Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth; Ebdrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    formulae. The substitution of round wires by equivalent solid layers is tested and tuned by changing the permeability of the insulation and the resistivity of the of the substitution layer. The tuning of these two parameters allows obtaining similar results for both cases even for materials with high...... permeabilities, like steel....

  18. Development of compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburising; current status and future challenges

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of the compound layer during gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburising of Fe based material is described. The first nucleation of the compound layer at the surface depends on the competition between the dissociation of ammonia and the removal of nitrogen from the surface by solid sta...

  19. Self-consistent electrostatic simulations of reforming double layers in the downward current region of the aurora

    H. Gunell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma on a magnetic field line in the downward current region of the aurora is simulated using a Vlasov model. It is found that an electric field parallel to the magnetic fields is supported by a double layer moving toward higher altitude. The double layer accelerates electrons upward, and these electrons give rise to plasma waves and electron phase-space holes through beam–plasma interaction. The double layer is disrupted when reaching altitudes of 1–2 Earth radii where the Langmuir condition no longer can be satisfied due to the diminishing density of electrons coming up from the ionosphere. During the disruption the potential drop is in part carried by the electron holes. The disruption creates favourable conditions for double layer formation near the ionosphere and double layers form anew in that region. The process repeats itself with a period of approximately 1 min. This period is determined by how far the double layer can reach before being disrupted: a higher disruption altitude corresponds to a longer repetition period. The disruption altitude is, in turn, found to increase with ionospheric density and to decrease with total voltage. The current displays oscillations around a mean value. The period of the oscillations is the same as the recurrence period of the double layer formations. The oscillation amplitude increases with increasing voltage, whereas the mean value of the current is independent of voltage in the 100 to 800 V range covered by our simulations. Instead, the mean value of the current is determined by the electron density at the ionospheric boundary.

  20. NASA's THEMIS Mission: Multipoint Observations of Substorms, the Foreshock, and the Magnetopause

    Sibeck, D. G.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kuznetsova, M.; Glabmeier, K.-H.; McFadden. J. P.

    2008-01-01

    From launch on February 17 through the repositioning to final orbits that began in September 2007, the five-spacecraft of the THEMIS mission operated nominally in nearly identical 14.6 RE apogee near-equatorial orbits. On March 23, while aligned from east to west in the duskside magnetotail, the spacecraft observed two substorm sequences in fast survey mode. Timing the motion of these signatures served as an early proof of concept for the main phase of the mission: particle injection and dipolarization signatures propagated duskward from one probe to another, as did auroral intensifications seen by the dedicated array of ground-based observatories. During the summer of 2007, the spacecraft were on the dayside, where the three inner spacecraft (C, D, E) were separated by 100-500 km and the two outer probes (B, -4) by 5,000 - 10,000 km. Here the THEMIS probes repeatedly encountered the magnetopause and bow shock, dissecting flux transfer events (FTEs), determining the instantaneous width of the low-latitude boundary layer, and simultaneously observing hot flow anomalies upstream and downstream from the bow shock at the moment of their inception. From January to March 2008, the spacecraft were in the Earths magnetotail with apogees of 31.0, 19.5, 11.8 (2) and 10.0 RE corresponding to periods of 4, 2, and 1 days. Radial alignments once each four days offered an opportunity to pinpoint when and where substorms begin. This talk reviews THEMIS discoveries to date, with an emphasis on model-data comparisons of FTE characteristics

  1. Magnetic field line draping in the plasma depletion layer

    Sibeck, D. G.; Lepping, R. P.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Simultaneous IMP 8 solar wind and ISEE 1/2 observations for a northern dawn ISEE 1/2 magnetopause crossing on November 6, 1977. During this crossing, ISEE 1/2 observed quasi-periodic pulses of magnetosheathlike plasma on northward magnetic field lines. The ISEE 1/2 observations were originally interpreted as evidence for strong diffusion of magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the inner edge of the low-latitude boundary layer. An alternate explanation, in terms of magnetic field merging and flux transfer events, has also been advocated. In this paper, a third interpretation is proposed in terms of quasi-periodic magnetopause motion which causes the satellites to repeatedly exit the magnetosphere and observe draped northward magnetosheath magnetic field lines in the plasma depletion layer.

  2. Current Challenges in Understanding and Forecasting Stable Boundary Layers over Land and Ice

    Gert-Jan eSteeneveld

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is challenging. Many physical processes come into play in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling and heterogeneity, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag. The development of robust stable boundary-layer parameterizations for weather and climate models is difficult because of the multiplicity of processes and their complex interactions. As a result, these models suffer from biases in key variables, such as the 2-m temperature, boundary-layer depth and wind speed. This short paper briefly summarizes the state-of-the-art of stable boundary layer research, and highlights physical processes that received only limited attention so far, in particular orographically-induced gravity wave drag, longwave radiation divergence, and the land-atmosphere coupling over a snow-covered surface. Finally, a conceptual framework with relevant processes and particularly their interactions is proposed.

  3. The Outwardly Rectifying Current of Layer 5 Neocortical Neurons that was Originally Identified as "Non-Specific Cationic" Is Essentially a Potassium Current.

    Omer Revah

    Full Text Available In whole-cell patch clamp recordings from layer 5 neocortical neurons, blockade of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels leaves a cesium current that is outward rectifying. This current was originally identified as a "non-specific cationic current", and subsequently it was hypothesized that it is mediated by TRP channels. In order to test this hypothesis, we used fluorescence imaging of intracellular sodium and calcium indicators, and found no evidence to suggest that it is associated with influx of either of these ions to the cell body or dendrites. Moreover, the current is still prominent in neurons from TRPC1-/- and TRPC5-/- mice. The effects on the current of various blocking agents, and especially its sensitivity to intracellular tetraethylammonium, suggest that it is not a non-specific cationic current, but rather that it is generated by cesium-permeable delayed rectifier potassium channels.

  4. Solar wind energy and electric field transfer to the Earth's magnetosphere VIA magnetopause reconnection

    Gonzalez, W.D.; Gonzalez, A.L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Some general expressions for the convection and parallel electric fields as well as for the energy transfer, due to magnetopause reconnection, are derived using a nose-reconnection model that takes into account the presence of the clefts. For the case of equal geomagnetic and magnetosheath field amplitudes, the expression for the power dissipated by the convection electric field reduces to the substorm parameter e widely discussed in the recent literature. This result suggests that magnetopause reconnection is defined at the nose with a tilted reconnection line, but that the convection electric field is related only to the dawn-dusk component of the reconnection electric field, as defined at high latitudes

  5. Solar wind energy transfer to the earth magnetosphere due to the magnetic junction in the magnetopause

    Gonzalez, A.L.C. de; Gonzalez-Alarcon, W.D.; Jardim, M.V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An expression for the energy transfer due to magnetopause reconnection, as well as related expressions for the convection and parallel electric fields, are presented. These expressions are derived from a reconnection model centered at the magnetopause nose, and that considers the presence of the clefts. The expression for the convection - electric field - related energy transfer reduces to the substorm parameter epsilon for the special case of equal magnetosheath and geomagnetic field amplitudes. This result suggests that the reconnection electric field is transmitted along a tilted reconnection line, but that the convection field is only related to the 'dawn to dusk' component of the reconnection - electric field. (Author) [pt

  6. Highly efficient and reliable high power LEDs with patterned sapphire substrate and strip-shaped distributed current blocking layer

    Zhou, Shengjun [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yuan, Shu; Liu, Yingce [Quantum Wafer Inc., Foshan 528251 (China); Guo, L. Jay [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Liu, Sheng, E-mail: victor_liu63@126.com [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ding, Han [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TEM is used to characterize threading dislocation existing in GaN epitaxial layer. • Effect of threading dislocation on optical and electrical of LEDs is discussed. • Strip-shaped SiO{sub 2} DCBL is designed to improve current spreading performance of LEDs. - Abstract: We demonstrated that the improvement in optical and electrical performance of high power LEDs was achieved using cone-shaped patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) and strip-shaped SiO{sub 2} distributed current blocking layer (DCBL). We found through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation that densities of both the screw dislocation and edge dislocation existing in GaN epitaxial layer grown on PSS were much less than that of GaN epitaxial layer grown on flat sapphire substrate (FSS). Compared to LED grown on FSS, LED grown on PSS showed higher sub-threshold forward-bias voltage and lower reverse leakage current, resulting in an enhancement in device reliability. We also designed a strip-shaped SiO{sub 2} DCBL beneath a strip-shaped p-electrode, which prevents the current from being concentrated on regions immediately adjacent the strip-shaped p-electrode, thereby facilitating uniform current spreading into the active region. By implementing strip-shaped SiO{sub 2} DCBL, light output power of high power PSS-LED chip could be further increased by 13%.

  7. Electroluminescence enhancement for near-ultraviolet light emitting diodes with graphene/AZO-based current spreading layers

    Lin, Li; Ou, Yiyu; Zhu, Xiaolong

    LEDs) have attracted significant research interest due to their intensive applications in various areas where indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the most widely employed transparent conductive materials for NUV LEDs. Compared to ITO, indium-free aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) has similar electrical......Near-ultraviolet light emitting diodes with different aluminum-doped zinc oxide-based current spreading layers were fabricated and electroluminescence (EL) was compared. A 170% EL enhancement was achieved by using a graphene-based interlayer. GaN-based near-ultraviolet light emitting diodes (NUV...... with a new type of current spreading layer (CSL) which combines AZO and a single-layer graphene (SLG) as an effective transparent CSL [1]. In the present work, LEDs with solo AZO CSL in Fig.1(a) and SLG/Ni/AZO-based CSL in Fig.1(b) were both fabricated for EL comparison. Standard mesa fabrication including...

  8. Fabrication of current confinement aperture structure by transforming a conductive GaN:Si epitaxial layer into an insulating GaOx layer.

    Lin, Chia-Feng; Lee, Wen-Che; Shieh, Bing-Cheng; Chen, Danti; Wang, Dili; Han, Jung

    2014-12-24

    We report here a simple and robust process to convert embedded conductive GaN epilayers into insulating GaOx and demonstrate its efficacy in vertical current blocking and lateral current steering in a working LED device. The fabrication processes consist of laser scribing, electrochemical (EC) wet-etching, photoelectrochemical (PEC) oxidation, and thermal oxidization of a sacrificial n(+)-GaN:Si layer. The conversion of GaN is made possible through an intermediate stage of porosification where the standard n-type GaN epilayers can be laterally and selectively anodized into a nanoporous (NP) texture while keeping the rest of the layers intact. The fibrous texture of NP GaN with an average wall thickness of less than 100 nm dramatically increases the surface-to-volume ratio and facilitates a rapid oxidation process of GaN into GaOX. The GaOX aperture was formed on the n-side of the LED between the active region and the n-type GaN layer. The wavelength blueshift phenomena of electroluminescence spectra is observed in the treated aperture-emission LED structure (441.5 nm) when compared to nontreated LED structure (443.7 nm) at 0.1 mA. The observation of aperture-confined electroluminescence from an InGaN LED structure suggests that the NP GaN based oxidation will play an enabling role in the design and fabrication of III-nitride photonic devices.

  9. Modelling Mercury's magnetosphere and plasma entry through the dayside magnetopause

    Massetti, S.; Orsini, S.; Milillo, A.; Mura, A.

    2007-09-01

    Owing to the next space mission Messenger (NASA) and BepiColombo (ESA/JAXA), there is a renewed interest in modelling the Mercury's environment. The geometry of the Mercury's magnetosphere, as well as its response to the solar wind conditions, is one of the major issues. The weak magnetic field of the planet and the increasing weight of the IMF BX component at Mercury's orbit, introduce critical differences with respect to the Earth's case, such as a strong north-south asymmetry and a significant solar wind precipitation into the dayside magnetosphere even for non-negative IMF BZ. With the aim of analysing the interaction between the solar wind and Mercury's magnetosphere, we have developed an empirical-analytical magnetospheric model starting from the Toffoletto-Hill TH93 code. Our model has been tuned to reproduce the key features of the Mariner 10 magnetic data, and to mimic the magnetic field topology obtained by the self-consistent hybrid simulation developed by Kallio and Janhunen [Solar wind and magnetospheric ion impact on Mercury's magnetosphere. Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1877, doi: 10.1029/2003GL017842]. The new model has then been used to study the effect of the magnetic reconnection on the magnetosheath plasma entry through the open areas of the dayside magnetosphere (cusps), which are expected to be one of the main sources of charged particles circulating inside the magnetosphere. We show that, depending on the Alfvén speeds on both sides of the magnetopause discontinuity, the reconnection process would be able to accelerate solar wind protons up to few tens of keV: part of these ions can hit the surface and then trigger, via ion-sputtering, the refilling of the planetary exosphere. Finally, we show that non-adiabatic effects are expected to develop in the cusp regions as the energy gained by injected particles increases. The extent of these non-adiabatic regions is shown to be also modulated by upstream IMF condition.

  10. Examination of pulsed eddy current for inspection of second layer aircraft wing lap-joint structures using outlier detection methods

    Butt, D.M., E-mail: Dennis.Butt@forces.gc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Underhill, P.R.; Krause, T.W., E-mail: Thomas.Krause@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Physics, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    Ageing aircraft are susceptible to fatigue cracks at bolt hole locations in multi-layer aluminum wing lap-joints due to cyclic loading conditions experienced during typical aircraft operation, Current inspection techniques require removal of fasteners to permit inspection of the second layer from within the bolt hole. Inspection from the top layer without fastener removal is desirable in order to minimize aircraft downtime while reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks without fastener removal has been demonstrated using a pulsed eddy current (PEC) technique. The technique utilizes a breakdown of the measured signal response into its principal components, each of which is multiplied by a representative factor known as a score. The reduced data set of scores, which represent the measured signal, are examined for outliers using cluster analysis methods in order to detect the presence of defects. However, the cluster analysis methodology is limited by the fact that a number of representative signals, obtained from fasteners where defects are not present, are required in order to perform classification of the data. Alternatively, blind outlier detection can be achieved without having to obtain representative defect-free signals, by using a modified smallest half-volume (MSHV) approach. Results obtained using this approach suggest that self-calibrating blind detection of cyclic fatigue cracks in second layer wing structures in the presence of ferrous fasteners is possible without prior knowledge of the sample under test and without the use of costly calibration standards. (author)

  11. Examination of pulsed eddy current for inspection of second layer aircraft wing lap-joint structures using outlier detection methods

    Butt, D.M.; Underhill, P.R.; Krause, T.W.

    2016-01-01

    Ageing aircraft are susceptible to fatigue cracks at bolt hole locations in multi-layer aluminum wing lap-joints due to cyclic loading conditions experienced during typical aircraft operation, Current inspection techniques require removal of fasteners to permit inspection of the second layer from within the bolt hole. Inspection from the top layer without fastener removal is desirable in order to minimize aircraft downtime while reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks without fastener removal has been demonstrated using a pulsed eddy current (PEC) technique. The technique utilizes a breakdown of the measured signal response into its principal components, each of which is multiplied by a representative factor known as a score. The reduced data set of scores, which represent the measured signal, are examined for outliers using cluster analysis methods in order to detect the presence of defects. However, the cluster analysis methodology is limited by the fact that a number of representative signals, obtained from fasteners where defects are not present, are required in order to perform classification of the data. Alternatively, blind outlier detection can be achieved without having to obtain representative defect-free signals, by using a modified smallest half-volume (MSHV) approach. Results obtained using this approach suggest that self-calibrating blind detection of cyclic fatigue cracks in second layer wing structures in the presence of ferrous fasteners is possible without prior knowledge of the sample under test and without the use of costly calibration standards. (author)

  12. Sub-solar Magnetopause Observation and Simulation of a Tripolar Guide-Magnetic Field Perturbation

    Eriksson, S.; Cassak, P.; Retino, A.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Polar satellite recorded two reconnection exhausts within 6 min on 1 April 2001 at a rather symmetric sub-solar magnetopause that displayed different out-of-plane signatures for similar solar wind conditions. The first case was reported by Mozer et al. [2002] and displayed a bipolar guide field supporting a quadrupole Hall field consistent with a single X-line. The second case, however, shows the first known example of a tripolar guide-field perturbation at Earth's magnetopause reminiscent of the types of solar wind exhausts that Eriksson et al. [2014; 2015] have reported to be in agreement with multiple X-lines. A dedicated particle-in-cell simulation is performed for the prevailing conditions across the magnetopause. We propose an explanation in terms of asymmetric Hall magnetic fields due to a presence of a magnetic island between two X-lines, and discuss how higher resolution MMS observations can be used to further study this problem at the magnetopause.

  13. Spatial distribution of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices at Earth's dayside and flank magnetopause

    M. G. G. T. Taylor

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI can drive waves at the magnetopause. These waves can grow to form rolled-up vortices and facilitate transfer of plasma into the magnetosphere. To investigate the persistence and frequency of such waves at the magnetopause we have carried out a survey of all Double Star 1 magnetopause crossings, using a combination of ion and magnetic field measurements. Using criteria originally used in a Geotail study made by Hasegawa et al. (2006 (forthwith referred to as H2006, 17 candidate events were identified from the entire TC-1 mission (covering ~623 orbits where the magnetopause was sampled, a majority of which were on the dayside of the terminator. The relationship between density and shear velocity was then investigated, to identify the predicted signature of a rolled up vortex from H2006 and all 17 events exhibited some level of rolled up behavior. The location of the events had a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry, with 12 (71% on the post noon, dusk flank suggesting preferential growth in this region.

  14. Observations of field-aligned energetic electron and ion distributions near the magnetopause at geosynchronous orbit

    Korth, A.; Kremser, G.; Daly, P.W.; Amata, E.

    1982-01-01

    On August 28, 1978, the dayside magnetopause crossed the geosynchronous satellite GEOS 2 several times during a geomagnetically disturbed period, and clear signatures of the interconnection of field lines through the magnetopause were observed. The MPAE particle spectrometer provided high time resolution observations of the distribution of energetic electrons (E>22 keV) and ions (E>27 keV). Magnetometer data were used to determine the location of GEOS 2 relative to the magnetopause. The pitch angle distributions of ions and electrons were found to be strongly asymmetric with respect to 90 0 , and the asymmetries have been interpreted in terms of field-aligned particle streaming. Evidence is provided for the first time for electron streaming inside the magnetopause which continues for many bounce periods. It is concluded that magnetospheric field lines opened, at least for brief time intervals, as a consequence of interconnection with magnetosheath field lines. Comparisons of electron spectra provide evidence that the streaming electrons observed in the magnetosheath originate in the magnetosphere

  15. Nanoparticle mediated electron transfer across organic layers: from current understanding to applications

    Gooding, J. Justin; Alam, Muhammad Tanzirul; Barfidokht, Abbas; Carter, Lachlan, E-mail: justin.gooding@unsw.edu.au [School of Chemistry and Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    In the last few years electrode-organic layer-nanoparticle constructs have attracted considerable research interest for systems where in the absence of the nanoparticles the electrode is passivated. This is because it has been observed that if the organic layer is a good self-assembled monolayer that passivates the electrode, the presence of the nanoparticles 'switches on' faradaic electrochemistry and because electron transfer between the electrode and the nanoparticles is apparently independent of the thickness of the organic layer. This review 1) outlines the full extent of the experimental observations regarding this phenomenon, 2) discusses a recent theoretical description to explain the observations that have just been supported with experimental evidences and 3) provides an overview of the application of these systems in sensing and photovoltaic. (author)

  16. Mechanical properties of the rust layer induced by impressed current method in reinforced mortar

    Care, S.; Nguyen, Q.T.; L'Hostis, V.; Berthaud, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical effects of rust layer formed in reinforced mortar through accelerated tests of corrosion. The morphological and physico-chemical properties (composition, structures) of the corrosion system were characterized at different stages by using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The corrosion pattern was mainly characterized by a rust layer confined at the interface between the steel and the mortar. Expansion coefficient of rust products was determined from the rust thickness and the Faraday's law. Furthermore, in order to understand the mechanical effects of corrosion on the damage of mortar, displacement field measurements were obtained by using digital image correlation. An analytical model (hollow cylinder subjected to inner and outer pressures) was used with a set of experimental data to deduce the time of cracking and the order of magnitude of the mechanical properties of the rust layer

  17. Low absorption loss p-AlGaN superlattice cladding layer for current-injection deep ultraviolet laser diodes

    Martens, M.; Kuhn, C.; Ziffer, E.; Simoneit, T.; Rass, J.; Wernicke, T. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kueller, V.; Knauer, A.; Einfeldt, S.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    Current injection into AlGaN-based laser diode structures with high aluminum mole fractions for deep ultraviolet emission is investigated. The electrical characteristics of laser diode structures with different p-AlGaN short period superlattice (SPSL) cladding layers with various aluminum mole fractions are compared. The heterostructures contain all elements that are needed for a current-injection laser diode including cladding and waveguide layers as well as an AlGaN quantum well active region emitting near 270 nm. We found that with increasing aluminum content in the p-AlGaN cladding, the diode turn-on voltage increases, while the series resistance slightly decreases. By introducing an SPSL instead of bulk layers, the operating voltage is significantly reduced. A gain guided broad area laser diode structure with transparent p-Al{sub 0.70}Ga{sub 0.30}N waveguide layers and a transparent p-cladding with an average aluminum content of 81% was designed for strong confinement of the transverse optical mode and low optical losses. Using an optimized SPSL, this diode could sustain current densities of more than 4.5 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Low absorption loss p-AlGaN superlattice cladding layer for current-injection deep ultraviolet laser diodes

    Martens, M.; Kuhn, C.; Ziffer, E.; Simoneit, T.; Rass, J.; Wernicke, T.; Kueller, V.; Knauer, A.; Einfeldt, S.; Weyers, M.; Kneissl, M.

    2016-01-01

    Current injection into AlGaN-based laser diode structures with high aluminum mole fractions for deep ultraviolet emission is investigated. The electrical characteristics of laser diode structures with different p-AlGaN short period superlattice (SPSL) cladding layers with various aluminum mole fractions are compared. The heterostructures contain all elements that are needed for a current-injection laser diode including cladding and waveguide layers as well as an AlGaN quantum well active region emitting near 270 nm. We found that with increasing aluminum content in the p-AlGaN cladding, the diode turn-on voltage increases, while the series resistance slightly decreases. By introducing an SPSL instead of bulk layers, the operating voltage is significantly reduced. A gain guided broad area laser diode structure with transparent p-Al_0_._7_0Ga_0_._3_0N waveguide layers and a transparent p-cladding with an average aluminum content of 81% was designed for strong confinement of the transverse optical mode and low optical losses. Using an optimized SPSL, this diode could sustain current densities of more than 4.5 kA/cm"2.

  19. Direct current (DC) resistivity and Induced Polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    Doetsch, J.; Fiandaca, G.; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... the soil freezing as a strong increase in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below...

  20. Direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP) monitoring of active layer dynamics at high temporal resolution

    Doetsch, Joseph; Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Christiansen, Anders V.

    2015-01-01

    With permafrost thawing and changes in active layer dynamics induced by climate change, interactions between biogeochemical and thermal processes in the ground are of great importance. Here, active layer dynamics have been monitored using direct current (DC) resistivity and induced polarization (IP...... in resistivity. While the freezing horizon generally moves deeper with time, some variations in the freezing depth are observed along the profile. Comparison with depth-specific soil temperature indicates an exponential relationship between resistivity and below-freezing temperature. Time-lapse inversions...

  1. Quantifying hidden defect in multi-layered structures by using eddy current system combined with a scanner

    Huang Pingjie; Zhou Zekui; Wu Zhaotong

    2005-01-01

    The eddy current testing forward model of scanning inspection of multi-layered structures is introduced and simulation work is carried out to reveal the interaction between the scanning coil and defects with different geometric properties. A multi-frequency ECT experimental instrument combined with a scanner is established and scanning inspections are performed to detect the artificial etched flaws with different geometric parameters in the multi-layered structures. The predicted signals by the forward model are compared with the measured signals and the defects are characterized

  2. Significant Atmospheric Boundary Layer Change Observed above an Agulhas Current Warm Cored Eddy

    C. Messager

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The air-sea impact of a warm cored eddy ejected from the Agulhas Retroflection region south of Africa was assessed through both ocean and atmospheric profiling measurements during the austral summer. The presence of the eddy causes dramatic atmospheric boundary layer deepening, exceeding what was measured previously over such a feature in the region. This deepening seems mainly due to the turbulent heat flux anomaly above the warm eddy inducing extensive deep and persistent changes in the atmospheric boundary layer thermodynamics. The loss of heat by turbulent processes suggests that this kind of oceanic feature is an important and persistent source of heat for the atmosphere.

  3. Statistical analysis of MMS observations of energetic electron escape observed at/beyond the dayside magnetopause

    Cohen, Ian J.; Mauk, Barry H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Westlake, Joseph H.; Sibeck, David G.; Turner, Drew L.; Fennell, Joseph F.; Blake, J. Bern; Jaynes, Allison N.; Leonard, Trevor W.; Baker, Daniel N.; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoff D.; Giles, Barbara J.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Torbert, Roy B.; Burch, James L.

    2017-09-01

    Observations from the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) instrument suite aboard the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft show that energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly across the dayside. This includes the surprisingly frequent observation of magnetospheric electrons in the duskside magnetosheath, an unexpected result given assumptions regarding magnetic drift shadowing. The 238 events identified in the 40 keV electron energy channel during the first MMS dayside season that exhibit strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions indicating monohemispheric field-aligned streaming away from the magnetopause. A review of the extremely rich literature of energetic electron observations beyond the magnetopause is provided to place these new observations into historical context. Despite the extensive history of such research, these new observations provide a more comprehensive data set that includes unprecedented magnetic local time (MLT) coverage of the dayside equatorial magnetopause/magnetosheath. These data clearly highlight the common escape of energetic electrons along magnetic field lines concluded to have been reconnected across the magnetopause. While these streaming escape events agree with prior studies which show strong correlation with geomagnetic activity (suggesting a magnetotail source) and occur most frequently during periods of southward IMF, the high number of duskside events is unexpected and previously unobserved. Although the lowest electron energy channel was the focus of this study, the events reported here exhibit pitch angle anisotropies indicative of streaming up to 200 keV, which could represent the magnetopause loss of >1 MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt.

  4. Statistical analysis of MMS observations of energetic electron escape observed at/beyond the dayside magnetopause

    Cohen, Ian J.; Mauk, Barry H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Westlake, Joseph H.; Sibeck, David G.

    2017-01-01

    Here, observations from the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) instrument suite aboard the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft show that energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly across the dayside. This includes the surprisingly frequent observation of magnetospheric electrons in the duskside magnetosheath, an unexpected result given assumptions regarding magnetic drift shadowing. The 238 events identified in the 40 keV electron energy channel during the first MMS dayside season that exhibit strongly anisotropic pitch angle distributions indicating monohemispheric field-aligned streaming away from the magnetopause. A review of the extremely rich literature of energetic electron observations beyond the magnetopause is provided to place these new observations into historical context. Despite the extensive history of such research, these new observations provide a more comprehensive data set that includes unprecedented magnetic local time (MLT) coverage of the dayside equatorial magnetopause/magnetosheath. These data clearly highlight the common escape of energetic electrons along magnetic field lines concluded to have been reconnected across the magnetopause. While these streaming escape events agree with prior studies which show strong correlation with geomagnetic activity (suggesting a magnetotail source) and occur most frequently during periods of southward IMF, the high number of duskside events is unexpected and previously unobserved. Although the lowest electron energy channel was the focus of this study, the events reported here exhibit pitch angle anisotropies indicative of streaming up to 200 keV, which could represent the magnetopause loss of >1 MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt.

  5. Reactively sputtered Ti-Si-N films for application as heating layers for low-current phase-change memory

    Yin, You; Noguchi, Tomoyuki; Ota, Kazuhiro; Higano, Naoya; Sone, Hayato; Hosaka, Sumio

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the properties of Ti-Si-N films for the application as the heating layers in phase-change memory (PCM). The experimental results show that the resistivity of Ti-Si-N films can be varied by over six orders of magnitude from 2.18 x 10 4 to 3.9x10 2 Ω-cm by increasing the flow rate ratio [N 2 /(N 2 +Ar)] from 0 to 10%. The controllability of resistivity might result from the concentration change from Ti-Si to mixture of TiN and Si 3 N 4 . Reversible switching was also successfully demonstrated by using a lateral PCM with these heating layers. The stability of the Ti-Si-N films at high temperatures implies that they can be used as the heating layers in the conventional vertical PCMs for current reduction.

  6. System of ionospheric currents excited by a magnetospheric generator in the boundary layer

    Denisenko, V.V.; Zamaj, S.S.; Kitaev, A.V.; Matveenkov, I.T.; Pivovarov, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    A model of ionospheric electric fields and currents in the vicinity of the daytime cusp is proposed; the fields and currents occur due to diffusion mechanism of electric field generation at the boundary of Earth's magnetosphere. The results of calculating electric fields and currents are presented for various values of magnetic field components in the solar wind

  7. Non-dissipative currents in the theory of thermomagnetic properties of inversion layers

    Streda, P.; Oji, H.

    1983-07-01

    Starting from the Kubo formula, the non-dissipative electric and thermal currents are expressed as functions of thermodynamical quantities only. These currents originate from the surface currents which are responsible for the quantized Hall effect. The results are in full agreement with that, obtained from thermodynamical arguments. One-electron approximation is used. (author)

  8. Influences of the current density on the performances of the chrome-plated layer in deterministic electroplating repair

    Xia, H.; Shen, X. M.; Yang, X. C.; Xiong, Y.; Jiang, G. L.

    2018-01-01

    Deterministic electroplating repair is a novel method for rapidly repairing the attrited parts. By the qualitative contrast and quantitative comparison, influences of the current density on performances of the chrome-plated layer were concluded in this study. The chrome-plated layers were fabricated under different current densities when the other parameters were kept constant. Hardnesses, thicknesses and components, surface morphologies and roughnesses, and wearability of the chrome-plated layers were detected by the Vickers hardness tester, scanning electron microscope / energy dispersive X-ray detector, digital microscope in the 3D imaging mode, and the ball-milling instrument with profilograph, respectively. In order to scientifically evaluate each factor, the experimental data was normalized. A comprehensive evaluation model was founded to quantitative analyse influence of the current density based on analytic hierarchy process method and the weighted evaluation method. The calculated comprehensive evaluation indexes corresponding to current density of 40A/dm2, 45A/dm2, 50A/dm2, 55A/dm2, 60A/dm2, and 65A/dm2 were 0.2246, 0.4850, 0.4799, 0.4922, 0.8672, and 0.1381, respectively. Experimental results indicate that final optimal option was 60A/dm2, and the priority orders were 60A/dm2, 55A/dm2, 45A/dm2, 50A/dm2, 40A/dm2, and 65A/dm2.

  9. The dependence of critical current density of GdFeCo layer on composition of thermally assisted STT-RAM

    Dai, B.; Zhu, J.; Liu, K.; Yang, L.; Han, J.

    2017-07-01

    Amorphous rare earth-transitional metal (RETM) GdFeCo memory layer with RE- and TM-rich compositions was fabricated in stacks of GdFeCo (10 nm)/Cu (3 nm)/[Co(0.2 nm)/Pd(0.4 nm)]6. Their magnetic properties and spin transfer torque (STT) switching of magnetization were investigated. The maximum magneto-resistance (MR) was around 0.24% for the TM-rich Gd21.4 (Fe90Co10)78.6 memory layer and was -0.03% for the RE-rich Gd29.0 (Fe90Co10)71.0 memory layer. The critical current densities Jc to switch the GdFeCo memory layers are in the range of 1.4 × 107 A/cm2-4.5 × 107 A/cm2. The dependence of critical current density Jc and effective anisotropy constant Keff on Gd composition were also investigated. Both Jc and Keff have maximum values in the Gd composition range from 21-29 at.%, suitable for thermally assisted STT-RAM for storage density exceeding Gb/inch2.

  10. Resonant Excitation of Boundary Layer Instability of DC Arc Plasma Jet by Current Modulation

    Kopecký, Vladimír; Hrabovský, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 6 (2011), s. 827-838 ISSN 0272-4324 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : dc arc jet * plasma jet oscillations * boundary layer instability * frequency spectra Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/v160841757161758/

  11. Interface-Enhanced Spin-Orbit Torques and Current-Induced Magnetization Switching of Pd /Co /AlOx Layers

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Garello, Kevin; Avci, Can Onur; Gabureac, Mihai; Gambardella, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic heterostructures that combine large spin-orbit torque efficiency, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and low resistivity are key to developing electrically controlled memory and logic devices. Here, we report on vector measurements of the current-induced spin-orbit torques and magnetization switching in perpendicularly magnetized Pd /Co /AlOx layers as a function of Pd thickness. We find sizable dampinglike (DL) and fieldlike (FL) torques, on the order of 1 mT per 107 A /cm2 , which have different thicknesses and magnetization angle dependencies. The analysis of the DL torque efficiency per unit current density and the electric field using drift-diffusion theory leads to an effective spin Hall angle and spin-diffusion length of Pd larger than 0.03 and 7 nm, respectively. The FL spin-orbit torque includes a significant interface contribution, is larger than estimated using drift-diffusion parameters, and, furthermore, is strongly enhanced upon rotation of the magnetization from the out-of-plane to the in-plane direction. Finally, taking advantage of the large spin-orbit torques in this system, we demonstrate bipolar magnetization switching of Pd /Co /AlOx layers with a similar current density to that used for Pt /Co layers with a comparable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  12. The low-latitude boundary layer at mid-altitiudes: Relation to large-scale Birkeland currents

    Woch, J.; Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    In this work the authors seek to test a projected relationship between the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and field aligned currents (FAC), or Birkeland currents. They use the procedure developed by Woch and Lundin for identifying LLBL boundaries. They look for correlations between properties of the FAC and properties of the LLBL. Their results show that in most cases the FAC observed are totally inside the region which exhibits LLBL plasma precipitation. The authors argue that within the biases to their data because of its source, and relative sensitivities, their conclusions support earlier work which argues for the LLBL acting as a source region for FAC features

  13. Subsolar magnetopause observation and kinetic simulation of a tripolar guide magnetic field perturbation consistent with a magnetic island

    Eriksson, S.; Cassak, P. A.; Retinò, A.; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-04-01

    The Polar satellite recorded two reconnection exhausts within 6 min on 1 April 2001 across a subsolar magnetopause that displayed a symmetric plasma density, but different out-of-plane magnetic field signatures for similar solar wind conditions. The first magnetopause crossing displayed a bipolar guide field variation in a weak external guide field consistent with a symmetric Hall field from a single X line. The subsequent crossing represents the first observation of a tripolar guide field perturbation at Earth's magnetopause in a strong guide field. This perturbation consists of a significant guide field enhancement between two narrow guide field depressions. A particle-in-cell simulation for the prevailing conditions across this second event resulted in a magnetic island between two simulated X lines across which a tripolar guide field developed consistent with the observation. The simulated island supports a scenario whereby Polar encountered the asymmetric quadrupole Hall magnetic fields between two X lines for symmetric conditions across the magnetopause.

  14. Spin-dependent current in resonant tunneling diode with ferromagnetic GaMnN layers

    Tang, N.Y.

    2009-01-01

    The spin-polarized tunneling current through a double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with ferromagnetic GaMnN emitter/collector is investigated theoretically. Two distinct spin splitting peaks can be observed at current-voltage (I-V) characteristics at low temperature. The spin polarization decreases with the temperature due to the thermal effect of electron density of states. When charge polarization effect is considered at the heterostructure, the spin polarization is enhanced significantly. A highly spin-polarized current can be obtained depending on the polarization charge density.

  15. Current status of AlInN layers lattice-matched to GaN for photonics and electronics

    Butte, R; Carlin, J-F; Feltin, E; Gonschorek, M; Nicolay, S; Christmann, G; Simeonov, D; Castiglia, A; Dorsaz, J; Buehlmann, H J; Christopoulos, S; Hoegersthal, G Baldassarri Hoeger von; Grundy, A J D; Mosca, M; Pinquier, C; Py, M A; Demangeot, F; Frandon, J; Lagoudakis, P G; Baumberg, J J; Grandjean, N

    2007-01-01

    We report on the current properties of Al 1-x In x N (x ∼ 0.18) layers lattice-matched (LM) to GaN and their specific use to realize nearly strain-free structures for photonic and electronic applications. Following a literature survey of the general properties of AlInN layers, structural and optical properties of thin state-of-the-art AlInN layers LM to GaN are described showing that despite improved structural properties these layers are still characterized by a typical background donor concentration of (1-5) x 10 18 cm -3 and a large Stokes shift (∼800 meV) between luminescence and absorption edge. The use of these AlInN layers LM to GaN is then exemplified through the properties of GaN/AlInN multiple quantum wells (QWs) suitable for near-infrared intersubband applications. A built-in electric field of 3.64 MV cm -1 solely due to spontaneous polarization is deduced from photoluminescence measurements carried out on strain-free single QW heterostructures, a value in good agreement with that deduced from theoretical calculation. Other potentialities regarding optoelectronics are demonstrated through the successful realization of crack-free highly reflective AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors (R > 99%) and high quality factor microcavities (Q > 2800) likely to be of high interest for short wavelength vertical light emitting devices and fundamental studies on the strong coupling regime between excitons and cavity photons. In this respect, room temperature (RT) lasing of a LM AlInN/GaN vertical cavity surface emitting laser under optical pumping is reported. A description of the selective lateral oxidation of AlInN layers for current confinement in nitride-based light emitting devices and the selective chemical etching of oxidized AlInN layers is also given. Finally, the characterization of LM AlInN/GaN heterojunctions will reveal the potential of such a system for the fabrication of high electron mobility transistors through the report of a high two

  16. Vertically oriented graphene bridging active-layer/current-collector interface for ultrahigh rate supercapacitors.

    Bo, Zheng; Zhu, Weiguang; Ma, Wei; Wen, Zhenhai; Shuai, Xiaorui; Chen, Junhong; Yan, Jianhua; Wang, Zhihua; Cen, Kefa; Feng, Xinliang

    2013-10-25

    Dense networks of graphene nanosheets standing vertically on a current collector can work as numerous electrically conductive bridges to facilitate charge transport and mitigate the constriction/spreading resistance at the interface between the active material and the current collector. The vertically oriented graphene-bridged supercapacitors present excellent rate and power capabilities. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Structure of the low-latitude boundary layer

    Sckopke, N.; Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sonnerup, B.U.O.; Bame, S.J.; Forbes, T.G.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Russell, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Observations at high temporal resolution of the frontside magnetopause and plasma boundary layer, made with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut, Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, fast plasma analyzer on board the Isee 1 and 2 spacecraft, have revealed a complex quasi-periodic structure of some of the observed boundary layers: cool tailward streaming boundary layer plasma is seen intermittently, with intervening periods of hot tenuous plasma which has properties similar to the magnetospheric population. While individual encounters with the boundary layer plasma last only a few minutes, the total observation time may extend over 1 hour or more. One such crossing, at 0800 hours local time and 40 0 northern GSM latitude, is examined in detail, including a quantitative comparison of the boundary layer entry and exit times of the two spacecraft. The data are found to be compatible with a boundary layer that is always attached to the magnetopause but where the layer thickness has a large-scale spatial modulation pattern which travels tailward past the spacecraft. Included are periods when the thickness is essentially zero and others when it is of the order of 1 R/sub E/. The duration of these periods is highly variable but is typically in the range of 2--5 min, corresponding to a distance along the magnetopause of the order of 3--8 R/sub E/. The observed boundary layer features include a steep density gradient at the magnetopause, with an approximately constant boundary layer plasma density amounting to about 25% of the magnetosheath density, and a second abrupt density decrease at the inner edge of the layer. It also appears that the purely magnetospheric plasma is ocassionally separated from the boundary layer by a halo region in which the plasma density is somewhat higher, and the temperature somewhat lower, than in the magnetosphere. A tentative model is proposed

  18. Sausage instabilities in the electron current layer and its role in the concept of fast ignition

    Das, Amita; Jain, Neeraj; Kaw, Predhiman; Sengupta, Sudip

    2004-01-01

    The fast ignition concept of laser fusion utilizes hot electrons produced at the surface of the target by an incident intense laser pulse for the creation of the hot spot for ignition. As the hot electrons move inwards to the core of the precompressed target, the electrons from the background plasma provide a return shielding current. Three dimensional PIC simulations have shown that intense Weibel, tearing and coalescence instabilities take place which organize the current distribution into a few current filaments. In each of these filaments the central core region constitutes a current due to the fast electrons propagating inwards towards the pellet core, while the outer cylindrical shell region carries the return shielding current. The presence of instabilities and their subsequent nonlinear development can hinder the propagation of fast electrons towards the core influencing the location of the hot spot for ignition. Earlier studies showing the existence of sausage-like modes were carried out in the nonrelativistic limit and under the assumption of equal electron densities of the fast and the cold electrons. The fast electron density, in general, differs considerably from the background plasma density as it is dependent on the incident laser intensity. This paper incorporates relativistic effects and also studies the dependence of the growth rate on the fast electron density. Finally, nonlinear saturation of the instability and its impact on the stopping of the fast electron motion towards the core have also been investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations have, however, currently been carried out for non-relativistic dynamics. The results show that the sheared velocity profile of the channel gets flattened, causing an effective drop in the inward moving current. (author)

  19. The response of the day side magnetosphere--ionosphere system to time-varying field line reconnection at the magnetopause. II. Erosion event of March 27, 1968

    Reid, G.C.; Holzer, T.E.

    1975-01-01

    The circuit analogy for the response of the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system to changes in day side field line reconnection rate is applied to real conditions and is used to calculate the expected variation in magnetopause position during the erosion event described by Aubry et al. (1970). Generally good agreement between observation and theory is found. The role of the dawn-dusk electric field responsible for magnetospheric convection is examined in some detail and is treated in the circuit analogy as the field due to an external generator connected across the circuit. It is found that the erosion process requires two distinct time constants for a proper description: (1) the time needed for magnetosheath plamsa to travel down the freshly reconnected field lines to the ionosphere and (2) roughly, the time required for the foot of a reconnected field line to travel one quarter of the total noon-midnight dimension of the polar cap. The second time constant is the dominant one and is not related to the ionospheric conductivity, as has been suggested previously. Examination of high-latitude magnetograms obtained during the erosion event discussed shows that the electric field oscillations predicted by the theory and observed by the spacecraft in terms of oscillations in the magnetopause position are also reflected in osci []lations in ionospheric current flow

  20. Transient, Small-Scale Field-Aligned Currents in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer During Storm Time Substorms

    Nakamura, R.; Sergeev, V. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Plaschke, F.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Varsani, A.; Schmid, D.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Russell, C. T.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report on field-aligned current observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft near the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) during two major substorms on 23 June 2015. Small-scale field-aligned currents were found embedded in fluctuating PSBL flux tubes near the Separatrix region. We resolve, for the first time, short-lived earthward (downward) intense field-aligned current sheets with thicknesses of a few tens of kilometers, which are well below the ion scale, on flux tubes moving equatorward earth ward during outward plasma sheet expansion. They coincide with upward field-aligned electron beams with energies of a few hundred eV. These electrons are most likely due to acceleration associated with a reconnection jet or high-energy ion beam-produced disturbances. The observations highlight coupling of multiscale processes in PSBL as a consequence of magnetotail reconnection.

  1. Energy Dissipation and Dynamics in Large Guide Field Turbulence Driven Reconnection at the Magnetopause

    TenBarge, J. M.; Shay, M. A.; Sharma, P.; Juno, J.; Haggerty, C. C.; Drake, J. F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hakim, A.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence and magnetic reconnection are the primary mechanisms responsible for the conversion of stored magnetic energy into particle energy in many space and astrophysical plasmas. The magnetospheric multiscale mission (MMS) has given us unprecedented access to high cadence particle and field data of turbulence and magnetic reconnection at earth's magnetopause. The observations include large guide field reconnection events generated within the turbulent magnetopause. Motivated by these observations, we present a study of large guide reconnection using the fully kinetic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell component of the Gkeyll simulation framework, and we also employ and compare with gyrokinetics to explore the asymptotically large guide field limit. In addition to studying the configuration space dynamics, we leverage the recently developed field-particle correlations to diagnose the dominant sources of dissipation and compare the results of the field-particle correlation to other energy dissipation measures.

  2. Multispacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock and magnetopause during extreme solar wind disturbances

    Tatrallyay, M.; Erdos, G.; Nemeth, Z.

    2012-01-01

    by the Cluster spacecraft were best predicted by the 3-D model of Lin et al. (2010). The applied empirical bow shock models and the 3-D semi-empiric bow shock model combined with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solution proved to be insufficient for predicting the observed unusual bow shock locations during large...... interplanetary disturbances. The results of a global 3-D MHD model were in good agreement with the Cluster observations on 17 January 2005, but they did not predict the bow shock crossings on 31 October 2003....... of three magnetopause and four bow shock models which describe them in considerably different ways using statistical methods based on observations. A new 2-D magnetopause model is introduced (based on Verigin et al., 2009) which takes into account the pressure of the compressed magnetosheath field raised...

  3. Ion temperature and ∇B effects on ULF fluctuations at the magnetopause

    Pillay, R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we present an extension of the work by Lakhina, Shukla and Stenflo (Geophys. Res. Lett. 20, 2419 1993) on the generation of ultralow frequency (ULF) fluctuations at the earth's magnetopause. A high beta model for the generation of these short wavelength fluctuations is described. In this model, drifts due to density and magnetic field gradients, present at the magnetopause, act as free energy sources for the excitation of the ULF waves. The model also considers both warm electrons and ions and is based on the SS equations (Shukla and Stenflo. J. Exp. Theor. Phys. 57, 692 1993) for low-frequency EM waves in non-uniform high beta magnetoplasmas. Using fluid theory the associated dispersion relation is first established, then numerically solved for unstable modes in different regions of parameter space. (orig.)

  4. A case study of low-frequency waves at the magnetopause

    L. Rezeau

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the study of one of the first magnetopause crossings observed by the four Cluster spacecraft simultaneously, on 10 December 2000. Although the delays between the crossings are very short, the features of the boundary appear quite different as seen by the different spacecraft, strongly suggesting the presence of a local curvature of the magnetopause at that time. The small-scale fluctuations observed by the STAFF search-coil experiment are placed in relation to this context. A preliminary investigation of their behaviour on the boundary and in the neighbourhood magnetosheath is performed in comparison with the theoretical model of Belmont and Rezeau (2001, which describes the interaction of waves with the boundary.Key words. Space plasma physics (transport processes, discontinuities, turbulence

  5. Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes With Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Diffusion Layers Constructed around Stainless Steel Mesh Current Collectors

    Zhang, Fang; Saito, Tomonori; Cheng, Shaoan; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    A new and simplified approach for making cathodes for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was developed by using metal meshcurrent collectorsandinexpensive polymer/carbon diffusion layers (DLs). Rather than adding a current collector to a cathode material such as carbon cloth, we constructed the cathode around the metal mesh itself, thereby avoiding the need for the carbon cloth or other supporting material. A base layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and carbon black was applied to the air-side of a stainless steel mesh, and Pt on carbon black with Nafion binder was applied to the solutionside as catalyst for oxygen reduction. The PDMS prevented water leakage and functioned as a DL by limiting oxygen transfer through the cathode and improving coulombic efficiency. PDMS is hydrophobic, stable, and less expensive than other DL materials, such as PTFE, that are commonly applied to air cathodes. Multiple PDMS/carbon layers were applied in order to optimize the performance of the cathode. Two PDMS/ carbon layers achieved the highest maximum power density of 1610 ± 56 mW/m 2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 47.0 ± 1.6 W/m3 based on liquid volume). This power output was comparable to the best result of 1635 ± 62 mW/m2 obtained using carbon cloth with three PDMS/carbon layers and a Pt catalyst. The coulombic efficiency of the mesh cathodes reached more than 80%, and was much higher than the maximum of 57% obtained with carbon cloth. These findings demonstrate that cathodes can be constructed around metal mesh materials such as stainless steel, and that an inexpensive coating of PDMS can prevent water leakage and lead to improved coulombic efficiencies. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  6. Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes With Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Diffusion Layers Constructed around Stainless Steel Mesh Current Collectors

    Zhang, Fang

    2010-02-15

    A new and simplified approach for making cathodes for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was developed by using metal meshcurrent collectorsandinexpensive polymer/carbon diffusion layers (DLs). Rather than adding a current collector to a cathode material such as carbon cloth, we constructed the cathode around the metal mesh itself, thereby avoiding the need for the carbon cloth or other supporting material. A base layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and carbon black was applied to the air-side of a stainless steel mesh, and Pt on carbon black with Nafion binder was applied to the solutionside as catalyst for oxygen reduction. The PDMS prevented water leakage and functioned as a DL by limiting oxygen transfer through the cathode and improving coulombic efficiency. PDMS is hydrophobic, stable, and less expensive than other DL materials, such as PTFE, that are commonly applied to air cathodes. Multiple PDMS/carbon layers were applied in order to optimize the performance of the cathode. Two PDMS/ carbon layers achieved the highest maximum power density of 1610 ± 56 mW/m 2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 47.0 ± 1.6 W/m3 based on liquid volume). This power output was comparable to the best result of 1635 ± 62 mW/m2 obtained using carbon cloth with three PDMS/carbon layers and a Pt catalyst. The coulombic efficiency of the mesh cathodes reached more than 80%, and was much higher than the maximum of 57% obtained with carbon cloth. These findings demonstrate that cathodes can be constructed around metal mesh materials such as stainless steel, and that an inexpensive coating of PDMS can prevent water leakage and lead to improved coulombic efficiencies. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  7. On the surface recombination current of metal-insulator semiconductor inversion layer solar cells

    Nielsen, Otto M.

    1981-01-01

    voltages Voc were found to be lower than for ~ cells. The measured differences in Voc were higher than expected from the dark characteristics which is explained as a difference in the surface recombination current due to a higher interface state density Nss of ~ cells. Journal of Applied Physics...

  8. Sinking of armour layer around a vertical cylinder exposed to waves and current

    Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Probst, Thomas; Petersen, Thor Ugelvig

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of the sinking of a scour protection adjacent to a monopile are described in this paper, together with the determination of the equilibrium sinking depth in various wave and combined wave and current conditions based on physical model tests.Sinking of the rocks may ultimately lead ...

  9. Force and light tuning vertical tunneling current in the atomic layered MoS2.

    Li, Feng; Lu, Zhixing; Lan, Yann-Wen; Jiao, Liying; Xu, Minxuan; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Xiankun; Wu, Hualin; Qi, Junjie

    2018-07-06

    In this work, the vertical electrical transport behavior of bilayer MoS 2 under the coupling of force and light was explored by the use of conductive atomic force microscopy. We found that the current-voltage behavior across the tip-MoS 2 -Pt junction is a tunneling current that can be well fitted by a Simmons approximation. The transport behavior is direct tunneling at low bias and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high bias, and the transition voltage and tunnel barrier height are extracted. The effect of force and light on the effective band gap of the junction is investigated. Furthermore, the source-drain current drops surprisingly when we continually increase the force, and the dropping point is altered by the provided light. This mechanism is responsible for the tuning of tunneling barrier height and width by force and light. These results provide a new way to design devices that take advantage of ultrathin two-dimensional materials. Ultrashort channel length electronic components that possess tunneling current are important for establishing high-efficiency electronic and optoelectronic systems.

  10. Do we know the actual magnetopause position for typical solar wind conditions?

    Samsonov, A. A.; Gordeev, E.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Šimůnek, Jiří; Sibeck, D. G.; Toth, G.; Merkin, V. G.; Raeder, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 7 (2016), s. 6493-6508 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19376S Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : magnetopause * MHD modeling Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.733, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016JA022471/abstract

  11. Passivation of Flexible YBCO Superconducting Current Lead With Amorphous SiO2 Layer

    Johannes, Daniel; Webber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADR) are operated in space to cool detectors of cosmic radiation to a few 10s of mK. A key element of the ADR is a superconducting magnet operating at about 0.3 K that is continually energized and de-energized in synchronism with a thermal switch, such that a piece of paramagnetic salt is alternately warm in a high magnetic field and cold in zero magnetic field. This causes the salt pill or refrigerant to cool, and it is able to suck heat from an object, e.g., the sensor, to be cooled. Current has to be fed into and out of the magnets from a dissipative power supply at the ambient temperature of the spacecraft. The current leads that link the magnets to the power supply inevitably conduct a significant amount of heat into the colder regions of the supporting cryostat, resulting in the need for larger, heavier, and more powerful supporting refrigerators. The aim of this project was to design and construct high-temperature superconductor (HTS) leads from YBCO (yttrium barium copper oxide) composite conductors to reduce the heat load significantly in the temperature regime below the critical temperature of YBCO. The magnet lead does not have to support current in the event that the YBCO ceases to be superconducting. Cus - tomarily, a normal metal conductor in parallel with the YBCO is a necessary part of the lead structure to allow for this upset condition; however, for this application, the normal metal can be dispensed with. Amorphous silicon dioxide is deposited directly onto the surface of YBCO, which resides on a flexible substrate. The silicon dioxide protects the YBCO from chemically reacting with atmospheric water and carbon dioxide, thus preserving the superconducting properties of the YBCO. The customary protective coating for flexible YBCO conductors is silver or a silver/gold alloy, which conducts heat many orders of magnitude better than SiO2 and so limits the use of such a composite conductor for passing current

  12. Enhanced light extraction efficiency of GaN-based light-emittng diodes by nitrogen implanted current blocking layer

    Kim, Yong Deok; Oh, Seung Kyu; Park, Min Joo; Kwak, Joon Seop, E-mail: jskwak@sunchon.ac.kr

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A nitrogen implanted current-blocking layer was successfully demonstrated. • Light-extraction efficiency and radiant intensity was increased by more than 20%. • Ion implantation was successfully implemented in GaN based light-emitting diodes. - Abstract: GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) with a nitrogen implanted current-blocking layer (CBL) were successfully demonstrated for improving the light extraction efficiency (LEE) and radiant intensity. The LEE and radiant intensity of the LEDs with a shallow implanted CBL with nitrogen was greatly increased by more than 20% compared to that of a conventional LED without the CBL due to an increase in the effective current path, which reduces light absorption at the thick p-pad electrode. Meanwhile, deep implanted CBL with a nitrogen resulted in deterioration of the LEE and radiant intensity because of formation of crystal damage, followed by absorption of the light generated at the multi-quantum well(MQW). These results clearly suggest that ion implantation method, which is widely applied in the fabrication of Si based devices, can be successfully implemented in the fabrication of GaN based LEDs by optimization of implanted depth.

  13. Analyzing the Magnetopause Internal Structure: New Possibilities Offered by MMS Tested in a Case Study

    Rezeau, L.; Belmont, G.; Manuzzo, R.; Aunai, N.; Dargent, J.

    2018-01-01

    We explore the structure of the magnetopause using a crossing observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft on 16 October 2015. Several methods (minimum variance analysis, BV method, and constant velocity analysis) are first applied to compute the normal to the magnetopause considered as a whole. The different results obtained are not identical, and we show that the whole boundary is not stationary and not planar, so that basic assumptions of these methods are not well satisfied. We then analyze more finely the internal structure for investigating the departures from planarity. Using the basic mathematical definition of what is a one-dimensional physical problem, we introduce a new single spacecraft method, called LNA (local normal analysis) for determining the varying normal, and we compare the results so obtained with those coming from the multispacecraft minimum directional derivative (MDD) tool developed by Shi et al. (2005). This last method gives the dimensionality of the magnetic variations from multipoint measurements and also allows estimating the direction of the local normal when the variations are locally 1-D. This study shows that the magnetopause does include approximate one-dimensional substructures but also two- and three-dimensional structures. It also shows that the dimensionality of the magnetic variations can differ from the variations of other fields so that, at some places, the magnetic field can have a 1-D structure although all the plasma variations do not verify the properties of a global one-dimensional problem. A generalization of the MDD tool is proposed.

  14. Multiple flux rope events at the magnetopause observations by TC-1 on 18 March 2004

    C. J. Xiao

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available From 23:10 to 23:50 UT on 18 March 2004, the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft detected eight flux ropes at the outbound crossing of the southern dawnside magnetopause. A notable guide field existed inside all ropes. In the mean time the Cluster spacecraft were staying in the magnetosheath and found that the events occurred under the condition of southward IMF Bz and dominant negative IMF By. There are six ropes that appeared quasi-periodically, with a repeated period being approximately 1-4 min. The last flux rope lasts for a longer time interval with a larger peak in the BN variations; it can thus be referred to as a typical FTE. The 18 March 2004 event is quite similar to the multiple flux rope event observed by Cluster on 26 January 2001 at the northern duskside high-latitude magnetopause. A detailed comparison of these two events is made in the paper. Preliminary studies imply that both of these multiple flux ropes events seem to be produced by component reconnection at the dayside low-latitude magnetopause.

  15. MESSENGER Orbital Observations of Large-Amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at Mercury's Magnetopause

    Sundberg, Torbjorn; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a survey of Kelvi\\ n-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orb it. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub -sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopau are much larger than at Earth. We attribute these greater rates to the limited wave energy dissipation in Mercury's highly resistive regolith. The wave amplitude was often on the order of ' 00 nT or more, and the wave periods were - 10- 20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is present in the data, in that all of the observed wave events occurred in the post-noon and dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is like ly related to finite Larmor-radius effects and is in agreement with results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. The waves were observed almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward, a pattern similar to that for most terrestrial KH wave events. Accompanying plasma measurements show that the waves were associated with the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  16. Variability of ULF wave power at the magnetopause: a study at low latitude with Cluster data

    Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Grison, B.; Belmont, G.; Rezeau, L.; Chanteur, G.; Robert, P.; Canu, P.

    2012-04-01

    Strong ULF wave activity has been observed at magnetopause crossings since a long time. Those turbulent-like waves are possible contributors to particle penetration from the Solar Wind to the Magnetosphere through the magnetopause. Statistical studies have been performed to understand under which conditions the ULF wave power is the most intense and thus the waves can be the most efficient for particle transport from one region to the other. Clearly the solar wind pressure organizes the data, the stronger the pressure, the higher the ULF power (Attié et al 2008). Double STAR-Cluster comparison has shown that ULF wave power is stronger at low latitude than at high latitude (Cornilleau-Wehrlin et al, 2008). The different studies performed have not, up to now, shown a stronger power in the vicinity of local noon. Nevertheless under identical activity conditions, the variability of this power, even at a given location in latitude and local time is very high. The present work intends at understanding this variability by means of the multi spacecraft mission Cluster. The data used are from spring 2008, while Cluster was crossing the magnetopause at low latitude, in particularly quite Solar Wind conditions. The first region of interest of this study is the sub-solar point vicinity where the long wavelength surface wave effects are most unlikely.

  17. Explosive magnetic reconnection caused by an X-shaped current-vortex layer in a collisionless plasma

    Hirota, M.; Hattori, Y. [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8677 (Japan); Morrison, P. J. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    A mechanism for explosive magnetic reconnection is investigated by analyzing the nonlinear evolution of a collisionless tearing mode in a two-fluid model that includes the effects of electron inertia and temperature. These effects cooperatively enable a fast reconnection by forming an X-shaped current-vortex layer centered at the reconnection point. A high-resolution simulation of this model for an unprecedentedly small electron skin depth d{sub e} and ion-sound gyroradius ρ{sub s}, satisfying d{sub e}=ρ{sub s}, shows an explosive tendency for nonlinear growth of the tearing mode, where it is newly found that the explosive widening of the X-shaped layer occurs locally around the reconnection point with the length of the X shape being shorter than the domain length and the wavelength of the linear tearing mode. The reason for the onset of this locally enhanced reconnection is explained theoretically by developing a novel nonlinear and nonequilibrium inner solution that models the local X-shaped layer, and then matching it to an outer solution that is approximated by a linear tearing eigenmode with a shorter wavelength than the domain length. This theoretical model proves that the local reconnection can release the magnetic energy more efficiently than the global one and the estimated scaling of the explosive growth rate agrees well with the simulation results.

  18. Two-stream Stability Properties of the Return-Current Layer for Intense Ion Beam Propagation Through Background Plasma

    Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Dorf, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    When an ion beam with sharp edge propagates through a background plasma, its current is neutralized by the plasma return current everywhere except at the beam edge over a characteristic transverse distance Δx perpendicular ∼ (delta) pe , where (delta) pe = c/ω pe is the collisionless skin depth, and ω pe is the electron plasma frequency. Because the background plasma electrons neutralizing the ion beam current inside the beam are streaming relative to the background plasma electrons outside the beam, the background plasma can support a two-stream surface-mode excitation. Such surface modes have been studied previously assuming complete charge and current neutralization, and have been shown to be strongly unstable. In this paper we study the detailed stability properties of this two-stream surface mode for an electron flow velocity profile self-consistently driven by the ion beam. In particular, it is shown that the self-magnetic field generated inside the unneutralized current layer, which has not been taken into account previously, completely eliminates the instability

  19. Laboratory investigation of physical mechanisms of auroral charged particle acceleration in the field-aligned currents layers

    Gavrilov, B.; Zetzer, J.; Sobyanin, D.; Podgorny, I.

    One of the major topics of space weather research is to understand auroral structure and the processes that guide, accelerate, and otherwise control particle precipitation and produce auroral substorms. Navigation, communications and radars in the high latitude regions are severely affected through the effects on the ionosphere. It has long been recognized that the direct cause of the aurora is the precipitation of energetic electrons and ions into the atmosphere leading to excitation of the ambient atmospheric gases. Observations of the ionospheric ionization profiles and auroral precipitation characteristics have shown that field-aligned potential drops are formed to create this effect. The problem is that it is not clear the structure of the regions of magnetic field-aligned electric fields and how they are supported in the magnetospheric plasma. The objective of this research is to study the physical mechanisms of these phenomena in a laboratory experiment. It should be achieved by simulating the charged particle acceleration due to field-aligned electrical field generation in all totality of the interconnected events: generation of a plasma flow, its evolution in the magnetic field, polarization of plasma, generation of the field-aligned currents, development of instabilities in the plasma and current layers, double layers or anomalous resistance regions appearance, electrons acceleration. Parameters of the laboratory simulation and preliminary results of the experiment are discussed.

  20. Vortex lines in layered superconductors. II. Pinning and critical currents in high temperature superconductors

    Manuel, P.

    1994-02-01

    In this article, a qualitative survey is given on the various phenomena which influence the critical current of high temperature superconductors. Critical current is defined as a property related to a non-zero electric field criterion, the level of which is fixed by experimental considerations, or efficiency requirements of applications. The presentation is restricted to extrinsic intragranular critical current, which depends in a complex way on the interplay between the characteristics of pinning centres and the properties of the vortex lattice. The discussion is focussed on the configuration {B} / / {c}, which contains the main elements of this problem. Differences of behaviour between Y(123) and BSCCO (Bi(2212) or Bi(2223)) are analysed in the context of their respective anisotropy factors. Possible regimes for pinning and creep are discussed in various temperature domains. From critical current results, a strong pinning regime is found to occur in BSCCO, whereas the pinning strength in Y(123) is still an open question. The thermal decrease of critical current allows a collective creep regime to appear in both materials, but at different temperature ranges. The disappearance of correlation effects near the irreversibility line results in a fall of the effective pinning energy. We show that in BSCCO, the effective pinning energy deduced from experimental results is not in agreement with pinning by randomly dispersed oxygen vacancies. Finally, we shortly describe the microstructures which could allow a more efficient pinning in future materials. On effectue une présentation qualitative des divers phénomènes qui contrôlent la valeur du courant critique dans les supraconducteurs à haute température. La notion de courant critique qui est utilisée est reliée à un critère de champ électrique non nul, fixé par des considérations expérimentales ou des exigences de rendement pour les applications. On se restreint au problème des courants critiques

  1. Effect of Lanthanum-Strontium Cathode Current-Collecting Layer on the Performance of Anode Supported Type Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Park, Sun-Young; Ji, Ho-Il; Kim, Hae-Ryoung; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Son, Ji-Won; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-07-01

    We applied screen-printed (La,Sr)CoO3 as a current-collecting layer of planar type unit-cell for lower temperature operation of SOFCs. In this study the effects of the cathode current-collecting layer on the performance of unit cell and symmetric half cell were investigated via AC and DC polarization experiments. According to our investigation, appropriately controlled current collecting layer was very effective to enhance the unit cell performance by reducing not only the ohmic resistance but also the polarization losses of SOFC cathode.

  2. Reevaluation of Performance of Electric Double-layer Capacitors from Constant-current Charge/Discharge and Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Allagui, Anis; Freeborn, Todd J; Elwakil, Ahmed S; Maundy, Brent J

    2016-12-09

    The electric characteristics of electric-double layer capacitors (EDLCs) are determined by their capacitance which is usually measured in the time domain from constant-current charging/discharging and cyclic voltammetry tests, and from the frequency domain using nonlinear least-squares fitting of spectral impedance. The time-voltage and current-voltage profiles from the first two techniques are commonly treated by assuming ideal R s C behavior in spite of the nonlinear response of the device, which in turn provides inaccurate values for its characteristic metrics [corrected]. In this paper we revisit the calculation of capacitance, power and energy of EDLCs from the time domain constant-current step response and linear voltage waveform, under the assumption that the device behaves as an equivalent fractional-order circuit consisting of a resistance R s in series with a constant phase element (CPE(Q, α), with Q being a pseudocapacitance and α a dispersion coefficient). In particular, we show with the derived (R s , Q, α)-based expressions, that the corresponding nonlinear effects in voltage-time and current-voltage can be encompassed through nonlinear terms function of the coefficient α, which is not possible with the classical R s C model. We validate our formulae with the experimental measurements of different EDLCs.

  3. Reevaluation of Performance of Electric Double-layer Capacitors from Constant-current Charge/Discharge and Cyclic Voltammetry

    Allagui, Anis; Freeborn, Todd J.; Elwakil, Ahmed S.; Maundy, Brent J.

    2016-12-01

    The electric characteristics of electric-double layer capacitors (EDLCs) are determined by their capacitance which is usually measured in the time domain from constant-current charging/discharging and cyclic voltammetry tests, and from the frequency domain using nonlinear least-squares fitting of spectral impedance. The time-voltage and current-voltage profiles from the first two techniques are commonly treated by assuming ideal SsC behavior in spite of the nonlinear response of the device, which in turn provides inaccurate values for its characteristic metrics. In this paper we revisit the calculation of capacitance, power and energy of EDLCs from the time domain constant-current step response and linear voltage waveform, under the assumption that the device behaves as an equivalent fractional-order circuit consisting of a resistance Rs in series with a constant phase element (CPE(Q, α), with Q being a pseudocapacitance and α a dispersion coefficient). In particular, we show with the derived (Rs, Q, α)-based expressions, that the corresponding nonlinear effects in voltage-time and current-voltage can be encompassed through nonlinear terms function of the coefficient α, which is not possible with the classical RsC model. We validate our formulae with the experimental measurements of different EDLCs.

  4. Effects of the intrinsic layer width on the band-to-band tunneling current in p-i-n GaN-based avalanche photodiodes

    Wang, Ling; Bao, Xichang; Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Chao; Yuan, Yonggang; Xu, Jintong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2009-01-01

    Dark current is critical for GaN-based avalanche photodiodes because it significantly increases the noise current and limits the multiplication factor. It has been found that the band-to-band tunneling current is the dominant origin of the dark current for avalanche photodiodes at the onset of breakdown voltage. Experimentally, for GaN-based avalanche photodiodes with a thinner intrinsic layer, the dark current increases nearly exponentially with the applied voltage even at a lower bias voltage. In this paper, the intrinsic layer (i-layer) width of GaN-based avalanche photodiodes has been varied to study its effect on the band-to-band tunneling current. A widely used equation was used to calculate the band-to-band tunneling current of avalanche photodiodes with different i-layer widths (i-layer 0.1 µm, 0.2 µm and 0.4 µm). At −40 V, the band-to-band tunneling current significantly reduces by a magnitude of 10 −15 A with an increase in the i-layer width from 0.1 µm to 0.2 µm, and a magnitude of 10 −29 A with an increase in the i-layer width from 0.2 µm to 0.4 µm. Then, GaN-based avalanche photodiodes (i-layer 0.1 µm, 0.2 µm and 0.4 µm) with different-sized mesa were fabricated. Also, the measurement of dark current of all three different structures was performed, and their multiplication factors were given

  5. Ionospheric plasma density structures associated with magnetopause motion: a case study using the Cluster spacecraft and the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    F. Pitout

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available On 5 January 2003, the footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, then orbiting in the dayside magnetosphere near the magnetopause, was in the close vicinity of the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR in the dayside afternoon sector. This configuration made possible the study of the magnetopause motion and its direct consequences on the ionospheric plasma at high latitude. Cluster observed multiple magnetopause crossings despite its high latitude, while on the ground the magnetic activity was very low, whereas the ionospheric plasma sounded by the ESR exhibited poleward moving plasma density structures. In this paper, we compare the satellite and radar data, in order to show that the plasma density structures are directly related to the magnetopause motion and its associated pulsed ionospheric flow. We propose that the variations in electric field make the convection velocity vary enough to alter the electron population by accelerating the chemistry in the F-region and act as a source of electron depletion. The magnetopause motion is in this case, a source of plasma density structures in the polar dayside ionosphere.

  6. Kinetic equilibrium for an asymmetric tangential layer with rotation of the magnetic field

    Belmont, Gérard; Dorville, Nicolas; Aunai, Nicolas; Rezeau, Laurence

    2015-04-01

    Finding kinetic equilibria for tangential current layers is a key issue for modeling plasma phenomena such as magnetic reconnection instabilities, for which theoretical and numerical studies have to start from steady-state current layers. Until 2012, all theoretical models -starting with the most famous "Harris" one- relied on distribution functions built as mono-valued functions of the trajectories invariants. For a coplanar anti-symmetric magnetic field and in absence of electric field, these models were only able to model symmetric variations of the plasma, so precluding any modeling of "magnetopause-like'' layers, which separate two plasmas of different densities and temperatures. Recently, the "BAS" model was presented (Belmont et al., 2012), where multi-valued functions were taken into account. This new tool is made necessary each time the magnetic field reversal occurs on scales larger than the particle Larmor radii, and therefore guaranties a logical transition with the MHD modeling of large scales. The BAS model so provides a new asymmetric equilibrium. It has been validated in a hybrid simulation by Aunai et al (2013), and more recently in a fully kinetic simulation as well. For this original equilibrium to be computed, the magnetic field had to stay coplanar inside the layer. We present here an important generalization, where the magnetic field rotates inside the layer (although restricted to a 180° rotation hitherto). The tangential layers so obtained are thus closer to those encountered at the real magnetopause. This will be necessary, in the future, for comparing directly the theoretical profiles with the experimental ones for the various physical parameters. As it was done previously, the equilibrium is presently tested with a hybrid simulation. Belmont, G.; Aunai, N.; Smets, R., Kinetic equilibrium for an asymmetric tangential layer, Physics of Plasmas, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp. 022108-022118-10, 2012 Aunai, N.; Belmont, G.; Smets, R., First

  7. Field-aligned currents near the magnetosphere boundary

    Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes present thinking about the structure of magnetospheric boundary layers and their roles in the generation of the field-aligned currents that are observed in the polar regions. A principal effect of the momentum loss by magnetosheath plasma to the magnetosphere boundary regions just within the magnetopause, whether it be by a diffusive process or by magnetic reconnection, is the tailward pulling of the surface flux tubes relative to those deeper below the surface. The dayside region 1 currents at low altitudes flow along field lines in the resulting regions of magnetic shear. The direction of the shear and its magnitude, actually measured in the boundary region, confirm that the polarities and intensities of the dayside region 1 currents can be accounted for by this process. The low latitude boundary layer, formerly thought to be threaded entirely by closed field lines, now appears to contain at least some open field lines, newly reconnected, that are in the process of being swept into the high latitude tail to form the plasma mantle. The open flux tubes of the flux transfer events, thought to be the product of patchy reconnection have a spiral magnetic structure whose helicity is such as to suggest currents having the polarities of the region 1 currents. 13 references

  8. Field-aligned currents near the magnetosphere boundary

    Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews present thinking about the structure of magnetospheric boundary layers and their roles in the generation of the field-aligned currents that are observed in the polar regions. A principal effect of the momentum loss by magnetosheath plasma to the magnetosphere boundary regions just within the magnetopause, whether it be by a diffusive process or by magnetic reconnection, is the tailward pulling of surface flux tubes relative to those deeper below the surface. The dayside region 1 currents at low altitudes flow along field lines in the resulting regions of magnetic shear. The direction of the shear and its magnitude, measured in the boundary region, confirm tht the polarities and intensities of the dayside region 1 currents can be accounted for by this process. The low latitude boundary layer, formerly thought to be threaded entirely by closed field lines, now appears to contain at least some open field lines, newly reconnected, that are in the process of being swept into the high latitude tail to form the plasma mantle. The open flux tubes of the flux transfer events, thought to be the product of patchy reconnection have a spiral magnetic structure whose helicity is such as to suggest currents having the polarities of the region 1 currents

  9. Modeling and simulation of defects detection in conductive multi-layered pieces by the eddy current technique

    Bennoud, S; Zergoug, M

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the eddy current method is one of the most effective techniques for the detection and characterization of surface and near-surface defects in conductive mediums especially in aluminum alloy. It is one of the most applied methods in industries which require a maximum of reliability and security (aerospace, aeronautics, nuclear, Etc). In this study, a code to solve electromagnetic problems by employing the finite element method is developed. The suggested model can simulate the probe response to the presence of a defect hidden in a multi-layered structure or a riveted structure on aluminum alloy. The developed code is based on the discretization in three dimensions of the Maxwell's equations in harmonic mode by the finite element method based on the combined potential formulations. That will enable us to interpret the results, to present them in graphical form and to carry out simulations for various applications

  10. Analysis of current-driven oscillatory dynamics of single-layer homoepitaxial islands on crystalline conducting substrates

    Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Kumar, Ashish; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2018-03-01

    We report results of a systematic study on the complex oscillatory current-driven dynamics of single-layer homoepitaxial islands on crystalline substrate surfaces and the dependence of this driven dynamical behavior on important physical parameters, including island size, substrate surface orientation, and direction of externally applied electric field. The analysis is based on a nonlinear model of driven island edge morphological evolution that accounts for curvature-driven edge diffusion, edge electromigration, and edge diffusional anisotropy. Using a linear theory of island edge morphological stability, we calculate a critical island size at which the island's equilibrium edge shape becomes unstable, which sets a lower bound for the onset of time-periodic oscillatory dynamical response. Using direct dynamical simulations, we study the edge morphological dynamics of current-driven single-layer islands at larger-than-critical size, and determine the actual island size at which the migrating islands undergo a transition from steady to time-periodic asymptotic states through a subcritical Hopf bifurcation. At the highest symmetry of diffusional anisotropy examined, on {111} surfaces of face-centered cubic crystalline substrates, we find that more complex stable oscillatory states can be reached through period-doubling bifurcation at island sizes larger than those at the Hopf points. We characterize in detail the island morphology and dynamical response at the stable time-periodic asymptotic states, determine the range of stability of these oscillatory states terminated by island breakup, and explain the morphological features of the stable oscillating islands on the basis of linear stability theory.

  11. The Response Time of the Magnetopause Reconnection Location to Changes in the Solar Wind: MMS Case Study

    Trattner, K. J.; Burch, J. L.; Ergun, R.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gomez, R. G.; Grimes, E. W.; Lewis, W. S.; Mauk, B.; Petrinec, S. M.; Pollock, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause is the mechanism by which magnetic fields in different regions change topology to create open magnetic field lines that allow energy, mass, and momentum to flow into the magnetosphere. It is the primary science goal of the recently launched MMS mission to unlock the mechanism of magnetic reconnection with a novel suite of plasma and field instruments. This study investigates several magnetopause crossings in the vicinity of the X-line on 19 September 2015 and compares the observed X-line location with predictions from the Maximum Magnetic Shear model. Rotations of the interplanetary magnetic field OMF) during the magnetopause crossings together with the close proximity of the four MMS satellites are used to determine the response time of the reconnection X-line location to changes in the IMF. The reconnection location exhibits a continuous motion during slow changes in the IMF but a delayed response to sudden changes in the IMF.

  12. On the quasi-periodic nature of magnetopause flux transfer events

    Lockwood, M.; Wild, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    The authors look at the interpretation of magnetopause flux transfer events (FTE), which claims to show that these events are quasi periodic with a mean period of about 8 minutes. FTE are characteristic signatures in the magnetic field observed by satellites in or near the magnetopause. They are mainly observed when the interplanetary magnetic field is southward, as is supported by a wide range of experimental evidence. There are several theoretical models which try to explain these events. The most successful to date is based upon a suggestion made by Saunders and Biernat, et al. This model has the advantage of accounting for some of the ground based observations of these events. It has been suggested that FTE represent bursts of enhanced magnetic reconnection, and may be the dominant mechanism of this solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. The authors also look at the variability of the IMF B z component as a potential source of the periodic FTE. Data from the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft taken during 1977 to 1979 were statistically surveyed for this report. The spacecraft crossed the magnetopause more than 172 times, and could observe FTE for typically 1 hr per pass. Data for the IMF came from the IMP8 spacecraft. Little data was available for the period of interest, but for the subsequent phase of the solar cycle there was considerable coverage. The data analysis shows a highly skewed recurrence period, with a mode of 3 min., and a lower and upper decile of 1.5 and 18.5 min. No significant peak is observed at 8 minutes. The shape of the distribution does not lend itself to any natural period of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. There may be a correlation with the B z component of the IMF, but the correlation suffers most from the variability of the IMF dataset

  13. Flux transfer events at the dayside magnetopause: Transient reconnection or magnetosheath dynamic pressure pulses?

    Lockwood, M.

    1991-01-01

    The suggestion is discussed that characteristic particle and field signatures at the dayside magnetopause, termed flux transfer events, are, in at least some cases, due to transient solar wind and/or magnetosheath dynamic pressure increases, rather than time-dependent magnetic reconnection. It is found that most individual cases of FTEs observed by a single spacecraft can, at least qualitatively, be explained by the pressure pulse model, provided a few rather unsatisfactory features of the predictions are explained in terms of measurement uncertainties. The most notable exceptions to this are some two-regime observations made by two satellites simultaneously, one on either side of the magnetopause. However, this configuration has not been frequently achieved for sufficient time, such observations are rare, and the relevant tests are still not conclusive. The strongest evidence that FTEs are produced by magnetic reconnection is the dependence of their occurence on the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) or of the magnetosheath field. The pressure pulse model provides an explanation for this dependence in the case of magnetosheath FTEs, but does not apply to magnetosphere FTEs. The only surveys of magnetosphere FTEs have not employed the simultaneous IMF, but have shown that their occurence is strongly dependent on the north-south component of the magnetosheath field, as observed earlier/later on the same magnetopause crossing. This paper employs statistics on the variability of the IMF orientation to investigate the effects of IMF changes between the times of the magnetosheath and FTE observations. It is shown that the previously published results are consistent with magnetospheric FTEs being entirely absent when the magentosheath field is northward

  14. Cluster observations of bounday layer structure and a flux transfer event near the cusp

    R. C. Fear

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available On the 25th January 2002 between 10:00 and 12:00 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern high-latitude cusp, the dayside magnetosphere and into the magnetosheath in a linear formation. In the magnetosphere the PEACE electron spectrometers on the four spacecraft all observed a series of transient bursts of magnetosheath-like plasma, but without bipolar magnetic signatures in the magnetopause normal component as might be expected if the plasma had been injected by transient reconnection (flux transfer events – FTEs. Reordering the data using the magnetopause transition parameter reveals that these plasma observations, the related variations in the magnetic field and the balance of magnetic and thermal gas pressures are consistent with transient entries into a stable high-latitude boundary layer structure. However, once some of the spacecraft entered the magnetosheath, FTE signatures were observed outside the magnetopause at the same time as some of the boundary layer entries occurred at the other spacecraft inside. Thus, (a the lack of a bipolar BN signature is inconsistent with the traditional picture of a magnetospheric FTE, and (b the cause of the observed entry of the spacecraft into the boundary layer (pressure pulse or passing magnetosheath FTE can only be determined by spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath. Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and bondary layers; Solar wind- magnetosphere interactions; Magnetosheath

  15. Cluster observations of bounday layer structure and a flux transfer event near the cusp

    R. C. Fear

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available On the 25th January 2002 between 10:00 and 12:00 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern high-latitude cusp, the dayside magnetosphere and into the magnetosheath in a linear formation. In the magnetosphere the PEACE electron spectrometers on the four spacecraft all observed a series of transient bursts of magnetosheath-like plasma, but without bipolar magnetic signatures in the magnetopause normal component as might be expected if the plasma had been injected by transient reconnection (flux transfer events – FTEs. Reordering the data using the magnetopause transition parameter reveals that these plasma observations, the related variations in the magnetic field and the balance of magnetic and thermal gas pressures are consistent with transient entries into a stable high-latitude boundary layer structure. However, once some of the spacecraft entered the magnetosheath, FTE signatures were observed outside the magnetopause at the same time as some of the boundary layer entries occurred at the other spacecraft inside. Thus, (a the lack of a bipolar BN signature is inconsistent with the traditional picture of a magnetospheric FTE, and (b the cause of the observed entry of the spacecraft into the boundary layer (pressure pulse or passing magnetosheath FTE can only be determined by spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and bondary layers; Solar wind- magnetosphere interactions; Magnetosheath

  16. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    H. J. Fahr

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016, it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  17. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Fahr, Hans J.; Nass, Uwe; Dutta-Roy, Robindro; Zoennchen, Jochen H.

    2018-03-01

    In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016), it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs) becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  18. On The Propagation And Modulation Of Electrostatic Solitary Waves Observed Near The Magnetopause On Cluster

    Pickett, J. S.; Christopher, I. W.; Gurnett, D. A.; Grison, B.; Grimald, S.; Santolik, O.; Decreau, P. M. E.; Lefebvre, B.; Kistler, L. M.; Chen, L.-J.; Engebretson, M. J.; Constantinescu, D.; Omura, Y.; Lakhina, G. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a study of Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) in which propagation of a series of noncyclical ESWs is observed from one Cluster spacecraft to another over distances as great as tens of km and time lags as great as a few tens of ms. This propagation study was conducted for locations near the magnetopause on the magnetosheath side. Propagation was found primarily toward the earth with speeds on the order of 1500 to 2400 km/s. The sizes of the ESWs obtained from these velocities were on the order of 1 km along the magnetic field direction and several tens of km perpendicular. These results are consistent with measurements on single spacecraft in which the ESW propagation is observed with time lags of only ∼0.1 ms. Our results thus show the stability of ESWs over time periods much greater than their own characteristic pulse durations of a few 100s of microseconds. We present also the results of a study of ESW modulation at the magnetopause on the earthward side. We found that ESWs were modulated at ∼1.3 Hz, consistent with a Pc1 wave which was observed concurrently. During this time, tens of eV electron beams are present. We propose a Buneman type instability in which the E '''' component of the Pc1 waves provides a mechanism for accelerating electrons, resulting in the generation of the ESWs modulated at the Pc1 frequency.

  19. On The Propagation And Modulation Of Electrostatic Solitary Waves Observed Near The Magnetopause On Cluster

    Pickett, J. S.; Christopher, I. W.; Grison, B.; Grimald, S.; Santolík, O.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Lefebvre, B.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kistler, L. M.; Constantinescu, D.; Chen, L.-J.; Omura, Y.; Lakhina, G. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a study of Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) in which propagation of a series of noncyclical ESWs is observed from one Cluster spacecraft to another over distances as great as tens of km and time lags as great as a few tens of ms. This propagation study was conducted for locations near the magnetopause on the magnetosheath side. Propagation was found primarily toward the earth with speeds on the order of 1500 to 2400 km/s. The sizes of the ESWs obtained from these velocities were on the order of 1 km along the magnetic field direction and several tens of km perpendicular. These results are consistent with measurements on single spacecraft in which the ESW propagation is observed with time lags of only ˜0.1 ms. Our results thus show the stability of ESWs over time periods much greater than their own characteristic pulse durations of a few 100s of microseconds. We present also the results of a study of ESW modulation at the magnetopause on the earthward side. We found that ESWs were modulated at ˜1.3 Hz, consistent with a Pc1 wave which was observed concurrently. During this time, tens of eV electron beams are present. We propose a Buneman type instability in which the E″″ component of the Pc1 waves provides a mechanism for accelerating electrons, resulting in the generation of the ESWs modulated at the Pc1 frequency.

  20. Solar wind energy transfer through the magnetopause of an open magnetosphere

    Lee, L.C.; Roederer, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    An expression for the total power P/sub T/ transferred from the solar wind to an ''open'' magnetopause with a nonzero normal component of the magnetic field, which is identified as a rotational discontinuity. The total power P/sub T/ consists of (1) the power P/sub EM/ representing the electromagnetic energy transfer and (2) the power P/sub KE/ representing the rate of kinetic energy carried by particles penetrating into the magnetosphere. It is found that P/sub EM/approx. =V/sub SW/ B/sub SW/psi, P/sub KE/approx. =(1/2 M/sub A/-1) P/sub EM/ and P/sub T/approx. =1/2M/sub A/P/sub EM/, where V/sub SW/, B/sub SW/, and M/sub A/ are the velocity, magnetic field, and the Alfven--Mach number in the solar wind, respectively, and Psi is the open magnetic flux in the magnetosphere. The Alfven--Mach number of flow at the magnetopause determines the nature of the local energy transfer; the power per unit area transferred from the solar wind to the magnetosphere consists mainly of kinetic energy. The electromagnetic energy rate P/sub EM/ controls the near-earth magnetospheric activity, whereas the kinetic energy rate P/sub KE/(approx. =3--4 P/sub EM/) should dominate the dynamics of the distant magnetotail

  1. Parameterizing the Magnetopause Reconnection Rate from Observations of the Expanding Polar Cap

    Milan, S. E.; Gosling, J. S.; Hubert, B.

    2012-04-01

    We determine an expression for the magnetopause reconnection rate in terms of upstream interplanetary parameters. We quantify the dayside reconnection rate from observations of the expanding polar cap when the nightside reconnection rate is assumed to be zero. The polar cap open flux is calculated from auroral images collected by the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Far Ultraviolet camera (FUV), and its rate of increase is correlated with upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the OMNI data-set. We find that the reconnection rate is successfully reproduced by considering the magnetic flux transport within a 4 Re-wide channel within the solar wind (with an additional small correction for the solar wind velocity) and an IMF clock angle dependence with an exponent of 9/2. Contrary to several previous studies we do not find a dependence of the reconnection rate on solar wind density. We discuss our findings in the context of previous studies and solar wind-magnetosphere coupling models.

  2. An Energetic Electron Flux Dropout Due to Magnetopause Shadowing on 1 June 2013

    Kang, Suk-Bin; Fok, Mei-Ching; Komar, Colin; Glocer, Alex; Li, Wen; Buzulukova, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    We examine the mechanisms responsible for the dropout of energetic electron flux during 31 May to 1 June 2013 using Van Allen Probe (Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)) electron flux data and simulations with the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model. During the storm main phase, L-shells at RBSP locations are greater than 8, which are connected to open drift shells. Consequently, diminished electron fluxes were observed over a wide range of energies. The combination of drift shell splitting, magnetopause shadowing, and drift loss all results in butterfly electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) at the nightside. During storm sudden commencement, RBSP observations display electron butterfly PADs over a wide range of energies. However, it is difficult to determine whether there are butterfly PADs during the storm main phase since the maximum observable equatorial pitch angle from RBSP is not larger than 40° during this period. To investigate the causes of the dropout, the CIMI model is used as a global 4-D kinetic inner magnetosphere model. The CIMI model reproduces the dropout with very similar timing and flux levels and PADs along the RBSP trajectory for 593 keV. Furthermore, the CIMI simulation shows butterfly PADs for 593 keV during the storm main phase. Based on comparison of observations and simulations, we suggest that the dropout during this event mainly results from magnetopause shadowing.

  3. Plasma and Energetic Particle Behaviors During Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection at the Magnetopause

    Lee, S. H.; Zhang, H.; Zong, Q.-G.; Otto, A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wang, Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Daly, P.W.; Reme, H.

    2014-01-01

    The factors controlling asymmetric reconnection and the role of the cold plasma population in the reconnection process are two outstanding questions. We present a case study of multipoint Cluster observations demonstrating that the separatrix and flow boundary angles are greater on the magnetosheath than on the magnetospheric side of the magnetopause, probably due to the stronger density than magnetic field asymmetry at this boundary. The motion of cold plasmaspheric ions entering the reconnection region differs from that of warmer magnetosheath and magnetospheric ions. In contrast to the warmer ions, which are probably accelerated by reconnection in the diffusion region near the subsolar magnetopause, the colder ions are simply entrained by ??×?? drifts at high latitudes on the recently reconnected magnetic field lines. This indicates that plasmaspheric ions can sometimes play only a very limited role in asymmetric reconnection, in contrast to previous simulation studies. Three cold ion populations (probably H+, He+, and O+) appear in the energy spectrum, consistent with ion acceleration to a common velocity.

  4. Magnetopause reconnection rate estimates for Jupiter's magnetosphere based on interplanetary measurements at ~5AU

    J. D. Nichols

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We make the first quantitative estimates of the magnetopause reconnection rate at Jupiter using extended in situ data sets, building on simple order of magnitude estimates made some thirty years ago by Brice and Ionannidis (1970 and Kennel and Coroniti (1975, 1977. The jovian low-latitude magnetopause (open flux production reconnection voltage is estimated using the Jackman et al. (2004 algorithm, validated at Earth, previously applied to Saturn, and here adapted to Jupiter. The high-latitude (lobe magnetopause reconnection voltage is similarly calculated using the related Gérard et al. (2005 algorithm, also previously used for Saturn. We employ data from the Ulysses spacecraft obtained during periods when it was located near 5AU and within 5° of the ecliptic plane (January to June 1992, January to August 1998, and April to October 2004, along with data from the Cassini spacecraft obtained during the Jupiter flyby in 2000/2001. We include the effect of magnetospheric compression through dynamic pressure modulation, and also examine the effect of variations in the direction of Jupiter's magnetic axis throughout the jovian day and year. The intervals of data considered represent different phases in the solar cycle, such that we are also able to examine solar cycle dependency. The overall average low-latitude reconnection voltage is estimated to be ~230 kV, such that the average amount of open flux created over one solar rotation is ~500 GWb. We thus estimate the average time to replenish Jupiter's magnetotail, which contains ~300-500 GWb of open flux, to be ~15-25 days, corresponding to a tail length of ~3.8-6.5 AU. The average high-latitude reconnection voltage is estimated to be ~130 kV, associated with lobe "stirring". Within these averages, however, the estimated voltages undergo considerable variation. Generally, the low-latitude reconnection voltage exhibits a "background" of ~100 kV that is punctuated by one or two significant

  5. Critical current density of four-CuO2-layer T1Ba2Ca3Cu4O11-δ

    Zhang, L.; Liu, J.Z.; Shelton, R.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A key requirement for technological application is to have superconductors with high critical current density at practical operating temperatures and magnetic fields. The critical current density is strongly related to underlying properties of high T c superconductors, such as layering, anisotropy and other intrinsic material structures. The thallium-based superconductors attracted much attention at early stage mainly due to their high superconducting transitions. Recent studies show that these materials appear to be a better choice for achieving higher critical current density because of a stronger interlayer coupling between superconducting layers. Single crystals of TlBa 2 Ca 3 Cu 4 O 11-δ were grown by a self-flux method. This material is a strong-layered superconductor with four-CuO 2 -planes in a unit cell and a superconducting transition temperature of 128K. Our experimental results show that TlBa 2 Ca 3 Cu 4 O 11-δ crystals have high irreversibility line, large critical current density and high upper critical field. The impact of layering and the number of Cu-O layers on flux pinning, critical current density and other magnetic properties will also be discussed

  6. A simulation study of the vortex structure in the low-latitude boundary layer

    Wei, C.Q.; Lee, L.C.; La Belle-Hamer, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Satellite observations indicate that the plasma density and the flow velocity are highly variable in the low-latitude boundary layer. The thickness of the boundary layer is also highly variable and appears to increase with increasing longitudinal distance from the subsolar point. In this paper plasma dynamics in the low-latitude boundary layer region is studied on the basis of a two-dimensional incompressible bydrodynamic numerical model. In the simulation, plasma is driven into the boundary layer region by imposing a diffusion flux along the magnetopause. The vortex motions associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are observed in the simulation. The resulting vortex structures in the plasma density and the flow velocity may coalesce as they are convected tailward, causing them to grow in size. The boundary layer thickness increases with increasing longitudinal distance from the subsolar point in accord with satellite observations. The plasma density and the flow velocity are positively correlated. A mixing region is formed where magnetosheath plasma and magnetospheric plasma mix due to the vortex motions. In the later stage of development, a density plateau is formed in the central part of the boundary layer. Many features of the satellite observations of the boundary layer can be explained using the numerical model. The simulation results also predict that the vortices generated in the postnoon (prenoon) boundary layer lead to the presence of localized upward (downward) field-aligned currents in both the northern and the southern polar ionospheres. The upward field-aligned currents in turn may lead to the formation of dayside auroral patches observed in the postnoon region

  7. Modeling the Magnetopause Shadowing and Drift Orbit Bifurcation Loss during the June 2015 Dropout Event

    Tu, W.; Cunningham, G.

    2017-12-01

    The relativistic electron flux in Earth's radiation belt are observed to drop by orders of magnitude on timescale of a few hours. Where do the electrons go during the dropout? This is one of the most important outstanding questions in radiation belt studies. Here we will study the 22 June 2015 dropout event which occurred during one of the largest geomagnetic storms in the last decade. A sudden and nearly complete loss of all the outer zone relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons were observed after a strong interplanetary shock. The Last Closed Drift Shell (LCDS) calculated using the TS04 model reached as low as L*=3.7 during the shock and stay below L*=4 for 1 hour. The unusually low LCDS values suggest that magnetopause shadowing and the associated outward radial diffusion can contribute significantly to the observed dropout. In addition, Drift Orbit Bifurcation (DOB) has been suggested as an important loss mechanism for radiation belt electrons, especially when the solar wind dynamic pressure is high, but its relative importance has not been quantified. Here, we will model the June 2015 dropout event using a radial diffusion model that includes physical and event-specific inputs. First, we will trace electron drift shells based on TS04 model to identify the LCDS and bifurcation regions as a function of the 2nd adiabatic invariant (K) and time. To model magnetopause shadowing, electron lifetimes in our model will be set to electron drift periods at L*>LCDS. Electron lifetimes inside the bifurcation region have been estimated by Ukhorskiy et al. [JGR 2011, doi:10.1029/2011JA016623] as a function of L* and K, which will also be implemented in the model. This will be the first effort to include the DOB loss in a comprehensive radiation belt model. Furthermore, to realistically simulate outward radial diffusion, the new radial diffusion coefficients that are calculated based on the realistic TS04 model and include physical K dependence [Cunningham, JGR 2016

  8. Modeling the Magnetopause Shadowing Loss during the October 2012 Dropout Event

    Tu, Weichao; Cunningham, Gregory

    2017-04-01

    The relativistic electron flux in Earth's outer radiation belt are observed to drop by orders of magnitude on timescales of a few hours, which is called radiation belt dropouts. Where do the electrons go during the dropouts? This is one of the most important outstanding questions in radiation belt studies. Radiation belt electrons can be lost either by precipitation into the atmosphere or by transport across the magnetopause into interplanetary space. The latter mechanism is called magnetopause shadowing, usually combined with outward radial diffusion of electrons due to the sharp radial gradient it creates. In order to quantify the relative contribution of these two mechanisms to radiation belt dropout, we performed an event study on the October 2012 dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes. First, the precipitating MeV electrons observed by multiple NOAA POES satellites at low altitude did not show evidence of enhanced precipitation during the dropout, which suggested that precipitation was not the dominant loss mechanism for the event. Then, in order to simulate the magnetopause shadowing loss and outward radial diffusion during the dropout, we applied a radial diffusion model with electron lifetimes on the order of electron drift periods outside the last closed drift shell. In addition, realistic and event-specific inputs of radial diffusion coefficients (DLL) and last closed drift shell (LCDS) were implemented in the model. Specifically, we used the new DLL developed by Cunningham [JGR 2016] which were estimated in realistic TS04 [Tsyganenko and Sitnov, JGR 2005] storm time magnetic field model and included physical K (2nd adiabatic invariant) or pitch angle dependence. Event-specific LCDS traced in TS04 model with realistic K dependence was also implemented. Our simulation results showed that these event-specific inputs are critical to explain the electron dropout during the event. The new DLL greatly improved the model performance at low L* regions (L

  9. Current and calcium responses to local activation of axonal NMDA receptors in developing cerebellar molecular layer interneurons.

    Bénédicte Rossi

    Full Text Available In developing cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs, NMDA increases spontaneous GABA release. This effect had been attributed to either direct activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs or an indirect pathway involving activation of somato-dendritic NMDARs followed by passive spread of somatic depolarization along the axon and activation of axonal voltage dependent Ca(2+ channels (VDCCs. Using Ca(2+ imaging and electrophysiology, we searched for preNMDARs by uncaging NMDAR agonists either broadly throughout the whole field or locally at specific axonal locations. Releasing either NMDA or glutamate in the presence of NBQX using short laser pulses elicited current transients that were highly sensitive to the location of the spot and restricted to a small number of varicosities. The signal was abolished in the presence of high Mg(2+ or by the addition of APV. Similar paradigms yielded restricted Ca(2+ transients in interneurons loaded with a Ca(2+ indicator. We found that the synaptic effects of NMDA were not inhibited by blocking VDCCs but were impaired in the presence of the ryanodine receptor antagonist dantrolene. Furthermore, in voltage clamped cells, bath applied NMDA triggers Ca(2+ elevations and induces neurotransmitter release in the axonal compartment. Our results suggest the existence of preNMDARs in developing MLIs and propose their involvement in the NMDA-evoked increase in GABA release by triggering a Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release process mediated by presynaptic Ca(2+ stores. Such a mechanism is likely to exert a crucial role in various forms of Ca(2+-mediated synaptic plasticity.

  10. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Pickett, J. S.; Chen, L.-J.; Santolík, O.; Grimald, S.; Lavraud, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lefebvre, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ghosh, S. S.; Grison, B.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Gurnett, D. A.; Torbert, R.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E.

    2009-06-01

    Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period) in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18-19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1) the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2) the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3) the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4) the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5) CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD) with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in more detail using the space

  11. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    J. S. Pickett

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18–19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1 the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2 the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3 the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4 the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5 CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in

  12. Resonant tunneling with high peak to valley current ratio in SiO2/nc-Si/SiO2 multi-layers at room temperature

    Chen, D. Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated carrier transport in SiO 2 /nc-Si/SiO 2 multi-layers by room temperature current-voltage measurements. Resonant tunneling signatures accompanied by current peaks are observed. Carrier transport in the multi-layers were analyzed by plots of ln(I/V 2 ) as a function of 1/V and ln(I) as a function of V 1/2 . Results suggest that besides films quality, nc-Si and barrier sub-layer thicknesses are important parameters that restrict carrier transport. When thicknesses are both small, direct tunneling dominates carrier transport, resonant tunneling occurs only at certain voltages and multi-resonant tunneling related current peaks can be observed but with peak to valley current ratio (PVCR) values smaller than 1.5. When barrier thickness is increased, trap-related and even high field related tunneling is excited, causing that multi-current peaks cannot be observed clearly, only one current peak with higher PVCR value of 7.7 can be observed. While if the thickness of nc-Si is large enough, quantum confinement is not so strong, a broad current peak with PVCR value as high as 60 can be measured, which may be due to small energy difference between the splitting energy levels in the quantum dots of nc-Si. Size distribution in a wide range may cause un-controllability of the peak voltages

  13. Improvement of Short-Circuit Current Density in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Sputtered Nanocolumnar TiO2 Compact Layer

    Lung-Chien Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a nanocolumnar TiO2 compact layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was examined. Such a compact layer was sputtered on a glass substrate with an indium tin oxide (ITO film using TiO2 powder as the raw material, with a thickness of ~100 nm. The compact layer improved the short-circuit current density and the efficiency of conversion of solar energy to electricity by the DSSC by 53.37% and 59.34%, yielding values of 27.33 mA/cm2 and 9.21%, respectively. The performance was attributed to the effective electron pathways in the TiO2 compact layer, which reduced the back reaction by preventing direct contact between the redox electrolyte and the conductive substrate.

  14. Force Balance at the Magnetopause Determined with MMS: Application to Flux Transfer Events

    Zhao, C.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Petrinec, S. M.; Paterson, W. R.; Zhou, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Chutter, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) consists of four identical spacecraft forming a closely separated (less than or equal to 10 km) and nearly regular tetrahedron. This configuration enables the decoupling of spatial and temporal variations and allows the calculation of the spatial gradients of plasma and electromagnetic field quantities. We make full use of the well cross-calibrated MMS magnetometers and fast plasma instruments measurements to calculate both the magnetic and plasma forces in flux transfer events (FTEs) and evaluate the relative contributions of different forces to the magnetopause momentum variation. This analysis demonstrates that some but not all FTEs, consistent with previous studies, are indeed force-free structures in which the magnetic pressure force balances the magnetic curvature force. Furthermore, we contrast these events with FTE events that have non-force-free signatures.

  15. Implications of the stagnation line model for energy input through the dayside magnetopause

    Pudovkin, M.I.; Semenov, V.S.; Heyn, M.F.; Biernat, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the formation of a stagnation line at the magnetopause the electromagnetic energy transport from the solar wind into the dayside magnetosphere is analyzed. The resulting energy flux is analyzed. The resulting energy flux is proportional to v/sub infinity/B/sub infinity/sin 2 (theta/sub infinity/-phi/sub infinity/), where v/sub infinity/ and B/sub infinity/ are the solar wind speed and magnetic field and theta/sub infinity/-phi/sub s/infinity is the angle between the IMF and the stagnation line projected into the interplanetary space. A stagnation line parallel to the separator gives approximately the sin 4 (theta/sub infinity//2) energy flux dependence of Akasofu's epsilon-index

  16. Plasma structure near the low-latitude boundary layer: A rebuttal

    Sckopke, N.

    1991-01-01

    A recent reanalysis of a well-documented interval of plasma and magnetic field data led its authors to offer a new model for the structure of the outer magnetosphere and the magnetosheath on the northern dawnside. On November 6, 1977, ISEE 1 and 2 had observed a series of quasi-periodic pulses of magnetosheath-like plasma on northward oriented magnetic field lines which were originally interpreted as repeated encounters of a pulsed low-latitude boundary layer inside a smooth magnetopause followed by a single outward crossing of the magnetopause. D.G. Sibeck and coworkers reinterpreted the ISEE observations as being due to quasi-periodic magnetopause motion causing the satellites to repeatedly exit the magnetosphere and to observe draped northward magnetosheath magnetic field lines in the plasma depletion layer. Their model is based on qualitative arguments concerning the amount of field line draping in the magnetosheath as well as the behavior of energetic electrons near the magnetopause. It is shown in this paper that both arguments are not in accordance with the available evidence

  17. Multiple Flux Rope Events at the High-Latitude Magnetopause: Cluster/Rapid Observation on January 26, 2001

    Huang, Zong-Ying; Pu, Zu-Yin; Xiao, Chi-Jie; Xong, Qui-Gang; Fu, Sui-Yan; Xie, Lun; Shi, Quan-Qi; Cao, Jin-Bin; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Shen, Cao; Shi, Jian-Kui; Lu, Li; Wang, Nai-Quan; Chen, Tao; Fritz, T.; Glasmeier, K.-H.; Daly, P.; Reme, H.

    2004-04-01

    From 11:10 to 11:40UT on January 26, 2001 the four Cluster II spacecraft were located in the duskside high latitude regions of the magnetosheath and magnetosheath boundary layer (MSBL). During this time Interval the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) had a negative Bz component. A detailed study on the multiple flux ropes (MFRs) observed in this period is conducted in this paper. It is found that: (1) The multiple flux ropes in the high latitude MSBL appeared quasi-periodically with a repeated time period of about 78s, which is much shorter than the averaged occurring period (about 8-11min) of the flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause (MP). (2) All the flux ropes observed in this event had a strong core magnetic field. The axial orientation of the most flux ropes is found to lie in the direction of the minimum magnetic field variance; a few flux ropes had their axes lying in the direction of the middle magnetic field variance; while for the remainders their principle axes could not be determined by the method of Principal Axis Analysis (PAA). The reason that causes this complexity relys on the different trajectories of the spacecraft passing through the flux ropes. (3) Each flux rope had a good corresponding HT frame of reference in which it was in a quasi-steady state. All flux ropes moved along the surface of the MP in a similar direction indicating that these flux ropes all came from the dawnside low latitude. Their radial scale is 1-2RE, comparable to the normal diameter of FTEs observed atthe dayside MP. (4) The energetic ions originated from the magnetosphere flowed out to the magnetosheath on the whole, while the solar wind plasma flowed into the magnetosphere along the axis of the flux ropes. The flux ropes offered channels for the transport of the solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere and the escaping of the magnetospheric plasma into the interplanetary space. (5) Each event was accompanied by an enhanced reversal of the dusk

  18. Particle dynamics and current-free double layers in an expanding, collisionless, two-electron-population plasma

    Hairapetian, G.; Stenzel, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The expansion of a two-electron-population, collisionless plasma into vacuum is investigated experimentally. Detailed in situ measurements of plasma density, plasma potential, electric field, and particle distribution functions are performed. At the source, the electron population consists of a high-density, cold (kT e congruent 4 eV) Maxwellian, and a sparse, energetic ( (1)/(2) mv 2 e congruent 80 eV) tail. During the expansion of plasma, space-charge effects self-consistently produce an ambipolar electric field whose amplitude is controlled by the energy of tail electrons. The ambipolar electric field accelerates a small number (∼1%) of ions to streaming energies which exceed and scale linearly with the energy of tail electrons. As the expansion proceeds, the energetic tail electrons electrostatically trap the colder Maxwellian electrons and prevent them from reaching the expansion front. A potential double layer develops at the position of the cold electron front. Upstream of the double layer both electron populations exist; but downstream, only the tail electrons do. Hence, the expansion front is dominated by retarded tail electrons. Initially, the double layer propagates away from the source with a speed approximately equal to the ion sound speed in the cold electron population. The propagation speed is independent of the tail electron energy. At later times, the propagating double layer slows down and eventually stagnates. The final position and amplitude of the double layer are controlled by the relative densities of the two electron populations in the source. The steady-state double layer persists till the end of the discharge (Δt congruent 1 msec), much longer than the ion transit time through the device (t congruent 150 μsec)

  19. Generation of highly collimated high-current ion beams by skin-layer laser-plasma interaction at relativistic laser intensities

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S.; Glowacz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Generation of fast ion beams by laser-induced skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration has been studied using a two-dimensional (2D) two-fluid relativistic computer code. It is shown that the key parameter determining the spatial structure and angular divergence of the ion beam is the ratio d L /L n , where d L is the laser beam diameter and L n is the plasma density gradient scale length. When d L >>L n , a dense highly collimated megaampere ion (proton) beam of the ion current density approaching TA/cm 2 can be generated by skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration, even with a tabletop subpicosecond laser

  20. MMS Observations of Large Guide Field Symmetric Reconnection Between Colliding Reconnection Jets at the Center of a Magnetic Flux Rope at the Magnetopause

    Oieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Haggerty, C.; Shay, M. A.; Eastwood, J. P.; Gershman, D. J.; Drake, J. F.; Fujimoto, M.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report evidence for reconnection between colliding reconnection jets in a compressed current sheet at the center of a magnetic flux rope at Earth's magnetopause. The reconnection involved nearly symmetric Inflow boundary conditions with a strong guide field of two. The thin (2.5 ion-skin depth (d(sub i) width) current sheet (at approximately 12 d(sub i) downstream of the X line) was well resolved by MMS, which revealed large asymmetries in plasma and field structures in the exhaust. Ion perpendicular heating, electron parallel heating, and density compression occurred on one side of the exhaust, while ion parallel heating and density depression were shifted to the other side. The normal electric field and double out-of-plane (bifurcated) currents spanned almost the entire exhaust. These observations are in good agreement with a kinetic simulation for similar boundary conditions, demonstrating in new detail that the structure of large guide field symmetric reconnection is distinctly different from antiparallel reconnection.

  1. Evidence for Space Charge in Atomic Layer Epitaxy ZnS:Mn Alternating- Current Thin-Film Electroluminescent Devices,

    1993-01-01

    exists wior with ra hho agop io model within the bulk portion of the phosphor layer. Although tAon to obtin alteratinbilarplses with mp del this...field region within the ZnS. emission with a peak at 460 nm and which exhibited ther- Postulating the existence of such a low-field region mal

  2. Elimination of macrostep-induced current flow nonuniformity in vertical GaN PN diode using carbon-free drift layer grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Fujikura, Hajime; Hayashi, Kentaro; Horikiri, Fumimasa; Narita, Yoshinobu; Konno, Taichiro; Yoshida, Takehiro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Mishima, Tomoyoshi

    2018-04-01

    In vertical GaN PN diodes (PNDs) grown entirely by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), large current nonuniformity was observed. This nonuniformity was induced by macrosteps on the GaN surface through modulation of carbon incorporation into the n-GaN crystal. It was eliminated in a hybrid PND consisting of a carbon-free n-GaN layer grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) and an MOCVD-regrown p-GaN layer. The hybrid PND showed a fairly low on-resistance (2 mΩ cm2) and high breakdown voltage (2 kV) even without a field plate electrode. These results clearly indicated the strong advantages of the HVPE-grown drift layer for improving power device performance, uniformity, and yield.

  3. Simultaneous in-situ observations of the signatures of dayside reconnection at the high- and low-latitude magnetopause

    J. A. Wild

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We present magnetic field and particle data recorded by the Cluster and Geotail satellites in the vicinity of the high- and low-latitude dayside magnetopause, respectively, on 17 February 2003. A favourable conjunction of these spacecraft culminated in the observation of a series of flux transfer events (FTEs, characterised by bipolar perturbations in the component of the magnetic field normal to the magnetopause, an enhancement in the overall magnetic field strength, and field tilting effects in the plane of the magnetopause whilst the satellites were located on the magnetosheath side of the boundary. Whilst a subset of the FTE signatures observed could be identified as being either normal or reverse polarity, the rapid succession of events observed made it difficult to classify some of the signatures unambiguously. Nevertheless, by considering the source region and motion of flux tubes opened by magnetic reconnection at low latitudes (i.e. between Cluster and Geotail, we demonstrate that the observations are consistent with the motion of northward (southward and tailward moving flux tubes anchored in the Northern (Southern Hemisphere passing in close proximity to the Cluster (Geotail satellites. We are able to demonstrate that a multi-spacecraft approach, coupled with a realistic model of flux tube motion in the magnetosheath, enables us to infer the approximate position of the reconnection site, which in this case was located at near-equatorial latitudes.

  4. A simulation study of impulsive penetration of solar wind irregularities into the magnetosphere at the dayside magnetopause

    Ma, Z.W.; Hawkins, J.G.; Lee, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code is used to study impulsive penetration processes that occur when a plasma irregularity in the magnetosheath, modeled as a field-aligned filament, impinges on the dayside magnetopause. If the magnetic fields in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere are parallel or antiparallel, then a filament in the magnetosheath can always penetrate into the magnetosphere. However, if the fields in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere are not aligned, then a filament can only penetrate into the magnetosphere when its initial kinetic energy density exceeds the magnetic energy density attributed to the transverse component of the magnetic field by a factor of 50. In this case, the magnetospheric field lines reconnect behind the filament, thereby trapping it within the magnetosphere. Otherwise, the increasing magnetic stress in front of the filament will eventually stop the filament from further penetration. For typical parameters found at the dayside magnetopause, the threshold condition obtained from this two-dimensional model predicts that penetration is possible only when the angle between the fields is within approximately 5 of parallel or antiparallel. During the penetration process, velocity vortices are observed both inside the filament and in the external plasma. Either increased β within the magnetosphere, or the larger plasma density at the magnetopause associated with antiparallel magnetic fields, will act to reduce the penetration velocity

  5. Surface profile gradient in amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} semi conductive layers regulates nanoscale electric current stability

    Cefalas, A.C., E-mail: ccefalas@eie.gr [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Kollia, Z.; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Gavriil, V. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. [Physics Division, School of Technology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Semashko, V.V.; Pavlov, V. [Kazan Federal University, Institute of Physics, 18 Kremljovskaja str., Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Sarantopoulou, E. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Kazan Federal University, Institute of Physics, 18 Kremljovskaja str., Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The work links the surface morphology of amorphous semiconductors with both their electric-thermal properties and current stability at the nanoscale (<1 μm). • Measured high correlation value between surface morphological spatial gradient and conductive electron energy spatial gradient or thermal gradient. • Unidirectional current stability is associated with asymmetric nanodomains along nanosize conductive paths. • Bidirectional current stability is inherent with either long conductive paths or nanosize conductive paths along symmetric nanodomains. • Conclusion: Surface design improves current stability across nanoelectonic junctions. - Abstract: A link between the morphological characteristics and the electric properties of amorphous layers is established by means of atomic, conductive, electrostatic force and thermal scanning microscopy. Using amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) semiconductive layer, it is found that surface profile gradients (morphological gradient), are highly correlated to both the electron energy gradient of trapped electrons in interactive Coulombic sites and the thermal gradient along conductive paths and thus thermal and electric properties are correlated with surface morphology at the nanoscale. Furthermore, morphological and electron energy gradients along opposite conductive paths of electrons intrinsically impose a current stability anisotropy. For either long conductive paths (L > 1 μm) or along symmetric nanodomains, current stability for both positive and negative currents i is demonstrated. On the contrary, for short conductive paths along non-symmetric nanodomains, the set of independent variables (L, i) is spanned by two current stability/intability loci. One locus specifies a stable state for negative currents, while the other locus also describes a stable state for positive currents.

  6. Effect of localized states on the current-voltage characteristics of metal-semiconductor contacts with thin interfacial layer

    Chattopadhyay, P.

    1994-10-01

    The role of discrete localized states on the current-voltage characteristics of metal-semiconductor contact is examined. It is seen that, because of these localized states, the logarithmic current vs voltage characteristics become nonlinear. Such nonlinearity is found sensitive to the temperature, and the energy and density of the localized states. The predicted temperature dependence of barrier height and the current-voltage characteristics are in agreement with the experimental results of Aboelfotoh [ Phys. Rev. B39, 5070 (1989)].

  7. Numerical study of the influence of applied voltage on the current balance factor of single layer organic light-emitting diodes

    Lu, Fei-ping; Liu, Xiao-bin; Xing, Yong-zhong

    2014-01-01

    Current balance factor (CBF) value, the ratio of the recombination current density and the total current density of a device, has an important function in fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), as well as in the performance of the organic electrophosphorescent devices. This paper investigates the influence of the applied voltage of a device on the CBF value of single layer OLED based on the numerical model of a bipolar single layer OLED with organic layer trap free and without doping. Results show that the largest CBF value can be achieved when the electron injection barrier (ϕ n ) is equal to the hole injection barrier (ϕ p ) in the lower voltage region at any instance. The largest CBF in the higher voltage region can be achieved in the case of ϕ n  > ϕ p under the condition of electron mobility (μ 0n ) > hole mobility (μ 0p ), whereas the result for the case of μ 0n   0p , is opposite. The largest CBF when μ 0n  = μ 0p can be achieved in the case of ϕ n  = ϕ p in the entire region of the applied voltage. In addition, the CBF value of the device increases with increasing applied voltage. The results obtained in this paper can present an in-depth understanding of the OLED working mechanism and help in the future fabrication of high efficiency OLEDs

  8. Conditions for the occurrence of intense turbidity currents in the benthic boundary layer over a sloping bottom

    Zhmur, VV

    2003-01-01

    The evolution of density currents over the continental slope of the ocean is investigated with allowance for the entrainment of the bottom sediments and background liquid in motion. A simple criterion is proposed for determining the possibility of evolving initially weak density currents into bottom

  9. Evidence for transient, local ion foreshocks caused by dayside magnetopause reconnection

    Y. Pfau-Kempf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a scenario resulting in time-dependent behaviour of the bow shock and transient, local ion reflection under unchanging solar wind conditions. Dayside magnetopause reconnection produces flux transfer events driving fast-mode wave fronts in the magnetosheath. These fronts push out the bow shock surface due to their increased downstream pressure. The resulting bow shock deformations lead to a configuration favourable to localized ion reflection and thus the formation of transient, travelling foreshock-like field-aligned ion beams. This is identified in two-dimensional global magnetospheric hybrid-Vlasov simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere performed using the Vlasiator model (http://vlasiator.fmi.fi. We also present observational data showing the occurrence of dayside reconnection and flux transfer events at the same time as Geotail observations of transient foreshock-like field-aligned ion beams. The spacecraft is located well upstream of the foreshock edge and the bow shock, during a steady southward interplanetary magnetic field and in the absence of any solar wind or interplanetary magnetic field perturbations. This indicates the formation of such localized ion foreshocks.

  10. On the Occurrence of Magnetic Reconnection Along the Dawn and Dusk Magnetopause

    Petrinec, S. M.; Burch, J. L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Trattner, K. J.; Gomez, R. G.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is recognized as the primary process by which bulk solar wind plasma is able to enter the magnetosphere. The amount of plasma and energy transport is affected by the reconnection rate along the reconnection line as well as the spatial extent of the reconnection line. These parameters are in turn influenced by parameters such as the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the dipole tilt angle of the Earth, and the local change in plasma beta between the magnetosheath and magnetosphere. Local variations of magnetosheath parameters are influenced by the character of the standing bow shock upstream of the observing location; i.e., there is greater variation downstream of the quasi-parallel shock than downstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock. Observations from the MMS mission are used to examine the occurrence of quasi-steady magnetic reconnection along the dawn and dusk regions of the magnetopause, and to determine the influence of local magnetosheath variations on the characteristics of the extended reconnection line.

  11. Hot magnetospheric O+ and cold ion behavior in magnetopause reconnection: Cluster observations

    Wang, S.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.; Liu, Y.; Genestreti, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    In reconnection, the presence of heavy ions like O+ increases the ion mass density reducing the fluid's Alfvén speed. In addition, it may modify the reconnection structure, which can also change the reconnection rate. However, because O+ ions have a larger Larmor radii than H+ ions at the same velocity, they may not be fully entrained in the reconnection flow and may have kinetic effects other than just increasing the mass density. In this study, for the first time, the ion velocity distribution functions of H+ and O+ from one magnetopause reconnection event with a strong guide field are analyzed to determine in detail the behavior of the different ion populations. We show that the hot magnetospheric O+ ions, along with the hot magnetospheric H+ ions almost fully participate in the reconnection exhaust flows. Finite Larmor radius effects are also apparent and control how far the ions extend on the magnetosheath side. Ion signatures consistent with heating after being picked up in the reconnection exhaust flow are observed in the H+ and O+ distribution functions. The dynamics of the cold magnetospheric ions depends on where they enter the reconnection region. If they enter the reconnection region at the downstream separatrix, they will be taken away by the magnetic field in an adiabatic way as analyzed by Drake et al. (2009a); if they enter close to the diffusion region, they behave as pick-up ions.

  12. Hybrid simulations of plasma transport by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause: magnetic shear

    Cowee, Misa M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gary, S Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions, massless fluid electrons) simulations of the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI) for a magnetopause configuration with a magnetic shear across the boundary are carried out to examine how the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere is affected by the shear field. Low magnetic shear conditions where the magnetosheath magnetic field is within 30{sup o} of northward is included in the simulations because KHI is thought to be important for plasma transport only for northward or near-northward interplanetary magnetic field orientations. The simulations show that coherent vortices can grow for these near-northward angles, and that they are sometimes more coherent than for pure northward conditions because the turbulence which breaks-down these vortices is reduced when there are magnetic tension forces. With increasing magnetic shear angle, the growth rate is reduced, and the vortices do not grow to as large of size which reduces the plasma transport. By tracking the individual particle motions diffusion coefficients can be obtained for the system, where the diffusion is not classical in nature but instead has a time dependence resulting from both the increasingly large-scale vortex motion and the small-scale turbulence generated in the break-down of the instabilities. Results indicate that diffusion on the order of 10{sup 9} m{sup 2}/s could possibly be generated by KHI on the flanks of the magnetosphere.

  13. THEMIS Observations of the Magnetopause Electron Diffusion Region: Large Amplitude Waves and Heated Electrons

    Tang, Xiangwei; Cattell, Cynthia; Dombeck, John; Dai, Lei; Wilson, Lynn B. III; Breneman, Aaron; Hupack, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region based on the criteria described by Scudder et al at the subsolar magnetopause using data from one Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite. These waves identified as whistler mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower hybrid waves, and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12 s waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler mode waves, which are at the electron scale and which enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region were analyzed in detail. The energetic electrons (approx. 30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with T(sub e(right angle))/T(sub e(parallel)) > 1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whistler mode waves propagate away from the center of the "X-line" along magnetic field lines, suggesting that the electron diffusion region is a possible source region of the whistler mode waves.

  14. Sputtering of sub-micrometer aluminum layers as compact, high-performance, light-weight current collector for supercapacitors

    Busom, J.; Schreiber, A.; Tolosa, A.; Jäckel, N.; Grobelsek, I.; Peter, N. J.; Presser, V.

    2016-10-01

    Supercapacitors are devices for rapid and efficient electrochemical energy storage and commonly employ carbon coated aluminum foil as the current collector. However, the thickness of the metallic foil and the corresponding added mass lower the specific and volumetric performance on a device level. A promising approach to drastically reduce the mass and volume of the current collector is to directly sputter aluminum on the freestanding electrode instead of adding a metal foil. Our work explores the limitations and performance perspectives of direct sputter coating of aluminum onto carbon film electrodes. The tight and interdigitated interface between the metallic film and the carbon electrode enables high power handling, exceeding the performance and stability of a state-of-the-art carbon coated aluminum foil current collector. In particular, we find an enhancement of 300% in specific power and 186% in specific energy when comparing aluminum sputter coated electrodes with conventional electrodes with Al current collectors.

  15. Development of biaxially textured buffer layers on rolled-Ni substrates for high current YBa2Cu3O7-y coated conductors

    Paranthaman, M.; Goyal, A.; Norton, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the development of 3 buffer layer architectures with good biaxial textures on rolled-Ni substrates using vacuum processing techniques. The techniques include pulsed laser ablation, e-beam evaporation, dc and rf magnetron sputtering. The first buffer layer architecture consists of an epitaxial laminate of Ag/Pd(Pt)/Ni. The second buffer layer consists of an epitaxial laminate of CeO 2 /Pd/Ni. The third alternative buffer layer architecture consists of an epitaxial laminate of YSZ/CeO 2 /Ni. The cube (100) texture in the Ni was produced by cold rolling followed by recrystallization. Crystallographic orientations of the Pd, Ag, CeO 2 , and YSZ films grown were all (100). We recently demonstrated a critical- current density of 0.73x10 6 A/cm 2 at 77 K and zero field on 1.4 μm thick YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-y (YBCO) film. This film was deposited by pulsed laser ablation on a YBCO/YSZ/CeO 2 /Ni substrate

  16. The Leakage Current Improvement of a Ni-Silicided SiGe/Si Junction Using a Si Cap Layer and the PAI Technique

    Chang Jian-Guang; Wu Chun-Bo; Ji Xiao-Li; Ma Hao-Wen; Yan Feng; Shi Yi; Zhang Rong

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the leakage current of ultra-shallow Ni-silicided SiGe/Si junctions for 45 nm CMOS technology using a Si cap layer and the pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) process. It is found that with the conventional Ni silicide method, the leakage current of a p + (SiGe)—n(Si) junction is large and attributed to band-to-band tunneling and the generation-recombination process. The two leakage contributors can be suppressed quite effectively when a Si cap layer is added in the Ni silicide method. The leakage reduction is about one order of magnitude and could be associated with the suppression of the agglomeration of the Ni germano-silicide film. In addition, the PAI process after the application of a Si cap layer has little effect on improving the junction leakage but reduces the sheet resistance of the silicide film. As a result, the novel Ni silicide method using a Si cap combined with PAI is a promising choice for SiGe junctions in advanced technology. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  17. Current status of submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors originating from the muscularis propria layer.

    Tan, Yuyong; Huo, Jirong; Liu, Deliang

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal submucosal tumors (SMTs) have been increasingly identified via the use of endoscopic ultrasonography, and removal is often recommended for SMTs that are >2 cm in diameter or symptomatic. Submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER), also known as submucosal endoscopic tumor resection, endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection or tunneling endoscopic muscularis dissection, is a novel endoscopic technique for treating gastrointestinal SMTs originating from the muscularis propria layer, and has been demonstrated to be effective in the removal of SMTs with a decreased rate of recurrence by clinical studies. STER may be performed for patients with esophageal or cardia SMTs, and its application has expanded beyond these types of SMTs due to modifications to the technique. The present study reviewed the applications, procedure, efficacy and complications associated with STER.

  18. Fast Low-Current Spin-Orbit-Torque Switching of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions through Atomic Modifications of the Free-Layer Interfaces

    Shi, Shengjie; Ou, Yongxi; Aradhya, S. V.; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2018-01-01

    Future applications of spin-orbit torque will require new mechanisms to improve the efficiency of switching nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs), while also controlling the magnetic dynamics to achieve fast nanosecond-scale performance with low-write-error rates. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to simultaneously enhance the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy and suppress interfacial spin-memory loss by introducing subatomic and monatomic layers of Hf at the top and bottom interfaces of the ferromagnetic free layer of an in-plane magnetized three-terminal MTJ device. When combined with a β -W spin Hall channel that generates spin-orbit torque, the cumulative effect is a switching current density of 5.4 ×106 A /cm2 .

  19. Bi-layer SixNy passivation on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs to suppress current collapse and improve breakdown

    Lee, K B; Green, R T; Houston, P A; Tan, W S; Uren, M J; Wallis, D J; Martin, T

    2010-01-01

    Si x N y deposited at low temperature was found to improve the breakdown voltage of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs at the expense of current collapse due to the presence of a high density of charge trapping states. On the other hand, stoichiometric Si 3 N 4 film deposited at high temperature was effective in mitigating current slump but no improvement in the breakdown voltage was observed. Combining the benefit of both films, a bi-layer stacked passivation has been employed on the HEMTs. Gate lag measurements revealed that the current collapse was mitigated and the breakdown voltage of the devices was found to increase from 120 V to 238 V upon passivation

  20. Current-limiting mechanisms in YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin layers and quasi-multilayers

    Haenisch, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, electrical transport properties and the maximum current carrying capability of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 -[δ] thin films and so called quasi-multilayers are investigated. These samples are prepared with pulsed laser deposition on single-crystalline substrates (SrTiO 3 ) as well as on biaxially textured Ni tapes. The critical current density of coated conductors is limited by small-angle grain boundaries in low magnetic fields, but by the intra-grain pinning properties in higher magnetic fields. Accordingly, these investigations are divided into two parts: In the first part, the limitation of the critical current density by grain-boundaries and grain boundary networks is investigated with the main focus on the influence of geometrical factors such as the conductor width or the grain aspect ratio. In the second part, a possible enhancement of the critical current density due to different doping types (atomar doping using Zn and precipitate doping using BaMO 3 where M is a transition metal) will be discussed. Here, not only the irreversibility field but also the pinning behaviour in very low magnetic fields is of interest to better understand the pinning mechanism of thin films. (Orig.)

  1. Complex Pattern Formation from Current-Driven Dynamics of Single-Layer Epitaxial Islands on Crystalline Conducting Substrates

    Kumar, Ashish; Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    We report a systematic study of complex pattern formation resulting from the driven dynamics of single-layer homoepitaxial islands on face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline conducting substrate surfaces under the action of an externally applied electric field. The analysis is based on an experimentally validated nonlinear model of mass transport via island edge atomic diffusion, which also accounts for edge diffusional anisotropy. We analyze the morphological stability and simulate the field-driven evolution of rounded islands for an electric field oriented along the fast diffusion direction. For larger than critical island sizes on {110} and {100} FCC substrates, we show that multiple necking instabilities generate complex island patterns, including void-containing islands, mediated by sequences of breakup and coalescence events and distributed symmetrically with respect to the electric field direction. We analyze the dependence of the formed patterns on the original island size and on the duration of application of the external field. Starting from a single large rounded island, we characterize the evolution of the number of daughter islands and their average size and uniformity. The analysis reveals that the pattern formation kinetics follows a universal scaling relation. Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy (Award No.: DE-FG02-07ER46407).

  2. Complex Pattern Formation from Current-Driven Dynamics of Single-Layer Homoepitaxial Islands on Crystalline Conducting Substrates

    Kumar, Ashish; Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-07-01

    We report a systematic study of complex pattern formation resulting from the driven dynamics of single-layer homoepitaxial islands on surfaces of face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline conducting substrates under the action of an externally applied electric field. The analysis is based on an experimentally validated nonlinear model of mass transport via island edge atomic diffusion, which also accounts for edge diffusional anisotropy. We analyze the morphological stability and simulate the field-driven evolution of rounded islands for an electric field oriented along the fast edge diffusion direction. For larger-than-critical island sizes on {110 } and {100 } fcc substrates, we show that multiple necking instabilities generate complex island patterns, including not-simply-connected void-containing islands mediated by sequences of breakup and coalescence events and distributed symmetrically with respect to the electric field direction. We analyze the dependence of the formed patterns on the original island size and on the duration of application of the external field. Starting from a single large rounded island, we characterize the evolution of the number of daughter islands and their average size and uniformity. The evolution of the average island size follows a universal power-law scaling relation, and the evolution of the total edge length of the islands in the complex pattern follows Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetics. Our study makes a strong case for the use of electric fields, as precisely controlled macroscopic forcing, toward surface patterning involving complex nanoscale features.

  3. The influence of the Al stabilizer layer thickness on the normal zone propagation velocity in high current superconductors

    Shilon, I.; Langeslag, S.A.E.; Martins, L.P.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2015-06-19

    The stability of high-current superconductors is challenging in the design of superconducting magnets. When the stability requirements are fulfilled, the protection against a quench must still be considered. A main factor in the design of quench protection systems is the resistance growth rate in the magnet following a quench. The usual method for determining the resistance growth in impregnated coils is to calculate the longitudinal velocity with which the normal zone propagates in the conductor along the coil windings. Here, we present a 2D numerical model for predicting the normal zone propagation velocity in Al stabilized Rutherford NbTi cables with large cross section. By solving two coupled differential equations under adiabatic conditions, the model takes into account the thermal diffusion and the current redistribution process following a quench. Both the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the superconductor and the metal cladding materials properties are included. Unlike common normal zon...

  4. Numerical study of the influence of applied voltage on the current balance factor of single layer organic light-emitting diodes

    Lu, Fei-ping, E-mail: lufp-sysu@163.com; Liu, Xiao-bin; Xing, Yong-zhong [College of Physics and Information Science, Tianshui Normal University, Tianshui 741001 (China)

    2014-04-28

    Current balance factor (CBF) value, the ratio of the recombination current density and the total current density of a device, has an important function in fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), as well as in the performance of the organic electrophosphorescent devices. This paper investigates the influence of the applied voltage of a device on the CBF value of single layer OLED based on the numerical model of a bipolar single layer OLED with organic layer trap free and without doping. Results show that the largest CBF value can be achieved when the electron injection barrier (ϕ{sub n}) is equal to the hole injection barrier (ϕ{sub p}) in the lower voltage region at any instance. The largest CBF in the higher voltage region can be achieved in the case of ϕ{sub n} > ϕ{sub p} under the condition of electron mobility (μ{sub 0n}) > hole mobility (μ{sub 0p}), whereas the result for the case of μ{sub 0n} < μ{sub 0p}, is opposite. The largest CBF when μ{sub 0n} = μ{sub 0p} can be achieved in the case of ϕ{sub n} = ϕ{sub p} in the entire region of the applied voltage. In addition, the CBF value of the device increases with increasing applied voltage. The results obtained in this paper can present an in-depth understanding of the OLED working mechanism and help in the future fabrication of high efficiency OLEDs.

  5. High-performance alternating current field-induced chromatic-stable white polymer electroluminescent devices employing a down-conversion layer

    Xia, Yingdong; Chen, Yonghua; Smith, Gregory M. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27105 (United States); Sun, Hengda; Yang, Dezhi [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Nie, Wanyi; Li, Yuan; Huang, Wenxiao [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27105 (United States); Ma, Dongge [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Carroll, David L., E-mail: carroldl@wfu.edu [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27105 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    In this work, a high-performance alternating current (AC) filed-induced chromatic-stable white polymer electroluminescence (WFIPEL) device was fabricated by combining a fluorophor Poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO)-based blue device with a yellow down-conversion layer (YAG:Ce). A maximum luminance of this down-conversion FIPEL device achieves 3230 cd m{sup −2}, which is 1.41 times higher than the device without the down-conversion layer. A maximum current efficiency and power efficiency of the down-conversion WFIPEL device reach 19.7 cd A{sup −1} at 3050 cd m{sup −2} and 5.37 lm W{sup −1} at 2310 cd m{sup −2} respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the power efficiency is one of the highest reports for the WFIPEL up to now. Moreover, Commison Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.28, 0.30) is obtained by adjusting the thickness of the down-conversion layer to 30 μm and it is kept stable over the entire AC-driven voltage range. We believe that this AC-driven, down-conversion, WFIPEL device may offer an easy way towards future flat and flexible lighting sources. - Highlights: • A high-performance AC filed-induced chromatic-stable white polymer electroluminescence (WFIPEL) device was fabricated. • A maximum luminance, current efficiency, and power efficiency achieves 3230 cd m{sup −2}, 19.7 cd A{sup −1}, and 5.37 lm W{sup −1}, respectively. • The power efficiency is one of the highest reports for the WFIPEL up to now. • The EL spectrum kept very stable over the entire AC-driven voltage range.

  6. Consequences of inhibition of mixed-layer deepening by the West India coastal current for winter phytoplankton bloom in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Vijith, V.; Vinayachandran, P.N.; Thushara, V.; Amol, P.; Shankar, D; Anil, A.C.

    Consequences of inhibition of mixed-layer deepening by the1 West India Coastal Current for winter phytoplankton bloom in2 the northeastern Arabian Sea3 V. Vijith1, P. N. Vinayachandran 1, V. Thushara 1, P. Amol 1, D. Shankar 2, A. C. Anil 24 1Centre... m in375 February (Figure 5h). As the ML deepens in the north, cold sub-surface water376 that is rich in NO3 and PO4 entrains to the ML (Figures 4a,d and e). Vertical sec-377 tions of the nutrients (Figure 4d-e) resemble the temperature sections...

  7. Multi-scale observations of magnetic reconnection: Cluster and MMS measurements of the reconnecting magnetopause at the subsolar region and dusk sector

    Toledo Redondo, S.; Escoubet, C. P.; Lavraud, B.; Andre, M.; Coxon, J.; Fear, R. C.; Aunai, N.; Hwang, K. J.; Li, W.; Fuselier, S. A.; Giles, B. L.; Russell, C. T.; Burch, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process that couples the shocked solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere, allowing the interchange of energy and mass. The X line of magnetic reconnection lies along the magnetopause but its extent and orientation are only partially understood, despite its importance for understanding global solar wind - magnetosphere coupling. We have identified a series of conjunctions between the MMS and Cluster missions where they crossed simultaneously the magnetopause at locations separated by several Earth radii: MMS spacecraft were in the subsolar region while Cluster were in the dusk flank. We identify signatures of reconnection at both spacecraft, allowing us to draw new conclusions about the extent, orientation and time variations of the X line along the magnetopause.

  8. Computer-aided design of multifrequency eddy-current tests for layered conductors with multiple property variations

    Deeds, W E; Dodd, C V; Scott, G W

    1979-10-01

    Our program is part of a larger project designed to develop multifrequency eddy-current inspection techniques for multilayered conductors with parallel planar boundaries. To reduce the need to specially program each new problem, a family of programs that handle a large class of related problems with only minor editorial and interactive changes were developed. Programs for two types of cylindrical coil probes were developed: the reflection probe, which contains the driver and pickup coils and is used from one side of the specimen, and the through-transmission probe set, which places the driver and pickup coils on opposite sides of the conductor stack. The programs perform the following basic functions: (1) simulation of an ideal instrument's response to specific conductor and defect configurations, (2) control of an eddy-current instrument interfaced to a minicomputer to acquire and record actual instrument responses to test specimens, (3) construction of complex function expansions to relate instrument response to conductor and defect properties by using measured or computed responses and properties, and (4) simulation of a microcomputer on board the instrument by the interfaced minicomputer to test the analytical programming for the microcomputer. The report contains the basic equations for the computations, the main and subroutine programs, instructions for editorial changes and program execution, analyses of the main programs, file requirements, and other miscellaneous aids for the user.

  9. The Importance and Current Limitations of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Retrieval from Space for Land-Atmosphere Coupling Studies

    Santanello, J. A., Jr.; Schaefer, A.

    2016-12-01

    There is an established need for improved PBL remote sounding over land for hydrology, land-atmosphere (L-A), PBL, cloud/convection, pollution/chemistry studies and associated model evaluation and development. Most notably, the connection of surface hydrology (through soil moisture) to clouds and precipitation relies on proper quantification of water's transport through the coupled system, which is modulated strongly by PBL structure, growth, and feedback processes such as entrainment. In-situ (ground-based or radiosonde) measurements will be spatially limited to small field campaigns for the foreseeable future, so satellite data is a must in order to understand these processes globally. The scales of these applications require diurnal resolution (e.g. 3-hourly or finer) at land-PBL coupling and water and energy cycles at their native scales. Today's satellite sensors (e.g. advanced IR, GEO, lidar, GPS-RO) do not reach close to these targets in terms of accuracy or resolution, and each of these sensors has some advantages but even more limitations that make them impractical for PBL and L-A studies. Unfortunately, there is very little attention or planning (short or long-term) in place for improving lower tropospheric sounding over land, and as a result PBL and L-A interactions have been identified as `gaps' in current programmatic focal areas. It is therefore timely to assess how these technologies can be leveraged, combined, or evolved in order to form a dedicated mission or sub-mission to routinely monitor the PBL on diurnal timescales. In addition, improved PBL monitoring from space needs to be addressed in the next Decadal Survey. In this talk, the importance of PBL information (structure, evolution) for L-A coupling diagnostics and model development will be summarized. The current array of PBL retrieval methods and products from space will then be assessed in terms of meeting the needs of these models, diagnostics, and scales, with a look forward as to how

  10. Direct observation of electrothermal instability structures on intensely Ohmically heated aluminum with current flowing in a surface skin layer

    Awe, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Implosions on the Z Facility assemble high-energy-density plasmas for radiation effects and ICF experiments, but achievable stagnation pressures and temperatures are degraded by the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. While the beryllium liners (tubes) used in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments are astonishingly smooth (10 to 50 nm RMS roughness), they also contain distributed micron-scale resistive inclusions, and large MRT amplitudes are observed. Early in the implosion, an electrothermal instability (ETI) may provide a perturbation which greatly exceeds the initial surface roughness of the liner. Resistive inhomogeneities drive nonuniform current density and Joule heating, resulting in locally higher temperature, and thus still higher resistivity. Such unstable temperature and pressure growth produce density perturbations which seed MRT. For MagLIF liners, ETI seeding of MRT has been inferred by evaluating late-time MRT, but a direct observation of ETI is not made. ETI is directly observed on the surface of 1.0-mm-diameter solid Al rods pulsed to 1 MA in 100 ns via high resolution gated optical imaging (2 ns temporal and 3 micron spatial resolution). Aluminum 6061 alloy rods, with micron-scale resistive inclusions, consistently first demonstrate overheating from distinct, 10-micron-scale, sub-eV spots, which 5-10 ns later merge into azimuthally stretched elliptical spots and discrete strata (40-100 microns wide by 10 microns tall). Axial plasma filaments form shortly thereafter. Surface plasma can be suppressed for rods coated with dielectric, enabling extended study of the evolution of stratified ETI structures, and experimental inference of ETI growth rates. This fundamentally new and highly 3-dimensional dataset informs ETI physics, including when the ETI seed of MRT may be initiated.

  11. Induced- and alternating-current electro-osmotic control of the diffusion layer growth in a microchannel-membrane interface device

    Park, Sinwook; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-11-01

    The passage of an electric current through an ionic permselective medium under an applied electric field is characterized by the formation of ionic concentration gradients, which result in regions of depleted and enriched ionic concentration at opposite ends of the medium. Induced-current electro-osmosis (ICEO) and alternating-current-electro-osmosis (ACEO) are shown to control the growth of the diffusion layer (DL) which, in turn, controls the diffusion limited ion transport through the microchannel-membrane system. We fabricated and tested devices made of a Nafion membrane connecting two opposite PDMS microchannels. An interdigitated electrode array was embedded within the microchannel with various distances from the microchannel-membrane interface. The induced ICEO (floating electrodes) / ACEO (active electrodes) vortices formed at the electrode array stir the fluid and thereby suppress the growth of the DL. The intensity of the ACEO vortices is controlled by either varying the voltage amplitude or the frequency, each having its own unique effect. Enhancement of the limiting current by on-demand control of the diffusion length is of importance in on-chip electro-dialysis, desalination and preconcentration of analytes.

  12. Electron density and currents of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer

    Bairamis, A.; Zervos, Ch.; Georgakilas, A.; Adikimenakis, A.; Kostopoulos, A.; Kayambaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Konstantinidis, G.

    2014-01-01

    AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer have been analyzed theoretically and experimentally, and the effects of the AlN barrier and GaN buffer layer thicknesses on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and transport properties have been evaluated. HEMT structures consisting of [300 nm GaN/ 200 nm AlN] buffer layer on sapphire were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and exhibited a remarkable agreement with the theoretical calculations, suggesting a negligible influence of the crystalline defects that increase near the heteroepitaxial interface. The 2DEG density varied from 6.8 × 10 12 to 2.1 × 10 13 cm −2 as the AlN barrier thickness increased from 2.2 to 4.5 nm, while a 4.5 nm AlN barrier would result to 3.1 × 10 13 cm −2 on a GaN buffer layer. The 3.0 nm AlN barrier structure exhibited the highest 2DEG mobility of 900 cm 2 /Vs for a density of 1.3 × 10 13 cm −2 . The results were also confirmed by the performance of 1 μm gate-length transistors. The scaling of AlN barrier thickness from 1.5 nm to 4.5 nm could modify the drain-source saturation current, for zero gate-source voltage, from zero (normally off condition) to 0.63 A/mm. The maximum drain-source current was 1.1 A/mm for AlN barrier thickness of 3.0 nm and 3.7 nm, and the maximum extrinsic transconductance was 320 mS/mm for 3.0 nm AlN barrier.

  13. Electron density and currents of AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer

    Bairamis, A.; Zervos, Ch.; Georgakilas, A., E-mail: alexandr@physics.uoc.gr [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, GR-71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Adikimenakis, A.; Kostopoulos, A.; Kayambaki, M.; Tsagaraki, K.; Konstantinidis, G. [Microelectronics Research Group, IESL, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, GR-71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-09-15

    AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with thin GaN/AlN buffer layer have been analyzed theoretically and experimentally, and the effects of the AlN barrier and GaN buffer layer thicknesses on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and transport properties have been evaluated. HEMT structures consisting of [300 nm GaN/ 200 nm AlN] buffer layer on sapphire were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and exhibited a remarkable agreement with the theoretical calculations, suggesting a negligible influence of the crystalline defects that increase near the heteroepitaxial interface. The 2DEG density varied from 6.8 × 10{sup 12} to 2.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} as the AlN barrier thickness increased from 2.2 to 4.5 nm, while a 4.5 nm AlN barrier would result to 3.1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} on a GaN buffer layer. The 3.0 nm AlN barrier structure exhibited the highest 2DEG mobility of 900 cm{sup 2}/Vs for a density of 1.3 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}. The results were also confirmed by the performance of 1 μm gate-length transistors. The scaling of AlN barrier thickness from 1.5 nm to 4.5 nm could modify the drain-source saturation current, for zero gate-source voltage, from zero (normally off condition) to 0.63 A/mm. The maximum drain-source current was 1.1 A/mm for AlN barrier thickness of 3.0 nm and 3.7 nm, and the maximum extrinsic transconductance was 320 mS/mm for 3.0 nm AlN barrier.

  14. Relationship between interplanetary parameters and the magnetopause reconnection rate quantified from observations of the expanding polar cap

    Milan, S. E.; Gosling, J. S.; Hubert, B.

    2012-03-01

    Many studies have attempted to quantify the coupling of energy from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. In this paper we parameterize the dependence of the magnetopause reconnection rate on interplanetary parameters from the OMNI data set. The reconnection rate is measured as the rate of expansion of the polar cap during periods when the nightside reconnection rate is thought to be low, determined from observations by the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) Far Ultraviolet (FUV) imager. Our fitting suggests that the reconnection rate is determined by the magnetic flux transport in the solar wind across a channel approximately 4 RE in width, with a small correction dependent on the solar wind speed, and a clock angle dependence. The reconnection rate is not found to be significantly dependent on the solar wind density. Comparison of the modeled reconnection rate with SuperDARN measurements of the cross-polar cap potential provides broad support for the magnitude of the predictions. In the course of the paper we discuss the relationship between the dayside reconnection rate and the cross-polar cap potential.

  15. Relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in stationary incompressible MHD

    D. H. Nickeler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic configurations with strong localized current concentrations and vortices play an important role in the dissipation of energy in space and astrophysical plasma. Within this work we investigate the relation between current sheets and vortex sheets in incompressible, stationary equilibria. For this approach it is helpful that the similar mathematical structure of magnetohydrostatics and stationary incompressible hydrodynamics allows us to transform static equilibria into stationary ones. The main control function for such a transformation is the profile of the Alfvén-Mach number MA, which is always constant along magnetic field lines, but can change from one field line to another. In the case of a global constant MA, vortices and electric current concentrations are parallel. More interesting is the nonlinear case, where MA varies perpendicular to the field lines. This is a typical situation at boundary layers like the magnetopause, heliopause, the solar wind flowing around helmet streamers and at the boundary of solar coronal holes. The corresponding current and vortex sheets show in some cases also an alignment, but not in every case. For special density distributions in 2-D, it is possible to have current but no vortex sheets. In 2-D, vortex sheets of field aligned-flows can also exist without strong current sheets, taking the limit of small Alfvén Mach numbers into account. The current sheet can vanish if the Alfvén Mach number is (almost constant and the density gradient is large across some boundary layer. It should be emphasized that the used theory is not only valid for small Alfvén Mach numbers MA MA ≲ 1. Connection to other theoretical approaches and observations and physical effects in space plasmas are presented. Differences in the various aspects of theoretical investigations of current sheets and vortex sheets are given.

  16. Cross-stacked carbon nanotube film as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer for high-performance lithium sulfur batteries.

    Sun, Li; Kong, Weibang; Li, Mengya; Wu, Hengcai; Jiang, Kaili; Li, Qunqing; Zhang, Yihe; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-02-19

    Cross-stacked carbon nanotube (CNT) film is proposed as an additional built-in current collector and adsorption layer in sulfur cathodes for advanced lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. On one hand, the CNT film with high conductivity, microstructural rough surface, high flexibility and mechanical durability retains stable and direct electronic contact with the sulfur cathode materials, therefore decreasing internal resistivity and suppressing polarization of the cathode. On the other hand, the highly porous structure and the high surface area of the CNT film provide abundant adsorption points to support and confine sulfur cathode materials, alleviate their aggregation and promote high sulfur utilization. Moreover, the lightweight and compact structure of the CNT film adds no extra weight or volume to the sulfur cathode, benefitting the improvement of energy densities. Based on these characteristics, the sulfur cathode with a 100-layer cross-stacked CNT film presents excellent rate performances with capacities of 986, 922 and 874 mAh g(-1) at cycling rates of 0.2C, 0.5C and 1C for sulfur loading of 60 wt%, corresponding to an improvement of 52%, 109% and 146% compared to that without a CNT film. Promising cycling performances are also demonstrated, offering great potential for scaled-up production of sulfur cathodes for Li-S batteries.

  17. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics of Au/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes and the effect of transition metal oxides as an interface layer

    Mahato, Somnath; Puigdollers, Joaquim

    2018-02-01

    Temperature dependent current-voltage (I‒V) characteristics of Au/n-type silicon (n-Si) Schottky barrier diodes have been investigated. Three transition metal oxides (TMO) are used as an interface layer between gold and silicon. The basic Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor (n), barrier height (ϕb 0) and series resistance (Rs) are calculated and successfully explained by the thermionic emission (TE) theory. It has been found that ideality factor decreased and barrier height increased with increased of temperature. The conventional Richardson plot of ln(I0/T2) vs. 1000/T is determined the activation energy (Ea) and Richardson constant (A*). Whereas value of 'A*' is much smaller than the known theoretical value of n-type Si. The temperature dependent I-V characteristics obtained the mean value of barrier height (ϕb 0 bar) and standard deviation (σs) from the linear plot of ϕap vs. 1000/T. From the modified Richardson plot of ln(I0/T2) ˗ (qσ)2/2(kT)2 vs. 1000/T gives Richardson constant and homogeneous barrier height of Schottky diodes. Main observation in this present work is the barrier height and ideality factor shows a considerable change but the series resistance value exhibits negligible change due to TMO as an interface layer.

  18. Effect of interface structure regulation caused by variation of imidization rate on conduction current characteristics of PI/nano-Al2O3 three-layer composite films

    Ma, Xinyu; Liu, Lizhu; Zhang, Xiaorui; He, Hongju

    2018-06-01

    A series of sandwich structure PI films were prepared by different imidization process, with pure PI film as the interlayer and PI/Al2O3 composite films as outer layers. The imidization rate of the film with different cured processes was calculated by characterizing by infrared spectrum (FT-IR), and the morphology of interlayer interface with different imidization rates by scanning electron microscope (SEM). When the imidization conditions of the first and second films were 260 °C/120 min, the composite films displayed better interface structure and higher imidization rate (ID) than others. Moreover, results also showed that the conduction current of three-layer composite film steadily improved with increased ID and temperature, and was higher than that of the pure film. At the temperature of 30 °C, the electrical aging threshold at different ID was obtained. When the ID reached the maximum value of 78.9%, the electrical aging threshold reached the maximum 41.69 kV/mm.

  19. Highly Efficient Spin-to-Charge Current Conversion in Strained HgTe Surface States Protected by a HgCdTe Layer

    Noel, P.; Thomas, C.; Fu, Y.; Vila, L.; Haas, B.; Jouneau, P.-H.; Gambarelli, S.; Meunier, T.; Ballet, P.; Attané, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    We report the observation of spin-to-charge current conversion in strained mercury telluride at room temperature, using spin pumping experiments. We show that a HgCdTe barrier can be used to protect the HgTe from direct contact with the ferromagnet, leading to very high conversion rates, with inverse Edelstein lengths up to 2.0 ±0.5 nm . The influence of the HgTe layer thickness on the conversion efficiency is found to differ strongly from what is expected in spin Hall effect systems. These measurements, associated with the temperature dependence of the resistivity, suggest that these high conversion rates are due to the spin momentum locking property of HgTe surface states.

  20. Temporal-spatial structure of magnetic merging at the magnetopause inferred from 557.7-nm all-sky images

    N. C. Maynard

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that high-resolution 557.7-nm all-sky images are useful tools for investigating the spatial and temporal evolution of merging on the dayside magnetopause. Analysis of ground and satellite measurements leads us to conclude that high-latitude merging events can occur at multiple sites simultaneously and vary asynchronously on time scales of 30s to 3min. Variations of 557.7nm emissions were observed at a 10s cadence at Ny-Ålesund on 19 December 2001, while significant changes in the IMF clock angle were reaching the magnetopause. The optical patterns are consistent with a scenario in which merging occurs around the rim of the high-latitude cusp at positions dictated by the IMF clock angle. Electrons energized at merging sites represent plausible sources for 557.7nm emissions in the cusp. Polar observations at the magnetopause have directly linked enhanced fluxes of ≥0.5keV electrons with merging. Spectra of electrons responsible for some of the emissions, measured during a DMSP F15 overflight, exhibit "inverted-V" features, indicating further acceleration above the ionosphere. SuperDARN spectral width boundaries, characteristic of open-closed field line transitions, are located at the equatorward edge of the 557.7nm emissions. Optical data suggest that with IMF BY>0, the Northern Hemisphere cusp divides into three source regions. When the IMF clock angle was ~150° structured 557.7-nm emissions came from east of the 13:00 MLT meridian. At larger clock angles the emissions appeared between 12:00 and 13:00 MLT. No significant 557.7-nm emissions were detected in the prenoon MLT sector. MHD simulations corroborate our scenario, showing that with the observed large dipole-tilt and IMF clock angles, merging sites develop near the front and eastern portions of the high-altitude cusp rim in the Northern Hemisphere and near the western part of the cusp rim in the Southern Hemisphere.

  1. Large amplitude solitary waves in and near the Earth’s magnetosphere, magnetopause and bow shock: Polar and Cluster observations

    C. Cattell

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Solitary waves with large electric fields (up to 100's of mV/m have been observed throughout the magnetosphere and in the bow shock. We discuss observations by Polar at high altitudes ( ~ 4-8 RE , during crossings of the plasma sheet boundary and cusp, and new measurements by Polar at the equatorial magnetopause and by Cluster near the bow shock, in the cusp and at the plasma sheet boundary. We describe the results of a statistical study of electron solitary waves observed by Polar at high altitudes. The mean solitary wave duration was ~ 2 ms. The waves have velocities from ~ 1000 km/s to  > 2500 km/s. Observed scale sizes (parallel to the magnetic field are on the order of 1-10lD, with eF/kTe from ~ 0.01 to O(1. The average speed of solitary waves at the plasma sheet boundary is faster than the average speed observed in the cusp and at cusp injections. The amplitude increases with both velocity and scale size. These observations are all consistent with the identification of the solitary waves as electron hole modes. We also report the discovery of solitary waves at the magnetopause, observed in Polar data obtained at the subsolar equatorial magnetopause. Both positive and negative potential structures have been observed with amplitudes up to ~ 25 mV/m. The velocities range from 150 km/s to >2500 km/s, with scale sizes the order of a kilometer (comparable to the Debye length. Initial observations of solitary waves by the four Cluster satellites are utilized to discuss the scale sizes and time variability of the regions where the solitary waves occur. Preliminary results from the four Cluster satellites have given a glimpse of the spatial and temporal variability of the occurrence of solitary waves and their association with other wave modes. In all the events studied, significant differences were observed in the waveforms observed simultaneously at the four locations separated by ~ 1000 km. When solitary waves were seen at one satellite, they

  2. Effect of atomic layer deposition temperature on current conduction in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films formed using H{sub 2}O oxidant

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi, E-mail: hiraiwa@aoni.waseda.jp, E-mail: qs4a-hriw@asahi-net.or.jp [Research Organization for Nano and Life Innovation, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-Tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Matsumura, Daisuke [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kawarada, Hiroshi, E-mail: kawarada@waseda.jp [Research Organization for Nano and Life Innovation, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-Tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); The Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan)

    2016-08-28

    To develop high-performance, high-reliability gate insulation and surface passivation technologies for wide-bandgap semiconductor devices, the effect of atomic layer deposition (ALD) temperature on current conduction in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films is investigated based on the recently proposed space-charge-controlled field emission model. Leakage current measurement shows that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors formed on the Si substrates underperform thermally grown SiO{sub 2} capacitors at the same average field. However, using equivalent oxide field as a more practical measure, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capacitors are found to outperform the SiO{sub 2} capacitors in the cases where the capacitors are negatively biased and the gate material is adequately selected to reduce virtual dipoles at the gate/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} electron affinity increases with the increasing ALD temperature, but the gate-side virtual dipoles are not affected. Therefore, the leakage current of negatively biased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capacitors is approximately independent of the ALD temperature because of the compensation of the opposite effects of increased electron affinity and permittivity in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. By contrast, the substrate-side sheet of charge increases with increasing ALD temperature above 210 °C and hence enhances the current of positively biased Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capacitors more significantly at high temperatures. Additionally, an anomalous oscillatory shift of the current-voltage characteristics with ALD temperature was observed in positively biased capacitors formed by low-temperature (≤210 °C) ALD. This shift is caused by dipoles at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/underlying SiO{sub 2} interface. Although they have a minimal positive-bias leakage current, the low-temperature-grown Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films cause the so-called blisters problem when heated above 400 °C. Therefore, because of the absence of blistering, a 450

  3. Leakage current conduction mechanisms and electrical properties of atomic-layer-deposited HfO2/Ga2O3 MOS capacitors

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Jia, Renxu; Lei, Yuan; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, current conduction mechanisms in HfO2/β-Ga2O3 metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors under positive and negative biases are investigated using the current-voltage (I-V) measurements conducted at temperatures from 298 K to 378 K. The Schottky emission is dominant under positively biased electric fields of 0.37-2.19 MV cm-1, and the extracted Schottky barrier height ranged from 0.88 eV to 0.91 eV at various temperatures. The Poole-Frenkel emission dominates under negatively biased fields of 1.92-4.83 MV cm-1, and the trap energy levels are from 0.71 eV to 0.77 eV at various temperatures. The conduction band offset (ΔE c) of HfO2/β-Ga2O3 is extracted to be 1.31  ±  0.05 eV via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while a large negative sheet charge density of 1.04  ×  1013 cm-2 is induced at the oxide layer and/or HfO2/β-Ga2O3 interface. A low C-V hysteresis of 0.76 V, low interface state density (D it) close to 1  ×  1012 eV-1 cm-2, and low leakage current density of 2.38  ×  10-5 A cm-2 at a gate voltage of 7 V has been obtained, suggesting the great electrical properties of HfO2/β-Ga2O3 MOSCAP. According to the above analysis, ALD-HfO2 is an attractive candidate for high voltage β-Ga2O3 power devices.

  4. Formation of field-twisting flux tubes on the magnetopause and solar wind particle entry into the magnetosphere

    Sato, T.; Shimada, T.; Tanaka, M.; Hayashi, T.; Watanabe, K.

    1986-01-01

    A global interaction between the solar wind with a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the magnetosphere is studied using a semi-global simulation model. A magnetic flux tube in which field lines are twisted is created as a result of repeated reconnection between the IMF and the outermost earth-rooted magnetic field near the equatorial plane and propagates to higher latitudes. When crossing the polar cusp, the flux tube penetrates into the magnetosphere reiterating reconnection with the earth-rooted higher latitude magnetic field, whereby solar wind particles are freely brought inside the magnetosphere. The flux tube structure has similarities in many aspects to the flux transfer events (FTEs) observed near the dayside magnetopause

  5. Observations of Energetic Particle Escape at the Magnetopause: Early Results from the MMS Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS)

    Cohen, I. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Westlake, J. H.; Sibeck, David Gary; Giles, Barbara L.; Pollock, C. J.; Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Energetic (greater than tens of keV) magnetospheric particle escape into the magnetosheath occurs commonly, irrespective of conditions that engender reconnection and boundary-normal magnetic fields. A signature observed by the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, simultaneous monohemispheric streaming of multiple species (electrons, H+, Hen+), is reported here as unexpectedly common in the dayside, dusk quadrant of the magnetosheath even though that region is thought to be drift-shadowed from energetic electrons. This signature is sometimes part of a pitch angle distribution evolving from symmetric in the magnetosphere, to asymmetric approaching the magnetopause, to monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath. While monohemispheric streaming in the magnetosheath may be possible without a boundary-normal magnetic field, the additional pitch angle depletion, particularly of electrons, on the magnetospheric side requires one. Observations of this signature in the dayside dusk sector imply that the static picture of magnetospheric drift-shadowing is inappropriate for energetic particle dynamics in the outer magnetosphere.

  6. Are CH2O measurements in the marine boundary layer suitable for testing the current understanding of CH4 photooxidation?: A model study

    Wagner, V.; von Glasow, R.; Fischer, H.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2002-02-01

    On the basis of a data set collected during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) campaign 1999, we investigated the formaldehyde (CH2O) budget in the southern Indian Ocean (SIO). With a photochemical box model we simulated the contribution of methane and nonmethane volatile organic compounds to the CH2O budget. To identify the reactions and model constraints that introduce the largest uncertainties in the modeled CH2O concentration, we carried out a local sensitivity analysis. Furthermore, a Monte Carlo method was used to assess the global error of the model predictions. According to this analysis the 2σ uncertainty in the modeled CH2O concentration is 49%. The deviation between observed (200 +/- 70 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) (2σ)) and modeled (224 +/- 110 pptv (2σ)) daily mean CH2O concentration is 12%. However, the combined errors of model and measurement are such that deviations as large as 65% are not significant at the 2σ level. Beyond the ``standard'' photochemistry we analyzed the impact of halogen and aerosol chemistry on the CH2O concentration and investigated the vertical distribution of CH2O in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Calculations with the Model of Chemistry Considering Aerosols indicate that, based on the current understanding, halogen chemistry and aerosol chemistry have no significant impact on the CH2O concentration under conditions encountered in the SIO. However, a detailed investigation including meteorological effects such as precipitation scavenging and convection reveals an uncertainty in state-of-the-art model predictions for CH2O in the MBL that is too large for a meaningful test of the current understanding of CH4 photooxidation.

  7. Drain Current Stress-Induced Instability in Amorphous InGaZnO Thin-Film Transistors with Different Active Layer Thicknesses

    Dapeng Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the initial electrical properties, positive gate bias stress (PBS, and drain current stress (DCS-induced instabilities of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs with various active layer thicknesses (TIGZO are investigated. As the TIGZO increased, the turn-on voltage (Von decreased, while the subthreshold swing slightly increased. Furthermore, the mobility of over 13 cm2·V−1·s−1 and the negligible hysteresis of ~0.5 V are obtained in all of the a-IGZO TFTs, regardless of the TIGZO. The PBS results exhibit that the Von shift is aggravated as the TIGZO decreases. In addition, the DCS-induced instability in the a-IGZO TFTs with various TIGZO values is revealed using current–voltage and capacitance–voltage (C–V measurements. An anomalous hump phenomenon is only observed in the off state of the gate-to-source (Cgs curve for all of the a-IGZO TFTs. This is due to the impact ionization that occurs near the drain side of the channel and the generated holes that flow towards the source side along the back-channel interface under the lateral electric field, which cause a lowered potential barrier near the source side. As the TIGZO value increased, the hump in the off state of the Cgs curve was gradually weakened.

  8. Drain Current Stress-Induced Instability in Amorphous InGaZnO Thin-Film Transistors with Different Active Layer Thicknesses.

    Wang, Dapeng; Zhao, Wenjing; Li, Hua; Furuta, Mamoru

    2018-04-05

    In this study, the initial electrical properties, positive gate bias stress (PBS), and drain current stress (DCS)-induced instabilities of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with various active layer thicknesses ( T IGZO ) are investigated. As the T IGZO increased, the turn-on voltage ( V on ) decreased, while the subthreshold swing slightly increased. Furthermore, the mobility of over 13 cm²·V −1 ·s −1 and the negligible hysteresis of ~0.5 V are obtained in all of the a-IGZO TFTs, regardless of the T IGZO . The PBS results exhibit that the V on shift is aggravated as the T IGZO decreases. In addition, the DCS-induced instability in the a-IGZO TFTs with various T IGZO values is revealed using current–voltage and capacitance–voltage ( C – V ) measurements. An anomalous hump phenomenon is only observed in the off state of the gate-to-source ( C gs ) curve for all of the a-IGZO TFTs. This is due to the impact ionization that occurs near the drain side of the channel and the generated holes that flow towards the source side along the back-channel interface under the lateral electric field, which cause a lowered potential barrier near the source side. As the T IGZO value increased, the hump in the off state of the C gs curve was gradually weakened.

  9. On the Validity of the “Thin” and “Thick” Double-Layer Assumptions When Calculating Streaming Currents in Porous Media

    Matthew D. Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We find that the thin double layer assumption, in which the thickness of the electrical diffuse layer is assumed small compared to the radius of curvature of a pore or throat, is valid in a capillary tubes model so long as the capillary radius is >200 times the double layer thickness, while the thick double layer assumption, in which the diffuse layer is assumed to extend across the entire pore or throat, is valid so long as the capillary radius is >6 times smaller than the double layer thickness. At low surface charge density (0.5 M the validity criteria are less stringent. Our results suggest that the thin double layer assumption is valid in sandstones at low specific surface charge (<10 mC⋅m−2, but may not be valid in sandstones of moderate- to small pore-throat size at higher surface charge if the brine concentration is low (<0.001 M. The thick double layer assumption is likely to be valid in mudstones at low brine concentration (<0.1 M and surface charge (<10 mC⋅m−2, but at higher surface charge, it is likely to be valid only at low brine concentration (<0.003 M. Consequently, neither assumption may be valid in mudstones saturated with natural brines.

  10. LaNiO3 buffer layers for high critical current density YBa2Cu3O7-δ and Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8-δ films

    Carlson, C.M.; Parilla, P.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Ginley, D.S.; Wang, Y.; Blaugher, R.D.; Price, J.C.; Overmyer, D.L.; Venturini, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate high critical current density superconducting films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) and Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 8-δ (Tl-2212) using LaNiO 3 (LNO) buffer layers. YBCO films grown on an LNO buffer layer have only a slightly lower J c (5 K, H=0) than films grown directly on a bare LaAlO 3 substrate. YBCO films grown on LNO buffer layers exhibit minor microstructural disorder and enhanced flux pinning. LNO-buffered Tl-2212 samples show large reductions in J c at all temperatures and fields compared to those grown on bare LaAlO 3 , correlating to both a-axis grain and nonsuperconducting phase formation. LNO could be a promising buffer layer for both YBCO and Tl-based superconducting films in coated conductor applications. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  11. LaNiO3 Buffer Layers for High Critical Current Density YBa2Cu3O7δ and Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8δ Films

    Carlson, C.M.; Parilla, P.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Ginley, D.S.; Wang, Y.-T.; Blaugher, R.D.; Price, J.C.; Overmyer, D.L.; Venturini, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate high critical current density superconducting films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) and Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 8-δ (Tl-2212) using LaNiO 3 (LNO) buffer layers. YBCO films grown on an LNO buffer layer have only a slightly lower J c (5K, H=0) than films grown directly on a bare LaAlO 3 substrate. It is noteworthy that YBCO films grown on LNO buffer layers exhibit minor microstructural disorder and enhanced flux pinning. LNO-buffered Tl-2212 samples show large reductions in J c at all temperatures and fields compared to those grown on bare LaAlO 3 , correlating to both a-axis grain and nonsuperconducting phase formation. With additional optimization, LNO could be a promising buffer layer for both YBCO and Tl-based superconducting films, perhaps ideally suited for coated conductor applications

  12. Layered materials

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  13. Preliminary results from a simulated laboratory experiment or an encounter of cluster satellite probes with a reconnection layer

    Yamada, M.; Ren, Y.; Ji, H.; Gerhardt, S.; Darfman, S.

    2006-12-01

    With the recent upgrade of the MRX (Magnetic Reconnection Experiment) device[1], our experimental operation allows us to carry out a jog experiment in which a current sheet can be moved swiftly across an inserted probe assembly. A cluster of probes with variable distances can be inserted into a known desired position in the MRX device. This setup can be similar to the situation in which a cluster of satellites encounters a rapidly moving reconnection layer. If necessary, we can create a neutral sheet where the density of one side is significantly higher than the other, as is the case for the magnetopause. A variable guide field will be applied to study its effect on reconnection. We proposed[2] to document basic patterns of data during a simulated encounter of the MRX reconnection layer with the four-probe mock-up system and compare them with data acquired from past satellites. Relative position of the MMS satellites in the magnetosphere can then be determined. Optimum cluster configuration or distance between the four satellites can be determined for various diagnostics or research missions. The relationship of magnetic fluctuations[3] with the observed out-of- plane quadrupole field, a characteristic signature of the Hall MHD, can be also studied in this series of experiments. In this paper, results from a preliminary experiment will be presented. These experiments utilize effectively the unique MRX ability to accurately know the location of diagnostics with respect to the moving reconnection layer. Supported by DoE, NASA, NSF. [1] M. Yamada et al, Phys. Plasmas 13, 052119 (2006), [2] M.Yamada et al, MMS-IDS proposal (2006), [3] H. Ji et al, Phys. Rev. Letts. 92, 115001 (2004)

  14. A Vortical Dawn Flank Boundary Layer for Near-Radial IMF: Wind Observations on 24 October 2001

    Farrugia, C. J.; Gratton, F. T.; Gnavi, G.; Torbert, R. B.; Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2014-01-01

    We present an example of a boundary layer tailward of the dawn terminator which is entirely populated by rolled-up flow vortices. Observations were made by Wind on 24 October 2001 as the spacecraft moved across the region at the X plane approximately equal to -13 Earth radii. Interplanetary conditions were steady with a near-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Approximately 15 vortices were observed over the 1.5 hours duration of Wind's crossing, each lasting approximately 5 min. The rolling up is inferred from the presence of a hot tenuous plasma being accelerated to speeds higher than in the adjoining magnetosheath, a circumstance which has been shown to be a reliable signature of this in single-spacecraft observations. A blob of cold dense plasma was entrained in each vortex, at whose leading edge abrupt polarity changes of field and velocity components at current sheets were regularly observed. In the frame of the average boundary layer velocity, the dense blobs were moving predominantly sunward and their scale size along the X plane was approximately 7.4 Earth radii. Inquiring into the generation mechanism of the vortices, we analyze the stability of the boundary layer to sheared flows using compressible magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz theory with continuous profiles for the physical quantities. We input parameters from (i) the exact theory of magnetosheath flow under aligned solar wind field and flow vectors near the terminator and (ii) the Wind data. It is shown that the configuration is indeed Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable. This is the first reported example of KH-unstable waves at the magnetopause under a radial IMF.

  15. Understanding S-Shaped Current-Voltage Characteristics in Organic Solar Cells Containing a TiOx Inter layer with Impedance Spectroscopy and Equivalent Circuit Analysis

    Ecker, Bernhard; Egelhaaf, Hans-Joachim; Steim, Roland; Parisi, Juergen; von Hauff', Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In this study we propose an equivalent circuit model to describe S-shaped current–voltage (I–V) characteristics in inverted solar cells with a TiOx interlayer between the cathode and the poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester active layer. Initially the solar cells

  16. Exospheric Neutral Density at the Earth's subsolar magnetopause deduced from the XMM-Newton X-ray observations

    Connor, H. K.; Carter, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Soft X-rays can be emitted when highly charged solar wind ions and exospheric neutrals exchange electrons. Astrophysics missions, such as XMM-Newton and ROSAT X-ray telescopes, have found that such solar wind charge exchange happens at the Earth's exosphere. The Earth's magnetosphere can be imaged via soft X-rays in order to understand its interaction with solar wind. Consequently, two soft X-ray telescope missions (CuPID and SMILE) are scheduled to launch in 2019 and 2021. They will provide wide field-of-view soft X-ray images of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere. The imagers will track the location and movement of the cusps, magnetopause, and bow shock in response to solar wind variations. To support these missions, an understanding of exospheric neutral density profile is needed. The neutral density is one of the controlling factors of soft X-ray signals. Strong neutral density can help to obtain high-resolution and high-cadence of soft X-ray images. In this study, we estimate the exospheric neutral density at 10 RE subsolar point using XMM X-ray observations, Cluster plasma observations, and OpenGGCM global magnetosphere - ionosphere MHD model. XMM-Newton observes line-of-sight, narrow field-of-view, integrated soft X-ray emissions when it looks through the dayside magnetosphere. OpenGGCM reproduces soft X-ray signals seen by the XMM spacecraft, assuming exospheric neutral density as a function of the neutral density at the 10RE subsolar point and the radial distance. Cluster observations are used to confirm OpenGGCM plasma results. Finally, we deduce the neutral density at 10 RE subsolar point by adjusting the model results to the XMM-Newton soft X-ray observations.

  17. MMS Observations of Reconnection at Dayside Magnetopause Crossings During Transitions of the Solar Wind to Sub-Alfvenic Flow

    Farrugia, C. J.; Lugaz, N.; Alm, L.; Vasquez, B. J.; Argall, M. R.; Kucharek, H.; Matsui, H.; Torbert, R. B.; Lavraud, B.; Le Contel, O.; Shuster, J. R.; Burch, J. L.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Giles, B. L.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Ergun, R.; Eastwood, J. P.; Cohen, I. J.; Dorelli, J.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Marklund, G. T.; Paulson, K.; Petrinec, S.; Phan, T.; Pollock, C.

    2017-12-01

    We present MMS) observations during two dayside magnetopause crossingsunder hitherto unexamined conditions: (i) when the bow shock is weakening and the solar wind transitioning to sub-Alfvenic flow, and (ii) when it is reforming. Interplanetary conditions consist of a magnetic cloud with (i) a strong B ( 20 nT) pointing south, and (ii) a density profile with episodic decreases to values of 0.3 /cc followed by moderate recovery. During the crossings he magnetosheath magnetic field is stronger than the magnetosphere field by a factor of 2.2. As a result, during the outbound crossing through the ion diffusion region, MMS observed an inversion of relative positions of the X and stagnation (S) lines from that typically the case: the S line was closer to the magnetosheath side. The S-line appears in the form of a slow expansion fan near which most of the energy dissipation is taking place. While in the magnetosphere between the crossings, MMS observed strong field and flow perturbations, which we argue to be due kinetic Alfvén waves.During the reconnection interval, whistler mode waves generated by an electron temperature anisotropy (Tperp>Tpar) were observed. Another aim of the paper isto distinguish bow shock-induced field and flow perturbations from reconnection-related signatures.The high resolution MMS data together with 2D hybrid simulations of bow shock dynamics helped us to distinguish between the two sources. We show examples of bow shock-related effects (such as heating) and reconnection effects such as accelerated flows satisfying the Walen relation.

  18. On the Impact of Electrostatic Correlations on the Double-Layer Polarization of a Spherical Particle in an Alternating Current Field.

    Alidoosti, Elaheh; Zhao, Hui

    2018-05-15

    At concentrated electrolytes, the ion-ion electrostatic correlation effect is considered an important factor in electrokinetics. In this paper, we compute, in theory and simulation, the dipole moment for a spherical particle (charged, dielectric) under the action of an alternating electric field using the modified continuum Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model by Bazant et al. [ Double Layer in Ionic Liquids: Overscreening Versus Crowding . Phys. Rev. Lett. 2011 , 106 , 046102 ] We investigate the dependency of the dipole moment in terms of frequency and its variation with such quantities like ζ-potential, electrostatic correlation length, and double-layer thickness. With thin electric double layers, we develop simple models through performing an asymptotic analysis of the modified PNP model. We also present numerical results for an arbitrary Debye screening length and electrostatic correlation length. From the results, we find a complicated impact of electrostatic correlations on the dipole moment. For instance, with increasing the electrostatic correlation length, the dipole moment decreases and reaches a minimum and then it goes up. This is because of initially decreasing of surface conduction and finally increasing due to the impact of ion-ion electrostatic correlations on ion's convection and migration. Also, we show that in contrast to the standard PNP model, the modified PNP model can qualitatively explain the data from the experimental results in multivalent electrolytes.

  19. Low-leakage-current AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on Si substrates with partially Mg-doped GaN buffer layer by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    Li Ming; Wang Yong; Wong Kai-Ming; Lau Kei-May

    2014-01-01

    High-performance low-leakage-current AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on silicon (111) substrates grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with a novel partially Magnesium (Mg)-doped GaN buffer scheme have been fabricated successfully. The growth and DC results were compared between Mg-doped GaN buffer layer and a unintentionally one. A 1-μm gate-length transistor with Mg-doped buffer layer exhibited an OFF-state drain leakage current of 8.3 × 10 −8 A/mm, to our best knowledge, which is the lowest value reported for MOCVD-grown AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on Si featuring the same dimension and structure. The RF characteristics of 0.25-μm gate length T-shaped gate HEMTs were also investigated

  20. Modelling of current-voltage characteristics of infrared photo-detectors based on type – II InAs/GaSb super-lattice diodes with unipolar blocking layers

    Vishnu Gopal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that current-voltage characteristics of infrared photo-detectors based on type-II InAs/GaSb super-lattices with uni-polar blocking layers can be modelled similar to a junction diode with a finite series resistance on account of blocking barriers. As an example this paper presents the results of a study of current-voltage characteristics of a type II InAs/GaSb super-lattice diode with PbIbN architecture using a recently proposed [J. Appl. Phys. 116, 084502 (2014] method for modelling of illuminated photovoltaic detectors. The thermal diffusion, generation – recombination (g-r, and ohmic currents are found as principal components besides a component of photocurrent due to background illumination. The experimentally observed reverse bias diode current in excess of thermal current (diffusion + g-r, photo-current and ohmic shunt current is reported to be best described by an exponential function of the type, Iexcess = Ir0 + K1exp(K2 V, where Ir0, K1 and K2 are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. The present investigations suggest that the exponential growth of excess current with the applied bias voltage may be taking place along the localized regions in the diode. These localized regions are the shunt resistance paths on account of the surface leakage currents and/or defects and dislocations in the base of the diode.

  1. Magnetic trapping of energetic particles on open dayside boundary layer flux tubes

    Cowley, S.W.H.; Lewis, Z.V.

    1990-01-01

    Both simple as well as detailed empirical magnetic models of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere suggest that field lines near the magnetopause boundary in the noon quadrant (∼ 09:00 to ∼ 15:00 M.L.T.) possess an unusual property due to the compressive effect of the impinging solar wind flow, namely that the equatorial region represents a local maximum in the magnetic field strength, and not a minimum as elsewhere in the magnetosphere. In this region the field lines can therefore support two distinct particle populations, those which bounce across the equator between mirror points on either side, and those which are trapped about the off-equatorial field strength minima and are confined to one side of the equator. When these field lines become magnetically open due to the occurrence of magnetic reconnection at the equatorial magnetopause, the former particles will rapidly escape into the magnetosheath by field-aligned flow, while the latter population may be sustained within the boundary layer over many bounce periods, as the flux tubes contract and move tailward. Consequently, trapped distributions of energetic particles may commonly occur on open field lines in the dayside boundary layer in the noon quadrant, particularly at high latitudes. The existence of such particles is thus not an infallible indicator of the presence of closed magnetic field lines in this region. At earlier and later local times, however, the boundary layer field lines revert to possessing a minimum in the field strength at the equator. (author)

  2. Plasma and energetic electron flux variations in the Mercury 1 C event: Evidence for a magnetospheric boundary layer

    Christon, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Near the outbound magnetopause crossing during the first encounter of Mariner 10 with the planet Mercury on March 29, 1974, large intensity, ∼ 6 s quasi-periodic variations in the intensity-time profile of the charged particle experiment's electron counting rate appeared as a series of peaks and valleys. The peaks have previously been interpreted as quasi-periodic burst sequences of mildly relativistic electrons, caused in one case by episodic ∼ 6-s magnetotail substorm reconnection events and in another case by multiple encounters with a substorm energized electron population drifting around Mercury with an ∼ 6 s drift period. In this paper, the authors offer a new and fundamentally different interpretation of the Mariner 10 energetic electron, plasma electron, and magnetic field data near the outbound magnetopause at Mercury 1. They show that magnetosheath-like boundary layer plasma was observed up to ∼ 360 km planetward of the dawn magnetopause crossing as sensed by the magnetometer. They show that observations of substorm enhanced > 35 keV electron flux (that previously interpreted as > 175 keV electrons) associated with the hot tenuous plasma sheet population were interleaved with ∼ 6 s period observations of a cold dense boundary layer plasma associated with a much lower > 35 keV electron flux. They argue that the ∼ 6 s temporal signature is due to variation of the thickness and/or position of the boundary layer plasma population. This explanation of the ∼ 6-s variations, based upon the analysis of the coincident responses of the magnetic field experiment and two independent charged particle instruments (at their highest temporal resolutions), finds a direct analogue in observations of Earth's magnetospheric boundary layer, although the time scales are significantly shorter at Mercury

  3. buffer Layer Growth, the Thickness Dependence of Jc in Coated Conductors, Local Identification of Current Limiting Mechanisms and Participation in the Wire Development Group

    Larbalestier, David; Hellstron, Eric; Abraimov, Dmytro

    2011-12-17

    The primary thrusts of our work were to provide critical understanding of how best to enhance the current-carrying capacity of coated conductors. These include the deconstruction of Jc as a function of fim thickness, the growth of in situ films incorporating strong pinning centers and the use of a suite of position-sensitive tools that enable location and analysis of key areas where current-limiting occurs.

  4. LaNiO(3) Buffer Layers for High Critical Current Density YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) and Tl(2)Ba(2)CaCu(2)O(8-delta) Films

    Carlson, C.M.; Parilla, P.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Ginley, D.S.; Wang, Y.-T.; Blaugher, R.D.; Price, J.C.; Overmyer, D.L.; Venturini, E.L.

    1999-08-24

    We demonstrate high critical current density superconducting films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8{minus}{delta}} (Tl-2212) using LaNiO{sub 3} (LNO) buffer layers. YBCO films grown on an LNO buffer layer have only a slightly lower J{sub c} (5K, H=0) than films grown directly on a bare LaAlO{sub 3} substrate. It is noteworthy that YBCO films grown on LNO buffer layers exhibit minor microstructural disorder and enhanced flux pinning. LNO-buffered Tl-2212 samples show large reductions in J{sub c} at all temperatures and fields compared to those grown on bare LaAlO{sub 3}, correlating to both a-axis grain and nonsuperconducting phase formation. With additional optimization, LNO could be a promising buffer layer for both YBCO and Tl-based superconducting films, perhaps ideally suited for coated conductor applications.

  5. Evaluating the Critical Thickness of TiO 2 Layer on Insulating Mesoporous Templates for Efficient Current Collection in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, a way of utilizing thin and conformal overlayer of titanium dioxide on an insulating mesoporous template as a photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells is presented. Different thicknesses of TiO2 ranging from 1 to 15 nm are deposited on the surface of the template by atomic layer deposition. This systematic study helps unraveling the minimum critical thickness of the TiO2 overlayer required to transport the photogenerated electrons efficiently. A merely 6-nm-thick TiO2 film on a 3-μm mesoporous insulating substrate is shown to transport 8 mA/cm 2 of photocurrent density along with ≈900 mV of open-circuit potential when using our standard donor-π-acceptor sensitizer and Co(bipyridine) redox mediator. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Evaluating the Critical Thickness of TiO 2 Layer on Insulating Mesoporous Templates for Efficient Current Collection in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Comte, Pascal; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Kessler, Florian; Yi, Chenyi; Nazeeruddin, Md. Khaja; Grä tzel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a way of utilizing thin and conformal overlayer of titanium dioxide on an insulating mesoporous template as a photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells is presented. Different thicknesses of TiO2 ranging from 1 to 15 nm are deposited on the surface of the template by atomic layer deposition. This systematic study helps unraveling the minimum critical thickness of the TiO2 overlayer required to transport the photogenerated electrons efficiently. A merely 6-nm-thick TiO2 film on a 3-μm mesoporous insulating substrate is shown to transport 8 mA/cm 2 of photocurrent density along with ≈900 mV of open-circuit potential when using our standard donor-π-acceptor sensitizer and Co(bipyridine) redox mediator. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Anomalous aspects of magnetosheath flow and of the shape and oscillations of the magnetopause during an interval of strongly northward interplanetary magnetic field

    Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Gosling, Jack T.; Walker, Raymond T.; Lazarus, Allan J.

    1992-01-01

    On 15 Feb. 1978, the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) remained steadily northward for more than 12 hours. The ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft were located near apogee on the dawn side flank of the magnetotail. IMP 8 was almost symmetrically located in the magnetosheath on the dusk flank and IMP 7 was upstream in the solar wind. Using plasma and magnetic field data, we show the following: (1) the magnetosheath flow speed on the flanks of the magnetotail steadily exceeded the solar wind speed by 20 percent; (2) surface waves with approximately a 5-min period and very non-sinusoidal waveform were persistently present on the dawn magnetopause and waves of similar period were present in the dusk magnetosheath; and (3) the magnetotail ceased to flare at an antisunward distance of 15 R(sub E). We propose that the acceleration of the magnetosheath flow is achieved by magnetic tension in the draped field configuration for northward IMF and that the reduction of tail flaring is consistent with a decreased amount of open magnetic flux and a larger standoff distance of the subsolar magnetopause. Results of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation support this phenomenological model.

  8. Formation of double layers

    Leung, P.; Wong, A.Y.; Quon, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on both stationary and propagating double layers and a related analytical model are described. Stationary double layers were produced in a multiple plasma device, in which an electron drift current was present. An investigation of the plasma parameters for the stable double layer condition is described. The particle distribution in the stable double layer establishes a potential profile, which creates electron and ion beams that excite plasma instabilities. The measured characteristics of the instabilities are consistent with the existence of the double layer. Propagating double layers are formed when the initial electron drift current is large. Ths slopes of the transition region increase as they propagate. A physical model for the formation of a double layer in the experimental device is described. This model explains the formation of the low potential region on the basis of the space charge. This space charge is created by the electron drift current. The model also accounts for the role of ions in double layer formation and explains the formation of moving double layers. (Auth.)

  9. Structure of reconnection boundary layers in incompressible MHD

    Sonnerup, B.U.Oe.; Wang, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The incompressible MHD equations with nonvanishing viscosity and resistivity are simplified by use of the boundary layer approximation to describe the flow and magnetic field in the exit flow regions of magnetic field reconnection configurations when the reconnection rate is small. The conditions are derived under which self-similar solutions exist of the resulting boundary layer equations. For the case of zero viscosity and resistivity, the equations describing such self-similar layers are then solved in terms of quadratures, and the resulting flow and field configurations are described. Symmetric solutions, relevant, for example, to reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, as well as asymmetric solutions, relevant to reconnection at the earth's magnetopause, are found to exist. The nature of the external solutions to which the boundary layer solutions should be matched is discussed briefly, but the actual matching, which is to occur at Alfven-wave characteristic curves in the boundary layer solutions, is not carried out. Finally, it is argued that the solutions obtained may also be used to describe the structure of the intense vortex layers observed to occur at magnetic separatrices in computer simulations and in certain analytical models of the reconnection process

  10. Effects of a highly Si-doped GaN current spreading layer at the n+-GaN/multi-quantum-well interface on InGaN/GaN blue-light-emitting diodes

    Kim, C. S.; Cho, H. K.; Choi, R. J.; Hahn, Y. B.; Lee, H. J.; Hong, C. H.

    2004-01-01

    Highly Si-doped GaN thin current spreading layer (CSL) with various carrier concentrations were inserted before the n + -GaN/multi-quantum-well (MQW) interface controlled by the growth rate and the modulated Si-doping in InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and their effects were investigated by using capacitance-voltage (C-V), current-voltage (I-V), and output power measurements. The LEDs with a highly Si-doped CSL show enhanced I-V characteristics and increased output power with increasing carrier concentration up to some critical point in the CSL. This means that proper high Si-doping in some limited area before the interface may enhance the device performance through the current spreading effect.

  11. High-current electron beam coupling to hybrid waveguide and plasma modes in a dielectric Cherenkov maser with a plasma layer

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli S.

    2002-01-01

    The linear theory of a dielectric Cherenkov maser with a plasma layer has been developed. The dispersion relation has been derived for the model of infinitely thin, fully magnetized, monoenergetic hollow electron beam, in the axisymmetric case. The results of the numerical solution of the dispersion relation and the analysis of the beam coupling to hybrid waves, both hybrid waveguide and hybrid plasma modes, are presented. For the hybrid waveguide mode, spatial growth rate dependences on frequency at different plasma densities demonstrate improvement in gain for moderate densities, but strong shifting the amplification band and narrowing the bandwidth. For the hybrid plasma mode, the case of mildly relativistic, 200-250 keV beams is of interest, so that the wave phase velocity is just slightly greater than the speed of light in a dielectric medium. It has been shown that depending on beam and plasma parameters, the hybrid plasma mode can be separated from the hybrid waveguide mode, or be coupled to it through the beam resulting in strong gain increase, or exhibit a flat gain vs frequency dependence over a very broad band. The parameters, at which the -3 dB bandwidth calculated for 30 dB peak gain exceeds an octave, have been found

  12. Stability of plasma cylinder with current in a helical plasma flow

    Leonovich, Anatoly S.; Kozlov, Daniil A.; Zong, Qiugang

    2018-04-01

    Stability of a plasma cylinder with a current wrapped by a helical plasma flow is studied. Unstable surface modes of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations develop at the boundary of the cylinder enwrapped by the plasma flow. Unstable eigenmodes can also develop for which the plasma cylinder is a waveguide. The growth rate of the surface modes is much higher than that for the eigenmodes. It is shown that the asymmetric MHD modes in the plasma cylinder are stable if the velocity of the plasma flow is below a certain threshold. Such a plasma flow velocity threshold is absent for the symmetric modes. They are unstable in any arbitrarily slow plasma flows. For all surface modes there is an upper threshold for the flow velocity above which they are stable. The helicity index of the flow around the plasma cylinder significantly affects both the Mach number dependence of the surface wave growth rate and the velocity threshold values. The higher the index, the lower the upper threshold of the velocity jump above which the surface waves become stable. Calculations have been carried out for the growth rates of unstable oscillations in an equilibrium plasma cylinder with current serving as a model of the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) of the Earth's magnetic tail. A tangential discontinuity model is used to simulate the geomagnetic tail boundary. It is shown that the magnetopause in the geotail LLBL is unstable to a surface wave (having the highest growth rate) in low- and medium-speed solar wind flows, but becomes stable to this wave in high-speed flows. However, it can remain weakly unstable to the radiative modes of MHD oscillations.

  13. The effect of Birkeland currents on magnetic field topology

    Peroomian, Vahe; Lyons, Larry R.; Schulz, Michael

    1996-01-01

    A technique was developed for the inclusion of large scale magnetospheric current systems in magnetic field models. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland current systems are included in the source surface model of the terrestrial magnetosphere. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland currents are placed in the model using a series of field aligned, infinitely thin wire segments. The normal component of the magnetic field from these currents is calculated on the surface of the magnetopause and shielded using image current carrying wires placed outside of the magnetosphere. It is found that the inclusion of the Birkeland currents in the model results in a northward magnetic field in the near-midnight tail, leading to the closure of previously open flux in the tail, and a southward magnetic field in the flanks. A sunward shift in the separatrix is observed.

  14. A comparison of energetic ions in the plasma depletion layer and the quasi-parallel magnetosheath

    Fuselier, Stephen A.

    1994-01-01

    Energetic ion spectra measured by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) downstream from the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock (in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath) and in the plasma depletion layer are compared. In the latter region, energetic ions are from a single source, leakage of magnetospheric ions across the magnetopause and into the plasma depletion layer. In the former region, both the magnetospheric source and shock acceleration of the thermal solar wind population at the quasi-parallel shock can contribute to the energetic ion spectra. The relative strengths of these two energetic ion sources are determined through the comparison of spectra from the two regions. It is found that magnetospheric leakage can provide an upper limit of 35% of the total energetic H(+) population in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath near the magnetopause in the energy range from approximately 10 to approximately 80 keV/e and substantially less than this limit for the energetic He(2+) population. The rest of the energetic H(+) population and nearly all of the energetic He(2+) population are accelerated out of the thermal solar wind population through shock acceleration processes. By comparing the energetic and thermal He(2+) and H(+) populations in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath, it is found that the quasi-parallel bow shock is 2 to 3 times more efficient at accelerating He(2+) than H(+). This result is consistent with previous estimates from shock acceleration theory and simulati ons.

  15. Characteristics of merging at the magnetopause inferred from dayside 557.7-nm all-sky images: IMF drivers of poleward moving auroral forms

    N. C. Maynard

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We combine in situ measurements from Cluster with high-resolution 557.7 nm all-sky images from South Pole to investigate the spatial and temporal evolution of merging on the dayside magnetopause. Variations of 557.7 nm emissions were observed at a 6 s cadence at South Pole on 29 April 2003 while significant changes in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF clock angle were reaching the magnetopause. Electrons energized at merging sites are the probable sources for 557.7 nm cusp emissions. At the same time Cluster was crossing the pre-noon cusp in the Northern Hemisphere. The combined observations confirm results of a previous study that merging events can occur at multiple sites simultaneously and vary asynchronously on time scales of 10 s to 3 min (Maynard et al., 2004. The intensity of the emissions and the merging rate appear to vary with changes in the IMF clock angle, IMF BX and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. Most poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs reflect responses to changes in interplanetary medium rather than to local processes. The changes in magnetopause position required by increases in dynamic pressure are mediated by merging and result in the generation of PMAFs. Small (15–20% variations in dynamic pressure of the solar wind are sufficient to launch PMAFs. Changes in IMF BX create magnetic flux compressions and rarefactions in the solar wind. Increases (decreases in IMF BX strengthens |B| near northern (southern hemisphere merging sites thereby enhancing merging rates and triggering PMAFs. When correlating responses in the two hemispheres, the presence of significant IMF BX also requires that different lag-times be applied to ACE measurements acquired ~0.1 AU upstream of Earth. Cluster observations set lag times for merging at Northern Hemisphere sites; post-noon optical emissions set times of Southern Hemisphere merging. All-sky images and magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicate that merging occurs in multiple

  16. Ionomer equivalent weight structuring in the cathode catalyst layer of automotive fuel cells: Effect on performance, current density distribution and electrochemical impedance spectra

    Herden, Susanne; Hirschfeld, Julian A.; Lohri, Cyrill; Perchthaler, Markus; Haase, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    To improve the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with segmented cathode electrodes have been manufactured. Electrodes with a higher and lower ionomer equivalent weight (EW) were used and analyzed using current density and temperature distribution, polarization curve, temperature sweep and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. These were performed using automotive metallic bipolar plates and operating conditions. Measurement data were used to manufacture an optimized segmented cathode electrode. We were able to show that our results are transferable from a small scale hardware to automotive application and that an ionomer EW segmentation of the cathode leads to performance improvement in a broad spectrum of operating conditions. Furthermore, we confirmed our results by using in-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  17. Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current

    William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-03-12

    Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

  18. High-time resolution measurements of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions during flux transfer events at the Earth's dayside magnetopause

    Jacob, J.D.; Cattell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary analysis of six flux transfer events which were observed simultaneously by IRM and CCE. IRM was able to measure magnetic fields and pressures far from the earth, while CCE made observations at the earth's magnetopause. The objective is to better understand the coupling of energy and momentum into the earth's magnetosphere, by in this case trying to better understand the processes active in flux transfer events. For three of the events the observations were made on common field lines, and IRM observed fluctuations in B z large enough to cause a south to north swing in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Pressure pulses were observed during two of these events. For the other three events there was no such consistent behavior of IMF direction or pressure pulses

  19. Different FTE signatures generated by the bursty single X line reconnection and the multiple X line reconnection at the dayside magnetopause

    Ding, D.Q.; Lee, L.C.; Ma, Z.W.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic signatures associated with the time-dependent magnetic reconnection processes at the dayside magnetopause are studied based on two-dimensional compressible MHD simulations. In the simulations, magnetic and plasma signatures resemblant to the observed flux transfer events (FTEs) can be generated either by the magnetic bulges formed during the bursty single X line reconnection (BSXR) or by the magnetic islands (flux tubes) formed during the multiple X line reconnection (MXR). It is found that the FTE magnetic signatures are not exhibited on the magnetospheric side if the FTEs are due to the BSXR process and B m /B s ≥ 1.7, where B m and B s are the magnetic field strength in the magnetosheath and in the magnetosphere, respectively. On the other hand, the bipolar FTE signatures can be detected on both the magnetosphere and magnetosheath sides if the FTEs are caused by the MXR process and B m /B s ≤ 2.6. When B m /B s > 2.6, the bipolar FTE signatures in the magnetosphere site become too small to be detected even if magnetic islands are formed during the MXR process. Futhermore, for B m /B s > 1, the region for the detection of FTE signatures in the magnetospheric side is smaller than that in the magnetosheath side. Since at the dayside magnetopause the typical value of B m /B s is 1-3, the simulation results indicate that more FTE signatures can be detected in the magnetosheath side than in the magnetosphere. It is also found that the MXR process often generates a clear bipolar B n signature while the BSXR process tends to produce FTEs with a monopolar B n signature near the reconnection region and a highly asymmetric bipolar B n signature away from the reconnection region

  20. Energetic magnetospheric protons in the plasma depletion layer

    Fuselier, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field draping against the Earth's dayside subsolar magnetopause creates a region of reduced plasma density and increased magnetic field called the plasma depletion layer. In this region, leakage of energetic ions from the Earth's magnetosphere onto magnetic field lines in the plasma depletion layer can be studied without interference from ions accelerated at the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Experiment/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) observations for 13 plasma depletion layer events are used to determine the characteristics of energetic protons between a few keV/e and ∼100keV/e leaked from the magnetosphere. Results indicate that the leaked proton distributions resemble those in the magnetosphere except that they have lower densities and temperatures and much higher velocities parallel (or antiparallel) and perpendicular to the magnetic field. Compared to the low-energy magnetosheath proton distributions present in the depletion layer, the leaked energetic proton distributions typically have substantially higher flow velocities along the magnetic field indicate that the leaked energetic proton distributions to contribute to the energetic proton population seen upstream and downstream from the quasi-parallel bow shock. However, their contribution is small compared to the contribution from acceleration of protons at the bow shock because the leaked proton densities are on the order of 10 times smaller than the energetic proton densities typically observed in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel bow shock

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Our parcel layer is maintained by the Land Records Department. We use General CAD to draw the linework and FME Workbench to create the shapefiles tied to current tax data., Published in 2013, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Chippewa County Government.

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Parcels and Land Ownership dataset current as of 2013. Our parcel layer is maintained by the Land Records Department. We use General CAD to draw the linework and FME...

  2. Effects of adsorbed pyridine derivatives and ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited alumina coatings on the conduction band-edge energy of TiO2 and on redox-shuttle-derived dark currents.

    Katz, Michael J; Vermeer, Michael J D; Farha, Omar K; Pellin, Michael J; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-01-15

    Both the adsorption of t-butylpyridine and the atomic-layer deposition of ultrathin conformal coatings of insulators (such as alumina) are known to boost open-circuit photovoltages substantially for dye-sensitized solar cells. One attractive interpretation is that these modifiers significantly shift the conduction-edge energy of the electrode, thereby shifting the onset potential for dark current arising from the interception of injected electrons by solution-phase redox shuttle components such as Co(phenanthroline)(3)(3+) and triiodide. For standard, high-area, nanoporous photoelectrodes, band-edge energies are difficult to measure directly. In contrast, for flat electrodes they are readily accessible from Mott-Schottky analyses of impedance data. Using such electrodes (specifically TiO(2)), we find that neither organic nor inorganic electrode-surface modifiers shift the conduction-band-edge energy sufficiently to account fully for the beneficial effects on electrode behavior (i.e., the suppression of dark current). Additional experiments reveal that the efficacy of ultrathin coatings of Al(2)O(3) arises chiefly from the passivation of redox-catalytic surface states. In contrast, adsorbed t-butylpyridine appears to suppress dark currents mainly by physically blocking access of shuttle molecules to the electrode surface. Studies with other derivatives of pyridine, including sterically and/or electronically diverse derivatives, show that heterocycle adsorption and the concomitant suppression of dark current does not require the coordination of surface Ti(IV) or Al(III) atoms. Notably, the favorable (i.e., negative) shifts in onset potential for the flow of dark current engendered by organic and inorganic surface modifiers are additive. Furthermore, they appear to be largely insensitive to the identity of shuttle molecules.

  3. On the physics of relativistic double layers

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-06-01

    A model of a strong, time-independent, and relativistic double layer is studied. Besides double layers having the electric field parallel to the current the model also describes a certain type of oblique double layers. The 'Langmuir condition' (ratio of ion current density to electron current density) as well as an expression for the potential drop of the double layer are derived. Furthermore, the distribution of charged particles, electric field, and potential within the double layer are clarified and discussed. It is found that the properties of relativistic double layers differ substantially from the properties of corresponding non-relativistic double layers. (Author)

  4. Magnetospheric convection and current system in the dayside polar cap

    Nishida, A.; Mukai, T.; Tsuruda, K.; Hayakawa, H.

    1992-01-01

    Field and particle observations on EXOS-D (Akebono) have yielded new information on convection and current system in the dayside polar cap. Convection patterns are distinctly different depending upon whether IMF B z is northward or southward. The number of convection cells is two when B z is southward but four when B z is northward. Lobe cells in which plasma flows sunward in the region of open field lines are observed as a pair (of which one is in the dawn and the other in the dusk sector) for any polarity of IMF B y and B z . Ions in the keV range precipitate not only in the dayside cusp region but also along the sunward directed streamlines of the dawn and dusk lobe cells. These observations require reconsideration on the position and the extent of the reconnection region on the magnetopause. They also suggest that the magnetotail plays a vital role in some phenomena which have been ascribed to dayside magnetopause processes. We have not been able to find evidence to prove the presence of the viscous cell under southward IMF

  5. Electrochemical behavior of single layer CrN, TiN, TiAlN coatings and nanolayered TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering

    William Grips, V.K.; Barshilia, Harish C.; Selvi, V. Ezhil; Kalavati; Rajam, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    The corrosion behaviors of single layer TiN, CrN, TiAlN and multilayer TiAlN/CrN coatings, deposited on steel substrate using a multi-target reactive direct current magnetron sputtering process, were studied in 3.5% NaCl solution by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The total thickness of the coatings was about 1.5 μm. About 0.5 μm thick chromium interlayer was used for improved adhesion of the coatings. The potentiodynamic polarization measurements showed that for all the coatings the corrosion potential shifted to higher values as compared to the uncoated substrate. Similarly, the corrosion current density decreased for coated samples, indicating better corrosion resistance of the coated samples. The multilayer coatings of TiAlN/CrN exhibited superior corrosion behavior as compared to the single layer coatings. The Nyquist and the Bode plots obtained from the EIS measurements were fitted by appropriate equivalent circuits to calculate the pore resistance, the charge transfer resistance and the capacitance. These studies revealed that the pore resistance was lowest for TiN coatings, which increased for TiAlN coatings. TiAlN/CrN multilayer coatings exhibited highest pore resistance. No significant change in the capacitive behavior of the coatings was observed, suggesting minimal morphological changes as a result of immersion in the electrolyte. This could be attributed to shorter immersion durations. These studies were confirmed by examining the corroded samples under scanning electron microscope. Preliminary experiments conducted with additional interlayer of electroless nickel (5.0 μm thick) have shown significant improvement in the corrosion resistance of the coatings

  6. On the magnetic effect of the quiet ring current

    Feldstein, Ya.I.; Porchkhidze, Ts.D.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic effects of the quiet ring current DRsu (q) along the geomagnetic equator near a minimUm of solar activity are considered. The division of Dsub(st)-variation of the geomagnetic field observed on the Earth's surface into DCF and DR components for January 23-24, 1974 has been carried out. DRsup(q) being 16.7 nT. A comparison with the magnetic field of the ring current and the energy particles moving round the Earth in the radiation zone shows a good agreement in the intensities obtained by two methods. This means that in calculating the Dsub(st)-index the values of the H-component of the field are taken as a bench mark during such time intervals when the DRsup(q) field is approximately compensated by the fields of currents on the magnetopause DCFsup(q). The estimates giVe RCsup(q) approximately - 12 nT

  7. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  8. The Bottom Boundary Layer

    Trowbridge, John H.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  9. Plasma depletion layer: its dependence on solar wind conditions and the Earth dipole tilt

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding upstream magnetosheath values. It is believed that the PDL is controlled jointly by conditions in the solar wind plasma and the (IMF. In this study, we extend our former model PDL studies by systematically investigating the dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on solar wind conditions using global MHD simulations. We first point out the difficulties for the depletion factor method and the plasma β method for defining the outer boundary of the plasma depletion layer. We propose to use the N/B ratio to define the PDL outer boundary, which can give the best description of flux tube depletion. We find a strong dependence of the magnetosheath environment on the solar wind magnetosonic Mach number. A difference between the stagnation point and the magnetopause derived from the open-closed magnetic field boundary is found. We also find a strong and complex dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on the IMF Bz. A density structure right inside the subsolar magnetopause for higher IMF Bz;might be responsible for some of this dependence. Both the IMF tilt and clock angles are found to have little influence on the magnetosheath and the PDL structures. However, the IMF geometry has a much stronger influence on the slow mode fronts in the magnetosheath. Finally, the Earth dipole tilt is found to play a minor role for the magnetosheath geometry and the PDL along the Sun-Earth line. A complex slow mode front geometry is found for cases with different Earth dipole tilts. Comparisons between our results with those from some former studies are conducted, and consistencies and inconsistencies are found.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath, solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (numerical

  10. Urban Growth Areas, This Layer represents the current Urbanized Area for Atlanta as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. An Urbanized Area is a concept used by the U.S. Census Bureau to measure the population, land area and population density of a built-up or continuously deve, Published in 2000, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Atlanta Regional Commission.

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Urban Growth Areas dataset current as of 2000. This Layer represents the current Urbanized Area for Atlanta as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. An Urbanized Area...

  11. Comparative study of low-temperature photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current in quinary Tl{sub 4}Ga{sub 3}InSe{sub 6}S{sub 2} layered crystals

    Gasanly, N.M., E-mail: nizami@metu.edu.tr [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Virtual International Scientific Research Centre, Baku State University, 1148 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2016-04-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectra of Tl{sub 4}Ga{sub 3}InSe{sub 6}S{sub 2} layered crystals grown by Bridgman method have been studied in the wavelength region of 560–690 nm and the temperature range of 15–45 K (PL) and in the temperature region of 10–90 K (TSC). A broad PL band centered at 620 nm (2.00 eV) was observed at T=15 K. Variations of emission band has been studied as a function of excitation laser intensity in the 0.7–36.5 mW cm{sup −2} range. Radiative transitions from donor level located at 150 meV below the bottom of conduction band to shallow acceptor level located at 10 meV above the top of the valence band were suggested to be responsible for the observed PL band. TSC curve of Tl{sub 4}Ga{sub 3}InSe{sub 6}S{sub 2} crystal exhibited one broad peak at about 41 K. The activation energy of trap level was found to be 11 meV. An energy level diagram showing transitions in the band gap of the crystal was plotted taking into account the results of PL and TSC measurements carried out below room temperature.

  12. Motion of the dayside polar cap boundary during substorm cycles: II. Generation of poleward-moving events and polar cap patches by pulses in the magnetopause reconnection rate

    M. Lockwood

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data from the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter VHF and CUTLASS (Co-operative UK Twin-Located Auroral Sounding System HF radars, we study the formation of ionospheric polar cap patches and their relationship to the magnetopause reconnection pulses identified in the companion paper by Lockwood et al. (2005. It is shown that the poleward-moving, high-concentration plasma patches observed in the ionosphere by EISCAT on 23 November 1999, as reported by Davies et al. (2002, were often associated with corresponding reconnection rate pulses. However, not all such pulses generated a patch and only within a limited MLT range (11:00-12:00 MLT did a patch result from a reconnection pulse. Three proposed mechanisms for the production of patches, and of the concentration minima that separate them, are analysed and evaluated: (1 concentration enhancement within the patches by cusp/cleft precipitation; (2 plasma depletion in the minima between the patches by fast plasma flows; and (3 intermittent injection of photoionisation-enhanced plasma into the polar cap. We devise a test to distinguish between the effects of these mechanisms. Some of the events repeat too frequently to apply the test. Others have sufficiently long repeat periods and mechanism (3 is shown to be the only explanation of three of the longer-lived patches seen on this day. However, effect (2 also appears to contribute to some events. We conclude that plasma concentration gradients on the edges of the larger patches arise mainly from local time variations in the subauroral plasma, via the mechanism proposed by Lockwood et al. (2000.

  13. Local electromagnetic waves in layered superconductors

    Gvozdikov, V.M.; Vega-Monroy, R.

    1999-01-01

    A dispersion equation for electromagnetic waves localized on a defect layer of a layered superconductor is obtained in the frame of a model which neglects electron hopping between layers but assumes an arbitrary current-current response function within the layers. The defect layer differs from the rest of the layers by density and mass of charge carriers. It is shown that near the critical temperature in the London limit the local mode lies within the superconducting gap and has a wave vector threshold depending on the layered crystal and defect layer parameters. In the case of highly anisotropic layered superconductors, like Bi- or Tl-based high-T c cuprates, the local mode exists within a narrow range of positive variations of the mass and charge carriers. (author)

  14. Boosting water oxidation layer-by-layer.

    Hidalgo-Acosta, Jonnathan C; Scanlon, Micheál D; Méndez, Manuel A; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-04-07

    Electrocatalysis of water oxidation was achieved using fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes modified with layer-by-layer deposited films consisting of bilayers of negatively charged citrate-stabilized IrO2 NPs and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) polymer. The IrO2 NP surface coverage can be fine-tuned by controlling the number of bilayers. The IrO2 NP films were amorphous, with the NPs therein being well-dispersed and retaining their as-synthesized shape and sizes. UV/vis spectroscopic and spectro-electrochemical studies confirmed that the total surface coverage and electrochemically addressable surface coverage of IrO2 NPs increased linearly with the number of bilayers up to 10 bilayers. The voltammetry of the modified electrode was that of hydrous iridium oxide films (HIROFs) with an observed super-Nernstian pH response of the Ir(III)/Ir(IV) and Ir(IV)-Ir(IV)/Ir(IV)-Ir(V) redox transitions and Nernstian shift of the oxygen evolution onset potential. The overpotential of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was essentially pH independent, varying only from 0.22 V to 0.28 V (at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2)), moving from acidic to alkaline conditions. Bulk electrolysis experiments revealed that the IrO2/PDDA films were stable and adherent under acidic and neutral conditions but degraded in alkaline solutions. Oxygen was evolved with Faradaic efficiencies approaching 100% under acidic (pH 1) and neutral (pH 7) conditions, and 88% in alkaline solutions (pH 13). This layer-by-layer approach forms the basis of future large-scale OER electrode development using ink-jet printing technology.

  15. Multi-layer universal correction magnet

    Parzen, G.

    1981-08-01

    This paper presents an approach for constructing a universal correction magnet in which the return currents play an active role in determining the field. The return currents are not hidden by the iron shield. The coil is wound in many layers, instead of just one layer. Each layer has a particular symmetry, and generates a particular class of field multipoles such that the location of the return current for each independently excited current block is clear. Three layers may be sufficient in many cases. This approach is applied to the ISABELLE storage accelerator correction system

  16. Sun–Earth connection: Boundary layer waves and auroras

    band plasma waves have been suggested as the source of hot ions in the ... law. Typical electric and magnetic field spectra of the magnetopause ..... started to come out, and they have given very useful information on the fine structure of.

  17. Structure and Dissipation Characteristics of an Electron Diffusion Region Observed by MMS During a Rapid, Normal-Incidence Magnetopause Crossing

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Argall, M. R.; Alm, L.; Farrugia, C. J.; Forbes, T. G.; Giles, B. L.; Rager, A.; Dorelli, J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Wilder, F. D.; Ahmadi, N.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.

    2017-12-01

    On 22 October 2016, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft encountered the electron diffusion region (EDR) when the magnetosheath field was southward, and there were signatures of fast reconnection, including flow jets, Hall fields, and large power dissipation. One rapid, normal-incidence crossing, during which the EDR structure was almost stationary in the boundary frame, provided an opportunity to observe the spatial structure for the zero guide field case of magnetic reconnection. The reconnection electric field was determined unambiguously to be 2-3 mV/m. There were clear signals of fluctuating parallel electric fields, up to 6 mV/m on the magnetosphere side of the diffusion region, associated with a Hall-like parallel current feature on the electron scale. The width of the main EDR structure was determined to be 2 km (1.8 de). Although the MMS spacecraft were in their closest tetrahedral separation of 8 km, the divergences and curls for these thin current structures could therefore not be computed in the usual manner. A method is developed to determine these quantities on a much smaller scale and applied to compute the normal component of terms in the generalized Ohm's law for the positions of each individual spacecraft (not a barocentric average). Although the gradient pressure term has a qualitative dependence that follows the observed variation of E + Ve × B, the quantitative magnitude of these terms differs by more than a factor of 2, which is shown to be greater than the respective errors. Thus, future research is required to find the manner in which Ohm's law is balanced.

  18. Comparison of two anisotropic layer models applied to induction motors

    Sprangers, R.L.J.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Boynov, K.O.; Waarma, J.; Lomonova, E.

    2013-01-01

    A general description of the Anisotropic Layer Theory, derived in the polar coordinate system, and applied to the analysis of squirrel-cage induction motors (IMs), is presented. The theory considers non-conductive layers, layer with predefined current density and layers with induced current density.

  19. Comparison of two anisotropic layer models applied to induction motors

    Sprangers, R.L.J.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Boynov, K.O.; Lomonova, E.A.; Waarma, J.

    2014-01-01

    A general description of the Anisotropic Layer Theory, derived in the polar coordinate system, and applied to the analysis of squirrel-cage induction motors (IMs), is presented. The theory considers non-conductive layers, layer with predefined current density and layers with induced current density.

  20. Hall magnetohydrodynamics of neutral layers

    Huba, J.D.; Rudakov, L.I.

    2003-01-01

    New analytical and numerical results of the dynamics of inhomogeneous, reversed field current layers in the Hall limit (i.e., characteristic length scales < or approx. the ion inertial length) are presented. Specifically, the two- and three-dimensional evolution of a current layer that supports a reversed field plasma configuration and has a density gradient along the current direction is studied. The two-dimensional study demonstrates that a density inhomogeneity along the current direction can dramatically redistribute the magnetic field and plasma via magnetic shock-like or rarefaction waves. The relative direction between the density gradient and current flow plays a critical role in the evolution of the current sheet. One important result is that the current sheet can become very thin rapidly when the density gradient is directed opposite to the current. The three-dimensional study uses the same plasma and field configuration as the two-dimensional study but is also initialized with a magnetic field perturbation localized along the current channel upstream of the plasma inhomogeneity. The perturbation induces a magnetic wave structure that propagates in the direction of the electron drift (i.e., opposite to the current). The propagating wave structure is a Hall phenomenon associated with magnetic field curvature. The interaction between the propagating wave structure and the evolving current layer can lead to rapid magnetic field line reconnection. The results are applied to laboratory and space plasma processes

  1. Direct determination of IMF B-Y-related cusp current systems, using SuperDARN radar and multiple ground magnetometer data: A link to theory on cusp current origin

    Amm, O.; Engebretson, M.J.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    , respectively, with magnitudes of around 0.5 A/km(2). The geometry of the current system resembles a DPY current system [Friis-Christensen and Wilhjelm, 1975]. Using our results, we test alternative theories on cusp current origin that lead to different predictions of the relative location of the cusp current...... are caused by a rotational discontinuity of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. In contrast, the idea of Clauer and Banks [1986] that a mapping of the solar wind E-z component to the ionosphere is responsible for the cusp current system is not supported....... system with respect to the open-closed field line boundary. The location of this boundary is inferred from DMSP F10 satellite data. The center of our resulting current system is located clearly poleward of the open-closed field line boundary, thus favoring the idea of Lee et al. [1985] that the cusp FACs...

  2. Graded Recombination Layers for Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Koleilat, Ghada I.; Wang, Xihua; Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-01-01

    it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron

  3. An Investigation of Hall Currents Associated with Tripolar Magnetic Fields During Magnetospheric Kelvin Helmholtz Waves

    Sturner, A. P.; Eriksson, S.; Newman, D. L.; Lapenta, G.; Gershman, D. J.; Plaschke, F.; Ergun, R.; Wilder, F. D.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Kinetic simulations and observations of magnetic reconnection suggest the Hall term of Ohm's Law is necessary for understanding fast reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere. During high (>1) guide field plasma conditions in the solar wind and in Earth's magnetopause, tripolar variations in the guide magnetic field are often observed during current sheet crossings, and have been linked to reconnection Hall magnetic fields. Two proposed mechanisms for these tripolar variations are the presence of multiple nearby X-lines and magnetic island coalescence. We present results of an investigation into the structure of the electron currents supporting tripolar guide magnetic field variations during Kelvin-Helmholtz wave current sheet crossings using the Magnetosphere Multiscale (MMS) Mission, and compare with bipolar magnetic field structures and with kinetic simulations to understand how these tripolar structures may be used as tracers for magnetic islands.

  4. Electron Currents and Heating in the Ion Diffusion Region of Asymmetric Reconnection

    Graham, D. B.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Norgren, C.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Ergun, R. E.; Paterson, W. R.; Gershman, D. J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In this letter the structure of the ion diffusion region of magnetic reconnection at Earths magnetopause is investigated using the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft. The ion diffusion region is characterized by a strong DC electric field, approximately equal to the Hall electric field, intense currents, and electron heating parallel to the background magnetic field. Current structures well below ion spatial scales are resolved, and the electron motion associated with lower hybrid drift waves is shown to contribute significantly to the total current density. The electron heating is shown to be consistent with large-scale parallel electric fields trapping and accelerating electrons, rather than wave-particle interactions. These results show that sub-ion scale processes occur in the ion diffusion region and are important for understanding electron heating and acceleration.

  5. Magnetic properties of layered superconductors

    Mansky, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The organic superconductors (BEDT-TTF) 2 Cu(SNC) 2 and (TMTSF) 2 ClO 4 , with T c = 10K and 1.2K, have layered and highly anisotropic crystal structures. This thesis describes AC magnetic susceptibility measurements on these materials which illustrate the consequences of the discrete layered structure for the magnetic properties of the superconducting state. A DC magnetic field applied parallel to the layers of either material causes the rapid suppression of the AC screening response, and this indicates that the pinning restoring force for vortex motion parallel to the layers is anomalously weak in this orientation. This is believed to be due to the small size of the interlayer coherence length relative to the layer spacing. A simple estimate based on the energy and length scales relevant to Josephson coupled layers gives the correct order of magnitude for the pinning force. Pinning for vortices oriented perpendicular to the layers is larger by a factor of 500 for BEDT and 25 for TMTSF. When the DC field is applied at an angle to the layers, the initial suppression of the susceptibility is identical to that for a field parallel to the layers; when the field component normal to the layers exceeds a threshold, a sharp recovery of screening occurs. These observations indicate that the field initially enters the sample only in the direction parallel to the layers. The recovery of screening signals field penetration in the perpendicular direction at higher field strength, and is due to the onset of pinning by in-plane vortex cores. This magnetic open-quotes lock-inclose quotes effect is a qualitatively new behavior and is a direct consequence of weak interlayer coupling. The London penetration depth associated with interlayer currents is found to be on the order of hundreds of microns, comparable to that of a Josephson junction, and two to three orders of magnitude larger than for conventional superconductors

  6. The INTERBALL-Tail ELECTRON experiment: initial results on the low-latitude boundary layer of the dawn magnetosphere

    J.-A. Sauvaud

    Full Text Available The Toulouse electron spectrometer flown on the Russian project INTERBALL-Tail performs electron measurements from 10 to 26 000 eV over a 4 solid angle in a satellite rotation period. The INTERBALL-Tail probe was launched on 3 August 1995 together with a subsatellite into a 65° inclination orbit with an apogee of about 30 RE. The INTERBALL mission also includes a polar spacecraft launched in August 1996 for correlated studies of the outer magnetosphere and of the auroral regions. We present new observations concerning the low-latitude boundary layers (LLBL of the magnetosphere obtained near the dawn magnetic meridian. LLBL are encountered at the interface between two plasma regimes, the magnetosheath and the dayside extension of the plasma sheet. Unexpectedly, the radial extent of the region where LLBL electrons can be sporadically detected as plasma clouds can reach up to 5 RE inside the magnetopause. The LLBL core electrons have an average energy of the order of 100 eV and are systematically field-aligned and counterstreaming. As a trend, the temperature of the LLBL electrons increases with decreasing distance to Earth. Along the satellite orbit, the apparent time of occurrence of LLBL electrons can vary from about 5 to 20 min from one pass to another. An initial first comparison between electron- and magnetic-field measurements indicates that the LLBL clouds coincide with a strong increase in the magnetic field (by up to a factor of 2. The resulting strong magnetic field gradient can explain why the plasma-sheet electron flux in the keV range is strongly depressed in LLBL occurrence regions (up to a factor of sim10. We also show that LLBL electron encounters are related to field-aligned current structures and that wide LLBL correspond to northward interplanetary magnetic field. Evidence for LLBL/plasma-sheet electron leakage into the magnetosheath during southward IMF is also presented.

  7. Layering and Ordering in Electrochemical Double Layers

    Liu, Yihua [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kawaguchi, Tomoya [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Pierce, Michael S. [Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, New York 14623, United States; Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Science, Safarik University, 041 54 Kosice, Slovakia; You, Hoydoo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2018-02-26

    Electrochemical double layers (EDL) form at electrified interfaces. While Gouy-Chapman model describes moderately charged EDL, formation of Stern layers was predicted for highly charged EDL. Our results provide structural evidence for a Stern layer of cations, at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in alkali fluoride and chloride electrolytes. Layering was observed by x-ray crystal truncation rods and atomic-scale recoil responses of Pt(111) surface layers. Ordering in the layer is confirmed by glancing-incidence in-plane diffraction measurements.

  8. LaNiO{sub 3} buffer layers for high critical current density YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8{minus}{delta}} films

    Carlson, C.M.; Parilla, P.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Ginley, D.S.; Wang, Y.; Blaugher, R.D.; Price, J.C.; Overmyer, D.L.; Venturini, E.L.

    1999-10-01

    We demonstrate high critical current density superconducting films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8{minus}{delta}} (Tl-2212) using LaNiO{sub 3} (LNO) buffer layers. YBCO films grown on an LNO buffer layer have only a slightly lower J{sub c} (5 K, H=0) than films grown directly on a bare LaAlO{sub 3} substrate. YBCO films grown on LNO buffer layers exhibit minor microstructural disorder and enhanced flux pinning. LNO-buffered Tl-2212 samples show large reductions in J{sub c} at all temperatures and fields compared to those grown on bare LaAlO{sub 3}, correlating to both {ital a}-axis grain and nonsuperconducting phase formation. LNO could be a promising buffer layer for both YBCO and Tl-based superconducting films in coated conductor applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Double Layer Dynamics in a Collisionless Magnetoplasma

    Iizuka, S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    and propagation of a double layer. The period of the oscillations is determined by the propagation length of the double layer. The current is limited during the propagation of the double layer by a growing negative potential barrier formed on the low potential tail. Similar phenomena appear when a potential......An experimental investigation of the dynamics of double layers is presented. The experiments are performed in a Q-machine plasma and the double layers are generated by applying a positive step potential to a cold collector plate terminating the plasma column. The double layer is created...... at the grounded plasma source just after the pulse is applied and it propagates towards the collector with a speed around the ion acoustic speed. When the collector is biased positively, large oscillations are obserced in the plasma current. These oscillations are found to be related to a recurring formation...

  10. The storage of nuclear wastes; General problematic of radioactive waste management; The currently operated ANDRA's storage centres in France; The Aube storage centre (CSA) and the industrial centre for gathering, warehousing and storage (Cires); The Cigeo project - Industrial centre of radioactive waste storage in deep geological layers; From R and D to innovation within the ANDRA

    Abadie, Pierre-Marie; Tallec, Michele; Legee, Frederic; Krieguer, Jean-Marie; Plas, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    This publication proposes a set of four articles which address various aspects related to the storage of nuclear wastes. The authors respectively propose an overview of the general problematic of nuclear waste management, a detailed description of existing storage sites which are currently operated by the ANDRA with a focus on the Aube storage centre or CSA, and on the industrial centre for gathering, warehousing and storage or Cires (The currently operated ANDRA's storage centres in France - The Aube Storage Centre or CSA, and the Industrial Centre for Regrouping, Warehousing and Storage or CIRES), a comprehensive overview of the current status of the Cigeo project which could become one of the most important technological works in France (The Cigeo project - Industrial centre of radioactive waste storage in deep geological layers), and a presentation showing how the ANDRA is involved in R and D activities and innovation (From R and D to innovation within the ANDRA)

  11. Eddy dynamics in the Southern Ocean: How does the interaction of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current with sea-bed topography influence the surface mixed layer and hence the carbon-climate feedback processes?

    Kobo, N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Ocean is an important sink for heat and CO2 and is one of the world’s most productive regions. The unique absence of blocking continents allows the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) to connect all ocean basins (Atlantic, Pacific...

  12. Hall effect in organic layered conductors

    R.A.Hasan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hall effect in organic layered conductors with a multisheeted Fermi surfaces was considered. It is shown that the experimental study of Hall effect and magnetoresistance anisotropy at different orientations of current and a quantizing magnetic field relative to the layers makes it possible to determine the contribution of various charge carriers groups to the conductivity, and to find out the character of Fermi surface anisotropy in the plane of layers.

  13. Global effects of double layers

    Raad, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    Locally the formation of an electrostatic double layer in a current carrying plasma leads to a direct acceleration of particles which may penetrate far into the surrounding medium. The potential across the double layer, giving this acceleration, must be maintained by the external system and is a basic parameter for the local to global coupling. The double layer potential is associated with an electric field parallel to the magnetic field. In general this leads to a magnetohydrodynamic relaxation of the surrounding medium providing the influx of energy which is dissipated by the double layer. The double layer potential is limited as is the maximum possible rate of energy influx. If the global response of the external medium can be represented by an external circuit and if an equivalent circuit element can be found to represent the double layer, for example a negative resistance for intermediate time scales, it is possible to give a description of the dynamics and stability of the whole system. (Author)

  14. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Garratt, J. R.

    1994-05-01

    A comprehensive and lucid account of the physics and dynamics of the lowest one to two kilometers of the Earth's atmosphere in direct contact with the Earth's surface, known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Dr. Garratt emphasizes the application of the ABL problems to numerical modeling of the climate, which makes this book unique among recent texts on the subject. He begins with a brief introduction to the ABL before leading to the development of mean and turbulence equations and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modeling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, so chapters four and five deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention given to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The author next treats the structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL, and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter seven then extends this discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is particularly relevant to current research because the extensive stratocumulus regions over the subtropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic have been identified as key players in the climate system. In the final chapters, Dr. Garratt summarizes the book's material by discussing appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes in general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate stimulation.

  15. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  16. Magnetic pulsations from 0.1 to 4.0 Hz and associated plasma properties in the earth's subsolar magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    AMPTE CCE magnetic field data acquired during periods of magnetospheric compressions when the spacecraft sampled the magnetosheath are analyzed on the basis of a dynamic spectral analysis covering frequencies 0.1 to 4.0 Hz. Ion and electron data are used to identify regions, to monitor the upstream shock geometry, and to evaluate moments of the proton distribution. Fourteen encounters representing 46 hr of observations are analyzed. A compilation of the temporal sequence of spectral structures shows that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves occur next to the magnetopause, while mirror waves occur outside the region of EMIC waves. It is concluded that there is a close relationship between EMIC waves in the sheath and the plasma depletion layer. For quasi-parallel upstream conditions, the magnetic field power spectra often exhibit no band limited structures but only broadband noise.

  17. Weak currents

    Leite Lopes, J.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the fundamental ideas on weak currents such as CVC and PCAC and a presentation of the Cabibbo current and the neutral weak currents according to the Salam-Weinberg model and the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Miami model are given [fr

  18. Spin current

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In a new branch of physics and technology called spin-electronics or spintronics, the flow of electrical charge (usual current) as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called 'spin current', are manipulated and controlled together. This book provides an introduction and guide to the new physics and application of spin current.

  19. The influence of convective current generator on the global current

    V. N. Morozov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical generalization of classical model of the global circuit with taking into account the convective current generator, working in the planetary boundary layer was considered. Convective current generator may be interpreted as generator, in which the electromotive force is generated by processes, of the turbulent transport of electrical charge. It is shown that the average potential of ionosphere is defined not only by the thunderstorm current generators, working at the present moment, but by the convective current generator also. The influence of the convective processes in the boundary layer on the electrical parameters of the atmosphere is not only local, but has global character as well. The numerical estimations, made for the case of the convective-unstable boundary layer demonstrate that the increase of the average potential of ionosphere may be of the order of 10% to 40%.

  20. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with the earth's magnetosphere: The generation of field-aligned currents

    Ogino, T.

    1986-01-01

    A global computer simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with the earth's magnetosphere was executed by using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model. As a result, we were able to reproduce quasi-steady-state magnetospheric configurations and a Birkeland field-aligned current system which depend on the polarity of the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Twin convection cells and a dawn to dusk electric potential of 30--100 kV appeared at the equator in the magnetosphere. Four types of field-aligned currents were observed. Region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents generated for all IMF conditions were 0.6--1.0 x 10 6 A and 0.15--0.61 x 10 6 A, respectively, in the total current. Region 1 currents at high latitudes are generated from the field-aligned vorticity at the flanks through a viscous interaction and are strengthened by a twisting of open magnetic field lines in the tail region for southward IMF. On the other hand, the low-latitude region 2 currents probably are generated mainly from the inner pressure gradient of the plasma sheet. The region 1 current obtained from the simulation was in good agreement with an estimate from our theoretical analysis of the localized Alfven mode. The other two types of field-aligned currents are the dayside magnetopause currents in the dayside cusp region, which increase for northward IMF, and the dayside cusp currents for southward IMF. The cusp currents are associated with a twisting of open magnetic field lines in the magnetopause region

  1. Enhancement of magnetoresistance by inserting thin NiAl layers at the interfaces in Co{sub 2}FeGa{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}/Ag/Co{sub 2}FeGa{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5} current-perpendicular-to-plane pseudo spin valves

    Jung, J. W.; Sakuraba, Y., E-mail: Sakuraba.Yuya@nims.go.jp; Sasaki, T. T.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Miura, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Kyoto Institute of Technology, Electrical Engineering and Electronics, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2016-03-07

    We have investigated the effects of insertion of a thin NiAl layer (≤0.63 nm) into a Co{sub 2}FeGa{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5} (CFGG)/Ag interface on the magnetoresistive properties in CFGG/Ag/CFGG current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) pseudo spin valves (PSVs). First-principles calculations of ballistic transmittance clarified that the interfacial band matching at the (001)-oriented NiAl/CFGG interface is better than that at the (001)-Ag/CFGG interface. The insertion of 0.21-nm-thick NiAl layers at the Co{sub 2}FeGa{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}/Ag interfaces effectively improved the magnetoresistance (MR) output; the observed average and the highest MR ratio (ΔRA) are 62% (25 mΩ μm{sup 2}) and 77% (31 mΩ μm{sup 2}) at room temperature, respectively, which are much higher than those without NiAl insertion. Microstructural analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy confirmed the existence of thin NiAl layers at the Ag interfaces with only modest interdiffusion even after annealing at 550 °C. The improvement of the interfacial spin-dependent scattering by very thin NiAl insertion can be a predominant reason for the enhancement of the MR output.

  2. Cavity nonlinear optics with layered materials

    Fryett Taylor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Unprecedented material compatibility and ease of integration, in addition to the unique and diverse optoelectronic properties of layered materials, have generated significant interest in their utilization in nanophotonic devices. While initial nanophotonic experiments with layered materials primarily focused on light sources, modulators, and detectors, recent efforts have included nonlinear optical devices. In this paper, we review the current state of cavity-enhanced nonlinear optics with layered materials. Along with conventional nonlinear optics related to harmonic generation, we report on emerging directions of nonlinear optics, where layered materials can potentially play a significant role.

  3. Benthic boundary layer modelling studies

    Richards, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to study the factors which control the height of the benthic boundary layer in the deep ocean and the dispersion of a tracer within and directly above the layer. This report covers tracer clouds of horizontal scales of 10 to 100 km. The dispersion of a tracer has been studied in two ways. Firstly, a number of particles have been introduced into the flow. The trajectories of these particles provide information on dispersion rates. For flow conditions similar to those observed in the abyssal N.E. Atlantic the diffusivity of a tracer was found to be 5 x 10 6 cm 2 s -1 for a tracer within the boundary layer and 8 x 10 6 cm 2 s -1 for a tracer above the boundary layer. The results are in accord with estimates made from current meter measurements. The second method of studying dispersion was to calculate the evolution of individual tracer clouds. Clouds within and above the benthic boundary layer often show quite different behaviour from each other although the general structure of the clouds in the two regions were found to have no significant differences. (author)

  4. Observation of the reversed current effect

    Jones, I.R.; Silawatshananai, C.

    1979-05-01

    The paper describes an observation of the reversed current effect, and its consequences, in a 'stabilized' Z-pinch. Magnetic probe measurements and holographic interferometry were used to follow the development of a reversed current layer and to pinpoint its location in the outer region of the pinched plasma column. The subsequent ejection of the outer plasma layer was observed using fast photography

  5. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  6. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  7. Current interruption by density depression

    Wagner, J.S.; Tajima, T.; Akasofu, S.I.

    1985-04-01

    Using a one-dimensional electrostatic particle code, we examine processes associated with current interruption in a collisionless plasma when a density depression is present along the current channel. Current interruption due to double layers was suggested by Alfven and Carlqvist (1967) as a cause of solar flares. At a local density depression, plasma instabilities caused by an electron current flow are accentuated, leading to current disruption. Our simulation study encompasses a wide range of the parameters in such a way that under appropriate conditions, both the Alfven and Carlqvist (1967) regime and the Smith and Priest (1972) regime take place. In the latter regime the density depression decays into a stationary structure (''ion-acoustic layer'') which spawns a series of ion-acoustic ''solitons'' and ion phase space holes travelling upstream. A large inductance of the current circuit tends to enhance the plasma instabilities

  8. Double layers in space

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-07-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. We briefly discuss the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Author)

  9. Double layers in space

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. The author briefly discusses the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Auth.)

  10. Current limiters

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  11. Boundary-Layer & health

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  12. Spin current

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance effect in magnetic multilayers in 1988, a new branch of physics and technology, called spin-electronics or spintronics, has emerged, where the flow of electrical charge as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called “spin current,” are manipulated and controlled together. The physics of magnetism and the application of spin current have progressed in tandem with the nanofabrication technology of magnets and the engineering of interfaces and thin films. This book aims to provide an introduction and guide to the new physics and applications of spin current, with an emphasis on the interaction between spin and charge currents in magnetic nanostructures.

  13. Diamagnetic boundary layers: a kinetic theory

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma such as those observed in the solar wind is presented. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary, one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers, in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases in which the magnetic field intensity and/or direction changed across the layer were considered. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii and the field changed smoothly , although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. The results are consistent with the observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU. (Auth.)

  14. Imposed currents in galvanic cells

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Soestbergen, M. van; Bazant, M.Z.

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the steady-state behavior of a general mathematical model for reversible galvanic cells, such as redox flow cells, reversible solid oxide fuel cells, and rechargeable batteries. We consider not only operation in the galvanic discharging mode, spontaneously generating a positive current against an external load, but also operation in two modes which require a net input of electrical energy: (i) the electrolytic charging mode, where a negative current is imposed to generate a voltage exceeding the open-circuit voltage, and (ii) the 'super-galvanic' discharging mode, where a positive current exceeding the short-circuit current is imposed to generate a negative voltage. Analysis of the various (dis-)charging modes of galvanic cells is important to predict the efficiency of electrical to chemical energy conversion and to provide sensitive tests for experimental validation of fuel cell models. In the model, we consider effects of diffuse charge on electrochemical charge-transfer rates by combining a generalized Frumkin-Butler-Volmer equation for reaction kinetics across the compact Stern layer with the full Poisson-Nernst-Planck transport theory, without assuming local electroneutrality. Since this approach is rare in the literature, we provide a brief historical review. To illustrate the general theory, we present results for a monovalent binary electrolyte, consisting of cations, which react at the electrodes, and non-reactive anions, which are either fixed in space (as in a solid electrolyte) or are mobile (as in a liquid electrolyte). The full model is solved numerically and compared to analytical results in the limit of thin diffuse layers, relative to the membrane thickness. The spatial profiles of the ion concentrations and electrostatic potential reveal a complex dependence on the kinetic parameters and the imposed current, in which the diffuse charge at each electrode and the total membrane charge can have either sign, contrary perhaps to intuition

  15. Neutral currents

    Paschos, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that over the past few years considerable progress has been made in the field of weak interactions. The existence of neutral currents involving leptons and hadrons has been established and some of the questions concerning their detailed structure have been answered. This imposes constraints on the gauge theories and has eliminated large classes of models. New questions have also been raised, one of which concerns the conservation laws obeyed by neutral currents. The wide range of investigations is impressive and is expected to continue with new results from particle, nuclear, and atomic physics. Headings include - various aspects of a gauge theory (choice of group, the symmetry breaking scheme, representation assignments for fermion fields); space-time structure; isospin structure; leptonic neutral currents; and atomic experiments. (U.K.)

  16. Multi-layers castings

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  17. Neutral currents

    Aubert, B.

    1994-11-01

    The evidence for the existence of weak neutral current has been a very controverted topics in the early 1970's, as well as the muon did in the 1930's. The history is very rich considering the evolution of the experimental techniques in high energy particle physics. The history of the discovery and the study of weak neutral current is reviewed. Later the quest of the intermediate vector boson continues with the decision of the community to build a large proton antiproton collider. (K.A.). 14 refs., 1 fig

  18. Synthesis/literature review for determining structural layer coefficients (SLC) of bases.

    2014-12-01

    FDOTs current method of determining a base material structural layer coefficient (SLC) is detailed in the : Materials Manual, Chapter 2.1, Structural Layer Coefficients for Flexible Pavement Base Materials. : Currently, any new base material not a...

  19. A double layer review

    Block, L.P.

    1977-06-01

    A review of the main results on electrostatic double layers (sometimes called space charge layers or sheaths) obtained from theory, and laboratory and space experiments up to the spring of 1977 is given. By means of barium jets and satellite probes, double layers have now been found at the altitudes, earlier predicted theoretically. The general potential distribution above the auroral zone, suggested by inverted V-events and electric field reversals, is corroborated. (author)

  20. Two layer powder pressing

    Schreiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    First, significance and advantages of sintered materials consisting of two layers are pointed out. By means of the two layer powder pressing technique metal powders are formed resulting in compacts with high accuracy of shape and mass. Attributes of basic powders, different filling methods and pressing techniques are discussed. The described technique is supposed to find further applications in the field of two layer compacts in the near future

  1. Economical Atomic Layer Deposition

    Wyman, Richard; Davis, Robert; Linford, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition is a self limiting deposition process that can produce films at a user specified height. At BYU we have designed a low cost and automated atomic layer deposition system. We have used the system to deposit silicon dioxide at room temperature using silicon tetrachloride and tetramethyl orthosilicate. Basics of atomic layer deposition, the system set up, automation techniques and our system's characterization are discussed.

  2. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  3. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  4. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  5. Double layer dynamics in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    Iizuka, Satoru; Michelsen, P.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Schrittwieser, R.; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Saeki, Koichi; Sato, Noriyoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of double layer dynamics are performed in a Q-machine plasma by applying a positive step potential to a cold end-plate collector. The double layer created at the grounded plasma source just after the pulse is applied propagates towards the collector with the plasma flow speed. Large oscillations occur in the plasma current which is related to a recurring formation and propagation of the double layer. The current is limited during the propagation by a growing negative potential dip formed on the low-potential tail. Similar phenomena appear on the low-potential tail of the stationary double layer formed by applying a potential difference between two plasma sources. (author)

  6. Double layer dynamics in a collisionless magnetoplasma

    Iizuka, S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of double layer dynamics are performed in a Q-machine plasma by applying a positive step potential to a cold end-plate collector. The double layer created at the grounded plasma source just after the pulse is applied propagates towards the collector with the plasma flow speed. Large...... oscillations occur in the plasma current which is related to a recurring formation and propagation of the double layer. The current is limited during the propagation by a growing negative potential dip formed on the low-potential tail. Similar phenomena appear on the low-potential tail of the stationary double...... layer formed by applying a potential difference between two plasma sources...

  7. Current algebra

    Jacob, M.

    1967-01-01

    The first three chapters of these lecture notes are devoted to generalities concerning current algebra. The weak currents are defined, and their main properties given (V-A hypothesis, conserved vector current, selection rules, partially conserved axial current,...). The SU (3) x SU (3) algebra of Gell-Mann is introduced, and the general properties of the non-leptonic weak Hamiltonian are discussed. Chapters 4 to 9 are devoted to some important applications of the algebra. First one proves the Adler- Weisberger formula, in two different ways, by either the infinite momentum frame, or the near-by singularities method. In the others chapters, the latter method is the only one used. The following topics are successively dealt with: semi leptonic decays of K mesons and hyperons, Kroll- Ruderman theorem, non leptonic decays of K mesons and hyperons ( ΔI = 1/2 rule), low energy theorems concerning processes with emission (or absorption) of a pion or a photon, super-convergence sum rules, and finally, neutrino reactions. (author) [fr

  8. Current Titles

    Various

    2006-06-01

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Jane Cavlina, Administrator, at 510/486-6036.

  9. Current scenario

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Current scenario. India , like other parts of the world, is also facing the problem of increase in the incidence of drug resistance in tuberculosis. Multi-drug resistance (MDR, resistance to RIF & INH) and extensively drug resistant strains (X-DR, resistance to RIF, INH, FQs ...

  10. Intrinsic superspin Hall current

    Linder, Jacob; Amundsen, Morten; Risinggârd, Vetle

    2017-09-01

    We discover an intrinsic superspin Hall current: an injected charge supercurrent in a Josephson junction containing heavy normal metals and a ferromagnet generates a transverse spin supercurrent. There is no accompanying dissipation of energy, in contrast to the conventional spin Hall effect. The physical origin of the effect is an antisymmetric spin density induced among transverse modes ky near the interface of the superconductor arising due to the coexistence of p -wave and conventional s -wave superconducting correlations with a belonging phase mismatch. Our predictions can be tested in hybrid structures including thin heavy metal layers combined with strong ferromagnets and ordinary s -wave superconductors.

  11. A note on the ring current in Saturn’s magnetosphere: Comparison of magnetic data obtained during the Pioneer-11 and Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys

    E. J. Bunce

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We examine the residual (measured minus internal magnetic field vectors observed in Saturn’s magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 fly-by in 1979, and compare them with those observed during the Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys in 1980 and 1981. We show for the first time that a ring current system was present within the magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 encounter, which was qualitatively similar to those present during the Voyager fly-bys. The analysis also shows, however, that the ring current was located closer to the planet during the Pioneer-11 encounter than during the comparable Voyager-1 fly-by, reflecting the more com-pressed nature of the magnetosphere at the time. The residual field vectors have been fit using an adaptation of the current system proposed for Jupiter by Connerney et al. (1981a. A model that provides a reasonably good fit to the Pioneer-11 Saturn data extends radially between 6.5 and 12.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance of 17 RS, has a north-south extent of 4 RS, and carries a total current of 9.6 MA. A corresponding model that provides a qualitatively similar fit to the Voyager data, determined previously by Connerney et al. (1983, extends radially between 8 and 15.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance for Voyager-1 of 23–24 RS, has a north-south extent of 6 RS, and carries a total current of 11.5 MA.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems, magnetospheric configuration and dynamics, planetary magnetospheres

  12. Stationary Double Layers in a Collisionless Magnetoplasma

    Noriyoshi, Sato; Mieno, Tetsu; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    1983-01-01

    of the plate on the low-potential side, being accompanied with current limitation. This localized potential drop moves along the plasma column, but finally stops and results in the formation of the stationary double layer in the presence of sufficient plasma supply from the plate on the high-potential side.......Stationary double layers are generated in a magnetoplasma by applying potential differences between two heated plates on which the plasma is produced by surface ionization. By measuring the double-layer formation process, a localized potential drop is found to be formed initially in front...

  13. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Y. I. Feldstein

    2001-05-01

    precipitation (AO is mapped to the dawn periphery of the Central Plasma Sheet (CPS; the soft small scale structured precipitation (SSSL is mapped to the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause, i.e. the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL. In the near-noon sector, earthward fluxes of soft electrons, which cause the Diffuse Red Aurora (DRA, are observed. The ion energies decrease with increasing latitude. The plasma spectra of the DRA regime are analogous to the spectra of the Plasma Mantle (PM. In the dawn sector, the large-scale field-aligned currents flow into the ionosphere at the SSSL latitudes (Region 1 and flow out at the AO or DAZ latitudes (Region 2. In the dawn and dusk sectors, the large-scale Region 1 and Region 2 FAC generation occurs in different plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere. The dawn and dusk FAC connection to the traditional Region 1 and Region 2 has only formal character, as FAC generating in various magnetospheric plasma domains integrate in the same region (Region 1 or Region 2. In the SSSL, there is anti-sunward convection; in the DAZ and the AO, there is the sunward convection. At PM latitudes, the convection is controlled by the azimuthal IMF component (By . It is suggested to extend the notation of the plasma pattern boundaries, as proposed by Newell et al. (1996, for the nightside sector of the auroral oval to the dawn sector.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma convection

  14. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Y. I. Feldstein

    electrons and isotropic ion precipitation (AO is mapped to the dawn periphery of the Central Plasma Sheet (CPS; the soft small scale structured precipitation (SSSL is mapped to the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause, i.e. the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL. In the near-noon sector, earthward fluxes of soft electrons, which cause the Diffuse Red Aurora (DRA, are observed. The ion energies decrease with increasing latitude. The plasma spectra of the DRA regime are analogous to the spectra of the Plasma Mantle (PM. In the dawn sector, the large-scale field-aligned currents flow into the ionosphere at the SSSL latitudes (Region 1 and flow out at the AO or DAZ latitudes (Region 2. In the dawn and dusk sectors, the large-scale Region 1 and Region 2 FAC generation occurs in different plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere. The dawn and dusk FAC connection to the traditional Region 1 and Region 2 has only formal character, as FAC generating in various magnetospheric plasma domains integrate in the same region (Region 1 or Region 2. In the SSSL, there is anti-sunward convection; in the DAZ and the AO, there is the sunward convection. At PM latitudes, the convection is controlled by the azimuthal IMF component (By . It is suggested to extend the notation of the plasma pattern boundaries, as proposed by Newell et al. (1996, for the nightside sector of the auroral oval to the dawn sector.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma convection

  15. Multi-layer monochromator

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Caspar, D.L.D.

    1975-01-01

    This invention provides an artificial monochromator crystal for efficiently selecting a narrow band of neutron wavelengths from a neutron beam having a Maxwellian wavelength distribution, by providing on a substrate a plurality of germanium layers, and alternate periodic layers of a different metal having tailored thicknesses, shapes, and volumetric and neutron scattering densities. (U.S.)

  16. Ozone Layer Protection

    ... and Research Centers Contact Us Share Ozone Layer Protection The stratospheric ozone layer is Earth’s “sunscreen” – protecting ... GreenChill Partnership Responsible Appliance Disposal (RAD) Program Ozone Protection vs. Ozone Pollution This website addresses stratospheric ozone ...

  17. Skin layer mechanics

    Geerligs, M.

    2010-01-01

    The human skin is composed of several layers, each with an unique structure and function. Knowledge about the mechanical behavior of these skin layers is important for clinical and cosmetic research, such as the development of personal care products and the understanding of skin diseases. Until

  18. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  19. On Multiple Hall-Like Electron Currents and Tripolar Guide Magnetic Field Perturbations During Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves

    Sturner, Andrew P.; Eriksson, Stefan; Nakamura, Takuma; Gershman, Daniel J.; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Ergun, Robert E.; Wilder, Frederick D.; Giles, Barbara; Pollock, Craig; Paterson, William R.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Burch, James L.

    2018-02-01

    Two magnetopause current sheet crossings with tripolar guide magnetic field signatures were observed by multiple Magnetosphere Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft during Kelvin-Helmholtz wave activity. The two out-of-plane magnetic field depressions of the tripolar guide magnetic field are largely supported by the observed in-plane electron currents, which are reminiscent of two clockwise Hall current loop systems. A comparison with a three-dimensional kinetic simulation of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves and vortex-induced reconnection suggests that MMS likely encountered the two Hall magnetic field depressions on either side of a magnetic reconnection X-line. Moreover, MMS observed an out-of-plane current reversal and a corresponding in-plane magnetic field rotation at the center of one of the current sheets, suggesting the presence of two adjacent flux ropes. The region inside one of the ion-scale flux ropes was characterized by an observed decrease of the total magnetic field, a strong axial current, and significant enhancements of electron density and parallel electron temperature. The flux rope boundary was characterized by currents opposite this axial current, strong in-plane and converging electric fields, parallel electric fields, and weak electron-frame Joule dissipation. These return current region observations may reflect a need to support the axial current rather than representing local reconnection signatures in the absence of any exhausts.

  20. Development of boundary layers

    Herbst, R.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layers develop along the blade surfaces on both the pressure and the suction side in a non-stationary flow field. This is due to the fact that there is a strongly fluctuating flow on the downstream blade row, especially as a result of the wakes of the upstream blade row. The author investigates the formation of boundary layers under non-stationary flow conditions and tries to establish a model describing the non-stationary boundary layer. For this purpose, plate boundary layers are measured, at constant flow rates but different interferent frequency and variable pressure gradients. By introducing the sample technique, measurements of the non-stationary boundary layer become possible, and the flow rate fluctuation can be divided in its components, i.e. stochastic turbulence and periodical fluctuation. (GL) [de

  1. Improved electron transport layer

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  2. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management

    Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

    2013-08-27

    A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

  3. Current awareness.

    Compagno, C; Brambilla, L; Capitanio, D; Boschi, F; Ranzi, B M; Porro, D

    2001-05-01

    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, this current awareness service is provided by John Wiley & Sons and contains newly-published material on yeasts. Each bibliography is divided into 10 sections. 1 Books, Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Biochemistry; 4 Biotechnology; 5 Cell Biology; 6 Gene Expression; 7 Genetics; 8 Physiology; 9 Medical Mycology; 10 Recombinant DNA Technology. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author. If, in the preceding period, no publications are located relevant to any one of these headings, that section will be omitted. (4 weeks journals - search completed 7th Mar. 2001)

  4. Current titles

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This booklet is published for those interested in current research being conducted at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. The NCEM is a DOE-designated national user facility and is available at no charge to qualified researchers. Access is controlled by an external steering committee. Interested researchers may contact Gretchen Hermes at (510) 486-5006 or address below for a User`s Guide. Copies of available papers can be ordered from: Theda Crawford National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, One Cyclotron Rd., MS72, Berkeley, California, USA 94720.

  5. The plasmasheet H+ and O+ contribution on the storm time ring current

    Mouikis, C.; Bingham, S.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Gkioulidou, M.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The source population of the storm time ring current is the night side plasma sheet. We use Van Allen Probes and Cluster observations to determine the contribution of the convecting plasma sheet H+ and O+ particles in the storm time development of the ring current. Using the Volland-Stern model with a dipole magnetic field together with the identification of the observed energy cutoffs in the particle spectra, we specify the pressure contributed by H+ and O+ populations that are on open drift paths vs. the pressure contributed by the trapped populations, for different local times. We find that during the storm main phase most of the ring current pressure in the pre-midnight inner magnetosphere is contributed by particles on open drift paths that cause the development of a strong partial ring current that causes most of the main phase Dst drop. These particles can reach as deep as L~2 and their pressure compares to the local magnetic field pressure as deep as L~3. During the recovery phase, if these particles are not lost at the magnetopause, will become trapped and will contribute to the symmetric ring current.

  6. Ultra-high current density thin-film Si diode

    Wang, Qi [Littleton, CO

    2008-04-22

    A combination of a thin-film .mu.c-Si and a-Si:H containing diode structure characterized by an ultra-high current density that exceeds 1000 A/cm.sup.2, comprising: a substrate; a bottom metal layer disposed on the substrate; an n-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited the bottom metal layer; an i-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the n-layer; a buffer layer of a-Si:H deposited on the i-layer, a p-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the buffer layer; and a top metal layer deposited on the p-layer.

  7. Current ornithology

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of the first volume of a projected series is the occasion for comment on scope, aims, and genesis of the work. The scope of Current Ornithology is all of the biology of birds. Ornithology, as a whole-organism science, is concerned with birds at every level of bi­ ological organization, from the molecular to the community, at least from the Jurassic to the present time, and over every scholarly discipline in which bird biology is done; to say this is merely to expand a dic­ tionary definition of "ornithology. " The aim of the work, to be realized over several volumes, is to present reviews or position statements con­ cerning the active fields of ornithological research. The reviews will be relatively short, and often will be done from the viewpoint of a readily­ identified group or school. Such a work could have come into being at any time within the past fifty years, but that Current Ornithology appears now is a result of events that are only seven to eight years old. One important event wa...

  8. Double layers and circuits in astrophysics

    Alfven, H.

    1986-05-01

    As the rate of energy release in a double layer with voltage DeltaV is P corresponding to IDeltaV, a double layer must be treated part of a circuit which delivers the current I. As neither double layer nor circuit can be derived from magnetofluid models of a plasma, such models are useless for treating energy transfer by menas of double layers. They must be replaced by particle models and circuit theory. A simple circuit is suggested which is applied to the energizing of auroroal particles, to solar flares, and to intergalactic double radio sources. Application to the heliospheric current systems leads to the prediction of two double layers on the sun's axis which may give radiations detectable from earth. Double layers in space should be classified as a new type of celestial object (one example is the double radio sources). It is tentatively suggested in X-ray and gamma-ray bursts may be due to exploding double layers (although annihilation is an alternative energy source). A study of how a number of the most used textbooks in astrophysics treat important concepts like double layers, critical velocity, pinch effects and circuits is made. It is found that students using these textbooks remain essentially ignorant of even the existence of these, in spite of the fact that some of them have been well known for half a centry (e.g., double layers, Langmuir, 1929: pinch effect, Bennet, 1934). The conclusion is that astrophysics is too important to be left in the hands of the astrophysicist. Earth bound and space telescope data must be treated by scientists who are familiar with laboratory and magnetospheric physics and circuit theory, and of course with modern plasma theory. At least by volume the universe consists to more than 99 percent of plasma, and electromagnetic forces are 10/sup39/ time stronger than gravitation

  9. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer on a wedge

    Rao, B.N.; Mittal, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the Hall and ionslip currents on the gas-dynamic boundary layer are investigated in view of the increasing prospects for using the MHD principle in electric power generation. The currents are included in the analysis using the generalized Ohm's law (Sherman and Sutton, 1964), and the resulting two nonlinear coupled equations are solved using a modification in the method suggested by Nachtsheim and Swigert (1965), Dewey and Gross (1967), and Steinheuer (1968). Solutions are presented for the incompressible laminar boundary-layer equations in the absence and the presence of the load parameter, and for the pressure gradient parameter for flow separation

  11. Topologically nontrivial quantum layers

    Carron, G.; Exner, P.; Krejcirik, D.

    2004-01-01

    Given a complete noncompact surface Σ embedded in R 3 , we consider the Dirichlet Laplacian in the layer Ω that is defined as a tubular neighborhood of constant width about Σ. Using an intrinsic approach to the geometry of Ω, we generalize the spectral results of the original paper by Duclos et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 223, 13 (2001)] to the situation when Σ does not possess poles. This enables us to consider topologically more complicated layers and state new spectral results. In particular, we are interested in layers built over surfaces with handles or several cylindrically symmetric ends. We also discuss more general regions obtained by compact deformations of certain Ω

  12. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma; Deposition assistee par un plasma a arc a haut courant continu de couches minces de Nitrure de Bore et de Silicium microcristallin hydrogene

    Franz, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 {sup o}C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 1'}3 cm{sup -3}. For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind

  13. Arctic Mixed Layer Dynamics

    Morison, James

    2003-01-01

    .... Over the years we have sought to understand the heat and mass balance of the mixed layer, marginal ice zone processes, the Arctic internal wave and mixing environment, summer and winter leads, and convection...

  14. Layered inorganic solids

    Čejka, Jiří; Morris, R. E.; Nachtigall, P.; Roth, Wieslaw Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10274-10275 ISSN 1477-9226 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : layered inorganic solids * physical chemistry * catalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  15. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  16. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  17. The theory of double layers

    Schamel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical and in some degree laboratory experiments suggest the existence of at least two different kinds of time-independent double layers: a strictly monotonic transition of the electrostatic potential and a transition accompanied by a negative spike at the low potential side (ion acoustic DL). An interpretation of both is presented in terms of analytic BGK modes. The first class of DLs commonly observed in voltage- or beam-driven plasmas needs for its existence beam-type distributions satisfying a Bohm criterion. The potential drop is at least of the order of Tsub(e), and stability arguments favour currents which satisfy the Langmuir condition. The second class found in current-driven plasma simulations is correlated with ion holes. This latter kind of nonlinear wave-solutions is linearly based on the slow ion-acoustic mode and exists due to a vortex-like distortion of the ion distribution in the thermal range. During the growth of an ion hole which is triggered by ion-acoustic fluctuations, the partial reflection of streaming electrons causes different plasma states on both sides of the potential dip and makes the ion hole asymmetric giving rise to an effective potential drop. This implies that the amplitude of this second type of double layers has an upper limit of 1-2 Tsub(e) and presumes a temperature ratio of Tsub(e)/Tsub(i) > or approximately 3 in coincidence with the numerical results. (Auth.)

  18. Experiments on ion acoustic typed double layers

    Chan, C.; Cho, M.H.; Intrator, T.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of small amplitude double layers with potential drops the order of the electron temperature, was examined experimentally by pulsing a grid and thereby changing the electron drift across the target chamber of a triple plasma device. The rarefactive part of a long wavelength, low frequency ion wave grew in amplitude due to the presence of slowly drifting electrons. The corresponding current limitation led to the formation of the double layers. Depending on the plasma conditions, the asymmetric double layers either transform into a weak monotonic layer, a propagating shock, or a series of rarefactive solitary pulses. The rarefactive pulses propagate with Mach number less than one and resemble solitary plasma holes with density cavities in both the electron and the ion density profiles

  19. Electric fields and field-aligned current generation in the magnetosphere

    Alexeev, I.I.; Belenkaya, E.S.; Kalegaev, V.V.; Lyutov, Yu.G.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present a calculation of the electric potential, field-aligned currents, and plasma convection caused by the penetration of the solar wind electric field into the magnetosphere. Ohm's law and the continuity equation of ionospheric currents are used. It is shown that the large-scale convection system is reversed in the plasma sheet flanks. In this region the plasma flow is antisunward earthward of the neutral line and sunward tailward of it. The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B z dependences on the dimension of the magnetopause open-quotes windowsclose quotes which are intersected by open field lines, on the potential drop across the polar cap, and on the distance to the neutral line are determined. Because of the IMF effect and the effect of seasonal or daily variations of the geomagnetic field which violate its symmetry relative to the equatorial plane, there may arise a potential drop along field lines which causes field-aligned currents. The values and directions of these currents, the field-aligned potential drop, and a self-consistent solution for the potential at the ionosphere level for high field-aligned conductivity have been determined. 41 refs., 7 figs

  20. Alfven Wave Reflection Model of Field-Aligned Currents at Mercury

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.; Slavin, James

    2010-01-01

    An Alfven Wave Reflection (AWR) model is proposed that provides closure for strong field-aligned currents (FACs) driven by the magnetopause reconnection in the magnetospheres of planets having no significant ionospheric and surface electrical conductance. The model is based on properties of the Alfven waves, generated at high altitudes and reflected from the low-conductivity surface of the planet. When magnetospheric convection is very slow, the incident and reflected Alfven waves propagate along approximately the same path. In this case, the net field-aligned currents will be small. However, as the convection speed increases. the reflected wave is displaced relatively to the incident wave so that the incident and reflected waves no longer compensate each other. In this case, the net field-aligned current may be large despite the lack of significant ionospheric and surface conductivity. Our estimate shows that for typical solar wind conditions at Mercury, the magnitude of Region 1-type FACs in Mercury's magnetosphere may reach hundreds of kilo-Amperes. This AWR model of field-aligned currents may provide a solution to the long-standing problem of the closure of FACs in the Mercury's magnetosphere. c2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetospheric Multiscale Satellites Observations of Parallel Electric Fields Associated with Magnetic Reconnection

    Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K. A.; Wilder, F. D.; Holmes, J. C.; Stawarz, J. E.; Eriksson, S.; Sturner, A. P.; Malaspina, D. M.; Usanova, M. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Burch, J. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Hesse, M.; Chen, L. J.; Lapenta, G.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F. S.; Drake, J.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Nakamura, R.; Marklund, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale satellites of parallel electric fields (E∥ ) associated with magnetic reconnection in the subsolar region of the Earth's magnetopause. E∥ events near the electron diffusion region have amplitudes on the order of 100 mV /m , which are significantly larger than those predicted for an antiparallel reconnection electric field. This Letter addresses specific types of E∥ events, which appear as large-amplitude, near unipolar spikes that are associated with tangled, reconnected magnetic fields. These E∥ events are primarily in or near a current layer near the separatrix and are interpreted to be double layers that may be responsible for secondary reconnection in tangled magnetic fields or flux ropes. These results are telling of the three-dimensional nature of magnetopause reconnection and indicate that magnetopause reconnection may be often patchy and/or drive turbulence along the separatrix that results in flux ropes and/or tangled magnetic fields.

  2. Graded Recombination Layers for Multijunction Photovoltaics

    Koleilat, Ghada I.

    2012-06-13

    Multijunction devices consist of a stack of semiconductor junctions having bandgaps tuned across a broad spectrum. In solar cells this concept is used to increase the efficiency of photovoltaic harvesting, while light emitters and detectors use it to achieve multicolor and spectrally tunable behavior. In series-connected current-matched multijunction devices, the recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We recently reported a tandem solar cell in which the recombination layer was implemented using a progression of n-type oxides whose doping densities and work functions serve to connect, with negligible resistive loss at solar current densities, the constituent cells. Here we present the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We report the number of interlayers and the requirements on work function and doping of each interlayer, to bridge an work function difference as high as 1.6 eV. We also find solutions that minimize the doping required of the interlayers in order to minimize optical absorption due to free carriers in the graded recombination layer (GRL). We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the interlayers. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Temperature manipulation during layer chick embryogenesis

    Walstra, I.; Napel, ten J.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of temperature manipulation (TM) during late embryogenesis on temperature preference, response to high environmental temperature, behavior, and performance in young layer chicks. Control (CC) embryos (n = 96) were incubated at 37.8°C eggshell temperature

  4. Stability of mixing layers

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  5. Three-layer magnetoconvection

    Lin, M.-K.; Silvers, L.J.; Proctor, M.R.E.

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that some stars have two or more convection zones in close proximity near to the stellar photosphere. These zones are separated by convectively stable regions that are relatively narrow. Due to the close proximity of these regions it is important to construct mathematical models to understand the transport and mixing of passive and dynamic quantities. One key quantity of interest is a magnetic field, a dynamic vector quantity, that can drastically alter the convectively driven flows, and have an important role in coupling the different layers. In this Letter we present the first investigation into the effect of an imposed magnetic field in such a geometry. We focus our attention on the effect of field strength and show that, while there are some similarities with results for magnetic field evolution in a single layer, new and interesting phenomena are also present in a three layer system

  6. Layered tin dioxide microrods

    Duan Junhong; Huang Hongbo; Gong Jiangfeng; Zhao Xiaoning; Cheng Guangxu; Yang Shaoguang

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline layered SnO 2 microrods were synthesized by a simple tin-water reaction at 900 deg. C. The structural and optical properties of the sample were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies and selected area electron diffraction patterns revealed that the layered SnO 2 microrods are single crystalline and their growth direction is along [1 1 0]. The growth mechanism of the microrods was proposed based on SEM, TEM characterization and thermodynamic analysis. It is deduced that the layered microrods grow by the stacking of SnO 2 sheets with a (1 1 0) surface in a vapour-liquid-solid process. Three emission peaks at 523, 569 and 626 nm were detected in room-temperature PL measurements

  7. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  8. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  9. Energy efficient three-layer panels and elastic compliance of their middle layer

    Petrov Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-layer panels are referred to light weight energy efficient building envelopes. According to current trends, mineral wool from basalt fiber is preferable to be used as panels middle layer. All three-layers of the construction together account for mechanical properties, though these layers taken separately have very different mechanical properties. The work of such a composite design has a number of features that require careful consideration when calculating the panels for strength. Thus, it has not yet been described how squeeze reduction of a relatively soft middle layer affects the load bearing capacity of a panel. When panels are exposed to external loads, their middle layer is squeezed thus changing the characteristics of the panel. This effect is particularly evident in supporting structures. Besides, squeeze reduction of the middle layer changes its elastic-plastic propeties. The purpose of this work is to study the effect of the middle layer of an energy efficient panel squeeze reduction on its load bearing capacity. When solving this task, the authors worked out a methodology which takes into account squeeze reduction of a middle layer and its effect on load bearing capacity of the panel. The researches introduced an algorithm for solving this task and created a tool that allows to easily receive the exact solution. The paper presents this methodology and describes a computer program for calculating three-layer panels with account of changing elastic compliance of a middle layer. The main result of the work is an extended methodology of calculation of the panels and an obtained engineering tool that allows to quickly obtain an extended solution.

  10. Geomagnetically Induced Currents Around the World During the 17 March 2015 Storm

    Carter, B. A.; Yizengaw, E.; Pradipta, R.; Weygand, J. M.; Piersanti, M.; Pulkkinen, Antti Aleksi; Moldwin, M. B.; Norman, R.; Zhang, K.

    2016-01-01

    Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) represent a significant space weather issue for power grid and pipeline infrastructure, particularly during severe geomagnetic storms. In this study, magnetometer data collected from around the world are analyzed to investigate the GICs caused by the 2015 St. Patricks Day storm. While significant GIC activity in the high-latitude regions due to storm time substorm activity is shown for this event, enhanced GIC activity was also measured at two equatorial stations in the American and Southeast Asian sectors. This equatorial GIC activity is closely examined, and it is shown that it is present both during the arrival of the interplanetary shock at the storm sudden commencement (SSC) in Southeast Asia and during the main phase of the storm approximately 10 h later in South America. The SSC caused magnetic field variations at the equator in Southeast Asia that were twice the magnitude of those observed only a few degrees to the north, strongly indicating that the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) played a significant role. The large equatorial magnetic field variations measured in South America are also examined, and the coincident solar wind data are used to investigate the causes of the sudden changes in the EEJ approximately 10 h into the storm. From this analysis it is concluded that sudden magnetopause current increases due to increases in the solarwind dynamic pressure, and the sudden changes in the resultant magnetospheric and ionospheric current systems, are the primary drivers of equatorial GICs.

  11. Thermionic detector with multiple layered ionization source

    Patterson, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for analyzing specific chemical substances in a gaseous environment comprises a thermionic source formed of multiple layers of ceramic material composition, an electrical current instrumentality for heating the thermionic source to operating temperatures in the range of 100 0 C. to 1000 0 C., an instrumentality for exposing the surface of the thermionic source to contact with the specific chemical substances for the purpose of forming gas phase ionization of the substances by a process of electrical charge emission from the surface, a collector electrode disposed adjacent to the thermiomic source, an instrumentality for biasing the thermionic source at an electrical potential which causes the gas phase ions to move toward the collector, and an instrumentality for measuring the ion current arriving at the collector. The thermionic source is constructed of a metallic heater element molded inside a sub-layer of hardened ceramic cement material impregnated with a metallic compound additive which is non-corrosive to the heater element during operation. The sub-layer is further covered by a surface-layer formed of hardened ceramic cement material impregnated with an alkali metal compound in a manner that eliminates corrosive contact of the alkali compounds with the heater element. The sub-layer further protects the heater element from contact with gas environments which may be corrosive. The specific ionization of different chemical substances is varied over a wide range by changing the composition and temperature of the thermionic source, and by changing the composition of the gas environment

  12. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    Wang, Qingwu [Chelmsford, MA; Li, Wenguang [Andover, MA; Jiang, Hua [Methuen, MA

    2012-01-03

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  13. Evidence for Bulk Ripplocations in Layered Solids

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew C.; Griggs, Justin; Taheri, Mitra L.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-09-01

    Plastically anisotropic/layered solids are ubiquitous in nature and understanding how they deform is crucial in geology, nuclear engineering, microelectronics, among other fields. Recently, a new defect termed a ripplocation-best described as an atomic scale ripple-was proposed to explain deformation in two-dimensional solids. Herein, we leverage atomistic simulations of graphite to extend the ripplocation idea to bulk layered solids, and confirm that it is essentially a buckling phenomenon. In contrast to dislocations, bulk ripplocations have no Burgers vector and no polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted to other ripplocations, both within the same, and on adjacent layers, the latter resulting in kink boundaries. Furthermore, we present transmission electron microscopy evidence consistent with the existence of bulk ripplocations in Ti3SiC2. Ripplocations are a topological imperative, as they allow atomic layers to glide relative to each other without breaking the in-plane bonds. A more complete understanding of their mechanics and behavior is critically important, and could profoundly influence our current understanding of how graphite, layered silicates, the MAX phases, and many other plastically anisotropic/layered solids, deform and accommodate strain.

  14. Surface layer effects on waste glass corrosion

    Feng, X.

    1993-01-01

    Water contact subjects waste glass to chemical attack that results in the formation of surface alteration layers. Two principal hypotheses have been advanced concerning the effect of surface alteration layers on continued glass corrosion: (1) they act as a mass transport barrier and (2) they influence the chemical affinity of the glass reaction. In general, transport barrier effects have been found to be less important than affinity effects in the corrosion of most high-level nuclear waste glasses. However, they can be important under some circumstances, for example, in a very alkaline solution, in leachants containing Mg ions, or under conditions where the matrix dissolution rate is very low. The latter suggests that physical barrier effect may affect the long-term glass dissolution rate. Surface layers influence glass reaction affinity through the effects of the altered glass and secondary phases on the solution chemistry. The reaction affinity may be controlled by various precipitates and crystalline phases, amorphous silica phases, gel layer, or all the components of the glass. The surface alteration layers influence radionuclide release mainly through colloid formation, crystalline phase incorporation, and gel layer retention. This paper reviews current understanding and uncertainties

  15. Problems of matter-antimatter boundary layers

    Lehnert, B.

    1975-01-01

    This paper outlines the problems of the quasi-steady matter-antimatter boundary layers discussed in Klein-Alfven's cosmological theory, and a crude model of the corresponding ambiplasma balance is presented: (i) at interstellar particle densities, no well-defined boundary layer can exist in presence of neutral gas, nor can such a layer be sustained in an unmagnetized fully ionized ambiplasma. (ii) Within the limits of applicability of the present model, sharply defined boundary layers are under certain conditions found to exist in a magnetized ambiplasma. Thus, at beta values less than unity, a steep pressure drop of the low-energy components of matter and antimatter can be balanced by a magnetic field and the electric currents in the ambiplasma. (iii) The boundary layer thickness is of the order of 2x 0 approximately 10/BT 0 sup(1/4) meters, where B is the magnetic field strength in MKS units and T 0 the characteristic temperature of the low-energy components in the layer. (Auth.)

  16. On the porosity of barrier layers

    J. Mignot

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Barrier layers are defined as the layer between the pycnocline and the thermocline when the latter are different as a result of salinity stratification. We present a revisited 2-degree resolution global climatology of monthly mean oceanic Barrier Layer (BL thickness first proposed by de Boyer Montégut et al. (2007. In addition to using an extended data set, we present a modified computation method that addresses the observed porosity of BLs. We name porosity the fact that barrier layers distribution can, in some areas, be very uneven regarding the space and time scales that are considered. This implies an intermittent alteration of air-sea exchanges by the BL. Therefore, it may have important consequences for the climatic impact of BLs. Differences between the two computation methods are small for robust BLs that are formed by large-scale processes. However, the former approach can significantly underestimate the thickness of short and/or localized barrier layers. This is especially the case for barrier layers formed by mesoscale mechanisms (under the intertropical convergence zone for example and along western boundary currents and equatorward of the sea surface salinity subtropical maxima. Complete characterisation of regional BL dynamics therefore requires a description of the robustness of BL distribution to assess the overall impact of BLs on the process of heat exchange between the ocean interior and the atmosphere.

  17. Physical layer network coding

    Fukui, Hironori; Popovski, Petar; Yomo, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has been proposed to improve throughput of the two-way relay channel, where two nodes communicate with each other, being assisted by a relay node. Most of the works related to PLNC are focused on a simple three-node model and they do not take into account...

  18. Thin layer activation

    Schweickert, H.; Fehsenfeld, P.

    1995-01-01

    The reliability of industrial equip ment is substantially influenced by wear and corrosion; monitoring can prevent accidents and avoid down-time. One powerful tool is thin layer activation analysis (TLA) using accelerator systems. The information is used to improve mechanical design and material usage; the technology is used by many large companies, particularly in the automotive industry, e.g. Daimler Benz. A critical area of a machine component receives a thin layer of radioactivity by irradiation with charged particles from an accelerator - usually a cyclotron. The radioactivity can be made homogeneous by suitable selection of particle, beam energy and angle of incidence. Layer thickness can be varied from 20 microns to around 1 mm with different depth distributions; the position and size of the wear zone can be set to within 0.1 mm. The machine is then reassembled and operated so that wear can be measured. An example is a combustion engine comprising piston ring, cylinder wall, cooling water jacket and housing wall, where wear measurements on the cylinder wall are required in a critical zone around the dead-point of the piston ring. Proton beam bombardment creates a radioactive layer whose thickness is known accurately, and characteristic gamma radiation from this radioactive zone penetrates through the engine and is detected externally. Measurements can be made either of the activity removed from the surface, or of the (reduced) residual activity; wear measurement of the order of 10 -9 metres is possible

  19. Our Shrinking Ozone Layer

    Depletion of the ozone layer is therefore having significant effects on life on .... but there is always a net balance between the rate of formation and destruction ..... award of Commonwealth Fellowship during the present work and also being an ...

  20. Layer-Cake Earth

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  1. Layered double hydroxides

    López Rayo, Sandra; Imran, Ahmad; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2017-01-01

    A novel zinc (Zn) fertilizer concept based on Zn doped layered double hydroxides (Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs) has been investigated. Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs were synthetized, their chemical composition was analyzed and their nutrient release was studied in buffered solutions with different pH values. Uptake...

  2. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  3. Superconductivity in Layered Organic Metals

    Jochen Wosnitza

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this short review, I will give an overview on the current understanding of the superconductivity in quasi-two-dimensional organic metals. Thereby, I will focus on charge-transfer salts based on bis(ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (BEDT-TTF or ET for short. In these materials, strong electronic correlations are clearly evident, resulting in unique phase diagrams. The layered crystallographic structure leads to highly anisotropic electronic as well as superconducting properties. The corresponding very high orbital critical field for in-plane magnetic-field alignment allows for the occurrence of the Fulde–Ferrell– Larkin–Ovchinnikov state as evidenced by thermodynamic measurements. The experimental picture on the nature of the superconducting state is still controversial with evidence both for unconventional as well as for BCS-like superconductivity.

  4. Characterization of ion implanted silicon by the electrolytic reverse current

    Hueller, J.; Pham, M.T.

    1977-01-01

    The current voltage behaviour of ion implanted silicon electrodes in HF electrolyte is investigated. The electrolytic reverse current, i.e. the reaction rate of the minority carrier limited reactions is found to increase. The current increase depends on the implanted dose and layer stripping. Reason for the increased reverse current can be referred to radiation damage acting as generation centres for minority carriers. Measurement of the electrolytic reverse current can be used for determining damage profiles. Layer stripping is carried out by anodic dissolution in the same electrolyte. The sensitivity of this new method for characterizing ion implanted silicon layers lies at 10 11 to 10 12 atoms/cm 2 . (author)

  5. Energy from streaming current and potential

    Olthuis, Wouter; Schippers, Bob; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-01-01

    It is investigated how much energy can be delivered by a streaming current source. A streaming current and subsequent streaming potential originate when double layer charge is transported by hydrodynamic flow. Theory and a network model of such a source is presented and initial experimental results

  6. On the formation of current ripples

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Flemming, Burg W.

    2015-01-01

    such an explanation based on a virtual boundary layer concept, and present a model predicting ripple height on the basis of grain size, current velocity and water depth. The model contradicts the conventional view of current ripples as bedforms not scaling with flow depth. Furthermore, it confirms the dependence...

  7. Peeling Back the Layers

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols. Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed. Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers. The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior. The Mazatzal targets were named after the home states of

  8. Bifurcation of Jovian magnetotail current sheet

    P. L. Israelevich

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple crossings of the magnetotail current sheet by a single spacecraft give the possibility to distinguish between two types of electric current density distribution: single-peaked (Harris type current layer and double-peaked (bifurcated current sheet. Magnetic field measurements in the Jovian magnetic tail by Voyager-2 reveal bifurcation of the tail current sheet. The electric current density possesses a minimum at the point of the Bx-component reversal and two maxima at the distance where the magnetic field strength reaches 50% of its value in the tail lobe.

  9. Bifurcation of Jovian magnetotail current sheet

    P. L. Israelevich

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple crossings of the magnetotail current sheet by a single spacecraft give the possibility to distinguish between two types of electric current density distribution: single-peaked (Harris type current layer and double-peaked (bifurcated current sheet. Magnetic field measurements in the Jovian magnetic tail by Voyager-2 reveal bifurcation of the tail current sheet. The electric current density possesses a minimum at the point of the Bx-component reversal and two maxima at the distance where the magnetic field strength reaches 50% of its value in the tail lobe.

  10. Physical Layer Network Coding

    Fukui, Hironori; Yomo, Hironori; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    of interfering nodes and usage of spatial reservation mechanisms. Specifically, we introduce a reserved area in order to protect the nodes involved in two-way relaying from the interference caused by neighboring nodes. We analytically derive the end-to-end rate achieved by PLNC considering the impact......Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has the potential to improve throughput of multi-hop networks. However, most of the works are focused on the simple, three-node model with two-way relaying, not taking into account the fact that there can be other neighboring nodes that can cause....../receive interference. The way to deal with this problem in distributed wireless networks is usage of MAC-layer mechanisms that make a spatial reservation of the shared wireless medium, similar to the well-known RTS/CTS in IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. In this paper, we investigate two-way relaying in presence...

  11. Crack layer theory

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  12. Gravitational double layers

    Senovilla, José M M

    2014-01-01

    I analyze the properties of thin shells through which the scalar curvature R is discontinuous in gravity theories with Lagrangian F(R) = R − 2Λ + αR 2 on the bulk. These shells/domain walls are of a new kind because they possess, in addition to the standard energy–momentum tensor, an external energy flux vector, an external scalar pressure/tension and, most exotic of all, another energy–momentum contribution resembling classical dipole distributions on a shell: a double layer. I prove that all these contributions are necessary to make the entire energy–momentum tensor divergence-free. This is the first known occurrence of such a type of double layer in a gravity theory. I present explicit examples in constant-curvature five-dimensional bulks, with a brief study of their properties: new physical behaviors arise. (fast track communications)

  13. Boundary-layer theory

    Schlichting (Deceased), Hermann

    2017-01-01

    This new edition of the near-legendary textbook by Schlichting and revised by Gersten presents a comprehensive overview of boundary-layer theory and its application to all areas of fluid mechanics, with particular emphasis on the flow past bodies (e.g. aircraft aerodynamics). The new edition features an updated reference list and over 100 additional changes throughout the book, reflecting the latest advances on the subject.

  14. Forced current sheet structure, formation and evolution: application to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere

    V. I. Domrin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available By means of a simulation model, the earlier predicted nonlinear kinetic structure, a Forced Kinetic Current Sheet (FKCS, with extremely anisotropic ion distributions, is shown to appear as a result of a fast nonlinear process of transition from a previously existing equilibrium. This occurs under triggering action of a weak MHD disturbance that is applied at the boundary of the simulation box. In the FKCS, current is carried by initially cold ions which are brought into the CS by convection from both sides, and accelerated inside the CS. The process then appears to be spontaneously self-sustained, as a MHD disturbance of a rarefaction wave type propagates over the background plasma outside the CS. Comparable to the Alfvénic discontinuity in MHD, transformation of electromagnetic energy into the energy of plasma flows occurs at the FKCS. But unlike the MHD case, ``free" energy is produced here: dissipation should occur later, through particle interaction with turbulent waves generated by unstable ion distribution being formed by the FKCS action. In this way, an effect of magnetic field ``annihilation" appears, required for fast magnetic reconnection. Application of the theory to observations at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail is considered.

  15. Barrier layer arrangement for conductive layers on silicon substrates

    Hung, L.S.; Agostinelli, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a circuit element comprised of a silicon substrate and a conductive layer located on the substrate. It is characterized in that the conductive layer consists essentially of a rare earth alkaline earth copper oxide and a barrier layer triad is interposed between the silicon substrate and the conductive layer comprised of a first triad layer located adjacent the silicon substrate consisting essentially of silica, a third triad layer remote from the silicon substrate consisting essentially of a least one Group 4 heavy metal oxide, and a second triad layer interposed between the first and third triad layers consisting essentially of a mixture of silica and at lease one Group 4 heavy metal oxide

  16. Low-latitude boundary layer near noon: An open field line model

    Lyons, L. R.; Schulz, M.; Pridmore-Brown, D. C.; Roeder, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    We propose that many features of the cusp and low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) observed near noon MLT can be explained by interpreting the LLBL as being on open lines with an inner boundary at the separatrix between open and closed magnetic field lines. This interpretation places the poleward boundary of the LLBL and equatorward boundary of the cusp along the field line that bifurcates at the cusp neutral point. The interpretation accounts for the abrupt boundary of magnetosheath particles at the inner edge of the LLBL, a feature that is inconsistent with LLBL formation by diffusion onto closed field lines, and for the distribution of magnetosheath particles appearing more as one continuous region than as two distinct regions across the noon cusp/LLBL boundary. Furthermore, we can explain the existence of energetic radiation belt electrons and protons with differing pitch angle distributions within the LLBL and their abrupt cutoff at the poleward boundary of the LLBL. By modeling the LLBL and cusp region quantitatively, we can account for a hemispherical difference in the location of the equatorial boundary of the cusp that is observed to be dependent on the dipole tilt angle but not on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) x component. We also find important variations and hemispherical differences in that the size of the LLBL that should depend strongly upon the x component of the IMF. This prediction is observationally testable. Finally, we find that when the IMF is strongly northward, the LLBL may include a narrow region adjacent to the magnetopause where field lines are detached (i.e., have both ends connected to the IMF).

  17. Free double layers in mercury-arc discharges

    Maciel, H.S.; Allen, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been carried out of free double layers formed within the plasma volume of a low-pressure mercury-arc discharge at high current densities. The free double layer is observed to form as a visible boundary, which drifts slowly from the central section of the discharge. Current-driven instabilities are observed as the discharge current is gradually increased to a critical value, at which current limitation is observed to occur. This process, which is accompanied by high-current spikes, ceases when the free double layer becomes visible as a sharp boundary dividing the discharge column into two regions of different luminosities. The layer is observed to form in the later stages of current limitation, the onset of which occurs for a ratio of drift to thermal speed of electrons of about unity. Electrical energy is converted by the layer into kinetic energy of the changed particles. Accordingly high-energy ions were measured by means of an electrostatic energy analyser. The multiple-sheath character of the free 'double layer'', which is inferred from probe measurements of potential profiles, is discussed and comparisons with other space-charge structures with the same topology are made. (author)

  18. State diagram of spin-torque oscillator with perpendicular reference layer and planar field generation layer

    Mengwei Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The state diagram of spin-torque oscillator (STO with perpendicular reference layer (REF and planar field generation layer (FGL was studied by a macrospin model and a micro-magnetic model. The state diagrams are calculated versus the current density, external field and external field angle. It was found that the oscillation in FGL could be controlled by current density combined with external field so as to achieve a wide frequency range. An optimized current and applied field region was given for microwave assisted magnetic recording (MAMR, considering both frequency and output field oscillation amplitude. The results of the macro-spin model were compared with those of the micro-magnetic model. The macro-spin model was qualitatively different from micro-magnetics and experimental results when the current density was large and the FGL was non-uniform.

  19. Macular Choroidal Small-Vessel Layer, Sattler's Layer and Haller's Layer Thicknesses: The Beijing Eye Study.

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Ya Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Wen Bin; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B

    2018-03-13

    To study macular choroidal layer thickness, 3187 study participants from the population-based Beijing Eye Study underwent spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with enhanced depth imaging for thickness measurements of the macular small-vessel layer, including the choriocapillaris, medium-sized choroidal vessel layer (Sattler's layer) and large choroidal vessel layer (Haller's layer). In multivariate analysis, greater thickness of all three choroidal layers was associated (all P  0.05) associated with the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy. There was a tendency (0.07 > P > 0.02) toward thinner choroidal layers in chronic angle-closure glaucoma. The ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness increased (P layer and Haller's layer thickness to total choroidal thickness decreased. A higher ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of AMD (early type, intermediate type, late geographic type). Axial elongation-associated and aging-associated choroidal thinning affected Haller's and Sattler's layers more markedly than the small-vessel layer. Non-exudative and exudative AMD, except for geographic atrophy, was associated with slightly increased choroidal thickness.

  20. Establishment of the Vertebrate Germ Layers.

    Tseng, Wei-Chia; Munisha, Mumingjiang; Gutierrez, Juan B; Dougan, Scott T

    2017-01-01

    The process of germ layer formation is a universal feature of animal development. The germ layers separate the cells that produce the internal organs and tissues from those that produce the nervous system and outer tissues. Their discovery in the early nineteenth century transformed embryology from a purely descriptive field into a rigorous scientific discipline, in which hypotheses could be tested by observation and experimentation. By systematically addressing the questions of how the germ layers are formed and how they generate overall body plan, scientists have made fundamental contributions to the fields of evolution, cell signaling, morphogenesis, and stem cell biology. At each step, this work was advanced by the development of innovative methods of observing cell behavior in vivo and in culture. Here, we take an historical approach to describe our current understanding of vertebrate germ layer formation as it relates to the long-standing questions of developmental biology. By comparing how germ layers form in distantly related vertebrate species, we find that highly conserved molecular pathways can be adapted to perform the same function in dramatically different embryonic environments.