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Sample records for magnetoencephalography multipolar modeling

  1. MEG (Magnetoencephalography) multipolar modeling of distributed sources using RAP-MUSIC (Recursively Applied and Projected Multiple Signal Characterization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J. C. (John C.); Baillet, S. (Sylvain); Jerbi, K. (Karim); Leahy, R. M. (Richard M.)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the use of truncated multipolar expansions for producing dynamic images of cortical neural activation from measurements of the magnetoencephalogram. We use a signal-subspace method to find the locations of a set of multipolar sources, each of which represents a region of activity in the cerebral cortex. Our method builds up an estimate of the sources in a recursive manner, i.e. we first search for point current dipoles, then magnetic dipoles, and finally first order multipoles. The dynamic behavior of these sources is then computed using a linear fit to the spatiotemporal data. The final step in the procedure is to map each of the multipolar sources into an equivalent distributed source on the cortical surface. The method is illustrated through an application to epileptic interictal MEG data.

  2. On MEG forward modelling using multipolar expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerbi, K. [Signal and Image Processing Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain Imaging Laboratory, Hopital de la Salpetiere, CNRS, Paris (France); Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baillet, S. [Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain Imaging Laboratory, Hopital de la Salpetiere, CNRS, Paris (France); Leahy, R.M. [Signal and Image Processing Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)]. E-mail: leahy@sipi.usc.edu

    2002-02-21

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a non-invasive functional imaging modality based on the measurement of the external magnetic field produced by neural current sources within the brain. The reconstruction of the underlying sources is a severely ill-posed inverse problem typically tackled using either low-dimensional parametric source models, such as an equivalent current dipole (ECD), or high-dimensional minimum-norm imaging techniques. The inability of the ECD to properly represent non-focal sources and the over-smoothed solutions obtained by minimum-norm methods underline the need for an alternative approach. Multipole expansion methods have the advantages of the parametric approach while at the same time adequately describing sources with significant spatial extent and arbitrary activation patterns. In this paper we first present a comparative review of spherical harmonic and Cartesian multipole expansion methods that can be used in MEG. The equations are given for the general case of arbitrary conductors and realistic sensor configurations and also for the special cases of spherically symmetric conductors and radially oriented sensors. We then report the results of computer simulations used to investigate the ability of a first-order multipole model (dipole and quadrupole) to represent spatially extended sources, which are simulated by 2D and 3D clusters of elemental dipoles. The overall field of a cluster is analysed using singular value decomposition and compared to the unit fields of a multipole, centred in the middle of the cluster, using subspace correlation metrics. Our results demonstrate the superior utility of the multipolar source model over ECD models in providing source representations of extended regions of activity. (author)

  3. Magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Lurie Family Foundations MEG Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Edgar, J.C.; Gaetz, William C.; Roberts, Timothy P.L. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Lurie Family Foundations MEG Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) may not be familiar to many pediatric radiologists, it is an increasingly available neuroimaging technique both for evaluating normal and abnormal intracranial neural activity and for functional mapping. By providing spatial, temporal, and time-frequency spectral information, MEG affords patients with epilepsy, intracranial neoplasia, and vascular malformations an opportunity for a sensitive and accurate non-invasive preoperative evaluation. This technique can optimize selection of surgical candidates as well as increase confidence in preoperative counseling and prognosis. Research applications that appear promising for near-future clinical translation include the evaluation of children with autism spectrum disorder, traumatic brain injury, and schizophrenia. (orig.)

  4. Magnetoencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although magnetoencephalography (MEG) may not be familiar to many pediatric radiologists, it is an increasingly available neuroimaging technique both for evaluating normal and abnormal intracranial neural activity and for functional mapping. By providing spatial, temporal, and time-frequency spectral information, MEG affords patients with epilepsy, intracranial neoplasia, and vascular malformations an opportunity for a sensitive and accurate non-invasive preoperative evaluation. This technique can optimize selection of surgical candidates as well as increase confidence in preoperative counseling and prognosis. Research applications that appear promising for near-future clinical translation include the evaluation of children with autism spectrum disorder, traumatic brain injury, and schizophrenia. (orig.)

  5. Bremsstrahlung during $\\alpha$-decay: quantum multipolar model

    CERN Document Server

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the improved multipolar model of bremsstrahlung accompanied the $\\alpha$-decay is presented. The angular formalism of calculations of the matrix elements, being enough complicated component of the model, is stated in details. A new definition of the angular (differential) probability of the photon emission in the $\\alpha$-decay is proposed where direction of motion of the $\\alpha$-particle outside (with its tunneling inside barrier) is defined on the basis of angular distribution of its spacial wave function. In such approach, the model gives values of the angular probability of the photons emission in absolute scale, without its normalization on experimental data. Effectiveness of the proposed definition and accuracy of the spectra calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are analyzed in their comparison with experimental data for the $^{210}{\\rm Po}$, $^{214}{\\rm Po}$, $^{226}{\\rm Ra}$ and $^{244}{\\rm Cm}$ nuclei, and for some other nuclei predictions are performed (in absolute scale). With ...

  6. A wind-shell interaction model for multipolar planetary nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, W; Esquivel, A; Garcia-Segura, G; Garcia-Diaz, Ma T; Lopez, J A; Magnor, M

    2013-01-01

    We explore the formation of multipolar structures in planetary and pre-planetary nebulae from the interaction of a fast post-AGB wind with a highly inhomogeneous and filamentary shell structure assumed to form during the final phase of the high density wind. The simulations were performed with a new hydrodynamics code integrated in the interactive framework of the astrophysical modeling package SHAPE. In contrast to conventional astrophysical hydrodynamics software, the new code does not require any programming intervention by the user for setting up or controlling the code. Visualization and analysis of the simulation data has been done in SHAPE without external software. The key conclusion from the simulations is that secondary lobes in planetary nebulae, such as Hubble 5 and K3-17, can be formed through the interaction of a fast low-density wind with a complex high density environment, such as a filamentary circumstellar shell. The more complicated alternative explanation of intermittent collimated outflow...

  7. Ellipsoidal head model for fetal magnetoencephalography: forward and inverse solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, David [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan St (M/C 063), Chicago, IL 60607-7053 (United States); Nehorai, Arye [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan St (M/C 063), Chicago, IL 60607-7053 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 S. Morgan St, 1120 SEO (M/C 154), Chicago, IL 60607-7053 (United States); Preissl, Hubert [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); MEG-Center, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, 72206 (Germany)

    2005-05-07

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is a non-invasive technique where measurements of the magnetic field outside the maternal abdomen are used to infer the source location and signals of the fetus' neural activity. There are a number of aspects related to fMEG modelling that must be addressed, such as the conductor volume, fetal position and orientation, gestation period, etc. We propose a solution to the forward problem of fMEG based on an ellipsoidal head geometry. This model has the advantage of highlighting special characteristics of the field that are inherent to the anisotropy of the human head, such as the spread and orientation of the field in relationship with the localization and position of the fetal head. Our forward solution is presented in the form of a kernel matrix that facilitates the solution of the inverse problem through decoupling of the dipole localization parameters from the source signals. Then, we use this model and the maximum likelihood technique to solve the inverse problem assuming the availability of measurements from multiple trials. The applicability and performance of our methods are illustrated through numerical examples based on a real 151-channel SQUID fMEG measurement system (SARA). SARA is an MEG system especially designed for fetal assessment and is currently used for heart and brain studies. Finally, since our model requires knowledge of the best-fitting ellipsoid's centre location and semiaxes lengths, we propose a method for estimating these parameters through a least-squares fit on anatomical information obtained from three-dimensional ultrasound images.

  8. Practical and Simple Wireless Channel Models for Use in Multipolarized Antenna Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KwangHyun Jeon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The next-generation wireless systems are expected to support data rates of more than 100 Mbps in outdoor environments. In order to support such large payloads, a polarized antenna may be employed as one of the candidate technologies. Recently, the third generation partnership standards bodies (3GPP/3GPP2 have defined a cross-polarized channel model in SCM-E for MIMO systems; however, this model is quite complex since it considers a great many channel-related parameters. Furthermore, the SCM-E channel model combines the channel coefficients of all the polarization links into one complex output, making it impossible to exploit the MIMO spatial multiplexing or diversity gains in the case of employing polarized antenna at transmitter and receiver side. In this paper, we present practical and simple 2D and 3D multipolarized multipath channel models, which take into account both the cross-polarization discrimination (XPD and the Rician factor. After verifying the proposed channel models, the BER and PER performances and throughput using the EGC and MRC combining techniques are evaluated in multipolarized antenna systems.

  9. Forward model theoretical basis for a superconducting imaging surface magnetoencephalography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharajh, K [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Volegov, P L [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kraus, R H [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2004-02-21

    A novel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system was designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that incorporates a helmet-shaped superconductor in order to increase the signal to noise ratio. The magnetic field perturbations caused by the superconducting surface must be included in the forward physics for accurate source localization. In this paper, the theoretical basis for the forward model that calculates the field of any magnetic source in the presence of an arbitrarily shaped superconducting surface is presented. Appropriate magnetic field integral equations are derived that provide a description of the physics of the forward model. These equations are derived starting from Maxwell's equations in the presence of inhomogeneous media, with the appropriate boundary conditions for a superconductor. A discretized version of this equation is then compared with known analytic solutions for simple superconducting surface geometries.

  10. Recovering experimental and theoretical electron densities in corundum using the multipolar model: IUCr Multipole Refinement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, S; Souhassou, M; Lecomte, C; Schwarz, K; Blaha, P; Rérat, M; Lichanot, A; Roversi, P

    2001-05-01

    This electron-density study on corundum (alpha-Al2O3) is part of the Multipole Refinement Project supported by the IUCr Commission on Charge, Spin and Momentum Densities. For this purpose, eight different data sets (two experimental and six theoretical) were chosen from which the electron density was derived by multipolar refinement (using the MOLLY program). The two experimental data sets were collected on a conventional CAD4 and at ESRF, ID11 with a CCD detector, respectively. The theoretical data sets consist of static, dynamic, static noisy and dynamic noisy moduli of structure factors calculated at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) levels. Comparisons of deformation and residual densities show that the multipolar analysis works satisfactorily but also indicate some drawbacks in the refinement. Some solutions and improvements during the refinements are proposed like contraction or expansion of the inner atomic shells or increasing the order of the spherical harmonic expansion.

  11. A Study on Decoding Models for the Reconstruction of Hand Trajectories from the Human Magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gi Yeom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decoding neural signals into control outputs has been a key to the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs. While many studies have identified neural correlates of kinematics or applied advanced machine learning algorithms to improve decoding performance, relatively less attention has been paid to optimal design of decoding models. For generating continuous movements from neural activity, design of decoding models should address how to incorporate movement dynamics into models and how to select a model given specific BCI objectives. Considering nonlinear and independent speed characteristics, we propose a hybrid Kalman filter to decode the hand direction and speed independently. We also investigate changes in performance of different decoding models (the linear and Kalman filters when they predict reaching movements only or predict both reach and rest. Our offline study on human magnetoencephalography (MEG during point-to-point arm movements shows that the performance of the linear filter or the Kalman filter is affected by including resting states for training and predicting movements. However, the hybrid Kalman filter consistently outperforms others regardless of movement states. The results demonstrate that better design of decoding models is achieved by incorporating movement dynamics into modeling or selecting a model according to decoding objectives.

  12. Libration driven multipolar instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Herreman, Wietze

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that...

  13. Evaluation of the solid state dipole moment and pyroelectric coefficient of phosphangulene by multipolar modeling of X-ray structure factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, G.K.H.; Krebs, Frederik C; Lebech, B.;

    2000-01-01

    The electron density distribution of the molecular pyroelectric material phosphangulene has been studied by multipolar modeling of X-ray diffraction data. The "in-crystal" molecular dipole moment has been evaluated to 4.7 D corresponding to a 42% dipole moment enhancement compared with the dipole...

  14. Multipolar nonlinear nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Daria

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear nanophotonics is a rapidly developing field with many useful applications for a design of nonlinear nanoantennas, light sources, nanolasers, sensors, and ultrafast miniature metadevices. A tight confinement of the local electromagnetic fields in resonant photonic nanostructures can boost nonlinear optical effects, thus offering versatile opportunities for subwavelength control of light. To achieve the desired functionalities, it is essential to gain flexible control over the near- and far-field properties of nanostructures. Thus, both modal and multipolar analyses are widely exploited for engineering nonlinear scattering from resonant nanoscale elements, in particular for enhancing the near-field interaction, tailoring the far-field multipolar interference, and optimization of the radiation directionality. Here, we review the recent advances in this recently emerged research field ranging from metallic structures exhibiting localized plasmonic resonances to hybrid metal-dielectric and all-dielectric...

  15. Radiative capture reactions and spectroscopy of multipolar anions in the framework of Gamow Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small open quantum systems, whose properties are profoundly affected by the environment of continuum states, are intensely studied in various fields of Physics: nuclear physics, atomic and molecular physics, quantum optics, etc. These different many-body systems, in spite of their specific features, have generic properties which are common to all weakly bound or unbound systems close to the threshold. Coupling to the continuum is essential to describe the low-energy nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, the formation of halo states in nuclei, atomic clusters and dipolar anions, or the near-threshold two neutron and alpha particle correlations (clustering). Recently, the open quantum system extension of the nuclear shell model, the Gamow shell model (GSM), based on the Berggren ensemble, has been applied successfully for the description of resonant states spectra in atomic nuclei. The coupled-channel formulation of the GSM (GSM-CC) allows to describe various low-energy nuclear reactions. In this work, the GSM-CC is formulated and applied for the description of proton/neutron radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest, such as: 17F(p, γ)18Ne, 7Be(p, γ)8B and 7Li(n, γ)8Li. Moreover, for the first time, the GSM has been applied in atomic physics for the description of spectra of dipolar anions. Systematic investigation of the hydrogen cyanide dipolar anion (HCN-) allowed to identify the collective bands of states both in the strong coupling regime, for weakly bound halo states, and in the weak coupling regime above the dissociation threshold. In the strong coupling regime, KJ = 0 anion a rotational band has been found. Above the threshold, KJ quantum number is not conserved. Resonances in this regime form rotational bands according to the angular momentum of the rotating molecule, whereas the band head energies and the lifetimes depend predominantly on the external electron wave function. (author)

  16. Multipolar, time-dynamical model for the loss compensation and lasing of a spherical plasmonic nanoparticle spaser immersed in an active gain medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Alessandro; Chipouline, Arkadi; Aradian, Ashod

    2016-09-01

    The plasmonic response of a metal nanoparticle in the presence of surrounding gain elements is studied, using a space and time-dependent model, which integrates a quantum formalism to describe the gain and a classical treatment for the metal. Our model fully takes into account the influence of the system geometry (nanosphere) and offers for the first time, the possibility to describe the temporal evolution of the fields and the coupling among the multipolar modes of the particle. We calculate the lasing threshold value for all multipoles of the spaser, and demonstrate that the dipolar one is lowest. The onset of the lasing instability, in the linear regime, is then studied both with and without external field forcing. We also study the behaviour of the system below the lasing threshold, with the external field, demonstrating the existence of an amplification regime where the nanoparticle’s plasmon is strongly enhanced as the threshold is approached. Finally, a qualitative discussion is provided on later, non-linear stages of the dynamics and the approach to the steady-state of the spaser; in particular, it is shown that, for the considered geometry, the spasing is necessarily multi-modal and multipolar modes are always activated.

  17. Magnetoencephalography recording and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayabal Velmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG non-invasively measures the magnetic field generated due to the excitatory postsynaptic electrical activity of the apical dendritic pyramidal cells. Such a tiny magnetic field is measured with the help of the biomagnetometer sensors coupled with the Super Conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID inside the magnetically shielded room (MSR. The subjects are usually screened for the presence of ferromagnetic materials, and then the head position indicator coils, electroencephalography (EEG electrodes (if measured simultaneously, and fiducials are digitized using a 3D digitizer, which aids in movement correction and also in transferring the MEG data from the head coordinates to the device and voxel coordinates, thereby enabling more accurate co-registration and localization. MEG data pre-processing involves filtering the data for environmental and subject interferences, artefact identification, and rejection. Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI is processed for correction and identifying fiducials. After choosing and computing for the appropriate head models (spherical or realistic; boundary/finite element model, the interictal/ictal epileptiform discharges are selected and modeled by an appropriate source modeling technique (clinically and commonly used - single equivalent current dipole - ECD model. The equivalent current dipole (ECD source localization of the modeled interictal epileptiform discharge (IED is considered physiologically valid or acceptable based on waveform morphology, isofield pattern, and dipole parameters (localization, dipole moment, confidence volume, goodness of fit. Thus, MEG source localization can aid clinicians in sublobar localization, lateralization, and grid placement, by evoking the irritative/seizure onset zone. It also accurately localizes the eloquent cortex-like visual, language areas. MEG also aids in diagnosing and delineating multiple novel findings in other neuropsychiatric

  18. Transferred multipolar atom model for 10β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate obtained from the biotransformation of methyloestrenolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroque, Muhammad Umer; Yousuf, Sammer; Zafar, Salman; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Ahmed, Maqsood

    2016-05-01

    Biotransformation is the structural modification of compounds using enzymes as the catalysts and it plays a key role in the synthesis of pharmaceutically important compounds. 10β,17β-Dihydroxy-17α-methylestr-4-en-3-one dihydrate, C19H28O3·2H2O, was obtained from the fungal biotransformation of methyloestrenolone. The structure was refined using the classical independent atom model (IAM) and a transferred multipolar atom model using the ELMAM2 database. The results from the two refinements have been compared. The ELMAM2 refinement has been found to be superior in terms of the refinement statistics. It has been shown that certain electron-density-derived properties can be calculated on the basis of the transferred parameters for crystals which diffract to ordinary resolution.

  19. Comparison of three-shell and simplified volume conductor models in magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, Matti; Hunold, Alexander; Haueisen, Jens

    2014-07-01

    Experimental MEG source imaging studies have typically been carried out with either a spherically symmetric head model or a single-shell boundary-element (BEM) model that is shaped according to the inner skull surface. The concepts and comparisons behind these simplified models have led to misunderstandings regarding the role of skull and scalp in MEG. In this work, we assess the forward-model errors due to different skull/scalp approximations and due to differences and errors in model geometries. We built five anatomical models of a volunteer using a set of T1-weighted MR scans and three common toolboxes. Three of the models represented typical models in experimental MEG, one was manually constructed, and one contained a major segmentation error at the skull base. For these anatomical models, we built forward models using four simplified approaches and a three-shell BEM approach that has been used as reference in previous studies. Our reference model contained in addition the skull fine-structure (spongy bone). We computed signal topographies for cortically constrained sources in the left hemisphere and compared the topographies using relative error and correlation metrics. The results show that the spongy bone has a minimal effect on MEG topographies, and thus the skull approximation of the three-shell model is justified. The three-shell model performed best, followed by the corrected-sphere and single-shell models, whereas the local-spheres and single-sphere models were clearly worse. The three-shell model was the most robust against the introduced segmentation error. In contrast to earlier claims, there was no noteworthy difference in the computation times between the realistically-shaped and sphere-based models, and the manual effort of building a three-shell model and a simplified model is comparable. We thus recommend the realistically-shaped three-shell model for experimental MEG work. In cases where this is not possible, we recommend a realistically

  20. Searching for the best model: ambiguity of inverse solutions and application to fetal magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, J [VSM MedTech Ltd, Coquitlam, BC, V3K 7B2 (Canada); Robinson, S E [VSM MedTech Ltd, Coquitlam, BC, V3K 7B2 (Canada); McCubbin, J [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Lowery, C L [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Eswaran, H [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Murphy, P [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Preissl, H [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2007-02-07

    Fetal brain signals produce weak magnetic fields at the maternal abdominal surface. In the presence of much stronger interference these weak fetal fields are often nearly indistinguishable from noise. Our initial objective was to validate these weak fetal brain fields by demonstrating that they agree with the electromagnetic model of the fetal brain. The fetal brain model is often not known and we have attempted to fit the data to not only the brain source position, orientation and magnitude, but also to the brain model position. Simulation tests of this extended model search on fetal MEG recordings using dipole fit and beamformers revealed a region of ambiguity. The region of ambiguity consists of a family of models which are not distinguishable in the presence of noise, and which exhibit large and comparable SNR when beamformers are used. Unlike the uncertainty of a dipole fit with known model plus noise, this extended ambiguity region yields nearly identical forward solutions, and is only weakly dependent on noise. The ambiguity region is located in a plane defined by the source position, orientation, and the true model centre, and will have a diameter approximately 0.67 of the modelled fetal head diameter. Existence of the ambiguity region allows us to only state that the fetal brain fields do not contradict the electromagnetic model; we can associate them with a family of models belonging to the ambiguity region, but not with any specific model. In addition to providing a level of confidence in the fetal brain signals, the ambiguity region knowledge in combination with beamformers allows detection of undistorted temporal waveforms with improved signal-to-noise ratio, even though the source position cannot be uniquely determined.

  1. Interictal networks in magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowska, Urszula; Badier, Jean-Michel; Gavaret, Martine; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Chauvel, Patrick; Bénar, Christian-George

    2014-06-01

    Epileptic networks involve complex relationships across several brain areas. Such networks have been shown on intracerebral EEG (stereotaxic EEG, SEEG), an invasive technique. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a noninvasive tool, which was recently proven to be efficient for localizing the generators of epileptiform discharges. However, despite the importance of characterizing non-invasively network aspects in partial epilepsies, only few studies have attempted to retrieve fine spatiotemporal dynamics of interictal discharges with MEG. Our goal was to assess the relevance of magnetoencephalography for detecting and characterizing the brain networks involved in interictal epileptic discharges. We propose here a semi-automatic method based on independent component analysis (ICA) and on co-occurrence of events across components. The method was evaluated in a series of seven patients by comparing its results with networks identified in SEEG. On both MEG and SEEG, we found that interictal discharges can involve remote regions which are acting in synchrony. More regions were identified in SEEG (38 in total) than in MEG (20). All MEG regions were confirmed by SEEG when an electrode was present in the vicinity. In all patients, at least one region could be identified as leading according to our criteria. A majority (71%) of MEG leaders were confirmed by SEEG. We have therefore shown that MEG measurements can extract a significant proportion of the networks visible in SEEG. This suggests that MEG can be a useful tool for defining noninvasively interictal epileptic networks, in terms of regions and patterns of connectivity, in search for a "primary irritative zone".

  2. The scalar magnetic potential in magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassios, G [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)], E-mail: G.Dassios@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2008-07-15

    Two results on Magnetoencephalography (MEG) are reported in this presentation. First, we present an integral formula connecting the scalar magnetic potential with the values of the electric potential on the boundary of a conductive region. This formula provides the magnetic potential analogue of the well known Geselowitz formula. Second, we construct the scalar magnetic potential for the realistic ellipsoidal model of the brain, as an eigenfunction expansion in terms of surface ellipsoidal harmonics.

  3. The role of multipolar magnetic fields in pulsar magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Asséo, E; Asseo, Estelle; Khechinashvili, David

    2002-01-01

    We explore the role of complex multipolar magnetic fields in determining physical processes near the surface of rotation powered pulsars. We model the actual magnetic field as the sum of global dipolar and star-centered multipolar fields. In configurations involving axially symmetric and uniform multipolar fields, 'neutral points' and 'neutral lines' exist close to the stellar surface. Also, the curvature radii of magnetic field lines near the stellar surface can never be smaller than the stellar radius, even for very high order multipoles. Consequently, such configurations are unable to provide an efficient pair creation process above pulsar polar caps, necessary for plasma mechanisms of generation of pulsar radiation. In configurations involving axially symmetric and non-uniform multipoles, the periphery of the pulsar polar cap becomes fragmented into symmetrically distributed narrow sub-regions where curvature radii of complex magnetic field lines are less than the radius of the star. The pair production p...

  4. Strategies for Business Schools in a Multi-Polar World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameron, Stephanie; Durand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the contours of the emerging business education and institutions in a multi-polar world and to identify the causes of the strategic convergence of management education, to explore the limitations of the dominant models of management education and to propose a range of strategic alternatives for…

  5. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating excited multipole modes. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric, and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and nonradiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible ...

  6. Direct reconstruction algorithm of current dipoles for vector magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, Takaaki [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Oohama, Junji [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Masaru [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takeda, Tsunehiro [Graduate School of Frontier Science, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Ando, Shigeru [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2007-07-07

    This paper presents a novel algorithm to reconstruct parameters of a sufficient number of current dipoles that describe data (equivalent current dipoles, ECDs, hereafter) from radial/vector magnetoencephalography (MEG) with and without electroencephalography (EEG). We assume a three-compartment head model and arbitrary surfaces on which the MEG sensors and EEG electrodes are placed. Via the multipole expansion of the magnetic field, we obtain algebraic equations relating the dipole parameters to the vector MEG/EEG data. By solving them directly, without providing initial parameter guesses and computing forward solutions iteratively, the dipole positions and moments projected onto the xy-plane (equatorial plane) are reconstructed from a single time shot of the data. In addition, when the head layers and the sensor surfaces are spherically symmetric, we show that the required data reduce to radial MEG only. This clarifies the advantage of vector MEG/EEG measurements and algorithms for a generally-shaped head and sensor surfaces. In the numerical simulations, the centroids of the patch sources are well localized using vector/radial MEG measured on the upper hemisphere. By assuming the model order to be larger than the actual dipole number, the resultant spurious dipole is shown to have a much smaller strength magnetic moment (about 0.05 times smaller when the SNR = 16 dB), so that the number of ECDs is reasonably estimated. We consider that our direct method with greatly reduced computational cost can also be used to provide a good initial guess for conventional dipolar/multipolar fitting algorithms.

  7. Direct reconstruction algorithm of current dipoles for vector magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Takaaki; Oohama, Junji; Hashimoto, Masaru; Takeda, Tsunehiro; Ando, Shigeru

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm to reconstruct parameters of a sufficient number of current dipoles that describe data (equivalent current dipoles, ECDs, hereafter) from radial/vector magnetoencephalography (MEG) with and without electroencephalography (EEG). We assume a three-compartment head model and arbitrary surfaces on which the MEG sensors and EEG electrodes are placed. Via the multipole expansion of the magnetic field, we obtain algebraic equations relating the dipole parameters to the vector MEG/EEG data. By solving them directly, without providing initial parameter guesses and computing forward solutions iteratively, the dipole positions and moments projected onto the xy-plane (equatorial plane) are reconstructed from a single time shot of the data. In addition, when the head layers and the sensor surfaces are spherically symmetric, we show that the required data reduce to radial MEG only. This clarifies the advantage of vector MEG/EEG measurements and algorithms for a generally-shaped head and sensor surfaces. In the numerical simulations, the centroids of the patch sources are well localized using vector/radial MEG measured on the upper hemisphere. By assuming the model order to be larger than the actual dipole number, the resultant spurious dipole is shown to have a much smaller strength magnetic moment (about 0.05 times smaller when the SNR = 16 dB), so that the number of ECDs is reasonably estimated. We consider that our direct method with greatly reduced computational cost can also be used to provide a good initial guess for conventional dipolar/multipolar fitting algorithms. PMID:17664582

  8. Multipolar expansion of orbital angular momentum modes

    OpenAIRE

    Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    In this letter a general method for expanding paraxial beams into multipolar electromagnetic fields is presented. This method is applied to the expansion of paraxial modes with orbital angular momentum (OAM), showing how the paraxial OAM is related to the general angular momentum of an electromagnetic wave. This method can be extended to quasi-paraxial beams, i.e. highly focused laser beams. Some applications to the control of electronic transitions in atoms are discussed.

  9. Polarizable multipolar electrostatics for cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Timothy L.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-08-01

    FFLUX is a novel force field under development for biomolecular modelling, and is based on topological atoms and the machine learning method kriging. Successful kriging models have been obtained for realistic electrostatics of amino acids, small peptides, and some carbohydrates but here, for the first time, we construct kriging models for a sizeable ligand of great importance, which is cholesterol. Cholesterol's mean total (internal) electrostatic energy prediction error amounts to 3.9 kJ mol-1, which pleasingly falls below the threshold of 1 kcal mol-1 often cited for accurate biomolecular modelling. We present a detailed analysis of the error distributions.

  10. Optical multipolar spread functions of an aplanatic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, Jérémy R.; Toury, Timothée

    2016-07-01

    The electromagnetic field near the focus of a perfect imaging system is calculated for different multipolar sources that play an important role in the radiation of nanostructures. Those multipoles are the exact and extended multipoles occurring in electrodynamics. The theory of diffraction of vector waves is reviewed rigorously for a dipolar radiation and applied to the imaging of multipolar sources. Different geometries are considered in order to connect with experiments and the multipolar spread functions are given in a ready-to-use format up to the octupolar order, in the general case and in the paraxial approximation. Defocus imaging is finally considered to provide a first step toward multipolar imaging.

  11. Organizing for Spaces and Dynamics of Multipolar Learning in Multinational Corporations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull Kristensen, Peer; Lotz, Maja

    Limited research has been conducted on how MNCs organize conditions and spaces for recursive learning to facilitate the practice of innovation across dispersed units as well as how organizational members at all levels may become involved in innovations through the engagement in ongoing multipolar...... formalized, yet autonomous and oriented toward a long-term continuous perspective in contrast to traditional hierarchical models....

  12. Multi-sensor magnetoencephalography with atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cort N.; Schwindt, P. D. D.; Weisend, M.

    2013-09-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with two independent, simultaneously operating rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometers. Evoked responses from auditory stimulation were recorded from multiple subjects with two multi-channel magnetometers located on opposite sides of the head. Signal processing techniques enabled by multi-channel measurements were used to improve signal quality. This is the first demonstration of multi-sensor atomic magnetometer magnetoencephalography and provides a framework for developing a non-cryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography array for source localization.

  13. Second Language Research Using Magnetoencephalography: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gwen L.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we show how magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a constructive tool for language research and review MEG findings in second language (L2) research. MEG is the magnetic analog of electroencephalography (EEG), and its primary advantage over other cross-sectional (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging, or positron emission tomography) functional…

  14. Multipolar spindle pole coalescence is a major source of kinetochore mis-attachment and chromosome mis-segregation in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T Silkworth

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells display a CIN (Chromosome Instability phenotype, by which they exhibit high rates of chromosome loss or gain at each cell cycle. Over the years, a number of different mechanisms, including mitotic spindle multipolarity, cytokinesis failure, and merotelic kinetochore orientation, have been proposed as causes of CIN. However, a comprehensive theory of how CIN is perpetuated is still lacking. We used CIN colorectal cancer cells as a model system to investigate the possible cellular mechanism(s underlying CIN. We found that CIN cells frequently assembled multipolar spindles in early mitosis. However, multipolar anaphase cells were very rare, and live-cell experiments showed that almost all CIN cells divided in a bipolar fashion. Moreover, fixed-cell analysis showed high frequencies of merotelically attached lagging chromosomes in bipolar anaphase CIN cells, and higher frequencies of merotelic attachments in multipolar vs. bipolar prometaphases. Finally, we found that multipolar CIN prometaphases typically possessed gamma-tubulin at all spindle poles, and that a significant fraction of bipolar metaphase/early anaphase CIN cells possessed more than one centrosome at a single spindle pole. Taken together, our data suggest a model by which merotelic kinetochore attachments can easily be established in multipolar prometaphases. Most of these multipolar prometaphase cells would then bi-polarize before anaphase onset, and the residual merotelic attachments would produce chromosome mis-segregation due to anaphase lagging chromosomes. We propose this spindle pole coalescence mechanism as a major contributor to chromosome instability in cancer cells.

  15. A global optimization approach to multi-polarity sentiment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinmiao; Li, Jing; Wu, Yukeng

    2015-01-01

    Following the rapid development of social media, sentiment analysis has become an important social media mining technique. The performance of automatic sentiment analysis primarily depends on feature selection and sentiment classification. While information gain (IG) and support vector machines (SVM) are two important techniques, few studies have optimized both approaches in sentiment analysis. The effectiveness of applying a global optimization approach to sentiment analysis remains unclear. We propose a global optimization-based sentiment analysis (PSOGO-Senti) approach to improve sentiment analysis with IG for feature selection and SVM as the learning engine. The PSOGO-Senti approach utilizes a particle swarm optimization algorithm to obtain a global optimal combination of feature dimensions and parameters in the SVM. We evaluate the PSOGO-Senti model on two datasets from different fields. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti model can improve binary and multi-polarity Chinese sentiment analysis. We compared the optimal feature subset selected by PSOGO-Senti with the features in the sentiment dictionary. The results of this comparison indicated that PSOGO-Senti can effectively remove redundant and noisy features and can select a domain-specific feature subset with a higher-explanatory power for a particular sentiment analysis task. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti approach is effective and robust for sentiment analysis tasks in different domains. By comparing the improvements of two-polarity, three-polarity and five-polarity sentiment analysis results, we found that the five-polarity sentiment analysis delivered the largest improvement. The improvement of the two-polarity sentiment analysis was the smallest. We conclude that the PSOGO-Senti achieves higher improvement for a more complicated sentiment analysis task. We also compared the results of PSOGO-Senti with those of the genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search method. From

  16. On the forward solution of electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemppainen, Pia; Peters, Maria

    1991-01-01

    The collocation method combined with a serial expansion of the electric potential is presented as an alternative way of solving the boundary integral equations of electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography.

  17. Nesting-driven multipolar order in CeB6 from photoemission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Koitzsch, A,; Heming, N.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Portnichenko, P. Y.; Dukhnenko, A. V.; Shitsevalova, N. Y.; Filipov, V. B.; Lev, L. L.; Strocov, V. N.; Ollivier, J.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Some heavy fermion materials show so-called hidden-order phases which are invisible to many characterization techniques and whose microscopic origin remained controversial for decades. Among such hidden-order compounds, CeB6 is of model character due to its simple electronic configuration and crystal structure. Apart from more conventional antiferromagnetism, it shows an elusive phase at low temperatures, which is commonly associated with multipolar order. Here we show that this phase roots i...

  18. Beamformer for simultaneous magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seokha; Jun, Sung Chan

    2010-05-01

    We proposed the beamformer for simultaneous magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography (EEG) analysis which has the synergy effects such as high spatial resolution, low localization bias and robustness for orientation of brain sources. Through Monte Carlo simulation study, it was found that the localization performance of our proposed beamformer was far superior to those of MEG-only and EEG-only. For the given specific sensor geometry (160 MEG, 50 EEG sensors), we investigated comparative localization performance of our proposed beamformer over various weighting factors of MEG data, while weighting factor of EEG keeps fixed. Furthermore, we demonstrated its capability for simulated two dipole problem and empirical somatosensory median nerve stimulation data.

  19. Magnetoencephalography in the presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkar, Siddharth; Knowlton, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is an important tool in the presurgical evaluation of patients with medically refractory epilepsy. The appropriate utilization and interpretation of MEG studies can increase the proportion of patients who may be able to further pursue surgical evaluation, refine surgical planning, and potentially increase the probability of seizure freedom after surgery. The aim of this paper is to provide the reader with a comprehensive but accessible guide to MEG, with particular emphasis on acquiring a working knowledge of MEG analysis, identifying patient groups that are most likely to benefit, and clarifying the limitations of this technology.

  20. A global optimization approach to multi-polarity sentiment analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinmiao Li

    Full Text Available Following the rapid development of social media, sentiment analysis has become an important social media mining technique. The performance of automatic sentiment analysis primarily depends on feature selection and sentiment classification. While information gain (IG and support vector machines (SVM are two important techniques, few studies have optimized both approaches in sentiment analysis. The effectiveness of applying a global optimization approach to sentiment analysis remains unclear. We propose a global optimization-based sentiment analysis (PSOGO-Senti approach to improve sentiment analysis with IG for feature selection and SVM as the learning engine. The PSOGO-Senti approach utilizes a particle swarm optimization algorithm to obtain a global optimal combination of feature dimensions and parameters in the SVM. We evaluate the PSOGO-Senti model on two datasets from different fields. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti model can improve binary and multi-polarity Chinese sentiment analysis. We compared the optimal feature subset selected by PSOGO-Senti with the features in the sentiment dictionary. The results of this comparison indicated that PSOGO-Senti can effectively remove redundant and noisy features and can select a domain-specific feature subset with a higher-explanatory power for a particular sentiment analysis task. The experimental results showed that the PSOGO-Senti approach is effective and robust for sentiment analysis tasks in different domains. By comparing the improvements of two-polarity, three-polarity and five-polarity sentiment analysis results, we found that the five-polarity sentiment analysis delivered the largest improvement. The improvement of the two-polarity sentiment analysis was the smallest. We conclude that the PSOGO-Senti achieves higher improvement for a more complicated sentiment analysis task. We also compared the results of PSOGO-Senti with those of the genetic algorithm (GA and grid

  1. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. I. Fully and partially open eruptions of flux ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Object, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-04-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for the enormous energy release of magnetars during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole-dominated background fields. Nevertheless, it is hard to generate fully open magnetic eruptions for multipolar background fields. Given the observational importance of the multipolar magnetic fields in the vicinity of the magnetar surface, it would be worthwhile to explore the possibility of the alternative eruption approach in multipolar background fields. Fortunately, we find that flux ropes may give rise to partially open eruptions in the multipolar fields, which involve only partial opening of background fields. The energy release fractions are greater for cases with central-arcaded multipoles than those with central-caved multipoles that emerged in background fields. Eruptions would fail only when the centrally caved multipoles become extremely strong.

  2. Magnetoencephalography in the preoperative evaluation for epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher T; Carlson, Chad E; Li, Zhimin; Raghavan, Manoj

    2014-05-01

    People with pharmacoresistant epilepsy are often candidates for resective epilepsy surgery. The presurgical evaluation for epilepsy aims to localize the epileptic network that initiates seizures (which should be disrupted or removed) and determine its spatial relationship to eloquent cortex (which should be preserved). Noninvasive functional imaging techniques play an increasingly important role in planning epilepsy surgery and assessing the feasibility, risks, and benefits of surgery. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be a very useful part of a comprehensive presurgical evaluation as it can model the sources of epileptiform activity and localize eloquent cortices within the same study. This review is designed to assist anyone in the field of neurology or related disciplines understand some methods and terminology relevant to clinical MEG. Every effort is made to present the information in nontechnical, approachable ways so that readers will come away with a basic understanding of how to interpret MEG findings when the reported data on one of their patients are presented to them.

  3. Magnetoencephalography from signals to dynamic cortical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aine, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    "Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides a time-accurate view into human brain function. The concerted action of neurons generates minute magnetic fields that can be detected---totally noninvasively---by sensitive multichannel magnetometers. The obtained millisecond accuracycomplements information obtained by other modern brain-imaging tools. Accurate timing is quintessential in normal brain function, often distorted in brain disorders. The noninvasiveness and time-sensitivityof MEG are great assets to developmental studies, as well. This multiauthored book covers an ambitiously wide range of MEG research from introductory to advanced level, from sensors to signals, and from focal sources to the dynamics of cortical networks. Written by active practioners of this multidisciplinary field, the book contains tutorials for newcomers and chapters of new challenging methods and emerging technologies to advanced MEG users. The reader will obtain a firm grasp of the possibilities of MEG in the study of audition, vision...

  4. SQUID-based multichannel system for Magnetoencephalography

    CERN Document Server

    Rombetto, S; Vettoliere, A; Trebeschi, A; Rossi, R; Russo, M

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a multichannel system based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements, developed and installed at Istituto di Cibernetica (ICIB) in Naples. This MEG system, consists of 163 full integrated SQUID magnetometers, 154 channels and 9 references, and has been designed to meet specifications concerning noise, dynamic range, slew rate and linearity through optimized design. The control electronics is located at room temperature and all the operations are performed inside a Magnetically Shielded Room (MSR). The system exhibits a magnetic white noise level of approximatively 5 fT/Hz1=2. This MEG system will be employed for both clinical and routine use. PACS numbers: 74.81.Fa, 85.25.Hv, 07.20.Mc, 85.25.Dq, 87.19.le, 87.85.Ng

  5. Competitiveness in a Multipolar Port System: Striving for Regional Gateway Status in Northeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihyun Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of competitiveness between hub ports in the multipolar Northeast Asian system will determine which ports achieve regional gateway status. A survey instrument to assess 21 measurement items generated 203 responses from Shanghai, Hong Kong and Busan. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a valid and reliable competitiveness construct underpinning 19 measurement scales and a four-factor model incorporating availability, operational efficiency, port costs and service quality. Differences in factor importance revealed that success as a regional gateway port depends on a port area developing strategically into a multi-functional business centre. The model offers a management tool to guide future port improvement.

  6. Magnetoencephalography in the diagnosis of concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Roland R; Huang, Mingxiong

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a biomedical technique which measures the magnetic fields emitted by the brain, generated by neuronal activity. Commercial whole-head MEG units have been available for about 15 years, but currently there are only about 20 such units operating in the USA. Here, we review the basic concepts of MEG and list some of the usual clinical indications: noninvasive localization of epileptic spikes and presurgical mapping of eloquent cortex. We then discuss using MEG to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI; concussions). Injured brain tissues in TBI patients generate abnormal low-frequency magnetic activity (delta-waves: 1-4 Hz) that can be measured and localized by MEG. These abnormal delta-waves originate from neurons that experience deafferentation from axonal injury to the associated white matter fiber tracts, also manifested on diffusion tensor imaging as reduced fractional anisotropy. Magnetoencephalographic evaluation of abnormal delta-waves (1-4 Hz) is probably the most sensitive objective test to diagnose concussions. An automated MEG low-frequency (slow wave) source imaging method, frequency-domain vector-based spatiotemporal analysis using a L1-minimum norm (VESTAL), achieved a positive finding rate of 87% for diagnosing concussions (blast-induced plus nonblast), 100% for moderate TBI, and no false-positive diagnoses in normal controls. There were also significant correlations between the number of cortical regions generating abnormal slow waves and the total postconcussive symptom scores in TBI patients.

  7. SQUID sensor array configurations for magnetoencephalography applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, J.; Robinson, S.E. [CTF Systems Inc., A subsidiary of VSM MedTech Ltd, Port Coquitlam, BC (Canada)

    2002-09-01

    Electrophysiological activity in the human brain generates a small magnetic field from the spatial superposition of individual neuronal source currents. At a distance of about 15 mm from the scalp, the observed field is of the order of 10{sub -13} to 10{sub -12} T peak-to-peak. This measurement process is termed magnetoencephalography (MEG). In order to minimize instrumental noise, the MEG is usually detected using superconducting flux transformers, coupled to SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors. Since MEG signals are also measured in the presence of significant environmental magnetic noise, flux transformers must be designed to strongly attenuate environmental noise, maintain low instrumental noise and maximize signals from the brain. Furthermore, the flux transformers must adequately sample spatial field variations if the brain activity is to be imaged. The flux transformer optimization for maximum brain signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) requires analysis of the spatial and temporal properties of brain activity, the environmental noise and how these signals are coupled to the flux transformer. Flux transformers that maximize SNR can detect the smallest brain signals and have the best ability to spatially separate dipolar sources. An optimal flux transformer design is a synthetic higher-order gradiometer based on relatively short-baseline first-order radial gradiometer primary sensors. (author)

  8. Magnetoencephalography with Optically Pumped Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Colombo, Anthony; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Carter, Tony; Berry, Christopher; Young, Amber; McKay, Jim; Weisend, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We are working to develop a 36-channel array of optically pumped atomic magnetometers (AMs) to perform magnetoencephalography (MEG) with the goal of localizing magnetic sources within the human brain. The 36-channel array will consist of nine 4-channel sensor modules where the channels within each sensor will be spaced by 18 mm and each sensor will cover a 40 mm by 40 mm area of the head. In a previous 4-channel AM prototype, we demonstrated the measurement of evoked responses in both the auditory and somatosensory cortexes. This prototype had a 5 fT/Hz1/2 sensitivity. In the current version of the AM under development we are maintaining the previous sensitivity while implementing several improvements, including increasing the bandwidth from 20 Hz to more than 100 Hz, reducing the separation of the active volume of the AM from exterior of the sensor from 25 mm to 10 mm or less, and reducing the active sensor volume by a factor >10 to ~15 mm3. We will present results on the performance of our most recent AM prototype and progress toward developing a complete MEG system including a person-sized magnetic shield to provide a low-noise magnetic environment for MEG measurements.

  9. Magnetoencephalography in the study of brain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzella, Vittorio; Marzetti, Laura; Della Penna, Stefania; de Pasquale, Francesco; Zappasodi, Filippo; Romani, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    To progress toward understanding of the mechanisms underlying the functional organization of the human brain, either a bottom-up or a top-down approach may be adopted. The former starts from the study of the detailed functioning of a small number of neuronal assemblies, while the latter tries to decode brain functioning by considering the brain as a whole. This review discusses the top-down approach and the use of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to describe global brain properties. The main idea behind this approach is that the concurrence of several areas is required for the brain to instantiate a specific behavior/functioning. A central issue is therefore the study of brain functional connectivity and the concept of brain networks as ensembles of distant brain areas that preferentially exchange information. Importantly, the human brain is a dynamic device, and MEG is ideally suited to investigate phenomena on behaviorally relevant timescales, also offering the possibility of capturing behaviorally-related brain connectivity dynamics.

  10. Optical Torque from Enhanced Scattering by Multipolar Plasmonic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Yoonkyung E; Jin, Dafei; Fang, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the optical angular momentum transfer from a circularly polarized plane wave to thin metal nanoparticles of different rotational symmetries. While absorption has been regarded as the predominant mechanism of torque generation on the nanoscale, we demonstrate numerically how the contribution from scattering can be enhanced by using multipolar plasmon resonance. The multipolar modes in non-circular particles can convert the angular momentum carried by the scattered field, thereby producing scattering-dominant optical torque, while a circularly symmetric particle cannot. Our results show that the optical torque induced by resonant scattering can contribute to 80% of the total optical torque in gold particles. This scattering-dominant torque generation is extremely mode-specific, and deserves to be distinguished from the absorption-dominant mechanism. Our findings might have applications in optical manipulation on the nanoscale as well as new designs in plasmonics and metamateria...

  11. First-Strike Stability in a Multipolar World

    OpenAIRE

    Melvin Best; Jerome Bracken

    1995-01-01

    First-strike stability in a multipolar world measures the incentives of all major nuclear weapon countries, in all possible coalitions, to refrain from preemptive attack. The analysis integrates the interactions of offensive weapon arsenals, vulnerable offensive weapons within these arsenals, defensive weapons, and value targets reflecting the national assets at stake. In the previously-dominant bipolar paradigm, when the United States and the Soviet Union possessed almost all of the strategi...

  12. High-resolution EEG (HR-EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaret, M; Maillard, L; Jung, J

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution EEG (HR-EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) allow the recording of spontaneous or evoked electromagnetic brain activity with excellent temporal resolution. Data must be recorded with high temporal resolution (sampling rate) and high spatial resolution (number of channels). Data analyses are based on several steps with selection of electromagnetic signals, elaboration of a head model and use of algorithms in order to solve the inverse problem. Due to considerable technical advances in spatial resolution, these tools now represent real methods of ElectroMagnetic Source Imaging. HR-EEG and MEG constitute non-invasive and complementary examinations, characterized by distinct sensitivities according to the location and orientation of intracerebral generators. In the presurgical assessment of drug-resistant partial epilepsies, HR-EEG and MEG can characterize and localize interictal activities and thus the irritative zone. HR-EEG and MEG often yield significant additional data that are complementary to other presurgical investigations and particularly relevant in MRI-negative cases. Currently, the determination of the epileptogenic zone and functional brain mapping remain rather less well-validated indications. In France, in 2014, HR-EEG is now part of standard clinical investigation of epilepsy, while MEG remains a research technique.

  13. Magnetoencephalography of epilepsy with a microfabricated atomic magnetrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alem, Orang; Benison, Alex M; Barth, Daniel S; Kitching, John; Knappe, Svenja

    2014-10-22

    Magnetoencephalography has long held the promise of providing a noninvasive tool for localizing epileptic seizures in humans because of its high spatial resolution compared with the scalp EEG. Yet, this promise has been elusive, not because of a lack of sensitivity or spatial resolution but because the large size and immobility of present cryogenic (superconducting) technology prevent long-term telemetry required to capture these very infrequent epileptiform events. To circumvent this limitation, we used Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems technology to construct a noncryogenic (room temperature) microfabricated atomic magnetometer ("magnetrode") based on laser spectroscopy of rubidium vapor and similar in size and flexibility to scalp EEG electrodes. We tested the magnetrode by measuring the magnetic signature of epileptiform discharges in a rat model of epilepsy. We were able to measure neuronal currents of single epileptic discharges and more subtle spontaneous brain activity with a high signal-to-noise ratio approaching that of present superconducting sensors. These measurements are a promising step toward the goal of high-resolution noninvasive telemetry of epileptic events in humans with seizure disorders.

  14. Magnetoencephalography with a two-color pump probe atomic magnetometer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Cort N.

    2010-07-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with a compact, fiber-coupled rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer. Optical pumping is performed on the D1 transition and Faraday rotation is measured on the D2 transition. The beams share an optical axis, with dichroic optics preparing beam polarizations appropriately. A sensitivity of <5 fT/{radical}Hz is achieved. Evoked responses resulting from median nerve and auditory stimulation were recorded with the atomic magnetometer. Recordings were validated by comparison with those taken by a commercial magnetoencephalography system. The design is amenable to arraying sensors around the head, providing a framework for noncryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  15. Magnetoencephalography: From first steps to clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmoniemi, Risto

    2014-03-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), the study of femtotesla-range magnetic fields produced by neuronal currents in the brain, originated in the 1960's. After Baule and McFee's (Am Heart J 66:95-6,1963) measurement of the cardiac magnetic field using induction-coil sensors, Cohen (Science 16:784-6, 1968) used a similar multi-turn coil to detect the brain's alpha rhythm. The introduction of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) by Zimmerman et al. (J Appl Phys 41: 1572-80) improved the sensitivity of magnetic sensing by several orders of magnitude, making MEG practical. The SQUID enabled the unaveraged recording of spontaneous brain rhythms (D. Cohen, Science 175:664-6, 1972) as well as evoked magnetic fields (Brenner et al., Science 190:480-2, 1975; Teyler et al., Life Sci 17:683-91, 1975). Subsequently, a large number of evoked-field variants were demonstrated. The main benefit of MEG is its ability to locate electrical activity in the brain at high temporal resolution. For practical work, we need large arrays of highly sensitive SQUIDs; such arrays were first built in the 1990's (Knuutila et al., IEEE Trans Magn 29:3315-20, 1993). While the intrinsic spatial accuracy of locating sources with well-calibrated large sensor arrays is better than one millimeter, uncertainties in determining the location and geometry of the cortex with respect to the array may lead to source-location errors of 5-10 mm or more. These errors could be reduced to 1 mm if one could obtain the structural image of the brain with the same sensors that are used for MEG and if the conductivity geometry of the head would be accurately known. This may indeed be possible if MRI is recorded with SQUIDs (McDermott et al., PNAS 21:7857-61, 2004) concurrently with MEG (Zotev et al., J Magn Reson 194:115-20, 2008), especially if large arrays are developed (Vesanen et al., Magn Reson Med 69:1795-1804, 2013); the conductivity distribution of the head might be possible to determine with current

  16. Tailoring unidirectional angular radiation through multipolar interference in a single-element subwavelength all-dielectric stair-like nanoantenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jingyi; Li, Qiang; Yang, Yuanqing; Qiu, Min

    2016-02-21

    The study of all-dielectric nanoantennas has become an emerging branch of the study of optical nanoantennas in recent years, with all-dielectric nanoantennas having an outstanding ability to tailor forward and backward unidirectional scattering arising from interference mainly between electric dipoles and magnetic dipoles induced simultaneously inside a nanoparticle. To further control their radiation properties, we demonstrate the off-normal scattering, by a silicon stair-like nanoantenna, of an incident near-infrared plane wave due to multipolar interference. The radiation angle could be tailored over a 20-degree range by tuning the geometric parameters of the nanoantenna. A multipolar model was adopted to interpret the interference among one electric dipole, two magnetic dipoles and one electric quadrupole induced inside the nanoantenna. The maximum radiation angle reached 20° at a wavelength near 1550 nm. Such a stair-like nanoantenna sets a good example for further flexible manipulation of multipolar resonances inside all-dielectric nanoparticles, which is an essential step towards practical application of all-dielectric nanoantennas in the near future.

  17. A comparative analysis of algorithms for the magnetoencephalography inverse problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, A [CNR-INFM LAMIA, Genova (Italy); Pascarella, A; Piana, M [Dipartimento di Informatica, Universita di Verona, Ca Vignal 2, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134, Verona (Italy); Campi, C [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso 35, 16146, Genova (Italy)], E-mail: sorrentino@fisica.unige.it

    2008-11-01

    We present a comparison of three methods for the solution of the magnetoencephalography inverse problem. The methods are: an eigenspace projected beamformer, an algorithm implementing multiple signal classification with recursively applied projection and a particle filter for Bayesian tracking. Synthetic data with neurophysiological significance are analyzed by the three methods to recover position and amplitude time course of the active sources.

  18. Multi-polarization reconstruction from compact polarimetry based on modified four-component scattering decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junjun Yin; Jian Yang

    2014-01-01

    An improved algorithm for multi-polarization recon-struction from compact polarimetry (CP) is proposed. According to two fundamental assumptions in compact polarimetric reconstruc-tion, two improvements are proposed. Firstly, the four-component model-based decomposition algorithm is modified with a new vol-ume scattering model. The decomposed helix scattering compo-nent is then used to deal with the non-reflection symmetry con-dition in compact polarimetric measurements. Using the decom-posed power and considering the scattering mechanism of each component, an average relationship between co-polarized and cross-polarized channels is developed over the original polariza-tion state extrapolation model. E-SAR polarimetric data acquired over the Oberpfaffenhofen area and JPL/AIRSAR polarimetric data acquired over San Francisco are used for verification, and good re-construction results are obtained, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Multiresolution Representation for Orbital Dynamics in Multipolar Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorova, A N; Fedorova, Antonina N.; Zeitlin, Michael G.

    2000-01-01

    We present the applications of variation -- wavelet analysis to polynomial/rational approximations for orbital motion in transverse plane for a single particle in a circular magnetic lattice in case when we take into account multipolar expansion up to an arbitrary finite number and additional kick terms. We reduce initial dynamical problem to the finite number (equal to the number of n-poles) of standard algebraical problems. We have the solution as a multiresolution (multiscales) expansion in the base of compactly supported wavelet basis.

  20. The Role of Angular Momentum in the Construction of Electromagnetic Multipolar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Nora; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Multipolar solutions of Maxwell's equations are used in many practical applications and are essential for the understanding of light-matter interactions at the fundamental level. Unlike the set of plane wave solutions of electromagnetic fields, the multipolar solutions do not share a standard derivation or notation. As a result, expressions…

  1. Anatomy of the Binary Black Hole Recoil: A Multipolar Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Buonanno, Alessandra; vanMeter, James R.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the recoil velocity computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including 1 = 4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (= 98%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (2 95%). We describe how the relative amplitude, and more importantly, the relative phase, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ring-down phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced, to a high level of accuracy, by an effective Newtonian formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing in the Newtonian formula the radial separation with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes. Analytic formulae, obtained by expressing the multipole moments in terms of the fundamental QNMs of a Kerr BH, are able to explain the onset and amount of '.anti-kick" for each of the simulations. Lastly, we apply this multipolar analysis to understand the remarkable difference between the amplitudes of planar and non-planar kicks for equal-mass spinning black holes.

  2. Algebraic reconstruction combined with the signal space separation method for the inverse magnetoencephalography problem with a dipole-quadrupole source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, T.; Koiwa, K.; Takagi, S.; Oyama, D.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents an algebraic reconstruction method for dipole-quadrupole sources using magnetoencephalography data. Compared to the conventional methods with the equivalent current dipoles source model, our method can more accurately reconstruct two close, oppositely directed sources. Numerical simulations show that two sources on both sides of the longitudinal fissure of cerebrum are stably estimated. The method is verified using a quadrupolar source phantom, which is composed of two isosceles-triangle-coils with parallel bases.

  3. Issues on Multi-polarization of GNSS-R for Passive Radar Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GNSS Reflectometry (GNSS-R is a currently developed remote sensing technology which belongs to the passive radar domain. This paper aims to deal with some issues on multi-polarization of GNSS-R technology. Four different polarization patterns of the received GNSS-R signal are discussed, including rl, rr, rv, rh. For each polarization, formulas for calculating the surface reflectivity (Γ using dielectric constant (ε and satellite elevation angle (θ are derivated. The rationality of these formulas is validated using data from a ground-based GNSS-R soil moisture experiment. The results of this research can provide references for further GNSS-R research, including simulation, experiment design, model development and data processing.

  4. Mapping preictal networks preceding childhood absence seizures using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs-Brichford, Eliza; Horn, Paul S; Tenney, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    The electrographic hallmark of childhood absence seizures is 3 Hz generalized spike and wave discharges; however, there is likely a focal thalamic or cortical onset that cannot be detected using scalp electroencephalography (EEG). The purpose of this study was to study the earliest preictal changes in children with absence epilepsy. In this report, magnetoencephalography recordings of 44 absence seizures recorded from 12 children with drug-naïve childhood absence seizures were used to perform time frequency analysis and source localization prior to the onset of the seizures. Evidence of preictal magnetoencephalography frequency changes were detected a mean of 694 ms before the initial spike on the EEG. A consistent pattern of focal sources was present in the frontal cortex and thalamus during this preictal period, but source localization occurred synchronously so that independent activity between the 2 structures could not be distinguished.

  5. Magnetoencephalography as a Putative Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zamrini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common dementia in the elderly and is estimated to affect tens of millions of people worldwide. AD is believed to have a prodromal stage lasting ten or more years. While amyloid deposits, tau filaments, and loss of brain cells are characteristics of the disease, the loss of dendritic spines and of synapses predate such changes. Popular preclinical detection strategies mainly involve cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, magnetic resonance imaging, metabolic PET scans, and amyloid imaging. One strategy missing from this list involves neurophysiological measures, which might be more sensitive to detect alterations in brain function. The Magnetoencephalography International Consortium of Alzheimer's Disease arose out of the need to advance the use of Magnetoencephalography (MEG, as a tool in AD and pre-AD research. This paper presents a framework for using MEG in dementia research, and for short-term research priorities.

  6. Anatomy of the binary black hole recoil: A multipolar analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittman, Jeremy D; van Meter, James R; Baker, John G; Boggs, William D; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J; McWilliams, Sean T

    2007-01-01

    We present a multipolar analysis of the gravitational recoil computed in recent numerical simulations of binary black hole (BH) coalescence, for both unequal masses and non-zero, non-precessing spins. We show that multipole moments up to and including l=4 are sufficient to accurately reproduce the final recoil velocity (within ~2%) and that only a few dominant modes contribute significantly to it (within ~5%). We describe how the relative amplitudes, and more importantly, the relative phases, of these few modes control the way in which the recoil builds up throughout the inspiral, merger, and ringdown phases. We also find that the numerical results can be reproduced by an ``effective Newtonian'' formula for the multipole moments obtained by replacing the radial separation in the Newtonian formulae with an effective radius computed from the numerical data. Beyond the merger, the numerical results are reproduced by a superposition of three Kerr quasi-normal modes (QNMs). Analytic formulae, obtained by expressin...

  7. Multipolar interference for non-reciprocal nonlinear generation

    CERN Document Server

    Poutrina, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    We show that nonlinear multipolar interference allows achieving not only unidirectional, but also non-reciprocal nonlinear generation from a nanoelement, with the direction of the nonlinearly produced light decoupled from that of at least one or several of the excitation beams. Alternatively, it may allow inhibiting the specified nonlinear response in a nanoelement or in its periodic arrangement by reversing the direction of one of the pumps. The described phenomena exploit the fact that, contrary to the linear response case, nonlinear magneto-electric interference stems from a combination of additive and multiplicative processes and includes an interference between various terms within the electric and magnetic partial waves themselves. We demonstrate the introduced concept numerically using an example of a plasmonic dimer geometry with realistic material parameters.

  8. Simulated multipolarized MAPSAR images to distinguish agricultural crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Fernando Silva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have shown the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images for agricultural applications, particularly for monitoring regions with limitations in terms of acquiring cloud free optical images. Recently, Brazil and Germany began a feasibility study on the construction of an orbital L-band SAR sensor referred to as MAPSAR (Multi-Application Purpose SAR. This sensor provides L-band images in three spatial resolutions and polarimetric, interferometric and stereoscopic capabilities. Thus, studies are needed to evaluate the potential of future MAPSAR images. The objective of this study was to evaluate multipolarized MAPSAR images simulated by the airborne SAR-R99B sensor to distinguish coffee, cotton and pasture fields in Brazil. Discrimination among crops was evaluated through graphical and cluster analysis of mean backscatter values, considering single, dual and triple polarizations. Planting row direction of coffee influenced the backscatter and was divided into two classes: parallel and perpendicular to the sensor look direction. Single polarizations had poor ability to discriminate the crops. The overall accuracies were less than 59 %, but the understanding of the microwave interaction with the crops could be explored. Combinations of two polarizations could differentiate various fields of crops, highlighting the combination VV-HV that reached 78 % overall accuracy. The use of three polarizations resulted in 85.4 % overall accuracy, indicating that the classes pasture and parallel coffee were fully discriminated from the other classes. These results confirmed the potential of multipolarized MAPSAR images to distinguish the studied crops and showed considerable improvement in the accuracy of the results when the number of polarizations was increased.

  9. Short exposure to paclitaxel induces multipolar spindle formation and aneuploidy through promotion of acentrosomal pole assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a widely used microtubule drug and cancer medicine. Here we report that by short exposure to paclitaxel at a low dose, multipolar spindles were induced in mitotic cells without centrosome amplification. Both TPX2 depletion and Aurora-A overexpression antagonized the multipolarity. Live cell imaging showed that some paclitaxel-treated cells accomplished multipolar cell division and a portion of the daughter cells went on to the next round of mitosis. The surviving cells grew into clones with varied genome content. The results indicated that an aneuploidy population could be induced by short exposure to paclitaxel at a low dose, implicating potential side effects of paclitaxel.

  10. Asia’s Complex Strategic Environment: Nuclear Multipolarity and Other Dangers

    OpenAIRE

    Twomey, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    An earlier version of this article was presented at the Asia Policy Assembly in Washington, D.C., on June 17–18, 2010. This article evaluates the implications of nuclear multipolarity and strategic complexity in Asia.

  11. The spatial structure of the Russian economy and the multipolar world

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Lapo

    2012-01-01

    There have been several poles of development USA, Europe, and China are formatted in the world economy. How does the multipolar world economy influence the Russian region‘s development? How does the spatial structure of Russian economy develop under the multipolar world economy? The studies based on the main results of new economic geography and gravity theory concerning the spatial concentration of production, the core and periphery formation in the economy of countries and large regions. We...

  12. Prdm8 regulates the morphological transition at multipolar phase during neocortical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Inoue

    Full Text Available Here, we found that the PR domain protein Prdm8 serves as a key regulator of the length of the multipolar phase by controlling the timing of morphological transition. We used a mouse line with expression of Prdm8-mVenus reporter and found that Prdm8 is predominantly expressed in the middle and upper intermediate zone during both the late and terminal multipolar phases. Prdm8 expression was almost coincident with Unc5D expression, a marker for the late multipolar phase, although the expression of Unc5D was found to be gradually down-regulated to the point at which mVenus expression was gradually up-regulated. This expression pattern suggests the possible involvement of Prdm8 in the control of the late and terminal multipolar phases, which controls the timing for morphological transition. To test this hypothesis, we performed gain- and loss-of-function analysis of neocortical development by using in utero electroporation. We found that the knockdown of Prdm8 results in premature change from multipolar to bipolar morphology, whereas the overexpression of Prdm8 maintained the multipolar morphology. Additionally, the postnatal analysis showed that the Prdm8 knockdown stimulated the number of early born neurons, and differentiated neurons located more deeply in the neocortex, however, majority of those cells could not acquire molecular features consistent with laminar location. Furthermore, we found the candidate genes that were predominantly utilized in both the late and terminal multipolar phases, and these candidate genes included those encoding for guidance molecules. In addition, we also found that the expression level of these guidance molecules was inhibited by the introduction of the Prdm8 expression vector. These results indicate that the Prdm8-mediated regulation of morphological changes that normally occur during the late and terminal multipolar phases plays an important role in neocortical development.

  13. Relationships between multipolarized radar backscatter and slash pine stand parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Yousif Ali; Hoffer, Roger M.

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized L-band (24.5 cm) aircraft radar data was obtained for a primarily forested area in northern Florida. Based on the results of previous studies by Hoffer and Hussin (1989), a swath of medium incidence angle (35-25 deg) data was defined. Three groups of slash pine stands were located in the data: 4- to 17-year-old plantations, 18- to 48-year-old plantations, and 16- to 53-year-old natural stands. Stand data obtained from the forest-products companies operating in the area include age, tree height, diameter-at-breast height, basal area, volume (cords/acre), and density (trees/acre). Each of these stand parameters were compared to each of the four polarizations (HH, VV, VH, and HV) of the radar data for each group of stands. Statistically significant relationships were found between the radar backscatter and the forest stand parameters only for the 4- to 17-year-old slash pine plantation stands. In general, the cross-polarized radar backscatter was more highly correlated with the various stand parameters than the like-polarized backscatter, and the VV-polarized data were more highly correlated than the HH-polarized data.

  14. Transverse multipolar light-matter couplings in evanescent waves

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Bonod, Nicolas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to study the interaction between matter and evanescent fields. The approach is based on the decomposition of evanescent plane waves into multipoles of well-defined angular momentum transverse to both decay and propagation directions. We use the approach to identify the origin of the recently observed directional coupling of emitters into guided modes, and of the opposite Zeeman state excitation of atoms near a fiber. We explain how to rigorously quantify both effects, and show that the directionality and the difference in excitation rates grow exponentially with the multipolar order of the light-matter interaction. We also use the approach to study and maximize the transverse torque exerted by an evanescent plane wave onto a given spherical absorbing particle. The maximum occurs at the quadrupolar order of the particle, and for a particular polarization of the plane wave. All the obtained physical insights can be traced back to the two main features of the decomposition of evanescent pl...

  15. Can visual information encoded in cortical columns be decoded from magnetoencephalography data in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Ramirez, Fernando Mario; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    It is a principal open question whether noninvasive imaging methods in humans can decode information encoded at a spatial scale as fine as the basic functional unit of cortex: cortical columns. We addressed this question in five magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiments by investigating a columnar-level encoded visual feature: contrast edge orientation. We found that MEG signals contained orientation-specific information as early as approximately 50 ms after stimulus onset even when controlling for confounds, such as overrepresentation of particular orientations, stimulus edge interactions, and global form-related signals. Theoretical modeling confirmed the plausibility of this empirical result. An essential consequence of our results is that information encoded in the human brain at the level of cortical columns should in general be accessible by multivariate analysis of electrophysiological signals.

  16. State-space solutions to the dynamic magnetoencephalography inverse problem using high performance computing

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Christopher J; Temereanca, Simona; Desai, Neil U; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Brown, Emery N; 10.1214/11-AOAS483

    2011-01-01

    Determining the magnitude and location of neural sources within the brain that are responsible for generating magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals measured on the surface of the head is a challenging problem in functional neuroimaging. The number of potential sources within the brain exceeds by an order of magnitude the number of recording sites. As a consequence, the estimates for the magnitude and location of the neural sources will be ill-conditioned because of the underdetermined nature of the problem. One well-known technique designed to address this imbalance is the minimum norm estimator (MNE). This approach imposes an $L^2$ regularization constraint that serves to stabilize and condition the source parameter estimates. However, these classes of regularizer are static in time and do not consider the temporal constraints inherent to the biophysics of the MEG experiment. In this paper we propose a dynamic state-space model that accounts for both spatial and temporal correlations within and across candida...

  17. Detection of magnetic nanoparticles with magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Wenyan [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Xu, Guizhi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin, 300130 (China); Sclabassi, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Zhu Jiangang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Melon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Bagic, Anto [Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Sun Mingui [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)], E-mail: mrsun@neuronet.pitt.edu

    2008-04-15

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been widely utilized in biomedical applications due to their extremely high sensitivity to magnetic signals. The present study explores the feasibility of a new type of nanotechnology-based imaging method using standard clinical magnetoencephalographic (MEG) systems equipped with SQUID sensors. Previous studies have shown that biological targets labeled with non-toxic, magnetized nanoparticles can be imaged by measuring the magnetic field generated by these particles. In this work, we demonstrate that (1) the magnetic signals from certain nanoparticles can be detected without magnetization using standard clinical MEG, (2) for some types of nanoparticles, only bound particles produce detectable signals, and (3) the magnetic field of particles several hours after magnetization is significantly stronger than that of un-magnetized particles. These findings hold promise in facilitating the potential application of magnetic nanoparticles to in vivo tumor imaging. The minimum amount of nanoparticles that produce detectable signals is predicted by theoretical modeling and computer simulation.

  18. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  19. Multipolar Electrostatic Energy Prediction for all 20 Natural Amino Acids Using Kriging Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Timothy L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-06-14

    A machine learning method called kriging is applied to the set of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Kriging models are built that predict electrostatic multipole moments for all topological atoms in any amino acid based on molecular geometry only. These models then predict molecular electrostatic interaction energies. On the basis of 200 unseen test geometries for each amino acid, no amino acid shows a mean prediction error above 5.3 kJ mol(-1), while the lowest error observed is 2.8 kJ mol(-1). The mean error across the entire set is only 4.2 kJ mol(-1) (or 1 kcal mol(-1)). Charged systems are created by protonating or deprotonating selected amino acids, and these show no significant deviation in prediction error over their neutral counterparts. Similarly, the proposed methodology can also handle amino acids with aromatic side chains, without the need for modification. Thus, we present a generic method capable of accurately capturing multipolar polarizable electrostatics in amino acids. PMID:27224739

  20. Post fall-back evolution of multipolar magnetic fields and radio pulsar activation

    CERN Document Server

    Igoshev, A P; Popov, S B

    2016-01-01

    It has long been unclear if the small-scale magnetic structures on the neutron star (NS) surface could survive the fall-back episode. The study of the Hall cascade (Cumming, Arras and Zweibel 2004; Wareing and Hollerbach 2009) hinted that energy in small scales structures should dissipate on short timescales. Our new 2D magneto-thermal simulations suggest the opposite. For the first $\\sim$10 kyrs after the fall-back episode with accreted mass $10^{-3} M_\\odot$, the observed NS magnetic field appears dipolar, which is insensitive to the initial magnetic topology. In framework of the Ruderman & Sutherland (1975) vacuum gap model during this interval, non-thermal radiation is strongly suppressed. After this time the initial (i.e. multipolar) structure begins to re-emerge through the NS crust. We distinguish three evolutionary epochs for the re-emergence process: the growth of internal toroidal field, the advection of buried poloidal field, and slow Ohmic diffusion. The efficiency of the first two stages can ...

  1. The Shaping of the Multipolar Pre-Planetary Nebula CRL 618 by Multi-directional Bullets

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Po-Sheng; Moraghan, Anthony; Smith, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the formation of the multipolar structures of the pre-planetary nebula (PPN) CRL 618, we perform 3D simulations using a multi-directional bullet model. The optical lobes of CRL 618 and fast molecular outflows at the tips of the lobes have been found to have similar expansion ages of ~ 100 yr. Additional fast molecular outflows were found near the source along the outflow axes with ages of ~ 45 yr, suggesting a second episode of bullet ejections. Thus, in our simulations, two episodes of bullet ejections are assumed. The shaping process is simulated using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamics code that includes molecular and atomic cooling. In addition, molecular chemistry is also included to calculate the CO intensity maps. Our results show the following: (1) Multi-epoch bullets interacting with the toroidal dense core can produce the collimated multiple lobes as seen in CRL 618. The total mass of the bullets is ~ 0.034 solar mass, consistent with the observed high-velocity CO emission in fast mole...

  2. THE SHAPING OF THE MULTIPOLAR PRE-PLANETARY NEBULA CRL 618 BY MULTIDIRECTIONAL BULLETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Po-Sheng; Lee, Chin-Fei; Moraghan, Anthony [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Smith, Michael, E-mail: posheng@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Centre for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    In order to understand the formation of the multipolar structures of the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618, we perform 3D simulations using a multidirectional bullet model. The optical lobes of CRL 618 and fast molecular outflows at the tips of the lobes have been found to have similar expansion ages of ∼100 yr. Additional fast molecular outflows were found near the source along the outflow axes with ages of ∼45 yr, suggesting a second episode of bullet ejections. Thus, in our simulations, two episodes of bullet ejections are assumed. The shaping process is simulated using the ZEUS-3D hydrodynamics code that includes molecular and atomic cooling. In addition, molecular chemistry is also included to calculate the CO intensity maps. Our results show the following: (1) Multiepoch bullets interacting with the toroidal dense core can produce the collimated multiple lobes as seen in CRL 618. The total mass of the bullets is ∼0.034 M{sub ⊙}, consistent with the observed high-velocity (HV) CO emission in fast molecular outflows. (2) The simulated CO J = 3–2 intensity maps show that the low-velocity cavity wall and the HV outflows along the lobes are reasonably consistent with the observations. The position–velocity diagram of the outflows along the outflow axes shows a linear increase of velocity with distance, similar to the observations. The ejections of these bullets could be due to magnetorotational explosions or nova-like explosions around a binary companion.

  3. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity. PMID:25402856

  4. Magnetar Giant Flares in Multipolar Magnetic Fields --- II. Flux Rope Eruptions With Current Sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. Especially, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. The released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares. The flux rope would go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is ...

  5. Observational Characteristics of Radio Emission Related to Multi-polar Magnetic Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Rui-Xiang Xie; Chun Xu; Shuo-Biao Shi; Yi-Hua Yan

    2005-01-01

    We present a large complex radio burst and its associated fast time structures observed on 2001 April 10 in the frequency range of 0.65-7.6 GHz. The NoRH radio image observation shows very complex radio source structures which include preexisting, newly emerging, submerging/cancelling polarities and a biposuggests that the radio burst is generated from a very complicated loop structure.According to the spectral and image observations, we assume that the beginning connection structure. A composite of radio continuum and fast time structures is contained in this flare. The various fast radio emission phenomena include normal and reverse drifting type Ⅲ bursts, and slowly drifting and no-drift structures.ture, which is an important source of the various types of fast time structures.The two-loop reconnection model can lead simultaneously to electron acceleration and corona heating. We have also analyzed the behaviors of coronal magnetic polarities and the emission processes of different types radio emission qualitatively.Interactions of a bipolar or multi-polar loop are consistent with our observational results. Our observations favor the magnetic reconnection configurations of the lar).

  6. Note: Optical receiver system for 152-channel magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2014-11-01

    An optical receiver system composing 13 serial data restore/synchronizer modules and a single module combiner converted optical 32-bit serial data into 32-bit synchronous parallel data for a computer to acquire 152-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. A serial data restore/synchronizer module identified 32-bit channel-voltage bits from 48-bit streaming serial data, and then consecutively reproduced 13 times of 32-bit serial data, acting in a synchronous clock. After selecting a single among 13 reproduced data in each module, a module combiner converted it into 32-bit parallel data, which were carried to 32-port digital input board in a computer. When the receiver system together with optical transmitters were applied to 152-channel superconducting quantum interference device sensors, this MEG system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz at a sample rate of 1 kSample/s per channel.

  7. Magnetoencephalography using a Multilayer hightc DC SQUID Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faley, M. I.; Poppe, U.; Borkowski, R. E. Dunin; Schiek, M.; Boers, F.; Chocholacs, H.; Dammers, J.; Eich, E.; Shah, N. J.; Ermakov, A. B.; Slobodchikov, V. Yu.; Maslennikov, Yu. V.; Koshelets, V. P.

    We describe tests of the use of a multilayer highTc DC SQUID magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) and compare our measurements with results obtained using a lowTc SQUID sensor. The integration of bias reversal readout electronics for highTc DC SQUID magnetometry into a commercial MEG data acquisition system is demonstrated. Results of measurements performed on a salinefilled head phantom are shown and the detection of an auditory evoked magnetic response of the human cortex elicited by a stimulus is illustrated. Future modifications of highTc DC SQUID sensors for applications in MEG, in order to reach a resolution of 1 fT/√Hz at 77.5 K over a wide frequency band, are outlined.

  8. Multi-channel atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography: a configuration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Begus, Samo; Xia, Hui; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Jazbinsek, Vojko; Trontelj, Zvonko; Romalis, Michael V

    2014-04-01

    Atomic magnetometers are emerging as an alternative to SQUID magnetometers for detection of biological magnetic fields. They have been used to measure both the magnetocardiography (MCG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. One of the virtues of the atomic magnetometers is their ability to operate as a multi-channel detector while using many common elements. Here we study two configurations of such a multi-channel atomic magnetometer optimized for MEG detection. We describe measurements of auditory evoked fields (AEF) from a human brain as well as localization of dipolar phantoms and auditory evoked fields. A clear N100m peak in AEF was observed with a signal-to-noise ratio of higher than 10 after averaging of 250 stimuli. Currently the intrinsic magnetic noise level is 4fTHz(-1/2) at 10Hz. We compare the performance of the two systems in regards to current source localization and discuss future development of atomic MEG systems.

  9. Magnetoencephalography in the study of epilepsy and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Elaine; Cerquiglini, Antonella; Cavanna, Andrea; Nakubulwa, Mable Angela; Furlong, Paul Lawrence; Witton, Caroline; Seri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The neural bases of altered consciousness in patients with epilepsy during seizures and at rest have raised significant interest in the last decade. This exponential growth has been supported by the parallel development of techniques and methods to investigate brain function noninvasively with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In this article, we review the contribution of magnetoencephalography to deconvolve the bioelectrical changes associated with impaired consciousness during seizures. We use data collected from a patient with refractory absence seizures to discuss how spike-wave discharges are associated with perturbations in optimal connectivity within and between brain regions and discuss indirect evidence to suggest that this phenomenon might explain the cognitive deficits experienced during prolonged 3/s spike-wave discharges.

  10. Note: Optical receiver system for 152-channel magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong [Center for Biosignals, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    An optical receiver system composing 13 serial data restore/synchronizer modules and a single module combiner converted optical 32-bit serial data into 32-bit synchronous parallel data for a computer to acquire 152-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals. A serial data restore/synchronizer module identified 32-bit channel-voltage bits from 48-bit streaming serial data, and then consecutively reproduced 13 times of 32-bit serial data, acting in a synchronous clock. After selecting a single among 13 reproduced data in each module, a module combiner converted it into 32-bit parallel data, which were carried to 32-port digital input board in a computer. When the receiver system together with optical transmitters were applied to 152-channel superconducting quantum interference device sensors, this MEG system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz at a sample rate of 1 kSample/s per channel.

  11. Synchronized brain activity and neurocognitive function in patients with low-grade glioma : a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Ingeborg; Douw, Linda; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Heimans, Jan J.; van Dijk, Bob W.; Postma, Tjeerd J.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Klein, Martin

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms underlying neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) by relating functional connectivity revealed by magnetoencephalography to neurocognitive function. We administered a battery of standardized neurocognitive tests measuring six neurocognitive

  12. Multichannel system based on a high sensitivity superconductive sensor for magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombetto, Sara; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio; Russo, Maurizio

    2014-07-08

    We developed a multichannel system based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for magnetoencephalography measurements. Our system consists of 163 fully-integrated SQUID magnetometers, 154 channels and 9 references, and all of the operations are performed inside a magnetically-shielded room. The system exhibits a magnetic field noise spectral density of approximatively 5 fT/Hz(1=2). The presented magnetoencephalography is the first system working in a clinical environment in Italy.

  13. Magnetoencephalography with a two-color pump-probe, fiber-coupled atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cort; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Weisend, Michael

    2010-12-01

    The authors have detected magnetic fields from the human brain with a compact, fiber-coupled rubidium spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer. Optical pumping is performed on the D1 transition and Faraday rotation is measured on the D2 transition. The beams share an optical axis, with dichroic optics preparing beam polarizations appropriately. A sensitivity of magnetoencephalography system. The design is amenable to arraying sensors around the head, providing a framework for noncryogenic, whole-head magnetoencephalography.

  14. Multichannel System Based on a High Sensitivity Superconductive Sensor for Magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rombetto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We developed a multichannel system based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs for magnetoencephalography measurements. Our system consists of 163 fully-integrated SQUID magnetometers, 154 channels and 9 references, and all of the operations are performed inside a magnetically-shielded room. The system exhibits a magnetic field noise spectral density of approximatively 5 fT/Hz1=2. The presented magnetoencephalography is the first system working in a clinical environment in Italy.

  15. Connexin 43 controls the multipolar phase of neuronal migration to the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuxin; Sun, Lin; Torii, Masaaki; Rakic, Pasko

    2012-05-22

    The prospective pyramidal neurons, migrating from the proliferative ventricular zone to the overlaying cortical plate, assume multipolar morphology while passing through the transient subventricular zone. Here, we show that this morphogenetic transformation, from the bipolar to the mutipolar and then back to bipolar again, is associated with expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) and, that knockdown of Cx43 retards, whereas its overexpression enhances, this morphogenetic process. In addition, we have observed that knockdown of Cx43 reduces expression of p27, whereas overexpression of p27 rescues the effect of Cx43 knockdown in the multipolar neurons. Furthermore, functional gap junction/hemichannel domain, and the C-terminal domain of Cx43, independently enhance the expression of p27 and promote the morphological transformation and migration of the multipolar neurons in the SVZ/IZ. Collectively, these results indicate that Cx43 regulates the passage of migrating neurons through their multipolar stage via p27 signaling and that interference with this process, by either genetic and/or environmental factors, may cause cortical malformations. PMID:22566616

  16. Turkey’s multi-polar diplomacy on its way to the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lika Mkrtchyan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkey conducts a multi-polar foreign diplomacy in order to strengthen its positions in the region, to gain control over the neighboring countries; as well as to make its way towards the European Union. Being on the EU’s waiting list, Turkey strives to get advantages of its prolonged status as a candidate country

  17. Evidence of multipolar response of Bacteriorhodopsin by noncollinear second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, F A; Larciprete, M C; Sibilia, C; Váró, G; Gergely, C

    2012-06-18

    Noncollinear second harmonic generation from a Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) oriented multilayer film was systematically investigated by varying the polarization state of both fundamental beams. Both experimental results and theoretical simulations, show that the resulting polarization mapping is an useful tool to put in evidence the optical chirality of the investigated film as well as the corresponding multipolar contributions to the nonlinear. PMID:22714524

  18. Design and performance of the LANL 158-channel magnetoencephalography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlachov, A. N. (Andrei N.); Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Espy, M. A. (Michelle A.); Best, E. D. (Elaine D.); Briles, M. Carolyn; Raby, E. Y. (Eric Y.); Flynn, E. R.

    2002-01-01

    Design and performance for a recently completed whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system using a superconducting imaging-surface (SIS) surrounding an array of SQUID magnetometers is reported. The helmet-like SIS is hemispherical in shape with a brim. The SIS images nearby sources while shields sensors from ambient magnetic noise. The shielding factor depends on magnetometer position and orientation. Typical shielding values of 200 in central sulcus area have been observed. Nine reference channels form three vector magnetometers, which are placed outside SIS. Signal channels consist of 149 SQUID magnetometers with 0.84nT/{Phi}{sub 0} field sensitivity and less then 3 fT/{radical}Hz noise. Typical SQUID - room temperature separations are about 20mm in the cooled state. Twelve 16-channel flux-lock loop units are connected to two 96-channel control units allowing up to 192 total SQUID channels. The control unit includes signal conditioning circuits as well as system test and control circuits. After conditioning all signals are fed to 192-channel, 24-bit data acquisition system capable of sampling up to 48kSa/sec/channel. The SIS-MEG system enables high-quality human functional brain data to be recorded in a one-layer magnetically shielded room.

  19. Complexity measures in magnetoencephalography: measuring "disorder" in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Brookes

    Full Text Available This paper details a methodology which, when applied to magnetoencephalography (MEG data, is capable of measuring the spatio-temporal dynamics of 'disorder' in the human brain. Our method, which is based upon signal entropy, shows that spatially separate brain regions (or networks generate temporally independent entropy time-courses. These time-courses are modulated by cognitive tasks, with an increase in local neural processing characterised by localised and transient increases in entropy in the neural signal. We explore the relationship between entropy and the more established time-frequency decomposition methods, which elucidate the temporal evolution of neural oscillations. We observe a direct but complex relationship between entropy and oscillatory amplitude, which suggests that these metrics are complementary. Finally, we provide a demonstration of the clinical utility of our method, using it to shed light on aberrant neurophysiological processing in schizophrenia. We demonstrate significantly increased task induced entropy change in patients (compared to controls in multiple brain regions, including a cingulo-insula network, bilateral insula cortices and a right fronto-parietal network. These findings demonstrate potential clinical utility for our method and support a recent hypothesis that schizophrenia can be characterised by abnormalities in the salience network (a well characterised distributed network comprising bilateral insula and cingulate cortices.

  20. Noise-free magnetoencephalography recordings of brain function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volegov, P; Matlachov, A; Mosher, J; Espy, M A; Kraus, R H Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-05-21

    Perhaps the greatest impediment to acquiring high-quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings is the ubiquitous ambient magnetic field noise. We have designed and built a whole-head MEG system using a helmet-like superconducting imaging surface (SIS) surrounding the array of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers used to measure the MEG signal. We previously demonstrated that the SIS passively shields the SQUID array from ambient magnetic field noise, independent of frequency, by 25-60 dB depending on sensor location. SQUID 'reference sensors' located on the outside of the SIS helmet measure ambient magnetic fields in very close proximity to the MEG magnetometers while being nearly perfectly shielded from all sources in the brain. The fact that the reference sensors measure no brain signal yet are located in close proximity to the MEG sensors enables very accurate estimation and subtraction of the ambient field noise contribution to the MEG sensors using an adaptive algorithm. We have demonstrated total ambient noise reduction factors in excess of 10{sup 6} (>120 dB). The residual noise for most MEG SQUID channels is at or near the intrinsic SQUID noise floor, typically 2-3 f T Hz{sup -1/2}. We are recording MEG signals with greater signal-to-noise than equivalent EEG measurements.

  1. Investigating the neural correlates of the Stroop effect with magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galer, Sophie; Op De Beeck, Marc; Urbain, Charline; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Ligot, Noémie; Wens, Vincent; Marty, Brice; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Peigneux, Philippe; De Tiège, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Reporting the ink color of a written word when it is itself a color name incongruent with the ink color (e.g. "red" printed in blue) induces a robust interference known as the Stroop effect. Although this effect has been the subject of numerous functional neuroimaging studies, its neuronal substrate is still a matter of debate. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of interference-related neural events using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and voxel-based analyses (SPM8). Evoked magnetic fields (EMFs) were acquired in 12 right-handed healthy subjects performing a color-word Stroop task. Behavioral results disclosed a classic interference effect with longer mean reaction times for incongruent than congruent stimuli. At the group level, EMFs' differences between incongruent and congruent trials spanned from 380 to 700 ms post-stimulus onset. Underlying neural sources were identified in the left pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and in the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) confirming the role of these regions in conflict processing.

  2. Wavelet-based localization of oscillatory sources from magnetoencephalography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lina, J M; Chowdhury, R; Lemay, E; Kobayashi, E; Grova, C

    2014-08-01

    Transient brain oscillatory activities recorded with Eelectroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) are characteristic features in physiological and pathological processes. This study is aimed at describing, evaluating, and illustrating with clinical data a new method for localizing the sources of oscillatory cortical activity recorded by MEG. The method combines time-frequency representation and an entropic regularization technique in a common framework, assuming that brain activity is sparse in time and space. Spatial sparsity relies on the assumption that brain activity is organized among cortical parcels. Sparsity in time is achieved by transposing the inverse problem in the wavelet representation, for both data and sources. We propose an estimator of the wavelet coefficients of the sources based on the maximum entropy on the mean (MEM) principle. The full dynamics of the sources is obtained from the inverse wavelet transform, and principal component analysis of the reconstructed time courses is applied to extract oscillatory components. This methodology is evaluated using realistic simulations of single-trial signals, combining fast and sudden discharges (spike) along with bursts of oscillating activity. The method is finally illustrated with a clinical application using MEG data acquired on a patient with a right orbitofrontal epilepsy.

  3. A magnetoencephalography study of visual processing of pain anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Andre G; Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Plow, Ela B; Burgess, Richard C; Mosher, John C

    2014-07-15

    Anticipating pain is important for avoiding injury; however, in chronic pain patients, anticipatory behavior can become maladaptive, leading to sensitization and limiting function. Knowledge of networks involved in pain anticipation and conditioning over time could help devise novel, better-targeted therapies. With the use of magnetoencephalography, we evaluated in 10 healthy subjects the neural processing of pain anticipation. Anticipatory cortical activity elicited by consecutive visual cues that signified imminent painful stimulus was compared with cues signifying nonpainful and no stimulus. We found that the neural processing of visually evoked pain anticipation involves the primary visual cortex along with cingulate and frontal regions. Visual cortex could quickly and independently encode and discriminate between visual cues associated with pain anticipation and no pain during preconscious phases following object presentation. When evaluating the effect of task repetition on participating cortical areas, we found that activity of prefrontal and cingulate regions was mostly prominent early on when subjects were still naive to a cue's contextual meaning. Visual cortical activity was significant throughout later phases. Although visual cortex may precisely and time efficiently decode cues anticipating pain or no pain, prefrontal areas establish the context associated with each cue. These findings have important implications toward processes involved in pain anticipation and maladaptive pain conditioning.

  4. [Investigation of the Cerebral Cortex Using Magnetoencephalography(MEG)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-04-01

    Cortical neurons are excited by signals from the thalamus that are conducted via thalamocortical fibers. As the cortex receives these signals, electric currents are conducted through the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex. These electric currents generate magnetic fields. These electric and magnetic currents can be recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG), respectively. The spatial resolution of MEG is higher than that of EEG because magnetic fields, unlike electric fields, are not affected by current conductivity. MEG also has several advantages over functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). It (1) is completely non-invasive; (2) measures neuronal activity rather than blood flow or metabolic changes; (3) has a higher temporal resolution than fMRI on the order of milliseconds; (4) enables the measurement of stimulus-evoked and event-related responses; (5) enables the analysis of frequency (i.e., brain rhythm) response, which means that physiological changes can be analyzed spatiotemporally; and (6) enables the detailed analysis of results from an individual subject, which eliminates the need to average results over several subjects. This latter advantage of MEG therefore enables the analysis of inter-individual differences.

  5. Complexity measures in magnetoencephalography: measuring "disorder" in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Matthew J; Hall, Emma L; Robson, Siân E; Price, Darren; Palaniyappan, Lena; Liddle, Elizabeth B; Liddle, Peter F; Robinson, Stephen E; Morris, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    This paper details a methodology which, when applied to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, is capable of measuring the spatio-temporal dynamics of 'disorder' in the human brain. Our method, which is based upon signal entropy, shows that spatially separate brain regions (or networks) generate temporally independent entropy time-courses. These time-courses are modulated by cognitive tasks, with an increase in local neural processing characterised by localised and transient increases in entropy in the neural signal. We explore the relationship between entropy and the more established time-frequency decomposition methods, which elucidate the temporal evolution of neural oscillations. We observe a direct but complex relationship between entropy and oscillatory amplitude, which suggests that these metrics are complementary. Finally, we provide a demonstration of the clinical utility of our method, using it to shed light on aberrant neurophysiological processing in schizophrenia. We demonstrate significantly increased task induced entropy change in patients (compared to controls) in multiple brain regions, including a cingulo-insula network, bilateral insula cortices and a right fronto-parietal network. These findings demonstrate potential clinical utility for our method and support a recent hypothesis that schizophrenia can be characterised by abnormalities in the salience network (a well characterised distributed network comprising bilateral insula and cingulate cortices).

  6. Localization of abnormal discharges causing insular epilepsy by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeon-Mi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    The insula, one of the five cerebral lobes of the brain, is located deep within the brain and lies mainly beneath the temporal lobe. Insular epilepsy can be easily confused and misdiagnosed as temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) because of the similar clinical symptoms and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) findings due to the insula location and neuronal connections with the temporal lobe. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has higher sensitivity and spatial resolution than scalp EEG, and thus can often identify epileptic discharges not revealed by scalp EEG. Simultaneous scalp EEG and MEG were performed to detect and localize epileptic discharges in two patients known to have insular epilepsy associated with cavernous angioma in the insula. Epileptic discharges were detected as abnormal spikes in the EEG and MEG findings. In Patient 1, the sources of all MEG spikes detected simultaneously by EEG and MEG (E/M-spikes) were localized in the anterior temporal lobe, similar to TLE. In contrast, the sources of all MEG spikes detected only by MEG (M-spikes) were adjacent to the insular lesion. In Patient 2, the sources of all MEG spikes detected simultaneously by EEG and MEG (E/M-spikes) were localized in the anterior temporal lobe. These findings indicate that MEG allows us to detect insular activity that is undetectable by scalp EEG. In conclusion, simultaneous EEG and MEG are helpful for detecting spikes and obtaining additional information about the epileptic origin and propagation in patients with insular epilepsy. PMID:22353789

  7. Noise-free magnetoencephalography recordings of brain function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, P.; Matlachov, A.; Mosher, J.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, R. H., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Perhaps the greatest impediment to acquiring high-quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings is the ubiquitous ambient magnetic field noise. We have designed and built a whole-head MEG system using a helmet-like superconducting imaging surface (SIS) surrounding the array of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers used to measure the MEG signal. We previously demonstrated that the SIS passively shields the SQUID array from ambient magnetic field noise, independent of frequency, by 25-60 dB depending on sensor location. SQUID 'reference sensors' located on the outside of the SIS helmet measure ambient magnetic fields in very close proximity to the MEG magnetometers while being nearly perfectly shielded from all sources in the brain. The fact that the reference sensors measure no brain signal yet are located in close proximity to the MEG sensors enables very accurate estimation and subtraction of the ambient field noise contribution to the MEG sensors using an adaptive algorithm. We have demonstrated total ambient noise reduction factors in excess of 106 (>120 dB). The residual noise for most MEG SQUID channels is at or near the intrinsic SQUID noise floor, typically 2-3 f T Hz-1/2. We are recording MEG signals with greater signal-to-noise than equivalent EEG measurements.

  8. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Object, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  9. Sequential Monte Carlo samplers for semi-linear inverse problems and application to magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, Sara; Sorrentino, Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the use of a recent class of sequential Monte Carlo methods for solving inverse problems characterized by a semi-linear structure, i.e. where the data depend linearly on a subset of variables and nonlinearly on the remaining ones. In this type of problems, under proper Gaussian assumptions one can marginalize the linear variables. This means that the Monte Carlo procedure needs only to be applied to the nonlinear variables, while the linear ones can be treated analytically; as a result, the Monte Carlo variance and/or the computational cost decrease. We use this approach to solve the inverse problem of magnetoencephalography, with a multi-dipole model for the sources. Here, data depend nonlinearly on the number of sources and their locations, and depend linearly on their current vectors. The semi-analytic approach enables us to estimate the number of dipoles and their location from a whole time-series, rather than a single time point, while keeping a low computational cost.

  10. The Neural Dynamics of Fronto-Parietal Networks in Childhood Revealed using Magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, Duncan E; Luckhoo, Henry; Woolrich, Mark; Kuo, Bo-Cheng; Nobre, Anna C; Scerif, Gaia

    2015-10-01

    Our ability to hold information in mind is limited, requires a high degree of cognitive control, and is necessary for many subsequent cognitive processes. Children, in particular, are highly variable in how, trial-by-trial, they manage to recruit cognitive control in service of memory. Fronto-parietal networks, typically recruited under conditions where this cognitive control is needed, undergo protracted development. We explored, for the first time, whether dynamic changes in fronto-parietal activity could account for children's variability in tests of visual short-term memory (VSTM). We recorded oscillatory brain activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG) as 9- to 12-year-old children and adults performed a VSTM task. We combined temporal independent component analysis (ICA) with general linear modeling to test whether the strength of fronto-parietal activity correlated with VSTM performance on a trial-by-trial basis. In children, but not adults, slow frequency theta (4-7 Hz) activity within a right lateralized fronto-parietal network in anticipation of the memoranda predicted the accuracy with which those memory items were subsequently retrieved. These findings suggest that inconsistent use of anticipatory control mechanism contributes significantly to trial-to-trial variability in VSTM maintenance performance.

  11. Synchronous neural interactions assessed by magnetoencephalography: a functional biomarker for brain disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.; Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Leuthold, Arthur C.; Lewis, Scott M.; Lynch, Joshua K.; Alonso, Aurelio A.; Aslam, Zaheer; Carpenter, Adam F.; Georgopoulos, Angeliki; Hemmy, Laura S.; Koutlas, Ioannis G.; Langheim, Frederick J. P.; Riley McCarten, J.; McPherson, Susan E.; Pardo, José V.; Pardo, Patricia J.; Parry, Gareth J.; Rottunda, Susan J.; Segal, Barbara M.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Stanwyck, John J.; Stephane, Massoud; Westermeyer, Joseph J.

    2007-12-01

    We report on a test to assess the dynamic brain function at high temporal resolution using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The essence of the test is the measurement of the dynamic synchronous neural interactions, an essential aspect of the brain function. MEG signals were recorded from 248 axial gradiometers while 142 human subjects fixated a spot of light for 45-60 s. After fitting an autoregressive integrative moving average (ARIMA) model and taking the stationary residuals, all pairwise, zero-lag, partial cross-correlations (PCCij0) and their z-transforms (zij0) between i and j sensors were calculated, providing estimates of the strength and sign (positive, negative) of direct synchronous coupling at 1 ms temporal resolution. We found that subsets of zij0 successfully classified individual subjects to their respective groups (multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, Sjögren's syndrome, chronic alcoholism, facial pain, healthy controls) and gave excellent external cross-validation results. Contribution by the authors: Designed research (APG); acquired data (AAA, IGK, FJPL, ACL, SML, JJS); analyzed data (APG, EK, ACL, JKL); wrote the paper (APG, EK, ACL, SML); contributed subjects (AAA, ZA, AFC, AG, LSH, IGK, FJPL, SML, JRM, SEM, JVP, PJP, GJP, SJR, BMS, SRS, MS, JJS, JJW); discussed results (All); contributed equally (ZA, AFC, AG, LSH, FJPL, JRM, SEM, JVP, PJP, GJP, SJR, BMS, SRS, MS, JJS, JJW).

  12. Multilevel Cortical Processing of Somatosensory Novelty: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeije, Gilles; Vaulet, Thibaut; Wens, Vincent; Marty, Brice; Goldman, Serge; De Tiège, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), this study investigates the spatio-temporal dynamics of the multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory change detection. Neuromagnetic signals of 16 healthy adult subjects (7 females and 9 males, mean age 29 ± 3 years) were recorded using whole-scalp-covering MEG while they underwent an oddball paradigm based on simple standard (right index fingertip tactile stimulation) and deviant (simultaneous right index fingertip and middle phalanx tactile stimulation) stimuli gathered into sequences to create and then deviate from stimulus patterns at multiple (local vs. global) levels of complexity. Five healthy adult subjects (3 females and 2 males, mean age 31, 6 ± 2 years) also underwent a similar oddball paradigm in which standard and deviant stimuli were flipped. Local deviations led to a somatosensory mismatch response peaking at 55–130 ms post-stimulus onset with a cortical generator located at the contralateral secondary somatosensory (cSII) cortex. The mismatch response was independent of the deviant stimuli physical characteristics. Global deviants led to a P300 response with cortical sources located bilaterally at temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and supplementary motor area (SMA). The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and the SMA were found to generate a contingent magnetic variation (CMV) attributed to top-down expectations. Amplitude of mismatch responses were modulated by top-down expectations and correlated with both the magnitude of the CMV and the P300 amplitude at the right TPJ. These results provide novel empirical evidence for a unified sensory novelty detection system in the human brain by linking detection of salient sensory stimuli in personal and extra-personal spaces to a common framework of multilevel cortical processing. PMID:27313523

  13. Categorical discrimination of human body parts by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Misaki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Okamura, Yumiko; Fukuma, Ryohei; Hirata, Masayuki; Araki, Toshihiko; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Humans recognize body parts in categories. Previous studies have shown that responses in the fusiform body area (FBA) and extrastriate body area (EBA) are evoked by the perception of the human body, when presented either as whole or as isolated parts. These responses occur approximately 190 ms after body images are visualized. The extent to which body-sensitive responses show specificity for different body part categories remains to be largely clarified. We used a decoding method to quantify neural responses associated with the perception of different categories of body parts. Nine subjects underwent measurements of their brain activities by magnetoencephalography (MEG) while viewing 14 images of feet, hands, mouths, and objects. We decoded categories of the presented images from the MEG signals using a support vector machine (SVM) and calculated their accuracy by 10-fold cross-validation. For each subject, a response that appeared to be a body-sensitive response was observed and the MEG signals corresponding to the three types of body categories were classified based on the signals in the occipitotemporal cortex. The accuracy in decoding body-part categories (with a peak at approximately 48%) was above chance (33.3%) and significantly higher than that for random categories. According to the time course and location, the responses are suggested to be body-sensitive and to include information regarding the body-part category. Finally, this non-invasive method can decode category information of a visual object with high temporal and spatial resolution and this result may have a significant impact in the field of brain-machine interface research.

  14. Neural effects of prolonged mental fatigue: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akira; Tanaka, Masaaki; Shigihara, Yoshihito; Kanai, Etsuko; Funakura, Masami; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Mental fatigue, manifest as a reduced efficiency for mental work load, is prevalent in modern society. It is important to understand the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue and to develop appropriate methods for evaluating mental fatigue. In this study we quantified the effect of a long-duration mental fatigue-inducing task on neural activity. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the time course change of neural activity over the long duration of the task trials. Nine healthy male volunteers participated in this study. They performed two mental fatigue-inducing tasks on separate days. The order of task presentation was randomized in a single-blinded, crossover fashion. Each task consisted of 25-min mental fatigue-inducing 0- or 2-back task session for three times. Subjective rating of mental fatigue sensation and electrocardiogram, and resting state MEG measurements were performed just before and after each task session. MEG data were analyzed using narrow-band adaptive spatial filtering methods. Alpha band (8-13 Hz) power in the visual cortex decreased after performing the mental fatigue-inducing tasks, and the decrease of alpha power was greater when they performed 2-back task trials. The decrease in alpha power was positively associated with the self-reported level of mental fatigue sensation and sympathetic nerve activity level. These results demonstrate that performing the prolonged mental fatigue-inducing task causes overactivation of the visual cortex, manifest as decreased alpha power in this brain region. Our results increase understanding of the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue and can be used to develop new quantitative methods to assess mental fatigue.

  15. Note: Unshielded bilateral magnetoencephalography system using two-dimensional gradiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yusuke; Kandori, Akihiko; Ogata, Kuniomi; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Kumagai, Yukio; Ohnuma, Mitsuru; Konaka, Kuni; Naritomi, Hiroaki

    2010-09-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) noninvasively measures neuronal activity with high temporal resolution. The aim of this study was to develop a new type of MEG system that can measure bilateral MEG waveforms without a magnetically shielded room, which is an obstacle to reducing both the cost and size of an MEG system. An unshielded bilateral MEG system was developed using four two-dimensional (2D) gradiometers and two symmetric cryostats. The 2D gradiometer, which is based on a low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device and wire-wound pickup coil detects a magnetic-field gradient in two orthogonal directions, or ∂/∂x(∂2Bz/∂z2), and reduces environmental magnetic-field noise by more than 50 dB. The cryostats can be symmetrically positioned in three directions: vertical, horizontal, and rotational. This makes it possible to detect bilateral neuronal activity in the cerebral cortex simultaneously. Bilateral auditory-evoked fields (AEF) of 18 elderly subjects were measured in an unshielded hospital environment using the MEG system. As a result, both the ipsilateral and the contralateral AEF component N100m, which is the magnetic counterpart of electric N100 in electroencephalography and appears about 100 ms after the onset of an auditory stimulus, were successfully detected for all the subjects. Moreover, the ipsilateral P50m and the contralateral P50m were also detected for 12 (67%) and 16 (89%) subjects, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the unshielded bilateral MEG system can detect MEG waveforms, which are associated with brain dysfunction such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and Down syndrome.

  16. Multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory novelty: a magnetoencephalography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles eNaeije

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using magnetoencephalography (MEG, this study investigates the spatio-temporal dynamics of the multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory change detection. Neuromagnetic signals of sixteen healthy adult subjects (7 females and 9 males, mean age 29 +/-3 y were recorded using whole-scalp-covering MEG while they underwent an oddball paradigm based on simple standard (right index fingertip tactile stimulation and deviant (simultaneous right index fingertip and middle phalanx tactile stimulation stimuli gathered into sequences to create and then deviate from stimulus patterns at multiple (local versus global levels of complexity. Five healthy adult subjects (3 females and 2 males, mean age 31,6 +/-2 y also underwent a similar oddball paradigm in which standard and deviant stimuli were flipped.Local deviations led to a somatosensory mismatch response peaking at 55-130 ms post-stimulus onset with a cortical generator located at the contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex. The mismatch response was independent of the deviant stimuli physical characteristics. Global deviants led to a P300 response with cortical sources located bilaterally at temporo-parietal junction (TPJ and supplementary motor area (SMA. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC and the SMA were found to generate a contingent magnetic variation (CMV attributed to top-down expectations. Amplitude of mismatch responses were modulated by top-down expectations and correlated with both the magnitude of the CMV and the P300 amplitude at the right TPJ. These results provide novel empirical evidence for a unified sensory novelty detection system in the human brain by linking detection of salient sensory stimuli in personal and extra-personal spaces to a common framework of multilevel cortical processing.

  17. Neural regulatory mechanism of desire for food: revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Fujimoto, Shigeo; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-16

    Currently, little is known about the brain function that allows individuals to suppress eating behavior. The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine changes in neural activity over time that were related to suppression of motivation to eat in 11 healthy males. The MEG experiment consisted of four motivation sessions and four suppression sessions in an alternating and counterbalanced order. During MEG recordings, participants viewed a set of food pictures and mosaic pictures projected onto a screen, and were then asked to rate their motivation to eat and the suppression of the motivation to eat during the recordings. The present study demonstrated a higher β-band (13-25 Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) level during the suppression sessions relative to the motivation sessions in the left supplementary motor area (SMA) 200-300 ms after the start of food picture presentation. Similar differences were also observed in θ-band (4-8 Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) after 500-600 ms. Negative relationships were observed between these levels of MEG responses and the number of food items for which the participants reported the motivation to eat during the MEG recordings. These findings indicate that the left DLPFC and SMA, particularly the DLPFC, play prominent roles in the suppression of motivation to eat. This may help to clarify the temporal aspects of the neural basis of self-control of appetitive motivation as well as aid development of self-control strategies such as cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with disordered appetite.

  18. Localizing evoked and induced responses to faces using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Gavin; Singh, Krish D

    2014-05-01

    A rich pattern of responses in frequency, time and space are known to be generated in the visual cortex in response to faces. Recently, a number of studies have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to try to record these responses non-invasively - in many cases using source analysis techniques based on the beamforming method. Here we sought both to characterize best practice for measuring face-specific responses using MEG beamforming, and to determine whether the results produced by the beamformer match evidence from other modalities. We measured activity to visual presentation of face stimuli and phase-scrambled control stimuli, and performed source analyses of both induced and evoked responses using Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry. We localized the gamma-band response to bilateral lateral occipital cortex, and both the gamma-band response and the M170-evoked response to the right fusiform gyrus. Differences in the gamma-band response between faces and scrambled stimuli were confined to the frequency range 50-90 Hz; gamma-band activity at higher frequencies did not differ between the two stimulus categories. We additionally identified a component of the M220-evoked response - localized to the parieto-occipital sulcus - which was enhanced for scrambled vs. unscrambled faces. These findings help to establish that MEG beamforming can localize face-specific responses in time, frequency and space with good accuracy (when validated against established findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial recordings), as well as contributing to the establishment of best methodological practice for the use of the beamformer method to measure face-specific responses.

  19. Categorical Discrimination of Human Body Parts by Magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misaki eNakamura

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Humans recognize body parts in categories. Previous studies have shown that responses in the fusiform body area (FBA and extrastriate body area (EBA are evoked by the perception of the human body, when presented either as whole or as isolated parts. These responses occur approximately 190 ms after body images are visualized. The extent to which body-sensitive responses show specificity for different body part categories remains to be largely clarified. We used a decoding method to quantify neural responses associated with the perception of different categories of body parts. Nine subjects underwent measurements of their brain activities by magnetoencephalography (MEG while viewing 14 images of feet, hands, mouths, and objects. We decoded categories of the presented images from the MEG signals using a support vector machine (SVM and calculated their accuracy by 10-fold cross-validation. For each subject, a response that appeared to be a body-sensitive response was observed and the MEG signals corresponding to the three types of body categories were classified based on the signals in the occipitotemporal cortex. The accuracy in decoding body-part categories (with a peak at approximately 48% was above chance (33.3% and significantly higher than that for random categories. According to the time course and location, the responses are suggested to be body-sensitive and to include information regarding the body-part category. Finally, this noninvasive method can decode category information of a visual object with high temporal and spatial resolution and this result may have a significant impact in the field of brain–machine interface research.

  20. Categorical discrimination of human body parts by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Misaki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Okamura, Yumiko; Fukuma, Ryohei; Hirata, Masayuki; Araki, Toshihiko; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Humans recognize body parts in categories. Previous studies have shown that responses in the fusiform body area (FBA) and extrastriate body area (EBA) are evoked by the perception of the human body, when presented either as whole or as isolated parts. These responses occur approximately 190 ms after body images are visualized. The extent to which body-sensitive responses show specificity for different body part categories remains to be largely clarified. We used a decoding method to quantify neural responses associated with the perception of different categories of body parts. Nine subjects underwent measurements of their brain activities by magnetoencephalography (MEG) while viewing 14 images of feet, hands, mouths, and objects. We decoded categories of the presented images from the MEG signals using a support vector machine (SVM) and calculated their accuracy by 10-fold cross-validation. For each subject, a response that appeared to be a body-sensitive response was observed and the MEG signals corresponding to the three types of body categories were classified based on the signals in the occipitotemporal cortex. The accuracy in decoding body-part categories (with a peak at approximately 48%) was above chance (33.3%) and significantly higher than that for random categories. According to the time course and location, the responses are suggested to be body-sensitive and to include information regarding the body-part category. Finally, this non-invasive method can decode category information of a visual object with high temporal and spatial resolution and this result may have a significant impact in the field of brain-machine interface research. PMID:26582986

  1. The emerging multi-polar world and China's grand game

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Rajan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-19

    This talk outlines a scenario describing an emerging multipolar world that is aligned with geographical regions. The stability and security of this multipolar world is examined with respect to demographics, trade (economics), resource constraints, and development. In particular I focus on Asia which has two large countries, China and India, competing for resources and markets and examine the emerging regional relations, opportunities and threats. These relationships must overcome many hurdles - the Subcontinent is in a weak position politically and strategically and faces many threats, and China's growing power could help stabilize it or create new threats. Since the fate of 1.5 billion (2.4 billion by 2050) people depends on how the Subcontinent evolves, this talk is meant to initiates a discussion of what China and India can do to help the region develop and stabilize.

  2. Wnt signaling regulates multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitard, Michael; Bocchi, Riccardo; Egervari, Kristof; Petrenko, Volodymyr; Viale, Beatrice; Gremaud, Stéphane; Zgraggen, Eloisa; Salmon, Patrick; Kiss, Jozsef Z

    2015-03-01

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development. PMID:25732825

  3. Multipolare Rhetorik vs. unilaterale Ambitionen : die Grenzen russischer Außenpolitik

    OpenAIRE

    Meister, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    "Das Eintreten für eine multipolare Weltordnung und gegen einen US-amerikanischen Unilateralismus ist eine Konstante russischer Außenpolitik seit dem Ende des Ost-West-Konflikts. Dabei gelten die Vereinten Nationen als die wichtigste internationale Organisation, um dieses Ziel zu erreichen. Jedoch führt Russlands Bekenntnis zu einer multipolaren Weltordnung nicht zu der Schlussfolgerung, multilateral zu handeln. Im Gegenteil, Moskau verfolgt eine klare Interessenpolitik, die weniger auf Konse...

  4. Analysis and Planning of 802.11n MIMO wireless network using Multi-Polarized Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Haotian; Nayyeri, Atefeh Dehghan

    2011-01-01

    MIMO (Multi Input Multi Output) technology is widely used in current wireless communication standard. Compared with SISO (Single Input Single Output) technology, MIMO can provide higher data rate and better communication quality. This thesis mainly focus on improving the communication quality of wireless local area network(WLAN) using wireless communication device with MIMO technology and Multi-polarized antenna. Meanwhile, an WLAN indoor plan example will be studied. The original WLAN indoor...

  5. Image-guided multipolar radiofrequency ablation of liver tumours: initial clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terraz, Sylvain; Constantin, Christophe; Becker, Christoph D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Majno, Pietro Edoardo; Mentha, Gilles [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Spahr, Laurent [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2007-09-15

    The local effectiveness and clinical usefulness of multipolar radiofrequency (RF) ablation of liver tumours was evaluated. Sixty-eight image-guided RF sessions were performed using a multipolar device with bipolar electrodes in 53 patients. There were 45 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and 42 metastases with a diameter {<=}3 cm (n = 55), 3.1-5 cm (n = 29) and >5 cm (n = 3); 26 nodules were within 5 mm from large vessels. Local effectiveness and complications were evaluated after RF procedures. Mean follow-up was 17 {+-} 10 months. Recurrence and survival rates were analysed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The primary and secondary technical effectiveness rate was 82% and 95%, respectively. The major and minor complication rate was 2.9%, respectively. The local tumour progression at 1- and 2-years was 5% and 9% for HCC nodules and 17% and 31% for metastases, respectively; four of 26 nodules (15%) close to vessels showed local progression. The survival at 1 year and 2 years was 97% and 90% for HCC and 84% and 68% for metastases, respectively. Multipolar RF technique creates ablation zones of adequate size and tailored shape and is effective to treat most liver tumours, including those close to major hepatic vessels. (orig.)

  6. POWER-SHIFTS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY. TRANSITION TOWARDS A MULTIPOLAR WORLD ORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IGNAT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to analyze the new realities and trends related to the new polarity of the global economy, and thus the reconfiguration of global power centers, a process characterized by two simultaneous trends: the rise of new powers and the relative decline of traditional powers. At the beginning of 21st century, global power is suffering two major changes: on the one hand it manifests a transition from West to East, from Atlantic to the Asia-Pacific, and on the other hand, a diffusion from state to non-state actors. Current global economic power has a multipolar distribution, shared between the United States, European Union, Japan and BRICs, with no balance of power between these poles, opposed by the strong ambition of rising countries, China especially, China that rivals the traditional powers represented by the developed countries. The evolution of the main macroeconomic indicators given by the most important global organizations, shows a gradual transition towards a multipolar world. Therefore, the United States is and will remain for a long period of time the global economic leader. However, as China, India and Brazil are growing rapidly, and Russia is looking for lost status, the world is becoming multipolar.

  7. RP58 Regulates the Multipolar-Bipolar Transition of Newborn Neurons in the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiaki Ohtaka-Maruyama

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that many brain diseases are associated with defects in neuronal migration, suggesting that this step of neurogenesis is critical for brain organization. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal migration remain largely unknown. Here, we identified the zinc-finger transcriptional repressor RP58 as a key regulator of neuronal migration via multipolar-to-bipolar transition. RP58−/− neurons exhibited severe defects in the formation of leading processes and never shifted to the locomotion mode. Cre-mediated deletion of RP58 using in utero electroporation in RP58flox/flox mice revealed that RP58 functions in cell-autonomous multipolar-to-bipolar transition, independent of cell-cycle exit. Finally, we found that RP58 represses Ngn2 transcription to regulate the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway; Ngn2 knockdown rescued migration defects of the RP58−/− neurons. Our findings highlight the critical role of RP58 in multipolar-to-bipolar transition via suppression of the Ngn2-Rnd2 pathway in the developing cerebral cortex.

  8. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-02-25

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions.

  9. 抑郁症患者执行控制脑皮质网络损害的脑磁源性研究%The primary explore of the damage of the executive control network in major depressive disorder:a dynamic causal model on magnetoencephalography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花玲玲; 姚志剑; 汤浩; 阎锐; 陈建淮; 韩颖琳; 卢青

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interconnection of the executive control network in major depressive disorder when they recognized the sad facial stimuli,and to discuss the aberrant mechanism of emotion processing.Methods Twenty major depressive patients and 20 well-matched healthy volunteers participated in the experiment.The brain actions of all subjects were recorded by the magnetoencephalography (MEG) when they were required to distinguish the emotion face.Based on prior knowledge,the interested brain area consisted of the primary visual cortex (V1),the orbitofrontal cortex(OFC),the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC),the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC).Then constructing three competing models to select an optimal model by the method of dynamic causal model(DCM),finally the differences of the effective connections of the optimal model between the depressed patients and healthy controls were analyzed.Results According to the results of Bayesian model selection (BMS),model 1 had the most exceedance probability of 0.80 with the features that there were bidirectional modulatory connections between the OFC,ACC and DLPFC.Given the best model,the parameters of effective connectivity of the optimal model were extracted,and then two-sample t-test over the model 1 was adopted.The modulatory effective connectivity from the OFC to the DLPFC in both hemisphere(t=-2.73,P=0.0096;t=-3.01,P=0.0046) and the OFC to the ACC (t=-2.93,P=0.0057) in the left hemisphere were significantly reduced in MDD.Conclusion There exists abnormal function of executive control network in depressed patients,the decreased effective connections between the OFC and the DLPFC,as well as the OFC and the ACC,may have correlation with the negative%目的 探究抑郁症患者在识别悲伤表情时执行控制网络中脑区的相互作用机制,并以此探讨抑郁症患者悲伤情绪处理异常的可能机制.方法 利用脑磁图(MEG)检测20例抑郁症患者及20例相匹配的健康对照者

  10. Between thought and expression, a magnetoencephalography study of the "tip-of-the-tongue" phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Karmen; Bradbury, David; Barnes, Gareth R; Leff, Alex P

    2014-10-01

    "Tip-of-the-tongue" (TOT) is the phenomenon associated with the inaccessibility of a known word from memory. It is universally experienced, increases in frequency with age, and is most common for proper nouns. It is a good model for the symptom of anomia experienced much more frequently by some aphasic patients following brain injury. Here, we induced the TOT state in older participants while they underwent brain scanning with magnetoencephalography to investigate the changes in oscillatory brain activity associated with failed retrieval of known words. Using confrontation naming of pictures of celebrities, we successfully induced the TOT state in 29% of trials and contrasted it with two other states: "Know" where the participants both correctly recognized the celebrity's face and retrieved their name and "Don't Know" when the participants did not recognize the celebrity. We wished to test Levelt's influential model of speech output by carrying out two analyses, one epoching the data to the point in time when the picture was displayed and the other looking back in time from when the participants first articulated their responses. Our main findings supported the components of Levelt's model, but not their serial activation over time as both semantic and motor areas were identified in both analyses. We also found enduring decreases in the alpha frequency band in the left ventral temporal region during the TOT state, suggesting ongoing semantic search. Finally, we identified reduced beta power in classical peri-sylvian language areas for the TOT condition, suggesting that brain regions that encode linguistic memories are also involved in their attempted retrieval.

  11. Increases in Language Lateralization in Normal Children as Observed Using Magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressel, Volker; Wilke, Marko; Lidzba, Karen; Lutzenberger, Werner; Krageloh-Mann, Ingeborg

    2008-01-01

    Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating hemispheric dominance for language have shown that hemispheric specialization increases with age. We employed magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate these effects as a function of normal development. In sum, 22 healthy children aged 7-16 years were investigated using…

  12. Learning New Names for New Objects: Cortical Effects as Measured by Magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Katri; Laine, Matti; Renvall, Kati; Saarinen, Timo; Martin, Nadine; Salmelin, Riitta

    2004-01-01

    We tracked the evolvement of naming-related cortical dynamics with magnetoencephalography when five normal adults successfully learned names and/or meanings of unfamiliar objects. In all subjects, the learning of new names was associated with pronounced cortical effects. The learning effect was of long latency and emerged as a change of activation…

  13. Semantic and Phonological Task-Set Priming and Stimulus Processing Investigated Using Magnetoencephalography (MEG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, F.; Rippon, G.; Hillebrand, A.; Singh, K. D.; Swithenby, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study the neural substrates of semantic and phonological task priming and task performance were investigated using single word task-primes. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were analysed using Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry (SAM) to determine the spatiotemporal and spectral characteristics of cortical responses. Comparisons were made…

  14. The Influence of Semantic Processing on Phonological Decisions in Children and Adults: A Magnetoencephalography (MEG) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Daniel T.; Ahlfors, Seppo P.; Mody, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the behavioral effects and neural activation patterns associated with implicit semantic processing influences on phonological judgments during reading in children and adults. Method: Whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings were obtained from 2 groups, children (9-13 years) and adults, performing a homophone judgment…

  15. Neural mechanisms underlying the exploration of small city maps using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaridi, Sofia; Christova, Peka; Christopoulos, Vassilios; Leuthold, Arthur C; Peponis, John; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2015-11-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying spatial cognition in the context of exploring realistic city maps are unknown. We conducted a novel brain imaging study to address the question of whether and how features of special importance for map exploration are encoded in the brain to make a spatial decision. Subjects explored by eyes small city maps exemplifying five different street network types in order to locate a hypothetical City Hall, while neural activity was recorded continuously by 248 magnetoencephalography (MEG) sensors at high temporal resolution. Monitoring subjects' eye positions, we locally characterized the maps by computing three spatial parameters of the areas that were explored. We computed the number of street intersections, the total street length, and the regularity index in the circular areas of 6 degrees of visual angle radius centered on instantaneous eye positions. We tested the hypothesis that neural activity during exploration is associated with the spatial parameters and modulated by street network type. All time series were rendered stationary and nonautocorrelated by applying an autoregressive integrated moving average model and taking the residuals. We then assessed the associations between the prewhitened time-varying MEG time series from 248 sensors and the prewhitened spatial parameters time series, for each street network type, using multiple linear regression analyses. In accord with our hypothesis, ongoing neural activity was strongly associated with the spatial parameters through localized and distributed networks, and neural processing of these parameters depended on the type of street network. Overall, processing of the spatial parameters seems to predominantly involve right frontal and prefrontal areas, but not for all street network layouts. These results are in line with findings from a series of previous studies showing that frontal and prefrontal areas are involved in the processing of spatial information and decision making

  16. Assessment of cortical dysfunction in human strabismic amblyopia using magnetoencephalography (MEG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.J. [Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey (United Kingdom); Holliday, I.E.; Harding, G.F.A. [Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Psychology, Aston University, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use the technique of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the effects of strabismic amblyopia on the processing of spatial information within the occipital cortex of humans. We recorded evoked magnetic responses to the onset of a chromatic (red/green) sinusoidal grating of periodicity 0.5-4.0 c deg{sup -1} using a 19-channel SQUID-based neuromagnetometer. Evoked responses were recorded monocularly on six amblyopes and six normally-sighted controls, the stimuli being positioned near the fovea in the lower right visual field of each observer. For comparison, the spatial contrast sensitivity function (CSF) for the detection of chromatic gratings was measured for one amblyope and one control using a two alternate forced-choice psychophysical procedure. We chose red/green sinusoids as our stimuli because they evoke strong magnetic responses from the occipital cortex in adult humans (Fylan, Holliday, Singh, Anderson and Harding. (1997). Neuroimage, 6, 47-57). Magnetic field strength was plotted as a function of stimulus spatial frequency for each eye of each subject. Interocular differences were only evident within the amblyopic group: for stimuli of 1-2 c deg{sup -1}, the evoked responses had significantly longer latencies and reduced amplitudes through the amblyopic eye (P<0.05). Importantly, the extent of the deficit was uncorrelated with either Snellen acuity or contrast sensitivity. Localization of the evoked responses was performed using a single equivalent current dipole model. Source localizations, for both normal and amblyopic subjects, were consistent with neural activity at the occipital pole near the V1/V2 border. We conclude that MEG is sensitive to the deficit in cortical processing associated with human amblyopia, and can be used to make quantitative neurophysiological measurements. The nature of the cortical deficit is discussed. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein–Ligand Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein–ligand complexes. Such fluorine–backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin–MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes with menin. We found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin–MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions in protein–ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin–MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine–backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein–protein interactions. PMID:26288158

  18. Nonlinear Accelerator Problems via Wavelets; 2, Orbital Dynamics in General Multipolar Field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorova, A N; Fedorova, Antonina N.; Zeitlin, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    In this series of eight papers we present the applications of methods from wavelet analysis to polynomial approximations for a number of accelerator physics problems. In this part we consider orbital motion in transverse plane for a single particle in a circular magnetic lattice in case when we take into account multipolar expansion up to an arbitrary finite number. We reduce initial dynamical problem to the finite number (equal to the number of n-poles) of standard algebraical problem and represent all dynamical variables via an expansion in the base of periodical wavelets.

  19. Multipolar third-harmonic generation driven by optically-induced magnetic resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Daria A; Smirnov, Lev A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the third-harmonic generation from high-index dielectric nanoparticles and discuss the basic features and multipolar nature of the parametrically generated electromagnetic fields near the Mie-type optical resonances in silicon particles. By combining both analytical and numerical methods, we study the nonlinear scattering from simple nanoparticle geometries such as spheres and disks driven by the magnetic dipole resonance. We reveal the approaches for manipulating and directing the resonantly enhanced nonlinear emission with subwavelength all-dielectric structures that can be of a particular interest for a design of nonlinear optical antennas and engineering the magnetic optical nonlinear response at nanoscale.

  20. Role of the multipolar black-body radiation shifts in the atomic clocks at the 10-18 uncertainty level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    We present here an overview of the role of the multipolar black-body radiation (BBR) shifts in the single ion atomic clocks to appraise the anticipated 10-18 uncertainty level. With an attempt to use the advanced technologies for reducing the instrumental uncertainties at the unprecedented low, it is essential to investigate contributions from the higher-order systematics to achieve the ambitious goal of securing the most precise clock frequency standard. In this context, we have analysed contributions to the BBR shifts from the multipolar polarizabilities in a few ion clocks.

  1. Ocean surface slick characterization by multi-polarization Radarsat-2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrunes, Stine; Brekke, Camilla; Eltoft, Torbjørn

    2012-09-01

    Marine oil spills are an important environmental problem, and satellite SAR remote sensing have become a valuable tool for the detection and monitoring of these spills. Natural phenomena with similar appearance as oil in SAR images, producing false detections, compose a challenge for oil spill observation services. One such lookalike phenomena is biogenic slicks produced by marine organisms. In this study we evaluate multi-polarization features for oil spill characterization and oil versus biogenic slick discrimination. During large-scale oil-on-water exercises conducted in the North Sea in June 2011 and June 2012, both mineral oil and plant oil were released and imaged by Radarsat-2 in Fine Quad-polarization mode. The plant oil will form a lm resembling biogenic slicks. The mineral oil spill and simulated look-alike are in this study compared based on multi-polarization features, combining the information in HH and VV channels. The polarimetric measurements from 2011 have earlier been analysed, and a potential for discrimination between mineral oil and biogenic slicks is found. The aim of the current study is to repeat the polarimetric analysis on the new independent data set from 2012. Preliminary results of the 2012 data set reveal both internal and between slick type variations, giving support to our previous findings from 2011.

  2. Multipolar electromagnetic fields around neutron stars: exact vacuum solutions and related properties

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic field topology in the surrounding of neutron stars is one of the key questions in pulsar magnetospheric physics. A very extensive literature exists about the assumption of a dipolar magnetic field but very little progress has been made in attempts to include multipolar components in a self-consistent way. In this paper, we study the effect of multipolar electromagnetic fields anchored in the star. We give exact analytical solutions in closed form for any order $l$ and apply them to the retarded point quadrupole ($l=2$), hexapole ($l=3$) and octopole ($l=4$), a generalization of the retarded point dipole ($l=1$). We also compare the Poynting flux from each multipole and show that the spin down luminosity depends on the ratio $R/r_{\\rm L}$, $R$ being the neutron star radius and $r_{\\rm L}$ the light-cylinder radius. Therefore the braking index also depends on $R/r_{\\rm L}$. As such multipole fields possess very different topology, most importantly smaller length scales compared to the dipolar field...

  3. Wnt Signaling Regulates Multipolar-to-Bipolar Transition of Migrating Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Boitard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during the multipolar stage plays a critical role in polarizing and orienting cells for radial migration. In addition, we show that reduced canonical Wnt signaling is triggered cell autonomously by time-dependent expression of Wnt5A and activation of non-canonical signaling. We identify ephrin-B1 as a canonical Wnt-signaling-regulated target in control of the multipolar-to-bipolar switch. These findings highlight the critical role of Wnt signaling activity in neuronal positioning during cortical development.

  4. Dependence of the probabilities of the electric-multipole electron transitions in W24+ on multipolarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usually it is accepted that the probabilities of the electric-multipole electron transitions are rapidly decreasing functions of their multipolarity. Therefore while calculating the probabilities of electronic transitions between the configurations of certain chosen parities, it seems sufficient to take into account the first nonzero term, i.e., to consider the electron transitions of lowest multipolarity permitted by the exact selection rules. This paper aims at verifying this assumption on the example of electric-octupole transitions in W24+ ion. For this purpose the large-scale multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Fock calculations have been performed for the configurations [Kr]4d104f4 and [Kr]4d104f35s energy levels of W24+ ion. The relativistic corrections were taken into account in the quasirelativistic Breit-Pauli and fully relativistic Breit (taking into account QED effects) approximations. The role of correlation, relativistic, and QED corrections is discussed. Line strengths, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities in Coulomb and Babushkin gauges are presented for E1 and E3 transitions among these levels.

  5. Multi-polar resistance switching and memory effect in copper phthalocyanine junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper phthalocyanine junctions, fabricated by magnetron sputtering and evaporating methods, show multi-polar (unipolar and bipolar) resistance switching and the memory effect. The multi-polar resistance switching has not been observed simultaneously in one organic material before. With both electrodes being cobalt, the unipolar resistance switching is universal. The high resistance state is switched to the low resistance state when the bias reaches the set voltage. Generally, the set voltage increases with the thickness of copper phthalocyanine and decreases with increasing dwell time of bias. Moreover, the low resistance state could be switched to the high resistance state by absorbing the phonon energy. The stability of the low resistance state could be tuned by different electrodes. In Au/copper phthalocyanine/Co system, the low resistance state is far more stable, and the bipolar resistance switching is found. Temperature dependence of electrical transport measurements demonstrates that there are no obvious differences in the electrical transport mechanism before and after the resistance switching. They fit quite well with Mott variable range hopping theory. The effect of Al2O3 on the resistance switching is excluded by control experiments. The holes trapping and detrapping in copper phthalocyanine layer are responsible for the resistance switching, and the interfacial effect between electrodes and copper phthalocyanine layer affects the memory effect. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. When the genome plays dice: circumvention of the spindle assembly checkpoint and near-random chromosome segregation in multipolar cancer cell mitoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gisselsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal cell division is coordinated by a bipolar mitotic spindle, ensuring symmetrical segregation of chromosomes. Cancer cells, however, occasionally divide into three or more directions. Such multipolar mitoses have been proposed to generate genetic diversity and thereby contribute to clonal evolution. However, this notion has been little validated experimentally. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromosome segregation and DNA content in daughter cells from multipolar mitoses were assessed by multiphoton cross sectioning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in cancer cells and non-neoplastic transformed cells. The DNA distribution resulting from multipolar cell division was found to be highly variable, with frequent nullisomies in the daughter cells. Time-lapse imaging of H2B/GFP-labelled multipolar mitoses revealed that the time from the initiation of metaphase to the beginning of anaphase was prolonged and that the metaphase plates often switched polarity several times before metaphase-anaphase transition. The multipolar metaphase-anaphase transition was accompanied by a normal reduction of cellular cyclin B levels, but typically occurred before completion of the normal separase activity cycle. Centromeric AURKB and MAD2 foci were observed frequently to remain on the centromeres of multipolar ana-telophase chromosomes, indicating that multipolar mitoses were able to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint with some sister chromatids remaining unseparated after anaphase. Accordingly, scoring the distribution of individual chromosomes in multipolar daughter nuclei revealed a high frequency of nondisjunction events, resulting in a near-binomial allotment of sister chromatids to the daughter cells. CONCLUSION: The capability of multipolar mitoses to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint system typically results in a near-random distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells. Spindle multipolarity could thus be a highly efficient

  7. Differential brain activity states during the perception and nonperception of illusory motion as revealed by magnetoencephalography

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, David A.; Leuthold, Arthur C.; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    2010-01-01

    We studied visual perception using an annular random-dot motion stimulus called the racetrack. We recorded neural activity using magnetoencephalography while subjects viewed variants of this stimulus that contained no inherent motion or various degrees of embedded motion. Subjects reported seeing rotary motion during viewing of all stimuli. We found that, in the absence of any motion signals, patterns of brain activity differed between states of motion perception and nonperception. Furthermor...

  8. Age-related sex differences in language lateralization: a magnetoencephalography (MEG) study in children

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Vickie Y.; MacDonald, Matt J.; Oh, Anna; Hua, Gordon N.; De Nil, Luc F.; Elizabeth W Pang

    2014-01-01

    It is well supported by behavioral and neuroimaging studies that typical language function is lateralized to the left hemisphere in the adult brain and this laterality is less well defined in children. The behavioral literature suggests there maybe be sex differences in language development but this has not been examined systematically using neuroimaging. In this study, magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to investigate the spatiotemporal patterns of language lateralization as a function of...

  9. Magnetoencephalography study of brain dynamics in young children born extremely preterm

    OpenAIRE

    Cepeda, I.L.; Grunau, R.E.; Weinberg, H.; Herdman, A.T.; Cheung, T; Liotti, M.; Amir, A; Synnes, A.; Whitfield, M

    2007-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded while 5–7 year-old children were performing a visual–spatial memory recognition task. Full-term children showed greater gamma-band (30–50 Hz) amplitude in the right temporal region during the task, than children who were born extremely preterm. These results may represent altered brain processing in extremely preterm children who escape major impairment.

  10. Research on novel multi-layer and multi-polarized slot-coupling planar antenna array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hou; Wu Wenzhou; Wang Jian

    2009-01-01

    A novel multi-layer planar antenna array to achieve multi-polarized radiation is developed. U-shaped coupling slots are embedded in the ground plane to extend the bandwidth. The phase relation between adjacent elements in the radiation field is analyzed when adjacent elements are fed in opposite phase. Return loss and radiation pattern are measured for a 16-element antenna array at 12.5 GHz. The radiation pattern shows a good agreement with the calculated one in the shape of the main beam. The return-loss of the proposed antenna array is less than -20 dB in the 12.5 GHz frequency band (12.25-12.75 GHz). Because of two feed ports the antenna can transmit arbitrary elliptic polarized waves if the two feed ports have different amplitude and phase. The main factors such as element spacing, substrate medium and manufacturing imperfection are analyzed and the corresponding conclusions are presented.

  11. Distributed Multipolar Expansion Approach to Calculation of Excitation Energy Transfer Couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błasiak, Bartosz; Maj, Michał; Cho, Minhaeng; Góra, Robert W

    2015-07-14

    We propose a new approach for estimating the electrostatic part of the excitation energy transfer (EET) coupling between electronically excited chromophores based on the transition density-derived cumulative atomic multipole moments (TrCAMM). In this approach, the transition potential of a chromophore is expressed in terms of truncated distributed multipolar expansion and analytical formulas for the TrCAMMs are derived. The accuracy and computational feasibility of the proposed approach is tested against the exact Coulombic couplings, and various multipole expansion truncation schemes are analyzed. The results of preliminary calculations show that the TrCAMM approach is capable of reproducing the exact Coulombic EET couplings accurately and efficiently and is superior to other widely used schemes: the transition charges from electrostatic potential (TrESP) and the transition density cube (TDC) method.

  12. The fate of chrysotile-induced multipolar mitosis and aneuploid population in cultured lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Araujo Cortez

    Full Text Available Chrysotile is one of the six types of asbestos, and it is the only one that can still be commercialized in many countries. Exposure to other types of asbestos has been associated with serious diseases, such as lung carcinomas and pleural mesotheliomas. The association of chrysotile exposure with disease is controversial. However, in vitro studies show the mutagenic potential of chrysotile, which can induce DNA and cell damage. The present work aimed to analyze alterations in lung small cell carcinoma cultures after 48 h of chrysotile exposure, followed by 2, 4 and 8 days of recovery in fiber-free culture medium. Some alterations, such as aneuploid cell formation, increased number of cells in G2/M phase and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed even after 8 days of recovery. The presence of chrysotile fibers in the cell cultures was detected and cell morphology was observed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After 4 and 8 days of recovery, only a few chrysotile fragments were present in some cells, and the cellular morphology was similar to that of control cells. Cells transfected with the GFP-tagged α-tubulin plasmid were treated with chrysotile for 24 or 48 h and cells in multipolar mitosis were observed by time-lapse microscopy. Fates of these cells were established: retention in metaphase, cell death, progression through M phase generating more than two daughter cells or cell fusion during telophase or cytokinesis. Some of them were related to the formation of aneuploid cells and cells with abnormal number of centrosomes.

  13. Investigation of optimal parameters for finite element solution of the forward problem in magnetic field tomography based on magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristovich, K Y; Khan, S H [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London, Northampton Square, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Borovkov, A I, E-mail: kirill.aristovich.1@city.ac.uk [St Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytechnicheskaya Street 29, St Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-17

    This paper presents an investigation of optimal parameters for finite element (FE) solution of the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) brain imaging based on magnetoencephalography (MEG). It highlights detailed analyses of the main parameters involved and evaluates their optimal values for various cases of FE model solutions (e.g., steady-state, transient, etc.). In each case, a detail study of some of the main parameters and their effects on FE solution and its accuracy are carefully tested and evaluated. These parameters include: total number and size of 3D FE elements used, number and size of elements used in surface discretisation (of both white and grey matters of the brain), number and size of elements used for approximation of current sources, number of anisotropic properties used in steady-state and transient solutions, and the time steps used in transient analyses. The optimal values of these parameters in relation to solution accuracy and mesh convergence criteria have been found and presented.

  14. Investigation of optimal parameters for finite element solution of the forward problem in magnetic field tomography based on magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.; Borovkov, A. I.

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of optimal parameters for finite element (FE) solution of the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) brain imaging based on magnetoencephalography (MEG). It highlights detailed analyses of the main parameters involved and evaluates their optimal values for various cases of FE model solutions (e.g., steady-state, transient, etc.). In each case, a detail study of some of the main parameters and their effects on FE solution and its accuracy are carefully tested and evaluated. These parameters include: total number and size of 3D FE elements used, number and size of elements used in surface discretisation (of both white and grey matters of the brain), number and size of elements used for approximation of current sources, number of anisotropic properties used in steady-state and transient solutions, and the time steps used in transient analyses. The optimal values of these parameters in relation to solution accuracy and mesh convergence criteria have been found and presented.

  15. Magnetoencephalography - a noninvasive brain imaging method with 1 ms time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Gratta, Cosimo; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca [Department of Clinical Sciences and Bioimaging, University ' G D' Annunzio' , Chieti (Italy); ITAB-Institute for Advanced Biomedical Technologies, University ' G D' Annunzio' , (Italy); INFM-National Institute for the Physics of Matter, Research Unit of L' Aquila (Italy); Tecchio, Franca [IESS-Institute for Solid State Electronics, National Council of Research, Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    The basics of magnetoencephalography (MEG), i.e. the measurement and the analysis of the tiny magnetic fields generated outside the scalp by the working human brain, are reviewed. Three main topics are discussed: (1) the relationship between the magnetic field and its generators, including on one hand the neurophysiological basis and the physical theory of magnetic field generation, and on the other hand the techniques for the estimation of the sources from the magnetic field measurements; (2) the instrumental techniques and the laboratory practice of neuromagnetic field measurement and (3) the main applications of MEG in basic neurophysiology as well as in clinical neurology. (author)

  16. Evidence for Early Morphological Decomposition: Combining Masked Priming with Magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Minna; Monahan, Philip J.; Poeppel, David

    2011-01-01

    Are words stored as morphologically structured representations? If so, when during word recognition are morphological pieces accessed? Recent masked priming studies support models that assume early decomposition of (potentially) morphologically complex words. The electrophysiological evidence, however, is inconsistent. We combined masked…

  17. Self-assembly characteristics of a multipolar donor-acceptor-based bis-pyrene integrated molecular tweezer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Asthana; Geeta Hundal; Pritam Mukhopadhyay

    2014-09-01

    A modular design of a molecular tweezer is presented that integrates a multipolar D--A [D: Donor, A: Acceptor] scaffold, 1-aminopyrene-based fluorophore units and L-alanine-based linkers. The synthesis of the molecule is based on two-fold aromatic nucleophilic reactions (ArSN) and coupling reactions of the acid and amino functionalities. This molecule crystallizes in a non-centrosymmteric (P21) space group.We present its rich self-assembly characteristics that involves an array of -stacking interactions. In addition, the molecular tweezer within its cleft forms H-bonding with two dimethylformamide molecules. Such multipolar D--A systems containing chiral and fluorophore units are potential candidatesfor a number of electronic and photonic applications.

  18. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyu Li

    Full Text Available The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17 is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5 in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ. Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice.

  19. ADAM17 is critical for multipolar exit and radial migration of neuronal intermediate progenitor cells in mice cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingyu; Zhang, Zhengyu; Li, Zengmin; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Bin; Pan, Le; Ma, Zhixing; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    The radial migration of neuronal progenitor cells is critical for the development of cerebral cortex layers. They go through a critical step transforming from multipolar to bipolar before outward migration. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM17) is a transmembrane protease which can process many substrates involved in cell-cell interaction, including Notch, ligands of EGFR, and some cell adhesion molecules. In this study, we used in utero electroporation to knock down or overexpress ADAM17 at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) in neuronal progenitor cells to examine the role of ADAM17 in cortical embryonic neurogenesis. Our results showed that the radial migration of ADAM17-knocked down cells were normal till E16.5 and reached the intermediate zone (IZ). Then most transfected cells stopped migration and stayed at the IZ to inner cortical plate (CP) layer at E18.5, and there was higher percentage of multipolar cells at IZ layer in the ADAM17-knocked down group compared to the cells in control group. Marker staining revealed that those ADAM17-knocked down cells differentiated normally from neural stem cells (NSCs) to neuronal intermediate progenitor cells (nIPCs) but did not differentiate into mature neurons. The migration and multipolar exit defects caused by ADAM17 knockdown could be partially rescued by over-expressing an shRNA resistant ADAM17, while overexpressing ADAM17 alone did not affect the radial migration. Taken together, our results showed for the first time that, ADAM17 is critical in regulating the multipolar-stage exit and radial migration of the nIPCs during telencephalon cortex development in mice. PMID:23755270

  20. Multipolarity analysis for 14C high-energy resonance populated by (18O,16O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12C(18O,16O)14C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition

  1. Multipolarity of the 2-→1- , ground-state transition in 210Bi via multivariable angular correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Szpak, B.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; Bocchi, G.; Bottoni, S.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C.; Urban, W.

    2016-07-01

    The multipolarity of the main transition leading to the ground state in 210Bi was investigated using the angular correlations of γ rays. The analyzed γ -coincidence data were obtained from the 209Bi(n ,γ )210Bi experiment performed at Institut Laue-Langevin Grenoble at the PF1B cold-neutron facility. The EXILL (EXOGAM at the ILL) multidetector array, consisting of 16 high-purity germanium detectors, was used to detect γ transitions. The mixing ratio of the 320-keV γ ray was defined by minimizing a multivariable χΣ2 function constructed from the coefficients of angular correlation functions for seven pairs of strong transitions in 210Bi. As a result, the almost pure M 1 multipolarity of the 320-keV γ ray was obtained, with an E 2 admixture of less than 0.6% only (95% confidence limit). Based on this multipolarity the neutron-capture cross section leading to the ground state in 210Bi, that decays in turn to radiotoxic 210Po, was determined to be within the limits 21.3(9) and 21.5(9) mb. This result is important for nuclear reactor applications.

  2. The bereitschaftspotential paradigm in investigating voluntary movement organization in humans using magnetoencephalography (MEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristeva-Feige, R; Rossi, S; Feige, B; Mergner, T; Lücking, C H; Rossini, P M

    1997-02-01

    In 1965, Kornhuber and Deecke first described the bereitschaftspotential (BP), a paradigm for investigating the organization of voluntary movement in humans, using electroencephalography (EEG). This paradigm has since been used in many studies for investigating motor control in healthy humans and patients. Over the last years, the advantages of magnetoencephalography (MEG) have been applied to the BP paradigm by a number of researchers. The main advantage of magnetoencephalography over electroencephalography is that MEG has a higher localization accuracy. This is due to the fact that the different structures of the head (brain, liquor cerebrospinalis, skull and scalp) influence the magnetic fields less than the volume current flow that causes the EEG. Additionally, the MEG is reference free, so that the localization of sources with a given precision is easier for MEG than it is for EEG. The present protocol shows in detail how the bereitschaftspotential paradigm can be applied using MEG. Some additional paradigms for investigating motor plasticity, somatosensory gating, Parkinson disease, and the efference copy theory are suggested as well.

  3. Locating Melody Processing Activity in Auditory Cortex with Magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Roy D; Andermann, Martin; Uppenkamp, Stefan; Rupp, André

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for isolating the brain activity associated with melodic pitch processing. The magnetoencephalograhic (MEG) response to a four note, diatonic melody built of French horn notes, is contrasted with the response to a control sequence containing four identical, "tonic" notes. The transient response (TR) to the first note of each bar is dominated by energy-onset activity; the melody processing is observed by contrasting the TRs to the remaining melodic and tonic notes of the bar (2-4). They have uniform shape within a tonic or melodic sequence which makes it possible to fit a 4-dipole model and show that there are two sources in each hemisphere--a melody source in the anterior part of Heschl's gyrus (HG) and an onset source about 10 mm posterior to it, in planum temporale (PT). The N1m to the initial note has a short latency and the same magnitude for the tonic and the melodic sequences. The melody activity is distinguished by the relative sizes of the N1m and P2m components of the TRs to notes 2-4. In the anterior source a given note elicits a much larger N1m-P2m complex with a shorter latency when it is part of a melodic sequence. This study shows how to isolate the N1m, energy-onset response in PT, and produce a clean melody response in the anterior part of auditory cortex (HG).

  4. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  5. Neutron star deformation due to arbitrary-order multipolar magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mastrano, Alpha; Melatos, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Certain multi-wavelength observations of neutron stars, such as intermittent radio emissions from rotation-powered pulsars beyond the pair-cascade death line, the pulse profile of the magnetar SGR 1900+14 after its 1998 August 27 giant flare, and X-ray spectral features of PSR J0821-4300 and SGR 0418+5729, suggest that the magnetic fields of non-accreting neutron stars are not purely dipolar and may contain higher-order multipoles. Here, we calculate the ellipticity of a non-barotropic neutron star with (i) a quadrupole poloidal-toroidal field, and (ii) a purely poloidal field containing arbitrary multipoles, deriving the relation between the ellipticity and the multipole amplitudes. We present, as a worked example, a purely poloidal field comprising dipole, quadrupole, and octupole components. We show the correlation between field energy and ellipticity for each multipole, that the l=4 multipole has the lowest energy, and that l=5 has the lowest ellipticity. We show how a mixed multipolar field creates an ob...

  6. Inspiral, merger and ringdown of unequal mass black hole binaries: a multipolar analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, E; Cardoso, V; González, J A; Hannam, M; Husa, S; Sperhake, U; Berti, Emanuele; Bruegmann, Bernd; Cardoso, Vitor; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Hannam, Mark; Husa, Sascha; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study the inspiral, merger and ringdown of unequal mass black hole binaries by analyzing a catalogue of numerical simulations for seven different values of the mass ratio (from q=M2/M1=1 to q=4). We compare numerical and Post-Newtonian results by projecting the waveforms onto spin-weighted spherical harmonics, characterized by angular indices (l,m). We find that the Post-Newtonian equations predict remarkably well the relation between the wave amplitude and the orbital frequency for each (l,m), and that the convergence of the Post-Newtonian series to the numerical results is non-monotonic. To leading order the total energy emitted in the merger phase scales like eta^2 and the spin of the final black hole scales like eta, where eta=q/(1+q)^2 is the symmetric mass ratio. We study the multipolar distribution of the radiation, finding that odd-l multipoles are suppressed in the equal mass limit. Higher multipoles carry a larger fraction of the total energy as q increases. We introduce and compare three differe...

  7. CT-guided Bipolar and Multipolar Radiofrequency Ablation (RF Ablation) of Renal Cell Carcinoma: Specific Technical Aspects and Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Lemm, G.; Hohenstein, E. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany); Bellemann, N.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Goezen, A. S.; Rassweiler, J. [Clinic for Urology, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH (Germany); Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, INF 110, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, P. L. [Minimally Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Clinic for Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CT-guided bipolar and multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to analyze specific technical aspects between both technologies. Methods. We included 22 consecutive patients (3 women; age 74.2 {+-} 8.6 years) after 28 CT-guided bipolar or multipolar RF ablations of 28 RCCs (diameter 2.5 {+-} 0.8 cm). Procedures were performed with a commercially available RF system (Celon AG Olympus, Berlin, Germany). Technical aspects of RF ablation procedures (ablation mode [bipolar or multipolar], number of applicators and ablation cycles, overall ablation time and deployed energy, and technical success rate) were analyzed. Clinical results (local recurrence-free survival and local tumor control rate, renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]) and complication rates were evaluated. Results. Bipolar RF ablation was performed in 12 procedures and multipolar RF ablation in 16 procedures (2 applicators in 14 procedures and 3 applicators in 2 procedures). One ablation cycle was performed in 15 procedures and two ablation cycles in 13 procedures. Overall ablation time and deployed energy were 35.0 {+-} 13.6 min and 43.7 {+-} 17.9 kJ. Technical success rate was 100 %. Major and minor complication rates were 4 and 14 %. At an imaging follow-up of 15.2 {+-} 8.8 months, local recurrence-free survival was 14.4 {+-} 8.8 months and local tumor control rate was 93 %. GFR did not deteriorate after RF ablation (50.8 {+-} 16.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} before RF ablation vs. 47.2 {+-} 11.9 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} after RF ablation; not significant). Conclusions. CT-guided bipolar and multipolar RF ablation of RCC has a high rate of clinical success and low complication rates. At short-term follow-up, clinical efficacy is high without deterioration of the renal function.

  8. Fetal Magnetoencephalography--Achievements and Challenges in the Study of Prenatal and Early Postnatal Brain Responses: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Carolin J.; Matuz, Tamara; Draganova, Rossitza; Eswaran, Hari; Preissl, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is the only non-invasive method for investigating evoked brain responses and spontaneous brain activity generated by the fetus "in utero". Fetal auditory as well as visual-evoked fields have been successfully recorded in basic stimulus-response studies. Moreover, paradigms investigating precursors for cognitive…

  9. 1,2:3,4-Diepoxybutane Induces Multipolar Mitosis in Cultured Human Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas Torres, Reyna Lucía; Domínguez Cruz, Martín Daniel; Borjas Gutiérrez, César; Ramírez Dueñas, María de Lourdes; Magaña Torres, María Teresa; González García, Juan Ramón

    2016-01-01

    1,3-Butadiene, a colorless gas regularly used in the production of plastics, thermoplastic resins, and styrene-butadiene rubber, poses an increased leukemia mortality risk to workers in this field. 1,3-Butadiene is also produced by incomplete combustion of motor fuels or by tobacco smoking. It is absorbed principally through the respiratory system and metabolized by several enzymes rendering 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB), which has the highest genotoxic potency of all metabolites of 1,3-butadiene. DEB is considered a carcinogen mainly due to its high potential as clastogen, which induces structural chromosome aberrations such as sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal breaks, and micronuclei. Due to its clastogenic effect, DEB is one of the most used agents for diagnostic studies of Fanconi anemia, a recessively inherited disease related to mutations affecting several genes involved in a common DNA repair pathway. When performing Fanconi anemia diagnostic tests in our laboratory, we have observed occasional multipolar mitosis (MM) in lymphocyte cultures exposed to 0.1 μg/ml of DEB and harvested in the absence of any mitotic spindle inhibitor. Although previous studies reported an aneugenic effect (i.e. it induces aneuploidy) of DEB, no mechanism was suggested to explain such observations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to 0.1 μg/ml of DEB is significantly associated with the occurrence of MM. We blindly assessed the frequency of MM in lymphocyte cultures from 10 nonsmoking healthy individuals. Two series of 3 cultures were performed from each sample under different conditions: A, without DEB; B, with 0.1 μg/ml of DEB, and C, with 25 μM of mitomycin C as positive control. Cultures exposed to DEB showed higher frequencies of MM (23 of 2,000 cells) than did the unexposed ones (3 of 2,000 cells). PMID:27193269

  10. Evidence for a Caregiving Instinct: Rapid Differentiation of Infant from Adult Vocalizations Using Magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Katherine S; Parsons, Christine E; Jegindoe Elmholdt, Else-Marie; Woolrich, Mark W; van Hartevelt, Tim J; Stevner, Angus B A; Stein, Alan; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2016-03-01

    Crying is the most salient vocal signal of distress. The cries of a newborn infant alert adult listeners and often elicit caregiving behavior. For the parent, rapid responding to an infant in distress is an adaptive behavior, functioning to ensure offspring survival. The ability to react rapidly requires quick recognition and evaluation of stimuli followed by a co-ordinated motor response. Previous neuroimaging research has demonstrated early specialized activity in response to infant faces. Using magnetoencephalography, we found similarly early (100-200 ms) differences in neural responses to infant and adult cry vocalizations in auditory, emotional, and motor cortical brain regions. We propose that this early differential activity may help to rapidly identify infant cries and engage affective and motor neural circuitry to promote adaptive behavioral responding, before conscious awareness. These differences were observed in adults who were not parents, perhaps indicative of a universal brain-based "caregiving instinct."

  11. Denoising and Frequency Analysis of Noninvasive Magnetoencephalography Sensor Signals for Functional Brain Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Ukil, A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is an important noninvasive, nonhazardous technology for functional brain mapping, measuring the magnetic fields due to the intracellular neuronal current flow in the brain. However, most often, the inherent level of noise in the MEG sensor data collection process is large enough to obscure the signal(s) of interest. In this paper, a denoising technique based on the wavelet transform and the multiresolution signal decomposition technique along with thresholding is presented, substantiated by application results. Thereafter, different frequency analysis are performed on the denoised MEG signals to identify the major frequencies of the brain oscillations present in the denoised signals. Time-frequency plots (spectrograms) of the denoised signals are also provided.

  12. [Research on magnetoencephalography-brain computer interface based on the PCA and LDA data reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjia; Zhou, Lina

    2011-12-01

    The magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be used as a control signal for brain computer interface (BCI). The BCI also includes the pattern information of the direction of hand movement. In the MEG signal classification, the feature extraction based on signal processing and linear classification is usually used. But the recognition rate has been difficult to improve. In the present paper, a principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method has been proposed for the feature extraction, and the non-linear nearest neighbor classification is introduced for the classifier. The confusion matrix is analyzed based on the results. The experimental results show that the PCA + LDA method is effective in the analysis of multi-channel MEG signals, improves the recognition rate to the extent of the average recognition rate 55.7%, which is better than the recognition rate 46.9% in the BCI competition IV.

  13. Altered Cortical Activation in Adolescents With Acute Migraine: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jing; deGrauw, Xinyao; Korostenskaja, Milena; Korman, Abraham M.; O’Brien, Hope L.; Kabbouche, Marielle A.; Powers, Scott W.; Hershey, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    To quantitatively assess cortical dysfunction in pediatric migraine, 31 adolescents with acute migraine and age- and gender-matched controls were studied using a magnetoencephalography (MEG) system at a sampling rate of 6,000 Hz. Neuromagnetic brain activation was elicited by a finger-tapping task. The spectral and spatial signatures of magnetoencephalography data in 5 to 2,884 Hz were analyzed using Morlet wavelet and beamformers. Compared with controls, 31 migraine subjects during their headache attack phases (ictal) showed significantly prolonged latencies of neuromagnetic activation in 5 to 30 Hz, increased spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz, and a higher likelihood of neuromagnetic activation in the supplementary motor area, the occipital and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortices, in 2,200 to 2,800 Hz. Of the 31 migraine subjects, 16 migraine subjects during their headache-free phases (interictal) showed that there were no significant differences between interictal and control MEG data except that interictal spectral power in 100 to 200 Hz was significantly decreased. The results demonstrated that migraine subjects had significantly aberrant ictal brain activation, which can normalize interictally. The spread of abnormal ictal brain activation in both low- and high-frequency ranges triggered by movements may play a key role in the cascade of migraine attacks. Perspective This is the first study focusing on the spectral and spatial signatures of cortical dysfunction in adolescents with migraine using MEG signals in a frequency range of 5 to 2,884 Hz. This analyzing aberrant brain activation may be important for developing new therapeutic interventions for migraine in the future. PMID:23792072

  14. The neurochemical basis of human cortical auditory processing: combining proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tollkötter Melanie

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A combination of magnetoencephalography and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to correlate the electrophysiology of rapid auditory processing and the neurochemistry of the auditory cortex in 15 healthy adults. To assess rapid auditory processing in the left auditory cortex, the amplitude and decrement of the N1m peak, the major component of the late auditory evoked response, were measured during rapidly successive presentation of acoustic stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that: (i the amplitude of the N1m response and (ii its decrement during rapid stimulation are associated with the cortical neurochemistry as determined by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Our results demonstrated a significant association between the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, a marker of neuronal integrity, and the amplitudes of individual N1m responses. In addition, the concentrations of choline-containing compounds, representing the functional integrity of membranes, were significantly associated with N1m amplitudes. No significant association was found between the concentrations of the glutamate/glutamine pool and the amplitudes of the first N1m. No significant associations were seen between the decrement of the N1m (the relative amplitude of the second N1m peak and the concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, choline-containing compounds, or the glutamate/glutamine pool. However, there was a trend for higher glutamate/glutamine concentrations in individuals with higher relative N1m amplitude. Conclusion These results suggest that neuronal and membrane functions are important for rapid auditory processing. This investigation provides a first link between the electrophysiology, as recorded by magnetoencephalography, and the neurochemistry, as assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, of the auditory cortex.

  15. Two-Step Coronal Transport of Solar Flare Particles from Magnetic Multipolarity Sources in a Flare Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Nian; WANG Shi-Jin

    2001-01-01

    The transport of solar flare particles in the corona is studied. Considering the problems in terms of the character istics of a sunspot group producing solar cosmic rays and solar flare processes, we find that formation of the fast propagation process is associated with annihilation of sunspots in the group with magnetic multipolarity. The slower propagation process depends on magnetic irregularities in the corona, and the evolution of the transport is related to the flare processes. Equations for the coronal transport are proposed and their initial and boundary conditions are given. The predicted results agree with the main observational features.

  16. A phosphatidylinositol lipids system, lamellipodin, and Ena/VASP regulate dynamic morphology of multipolar migrating cells in the developing cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Sasaki, Shinji; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Ogawa, Yukino; Yasui, Masato; Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2012-08-22

    In the developing mammalian cerebral cortex, excitatory neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone; these neurons migrate toward the pial surface. The neurons generated in the VZ assume a multipolar morphology and remain in a narrow region called the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) for ∼24 h, in which they extend and retract multiple processes dynamically. They eventually extend an axon tangentially and begin radial migration using a migratory mode called locomotion. Despite the potential biological importance of the process movement of multipolar cells, the molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we observed that the processes of mouse multipolar cells were actin rich and morphologically resembled the filopodia and lamellipodia in growth cones; thus, we focused on the actin-remodeling proteins Lamellipodin (Lpd) and Ena/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). Lpd binds to phosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P₂] and recruits Ena/VASP, which promotes the assembly of actin filaments, to the plasma membranes. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry revealed that Lpd is expressed in multipolar cells in the MAZ. The functional silencing of either Lpd or Ena/VASP decreased the number of primary processes. Immunostaining and a Förster resonance energy transfer analysis revealed the subcellular localization of PI(3,4)P₂ at the tips of the processes. A knockdown experiment and treatment with an inhibitor for Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-2, a 5-phosphatase that produces PI(3,4)P₂ from phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, decreased the number of primary processes. Our observations suggest that PI(3,4)P₂, Lpd, and Ena/VASP are involved in the process movement of multipolar migrating cells.

  17. Resting-state magnetoencephalography study of “small world” characteristics and cognitive dysfunction in patients with glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Hu X; Lei T; Xu HZ; Zou YJ; Liu HY

    2013-01-01

    Xin-Hua Hu, Ting Lei, Hua-Zhong Xu, Yuan-Jie Zou, Hong-Yi Liu Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze “small world” characteristics in glioma patients in order to understand the relationship between cognitive dysfunction and brain functional connectivity network in the resting state. Methods: Resting-state magnetoencephalography was performed in...

  18. Resting-state magnetoencephalography study of “small world” characteristics and cognitive dysfunction in patients with glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Xin-Hua Hu, Ting Lei, Hua-Zhong Xu, Yuan-Jie Zou, Hong-Yi Liu Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze “small world” characteristics in glioma patients in order to understand the relationship between cognitive dysfunction and brain functional connectivity network in the resting state. Methods: Resting-state magnetoencephalography was...

  19. Excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape establish neuronal polarity by forming a tangentially oriented axon in the intermediate zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The formation of axon-dendrite polarity is crucial for neuron to make the proper information flow within the brain. Although the processes of neuronal polarity formation have been extensively studied using neurons in dissociated culture, the corresponding developmental processes in vivo are still unclear. Here, we illuminate the initial steps of morphological polarization of excitatory cortical neurons in situ, by sparsely labeling their neuroepithelial progenitors using in utero electroporation and then examining their neuronal progeny in brain sections and in slice cultures. Morphological analysis showed that an axon-like long tangential process formed in progeny cells in the intermediate zone (IZ). Time-lapse imaging analysis using slice culture revealed that progeny cells with multipolar shape, after alternately extending and retracting their short processes for several hours, suddenly elongated a long process tangentially. These cells then transformed into a bipolar shape, extending a pia-directed leading process, and migrated radially leaving the tangential process behind, which gave rise to an "L-shaped" axon. Our findings suggest that neuronal polarity in these cells is established de novo from a nonpolarized stage in vivo and indicate that excitatory cortical neurons with multipolar shape in the IZ initiate axon outgrowth before radial migration into the cortical plate. PMID:22267309

  20. Comparative analysis of transverse intrafascicular multichannel, longitudinal intrafascicular and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of nerve fascicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Jordi; Boretius, Tim; Andreu, David; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Stieglitz, Thomas; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    The selection of a suitable nerve electrode for neuroprosthetic applications implies a trade-off between invasiveness and selectivity, wherein the ultimate goal is achieving the highest selectivity for a high number of nerve fascicles by the least invasiveness and potential damage to the nerve. The transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME) is intended to be transversally inserted into the peripheral nerve and to be useful to selectively activate subsets of axons in different fascicles within the same nerve. We present a comparative study of TIME, LIFE and multipolar cuff electrodes for the selective stimulation of small nerves. The electrodes were implanted on the rat sciatic nerve, and the activation of gastrocnemius, plantar and tibialis anterior muscles was recorded by EMG signals. Thus, the study allowed us to ascertain the selectivity of stimulation at the interfascicular and also at the intrafascicular level. The results of this study indicate that (1) intrafascicular electrodes (LIFE and TIME) provide excitation circumscribed to the implanted fascicle, whereas extraneural electrodes (cuffs) predominantly excite nerve fascicles located superficially; (2) the minimum threshold for muscle activation with TIME and LIFE was significantly lower than with cuff electrodes; (3) TIME allowed us to selectively activate the three tested muscles when stimulating through different active sites of one device, both at inter- and intrafascicular levels, whereas selective activation using multipolar cuff (with a longitudinal tripolar stimulation configuration) was only possible for two muscles, at the interfascicular level, and LIFE did not activate selectively more than one muscle in the implanted nerve fascicle.

  1. Experimental and theoretical charge-density analysis of 1,4-bis(5-hexyl-2-thienyl)butane-1,4-dione: applications of a virtual-atom model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maqsood; Nassour, Ayoub; Noureen, Sajida; Lecomte, Claude; Jelsch, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The experimental and theoretical charge densities of 1,4-bis(5-hexyl-2-thienyl)butane-1,4-dione, a precursor in the synthesis of thiophene-based semiconductors and organic solar cells, are presented. A dummy bond charges spherical atom model is applied besides the multipolar atom model. The results show that the dummy bond charges model is accurate enough to calculate electrostatic-derived properties which are comparable with those obtained by the multipolar atom model. The refinement statistics and the residual electron density values are found to be intermediate between the independent atom and the multipolar formalisms.

  2. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julien; Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-10-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  3. Atomic Forces for Geometry-Dependent Point Multipole and Gaussian Multipole Models

    OpenAIRE

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Duke, Robert; Darden, Thomas; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2010-01-01

    In standard treatments of atomic multipole models, interaction energies, total molecular forces, and total molecular torques are given for multipolar interactions between rigid molecules. However, if the molecules are assumed to be flexible, two additional multipolar atomic forces arise due to 1) the transfer of torque between neighboring atoms, and 2) the dependence of multipole moment on internal geometry (bond lengths, bond angles, etc.) for geometry-dependent multipole models. In the curr...

  4. Enhanced Early Neuronal Processing of Food Pictures in Anorexia Nervosa: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren R. Godier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies in Anorexia Nervosa (AN have shown increased activation in reward and cognitive control regions in response to food, and a behavioral attentional bias (AB towards food stimuli is reported. This study aimed to further investigate the neural processing of food using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Participants were 13 females with restricting-type AN, 14 females recovered from restricting-type AN, and 15 female healthy controls. MEG data was acquired whilst participants viewed high- and low-calorie food pictures. Attention was assessed with a reaction time task and eye tracking. Time-series analysis suggested increased neural activity in response to both calorie conditions in the AN groups, consistent with an early AB. Increased activity was observed at 150 ms in the current AN group. Neuronal activity at this latency was at normal level in the recovered group; however, this group exhibited enhanced activity at 320 ms after stimulus. Consistent with previous studies, analysis in source space and behavioral data suggested enhanced attention and cognitive control processes in response to food stimuli in AN. This may enable avoidance of salient food stimuli and maintenance of dietary restraint in AN. A later latency of increased activity in the recovered group may reflect a reversal of this avoidance, with source space and behavioral data indicating increased visual and cognitive processing of food stimuli.

  5. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  6. Enhanced Early Neuronal Processing of Food Pictures in Anorexia Nervosa: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Jessica C.; Park, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) have shown increased activation in reward and cognitive control regions in response to food, and a behavioral attentional bias (AB) towards food stimuli is reported. This study aimed to further investigate the neural processing of food using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Participants were 13 females with restricting-type AN, 14 females recovered from restricting-type AN, and 15 female healthy controls. MEG data was acquired whilst participants viewed high- and low-calorie food pictures. Attention was assessed with a reaction time task and eye tracking. Time-series analysis suggested increased neural activity in response to both calorie conditions in the AN groups, consistent with an early AB. Increased activity was observed at 150 ms in the current AN group. Neuronal activity at this latency was at normal level in the recovered group; however, this group exhibited enhanced activity at 320 ms after stimulus. Consistent with previous studies, analysis in source space and behavioral data suggested enhanced attention and cognitive control processes in response to food stimuli in AN. This may enable avoidance of salient food stimuli and maintenance of dietary restraint in AN. A later latency of increased activity in the recovered group may reflect a reversal of this avoidance, with source space and behavioral data indicating increased visual and cognitive processing of food stimuli. PMID:27525258

  7. Measurement of the occipital alpha rhythm and temporal tau rhythm by using magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. E.; Gohel, Bakul; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; An, Kyung Min [Center for Biosignals, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Developing Magnetoencephalography (MEG) based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) facilitates to observe the human brain functions in non-invasively and high temporal and high spatial resolution. By using this MEG, we studied alpha rhythm (8-13 Hz) that is one of the most predominant spontaneous rhythm in human brain. The 8–13 Hz rhythm is observed in several sensory region in the brain. In visual related region of occipital, we call to alpha rhythm, and auditory related region of temporal call to tau rhythm, sensorimotor related region of parietal call to mu rhythm. These rhythms are decreased in task related region and increased in task irrelevant regions. This means that these rhythms play a pivotal role of inhibition in task irrelevant region. It may be helpful to attention to the task. In several literature about the alpha-band inhibition in multi-sensory modality experiment, they observed this effect in the occipital and somatosensory region. In this study, we hypothesized that we can also observe the alpha-band inhibition in the auditory cortex, mediated by the tau rhythm. Before that, we first investigated the existence of the alpha and tau rhythm in occipital and temporal region, respectively. To see these rhythms, we applied the visual and auditory stimulation, in turns, suppressed in task relevant regions, respectively.

  8. A precorrected-FFT method to accelerate the solution of the forward problem in magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tissari, Satu [CSC-Scientific Computing Ltd, PO Box 405, FIN-02101 Espoo (Finland); Rahola, Jussi [Simulintu Oy, Niittykummuntie 6 A 8, FIN-02200 Espoo (Finland)

    2003-02-21

    Accurate localization of brain activity recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) requires that the forward problem, i.e. the magnetic field caused by a dipolar source current in a homogeneous volume conductor, be solved precisely. We have used the Galerkin method with piecewise linear basis functions in the boundary element method to improve the solution of the forward problem. In addition, we have replaced the direct method, i.e. the LU decomposition, by a modern iterative method to solve the dense linear system of equations arising from the boundary element discretization. In this paper we describe a precorrected-FFT method which we have combined with the iterative method to accelerate the solution of the forward problem and to avoid the explicit formation of the dense coefficient matrix. For example, with a triangular mesh of 18000 triangles, the CPU time to solve the forward problem was decreased from 3.5 h to less than 5 min, and the computer memory requirements were decreased from 1.3 GB to 156 MB. The method makes it possible to solve quickly significantly larger problems with widely-used workstations.

  9. Producing speech with a newly learned morphosyntax and vocabulary: an magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultén, Annika; Karvonen, Leena; Laine, Matti; Salmelin, Riitta

    2014-08-01

    Ten participants learned a miniature language (Anigram), which they later employed to verbally describe a pictured event. Using magnetoencephalography, the cortical dynamics of sentence production in Anigram was compared with that in the native tongue from the preparation phase up to the production of the final word. At the preparation phase, a cartoon image with two animals prompted the participants to plan either the corresponding simple sentence (e.g., "the bear hits the lion") or a grammar-free list of the two nouns ("the bear, the lion"). For the newly learned language, this stage induced stronger left angular and adjacent inferior parietal activations than for the native language, likely reflecting a higher load on lexical retrieval and STM storage. The preparation phase was followed by a cloze task where the participants were prompted to produce the last word of the sentence or word sequence. Production of the sentence-final word required retrieval of rule-based inflectional morphology and was accompanied by increased activation of the left middle superior temporal cortex that did not differ between the two languages. Activation of the right temporal cortex during the cloze task suggested that this area plays a role in integrating word meanings into the sentence frame. The present results indicate that, after just a few days of exposure, the newly learned language harnesses the neural resources for multiword production much the same way as the native tongue and that the left and right temporal cortices seem to have functionally different roles in this processing.

  10. A magnetoencephalography study of multi-modal processing of pain anticipation in primary sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, R; Burgess, R C; Plow, E B; Floden, D P; Machado, A G

    2015-09-24

    Pain anticipation plays a critical role in pain chronification and results in disability due to pain avoidance. It is important to understand how different sensory modalities (auditory, visual or tactile) may influence pain anticipation as different strategies could be applied to mitigate anticipatory phenomena and chronification. In this study, using a countdown paradigm, we evaluated with magnetoencephalography the neural networks associated with pain anticipation elicited by different sensory modalities in normal volunteers. When encountered with well-established cues that signaled pain, visual and somatosensory cortices engaged the pain neuromatrix areas early during the countdown process, whereas the auditory cortex displayed delayed processing. In addition, during pain anticipation, the visual cortex displayed independent processing capabilities after learning the contextual meaning of cues from associative and limbic areas. Interestingly, cross-modal activation was also evident and strong when visual and tactile cues signaled upcoming pain. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and mid-cingulate cortex showed significant activity during pain anticipation regardless of modality. Our results show pain anticipation is processed with great time efficiency by a highly specialized and hierarchical network. The highest degree of higher-order processing is modulated by context (pain) rather than content (modality) and rests within the associative limbic regions, corroborating their intrinsic role in chronification.

  11. Simultaneous measurement of neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics by unshielded magnetoencephalography and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yusuke; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Kandori, Akihiko; Maki, Atsushi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2012-10-01

    The correlation between neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics, namely, neurovascular coupling (NVC), is important to shed light on the mechanism of a variety of brain functions or neuronal diseases. NVC can be studied by simultaneously measuring neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics. Consequently, noninvasive measurements of the NVC have been widely studied using both electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, electromagnetic interference between EEG and fMRI is still a major problem. On the other hand, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is another promising tool for detecting cortical hemodynamics because it can be combined with EEG or magnetoencephalography (MEG) without any electromagnetic interference. Accordingly, in the present study, a simultaneous measurement system-combining an unshielded MEG using a two-dimensional gradiometer based on a low-T superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and an NIRS using nonmagnetic thin probes-was developed. This combined system was used to simultaneously measure both an auditory-evoked magnetic field and blood flow change in the auditory cortex. It was experimentally demonstrated that the combined unshielded MEG/NIRS system can simultaneously measure neuronal activity and cortical hemodynamics.

  12. Differential spectral power alteration following acupuncture at different designated places revealed by magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Youbo; Bai, Lijun; Dai, Ruwei; Xue, Ting; Zhong, Chongguang; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Hu; Feng, Yuanyuan; Wei, Wenjuan; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    As an ancient therapeutic technique in Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture has been used increasingly in modern society to treat a range of clinical conditions as an alternative and complementary therapy. However, acupoint specificity, lying at the core of acupuncture, still faces many controversies. Considering previous neuroimaging studies on acupuncture have mainly employed functional magnetic resonance imaging, which only measures the secondary effect of neural activity on cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, in the current study, we adopted an electrophysiological measurement technique named magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure the direct neural activity. 28 healthy college students were recruited in this study. We filtered MEG data into 5 consecutive frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma band) and grouped 140 sensors into 10 main brain regions (left/right frontal, central, temporal, parietal and occipital regions). Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) based spectral analysis approach was further performed to explore the differential band-limited power change patterns of acupuncture at Stomach Meridian 36 (ST36) using a nearby nonacupoint (NAP) as control condition. Significantly increased delta power and decreased alpha as well as beta power in bilateral frontal ROIs were observed following stimulation at ST36. Compared with ST36, decreased alpha power in left and right central, right parietal as well as right temporal ROIs were detected in NAP group. Our research results may provide additional evidence for acupoint specificity.

  13. A constrained ICA approach for real-time cardiac artifact rejection in magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Lukas; Dammers, Jürgen; Roberts, Timothy P L; Shah, N Jon

    2014-02-01

    Recently, magnetoencephalography (MEG)-based real-time brain computing interfaces (BCI) have been developed to enable novel and promising methods of neuroscience research and therapy. Artifact rejection prior to source localization largely enhances the localization accuracy. However, many BCI approaches neglect real-time artifact removal due to its time consuming processing. With cardiac artifact rejection for real-time analysis (CARTA), we introduce a novel algorithm capable of real-time cardiac artifact (CA) rejection. The method is based on constrained independent component analysis (ICA), where a priori information of the underlying source signal is used to optimize and accelerate signal decomposition. In CARTA, this is performed by estimating the subject's individual density distribution of the cardiac activity, which leads to a subject-specific signal decomposition algorithm. We show that the new method is capable of effectively reducing CAs within one iteration and a time delay of 1 ms. In contrast, Infomax and Extended Infomax ICA converged not until seven iterations, while FastICA needs at least ten iterations. CARTA was tested and applied to data from three different but most common MEG systems (4-D-Neuroimaging, VSM MedTech Inc., and Elekta Neuromag). Therefore, the new method contributes to reliable signal analysis utilizing BCI approaches.

  14. Signal Space Separation method with block matrix inversion for extraction of signals in magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, R.; Janawadkar, M. P.

    2012-10-01

    Signal Space Separation (SSS) method is a technique utilized to eliminate the contribution of unwanted signals due to external magnetic noise that inevitably get recorded along with the actual magnetic signal due to neuronal currents in the brain. In this paper, the SSS method has been implemented using block matrix inversion. By implementing block matrix inversion along with regrouping of radial terms, it has been possible to extract the true brain signal from the measured magnetic signal which includes the contribution from an external magnetic dipole artifact for measurements from as few as 64 channels. We observe that the minimum root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the signal inferred from block matrix inversion with regrouped terms is around 6 fT when the truncation order is set at L1 = 11 for signals of interest and L2 = 2 for external noise sources and saturates to similar values for higher L1. The RMSD of extracted signal is 50% smaller than the minimum RMSD when the magnetoencephalography signal is extracted by direct pseudoinverse technique and does not have a deep minimum in the truncation order L1 as observed when direct pseudoinverse technique is used.

  15. Neural correlation of successful cognitive behaviour therapy for spider phobia: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; Alderson-Day, Ben; Prendergast, Garreth; Kennedy, Juliette; Bennett, Sophie; Docherty, Mary; Whitton, Clare; Manea, Laura; Gouws, Andre; Tomlinson, Heather; Green, Gary

    2013-12-30

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment for spider phobia, but the underlying neural correlates of therapeutic change are yet to be specified. The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study responses within the first half second, to phobogenic stimuli in a group of individuals with spider phobia prior to treatment (n=12) and then in nine of them following successful CBT (where they could touch and manage live large common house spiders) at least 9 months later. We also compared responses to a group of age-matched healthy control participants (n=11). Participants viewed static photographs of real spiders, other fear-inducing images (e.g. snakes, sharks) and neutral stimuli (e.g. kittens). Beamforming methods were used to localise sources of significant power changes in response to stimuli. Prior to treatment, participants with spider phobia showed a significant maximum response in the right frontal pole when viewing images of real spiders specifically. No significant frontal response was observed for either control participants or participants with spider phobia post-treatment. In addition, participants' subjective ratings of spider stimuli significantly predicted peak responses in right frontal regions. The implications for understanding brain-based effects of cognitive therapies are discussed.

  16. The use of magnetoencephalography in the study of psychopharmacology (pharmaco-MEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D

    2014-09-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a neuroimaging technique that allows direct measurement of the magnetic fields generated by synchronised ionic neural currents in the brain with moderately good spatial resolution and high temporal resolution. Because chemical neuromodulation can cause changes in neuronal processing on the millisecond time-scale, the combination of MEG with pharmacological interventions (pharmaco-MEG) is a powerful tool for measuring the effects of experimental modulations of neurotransmission in the living human brain. Importantly, pharmaco-MEG can be used in both healthy humans to understand normal brain function and in patients to understand brain pathologies and drug-treatment effects. In this paper, the physiological and technical basis of pharmaco-MEG is introduced and contrasted with other pharmacological neuroimaging techniques. Ongoing developments in MEG analysis techniques such as source-localisation, functional and effective connectivity analyses, which have allowed for more powerful inferences to be made with recent pharmaco-MEG data, are described. Studies which have utilised pharmaco-MEG across a range of neurotransmitter systems (GABA, glutamate, acetylcholine, dopamine and serotonin) are reviewed.

  17. Neuroimaging studies of bilingual expressive language representation in the brain: potential applications for magnetoencephalography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth W.Pang

    2012-01-01

    Bilingualism is the ability to use two or more languages with equal or near equal fluency.How the brain,often seamlessly,selects,controls,and switches between languages is an enigma.Neuroimaging studies offer the unique opportunity to probe the mechanisms underlying bilingual brain function.Non-invasive methods,in particular,functional MRI (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERPs),have allowed examination in healthy control populations.Whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG),a relatively new addition to the cadre of neuroimaging tools,offers a combination of the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of ERPs.Thus far,MEG has been applied to the studies of bilingual receptive language,or bilingual language comprehension.MEG has not yet been applied to the study of bilingual language production as such studies have faced more challenges (see Salmelin,2007 for a review),and these have only recently been addressed.Here,we review the literature on MEG expressive language studies and point out a direction for the application of MEG to the study of bilingual language production.

  18. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahabi, Adham; Klamer, Silke; Sahib, Ashish Kaul; Lerche, Holger; Braun, Christoph; Focke, Niels K

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE) is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease.

  19. Magnetoencephalography Detection of High-Frequency Oscillations in the Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly eLeiken

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence from invasive intracranial recordings suggests that the matured brain generates both physiological and pathological high-frequency signals. The present study was designed to detect high-frequency brain signals in the developing brain using newly developed magnetoencephalography (MEG methods. Twenty healthy children were studied with a high sampling rate MEG system. Functional high-frequency brain signals were evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the index fingers. To determine if the high-frequency neuromagnetic signals are true brain responses in high-frequency range, we analyzed the MEG data using the conventional averaging as well as newly developed time-frequency analysis along with beamforming. The data of healthy children showed that very high-frequency brain signals (> 1000 Hz in the somatosensory cortex in the developing brain could be detected and localized using MEG. The amplitude of very high-frequency brain signals was significantly weaker than that of the low-frequency brain signals. Very high-frequency brain signals showed a much earlier latency than those of a low-frequency. Magnetic source imaging (MSI revealed that a portion of the high-frequency signals was from the somatosensory cortex, another portion of the high-frequency signals was probably from the thalamus. Our results provide evidence that the developing brain generates high-frequency signals that can be detected with the noninvasive technique of MEG. MEG detection of high-frequency brain signals may open a new window for the study of developing brain function.

  20. Temporal dynamics of the knowledge-mediated visual disambiguation process in humans: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Tomokazu; Ogata, Katsuya; Kimura, Takahiro; Kume, Yuko; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Disambiguation of a noisy visual scene with prior knowledge is an indispensable task of the visual system. To adequately adapt to a dynamically changing visual environment full of noisy visual scenes, the implementation of knowledge-mediated disambiguation in the brain is imperative and essential for proceeding as fast as possible under the limited capacity of visual image processing. However, the temporal profile of the disambiguation process has not yet been fully elucidated in the brain. The present study attempted to determine how quickly knowledge-mediated disambiguation began to proceed along visual areas after the onset of a two-tone ambiguous image using magnetoencephalography with high temporal resolution. Using the predictive coding framework, we focused on activity reduction for the two-tone ambiguous image as an index of the implementation of disambiguation. Source analysis revealed that a significant activity reduction was observed in the lateral occipital area at approximately 120 ms after the onset of the ambiguous image, but not in preceding activity (about 115 ms) in the cuneus when participants perceptually disambiguated the ambiguous image with prior knowledge. These results suggested that knowledge-mediated disambiguation may be implemented as early as approximately 120 ms following an ambiguous visual scene, at least in the lateral occipital area, and provided an insight into the temporal profile of the disambiguation process of a noisy visual scene with prior knowledge.

  1. Magnetoencephalography based on high-Tc superconductivity: a closer look into the brain?

    CERN Document Server

    Öisjöen, F; Figueras, G A; Chukharkin, M L; Kalabukhov, A; Hedström, A; Elam, M; Winkler, D

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables the study of brain activity by recording the magnetic fields generated by neural currents and has become an important technique for neuroscientists in research and clinical settings. Unlike the liquid-helium cooled low-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that have been at the heart of modern MEG systems since their invention, high-Tc SQUIDs can operate with liquid nitrogen cooling. The relaxation of thermal insulation requirements allows for a reduction in the stand-off distance between the sensor and the room-temperature environment from a few centimeters to less than a millimeter, where MEG signal strength is significantly higher. Despite this advantage, high-Tc SQUIDs have only been used for proof-of-principle MEG recordings of well-understood evoked activity. Here we show high-Tc SQUID-based MEG may be capable of providing novel information about brain activity due to the close proximity of the sensor to the head. We have performed single- and two-...

  2. Friends, not foes: Magnetoencephalography as a tool to uncover brain dynamics during transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuling, Toralf; Ruhnau, Philipp; Fuscà, Marco; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Herrmann, Christoph S; Weisz, Nathan

    2015-09-01

    Brain oscillations are supposedly crucial for normal cognitive functioning and alterations are associated with cognitive dysfunctions. To demonstrate their causal role on behavior, entrainment approaches in particular aim at driving endogenous oscillations via rhythmic stimulation. Within this context, transcranial electrical stimulation, especially transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), has received renewed attention. This is likely due to the possibility of defining oscillatory stimulation properties precisely. Also, measurements comparing pre-tACS with post-tACS electroencephalography (EEG) have shown impressive modulations. However, the period during tACS has remained a blackbox until now, due to the enormous stimulation artifact. By means of application of beamforming to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we successfully recovered modulations of the amplitude of brain oscillations during weak and strong tACS. Additionally, we demonstrate that also evoked responses to visual and auditory stimuli can be recovered during tACS. The main contribution of the present study is to provide critical evidence that during ongoing tACS, subtle modulations of oscillatory brain activity can be reconstructed even at the stimulation frequency. Future tACS experiments will be able to deliver direct physiological insights in order to further the understanding of the contribution of brain oscillations to cognition and behavior.

  3. Neural effect of mental fatigue on physical fatigue: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-13

    We sought to clarify the neural effect of mental fatigue on physical fatigue using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and classical conditioning techniques. Eleven right-handed volunteers participated in this study. On the first day, participants performed fatigue-inducing maximum handgrip trials for 10 min; metronome sounds were started 5 min after the beginning of the trials. We used metronome sounds as conditioned stimuli and maximum handgrip trials as unconditioned stimuli to cause physical fatigue. On the next day, MEG recordings during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by the metronome sounds were performed for 10 min just before (control session) and after (mental fatigue session) a 30-min fatigue-inducing mental task session. In the right anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 23), the alpha-band event-related synchronization of the mental fatigue session relative to the control session within the time window of 500–600 ms after the onset of handgrip cue sounds was identified. We demonstrated that mental fatigue suppresses activities in the right anterior cingulate cortex during physical fatigue.

  4. Disrupted brain network topology in Parkinson's disease: a longitudinal magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Dubbelink, Kim T E; Hillebrand, Arjan; Stoffers, Diederick; Deijen, Jan Berend; Twisk, Jos W R; Stam, Cornelis J; Berendse, Henk W

    2014-01-01

    Although alterations in resting-state functional connectivity between brain regions have previously been reported in Parkinson's disease, the spatial organization of these changes remains largely unknown. Here, we longitudinally studied brain network topology in Parkinson's disease in relation to clinical measures of disease progression, using magnetoencephalography and concepts from graph theory. We characterized whole-brain functional networks by means of a standard graph analysis approach, measuring clustering coefficient and shortest path length, as well as the construction of a minimum spanning tree, a novel approach that allows a unique and unbiased characterization of brain networks. We observed that brain networks in early stage untreated patients displayed lower local clustering with preserved path length in the delta frequency band in comparison to controls. Longitudinal analysis over a 4-year period in a larger group of patients showed a progressive decrease in local clustering in multiple frequency bands together with a decrease in path length in the alpha2 frequency band. In addition, minimum spanning tree analysis revealed a decentralized and less integrated network configuration in early stage, untreated Parkinson's disease that also progressed over time. Moreover, the longitudinal changes in network topology identified with both techniques were associated with deteriorating motor function and cognitive performance. Our results indicate that impaired local efficiency and network decentralization are very early features of Parkinson's disease that continue to progress over time, together with reductions in global efficiency. As these network changes appear to reflect clinically relevant phenomena, they hold promise as markers of disease progression.

  5. Enhanced Early Neuronal Processing of Food Pictures in Anorexia Nervosa: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, Lauren R; Scaife, Jessica C; Braeutigam, Sven; Park, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) have shown increased activation in reward and cognitive control regions in response to food, and a behavioral attentional bias (AB) towards food stimuli is reported. This study aimed to further investigate the neural processing of food using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Participants were 13 females with restricting-type AN, 14 females recovered from restricting-type AN, and 15 female healthy controls. MEG data was acquired whilst participants viewed high- and low-calorie food pictures. Attention was assessed with a reaction time task and eye tracking. Time-series analysis suggested increased neural activity in response to both calorie conditions in the AN groups, consistent with an early AB. Increased activity was observed at 150 ms in the current AN group. Neuronal activity at this latency was at normal level in the recovered group; however, this group exhibited enhanced activity at 320 ms after stimulus. Consistent with previous studies, analysis in source space and behavioral data suggested enhanced attention and cognitive control processes in response to food stimuli in AN. This may enable avoidance of salient food stimuli and maintenance of dietary restraint in AN. A later latency of increased activity in the recovered group may reflect a reversal of this avoidance, with source space and behavioral data indicating increased visual and cognitive processing of food stimuli. PMID:27525258

  6. Magnetoencephalography shows atypical sensitivity to linguistic sound sequences in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jonathan R; Wagley, Neelima; Kovelman, Ioulia; Bowyer, Susan M; Richard, Annette E; Lajiness-O'Neill, Renee

    2016-09-01

    Neuroscientific evidence points toward atypical auditory processing in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and yet, the consequences of this for receptive language remain unclear. Using magnetoencephalography and a passive listening task, we test for cascading effects on speech sound processing. Children with ASD and age-matched control participants (8-12 years old) listened to nonce linguistic stimuli that either did or did not conform to the phonological rules that govern consonant sequences in English (e.g. legal 'vimp' vs. illegal 'vimk'). Beamformer source analysis was used to isolate evoked responses (0.1-30 Hz) to these stimuli in the left and the right auditory cortex. Right auditory responses from participants with ASD, but not control participants, showed an attenuated response to illegal sequences relative to legal sequences that emerged around 330 ms after the onset of the critical phoneme. These results suggest that phonological processing is impacted in ASD, perhaps because of cascading effects from disrupted initial acoustic processing. PMID:27468112

  7. Development of Human Somatosensory Cortical Functions - What have We Learned from Magnetoencephalography: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Päivi; Lauronen, Leena; Pihko, Elina

    2014-01-01

    The mysteries of early development of cortical processing in humans have started to unravel with the help of new non-invasive brain research tools like multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG). In this review, we evaluate, within a wider neuroscientific and clinical context, the value of MEG in studying normal and disturbed functional development of the human somatosensory system. The combination of excellent temporal resolution and good localization accuracy provided by MEG has, in the case of somatosensory studies, enabled the differentiation of activation patterns from the newborn's primary (SI) and secondary somatosensory (SII) areas. Furthermore, MEG has shown that the functioning of both SI and SII in newborns has particular immature features in comparison with adults. In extremely preterm infants, the neonatal MEG response from SII also seems to potentially predict developmental outcome: those lacking SII responses at term show worse motor performance at age 2 years than those with normal SII responses at term. In older children with unilateral early brain lesions, bilateral alterations in somatosensory cortical activation detected in MEG imply that the impact of a localized insult may have an unexpectedly wide effect on cortical somatosensory networks. The achievements over the last decade show that MEG provides a unique approach for studying the development of the somatosensory system and its disturbances in childhood. MEG well complements other neuroimaging methods in studies of cortical processes in the developing brain.

  8. Magnetoencephalography Reveals a Widespread Increase in Network Connectivity in Idiopathic/Genetic Generalized Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adham Elshahabi

    Full Text Available Idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsy (IGE/GGE is characterized by seizures, which start and rapidly engage widely distributed networks, and result in symptoms such as absences, generalized myoclonic and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Although routine magnetic resonance imaging is apparently normal, many studies have reported structural alterations in IGE/GGE patients using diffusion tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Changes have also been reported in functional networks during generalized spike wave discharges. However, network function in the resting-state without epileptiforme discharges has been less well studied. We hypothesize that resting-state networks are more representative of the underlying pathophysiology and abnormal network synchrony. We studied functional network connectivity derived from whole-brain magnetoencephalography recordings in thirteen IGE/GGE and nineteen healthy controls. Using graph theoretical network analysis, we found a widespread increase in connectivity in patients compared to controls. These changes were most pronounced in the motor network, the mesio-frontal and temporal cortex. We did not, however, find any significant difference between the normalized clustering coefficients, indicating preserved gross network architecture. Our findings suggest that increased resting state connectivity could be an important factor for seizure spread and/or generation in IGE/GGE, and could serve as a biomarker for the disease.

  9. The neural processing of musical instrument size information in the brain investigated by magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Andre; van Dinther, Ralph; Patterson, Roy D.

    2005-04-01

    The specific cortical representation of size was investigated by recording auditory evoked fields (AEFs) elicited by changes of instrument size and pitch. In Experiment 1, a French horn and one scaled to double the size played a three note melody around F3 or its octave, F4. Many copies of these four melodies were played in random order and the AEF was measured continuously. A similar procedure was applied to saxophone sounds in a separate run. In Experiment 2, the size and type of instrument (French horn and saxophone) were varied without changing the octave. AEFs were recorded in five subjects using magnetoencephalography and evaluated by spatio-temporal source analysis with one equivalent dipole in each hemisphere. The morphology of the source waveforms revealed that each note within the melody elicits a well-defined P1-N1-P2 AEF-complex with adaptation for the 2nd and 3rd note. At the transition of size, pitch, or both, a larger AEF-complex was evoked. However, size changes elicited a stronger N1 than pitch changes. Furthermore, this size-related N1 enhancement was larger for French horn than saxophone. The results indicate that the N1 plays an important role in the specific representation of instrument size.

  10. Properties of highly electronegative plasmas produced in a multipolar magnetic-confined device with a transversal magnetic filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draghici, Mihai; Stamate, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    Highly electronegative plasmas were produced in Ar/SF6 gas mixtures in a dc discharge with multipolar magnetic confinement and transversal magnetic filter. Langmuir probe and mass spectrometry were used for plasma diagnostics. Plasma potential drift, the influence of small or large area biased...... electrodes on plasma parameters, the formation of the negative ion sheath and etching rates by positive and negative ions have been investigated for different experimental conditions. When the electron temperature was reduced below 1 eV the density ratio of negative ion to electron exceeded 100 even for very...... low amounts of SF6 gas. The plasma potential drift could be controlled by proper wall conditioning. A large electrode biased positively had no effect on plasma potential for density ratios of negative ions to electrons larger than 50. For similar electronegativities or higher a negative ion sheath...

  11. Neural mechanisms of phonemic restoration for speech comprehension revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Kishiko; Ishii, Akira; Takano, Sakurako; Yamamoto, Hidefumi; Sakashita, Tetsushi; Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Yamane, Hideo

    2013-11-01

    In daily communication, we can usually still hear the spoken words as if they had not been masked and can comprehend the speech when spoken words are masked by background noise. This phenomenon is known as phonemic restoration. Since little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying phonemic restoration for speech comprehension, we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Twelve healthy male volunteers with normal hearing participated in the study. Participants were requested to carefully listen to and understand recorded spoken Japanese stories, which were either played forward (forward condition) or in reverse (reverse condition), with their eyes closed. Several syllables of spoken words were replaced by 300-ms white-noise stimuli with an inter-stimulus interval of 1.6-20.3s. We compared MEG responses to white-noise stimuli during the forward condition with those during the reverse condition using time-frequency analyses. Increased 3-5 Hz band power in the forward condition compared with the reverse condition was continuously observed in the left inferior frontal gyrus [Brodmann's areas (BAs) 45, 46, and 47] and decreased 18-22 Hz band powers caused by white-noise stimuli were seen in the left transverse temporal gyrus (BA 42) and superior temporal gyrus (BA 22). These results suggest that the left inferior frontal gyrus and left transverse and superior temporal gyri are involved in phonemic restoration for speech comprehension. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms of phonemic restoration as well as develop innovative treatment methods for individuals suffering from impaired speech comprehension, particularly in noisy environments. PMID:24055105

  12. Visual and auditory stimuli associated with swallowing activate mirror neurons: a magnetoencephalography study.

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    Ushioda, Takashi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Sanjo, Yusuke; Yamane, Gen-Yuki; Abe, Shinichi; Tsuji, Yusuke; Ishiyama, Atushi

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated activated areas of the cerebral cortex with regard to the mirror neuron system during swallowing. To identify the activated areas, we used magnetoencephalography. Subjects were ten consenting volunteers. Swallowing-related stimuli comprised an animated image of the left profile of a person swallowing water with laryngeal elevation as a visual swallowing trigger stimulus and a swallowing sound as an auditory swallowing trigger stimulus. As control stimuli, a still frame image of the left profile without an additional trigger was shown, and an artificial sound as a false auditory trigger was provided. Triggers were presented at 3,000 ms after the start of image presentation. The stimuli were combined and presented and the areas activated were identified for each stimulus. With animation and still-frame stimuli, the visual association area (Brodmann area (BA) 18) was activated at the start of image presentation, while with the swallowing sound and artificial sound stimuli, the auditory areas BA 41 and BA 42 were activated at the time of trigger presentation. However, with animation stimuli (animation stimulus, animation + swallowing sound stimuli, and animation + artificial sound stimuli), activation in BA 6 and BA 40, corresponding to mirror neurons, was observed between 620 and 720 ms before the trigger. Besides, there were also significant differences in latency time and peak intensity between animation stimulus and animation + swallowing sound stimuli. Our results suggest that mirror neurons are activated by swallowing-related visual and auditory stimuli.

  13. Interactions between visual and motor areas during the recognition of plausible actions as revealed by magnetoencephalography.

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    Pavlidou, Anastasia; Schnitzler, Alfons; Lange, Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have shown activation of the mirror neuron system (MNS), comprising the temporal, posterior parietal, and sensorimotor areas when observing plausible actions, but far less is known on how these cortical areas interact during the recognition of a plausible action. Here, we recorded neural activity with magnetoencephalography while subjects viewed point-light displays of biologically plausible and scrambled versions of actions. We were interested in modulations of oscillatory activity and, specifically, in coupling of oscillatory activity between visual and motor areas. Both plausible and scrambled actions elicited modulations of θ (5-7 Hz), α (7-13 Hz), β (13-35 Hz), and γ (55-100 Hz) power within visual and motor areas. When comparing between the two actions, we observed sequential and spatially distinct increases of γ (∼65 Hz), β (∼25 Hz), and α (∼11 Hz) power between 0.5 and 1.3 s in parieto-occipital, sensorimotor, and left temporal areas. In addition, significant clusters of γ (∼65 Hz) and α/β (∼15 Hz) power decrease were observed in right temporal and parieto-occipital areas between 1.3 and 2.0 s. We found β-power in sensorimotor areas to be positively correlated on a trial-by-trial basis with parieto-occipital γ and left temporal α-power for the plausible but not for the scrambled condition. These results provide new insights in the neuronal oscillatory activity of the areas involved in the recognition of plausible action movements and their interaction. The power correlations between specific areas underscore the importance of interactions between visual and motor areas of the MNS during the recognition of a plausible action.

  14. The neural mechanisms of re-experiencing mental fatigue sensation: a magnetoencephalography study.

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    Akira Ishii

    Full Text Available There have been several studies which have tried to clarify the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation; however fatigue sensation has multiple aspects. We hypothesized that past experience related to fatigue sensation is an important factor which contributes to future formation of fatigue sensation through the transfer to memories that are located within specific brain structures. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation related to memory. In the present study, we investigated the neural activity caused by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation that had been experienced during a fatigue-inducing session. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion. In the fatigue experiment, they performed a 2-back test session for 40 min to induce fatigue sensation, a rest session for 15 min to recover from fatigue, and a magnetoencephalography (MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body with fatigue that they had experienced in the 2-back test session. In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session. Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms underlying fatigue sensation.

  15. Neural effects of mental fatigue caused by continuous attention load: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Mental fatigue can be defined as a psychobiological state caused by prolonged periods of demanding cognitive activity and manifests as a reduced efficiency in cognitive performance. Mental fatigue is one of the most significant causes of accidents in modern society. Therefore, understanding the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue is important. However, the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the neural activity that results from mental fatigue caused by a continuous attention load. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to evaluate the neural activities during the attention task. Ten healthy male volunteers participated in this study. They performed a continuous attention task lasting 10 min. Subjective ratings of mental fatigue, mental stress, boredom, and sleepiness were performed just after the task trial. MEG data were analyzed using narrow-band adaptive spatial filtering methods. An increase in the beta-frequency band (13-25 Hz) power in the right inferior and middle frontal gyri (Brodmann׳s areas 44 and 9 respectively) was caused by the mental fatigue. The increase in the beta-frequency band power in the right middle frontal gyrus was negatively associated with the self-reported level of mental stress and was positively associated with those of boredom and sleepiness. These results demonstrate that performing a continuous mental fatigue-inducing task causes changes in the activation of the prefrontal cortex, and manifests as an increased beta-frequency power in this brain area as well as sleepiness. Our results contribute to greater understanding of the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue.

  16. Spatial variability in cortex-muscle coherence investigated with magnetoencephalography and high-density surface electromyography.

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    Piitulainen, Harri; Botter, Alberto; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2015-11-01

    Cortex-muscle coherence (CMC) reflects coupling between magnetoencephalography (MEG) and surface electromyography (sEMG), being strongest during isometric contraction but absent, for unknown reasons, in some individuals. We used a novel nonmagnetic high-density sEMG (HD-sEMG) electrode grid (36 mm × 12 mm; 60 electrodes separated by 3 mm) to study effects of sEMG recording site, electrode derivation, and rectification on the strength of CMC. Monopolar sEMG from right thenar and 306-channel whole-scalp MEG were recorded from 14 subjects during 4-min isometric thumb abduction. CMC was computed for 60 monopolar, 55 bipolar, and 32 Laplacian HD-sEMG derivations, and two derivations were computed to mimic "macroscopic" monopolar and bipolar sEMG (electrode diameter 9 mm; interelectrode distance 21 mm). With unrectified sEMG, 12 subjects showed statistically significant CMC in 91-95% of the HD-sEMG channels, with maximum coherence at ∼25 Hz. CMC was about a fifth stronger for monopolar than bipolar and Laplacian derivations. Monopolar derivations resulted in most uniform CMC distributions across the thenar and in tightest cortical source clusters in the left rolandic hand area. CMC was 19-27% stronger for HD-sEMG than for "macroscopic" monopolar or bipolar derivations. EMG rectification reduced the CMC peak by a quarter, resulted in a more uniformly distributed CMC across the thenar, and provided more tightly clustered cortical sources than unrectifed sEMGs. Moreover, it revealed CMC at ∼12 Hz. We conclude that HD-sEMG, especially with monopolar derivation, can facilitate detection of CMC and that individual muscle anatomy cannot explain the high interindividual CMC variability.

  17. The neural mechanisms of re-experiencing mental fatigue sensation: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akira; Karasuyama, Takuma; Kikuchi, Taiki; Tanaka, Masaaki; Yamano, Emi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several studies which have tried to clarify the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation; however fatigue sensation has multiple aspects. We hypothesized that past experience related to fatigue sensation is an important factor which contributes to future formation of fatigue sensation through the transfer to memories that are located within specific brain structures. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation related to memory. In the present study, we investigated the neural activity caused by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation that had been experienced during a fatigue-inducing session. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion. In the fatigue experiment, they performed a 2-back test session for 40 min to induce fatigue sensation, a rest session for 15 min to recover from fatigue, and a magnetoencephalography (MEG) session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body with fatigue that they had experienced in the 2-back test session. In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session. Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA) 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms underlying fatigue sensation.

  18. Hypersynchrony despite pathologically reduced beta oscillations in patients with Parkinson's disease: a pharmaco-magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Kurz, Max J; Becker, Katherine M; Santamaria, Pamela M; Gendelman, Howard E; Wilson, Tony W

    2014-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive debilitating neurodegenerative disorder clinically manifest by motor, posture and gait abnormalities. Human neurophysiological studies recording local field potentials within the subthalamic nucleus and scalp-based electroencephalography have shown pathological beta synchrony throughout the basal ganglia-thalamic-cortical motor network in PD. Notably, suppression of this pathological beta synchrony by dopamine replacement therapy or deep-brain stimulation has been associated with improved motor function. However, due to the invasive nature of these studies, it remains unknown whether this "pathological beta" is actually stronger than that observed in healthy demographically matched controls. We used magnetoencephalography to investigate neuronal synchrony and oscillatory amplitude in the beta range and lower frequencies during the resting state in patients with PD and a matched group of patients without neurological disease. Patients with PD were studied both in the practically defined drug "OFF" state, and after administration of dopamine replacements. We found that beta oscillatory amplitude was reduced bilaterally in the primary motor regions of unmedicated patients with PD compared with controls. Administration of dopaminergic medications significantly increased beta oscillatory activity, thus having a normalizing effect. Interestingly, we also found significantly stronger beta synchrony (i.e., hypersynchrony) between the primary motor regions in unmedicated patients with PD compared with controls, and that medication reduced this coupling which is in agreement with the intraoperative studies. These results are consistent with the known functionality of the basal ganglia-thalamic-cortical motor circuit and the likely consequences of beta hypersynchrony in the subthalamic nucleus of patients with PD.

  19. Effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz auditory steady state response--magnetoencephalography study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Usubuchi

    Full Text Available The auditory steady state response (ASSR is an oscillatory brain response, which is phase locked to the rhythm of an auditory stimulus. ASSRs have been recorded in response to a wide frequency range of modulation and/or repetition, but the physiological features of the ASSRs are somewhat different depending on the modulation frequency. Recently, the 20-Hz ASSR has been emphasized in clinical examinations, especially in the area of psychiatry. However, little is known about the physiological properties of the 20-Hz ASSR, compared to those of the 40-Hz and 80-Hz ASSRs. The effects of contralateral noise on the ASSR are known to depend on the modulation frequency to evoke ASSR. However, the effects of contralateral noise on the 20-Hz ASSR are not known. Here we assessed the effects of contralateral white noise at a level of 70 dB SPL on the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 9 healthy volunteers (8 males and 1 female, mean age 31.2 years. The ASSRs were elicited by monaural 1000-Hz 5-s tone bursts amplitude-modulated at 20 and 39 Hz and presented at 80 dB SPL. Contralateral noise caused significant suppression of both the 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs, although suppression was significantly smaller for the 20-Hz ASSRs than the 40-Hz ASSRs. Moreover, the greatest suppression of both 20-Hz and 40-Hz ASSRs occurred in the right hemisphere when stimuli were presented to the right ear with contralateral noise. The present study newly showed that 20-Hz ASSRs are suppressed by contralateral noise, which may be important both for characterization of the 20-Hz ASSR and for interpretation in clinical situations. Physicians must be aware that the 20-Hz ASSR is significantly suppressed by sound (e.g. masking noise or binaural stimulation applied to the contralateral ear.

  20. Neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue: a magnetoencephalography study.

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    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Central inhibition plays an important role in physical performance during physical fatigue. We tried to clarify the neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue using the magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a classical conditioning technique. Twelve right-handed volunteers participated in this study. Participants underwent MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds for 10 min. Thereafter, fatigue-inducing maximum handgrip trials were performed for 10 min; the metronome sounds were started 5 min after the beginning of the handgrip trials. We used metronome sounds as conditioned stimuli and maximum handgrip trials as unconditioned stimuli to cause central inhibition. The next day, MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds were measured for 10 min. Levels of the fatigue sensation in the right hand and sympathetic nerve activity on the second day were significantly higher than those on the first day. In the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 46), the alpha-band event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the second MEG session relative to the first session with the time window of 200 to 300 ms after the onset of handgrip cue sounds was identified. The ERD level in this brain region was positively associated with the change in subjective level of right hand fatigue after the conditioning session and was negatively associated with that of the sympathetic nerve activity. We demonstrated that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in the neural substrates of central inhibition during physical fatigue.

  1. The neural substrates of physical fatigue sensation to evaluate ourselves: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, A; Tanaka, M; Yamano, E; Watanabe, Y

    2014-03-01

    It is important to clarify the neural mechanisms underlying fatigue sensation. There have been several studies which identified brain regions in which the level of the neural activities was correlated with the subjective level of fatigue. However, the neural activity evoked when we evaluate our level of fatigue may not be related to the subjective level of fatigue. Thus, we tried to identify the neural activities caused by the evaluation of the level of fatigue, which may not be related to the subjective level of fatigue. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure neural activity in 10 healthy participants enrolled in our study. During MEG recordings, participants were asked to evaluate the level of physical fatigue in their right hand in time with execution cues (evaluation session) or to direct attention to their right hand in time with execution cues (control session). Equivalent current dipole (ECD) analysis was performed to localize the neural activity limited to the evaluation session. In the evaluation session, ECDs with mean latencies of approximately 380ms were observed in nine of 10 participants. These were localized in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), while in the control session, the ECDs in the same brain region were observed in only two of 10 participants. The proportion of participants in whom ECDs were observed in the PCC in the evaluation session was significantly higher than that in the control session (McNemar test). In addition, the intensities of the ECDs were positively associated with the extent to which the participants successfully evaluated the fatigue in their right hand in the evaluation session. These data suggest that the PCC is involved in the neural substrates associated with self-evaluation of physical fatigue.

  2. Suppressive responses by visual food cues in postprandial activities of insular cortex as revealed by magnetoencephalography.

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    Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-06-01

    'Hara-Hachibu' in Japanese means a subjective sense by which we stop eating just before the motivation to eat is completely lost, a similar concept to caloric restriction (CR). Insular cortex is a critical platform which integrates sensory information into decision-making processes in eating behavior. We compared the responses of insular cortex, as assessed by magnetoencephalography (MEG), immediately after presentation of food images in the Fasting condition with those in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition. Eleven healthy, right-handed males [age, 27.2±9.6 years; body mass index, 22.6±2.1kg/m(2) (mean±SD)] were enrolled in a randomized, two-crossover experiment (Fasting and 'Hara-Hachibu' conditions). Before the MEG recordings in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition, the participants consumed rice balls as much as they judged themselves to have consumed shortly before reaching satiety. During the MEG recordings, they viewed food pictures projected on a screen. The intensities of MEG responses to viewing food pictures were significantly lower in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition than those in the Fasting condition (P<0.05). The intensities of the MEG responses to the visual food stimuli in the 'Hara-Hachibu' condition was positively associated with the factor-3 (food tasted) (r=0.693, P=0.018) and aggregated scores (r=0.659, P=0.027) of the Power of Food Scale, a self-report measure of hedonic hunger. These findings may help to elucidate the neural basis of variability of appetite phenotypes under the condition of CR among individuals, and to develop possible strategies for the maintenance of adequate CR in daily life.

  3. Oscillatory neuronal dynamics associated with manual acupuncture: a magnetoencephalography study using beamforming analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz eAsghar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG enables non-invasive recording of neuronal activity, with reconstruction methods providing estimates of underlying brain source locations and oscillatory dynamics from externally recorded neuromagnetic fields. The aim of our study was to use MEG to determine the effect of manual acupuncture on neuronal oscillatory dynamics. A major problem in MEG investigations of manual acupuncture is the absence of onset times for each needle manipulation. Given that beamforming (spatial filtering analysis is not dependent upon stimulus-driven responses being phase-locked to stimulus onset, we postulated that beamforming could reveal source locations and induced changes in neuronal activity during manual acupuncture. In a beamformer analysis, a two-minute period of manual acupuncture needle manipulation delivered to the ipsilateral right LI-4 (Hegu acupoint was contrasted with a two-minute baseline period. We considered oscillatory power changes in the theta (4-8Hz, alpha (8-13Hz, beta (13-30Hz and gamma (30-100Hz frequency bands. We found significant decreases in beta band power in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus. In the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere, we found significant power decreases in beta and gamma frequency bands in only the superior frontal gyrus. No significant power modulations were found in theta and alpha bands. Our results indicate that beamforming is a useful analytical tool to reconstruct underlying neuronal activity associated with manual acupuncture. Our main finding was of beta power decreases in primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus, which opens up a line of future investigation regarding whether this contributes towards an underlying mechanism of acupuncture.

  4. Neural mechanisms of phonemic restoration for speech comprehension revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Kishiko; Ishii, Akira; Takano, Sakurako; Yamamoto, Hidefumi; Sakashita, Tetsushi; Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Yamane, Hideo

    2013-11-01

    In daily communication, we can usually still hear the spoken words as if they had not been masked and can comprehend the speech when spoken words are masked by background noise. This phenomenon is known as phonemic restoration. Since little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying phonemic restoration for speech comprehension, we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Twelve healthy male volunteers with normal hearing participated in the study. Participants were requested to carefully listen to and understand recorded spoken Japanese stories, which were either played forward (forward condition) or in reverse (reverse condition), with their eyes closed. Several syllables of spoken words were replaced by 300-ms white-noise stimuli with an inter-stimulus interval of 1.6-20.3s. We compared MEG responses to white-noise stimuli during the forward condition with those during the reverse condition using time-frequency analyses. Increased 3-5 Hz band power in the forward condition compared with the reverse condition was continuously observed in the left inferior frontal gyrus [Brodmann's areas (BAs) 45, 46, and 47] and decreased 18-22 Hz band powers caused by white-noise stimuli were seen in the left transverse temporal gyrus (BA 42) and superior temporal gyrus (BA 22). These results suggest that the left inferior frontal gyrus and left transverse and superior temporal gyri are involved in phonemic restoration for speech comprehension. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms of phonemic restoration as well as develop innovative treatment methods for individuals suffering from impaired speech comprehension, particularly in noisy environments.

  5. Cortical activity associated with the detection of temporal gaps in tones: A magnetoencephalography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako eMitsudo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We used magnetoencephalography (MEG in two experiments to investigate spatio-temporal profiles of brain responses to gaps in tones. Stimuli consisted of leading and trailing markers with gaps between the two markers of 0, 30, or 80 ms. Leading and trailing markers were 300 ms pure tones at 800 Hz or 3200 Hz. Two conditions were examined: the within-frequency (WF condition in which the leading and trailing markers had identical frequencies, and the between-frequency (BF condition in which they had different frequencies. Using minimum-norm estimates (MNE, we localized the source activations at the time of the peak response to the trailing markers. Results showed that MEG signals in response to 800 Hz and 3200 Hz tones were localized in different regions within the auditory cortex, indicating that the frequency pathways activated by the two markers were spatially represented. The time course of regional activity (RA was extracted from each localized region for each condition. In Experiment 1, which used a continuous tone for the WF 0-ms stimulus, the N1m amplitude for the trailing marker in the WF condition differed depending on gap duration but not tonal frequency. In contrast, N1m amplitude in BF conditions differed depending on the frequency of the trailing marker. In Experiment 2, in which the 0-ms gap stimulus in the WF condition was made from two markers and included an amplitude reduction in the middle, the amplitude in WF and BF conditions changed depending on frequency, but not gap duration. The difference in temporal characteristics between WF and BF conditions could be observed in the regional activity.

  6. BabyMEG: A whole-head pediatric magnetoencephalography system for human brain development research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Hämäläinen, Matti; Pratt, Kevin; Mascarenas, Anthony; Miller, Paul; Han, Menglai; Robles, Jose; Cavallini, Anders; Power, Bill; Sieng, Kosal; Sun, Limin; Lew, Seok; Doshi, Chiran; Ahtam, Banu; Dinh, Christoph; Esch, Lorenz; Grant, Ellen; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Paulson, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    We developed a 375-channel, whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system ("BabyMEG") for studying the electrophysiological development of human brain during the first years of life. The helmet accommodates heads up to 95% of 36-month old boys in the USA. The unique two-layer sensor array consists of: (1) 270 magnetometers (10 mm diameter, ˜15 mm coil-to-coil spacing) in the inner layer, (2) thirty-five three-axis magnetometers (20 mm × 20 mm) in the outer layer 4 cm away from the inner layer. Additionally, there are three three-axis reference magnetometers. With the help of a remotely operated position adjustment mechanism, the sensor array can be positioned to provide a uniform short spacing (mean 8.5 mm) between the sensor array and room temperature surface of the dewar. The sensors are connected to superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4.2 K with median sensitivity levels of 7.5 fT/√Hz for the inner and 4 fT/√Hz for the outer layer sensors. SQUID outputs are digitized by a 24-bit acquisition system. A closed-cycle helium recycler provides maintenance-free continuous operation, eliminating the need for helium, with no interruption needed during MEG measurements. BabyMEG with the recycler has been fully operational from March, 2015. Ongoing spontaneous brain activity can be monitored in real time without interference from external magnetic noise sources including the recycler, using a combination of a lightly shielded two-layer magnetically shielded room, an external active shielding, a signal-space projection method, and a synthetic gradiometer approach. Evoked responses in the cortex can be clearly detected without averaging. These new design features and capabilities represent several advances in MEG, increasing the utility of this technique in basic neuroscience as well as in clinical research and patient studies.

  7. Test-retest reliability of resting-state magnetoencephalography power in sensor and source space.

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    Martín-Buro, María Carmen; Garcés, Pilar; Maestú, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported changes in spontaneous brain rhythms that could be used as clinical biomarkers or in the evaluation of neuropsychological and drug treatments in longitudinal studies using magnetoencephalography (MEG). There is an increasing necessity to use these measures in early diagnosis and pathology progression; however, there is a lack of studies addressing how reliable they are. Here, we provide the first test-retest reliability estimate of MEG power in resting-state at sensor and source space. In this study, we recorded 3 sessions of resting-state MEG activity from 24 healthy subjects with an interval of a week between each session. Power values were estimated at sensor and source space with beamforming for classical frequency bands: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz), low beta (13-20 Hz), high beta (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-45 Hz). Then, test-retest reliability was evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We also evaluated the relation between source power and the within-subject variability. In general, ICC of theta, alpha, and low beta power was fairly high (ICC > 0.6) while in delta and gamma power was lower. In source space, fronto-posterior alpha, frontal beta, and medial temporal theta showed the most reliable profiles. Signal-to-noise ratio could be partially responsible for reliability as low signal intensity resulted in high within-subject variability, but also the inherent nature of some brain rhythms in resting-state might be driving these reliability patterns. In conclusion, our results described the reliability of MEG power estimates in each frequency band, which could be considered in disease characterization or clinical trials.

  8. Auditory cortical responses evoked by pure tones in healthy and sensorineural hearing loss subjects: functional MRI and magnetoencephalography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yun-ting; GENG Zuo-jun; ZHANG Quan; LI Wei; ZHANG Jing

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography are new techniques of brain functional imaging which can provide the information of excitation of neurons by measure the changes of hemodynamics and electrophysiological data of local brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to study functional brain areas evoked by pure tones in healthy and sensorineural hearing loss subjects with these techniques and to compare the differences between the two groups.Methods Thirty healthy and 30 sensorineural hearing loss subjects were included in this study. In fMRI,block-design paradigm was used. During the active epoch the participants listened to 1000 Hz, sound pressure level 140 dB pure tones at duration 500 ms, interstimulus interval 1000 ms, which presented continuously via a magnetic resonance-compatible audio system. None stimulus was executed in control epoch. In magnetoencephalography study, every subject received stimuli of 1000 Hz tone bursts delivered to the bilateral ear at duration 8 ms, interstimulus intervals 1000 ms. Sound pressure level in healthy subjects was 30 dB; in sensorineural hearing loss subjects was 20 dB above everyone' s hearing threshold respectively. All subjects were examined with 306-channel whole-scalp neuromagnetometer.Results In fMRI, all subjects showed significant activations in bilateral Heschl's gyri, anterior pole of planum temporale, planum temporale, precentral gyri, postcentral gyri, supramarginal gyri, superior temporal gyri,inferior frontal gyri, occipital lobes and cerebellums. The healthy subjects had more intensive activation in bilateral Heschl's gyri, anterior pole of planum temporale, inferior frontal gyri, left superior temporal gyri and fight planum temporale than the hearing loss subjects. But in precentral gyri, postcentral gyri and occipital lobes,the activation is more intensive in the hearing loss subjects. In magnetoencephalography study, both in the

  9. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  10. Particle filters for the magnetoencephalography inverse problem: increasing the efficiency through a semi-analytic approach (Rao-Blackwellization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, A [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova (Italy); Pascarella, A; Campi, C [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Genova (Italy); Piana, M [Dipartimento di Informatica, Universita di Verona (Italy)], E-mail: sorrentino@fisica.unige.it

    2008-07-15

    We consider the problem of dynamically estimating the parameters of point-like neural sources from magnetoencephalography data. Since the problem is non-linear, we apply the sequential Monte Carlo algorithms known as particle filters for solving the Bayesian filtering problem. We suggest that the linear dependence of the data on a subset of the parameters allows the analytic computation of the posterior density for these parameters, i.e. Rao-Blackwellization; this considerably improves the accuracy of the method and its statistical efficiency.

  11. Resting-state magnetoencephalography study of “small world” characteristics and cognitive dysfunction in patients with glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu X

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Xin-Hua Hu, Ting Lei, Hua-Zhong Xu, Yuan-Jie Zou, Hong-Yi Liu Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to analyze “small world” characteristics in glioma patients in order to understand the relationship between cognitive dysfunction and brain functional connectivity network in the resting state. Methods: Resting-state magnetoencephalography was performed in 20 patients with glioma and 20 healthy subjects. The clustering coefficient of the resting functional connectivity network in the brain, average path length, and “small world” index (SWI were calculated. Cognitive function was estimated by testing of attention, verbal fluency, memory, athletic ability, visual-spatial ability, and intelligence. Results: Compared with healthy controls, patients with glioma showed decreased cognitive function, and diminished low and high gamma band “small world” characteristics in the resting functional connectivity network. Conclusion: The SWI is associated with cognitive function and is diminished in patients with glioma, and is therefore correlated with cognition dysfunction. Keywords: glioma, cognitive dysfunction, “small world”, functional connectivity network, magnetoencephalography

  12. BabySQUID: A mobile, high-resolution multichannel magnetoencephalography system for neonatal brain assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Pratt, Kevin; Atwood, Christopher; Mascarenas, Anthony; Reineman, Richard; Nurminen, Jussi; Paulson, Douglas

    2006-02-01

    We developed a prototype of a mobile, high-resolution, multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, called babySQUID, for assessing brain functions in newborns and infants. Unlike electroencephalography, MEG signals are not distorted by the scalp or the fontanels and sutures in the skull. Thus, brain activity can be measured and localized with MEG as if the sensors were above an exposed brain. The babySQUID is housed in a moveable cart small enough to be transported from one room to another. To assess brain functions, one places the baby on the bed of the cart and the head on its headrest with MEG sensors just below. The sensor array consists of 76 first-order axial gradiometers, each with a pickup coil diameter of 6mm and a baseline of 30mm, in a high-density array with a spacing of 12-14mm center-to-center. The pickup coils are 6±1mm below the outer surface of the headrest. The short gap provides unprecedented sensitivity since the scalp and skull are thin (as little as 3-4mm altogether) in babies. In an electromagnetically unshielded room in a hospital, the field sensitivity at 1kHz was ˜17fT/√Hz. The noise was reduced from ˜400to200fT/√Hz at 1Hz using a reference cancellation technique and further to ˜40fT/√Hz using a gradient common mode rejection technique. Although the residual environmental magnetic noise interfered with the operation of the babySQUID, the instrument functioned sufficiently well to detect spontaneous brain signals from babies with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of as much as 7.6:1. In a magnetically shielded room, the field sensitivity was 17fT/√Hz at 20Hz and 30fT/√Hz at 1Hz without implementation of reference or gradient cancellation. The sensitivity was sufficiently high to detect spontaneous brain activity from a 7month old baby with a SNR as much as 40:1 and evoked somatosensory responses with a 50Hz bandwidth after as little as four averages. We expect that both the noise and the sensor gap can be reduced further by

  13. 治理语境下的多元行政法%Multipolar Administrative Law Under Context of Governance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞雪

    2014-01-01

    治理理论给行政法治模式带来了深刻变革,治理机制全方位激励治理主体的普遍参与,尽可能地拓展、开放公共过程,多元行政法由此勃兴。与传统行政法关注行政主体与相对人权利义务关系的视角不同,治理语境下的多元行政法将视野扩展到了跨国治理机构、企业、社会组织等其他治理主体,关注治理网络中不同主体之间的协商与合作。行政法基本原则并未伴随着国家角色的回退而限缩,而是在拘束行政机关的行政行为之外,扩展到了更多承担公共治理任务的主体。治理工具也从过去政府“控制—命令”的传统方式,转向了软硬结合的多元化态势。%The governance theory brings profound changes to the administrative law. The governance mechanism encourages universal participation of different governance bodies in order to expand to more public procedures, leading to the lfourish of the multipolar administrative law. Compared to the perspective focusing on the right-obligation relationship between administrative bodies and the third party of the traditional administrative law, this multipolar administrative law under the governance context turns to pay attention to other governance bodies such as transnational governance organizations, enterprises and social organizations, etc., as well as the negotiation and cooperation among them in the governance network. Nevertheless, the administrative law basic principle does not retreat back with the role of state’s going back and it even acts on more publicgovernance bodies besides the administrative authorities. Moreover, governance tools also comprise the hybrid of soft and hard instruments, rather than the before way of single ‘common-and –control’.

  14. Study on the 143Nd(n, γα)140Ce reaction on resonance neutrons and multipolarity of γ-transitions between compound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 143Nd(n, γa)140Ce reaction on resonance neutrons was investigated by the time-of-flight method at the IBR-30 pulse reactor. The width of the resonance with spin 4- at E0=55 eV was GITAsub(γa)=0.089+-0.017 μeV and at E0=159 eV was GITAsub(γa)=0.087+-0.024 μeV. The ratio of widths of resonances with spin 4- and 3- (on thermal neutrons) gave the radiative strength functions for the γ-transitions between compound states with multipolarity E1 and M1 to be equal to Ssub(γ)sup(cc)(E1)=(8+-3)x10sup(-9) MeV-3 and Ssub(γ)sup(cc) (M1)=(7+-3)x10sup(-9) Mev-3. This confirms the earlier extablished fact of the large contribution of M1 multipolarities into γ-transitions between the compound states. But still one cannot neglect the contribution of E1 multipolarity

  15. Automated Wetland Delineation from Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarized SAR Images in High Temporal and Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, L.; Schmitt, A.; Wendleder, A.

    2016-06-01

    Water scarcity is one of the main challenges posed by the changing climate. Especially in semi-arid regions where water reservoirs are filled during the very short rainy season, but have to store enough water for the extremely long dry season, the intelligent handling of water resources is vital. This study focusses on Lac Bam in Burkina Faso, which is the largest natural lake of the country and of high importance for the local inhabitants for irrigated farming, animal watering, and extraction of water for drinking and sanitation. With respect to the competition for water resources an independent area-wide monitoring system is essential for the acceptance of any decision maker. The following contribution introduces a weather and illumination independent monitoring system for the automated wetland delineation with a high temporal (about two weeks) and a high spatial sampling (about five meters). The similarities of the multispectral and multi-polarized SAR acquisitions by RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are studied as well as the differences. The results indicate that even basic approaches without pre-classification time series analysis or post-classification filtering are already enough to establish a monitoring system of prime importance for a whole region.

  16. Numerical simulation and performance improvement of a multi-polar concentric Halbach cylindrical magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yonghua; Guo, Yue; Xiao, Shuifang; Yu, Shen; Ji, Hu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    Multi-polar concentric Halbach cylinders of magnets could generate the magnetic field varying considerably in the annular gaps, thus were applied in the rotary magnetic refrigerators. In the current investigation, a six-polar concentric Halbach cylinder is developed based on the ideal concentric one by the numerical simulation with COMSOL Multiphysics. Cylinder radii are optimized and magnet material profiles are adjusted for a better overall performance (Λcool). Moreover, the segmentation on the concentric cylinder is conducted for an easy fabrication, and the edge effect of finite-length device is studied. With the present investigation, it is found that a larger external radius of external cylinder facilitates a larger flux density in the high field region (| B | bar high), while Λcool could be worse. Meanwhile, with the removal of magnet materials enclosed by the equipotential lines of magnetic vector potential, the magnetic flux density in low field region (| B | bar low) drops from 0.271 to 0.0136 T, and Λcool rises from 1.36 to 1.85 T0.7. Moreover, a proper segmentation would not degrade the difference between | B | bar high and | B | bar low, on the contrary, Λcool rises by about 20.2% due to magnet materials lack for efficiency replaced by soft irons. Finally, current 3D simulation indicates the edge effect on Λcool could be trivial.

  17. AUTOMATED WETLAND DELINEATION FROM MULTI-FREQUENCY AND MULTI-POLARIZED SAR IMAGES IN HIGH TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Moser

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Water scarcity is one of the main challenges posed by the changing climate. Especially in semi-arid regions where water reservoirs are filled during the very short rainy season, but have to store enough water for the extremely long dry season, the intelligent handling of water resources is vital. This study focusses on Lac Bam in Burkina Faso, which is the largest natural lake of the country and of high importance for the local inhabitants for irrigated farming, animal watering, and extraction of water for drinking and sanitation. With respect to the competition for water resources an independent area-wide monitoring system is essential for the acceptance of any decision maker. The following contribution introduces a weather and illumination independent monitoring system for the automated wetland delineation with a high temporal (about two weeks and a high spatial sampling (about five meters. The similarities of the multispectral and multi-polarized SAR acquisitions by RADARSAT-2 and TerraSAR-X are studied as well as the differences. The results indicate that even basic approaches without pre-classification time series analysis or post-classification filtering are already enough to establish a monitoring system of prime importance for a whole region.

  18. Occurrence of multipolar mitoses and association with Aurora-A/-B kinases and p53 mutations in aneuploid esophageal carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münch Claudia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aurora kinases and loss of p53 function are implicated in the carcinogenesis of aneuploid esophageal cancers. Their association with occurrence of multipolar mitoses in the two main histotypes of aneuploid esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC and Barrett's adenocarcinoma (BAC remains unclear. Here, we investigated the occurrence of multipolar mitoses, Aurora-A/-B gene copy numbers and expression/activation as well as p53 alterations in aneuploid ESCC and BAC cancer cell lines. Results A control esophageal epithelial cell line (EPC-hTERT had normal Aurora-A and -B gene copy numbers and expression, was p53 wild type and displayed bipolar mitoses. In contrast, both ESCC (OE21, Kyse-410 and BAC (OE33, OE19 cell lines were aneuploid and displayed elevated gene copy numbers of Aurora-A (chromosome 20 polysomy: OE21, OE33, OE19; gene amplification: Kyse-410 and Aurora-B (chromosome 17 polysomy: OE21, Kyse-410. Aurora-B gene copy numbers were not elevated in OE19 and OE33 cells despite chromosome 17 polysomy. Aurora-A expression and activity (Aurora-A/phosphoT288 was not directly linked to gene copy numbers and was highest in Kyse-410 and OE33 cells. Aurora-B expression and activity (Aurora-B/phosphoT232 was higher in OE21 and Kyse-410 than in OE33 and OE19 cells. The mitotic index was highest in OE21, followed by OE33 > OE19 > Kyse-410 and EPC-hTERT cells. Multipolar mitoses occurred with high frequency in OE33 (13.8 ± 4.2%, followed by OE21 (7.7 ± 5.0% and Kyse-410 (6.3 ± 2.0% cells. Single multipolar mitoses occurred in OE19 (1.0 ± 1.0% cells. Distinct p53 mutations and p53 protein expression patterns were found in all esophageal cancer cell lines, but complete functional p53 inactivation occurred in OE21 and OE33 only. Conclusions High Aurora-A expression alone is not associated with overt multipolar mitoses in aneuploid ESCC and BAC cancer cells, as specifically shown here for OE21 and OE33 cells, respectively

  19. Ketamine Dysregulates the Amplitude and Connectivity of High-Frequency Oscillations in Cortical-Subcortical Networks in Humans: Evidence From Resting-State Magnetoencephalography-Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivolta, Davide; Heidegger, Tonio; Scheller, Bertram; Sauer, Andreas; Schaum, Michael; Birkner, Katharina; Singer, Wolf; Wibral, Michael; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Hypofunctioning of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) has been prominently implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (ScZ). The current study tested the effects of ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and NMDA-R antagonist, on resting-state activity recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy volunteers. In a single-blind cross-over design, each participant (n = 12) received, on 2 different sessions, a subanesthetic dose of S-ketamine (0.006 mg/Kg) and saline injection. MEG-data were analyzed at sensor- and source-level in the beta (13-30 Hz) and gamma (30-90 Hz) frequency ranges. In addition, connectivity analysis at source-level was performed using transfer entropy (TE). Ketamine increased gamma-power while beta-band activity was decreased. Specifically, elevated 30-90 Hz activity was pronounced in subcortical (thalamus and hippocampus) and cortical (frontal and temporal cortex) regions, whilst reductions in beta-band power were localized to the precuneus, cerebellum, anterior cingulate, temporal and visual cortex. TE analysis demonstrated increased information transfer in a thalamo-cortical network after ketamine administration. The findings are consistent with the pronounced dysregulation of high-frequency oscillations following the inhibition of NMDA-R in animal models of ScZ as well as with evidence from electroencephalogram-data in ScZ-patients and increased functional connectivity during early illness stages. Moreover, our data highlight the potential contribution of thalamo-cortical connectivity patterns towards ketamine-induced neuronal dysregulation, which may be relevant for the understanding of ScZ as a disorder of disinhibition of neural circuits.

  20. Abnormal thalamocortical dynamics may be altered by deep brain stimulation: using magnetoencephalography to study phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, N J; Jenkinson, N; Kringelbach, M L; Hansen, P C; Pereira, E A; Brittain, J S; Holland, P; Holliday, I E; Owen, S; Stein, J; Aziz, T

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used to alleviate chronic pain. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the mechanisms of DBS for pain is difficult because of the artefact caused by the stimulator. We were able to record activity over the occipital lobe of a patient using DBS for phantom limb pain during presentation of a visual stimulus. This demonstrates that MEG can be used to study patients undergoing DBS provided control stimuli are used to check the reliability of the data. We then asked the patient to rate his pain during and off DBS. Correlations were found between these ratings and power in theta (6-9) and beta bands (12-30). Further, there was a tendency for frequencies under 25 Hz to correlate with each other after a period off stimulation compared with immediately after DBS. The results are interpreted as reflecting abnormal thalamocortical dynamics, previously implicated in painful syndromes.

  1. A multicenter study of the early detection of synaptic dysfunction in Mild Cognitive Impairment using Magnetoencephalography-derived functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestú, Fernando; Peña, Jose-Maria; Garcés, Pilar; González, Santiago; Bajo, Ricardo; Bagic, Anto; Cuesta, Pablo; Funke, Michael; Mäkelä, Jyrki P; Menasalvas, Ernestina; Nakamura, Akinori; Parkkonen, Lauri; López, Maria E; Del Pozo, Francisco; Sudre, Gustavo; Zamrini, Edward; Pekkonen, Eero; Henson, Richard N; Becker, James T

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic disruption is an early pathological sign of the neurodegeneration of Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT). The changes in network synchronization are evident in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) at the group level, but there are very few Magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies regarding discrimination at the individual level. In an international multicenter study, we used MEG and functional connectivity metrics to discriminate MCI from normal aging at the individual person level. A labeled sample of features (links) that distinguished MCI patients from controls in a training dataset was used to classify MCI subjects in two testing datasets from four other MEG centers. We identified a pattern of neuronal hypersynchronization in MCI, in which the features that best discriminated MCI were fronto-parietal and interhemispheric links. The hypersynchronization pattern found in the MCI patients was stable across the five different centers, and may be considered an early sign of synaptic disruption and a possible preclinical biomarker for MCI/DAT.

  2. Differential temporal neural responses of pain-related regions by acupuncture at acupoint ST36: a magnetoencephalography study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hao; ZHANG Xiao-tong; YAN HAO; BAI Li-jun; AI Lin; WANG Feng-bin; YOU You-bo; CHEN Peng; WANG Bao-guo

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous neuroimaging studies primarily focused on the spatial distribution of acupuncture needling stimulation. However, a salient feature of acupuncture was its long-lasting effect. This study attempted to detect the spatial-temporal neural responses evoked by acupuncture at an analgesia acupoint ST36 by using magnetoencephalography. To further verify its functional specificity, we also adopted acupuncture at Pericardium 6 and nonacupoint as separated controls.Methods Forty-two college students, all right-handed and acupuncture naive, participated in this study. Every participant received only one acupoint stimulation, resulting in 14 subjects in one group. Both magnetoencephalography data (151-channel whole-head system) and structural functional magnetic resonance imaging data (3D sequence with a voxel size of 1 mm3 for anatomical localization) were collected for each subject. All processing procedures were performed in BrainStorm Toolbox.Results Acupuncture at ST36 showed a significantly time-varied brain activities with different onset time. Our results presented that acupuncture at different acupoints (or comparing with nonacupoint) can specifically induce neural responses in different brain areas-acupuncture at ST36 can specifically induce the neural responses of pain-inhibition areas, while acupuncture at PC6 can specifically induce the activities of the insula and amygdala.Conclusions In the present study, we attempted to detect the temporal neural responses underlying the functional specificity of acupuncture at ST36, using acupoint belonging to different meridians and non-acupoint with efficacy-irreverent as separate controls. The specific neural substrates involving acupuncture at different acupoints may be related to its functional specificity in clinical settings.

  3. BRICS AND ITS ROLE IN THE SHAPING OF A MULTIPOLAR WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vinogradov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other dialogue format — G7 — BRICS countries represent not only different social and economic systems, but also different civilizations. Civilizations are the basic actors of history because they exist longer than other social subjects, and have a greater influence on world history than any other historical entity. Until today the basis of the international relations was formed by principles of inter-European relations. But the model of relations within one civilization inevitably has the limited value. Moreover, it is not the only model possible. Growing threat to Euro-Atlantic’s main advantage — economic superiority, has opened prospects to other trends. BRICS will inevitably develop from economic group into international political and intercivilizational consortium.

  4. BRICS AND ITS ROLE IN THE SHAPING OF A MULTIPOLAR WORLD

    OpenAIRE

    Vinogradov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike other dialogue format — G7 — BRICS countries represent not only different social and economic systems, but also different civilizations. Civilizations are the basic actors of history because they exist longer than other social subjects, and have a greater influence on world history than any other historical entity. Until today the basis of the international relations was formed by principles of inter-European relations. But the model of relations within one civilization inevitably has ...

  5. Realistic sampling of amino acid geometries for a multipolar polarizable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy J; Cardamone, Salvatore; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-09-15

    The Quantum Chemical Topological Force Field (QCTFF) uses the machine learning method kriging to map atomic multipole moments to the coordinates of all atoms in the molecular system. It is important that kriging operates on relevant and realistic training sets of molecular geometries. Therefore, we sampled single amino acid geometries directly from protein crystal structures stored in the Protein Databank (PDB). This sampling enhances the conformational realism (in terms of dihedral angles) of the training geometries. However, these geometries can be fraught with inaccurate bond lengths and valence angles due to artefacts of the refinement process of the X-ray diffraction patterns, combined with experimentally invisible hydrogen atoms. This is why we developed a hybrid PDB/nonstationary normal modes (NM) sampling approach called PDB/NM. This method is superior over standard NM sampling, which captures only geometries optimized from the stationary points of single amino acids in the gas phase. Indeed, PDB/NM combines the sampling of relevant dihedral angles with chemically correct local geometries. Geometries sampled using PDB/NM were used to build kriging models for alanine and lysine, and their prediction accuracy was compared to models built from geometries sampled from three other sampling approaches. Bond length variation, as opposed to variation in dihedral angles, puts pressure on prediction accuracy, potentially lowering it. Hence, the larger coverage of dihedral angles of the PDB/NM method does not deteriorate the predictive accuracy of kriging models, compared to the NM sampling around local energetic minima used so far in the development of QCTFF.

  6. Multipolarity analysis for {sup 14}C high-energy resonance populated by ({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbone, D., E-mail: carboned@lns.infn.it; Cavallaro, M.; Bondì, M.; Agodi, C.; Cunsolo, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cappuzzello, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Azaiez, F.; Franchoo, S.; Khan, E. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universitè Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Bonaccorso, A. [INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Fortunato, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Foti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Linares, R.; Lubian, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi (Brazil); Scarpaci, J. A. [Centre de Sciences Nucleaires et de Sciences de Matieres, Universitè Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Vitturi, A. [INFN-Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been explored up to high excitation energy of the residual nucleus thanks to the use of the MAGNEX spectrometer to detect the ejectiles. In the region above the two-neutron separation energy, a resonance has been observed at 16.9 MeV. A multipolarity analysis of the cross section angular distribution indicates an L = 0 character for such a transition.

  7. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Indranuj, E-mail: indranuj@aees.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  8. The Fate of Sub-micron Circumplanetary Dust Grains II: Multipolar Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We study the radial and vertical stability of dust grains launched with all charge-to-mass ratios at arbitrary distances from rotating planets with complex magnetic fields. We show that the aligned dipole magnetic field model analyzed by Jontof-Hutter and Hamilton (2012) is an excellent approximation in most cases, but that fundamentally new physics arises with the inclusion of non-axisymmetric magnetic field terms. In particular, large numbers of distant negatively-charged dust grains, stable in a magnetic dipole, can be driven to escape by a more complex field. We trace the origin of the instability to overlapping Lorentz resonances which are extremely powerful when the gravitational and electromagnetic forces on a dust grain are comparable. These resonances enable a dust grain to tap the spin energy of the planet to power its escape. We also explore the relatively minor influence of different launch speeds and the far more important effects of variable grain charge. Only the latter are capable of significa...

  9. Many-body dipole-induced dipole model for electrorheological fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Ji-Ping; Yu Kin-Wah

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical investigations on electrorheological (ER) fluids usually rely on computer simulations. An initial approach for these studies would be the point-dipole (PD) approximation, which is known to err considerably when the particles approach and finally touch each other due to many-body and multipolar interactions. Thus various works have attempted to go beyond the PD model. Being beyond the PD model, previous attempts have been restricted to either local-field effects only or multipolar effects only, but not both. For instance, we recently proposed a dipoleinduced-dipole (DID) model which is shown to be both more accurate than the PD model and easy to use. This work is necessary because the many-body (local-field) effect is included to put forth the many-body DID model. The results show that the multipolar interactions can indeed be dominant over the dipole interaction, while the local-field effect may yield a correction.

  10. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavin Shah

    Full Text Available The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ from radial glia cells (RGCs and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP. During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ and lower intermediate zone (IZ. Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process.

  11. C3G/Rapgef1 Is Required in Multipolar Neurons for the Transition to a Bipolar Morphology during Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhavin; Lutter, Daniela; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Kato, Katsuhiro; Tsytsyura, Yaroslav; Glyvuk, Natalia; Sakakibara, Akira; Klingauf, Jürgen; Adams, Ralf H; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of a polarized morphology is essential for the development and function of neurons. During the development of the mammalian neocortex, neurons arise in the ventricular zone (VZ) from radial glia cells (RGCs) and leave the VZ to generate the cortical plate (CP). During their migration, newborn neurons first assume a multipolar morphology in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and lower intermediate zone (IZ). Subsequently, they undergo a multi-to-bipolar (MTB) transition to become bipolar in the upper IZ by developing a leading process and a trailing axon. The small GTPases Rap1A and Rap1B act as master regulators of neural cell polarity in the developing mouse neocortex. They are required for maintaining the polarity of RGCs and directing the MTB transition of multipolar neurons. Here we show that the Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) C3G (encoded by the Rapgef1 gene) is a crucial regulator of the MTB transition in vivo by conditionally inactivating the Rapgef1 gene in the developing mouse cortex at different time points during neuronal development. Inactivation of C3G results in defects in neuronal migration, axon formation and cortical lamination. Live cell imaging shows that C3G is required in cortical neurons for both the specification of an axon and the initiation of radial migration by forming a leading process. PMID:27111087

  12. Multipolarity or cosmopolitanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Dreyer

    In a series of publications Chantal Mouffe (2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2008, 2009, 2013) has criticized cosmopolitanism for its lack of conceptualization of power, conflict and struggle, in short of politics. Even though this critique is largely well placed, the conclusions drawn from the analysis...... by Mouffe are flawed. As she puts it, if a cosmopolitan democracy “was ever realized, it could only signify the world hegemony of a dominant power that would have been able to impose its conception of the world on the entire planet and which, identifying its interests with those of humanity, would treat any...... rights as legitimating devises for non-democratic goals, should not make us abandon the realization of these values on the global scale as the political goal....

  13. Multipolarity or cosmopolitanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Dreyer

    of hegemony – as developed by herself and Laclau in Hegemony and Socialist Strategy, (Laclau and Mouffe,1985), precisely allows us to see the distance between universal values, such as freedom and equality for all, and their actual interpretation and use. The fact that the West are using democracy and human......In a series of publications Chantal Mouffe (2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2008, 2009, 2013) has criticized cosmopolitanism for its lack of conceptualization of power, conflict and struggle, in short of politics. Even though this critique is largely well placed, the conclusions drawn from the analysis...... by Mouffe are flawed. As she puts it, if a cosmopolitan democracy “was ever realized, it could only signify the world hegemony of a dominant power that would have been able to impose its conception of the world on the entire planet and which, identifying its interests with those of humanity, would treat any...

  14. Moving Toward Multipolarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KERRY; BROWN

    2009-01-01

    Prospects of an improved relationship between China and Europe are brightening but expectations may have to be reined in Since 2003, the European Union (EU) and China have described their relationship as one of "strategic partnership." But the term is one that

  15. A multicenter study of the early detection of synaptic dysfunction in Mild Cognitive Impairment using Magnetoencephalography-derived functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Maestú, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic disruption is an early pathological sign of the neurodegeneration of Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT. The changes in network synchronization are evident in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI at the group level, but there are very few Magnetoencephalography (MEG studies regarding discrimination at the individual level. In an international multicenter study, we used MEG and functional connectivity metrics to discriminate MCI from normal aging at the individual person level. A labeled sample of features (links that distinguished MCI patients from controls in a training dataset was used to classify MCI subjects in two testing datasets from four other MEG centers. We identified a pattern of neuronal hypersynchronization in MCI, in which the features that best discriminated MCI were fronto-parietal and interhemispheric links. The hypersynchronization pattern found in the MCI patients was stable across the five different centers, and may be considered an early sign of synaptic disruption and a possible preclinical biomarker for MCI/DAT.

  16. Cross-Correlation of Motor Activity Signals from dc-Magnetoencephalography, Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilmann H. Sander

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal and vascular responses due to finger movements were synchronously measured using dc-magnetoencephalography (dcMEG and time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (trNIRS. The finger movements were monitored with electromyography (EMG. Cortical responses related to the finger movement sequence were extracted by independent component analysis from both the dcMEG and the trNIRS data. The temporal relations between EMG rate, dcMEG, and trNIRS responses were assessed pairwise using the cross-correlation function (CCF, which does not require epoch averaging. A positive lag on a scale of seconds was found for the maximum of the CCF between dcMEG and trNIRS. A zero lag is observed for the CCF between dcMEG and EMG. Additionally this CCF exhibits oscillations at the frequency of individual finger movements. These findings show that the dcMEG with a bandwidth up to 8 Hz records both slow and faster neuronal responses, whereas the vascular response is confirmed to change on a scale of seconds.

  17. Does IQ affect the functional brain network involved in pseudoword reading in students with reading disability? A magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, Panagiotis G; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Papanicolaou, Andrew C; Fletcher, Jack M

    2014-01-01

    The study examined whether individual differences in performance and verbal IQ affect the profiles of reading-related regional brain activation in 127 students experiencing reading difficulties and typical readers. Using magnetoencephalography in a pseudoword read-aloud task, we compared brain activation profiles of students experiencing word-level reading difficulties who did (n = 29) or did not (n = 36) meet the IQ-reading achievement discrepancy criterion. Typical readers assigned to a lower-IQ (n = 18) or a higher IQ (n = 44) subgroup served as controls. Minimum norm estimates of regional cortical activity revealed that the degree of hypoactivation in the left superior temporal and supramarginal gyri in both RD subgroups was not affected by IQ. Moreover, IQ did not moderate the positive association between degree of activation in the left fusiform gyrus and phonological decoding ability. We did find, however, that the hypoactivation of the left pars opercularis in RD was restricted to lower-IQ participants. In accordance with previous morphometric and fMRI studies, degree of activity in inferior frontal, and inferior parietal regions correlated with IQ across reading ability subgroups. Results are consistent with current views questioning the relevance of IQ-discrepancy criteria in the diagnosis of dyslexia. PMID:24409136

  18. Does IQ affect the functional brain network involved in pseudoword reading in students with reading disability? A magnetoencephalography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis G Simos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined whether individual differences in performance and verbal IQ affect the profiles of reading-related regional brain activation in 127 students experiencing reading difficulties and typical readers. Using magnetoencephalography in a pseudoword read-aloud task, we compared brain activation profiles of students experiencing word-level reading difficulties who did (n=29 or did not (n=36 meet the IQ-reading achievement discrepancy criterion. Typical readers assigned to a lower-IQ (n=18 or a higher IQ (n=44 subgroup served as controls. Minimum norm estimates of regional cortical activity revealed that the degree of hypoactivation in the left superior temporal and supramarginal gyri in both RD subgroups was not affected by IQ. Moreover, IQ did not moderate the positive association between degree of activation in the left fusiform gyrus and phonological decoding ability. We did find, however, that the hypoactivation of the left pars opercularis in RD was restricted to lower-IQ participants. In accordance with previous morphometric and fMRI studies, degree of activity in inferior frontal and inferior parietal regions correlated with IQ across reading ability subgroups. Results are consistent with current views questioning the relevance of IQ measures and IQ-discrepancy criteria in the diagnosis of dyslexia.

  19. Assessment of language dominance by event-related oscillatory changes in an auditory language task: magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Young; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Won Sup

    2010-08-01

    The authors investigated the oscillatory changes induced by auditory language task to assess hemispheric dominance of language. Magnetoencephalography studies were conducted during word listening in 6 normal right-handed volunteers and 13 epilepsy patients who underwent Wada test. We carried out a time-frequency analysis of event-related desynchronization (ERD)/event-related synchronization (ERS) and intertrial coherence. We localized ERD/ERS on each subject's magnetic resonance images using beamformer. We compared ERD/ERS values between the left and right side of regions of interest in inferior frontal and superior temporal areas. We assessed the target frequency range that correlated best with the Wada test results. In all normal subjects, gamma ERD was lateralized to the left side in both the inferior frontal and superior temporal areas. In epilepsy patients, the concordance rate of gamma ERD and the Wada test results was 76.9% for the inferior frontal area and 69.2% for the superior temporal area. Gamma ERD can be considered as an indicator of language function, although it was not sufficient to replace the Wada test in the evaluation of epilepsy patients. The gamma ERD value of the inferior frontal area was more reliable for the assessment of language dominance compared with that obtained in the superior temporal area. PMID:20634707

  20. Estimation of the velocity and trajectory of three-dimensional reaching movements from non-invasive magnetoencephalography signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Hong Gi; Sic Kim, June; Chung, Chun Kee

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Studies on the non-invasive brain-machine interface that controls prosthetic devices via movement intentions are at their very early stages. Here, we aimed to estimate three-dimensional arm movements using magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals with high accuracy. Approach. Whole-head MEG signals were acquired during three-dimensional reaching movements (center-out paradigm). For movement decoding, we selected 68 MEG channels in motor-related areas, which were band-pass filtered using four subfrequency bands (0.5-8, 9-22, 25-40 and 57-97 Hz). After the filtering, the signals were resampled, and 11 data points preceding the current data point were used as features for estimating velocity. Multiple linear regressions were used to estimate movement velocities. Movement trajectories were calculated by integrating estimated velocities. We evaluated our results by calculating correlation coefficients (r) between real and estimated velocities. Main results. Movement velocities could be estimated from the low-frequency MEG signals (0.5-8 Hz) with significant and considerably high accuracy (p 0.7). We also showed that preceding (60-140 ms) MEG signals are important to estimate current movement velocities and the intervals of brain signals of 200-300 ms are sufficient for movement estimation. Significance. These results imply that disabled people will be able to control prosthetic devices without surgery in the near future.

  1. The stability of source localization in a whole-head magnetoencephalography system demonstrated by auditory evoked field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Yang, Hong-Chang; Tsai, Sung-Ying; Liu, Yu-Wei; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kwon, Hyukchan

    2011-10-01

    Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), which is a very sensitive magnetic sensor, has been widely used to detect the ultra-small magnetic signals in many different territories, especially in the biomagnetic measurement. In this study, a 128-channel SQUID first-order axial gradiometer system for whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) measurements was setup to characterize the auditory evoked magnetic fields (AEFs). A 500 Hz monaural pure tone persisting 425 ms with the sound pressure level of 80 dB was randomly applied to the left ear of subject with the inter-stimulus interval of 1.5 ˜ 2.8 s to prevent fatigue of nerves. We demonstrated the characteristic waveforms of AEFs can be accurately recorded and analyzed. Using source localization processes, the origins of AEFs were successfully calculated to be at the auditory cortices which are brain areas known for responsive to sound stimulus. A phantom experiment also proved the good localization accuracy of the established MEG system and measurement procedures. The validated performance of the SQUID system suggests that this technique can also be employed in other brain research.

  2. SQUID-based systems for co-registration of ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance images and magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlashov, A. N.; Burmistrov, E.; Magnelind, P. E.; Schultz, L.; Urbaitis, A. V.; Volegov, P. L.; Yoder, J.; Espy, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ultra-low magnetic fields (ULF) of ∼100 μT, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection, has enabled a new class of magnetoencephalography (MEG) instrumentation capable of recording both anatomical (via the ULF MRI) and functional (biomagnetic) information about the brain. The combined ULF MRI/MEG instrument allows both structural and functional information to be co-registered to a single coordinate system and acquired in a single device. In this paper we discuss the considerations and challenges required to develop a combined ULF MRI/MEG device, including pulse sequence development, magnetic field generation, SQUID operation in an environment of pulsed pre-polarization, and optimization of pick-up coil geometries for MRI in different noise environments. We also discuss the design of a “hybrid” ULF MRI/MEG system under development in our laboratory that uses SQUID pick-up coils separately optimized for MEG and ULF MRI.

  3. SQUID-based systems for co-registration of ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance images and magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, A.N., E-mail: matlach@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Burmistrov, E.; Magnelind, P.E.; Schultz, L.; Urbaitis, A.V.; Volegov, P.L.; Yoder, J.; Espy, M.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    The ability to perform magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in ultra-low magnetic fields (ULF) of {approx}100 {mu}T, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection, has enabled a new class of magnetoencephalography (MEG) instrumentation capable of recording both anatomical (via the ULF MRI) and functional (biomagnetic) information about the brain. The combined ULF MRI/MEG instrument allows both structural and functional information to be co-registered to a single coordinate system and acquired in a single device. In this paper we discuss the considerations and challenges required to develop a combined ULF MRI/MEG device, including pulse sequence development, magnetic field generation, SQUID operation in an environment of pulsed pre-polarization, and optimization of pick-up coil geometries for MRI in different noise environments. We also discuss the design of a 'hybrid' ULF MRI/MEG system under development in our laboratory that uses SQUID pick-up coils separately optimized for MEG and ULF MRI.

  4. Fast Room Temperature Very Low Field-Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Compatible with MagnetoEncephaloGraphy Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galante, Angelo; Sinibaldi, Raffaele; Conti, Allegra; De Luca, Cinzia; Catallo, Nadia; Sebastiani, Piero; Pizzella, Vittorio; Romani, Gian Luca; Sotgiu, Antonello; Della Penna, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, ultra-low field (ULF)-MRI is being given more and more attention, due to the possibility of integrating ULF-MRI and Magnetoencephalography (MEG) in the same device. Despite the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction, there are several advantages to operating at ULF, including increased tissue contrast, reduced cost and weight of the scanners, the potential to image patients that are not compatible with clinical scanners, and the opportunity to integrate different imaging modalities. The majority of ULF-MRI systems are based, until now, on magnetic field pulsed techniques for increasing SNR, using SQUID based detectors with Larmor frequencies in the kHz range. Although promising results were recently obtained with such systems, it is an open question whether similar SNR and reduced acquisition time can be achieved with simpler devices. In this work a room-temperature, MEG-compatible very-low field (VLF)-MRI device working in the range of several hundred kHz without sample pre-polarization is presented. This preserves many advantages of ULF-MRI, but for equivalent imaging conditions and SNR we achieve reduced imaging time based on preliminary results using phantoms and ex-vivo rabbits heads.

  5. Does IQ affect the functional brain network involved in pseudoword reading in students with reading disability? A magnetoencephalography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, Panagiotis G.; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Papanicolaou, Andrew C.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2014-01-01

    The study examined whether individual differences in performance and verbal IQ affect the profiles of reading-related regional brain activation in 127 students experiencing reading difficulties and typical readers. Using magnetoencephalography in a pseudoword read-aloud task, we compared brain activation profiles of students experiencing word-level reading difficulties who did (n = 29) or did not (n = 36) meet the IQ-reading achievement discrepancy criterion. Typical readers assigned to a lower-IQ (n = 18) or a higher IQ (n = 44) subgroup served as controls. Minimum norm estimates of regional cortical activity revealed that the degree of hypoactivation in the left superior temporal and supramarginal gyri in both RD subgroups was not affected by IQ. Moreover, IQ did not moderate the positive association between degree of activation in the left fusiform gyrus and phonological decoding ability. We did find, however, that the hypoactivation of the left pars opercularis in RD was restricted to lower-IQ participants. In accordance with previous morphometric and fMRI studies, degree of activity in inferior frontal, and inferior parietal regions correlated with IQ across reading ability subgroups. Results are consistent with current views questioning the relevance of IQ-discrepancy criteria in the diagnosis of dyslexia. PMID:24409136

  6. Per-point and per-field contextual classification of multipolarization and multiple incidence angle aircraft L-band radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, Roger M.; Hussin, Yousif Ali

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized aircraft L-band radar data are classified using two different image classification algorithms: (1) a per-point classifier, and (2) a contextual, or per-field, classifier. Due to the distinct variations in radar backscatter as a function of incidence angle, the data are stratified into three incidence-angle groupings, and training and test data are defined for each stratum. A low-pass digital mean filter with varied window size (i.e., 3x3, 5x5, and 7x7 pixels) is applied to the data prior to the classification. A predominately forested area in northern Florida was the study site. The results obtained by using these image classifiers are then presented and discussed.

  7. Auditory and cognitive deficits associated with acquired amusia after stroke: a magnetoencephalography and neuropsychological follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teppo Särkämö

    Full Text Available Acquired amusia is a common disorder after damage to the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. However, its neurocognitive mechanisms, especially the relative contribution of perceptual and cognitive factors, are still unclear. We studied cognitive and auditory processing in the amusic brain by performing neuropsychological testing as well as magnetoencephalography (MEG measurements of frequency and duration discrimination using magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm recordings. Fifty-three patients with a left (n = 24 or right (n = 29 hemisphere MCA stroke (MRI verified were investigated 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after the stroke. Amusia was evaluated using the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA. We found that amusia caused by right hemisphere damage (RHD, especially to temporal and frontal areas, was more severe than amusia caused by left hemisphere damage (LHD. Furthermore, the severity of amusia was found to correlate with weaker frequency MMNm responses only in amusic RHD patients. Additionally, within the RHD subgroup, the amusic patients who had damage to the auditory cortex (AC showed worse recovery on the MBEA as well as weaker MMNm responses throughout the 6-month follow-up than the non-amusic patients or the amusic patients without AC damage. Furthermore, the amusic patients both with and without AC damage performed worse than the non-amusic patients on tests of working memory, attention, and cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest domain-general cognitive deficits to be the primary mechanism underlying amusia without AC damage whereas amusia with AC damage is associated with both auditory and cognitive deficits.

  8. Augmented Pain Processing in Primary and Secondary Somatosensory Cortex in Fibromyalgia: A Magnetoencephalography Study Using Intra-Epidermal Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Manyoel; Roosink, Meyke; Kim, June Sic; Kim, Hye Won; Lee, Eun Bong; Son, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hyun Ah; Chung, Chun Kee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate augmented pain processing in the cortical somatosensory system in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Cortical evoked responses were recorded in FM (n = 19) and healthy subjects (n = 21) using magnetoencephalography after noxious intra-epidermal electrical stimulation (IES) of the hand dorsum (pain rating 6 on a numeric rating scale, perceptually-equivalent). In addition, healthy subjects were stimulated using the amplitude corresponding to the average stimulus intensity rated 6 in patients with FM (intensity-equivalent). Quantitative sensory testing was performed on the hand dorsum or thenar muscle (neutral site) and over the trapezius muscle (tender point), using IES (thresholds, ratings, temporal summation of pain, stimulus-response curve) and mechanical stimuli (threshold, ratings). Increased amplitude of cortical responses was found in patients with FM as compared to healthy subjects. These included the contralateral primary (S1) and bilateral secondary somatosensory cortices (S2) in response to intensity-equivalent stimuli and the contralateral S1 and S2 in response to perceptually-equivalent stimuli. The amplitude of the contralateral S2 response in patients with FM was positively correlated with average pain intensity over the last week. Quantitative sensory testing results showed that patients with FM were more sensitive to painful IES as well as to mechanical stimulation, regardless of whether the stimulation site was the hand or the trapezius muscle. Interestingly, the slope of the stimulus-response relationship as well as temporal summation of pain in response to IES was not different between groups. Together, these results suggest that the observed pain augmentation in response to IES in patients with FM could be due to sensitization or disinhibition of the cortical somatosensory system. Since the S2 has been shown to play a role in higher-order functions, further studies are needed to clarify the role of augmented

  9. Parametrized post-Newtonian theory of reference frames, multipolar expansions and equations of motion in the N-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    along with the law of relativistic precession of its spatial axes. These transformations depend on the PPN parameters β and γ, generalize general relativistic transformations of the IAU 2000 resolutions, and should be used in the data processing of the solar system gravitational experiments aimed to detect the presence of the scalar field. These PPN transformations are also applicable in the precise time-keeping metrology, celestial mechanics, astrometry, geodesy and navigation.We consider a multipolar post-Newtonian expansion of the gravitational and scalar fields and construct a set of internal and external gravitational multipoles depending on the parameters β and γ. These PPN multipoles generalize the Thorne-Blanchet-Damour multipoles defined in harmonic coordinates of general theory of relativity. The PPN multipoles of the scalar-tensor theory of gravity are split in three classes-active, conformal, and scalar multipoles. Only two of them are algebraically independent and we chose to work with the conformal and active multipoles. We derive the laws of conservations of the multipole moments and show that they must be formulated in terms of the conformal multipoles. We focus then on the law of conservation of body's linear momentum which is defined as a time derivative of the conformal dipole moment of the body in the local coordinates. We prove that the local force violating the law of conservation of the body's linear momentum depends exclusively on the active multipole moments of the body along with a few other terms which depend on the internal structure of the body and are responsible for the violation of the strong principle of equivalence (the Nordtvedt effect).The PPN translational equations of motion of extended bodies in the global coordinate frame and with all gravitational multipoles taken into account are derived from the law of conservation of the body's linear momentum supplemented by the law of motion of the origin of the local frame derived from

  10. 脑磁图在缺血性脑血管病中的应用%Application of magnetoencephalography in ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙占用; 吕佩源

    2012-01-01

    缺血性脑血管病可导致脑皮质电生理改变.脑磁图(magnetoencephalography,MEG)可 客观和敏感地检测皮质磁场,具有极高的时间和空间分辨率,并能定位磁场发生源部位.目前,MEG主要用于自发波检测以及体感诱发磁场、听觉诱发磁场、视觉诱发磁场和事件相关磁场的检测,也为缺血性脑血管病的皮质功能改变提供了有价值的信息,但还需要进一步深入研究.%Ischemic cerebrovascular disease results in electrophysiological changes of the cerebral cortex.Magnetoencephalography (MEG) can objectively and sensitively detect cortical magnetic field.It has a very high temporal and spatial resolution,and locates the magnetic field source.At present,MEG is mainly used for the detection of spontaneous wave and the detection of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields,auditory evoked magnetic fields,visual evoked magnetic fields,and event-related magnetic fields,and provides valuable information for cortex function changes of ischemic cerebrovascular disease.However,further study is still needed.

  11. Interpreting sea surface slicks on the basis of the normalized radar cross-section model using RADARSAT-2 copolarization dual-channel SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivonin, D. V.; Skrunes, S.; Brekke, C.; Ivanov, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A simple automatic multipolarization technique for discrimination of main types of thin oil films (of thickness less than the radio wave skin depth) from natural ones is proposed. It is based on a new multipolarization parameter related to the ratio between the damping in the slick of specially normalized resonant and nonresonant signals calculated using the normalized radar cross-section model proposed by Kudryavtsev et al. (2003a). The technique is tested on RADARSAT-2 copolarization (VV/HH) synthetic aperture radar images of slicks of a priori known provenance (mineral oils, e.g., emulsion and crude oil, and plant oil served to model a natural slick) released during annual oil-on-water exercises in the North Sea in 2011 and 2012. It has been shown that the suggested multipolarization parameter gives new capabilities in interpreting slicks visible on synthetic aperture radar images while allowing discrimination between mineral oil and plant oil slicks.

  12. Multipolar phases and magnetically hidden order: review of the heavy-fermion compound Ce1‑x La x B6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Alistair S.; Friemel, Gerd; Inosov, Dmytro S.

    2016-06-01

    Cerium hexaboride is a cubic f-electron heavy-fermion compound that displays a rich array of low-temperature magnetic ordering phenomena which have been the subject of investigation for more than 50 years. Its complex behaviour is the result of competing interactions, with both itinerant and local electrons playing important roles. Investigating this material has proven to be a substantial challenge, in particular because of the appearance of a ‘magnetically hidden order’ phase, which remained elusive to neutron-scattering investigations for many years. It was not until the development of modern x-ray scattering techniques that the long suspected multipolar origin of this phase was confirmed. Doping with non-magnetic lanthanum dilutes the magnetic cerium sublattice and reduces the f-electron count, bringing about substantial changes to the ground state with the emergence of new phases and quantum critical phenomena. To this day, Ce1‑x La x B6 and its related compounds remain a subject of intense interest. Despite the substantial progress in understanding their behaviour, they continue to reveal new and unexplained physical phenomena. Here we present a review of the accumulated body of knowledge on this family of materials in order to provide a firm standpoint for future investigations.

  13. Best Accuracy Land Use/Land Cover (LULC Classification to Derive Crop Types Using Multitemporal, Multisensor, and Multi-Polarization SAR Satellite Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hütt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available When using microwave remote sensing for land use/land cover (LULC classifications, there are a wide variety of imaging parameters to choose from, such as wavelength, imaging mode, incidence angle, spatial resolution, and coverage. There is still a need for further study of the combination, comparison, and quantification of the potential of multiple diverse radar images for LULC classifications. Our study site, the Qixing farm in Heilongjiang province, China, is especially suitable to demonstrate this. As in most rice growing regions, there is a high cloud cover during the growing season, making LULC from optical images unreliable. From the study year 2009, we obtained nine TerraSAR-X, two Radarsat-2, one Envisat-ASAR, and an optical FORMOSAT-2 image, which is mainly used for comparison, but also for a combination. To evaluate the potential of the input images and derive LULC with the highest possible precision, two classifiers were used: the well-established Maximum Likelihood classifier, which was optimized to find those input bands, yielding the highest precision, and the random forest classifier. The resulting highly accurate LULC-maps for the whole farm with a spatial resolution as high as 8 m demonstrate the beneficial use of a combination of x- and c-band microwave data, the potential of multitemporal very high resolution multi-polarization TerraSAR-X data, and the profitable integration and comparison of microwave and optical remote sensing images for LULC classifications.

  14. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  15. The multipolar magnetic fields of accreting pre-main-sequence stars: B at the inner disk, B along the accretion flow, and B at the accretion shock

    CERN Document Server

    Gregory, Scott G; Hussain, Gaitee A J

    2016-01-01

    Zeeman-Doppler imaging studies have revealed the complexity of the large-scale magnetic fields of accreting pre-main-sequence stars. All have multipolar magnetic fields with the octupole component being the dominant field mode for many of the stars studied thusfar. Young accreting stars with fully convective interiors often feature simple axisymmetric magnetic fields with dipole components of order a kilo-Gauss (at least those of mass $\\gtrsim0.5\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$), while those with substantially radiative interiors host more complex non-axisymmetric magnetic fields with dipole components of order a few 0.1 kilo-Gauss. Here, via several simple examples, we demonstrate that i). in most cases, the dipole component alone can be used to estimate the disk truncation radius (but little else); ii) due the presence of higher order magnetic field components, the field strength in the accretion spots is far in excess of that expected if a pure dipole magnetic field is assumed. (Fields of $\\sim$6$\\,{\\rm kG}$ have been mea...

  16. Modeling Choices in Nuclear Warfighting: Two Classroom Simulations on Escalation and Retaliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Two classroom simulations--"Superpower Confrontation" and "Multipolar Asian Simulation"--are used to teach and test various aspects of the Borden versus Brodie debate on the Schelling versus Lanchester approach to nuclear conflict modeling and resolution. The author applies a Schelling test to segregate high from low empathic students, and assigns…

  17. Comparison of epileptogenic focus localization using magnetoencephalography and video electroencephalogram%脑磁图与视频脑电图定位癫痫灶的结果比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张萍; 吴若秋

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A considerable number of epilepsy patients cannot be treated sufficiently by drug. Epilepsy surgery is a treatment option in these cases. However, precisely localizing epileptogenic zone in epileptic patients is a successful element of epilepsy surgery. Its goal is to remove a minimum volume to control the seizures without cognitive impairment. Presurgical evaluation typically involves electroencephalogram (EEG), video-EEG monitoring, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single photon emission computed tomography and neuropsychological testing. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been as a noninvasive technique to be used to epilepsy surgical planning and brain functional study in many countries.OBJECTIVE: To preoperatively localize epileptogenic zone in patients with lesion-associated epilepsy using magnetoencephalography, compare with noninvasive video-EEG, and assess its localizing value according to the surgical outcomes. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A retrospective case analysis was performed at the Magnetoencephalography Laboratory, Guangdong 999 Brain Hospital, China between November 2001 and December 2005.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 618 epileptic patients undergoing magnetoencephalography. Spontaneous magnetic field signal was collected to analyze single dipole location. Of them, 149 patients with MRI-documented epilepsy underwent surgery. The history of disease was at least 2 years. The course of disease ranged 2-35 years, with an average of 9.5 years. METHODS: MEG was recorded by a 148-channels whole head type MEG system (Magnes WH2500, 4-D Neuroimaging, San Diego, CA, USA) in Magnetically Shielded Room (MSR, Germany). Sampling rate: 508.63 Hz, 30-minutes interictal MEG (Bandpass: 1.0-100 Hz). For magnetic source imaging, the nasion and preauricular points were applied as fiducials. Single equivalent current dipole (ECDs) and head sphere model were applied for analysis. Estimated ECDs were overlaid on T1-weighted MRI of each subject.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

  18. Multi-polarization Antenna for Mobile Communication%一种适用于移动通信的多极化天线

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宗全; 钱祖平; 韩振平; 倪为民

    2011-01-01

    为满足移动通信系统极化复用的需求,文章设计了一种新型多极化天线。该天线有两个独立端口,分别工作在圆极化和线极化,可以接收空间三个互相正交的电场分量。实测结果表明,线极化和圆极化端口回波损耗S_(11)小于-10 dB的工作频带分别为1.69 GHz~1.84 GHz和1.66 GHz~2.32GHz,圆极化轴比(AR)小于3dB的工作频带为1.77 GHz~1.97 GHz,端口间隔离度均在-15 dB以下,满足了移动通信系统天线设计小型化的要求。%To meet the polarization multiplexing demand of the mobile communication system, a new multi-polarization antenna was designed.The antenna contains two independent ports working with linear and circular polarization respectively,so that it can receive three orthogonal components of electric field in space.The measured results show that the impedance bandwidth whose S_(11) is less than -10 dB is 1.69 GHz~l.84 GHz and 1.66 GHz~2.32 GHz for linear-polarization and circular-polarization ports respectively.The bandwidth for AR3 dB is 1.77 GHz~1.97 GHz.The isolation between the two ports is below -15 dB.The antenna can meet the miniaturization demand of the mobile communication system antenna design.

  19. Increased doublecortin (DCX expression and incidence of DCX-immunoreactive multipolar cells in the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb system of suicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa E Maheu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Postmortem studies have confirmed the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and implicated this process in antidepressant response, yet neurogenesis in other regions remains to be examined in the context of depression. Here we assess the extent of subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB neurogenesis in adult humans having died by suicide. Protein expression of proliferative and neurogenic markers Sox2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and doublecortin (DCX were examined in postmortem SVZ and OB samples from depressed suicides and matched sudden-death controls. In the SVZ, DCX-immunoreactive (IR cells displayed phenotypes typical of progenitors, whereas in the olfactory tract (OT, they were multipolar with variable size and morphologies suggestive of differentiating cells. DCX expression was significantly increased in the OB of suicides, whereas SVZ DCX expression was higher among unmedicated, but not antidepressant-treated, suicides. Although very few DCX-IR cells were present in the control OT, they were considerably more common in suicides and correlated with OB DCX levels. Suicides also displayed higher DCX-IR process volumes. These results support the notion that OB neurogenesis is minimal in adult humans. They further indicate that the differentiation and migration of SVZ-derived neuroblasts may be altered in unmedicated suicides, leading to an accumulation of ectopically-differentiating cells in the OT. Normal SVZ DCX expression among suicides receiving antidepressants suggests a potentially novel mode of action of antidepressant medication. Given the modest group sizes and rarity of DCX-IR cells assessed here, a larger-scale characterization will be required before firm conclusions can be made regarding the identity of these cells.

  20. A Rússia na ordem mundial: com o Ocidente, com o Oriente ou um pólo autônomo em um mundo multipolar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zhebit

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo persegue o objetivo de definir o lugar e o papel da Rússia nas relações internacionais contemporâneas nos últimos anos. Ao se debruçar sobre o dilema tradicional da política externa russa - Ocidentalismo versus Orientalismo - o autor analisa o cenário de multipolaridade defendido pela nova concepção da política externa russa e o relaciona com a fase do pragmatismo e do multilateralismo que caracteriza a atuação internacional da Rússia de Putin, fazendo considerações, decorrentes do impacto dos ataques terroristas aos Estados Unidos em 11 de setembro de 2001 sobre a política externa russa. A atitude pragmática e a natureza multivetorial da política externa russa contribuem, segundo o autor, para o fortalecimento das posições internacionais da Rússia em comparação com a perda ou a natureza incerta das alianças e dos relacionamentos do período da transição pós-soviética.The article pursues the purpose to place Russia and its politics within the context of today's international relations. While discussing the traditional dilemma of the Russian foreign politics - Occidentalism versus Orientalism - the author analyses the scenario of multipolarity, backed up by the new Russian foreign policy concept. Hence it is related to the pragmatism and the multilateralism of the international posture of Putin's Russia, the author makes several considerations, which follow from the impact of the September 11th, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States of America with regard to Russia's foreign policy. The pragmatic attitude and the multi-axis nature of the Russian foreign policy nowadays contribute, according to the author, to strengthen Russia's international background in comparison with the loss or the uncertain nature of alliances and relationships of the post-Soviet transition period.

  1. Anti-Stress, Behavioural and Magnetoencephalography Effects of an l-Theanine-Based Nutrient Drink: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David J.; de Klerk, Suzanne; Woods, William; Gondalia, Shakuntla; Noonan, Chris; Scholey, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    l-theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide) is an amino acid found primarily in the green tea plant. This study explored the effects of an l-theanine-based nutrient drink on mood responses to a cognitive stressor. Additional measures included an assessment of cognitive performance and resting state alpha oscillatory activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Thirty-four healthy adults aged 18–40 participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study. The primary outcome measure, subjective stress response to a multitasking cognitive stressor, was significantly reduced one hour after administration of the l-theanine drink when compared to placebo. The salivary cortisol response to the stressor was reduced three hours post-dose following active treatment. No treatment-related cognitive performance changes were observed. Resting state alpha oscillatory activity was significantly greater in posterior MEG sensors after active treatment compared to placebo two hours post-dose; however, this effect was only apparent for those higher in trait anxiety. This change in resting state alpha oscillatory activity was not correlated with the change in subjective stress response or the cortisol response, suggesting further research is required to assess the functional relevance of these treatment-related changes in resting alpha activity. These findings further support the anti-stress effects of l-theanine. PMID:26797633

  2. Use of interictal (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and magnetoencephalography (MEG) to localize epileptogenic foci in non-lesional epilepsy in a cohort of 16 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchun; Liu, Bo; Fu, Liqi; Cui, Zhiqiang

    2015-08-15

    We assessed the efficacy of interictal 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) for localizing the epileptogenic foci in a small cohort of patients with non-lesional epilepsy. Sixteen patients, aged 8-32 years, with non-lesional epilepsy underwent MRI, continuous scalp video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring, interictal (FDG)-PET and MEG at our institution. Each patient subsequently underwent intracranial grid placement. The data from the intracranial grids was correlated with the previous studies to determine the efficacy of FDG-PET and MEG in localizing the epileptogenic zone. Of the 16 patients, the epileptogenic zone was accurately localized in 8 (50%) using FDG-PET and in 12 patients (75%) using MEG. Of the 11 patients with a temporal hypometabolism, only 4 were ultimately confirmed as temporal lobe epilepsy via intracranial grids and 2 additional patients were found to have extra-temporal lobe epilepsy. Compared to interictal FDG-PET, MEG appears to be more sensitive to detection of the epileptogenic zone in this small cohort of non-lesional epilepsy patients though provided more diffuse foci. Our findings can help in determining the surgical eligibility of a patient especially when MRI or video-EEG monitoring are non-localizing, and can help with placement of subdural grids and strips for EEG studies.

  3. Localization of dynamic activity of brain function with magnetoencephalography%脑磁图对脑功能动态活动的定位作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙吉林; 吴杰

    2004-01-01

    脑磁图 (magnetoencephalography, MEG)通过无创伤性的方法探测大脑生物电流所产生的磁场变化,具有很高的时间分辨率及空间分辨率,可以与 MRI结合形成磁源性影像( MSI),对脑重要功能区及癫痫灶进行精确定位,用以指导临床医师确定手术方案及指导伽玛刀治疗,以最大范围地切除病变并保留脑的重要功能区,提高患者术后生活质量;可以对轻度脑损伤患者、一过性脑缺血发作患者的脑功能损害提供客观依据.

  4. Magnetoencephalography Slow-Wave Detection in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Ongoing Symptoms Correlated with Long-Term Neuropsychological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb Swan, Ashley; Nichols, Sharon; Drake, Angela; Angeles, AnneMarie; Diwakar, Mithun; Song, Tao; Lee, Roland R; Huang, Ming-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in the United States, accounting for as many as 75-80% of all TBIs. It is recognized as a significant public health concern, but there are ongoing controversies regarding the etiology of persistent symptoms post-mTBI. This constellation of nonspecific symptoms is referred to as postconcussive syndrome (PCS). The present study combined results from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and cognitive assessment to examine group differences and relationships between brain activity and cognitive performance in 31 military and civilian individuals with a history of mTBI+PCS and 33 matched healthy control subjects. An operator-free analysis was used for MEG data to increase reliability of the technique. Subjects completed a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, and measures of abnormal slow-wave activity from MEG were collected. Results demonstrated significant group differences on measures of executive functioning and processing speed. In addition, significant correlations between slow-wave activity on MEG and patterns of cognitive functioning were found in cortical areas, consistent with cognitive impairments on exams. Results provide more objective evidence that there may be subtle changes to the neurobiological integrity of the brain that can be detected by MEG. Further, these findings suggest that these abnormalities are associated with cognitive outcomes and may account, at least in part, for long-term PCS in those who have sustained an mTBI.

  5. The magnetic lead field theorem in the quasi-static approximation and its use for magnetoencephalography forward calculation in realistic volume conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte, Guido [Human Motor Control Section, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2003-11-21

    The equation for the magnetic lead field for a given magnetoencephalography (MEG) channel is well known for arbitrary frequencies but is not directly applicable to MEG in the quasi-static approximation. In this paper we derive an equationstarting from the very definition of the lead field instead of using Helmholtz's reciprocity theorems. The results are (a) the transpose of the conductivity times the lead field is divergence-free, and (b) the lead field differs from the one in any other volume conductor by a gradient of a scalar function. Consequently, for a piecewise homogeneous and isotropic volume conductor, the lead field is always tangential at the outermost surface. Based on this theoretical result, we formulated a simple and fast method for the MEG forward calculation for one shell of arbitrary shape: we correct the corresponding lead field for a spherical volume conductor by a superposition of basis functions, gradients of harmonic functions constructed here from spherical harmonics, with coefficients fitted to the boundary conditions. The algorithm was tested for a prolate spheroid of realistic shape for which the analytical solution is known. For high order in the expansion, we found the solutions to be essentially exact and for reasonable accuracies much fewer multiplications are needed than in typical implementations of the boundary element methods. The generalization to more shells is straightforward.

  6. Brain activity is related to individual differences in the number of items stored in auditory short-term memory for pitch: evidence from magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimault, Stephan; Nolden, Sophie; Lefebvre, Christine; Vachon, François; Hyde, Krista; Peretz, Isabelle; Zatorre, Robert; Robitaille, Nicolas; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine brain activity related to the maintenance of non-verbal pitch information in auditory short-term memory (ASTM). We focused on brain activity that increased with the number of items effectively held in memory by the participants during the retention interval of an auditory memory task. We used very simple acoustic materials (i.e., pure tones that varied in pitch) that minimized activation from non-ASTM related systems. MEG revealed neural activity in frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices that increased with a greater number of items effectively held in memory by the participants during the maintenance of pitch representations in ASTM. The present results reinforce the functional role of frontal and temporal cortices in the retention of pitch information in ASTM. This is the first MEG study to provide both fine spatial localization and temporal resolution on the neural mechanisms of non-verbal ASTM for pitch in relation to individual differences in the capacity of ASTM. This research contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms mediating the representation and maintenance of basic non-verbal auditory features in the human brain.

  7. Anti-Stress, Behavioural and Magnetoencephalography Effects of an L-Theanine-Based Nutrient Drink: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, David J; de Klerk, Suzanne; Woods, William; Gondalia, Shakuntla; Noonan, Chris; Scholey, Andrew B

    2016-01-19

    L-theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide) is an amino acid found primarily in the green tea plant. This study explored the effects of an L-theanine-based nutrient drink on mood responses to a cognitive stressor. Additional measures included an assessment of cognitive performance and resting state alpha oscillatory activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Thirty-four healthy adults aged 18-40 participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study. The primary outcome measure, subjective stress response to a multitasking cognitive stressor, was significantly reduced one hour after administration of the L-theanine drink when compared to placebo. The salivary cortisol response to the stressor was reduced three hours post-dose following active treatment. No treatment-related cognitive performance changes were observed. Resting state alpha oscillatory activity was significantly greater in posterior MEG sensors after active treatment compared to placebo two hours post-dose; however, this effect was only apparent for those higher in trait anxiety. This change in resting state alpha oscillatory activity was not correlated with the change in subjective stress response or the cortisol response, suggesting further research is required to assess the functional relevance of these treatment-related changes in resting alpha activity. These findings further support the anti-stress effects of L-theanine.

  8. Perceptual Temporal Asymmetry Associated with Distinct ON and OFF Responses to Time-Varying Sounds with Rising versus Falling Intensity: A Magnetoencephalography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Bing; Koerner, Tess K.; Schlauch, Robert S.; Tanaka, Keita; Kawakatsu, Masaki; Nemoto, Iku; Imada, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    This magnetoencephalography (MEG) study investigated evoked ON and OFF responses to ramped and damped sounds in normal-hearing human adults. Two pairs of stimuli that differed in spectral complexity were used in a passive listening task; each pair contained identical acoustical properties except for the intensity envelope. Behavioral duration judgment was conducted in separate sessions, which replicated the perceptual bias in favour of the ramped sounds and the effect of spectral complexity on perceived duration asymmetry. MEG results showed similar cortical sites for the ON and OFF responses. There was a dominant ON response with stronger phase-locking factor (PLF) in the alpha (8–14 Hz) and theta (4–8 Hz) bands for the damped sounds. In contrast, the OFF response for sounds with rising intensity was associated with stronger PLF in the gamma band (30–70 Hz). Exploratory correlation analysis showed that the OFF response in the left auditory cortex was a good predictor of the perceived temporal asymmetry for the spectrally simpler pair. The results indicate distinct asymmetry in ON and OFF responses and neural oscillation patterns associated with the dynamic intensity changes, which provides important preliminary data for future studies to examine how the auditory system develops such an asymmetry as a function of age and learning experience and whether the absence of asymmetry or abnormal ON and OFF responses can be taken as a biomarker for certain neurological conditions associated with auditory processing deficits. PMID:27527227

  9. Anti-Stress, Behavioural and Magnetoencephalography Effects of an l-Theanine-Based Nutrient Drink: A Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. White

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available l-theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide is an amino acid found primarily in the green tea plant. This study explored the effects of an l-theanine-based nutrient drink on mood responses to a cognitive stressor. Additional measures included an assessment of cognitive performance and resting state alpha oscillatory activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Thirty-four healthy adults aged 18–40 participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover study. The primary outcome measure, subjective stress response to a multitasking cognitive stressor, was significantly reduced one hour after administration of the l-theanine drink when compared to placebo. The salivary cortisol response to the stressor was reduced three hours post-dose following active treatment. No treatment-related cognitive performance changes were observed. Resting state alpha oscillatory activity was significantly greater in posterior MEG sensors after active treatment compared to placebo two hours post-dose; however, this effect was only apparent for those higher in trait anxiety. This change in resting state alpha oscillatory activity was not correlated with the change in subjective stress response or the cortisol response, suggesting further research is required to assess the functional relevance of these treatment-related changes in resting alpha activity. These findings further support the anti-stress effects of l-theanine.

  10. Magnetoencephalography Slow-Wave Detection in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Ongoing Symptoms Correlated with Long-Term Neuropsychological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb Swan, Ashley; Nichols, Sharon; Drake, Angela; Angeles, AnneMarie; Diwakar, Mithun; Song, Tao; Lee, Roland R; Huang, Ming-Xiong

    2015-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in the United States, accounting for as many as 75-80% of all TBIs. It is recognized as a significant public health concern, but there are ongoing controversies regarding the etiology of persistent symptoms post-mTBI. This constellation of nonspecific symptoms is referred to as postconcussive syndrome (PCS). The present study combined results from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and cognitive assessment to examine group differences and relationships between brain activity and cognitive performance in 31 military and civilian individuals with a history of mTBI+PCS and 33 matched healthy control subjects. An operator-free analysis was used for MEG data to increase reliability of the technique. Subjects completed a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, and measures of abnormal slow-wave activity from MEG were collected. Results demonstrated significant group differences on measures of executive functioning and processing speed. In addition, significant correlations between slow-wave activity on MEG and patterns of cognitive functioning were found in cortical areas, consistent with cognitive impairments on exams. Results provide more objective evidence that there may be subtle changes to the neurobiological integrity of the brain that can be detected by MEG. Further, these findings suggest that these abnormalities are associated with cognitive outcomes and may account, at least in part, for long-term PCS in those who have sustained an mTBI. PMID:25808909

  11. Sustainability in a multipolar world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basha i Novosejt, A.; Weterings, R.; Ridder, M. de; Frinking, E.

    2010-01-01

    In its 30-Year Update of the well-known publication ‘The Limits to growth’ the Club of Rome stressed that the once debated notion of a physically limited world growth is becoming apparent in many well-documented studies. Three decades ago, the Brundtland Commission on Development and Environment ini

  12. On World Multi-Polarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuSui

    2004-01-01

    After the end of the Cold War, especially after the Bush Jr. government assuming power, the U.S. has actively pursued unilateralism and strengthened the momentum of unipolarity, relying on its position of strength as the only superpower and taking advantage of the fight against terrorism. However, the re-

  13. Sustainability in a multipolar world

    OpenAIRE

    Basha i Novosejt, A.; Weterings, R.; de Ridder, M.; Frinking, E.

    2010-01-01

    In its 30-Year Update of the well-known publication ‘The Limits to growth’ the Club of Rome stressed that the once debated notion of a physically limited world growth is becoming apparent in many well-documented studies. Three decades ago, the Brundtland Commission on Development and Environment initiated an international momentum to secure the needs of both present and future generations through a joint policy agenda for sustainable development. Institutions such as the United Nations played...

  14. Crisis del lóbulo temporal registrada mediante magnetoencefalografía: caso clínico Temporal lobe seizure recorded by magnetoencephalography: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Amo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available La localización del inicio de las crisis es un factor importante para la evaluación prequirúrgica de la epilepsia. En este trabajo se describe la localización del inicio de una crisis registrada mediante magnetoencefalografía (MEG en un niño de 12 años que presenta crisis parciales complejas farmacorresistentes. La RM muestra una lesión de 20mm de diámetro en el hipocampo izquierdo. EEG de superficie con ondas theta temporales izquierdas. Registro MEG interictal con punta-onda aislada posterior e inferior a la lesión de la RM. Registro MEG ictal con punta-onda (2 Hz. La localización de los dipolos indica el inicio de la crisis en la circunvolución temporal inferior en la misma localización que la actividad interictal MEG. Esta actividad ictal se propaga bilateralmente a áreas frontales. El registro corticográfico intraquirúrgico confirma los resultados de la localización interictal mediante MEG.Ictal onset localization is a important factor in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. This paper describes the localization of a seizure onset recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG from a 12-year-old male patient who suffered from complex partial drug-resistant seizures. MRI revealed a 20mm diameter lesion located in left hippocampus. Scalp EEG showed left temporal theta waves. Interictal MEG registrations detected isolated spike-wave activity posterior and inferior to the MRI lesion. Ictal MEG showed continuous spike-wave activity (2 Hz. Dipole localization sited seizure onset in the inferior left temporal gyrus, the same localization of the interictal MEG activity. This ictal activity spreads bilaterally to frontal areas. Intrasurgical electrocorticography recording confirmed interictal MEG results.

  15. Spectral power and functional connectivity changes during mindfulness meditation with eyes open: A magnetoencephalography (MEG) study in long-term meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W P; Camfield, D A; Woods, W; Sarris, J; Pipingas, A

    2015-10-01

    Whilst a number of previous studies have been conducted in order to investigate functional brain changes associated with eyes-closed meditation techniques, there is a relative scarcity in the literature with regards to changes occurring during eyes-open meditation. The current project used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate differences in spectral power and functional connectivity between 11 long-term mindfulness meditators (LTMMs) with >5 years of experience and 12 meditation-naïve control participants both during baseline eyes-open rest and eyes-open open-monitoring (OM) mindfulness meditation. During resting with eyes-open, prior to meditating, greater mean alpha power was observed for LTMMs in comparison to controls. However, during the course of OM meditation, a significantly greater increase in theta power was observed over a broad fronto-centro-parietal region for control participants in comparison to LTMMs. In contrast, whole-head mean connectivity was found to be significantly greater for long-term meditators in comparison to controls in the theta band both during rest as well as during meditation. Additionally, mean connectivity was significantly lower for long-term meditators in the low gamma band during rest and significantly lower in both low and high gamma bands during meditation; and the variance of low-gamma connectivity scores for long-term meditators was significantly decreased compared to the control group. The current study provides important new information as to the trait functional changes in brain activity associated with long-term mindfulness meditation, as well as the state changes specifically associated with eyes-open open monitoring meditation techniques.

  16. Spectral power and functional connectivity changes during mindfulness meditation with eyes open: A magnetoencephalography (MEG) study in long-term meditators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W P; Camfield, D A; Woods, W; Sarris, J; Pipingas, A

    2015-10-01

    Whilst a number of previous studies have been conducted in order to investigate functional brain changes associated with eyes-closed meditation techniques, there is a relative scarcity in the literature with regards to changes occurring during eyes-open meditation. The current project used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate differences in spectral power and functional connectivity between 11 long-term mindfulness meditators (LTMMs) with >5 years of experience and 12 meditation-naïve control participants both during baseline eyes-open rest and eyes-open open-monitoring (OM) mindfulness meditation. During resting with eyes-open, prior to meditating, greater mean alpha power was observed for LTMMs in comparison to controls. However, during the course of OM meditation, a significantly greater increase in theta power was observed over a broad fronto-centro-parietal region for control participants in comparison to LTMMs. In contrast, whole-head mean connectivity was found to be significantly greater for long-term meditators in comparison to controls in the theta band both during rest as well as during meditation. Additionally, mean connectivity was significantly lower for long-term meditators in the low gamma band during rest and significantly lower in both low and high gamma bands during meditation; and the variance of low-gamma connectivity scores for long-term meditators was significantly decreased compared to the control group. The current study provides important new information as to the trait functional changes in brain activity associated with long-term mindfulness meditation, as well as the state changes specifically associated with eyes-open open monitoring meditation techniques. PMID:26166440

  17. Mental Imagery of Speech and Movement Implicates the Dynamics of Internal Forward Models

    OpenAIRE

    DavidPoeppel

    2010-01-01

    The classical concept of efference copies in the context of internal forward models has stimulated productive research in cognitive science and neuroscience. There are compelling reasons to argue for such a mechanism, but finding direct evidence in the human brain remains difficult. Here we investigate the dynamics of internal forward models from an unconventional angle: mental imagery, assessed while recording high temporal resolution neuronal activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG). We ...

  18. Spatiotemporal Accuracy of Gradient Magnetic-Field Topography (GMFT) Confirmed by Simultaneous Magnetoencephalography and Intracranial Electroencephalography Recordings in Patients with Intractable Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirozu, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Akira; Masuda, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Masafumi; Ito, Yosuke; Nakayama, Yoko; Higashijima, Takefumi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Gradient magnetic-field topography (GMFT) is one method for analyzing magnetoencephalography (MEG) and representing the spatiotemporal dynamics of activity on the brain surface. In contrast to spatial filters, GMFT does not include a process reconstructing sources by mixing sensor signals with adequate weighting. Consequently, noisy sensors have localized and limited effects on the results, and GMFT can handle MEG recordings with low signal-to-noise ratio. This property is derived from the principle of the planar-type gradiometer, which obtains maximum gradient magnetic-field signals just above the electrical current source. We assumed that this characteristic allows GMFT to represent even faint changes in brain activities that cannot be achieved with conventional equivalent current dipole analysis or spatial filters. GMFT is thus hypothesized to represent brain surface activities from onset to propagation of epileptic discharges. This study aimed to validate the spatiotemporal accuracy of GMFT by analyzing epileptic activities using simultaneous MEG and intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings. Participants in this study comprised 12 patients with intractable epilepsy. Epileptic spikes simultaneously detected on both MEG and iEEG were analyzed by GMFT and voltage topography (VT), respectively. Discrepancies in spatial distribution between GMFT and VT were evaluated for each epileptic spike. On the lateral cortices, areas of GMFT activity onset were almost concordant with VT activities arising at the gyral unit level (concordance rate, 66.7–100%). Median time lag between GMFT and VT at onset in each patient was 11.0–42.0 ms. On the temporal base, VT represented basal activities, whereas GMFT failed but instead represented propagated activities of the lateral temporal cortices. Activities limited to within the basal temporal or deep brain region were not reflected on GMFT. In conclusion, GMFT appears to accurately represent brain activities of the

  19. Spatiotemporal Accuracy of Gradient Magnetic-Field Topography (GMFT) Confirmed by Simultaneous Magnetoencephalography and Intracranial Electroencephalography Recordings in Patients with Intractable Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirozu, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Akira; Masuda, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Masafumi; Ito, Yosuke; Nakayama, Yoko; Higashijima, Takefumi; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Gradient magnetic-field topography (GMFT) is one method for analyzing magnetoencephalography (MEG) and representing the spatiotemporal dynamics of activity on the brain surface. In contrast to spatial filters, GMFT does not include a process reconstructing sources by mixing sensor signals with adequate weighting. Consequently, noisy sensors have localized and limited effects on the results, and GMFT can handle MEG recordings with low signal-to-noise ratio. This property is derived from the principle of the planar-type gradiometer, which obtains maximum gradient magnetic-field signals just above the electrical current source. We assumed that this characteristic allows GMFT to represent even faint changes in brain activities that cannot be achieved with conventional equivalent current dipole analysis or spatial filters. GMFT is thus hypothesized to represent brain surface activities from onset to propagation of epileptic discharges. This study aimed to validate the spatiotemporal accuracy of GMFT by analyzing epileptic activities using simultaneous MEG and intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) recordings. Participants in this study comprised 12 patients with intractable epilepsy. Epileptic spikes simultaneously detected on both MEG and iEEG were analyzed by GMFT and voltage topography (VT), respectively. Discrepancies in spatial distribution between GMFT and VT were evaluated for each epileptic spike. On the lateral cortices, areas of GMFT activity onset were almost concordant with VT activities arising at the gyral unit level (concordance rate, 66.7-100%). Median time lag between GMFT and VT at onset in each patient was 11.0-42.0 ms. On the temporal base, VT represented basal activities, whereas GMFT failed but instead represented propagated activities of the lateral temporal cortices. Activities limited to within the basal temporal or deep brain region were not reflected on GMFT. In conclusion, GMFT appears to accurately represent brain activities of the

  20. Spatial filtering in multichannel magnetoencephalography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, P.; Kouwenhoven, M.

    1989-01-01

    Partial differential equations in boundary-value problems have been studied in order to estimate the influence of several geometrical and physical parameters involved in the outward transmission of the brain's magnetic field. Explicit Green kernels are used to obtain integral forms of generalized so

  1. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  2. 脑磁图神经导航引导下的脑功能区手术%Cerebral focus located in functional area:surgical removing under the guidance of magnetoencephalography and neuronavigational system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宏毅; 邹元杰; 吴婷; 张岩松; 章文斌; 常义

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the surgical treatment for focus located on functional area,improve the protection of neurofunction.Methods There are 15 cases of hemisphere domain focus including glioma,meningioma,cavernous hemangioma and abscess,involving the momr area and the linguistic community.Magnetoencephalography was used to locate the functional domain preoperatively,neuronavigation system combining with magnetoencephalography was used during the operations.Results Seven of eight patients have the normal upper limbs function whose limbs function were normal before operation,one patient's muscular strength become weak,in 4 patients whose muscular strength Was weak,3 of them recovered.And one patient has no change,two patients who have the tumor border on the linguistic community recovered postoperatively.Conclusions Magnetoencephalography system can accurately locate the functional area,the reasonable surgical approach will be designed with the help of Magnetoencephalography and neuronavigation system.By the means of the fence which were inserted through dura into the interface between the cerebra and focus,brain shift during the eady operation can be prevented effectively,which will improve the accuracy of operation and protect the ncurofunction.%目的 研究大脑半球功能区的手术治疗,提高神经功能的保护.方法 本组15例大脑半球内病灶包括:脑胶质瘤、脑膜瘤、海绵状血管瘤、脑脓肿,涉及运动区及语言区.手术前均行脑磁图功能定位,采取脑磁图-神经导航引导下的手术切除.结果 术前肢体运动功能正常的8例中7例术后肌力依然正常,1例对侧肌力减弱;术前肌力减弱的4例中3例术后恢复正常,无变化1例;2例语言区的肿瘤术后功能正常.结论 脑磁图可以准确定位神经功能区域,与神经导航联合应用可以设计合理的手术入路;对皮层表面的腩胶质瘤采用经硬脑膜病灶-脑界面栅栏分隔法,可有效地防止手术早期脑移

  3. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Howard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H...H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface.

  4. Experimental Study on Multi-Band and Multi-Polarization Characteristics of Sea Clutter%多波段多极化海杂波特性的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康士峰; 葛德彪; 罗贤云; 张忠治

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the study of sea clutter characteristics is very important for radar and microwave remote sensing. The multi-band (S, C, X, Ku ) and multi-polarization characteristics of sea clutter measured based on the vector metwork analyzer HP8720C are described in this paper. The measureing system, experimental description and methods of data processing are included. The relationship between clutter characteristics (scatter coefficent, doppler spectrum) and frequency, polarization incident angle (including low-grazing angle) are obtained and some typical results are given.%长期以来,海杂波特性研究一直是雷达和微波遥感界普遍关心的问题。本文讨论基于矢量网络分析仪组建的波谱计对海杂波特性所进行的多波段(S,C,X,Ku)多极化测量,包括测量系统、实验描述和数据处理方法,通过数据分析得到不同海态下杂波特性(散射系数、多普勒谱等)随频率、极化和人射角(含小擦地角)的变化关系并给出一些典型结果。

  5. 基于EMD和Hilbert变换的脑磁信号特征提取和分类%Feature extraction and classification of magnetoencephalography based on EMD and Hilbert transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健锋; 黄晓霞

    2014-01-01

    为研究通过脑机接口(Brain-Computer Interface,BCI)处理非线性、非稳定性信号问题,针对基于脑磁信号(magnetoencephalography,MEG)的BCI,提出一种基于经验模式分解(Empirical Mode Decomposition,EMD)和Hilbert变换的MEG特征提取和分类方法.该方法首先对MEG数据进行预处理;其次用EMD和Hilbert变换方法提取特征向量;然后用主成分分析法对提取到的特征向量进行降维处理;最后把处理过的特征向量作为支持向量机(Support Vector Machine,SVM)的一个输入向量实现MEG的分类.使用该方法对第4届国际BCI竞赛提供的MEG数据进行分类,实验结果表明可以获得较高的分类准确率.

  6. Latin American regionalism in a multipolar world

    OpenAIRE

    Garzón, Jorge F.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of Latin American regionalism has experienced profound transformations in a relatively short period of time. Regional organizations have proliferated; the open regionalism of the 1990s has gone into decay; new organizations, often referred to as belonging to a new wave of a more political “posthegemonic regionalism,” took center stage; only to be displaced in the attention of observers by newer trade-oriented organizations such as the Pacific Alliance. These developments have be...

  7. Asian century or multi-polar century ?

    OpenAIRE

    Dollar, David

    2007-01-01

    The "rise of Asia" is something of a myth. During 1990-2005 China accounted for 28 percent of global growth, measured at purchasing power parity (PPP). India accounted for 9 percent. The rest of developing Asia, with nearly a billion people, accounted for only 7 percent, the same as Latin America. Hence there is no general success of Asian developing economies. China has grown better than ...

  8. The african protoproverbial in a multipolar world

    OpenAIRE

    Taiwo, Ọlọruntọba-Oju

    2014-01-01

    The proverb is a rhetorical universal and as such shares features across linguistic, ethnic and culture boundaries, thus making typological distinctions along ethnic or regional lines a daunting task. Further complicating this scenario within the African context is the relentless hybridization and subversion of the African proverb consequent on colonial contact and sundry postcolonial interventions. This twin trajectory, the conceptual universalism of the proverb and the relent...

  9. Multipolar interference for directed light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancu, Ion M; Curto, Alberto G; Castro-López, Marta; Kuttge, Martin; van Hulst, Niek F

    2014-01-01

    By directing light, optical antennas can enhance light-matter interaction and improve the efficiency of nanophotonic devices. Here we exploit the interference among the electric dipole, quadrupole, and magnetic dipole moments of a split-ring resonator to experimentally realize a compact directional optical antenna. This single-element antenna design robustly directs emission even when covered with nanometric emitters at random positions, outperforming previously demonstrated nanoantennas with a bandwidth of 200 nm and a directivity of 10.1 dB from a subwavelength structure. The advantages of this approach bring directional optical antennas closer to practical applications.

  10. Research on Magnetoencephalography-Brain Computer Interface Based on the PCA and LDA Data Reduction%基于PCA和LDA数据降维的脑磁图脑机接口研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金甲; 周丽娜

    2011-01-01

    The magnetoencephalography (MEG) can be used as a control signal for brain computer interface (BCD. The BCI also includes the pattern information of the direction of hand movement. In the MEG signal classification, the feature extraction based on signal processing and linear classification is usually used. But the recognition rate has been difficult to improve. In the present paper, a principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) method has been proposed for the feature extraction, and the non-linear nearest neighbor classification is introduced for the classifier. The confusion matrix is analyzed based on the results. The experimental results show that the PC A + LDA method is effective in the analysis of multi-channel MEG signals, improves the recognition rate to the extent of the average recognition rate 55. 7%, which is better than the recognition rate 46. 9% in the BCI competition IV.%脑磁图(MEG)信号作为一种新的脑-机接口(BCI)输入信号,含有手运动方向的模式信息.通常对MEG信号采用信号处理的特征提取和线性分类,识别率一直难于提高.本文提出用主成分分析(PCA)方法对其进行特征提取,并用线性判别分析(LDA)进行了优化,最后用最近邻非线性分类器进行分类,在分类结果的基础上分析了混淆矩阵.实验结果表明PCA+ LDA方法能有效的分析多通道的MEG信号,平均识别率达到了53.0%,优于BCI竞赛Ⅳ的识别率46.9%.

  11. Application of functional location by magnetoencephalography in tumor surgery in the eloquent brain area%脑磁图功能定位在脑功能区肿瘤手术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨坤; 刘宏毅; 张锐; 邹元杰; 张岩松; 黄庆玖; 吴婷

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the value of functional location by magnetoencephalography (MEG) in tumor surgery in the eloquent brain area. Methods Clinical data of 24 patients with intracranial tumors located in the eloquent brain areas and its peripheral areas were analyzed retrospectively. Preoperative MEG and intraoperative neuronavigation system were used to guide the tumor resection and preserve the brain function. Results The tumors located in the eloquent brain areas in 6 cases, partially overlapped with the functional area in 6, located at the margin of the functional area in S, and kept 1 to 2 cm away from the functional areas in 7. Total tumor resection was achieved in 20 cases and subtotal resection in 4. Temporary nerve dysfunction aggravated in 6 cases postoperatively and permanent dysfunction in 4. Conclusions MEG is less invasive technique for functional location preoperatively, can identify the relationship between tumors and functional areas, therefore its use in tumor resection in the functional and around areas can decrease occurrence of nerve dysfunction and improve postoperative life quality.%目的 评价脑磁图(MEG)功能定位在脑功能区肿瘤手术的应用价值.方法 回顾性分析24例肿瘤位于功能区及其附近病人的临床资料.术前行MEG功能定位,术中结合神经导航系统实时定位肿瘤及功能区,指导肿瘤切除和功能保护.结果 肿瘤位于功能区6例,与功能区部分重叠6例,功能区边缘5例,功能区外1-2cm7例.肿瘤全切除20例,次全切除4例.术后出现一过性神经功能障碍加重6例,持久性功能障碍加重4例.结论 MEG功能定位是术前无创功能定位技术,能够明确肿瘤与功能区位置关系,应用于功能区及附近肿瘤手术,可减少神经功能障碍的发生,提高病人术后生活质量.

  12. Extraction method of the magnetoencephalography somatosensory evoked signals based on the MP decomposition%基于匹配追踪的脑磁图体感诱发信号提取方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭洁; 严汉民

    2014-01-01

    目的:利用匹配追踪(MP)算法的良好参数化描述特性,研究癫痫脑磁图的时频分布特征。方法:提出应用MP算法提取体感诱发磁场(SEF)信号的详细的时频成分。结果:对多例正常受试者的体感诱发脑磁图信号进行时频分析,从中提出大部分信号中都存在的时频成分,表明系列稳定的SEF时频成分可使用MP分解算法识别。结论:体感诱发信号通过MP分解,能够产生稳定和微小的时频成分,并且这些成分在时频中具有特定的位置,从而为临床脑功能和脑部疾患发病机制的研究提供可靠的研究指标。%Objective:Matching pursuit algorithm(MAP),for its good parametric characterization, is applied in Magnetoencephalography(MEG) to study time-frequency distribution. Methods:This paper proposes to apply a high-resolution time-frequency analysis algorithm, the matching pursuit (MP), to extract detailed time-frequency components of SEF signals. Results: Experimental results on cortical SEF signals of several normal subjects show that a series of stable SEF time components can be identified using the MP decomposition algorithm. Conclusion:This study shows that there is a set of stable and minute time-frequency componentsin SEF signals, which are revealed by the MP decomposition. These stable SEF components have specific localizations in the time domain and may provide a reliable index for clinical research of brain function and brain disease pathogenesis.

  13. Detailed magnetic model simulations of the H- injection chicane magnets for the CERN PS Booster Upgrade, including eddy currents and influence on beam dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, E; Borburgh, J; Carli, C; Martini, M; Forte, V

    2014-01-01

    The CERN PS Booster will be upgraded with an H- injection system. The chicanemagnets for the injection bump ramp-down in 5 ms and generate eddy currents in the inconel vacuum chamber which perturb the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The multipolar field components are extracted from 3D OPERA simulations and are included in the lattice model. The -beating correction is computed all along the ramp and complete tracking simulations including space-charge are performed to evaluate the impact of these perturbations and correction on beam dynamics.

  14. A study on resting-state magnetoencephalography of interictal brain activity in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy%颞叶癫痫患者发作间期脑活动的静息态脑磁图研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱旭昌; 朱海涛; 朱劲龙; 张锐

    2015-01-01

    目的:用脑磁图合成孔径磁场测定(SAMg2)技术分析左侧颞叶癫痫患者与正常对照者的脑电活动差异,评估左侧颞叶癫痫患者发作间期脑活动的改变。方法给20例左侧颞叶癫痫患者及20名健康志愿者(正常对照组)进行静息态脑磁图检查,通过 CTF 软件中的合成孔径磁场测定技术计算所有受试者的SAMg2值;计算后,使每位受试者的 SAMg2值与其对应的3D-MRI 进行融合。结果与正常对照组比较,左侧颞叶癫痫患者颞叶及其内侧结构的 SAMg2值显著升高,而双侧视觉皮质等颞叶以外脑区的 SAMg2值降低。左侧颞叶癫痫患者异常区域的脑活动与癫痫发作频率密切相关,而性别、年龄的影响无统计学意义。结论左侧颞叶癫痫是一种多灶性的网络疾病,具有复杂的癫痫网络和脑功能缺失网络。%Objective To analyze the activity differences between patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy(LTLE)and normal controls by magnetoencephalography(MEG)synthetic aperture magnetometry(SAM),and assess the alteration of interictal brain activity in patients with LTLE. Methods Resting-state MEG data were collected from 20 patients with LTLE and 20 healthy volunteers(normal control group).The SAMg2 Z-map of each subject were calculated by the SAMg2 script of the CTF software.After the calculation,the SAMg2 Z-map of each subject were registered with their corresponding 3D MRI.Results Compared with the normal control group,significantly elevated SAMg2 signals were found in left temporal lobe epilepsy patients in the left temporal lobe and medial structures.Marked decreases of SAMg2 signals were found in wide extratemporal lobe, such as the bilateral visual cortex.Abnormal regions of left temporal lobe epilepsy patients were significantly associated with frequency of seizures.There were no significant differences in age and gender between the two groups.Conclusion Left temporal lobe epilepsy

  15. 脑磁图对颅内电极脑电图电极埋置的指导价值%Effect of magnetoencephalography on intracranial electrode placement strategy in intractable partial epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁虎; 乔慧; 白勤; 史增敏; 王冯彬; 舒宁; 孟凡刚

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study whether magnetoencephalography (MEG) could indicate intracranial electroencephalography(icEEG) by affecting electrode placement and localization of the seizure onset zone,and then improve the curative effect of the surgical patients of refractory partial epilepsy.Methods Of all consecutive epilepsy surgery candidates between 2009 -2010,83 cases who meet the refractory partial epilepsy diagnostic criteria were prospectively enrolled in this research.The 83 patients were randomly divided into two groups.In one group (MEG + icEEG group),including 43 patients,the MEG results were provided to affect the initial intracranial electrodes placement decision which was based on case -history,semilogy,EEG,MRI.By contrast,for the other group(icEEG group),including 40 patients,the MEG localization results were not provided.All patients underwent epileptogenic foci surgical resection.The follow-up was performed at least 12 months after the operation.The surgical outcome was evaluated by Engel curative effect grading.Engel Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ was defined as effectiv whereas Engel Ⅳ was recognized as invalid.Results According to the surgical outcome of icEEG group,23 patients (54%) obtained good postsurgical seizure outcome.While in MEG + icEEG group,the rate was 78% (31/40).There was statistically significant difference between the two groups(x2 =5.256,P =0.022).Conclusions MEG spike localization could affect icEEG by indicating the electrodes placement,increasing the chance that the seizure onset zone is sampled and improving diagnostic yield of icEEG when patients undergo icEEG for presurgical epilepsy evaluations,finally promote the effectiveness of the surgical resection.%目的 通过研究脑磁图(MEG)对侵入性颅内电极脑电图(icEEG)中电极埋置策略的影响,评价MEG在癫痫外科术前评估中的应用价值.方法 收集83例经临床发作症状学、电生理及影像学诊断为难治性部分性癫痫患者,根据MEG是否参与评估

  16. A comparative study between magnetoencephalography resting-state neural networks ;and electrocorticography locating%脑磁图静息态脑网络定位与皮质脑电图的对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴婷; 刘宏毅; 张锐; 陈奇琦; 杨露; 张远超; 蒋田仔

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨脑磁图( MEG)静息态脑网络定位与皮质脑电图( ECoG)的一致性。方法选取难治性癫痫患者16例,术前均运用脑磁图静息态网络定位,同时运用传统的脑磁图Dipole法和SAM法皮质脑电图定位,与皮质脑电图的结果对照,分别比较两种技术的吻合度。结果16例患者均有明显的棘波放电, Dipole定位局限10例,散发6例,SAM值升高单病灶11例,多病灶5例。16例患者均显示静息态脑网络异常,敏感度100%(16/16)。 Dipole定位ECoG的定位符合率为62.5%(10/16),SAM与ECoG的定位符合率为68.7%(11/16),MEG脑网络功能异常与ECoG 的定侧符合率为100%,定位符合率为81.2%(13/16)。结论脑磁图静息态网络定位可以敏感地定位癫痫放电区,可以为癫痫手术规划提供帮助。%Objective To explore the consistency of magnetoencephalography ( MEG ) resting-state neural networks and electrocorticography ( ECoG ) locating .Methods 16 patients with refractory epilepsy were recruited and MEG resting-state neural networks and ECoG were located before surgical operation to contrast the consistency .Results Spikes were observed in 16 patients, and located focally in 10 and sporadically 6 by Dipole.Single focus in 11 patients and multiple lesions in 5 patients were located by SAM .The resting state brain network of all patients were abnormal,the sensitivity was 100%(16/16).The coincidence rate was 62.5%(10/16) between Dipole and ECoG, 68.7%(10/16) between SAM and ECoG , 81.2%(13/16) between MEG and ECoG locating seizure onset zones , 100% between MEG and ECoG locating resting state brain network .Conclusion MEG resting-state neural networks may locate locate seizure onset zones , and contribute epilepsy operation .

  17. Coherence analysis of magnetoencephalography signals related to self-paced finger press%手指自主按键运动中脑磁图信号的相干性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯文生; 张阳; 李卫娜; 吴小鹰; 吴国材; 冯华; 郑小林

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the connection between spatially separated brain regions, as well as the changes of the connection in time and frequency domain.Self-paced finger press related magnetoencephalography signals were recorded and analyzed by means of coherence analysis.The coherence coefficient of two signals corresponding to different cortical areas was calculated.Time frequency analysis was also used to determine if the cortical connection changes closely co-vary with time over the course of motor task in the three frequency band-α(5-15 Hz) 、β ( 16-25 Hz) and low γ(30-45 Hz).The results showed that channels with the most significant coherence relative to the selected reference channel were approximately in the same area, and with an increase of frequency band both the coherence coefficient and the coupled area declined.Moreover, the coherence coefficient changed co-varied with time in the three frequency band.It was infered that there are different neuronal modulations in the contralateral motor cortex, and this modulation co-varies with time, which consequently reflects the changes of correlation between different brain regions in time and frequency domain.%为了获取手指运动过程中不同脑功能区之间的联系,以及这种功能性联系在时频域和空间的变化,记录了与手指运动相关的脑磁图信号,然后对其进行相干性分析,并计算了不同位置信号之间的相干性系数.通过时频分析进一步探讨了在α(5~15 Hz)、β(16~25 Hz)、lowγ(30~45 Hz)3个频带的不同皮层区联系随时间的变化关系.结果表明:α、β、lowγ 3个频带与所选参考信号相干性呈现出位置大致相同,相干强度和相干范围均从α到lowγ依次递减,相干性系数随时闻而变化,进而推论出相干性的变化表明对侧运动皮层存在不同的神经模式,而且这些神经模式也是随时间变化的,由此反映出不同功能区的联系在时频域的变化.

  18. 卒中后吞咽障碍患者脑磁图下吞咽皮质环路预探索研究%A Preliminary Magnetoencephalography Study of the Voluntary Swallowing in Dysphasia Patients after Stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婧; 张宁; 乔慧; 王春雪; 赵性泉; 王拥军

    2014-01-01

    目的探讨卒中后吞咽障碍患者皮质吞咽中枢在脑磁图中的激活情况,为吞咽皮质中枢的功能探讨提供资料。  方法采用151通道Omega2000全头型生物磁仪(CTF.co,Canada)对6例卒中后吞咽障碍的患者进行脑磁信号的采集。以等电流偶极(equivalent current dipole,ECD)记录肌电信号开始前-2500 ms内激活脑区的部位及时间顺序。以每隔20 s、25 s、30 s、35 s时间不等的方式向受试者口腔注射室温纯净水0.5~1 ml共10次。所有检查者均行头颅磁共振成像(magnetic resonance imaging,MRI)检查,并与脑磁图的磁场变化结果融合,形成磁源性成像(magnetic source imaging,MSI)。  结果5例患者得到磁源性影像。所激活的脑区包括岛叶、初级运动感觉皮质、扣带、丘脑等。部分脑区呈现反复激活,脑内吞咽皮质激活存在3个相对较为固定的环路。中央前后回、岛叶、丘脑、扣带回持续稳定激活,其初次激活发生在一定时间段内。后扣带较前扣带回及岛叶激活较晚。  结论吞咽皮质在处理吞咽信息中可能存在一定的环路。后扣带回激活较晚可能是由于卒中后吞咽皮质功能活动受损的表现。%Objective To investigate the activation areas in brain in the dysphagia patients after stroke. Methods The 151 channel of Omega 2000 magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to identify the magnetic ifeld change of brain of 6 dysphagia patients after stroke during the 2500 ms before the swallowing burst of the submental electromyography. Subjects swallowed 1 ml water boluses after it was infused into their oral cavity through a plastic catheter placed in the midline in different interval times from 20 s, 25 s, 30 s, 35 s (randomized) and total 10 boluses were injected. Equivalent current dipole (ECD) analysis method was used to get activation of the associated areas of brain. All the patients had magnetic resonance

  19. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine,” 14513 Teltow (Germany); Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Heyda, Jan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  20. 抑郁症住院患者静息态的脑磁频谱分析%A magnetoencephalography analysis of resting state power spectrum of inpatients with major depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤浩; 卢青; 韩莉; 江海腾; 罗国平; 姚志剑

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the discrepancies of magnetoencephalography (MEG) spectral power between female patients with major depressive disorder and nondepressed subjects in resting state.Methods Whole head MEG recordings were obtained in 12 female patients with major depressive disorder and 12 age-and education-matched nondepressed control subjects in resting state condition with eyes closed.Each region's mean power in delta,theta,alpha,beta frequency bands was calculated through power normalization.Discrepancies between groups were obtained by two sample t-test using MATLAB 7.8.Results The power of alpha and beta frequency bands in patients was increased relative to controls,the abnormal brain regions were separately shown as follows:the alpha frequency band in the right parietal lobe (0.031 vs.0.017; t =1.911,P =0.035),the beta frequency band in the left parietal lobe (0.025vs.0.015;t =2.504,P=0.010),the right parietal lobe(0.026 vs.0.016;t =2.063,P =0.026),the left occipital lobe(0.054 vs.0.029 ; t =3.000,P =0.003) and the right occipital lobe (0.046 vs.0.032 ; t =2.035,P =0.027).The power of delta and theta frequency bands was decreased in patients relative to controls,the abnormal brain regions were separately shown as follows:the delta frequency band in the left occipital lobe (0.029 vs.0.049 ; t =-1.788,P =0.044) ; the theta frequency band in the right central region(0.005 vs.0.012;t =-1.820,P =0.041) and the right temporal lobe(0.015 vs.0.023;t =-1.934,P =0.033).Conclusions The discrepancies of spectral power show a prevalence in posterior brain areas involving delta,theta,alpha and beta frequency bands in depressed patients in comparison with nondepressed comparison subjects.%目的 探讨抑郁症患者与正常对照静息态脑磁频谱分布特征的差异.方法 12例女性抑郁症患者(患者组)和12名年龄、受教育程度相匹配的女性健康对照者(对照组)接受脑磁图静息态扫描,通过频谱分析计算delta、theta、alpha

  1. Probabilistic forward model for electroencephalography source analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plis, Sergey M [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); George, John S [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Jun, Sung C [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ranken, Doug M [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Volegov, Petr L [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schmidt, David M [MS-D454, Applied Modern Physics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-09-07

    Source localization by electroencephalography (EEG) requires an accurate model of head geometry and tissue conductivity. The estimation of source time courses from EEG or from EEG in conjunction with magnetoencephalography (MEG) requires a forward model consistent with true activity for the best outcome. Although MRI provides an excellent description of soft tissue anatomy, a high resolution model of the skull (the dominant resistive component of the head) requires CT, which is not justified for routine physiological studies. Although a number of techniques have been employed to estimate tissue conductivity, no present techniques provide the noninvasive 3D tomographic mapping of conductivity that would be desirable. We introduce a formalism for probabilistic forward modeling that allows the propagation of uncertainties in model parameters into possible errors in source localization. We consider uncertainties in the conductivity profile of the skull, but the approach is general and can be extended to other kinds of uncertainties in the forward model. We and others have previously suggested the possibility of extracting conductivity of the skull from measured electroencephalography data by simultaneously optimizing over dipole parameters and the conductivity values required by the forward model. Using Cramer-Rao bounds, we demonstrate that this approach does not improve localization results nor does it produce reliable conductivity estimates. We conclude that the conductivity of the skull has to be either accurately measured by an independent technique, or that the uncertainties in the conductivity values should be reflected in uncertainty in the source location estimates.

  2. New modes of nuclear excitations in microscopic and collective model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic approach based on density functional theory and multi-phonon QRPA methods is successfully applied for investigations of pygmy resonances and other excitations of different multipolarities and energies in stable and exotic nuclei. From systematic studies of nuclear response functions a clear indication of close connection between low-energy excited states related to pygmy resonances and nuclear skin oscillations is observed. This is confirmed also in analyses of transition densities and currents. A useful link to collective model approaches is used for distinction of pygmy resonance from other modes of excitations related low-energy multi-phonon vibrations, twist modes or giant resonances observed in response functions and data. Furthermore, nuclear skins are found to affect M1 strength distributions in nuclei, as confirmed by recent experiments. The fine structure of the spin-flip M1 resonance is discussed and compared to experimental data.

  3. Modeling versus accuracy in EEG and MEG data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.C.; Huang, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Spencer, M.E. [Signal Processing Solutions, Redondo Beach, CA (United States)

    1997-07-30

    The widespread availability of high-resolution anatomical information has placed a greater emphasis on accurate electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography (collectively, E/MEG) modeling. A more accurate representation of the cortex, inner skull surface, outer skull surface, and scalp should lead to a more accurate forward model and hence improve inverse modeling efforts. The authors examine a few topics in this paper that highlight some of the problems of forward modeling, then discuss the impacts these results have on the inverse problem. The authors begin by assuming a perfect head model, that of the sphere, then show the lower bounds on localization accuracy of dipoles within this perfect forward model. For more realistic anatomy, the boundary element method (BEM) is a common numerical technique for solving the boundary integral equations. For a three-layer BEM, the computational requirements can be too intensive for many inverse techniques, so they examine a few simplifications. They quantify errors in generating this forward model by defining a regularized percentage error metric. The authors then apply this metric to a single layer boundary element solution, a multiple sphere approach, and the common single sphere model. They conclude with an MEG localization demonstration on a novel experimental human phantom, using both BEM and multiple spheres.

  4. Towards a multipolar science world: Trends and impact

    OpenAIRE

    Veugelers, Reinhilde

    2010-01-01

    This paper brings together recent statistical evidence on international (co-)publications and (foreign) PhD-students and scholars to document shifts in geographic sources of scientific production and their impact. The evidence demonstrates that despite the continued dominance of the US and the increasing importance of the EU, the TRIAD is in relative decline. Other geographic sources of science outside the TRIAD are rising, both in quantity, but also, although still to a lesser extent, in qua...

  5. The filamentary Multi-Polar Planetary Nebula NGC 5189

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, L; López, J A; García-Díaz, Ma T; Ramos-Larios, G

    2012-01-01

    We present a set of optical and infrared images combined with long-slit, medium and high dispersion spectra of the southern planetary nebula (PN) NGC 5189. The complex morphology of this PN is puzzling and has not been studied in detail so far. Our investigation reveals the presence of a new dense and cold infrared torus (alongside the optical one) which probably generated one of the two optically seen bipolar outflows and which might be responsible for the twisted appearance of the optical torus via an interaction process. The high-resolution MES-AAT spectra clearly show the presence of filamentary and knotty structures as well as three expanding bubbles. Our findings therefore suggest that NGC 5189 is a quadrupolar nebula with multiple sets of symmetrical condensations in which the interaction of outflows has determined the complex morphology.

  6. THE FILAMENTARY MULTI-POLAR PLANETARY NEBULA NGC5189

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sabin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a set of optical and infrared images combined with long-slit, medium and high dispersion spectra of the southern planetary nebula (PN NGC5189. The complex morphology of this PN is puzzling and has not been studied in detailed so far. Our investigation reveals the presence of a new dense and cold infrared torus (alongside the optical one which probably generated one of the two optically seen bipolar outflows and which might be responsible for the twisted appearance of the optical torus via an interaction process. The high-resolution MES-AAT spectra clearly show the presence of filamentary and knotty structures as well as three expanding bubbles. Our findings therefore suggest that NGC5189 is a quadrupolar nebula with multiple sets of symmetrical condensations in which the interaction of outflows has determined its complex morphology.

  7. China's Soft Diplomacy in an Emerging Multi-polar World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    Keynote presentation for the conference"The Growing Prominence of China on the World Stage: Exploring the Political, Economic, and Cultural Relations of China and Global Stakeholders" International Conference, Berlin, September 15th - 18th, 2011 - Held Parallel to the "Berlin - Asia Pacific Weeks...

  8. GEOPOLITICAL STRATEGIES AND MODERNITY: MULTIPOLAR WORLD OF NOWADAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenko Scekic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The political map of the planet has transformed substantially during the last century. Former colonial powers had to be satisfied with the perfidious forms of political and economic control. The last decades were marked by the global dominance of the US and its allies, as well as the military superiority of the NATO pact. The beginning of the new millennium was filled with military and financial crises. On the global stage have appeared new economic and military powers and organizations such as the BRICS, the Eurasian Union, the economic power of China, and Russia's comeback in the geopolitical games. The former geopolitical theories become topical again.

  9. 脑磁图描记联合术中唤醒用于显微镜下切除功能区胚胎发育不良性神经上皮瘤%Magnetoencephalography and awaking anesthesia in microsurgical resection of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor in function areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭韬; 李文玲; 武江; 赵文清; 康进生; 杜亚丽; 董长征; 岳向勇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize our experience on application of magnetoeneephalography (MEG) and awaking anesthesia in microsurgical treatment of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors in the functional areas. Methods The range of the functional area was largely defined by MEG; intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation was used under awaking anesthesia to identify the border of function area and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors were resected under microscope in four patients and the outcomes of the patients were observed. Results Satisfactory outcomes were obtained in the 4 patients and there were no injuries in the function area. No epileptic seizures or recurrence of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors were found during long term follow-up. Conclusion Combined treatment using MEG and awaking anesthesia contributes to safe and effective surgical treatment of dysembroplastic neuroepithelial tumors in the function areas.%目的 总结脑磁图(magnetoencephalography, MEG)描记与术中唤醒联合应用切除功能区胚胎发育不良性神经上皮瘤(dysembroplastic neuroepithelial tumor,DNT)的经验.方法根据MEG结果大体确定功能区范围,在唤醒麻醉下应用术中皮质电刺激刺激相应区域皮质,明确功能区和DNT边界.在显微镜下切除DNT 4例,观察治疗效果.结果 4例患者手术效果良好,无功能区损害.长期随访未出现癫发作及DNT复发.结论 联合应用MEG与术中唤醒技术显微镜下切除肿瘤是治疗功能区DNT安全、有效的方法.

  10. 脑磁图与神经导航结合在脑功能区肿瘤切除中的初步应用(附31例报道)%Application of magnetoencephalography with neuronavigation in brain neoplasm surgery (31 cases report)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建; 鲁明; 林涛; 孙鹏; 黄勤

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨脑磁图功能区定位与神经导航结合在肿瘤神经外科的应用价值.方法 选择31例功能区肿瘤患者术前行脑磁图(Magnetoencephalography,MEG)确定肿瘤范围及相邻皮质功能区位置,将影像数据输入Brain-LAB导航系统工作站,进行三维重建并制定手术计划,标记肿瘤病灶及其临近重要功能区,应用显微外科技术切除病变,术后进行临床和影像学评价.结果 肿瘤全切除26例,次全切除2例,大部切除3例.术后新增一过性功能障碍8例.结论 MEG是一种无创检查方法,结合神经导航将病灶与功能区定位应用于肿瘤神经外科,能够有针对性地选择手术入路,并在术中更精确地保护功能区,从而使功能区损伤的机会大为减少.

  11. Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten

    2005-01-01

    Artiklen fremhæver den visuelle rotation - billeder, tegninger, modeller, værker - som det privilligerede medium i kommunikationen af ideer imellem skabende arkitekter......Artiklen fremhæver den visuelle rotation - billeder, tegninger, modeller, værker - som det privilligerede medium i kommunikationen af ideer imellem skabende arkitekter...

  12. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristovich, K Y; Khan, S H, E-mail: kirill.aristovich.1@city.ac.u [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London, Northampton Square, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  13. Evaluation of multiple-sphere head models for MEG source localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalancette, M; Cheyne, D [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Ave., Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); Quraan, M, E-mail: marc.lalancette@sickkids.ca, E-mail: douglas.cheyne@utoronto.ca [Krembil Neuroscience Centre, Toronto Western Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 (Canada)

    2011-09-07

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) source analysis has largely relied on spherical conductor models of the head to simplify forward calculations of the brain's magnetic field. Multiple- (or overlapping, local) sphere models, where an optimal sphere is selected for each sensor, are considered an improvement over single-sphere models and are computationally simpler than realistic models. However, there is limited information available regarding the different methods used to generate these models and their relative accuracy. We describe a variety of single- and multiple-sphere fitting approaches, including a novel method that attempts to minimize the field error. An accurate boundary element method simulation was used to evaluate the relative field measurement error (12% on average) and dipole fit localization bias (3.5 mm) of each model over the entire brain. All spherical models can contribute in the order of 1 cm to the localization bias in regions of the head that depart significantly from a sphere (inferior frontal and temporal). These spherical approximation errors can give rise to larger localization differences when all modeling effects are taken into account and with more complex source configurations or other inverse techniques, as shown with a beamformer example. Results differed noticeably depending on the source location, making it difficult to recommend a fitting method that performs best in general. Given these limitations, it may be advisable to expand the use of realistic head models.

  14. Neuronal-like differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced by striatal extracts from a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoling Qin; Wang Han; Zhigang Yu

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of Parkinson's disease was established by 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the medial forebrain bundle. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated from the femur and tibia, and were co-cultured with 10% and 60% lesioned or intact striatal extracts. The results showed that when exposed to lesioned striatal extracts, BMSCs developed bipolar or multi-polar morphologies, and there was an increase in the percentage of cells that expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Moreover, the percentage of NSE-positive cells increased with increasing concentrations of lesioned striatal extracts. However, intact striatal extracts only increased the percentage of GFAP-positive cells. The findings suggest that striatal extracts from Parkinson's disease rats induce BMSCs to differentiate into neuronal-like cells in vitro.

  15. Analysis of slow-onset neurite formation in NG108-15 cells: implications for a unified model of neurite elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalheiser, N R

    1989-01-01

    When undifferentiated NG108-15 cells are plated onto polylysine coated Petri dishes in serum-free medium, they form neurites within 1-4 h if plated in the presence of laminin or 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (rapid-onset neurites). In the absence of such agents, serum-deprived NG108-15 cells extend axon-like neurites onto polylysine over several days; here we characterize the dynamic behavior of this slow-onset outgrowth pattern in detail. Individual cells plated on laminin expressed a gradual multipolar-to-unipolar transition due to rapid-onset neurites becoming remodelled into the appearance of slow-onset neurites. This phenomenon reflected the selective stabilization of certain rapid-onset neurites, along with the restriction of motility to their distal tips. Based upon the properties and interactions of both rapid- and slow-onset neurites in NG108-15 cells, a unified model for neurite formation is presented. PMID:2917412

  16. 脑磁图及弥散张量成像在中央区低级别胶质瘤手术中的应用%Application of magnetoencephalography and diffusion tensor imaging in low-grade glioma surgery of central areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建; 林涛; 李业海

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of neurological function protection of low-grade glioma resection of central areas in combination with magnetoencephalography (MEG),diffusion tensor imaging (DTI),and neuronavigation technology.Methods Forty patients with glioma grade Ⅱ involving central areas were randomly divided into either a control group or an experimental group (n =20 in each group).According to the conventional nerve navigation,the gliomas were localized and resected surgically in the control group; the magnetoencephalography,DTI and neural navigation image sequence were fused for intraoperative navigation in the experimental group,and the cerebral cortical functional areas and subcortical tracts were located under the intraoperative visualization in order to achieve the precise excision of the lesions.Within 3 days after procedure,the patients conducted MRI and DTI examinations.The extent of glioma resection,the integrity of nerve tracts,the recovery of neurological function at 1 month after procedure,and the KPS scores in both groups were compared.Results The total resection rate of gliomas in the experimental group (85%,17/20) was significantly higher than that of the control group (55%,11/20).The postoperative paralyzed rate in the experimental group (25%,5/20) was significantly lower than that of the control group (60%,12/20).The mean Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) score (84.50 ± 21.6) at one month after procedure in experimental group was significantly higher than that in the control group (64.05 ± 33.36).There were significant differences in glioma resection rate,fiber tracts (FA value),neurological preservation,and KPS scores between the two groups (P < 0.05).Conclusion By the combined use of MEG,DTI,and neural navigation technology,the gliomas in central areas can be removed as much as possible and better preserve the neurological function of patients in order to improve their quality of life.%目的 探讨联合利用脑磁

  17. Mental imagery of speech and movement implicates the dynamics of internal forward models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing eTian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The classical concept of efference copies in the context of internal forward models has stimulated productive research in cognitive science and neuroscience. There are compelling reasons to argue for such a mechanism, but finding direct evidence in the human brain remains difficult. Here we investigate the dynamics of internal forward models from an unconventional angle: mental imagery, assessed while recording high temporal resolution neuronal activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG. We compare two overt and covert tasks; our covert, mental imagery tasks are unconfounded by overt input/output demands – but in turn necessitate the development of appropriate multi-dimensional topographic analyses. Finger tapping (studies 1-2 and speech experiments (studies 3-5 provide temporally constrained results that implicate the estimation of an efference copy. We suggest that one internal forward model over parietal cortex subserves the kinesthetic feeling in motor imagery. Secondly, observed auditory neural activity ~170 ms after motor estimation in speech experiments (studies 3-5 demonstrates the anticipated auditory consequences of planned motor commands in a second internal forward model in imagery of speech production. Our results provide neurophysiological evidence from the human brain in favor of internal forward models deploying efference copies in somatosensory and auditory cortex, in finger tapping and speech production tasks, respectively, and also suggest the dynamics and sequential updating structure of internal forward models.

  18. Distorted cortical networks in dislexia: findings using Magnetoencephalography (MEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo M. Catillo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In dyslexic children a functional deficit in the brain circuitry supporting some of the cognitive operations taking place while they learn how the printed words maps onto spoken language is suspected. Until recently, however, no information existed regarding the functional status of this circuit during the early stages of reading acquisition. In the context of three studies we sought to address key issues in the pathophysiology of this condition using Magnetoencephalograhy (MEG at the University of Texas-Houston. The first study, including 30 kindergarten children at risk for developing reading problems and 15 not-at-risk controls, ascertained that the aberrant neural circuit that underlies reading problems appears to be present in the initial stages of reading acquisition. A subset of these children were retested a year later using identical procedures in a second study. Children in the at-risk group showed the most prominent changes in brain activation profiles and successfully predicted individual differences in the growth of reading skill measures. The results of a third study showed clearly that the aberrant activation profile can be normalized following intensive behavioral instruction. These findings are consistent with the view that dyslexia represents a functional deficit in the neural network that mediates the conversion of print to sound, which is amenable to change given adequate instruction.

  19. Phase-compensated averaging for analyzing electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography epochs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matani, Ayumu; Naruse, Yasushi; Terazono, Yasushi; Iwasaki, Taro; Fujimaki, Norio; Murata, Tsutomu

    2010-05-01

    Stimulus-locked averaging for electroencephalography and/or megnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) epochs cancels out ongoing spontaneous activities by treating them as noise. However, such spontaneous activities are the object of interest for EEG/MEG researchers who study phase-related phenomena, e.g., long-distance synchronization, phase-reset, and event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERD/ERS). We propose a complex-weighted averaging method, called phase-compensated averaging, to investigate phase-related phenomena. In this method, any EEG/MEG channel is used as a trigger for averaging by setting the instantaneous phases at the trigger timings to 0 so that cross-channel averages are obtained. First, we evaluated the fundamental characteristics of this method by performing simulations. The results showed that this method could selectively average ongoing spontaneous activity phase-locked in each channel; that is, it evaluates the directional phase-synchronizing relationship between channels. We then analyzed flash evoked potentials. This method clarified the directional phase-synchronizing relationship from the frontal to occipital channels and recovered another piece of information, perhaps regarding the sequence of experiments, which is lost when using only conventional averaging. This method can also be used to reconstruct EEG/MEG time series to visualize long-distance synchronization and phase-reset directly, and on the basis of the potentials, ERS/ERD can be explained as a side effect of phase-reset. PMID:20172813

  20. Noise cancellation in magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography with isolated reference sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Espy, Michelle A.; Matlachov, Andrei; Volegov, Petr

    2010-06-01

    An apparatus measures electromagnetic signals from a weak signal source. A plurality of primary sensors is placed in functional proximity to the weak signal source with an electromagnetic field isolation surface arranged adjacent the primary sensors and between the weak signal source and sources of ambient noise. A plurality of reference sensors is placed adjacent the electromagnetic field isolation surface and arranged between the electromagnetic isolation surface and sources of ambient noise.

  1. Low frequency overactivation in dyslexia: Evidence from resting state Magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnotta, Mattia F; Zouridakis, George; Lianyang Li; Lizarazu, Mikel; Lallier, Marie; Molinaro, Nicola; Carreiras, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compared the brain activation profiles obtained from resting state Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) activity in 15 dyslexic patients with the profiles of 15 normal controls, using power spectral density (PSD) analysis. We first estimated intracranial dipolar MEG sources on a dense grid on the cortical surface and then projected these sources on a standardized atlas with 68 regions of interest (ROIs). Averaging the PSD values of all sources in each ROI across all control subjects resulted in a normative database that was used to convert the PSD values of dyslexic patients into z-scores in eight distinct frequency bands. We found that dyslexic patients exhibited statistically significant overactivation in the delta band (0.1-4 Hz) in the right temporal (entorhinal and insula), left inferior frontal (Broca's area), and right inferior frontal regions. Overactivation may be interpreted as a compensatory mechanism for reading characterizing dyslexic patients. These findings suggest that resting-state MEG activation maps may be used as specific biomarkers that can help with the diagnosis of and assess the efficacy of intervention in dyslexia.

  2. Decoding Brain States Based on Magnetoencephalography From Prespecified Cortical Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyin; Li, Xin; Foldes, Stephen T; Wang, Wei; Collinger, Jennifer L; Weber, Douglas J; Bagić, Anto

    2016-01-01

    Brain state decoding based on whole-head MEG has been extensively studied over the past decade. Recent MEG applications pose an emerging need of decoding brain states based on MEG signals originating from prespecified cortical regions. Toward this goal, we propose a novel region-of-interest-constrained discriminant analysis algorithm (RDA) in this paper. RDA integrates linear classification and beamspace transformation into a unified framework by formulating a constrained optimization problem. Our experimental results based on human subjects demonstrate that RDA can efficiently extract the discriminant pattern from prespecified cortical regions to accurately distinguish different brain states.

  3. How do brain tumors alter functional connectivity? : A magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bosma, Ingeborg; Klein, Martin; Baayen, Johannes C; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Postma, Tjeerd J; Heimans, Jan J; van Dijk, Bob W; de Munck, Jan C; de Jongh, Arent; Cover, Keith S; Stam, Cornelis J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that brain tumors interfere with normal brain function by disrupting functional connectivity of brain networks. METHODS: Functional connectivity was assessed by computing the synchronization likelihood in a broad band (0.5-60Hz) or in the g

  4. Magnetoencephalography evidence for different brain subregions serving two musical cultures

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUNAGA, Rie; Yokosawa, Koichi; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who have been exposed to two different musical cultures (bimusicals) can be differentiated from those exposed to only one musical culture (monomusicals). Just as bilingual speakers handle the distinct language-syntactic rules of each of two languages, bimusical listeners handle two distinct musical-syntactic rules (e.g., tonal schemas) in each musical culture. This study sought to determine specific brain activities that contribute to differentiating two culture-specific tonal str...

  5. 女性偏头痛患者发作期静息态神经网络的多频段脑磁图研究%Multi-frequency magnetoencephalography study on alterations of resting-state neural networks in females with migraine at attack stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴迪; 管青山; 王小姗

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the alterations of resting-state neural networks in females with migraine at attack stage in low-and high-frequency ranges compared to healthy controls. Methods Resting-state magnetoencephalography data from 20 females with migraine ( migraine group ) and 20 age-and gender-matched healthy controls ( control group ) were collected to compute the neural network parameters through graph theory analysis.Independent samples t test was used to compare the difference of the network parameters between the two groups.The Pearson coefficient was used to assess the relationship between the abnormal network parameters and clinical manifestations of migraine.Results Compared with control group, females in migraine group at attack stage showed increased functional connectivity in the 0.1 -1 Hz, 4 -8 Hz, 12 -30 Hz, 30 -80 Hz band; increased shortest path length in the 80-250 Hz band; increased clustering coefficient and degree in the 0.1 -1 Hz band;decreased clustering coefficient and degree in the 4 -8 Hz, 12 -30 Hz band ( P<0.05 -0.01 ) .The functional connectivity of females with migraine at attack stage was positively correlated with number of years with migraine in the 12-30 Hz ( r=0.56, P=0.01 ) .Conclusion These results indicate that inherent neural networks are significantly impaired in low-and high-frequency ranges in females with migraine at attack stage and may contribute to the clinical manifestations of this disorder.%目的:探讨女性偏头痛患者发作期静息态的神经网络在高频及低频范围内的改变。方法采集20例女性偏头痛患者(偏头痛组)及20名年龄及性别相匹配的健康对照者(对照组)的静息态脑磁图数据,利用图形理论分析两组受试者的神经网络参数。利用独立样本t检验比较两组的神经网络参数有无差别,利用Pearson相关系数分析偏头痛患者的神经网络参数是否与患者临床特点有关。结果与对照组相比,女性

  6. 脑磁图定位皮质运动区与术中皮质电刺激运动诱发电位的对照研究%Control study of magnetoencephalography and intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation based motor evoked potential monitoring for mapping motor cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨坤; 张玉海; 杨露; 张岩松; 杨纶先; 邹元杰; 张锐; 刘宏毅

    2014-01-01

    目的评价脑磁图(MEG)术前定位初级运动皮质(M1)的准确性。方法选取顺序入院的中央区胶质瘤26例,术前均运用MEG定位皮质运动区,与MRI导航影像融合,在神经导航下定位MEG激活区。术中对MEG成功定位的病例行直接皮质电刺激(DCES),比较两种技术的吻合度。结果因病人不能配合,MEG定位失败2例,余24例均定位成功,每例激活区1~5个。DCES成功监测24例,所有选择的DCES靶点共41个,阳性靶点24个,1个/例。以所有的41个靶点分析,MEG定位M1区与DCES定位的吻合率为58.5%;而以第1组病灶侧M1区和第2组病灶侧中央区的MEG激活区中27个靶点分析,两者吻合率为88.9%;仅以第1组M1区的MEG激活区中17个靶点分析,两者吻合率为100%。结论 MEG可以灵敏而可靠地定位M1区,可用于中央区胶质瘤病人术前手术规划。%Objective To evaluate the accuracy of preoperative primary motor cortex (M1) mapping with magnetoencephalography (MEG). Methods Twenty-six consecutive patients with glioma in the central region were selected. Motor cortex was located by MEG preoperatively, and its results were overlaid on the MRI, then the activated regions located under neuronavigation. Intraoperative direct cortical electrical stimulation (DCES) was performed in patients located successfully by MEG, and the coincidence rate was calculated between MEG and DCES techniques. Results MEG mapping failed in 2 patients because of the problems of patients, and succeeded in other 24 patients with 1 to 5 activated regions in every patient. DCES was performed in 24 patients with 41 targets, including 24 positive targets, one target in every patient. For the analysis of all the 41 targets, the coincidence rate was 58.5%in mapping M1 between MEG and DCES. For the analysis of 27 targets in MEG activated regions of M1 in group 1 and central region in group 2 at the lesion side, the coincidence rate of the two techniques was 88.9%. For the

  7. PET和脑磁图综合定位对难治性癫(癎)低剂量立体定向放射外科治疗远期效果的影响%Effect of combined localization by positron emission tomography and magnetoencephalography on long-term efficacy of low dose radiosurgery for intractable epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王克万; 漆松涛; 杨开军; 徐波涛; 王洪筱; 李玉芬

    2012-01-01

    目的 为探讨正电子发射断层扫描(PET)和脑磁图综合定位对难治性癫(癎)低剂量放射外科治疗远期效果的影响.方法 回顾性分析采用放射外科治疗的8例难治性癫(癎)病人的临床资料,治疗前均行MRI、视频脑电图(VEEG)、18F-脱氧葡萄糖正电子发射断层扫描(18F-FDG PET)显像、脑磁图检查.放射外科治疗以脑磁图定位区为中心靶点,体积大于脑磁图显示范围,但局限于PET低代谢区内.中心剂量为11~13.25 Gy.结果 随访8例,时间8~10年.Engel分级:Ⅰ级4例,Ⅱ级2例,Ⅲ级2例.2例行脑磁图复查未检出致(癎)灶,1例行PET复查见原低代谢区无明显变化.结论 PET和脑磁图综合定位可明显增加致(癎)灶定位准确性,从而提高放射外科疗效.%Objective To investigate the effect of localization of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) to localize the epileptic foci on the long-term efficacy of low dose stereotactic radiosurgery for intractable epilepsy. Methods Clinical data of 8 patients with intractable epilepsy were analyzed retrospectively who underwent radiosurgery. All the patients were examined by MRI, video electroencephalogram (VEEG), 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (18F-FDG PET) and MEG before surgery. The foci localized by MEG were set as central target of radiosurgery and the volume was larger than the regions by MEG but within the low metabolic areas detected by PET. The central dose of radiosurgery was 11 to 13.25 Gy. Results All the patients were followed up for 8 to 10 years. The results were class Ⅰ in 4 patients, class Ⅱ in 2 and class Ⅲ in 2 according to Engel classification. Two patients were reexamined by MEG and no epileptic foci were found. One patient was reexamined by PET and no obvious change of the original low metabolic areas was found. Conclusions PET combined with MEG can increase the accuracy of localization of epileptic foci and improve the outcome of radiosurgery.

  8. Coarse-grained rigid blob model for soft matter simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Sheng D.; Kress, Joel D.; Redondo, Antonio

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a coarse-grained multiscale molecular simulation method for soft matter systems that directly incorporates stereochemical information. We divide the material into disjoint groups of atoms or particles that move as separate rigid bodies; we call these groups "rigid blobs," hence the name coarse-grained rigid blob model. The method is enabled by the construction of transferable interblob potentials that approximate the net intermolecular interactions, as obtained from ab initio electronic structure calculations, other all-atom empirical potentials, experimental data, or any combination of the above. We utilize a multipolar expansion to obtain the interblob potential-energy functions. The series, which contains controllable approximations that allow us to estimate the errors, approaches the original intermolecular potential as the number of terms increases. Using a novel numerical algorithm, we can calculate the interblob potentials very efficiently in terms of a few interaction moment tensors. This reduces the labor well beyond what is required in standard molecular-dynamics calculations and allows large-scale simulations for temporal scales commensurate with characteristic times of nano- and mesoscale systems. A detailed derivation of the formulas is presented, followed by illustrative applications to several systems showing that the method can effectively capture realistic microscopic details and can easily extend to large-scale simulations.

  9. Multi-area neural mass modeling of EEG and MEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2010-09-01

    We previously proposed an integrated electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) model based on an extended neural mass model (ENMM) within a single cortical area. In the ENMM, a cortical area contains several minicolumns where strengths of their connections diminish exponentially with their distances. The ENMM was derived based on the physiological principles of the cortical minicolumns and their connections within a single cortical area to generate EEG, MEG, and fMRI signals. The purpose of this paper is to further extend the ENMM model from a single-area to a multi-area model to develop a neural mass model of the entire brain that generates EEG and MEG signals. For multi-area modeling, two connection types are considered: short-range connections (SRCs) and long-range connections (LRCs). The intra-area SRCs among the minicolumns within the areas were previously modeled in the ENMM. To define inter-area LRCs among the cortical areas, we consider that the cell populations of all minicolumns in the destination area are affected by the excitatory afferent of the pyramidal cells of all minicolumns in the source area. The state-space representation of the multi-area model is derived considering the intra-minicolumn, SRCs', and LRCs' parameters. Using simulations, we evaluate effects of parameters of the model on its dynamics and, based on stability analysis, find valid ranges for parameters of the model. In addition, we evaluate reducing redundancy of the model parameters using simulation results and conclude that the parameters of the model can be limited to the LRCs and SRCs while the intra-minicolumn parameters stay at their physiological mean values. The proposed multi-area integrated E/MEG model provides an efficient neuroimaging technique for effective connectivity analysis in healthy subjects as well as neurological and psychiatric patients. PMID:20080193

  10. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Maxwell A; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Moore, Christopher I; Jones, Stephanie R

    2016-08-16

    Human neocortical 15-29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting 50 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  11. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Maxwell A.; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Human neocortical 15–29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  12. Nuclear liquid-drop model and surface-curvature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear liquid-drop model is revisited and an explicit introduction of the surface-curvature terms is presented. The corresponding parameters of the extended classical energy formula are adjusted to the contemporarily known nuclear binding energies and fission-barrier heights. Using 2766 binding energies of nuclei with Z≥8 and N≥8 it is shown that the performance of the new approach is improved by a factor of about 6, compared to the previously published liquid-drop model results, in terms of the masses (new rms deviation =0.698 MeV) and the fission barriers by a factor of about 3.5 (new rms deviation of the fission barriers of isotopes with Z>70 is B>=0.88 MeV). The role of the nuclear surface-curvature terms and their effects on the description of the experimental quantities are discussed in detail. For comparison, the parameters of the more 'traditional' classical energy expressions are refitted, taking into account the nuclear masses known today and the performances of several variants of the model are compared. The isospin dependence in the new description of the barriers is in a good agreement with the extended Thomas-Fermi approach. It also demonstrates a good qualitative agreement with the fission lifetime systematics tested on the long chain of Fermium isotopes known experimentally. The new approach offers a very high stability in terms of the extrapolation from the narrower range of nuclides to a more extended one--a property of particular interest for the contemporary exotic beam projects: the corresponding properties are illustrated and discussed. The new description of the fission barriers being significantly improved, in particular, the new calculated barriers being lower, flatter, but stiffer against high-multipolarity deformations. The chances for 'extra' stabilization of the hyperdeformed minima at high spin increase, thus calling for the new total energy Strutinsky-type calculations

  13. An asymmetric jet launching model for the protoplanetary nebula CRL 618

    CERN Document Server

    Velazquez, P F; Raga, A C; Toledo-Roy, J C

    2014-01-01

    We propose an asymmetrical jet ejection mechanism in order to model the mirror symmetry observed in the lobe distribution of some protoplanetary nebulae (pPNe), such as the pPN CRL 618. 3D hydrodynamical simulations of a precessing jet launched from an orbiting source were carried out including an alternation in the ejections of the two outflow lobes, depending on which side of the precessing accretion disk is hit by the accretion column from a Roche lobe-filling binary companion. Both synthetic optical emission maps and position-velocity (PV) diagrams were obtained from the numerical results with the purpose of carrying out a direct comparison with observations. Depending on the observer's point of view, multipolar morphologies are obtained which exhibit a mirror symmetry at large distances from the central source. The obtained lobe sizes and their spatial distribution are in good agreement with the observed morphology of the pPN CRL 618. We also obtain that the kinematic ages of the fingers are similar to t...

  14. Resonant X-ray scattering and multipolar order in actinide dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The discovery in 2002 of electric quadrupole ordering in the NpO2 opened a new chapter in the understanding of the low-temperature ground states of actinide dioxides, insulating compounds with the simple cubic CaF2 crystal structure and general formula U1-xNpxO2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1). The phenomenon found at 25 K in NpO2 is that the 5f charge distribution develops an anisotropic component, with long-range ordering of the charge quadrupoles driven by a primary magnetic octupolar order parameter belonging to the totally symmetric irreducible representation of L = 3 in D3d symmetry (□1). The experiments consist of tuning the photon energy to the actinide M absorption edge (at which photon energy core 3d electrons are promoted to the partially occupied 5f valence states), and then, once the repeat of the anisotropic charge distribution is known, to measure the azimuthal distribution of the scattered resonant x-ray intensity. This intensity distribution is related to the symmetry of the 5f anisotropic charge distribution. The experiments were performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France, with the single crystals mounted in ITU. NpO2 shows no measurable magnetic dipole component. In 2003 experiments were performed on a single crystal with x = 0.25. Dipole ordering was found on both the U and Np ions, and quadrupolar ordering was also found associated with both ions. However, these were different from those in pure NpO2. Whereas a longitudinal (L) 3-k configuration was found for NpO2, the x = 0.25 sample was found to have a transverse (T) 3-k configuration. The understanding of these different configurations then allowed an experiment to be performed in 2005 on a single crystal of UO2. The azimuthal dependence of the intensity from non-specular reflections reveals 3-k T anti-ferro-electric-quadrupolar order also UO2. The complication in UO2 is that both dipole ordering and an internal distortion of the oxygen atoms due to the quadrupole ordering are present; these have contrived to make it difficult to observe directly the quadrupole ordering in UO2, although such ordering was predicted almost 40 years ago, and the oxygen displacements reported 30 years ago [5]. These experiments also suggest a qualitative explanation of the unusual behaviour of the mixed oxides with 0.40 < x < 0.80. In this region there is competition between the L and T quadrupole ordering, resulting in quadrupolar frustration and only short-range dipole and quadrupole ordering. (authors)

  15. NATO in a Multipolar World : U.S. Foreign Policy Discourse and the Future of NATO

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Oppgaven analyserer amerikansk utenrikspolitisks diskurs med tanke på utfordringer knyttet til NATO. Selv om NATO i utgangspunktet er ansett som en vellykket allianse har den, særlig siden slutten av den kalde krigen, vært et tema for flere debatter. Denne oppgaven tar for seg fire debatter som har vært sentrale rundt NATO og setter de i sammenheng med større spørsmål i amerikansk utenrikspolitikk. En av debattene er strukturelle og omhandler det transatlantiske forholdet, mens de andre er kn...

  16. Effect of multipolar interaction on the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Xiao-Feng; Gao Lei

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids or liquids with suspended nanoparticles are likely to be the future heat transfer media, as they exhibit higher thermal conductivity than those of liquids. It has been proposed that nanoparticles are apt to congregate and form clusters, and hence the interaction between nanoparticles becomes important. In this paper, by taking into account the interaction between nearest-neighbour inclusions, we adopt the multiple image method to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Numerical results show that then the thermal conductivity ratio between the nanoparticles and fluids is large, and the two nanoparticles are close up and even touch, and the point-dipole theory such as Maxwell-Garnett theory becomes rough as many-body interactions are neglected. Our theoretical results on the effective thermal conductivity of CuO/water and Al2O3/water nanofluids are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Dynamic polarizability and electric multipolar transitions in two electron atoms under exponential cosine screened coulomb potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Supriya K.; Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed investigations on the frequency dependent polarizabilities, transition energies, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities of two electron systems He, B e2 +, C4 + , and O6 + under electric dipolar (E1) and quadrupolar (E2) excitations have been performed using exponential cosine screened coulomb potential with a view to understand the structural behaviour of such systems due to external confinement produced by plasma environment. Time dependent coupled Hartree-Fock theory within a variational framework has been adopted for studying the first three low lying excited states 1 s2:1Se→1 s n p :1Po (n = 2, 3, 4) and 1 s n d :1De (n = 3, 4, 5) under such excitations. Quantitatively, the effect of confinement produced by the external plasma has been taken care of by considering the change in atomic potential through plasma screening, directly related to the coupling strength of the plasma with the atomic charge cloud. With increased plasma screening, a gradual destabilisation of the energy levels with subsequent reduction of the ionization potential and number of excited states has been observed. Behavioral pattern of the frequency dependent polarizabilities, excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities under systematic increase of the screening has been investigated. Results have been compared thoroughly with those available for free systems and under confinement by exponential cosine screened and screened Coulomb potential.

  18. Nonlinear optical response in condensed phases : A microscopic theory using the multipolar Hamiltonian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoester, Jasper; Mukamel, Shaul

    1990-01-01

    A general scheme is presented for calculating the nonlinear optical response in condensed phases that provides a unified picture of excitons, polaritons, retardation, and local-field effects in crystals and in disordered systems. A fully microscopic starting point is taken by considering the evoluti

  19. Wnt Signaling Regulates Multipolar-to-Bipolar Transition of Migrating Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Boitard; Riccardo Bocchi; Kristof Egervari; Volodymyr Petrenko; Beatrice Viale; Stéphane Gremaud; Eloisa Zgraggen; Patrick Salmon; Jozsef Z. Kiss

    2015-01-01

    The precise timing of pyramidal cell migration from the ventricular germinal zone to the cortical plate is essential for establishing cortical layers, and migration errors can lead to neurodevelopmental disorders underlying psychiatric and neurological diseases. Here, we report that Wnt canonical as well as non-canonical signaling is active in pyramidal precursors during radial migration. We demonstrate using constitutive and conditional genetic strategies that transient downregulation of can...

  20. Multi-polarization quantum control of rotational motion through dipole coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turinici, Gabriel [Ceremade, Universite Paris Dauphine, Place du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 75775 Paris Cedex 16 (France); Rabitz, Herschel [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1009 (United States)], E-mail: Gabriel.Turinici@dauphine.fr, E-mail: hrabitz@princeton.edu

    2010-03-12

    In this work we analyze the quantum controllability of rotational motion under the influence of an external laser field coupled through a permanent dipole moment. The analysis takes into consideration up to three polarization fields, but we also discuss the consequences for working with fewer polarized fields.

  1. Multi-polarization quantum control of rotational motion through dipole coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinici, Gabriel; Rabitz, Herschel

    2010-03-01

    In this work we analyze the quantum controllability of rotational motion under the influence of an external laser field coupled through a permanent dipole moment. The analysis takes into consideration up to three polarization fields, but we also discuss the consequences for working with fewer polarized fields.

  2. Multipolar universal relations between f-mode frequency and tidal deformability of compact stars

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, T K; Leung, P T; Lin, L -M

    2014-01-01

    Though individual stellar parameters of compact stars usually demonstrate obvious dependence on the equation of state (EOS), EOS-insensitive universal formulas relating these parameters remarkably exist. In the present paper, we explore the inter-relationship between two such formulas, namely the f-I relation connecting the $f$-mode quadrupole oscillation frequency $\\omega_2$ and the moment of inertia $I$, and the I-Love-Q relations relating $I$, the quadrupole tidal deformability $\\lambda_2$, and the quadrupole moment $Q$, which have been proposed by Lau et al. [Astrophys. J. {\\bf 714}, 1234 (2010)], and Yagi and Yunes [Science, {\\bf 341}, 365 (2013)], respectively. A relativistic universal relation between $\\omega_l$ and $\\lambda_l$ with the same angular momentum $l=2,3,\\ldots$, the so called "diagonal f-Love relation" that holds for realistic compact stars and stiff polytropic stars, is unveiled here. An in-depth investigation in the Newtonian limit is further carried out to pinpoint its underlying physica...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF ISLAMIC FINANCE MARKETS IN A MULTI-POLAR WORLD AND SUKUK ISSUANCE

    OpenAIRE

    ÇANAKCI, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The financial crisis in the world economy after 2008 brought forward the importance of Islamic finance instruments and increased their usage in this way. Islamic finance, as a complementary component among financial instruments, provides sustainable material and spiritual welfare with its fairer, more participative and more sharing structure, by encouraging people/establishments that wishes to make investments and facilitate access to financing in economy. In this context “Sukuk” exports, whi...

  4. Multipolar correlations and deformation effect on nuclear transition matrix elements of double-$\\beta $ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, R; Rath, P K; Raina, P K; Hirsch, J G

    2009-01-01

    The two neutrino and neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{94,96}$Zr, $^{98,100}$Mo, $^{104}$Ru, $^{110}$Pd, $^{128,130}$Te and $^{150}$Nd isotopes for the $0^{+}\\to 0^{+}$ transition is studied within the PHFB framework along with an effective two-body interaction consisting of pairing, quadrupole-quadrupole and hexadecapole-hexadecapole correlations. It is found that the effect of hexadecapolar correlations can be assimilated substantially as a renormalization of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. The effect of deformation on nuclear transition matrix elements is investigated by varying the strength of quadrupolar correlations in the parent and daughter nuclei independently. The variation of the nuclear transition matrix elements as a function of the difference in deformation parameters of parent and daughter nuclei reveals that in general, the former tend to be maximum for equal deformation and they decrease as the difference in deformation parameters increases, exhibiting a very similar trend for the $...

  5. Energetic diplomacy and its role on creation of a new multipolar world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Gelev

    2016-01-01

    Many of us would ask does this mean the reincarnation of the so called almost forgotten Cold War only now coming in such a shape that seems to be far more terrifying in character with a great deal of chance to impose the brink of a new world war and another humanitarian wash-out to humanity.

  6. Human in vitro reporter model of neuronal development and early differentiation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdahn Ulrich

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During developmental and adult neurogenesis, doublecortin is an early neuronal marker expressed when neural stem cells assume a neuronal cell fate. To understand mechanisms involved in early processes of neuronal fate decision, we investigated cell lines for their capacity to induce expression of doublecortin upon neuronal differentiation and develop in vitro reporter models using doublecortin promoter sequences. Results Among various cell lines investigated, the human teratocarcinoma cell line NTERA-2 was found to fulfill our criteria. Following induction of differentiation using retinoic acid treatment, we observed a 16-fold increase in doublecortin mRNA expression, as well as strong induction of doublecortin polypeptide expression. The acquisition of a neuronal precursor phenotype was also substantiated by the establishment of a multipolar neuronal morphology and expression of additional neuronal markers, such as Map2, βIII-tubulin and neuron-specific enolase. Moreover, stable transfection in NTERA-2 cells of reporter constructs encoding fluorescent or luminescent genes under the control of the doublecortin promoter allowed us to directly detect induction of neuronal differentiation in cell culture, such as following retinoic acid treatment or mouse Ngn2 transient overexpression. Conclusion Induction of doublecortin expression in differentiating NTERA-2 cells suggests that these cells accurately recapitulate some of the very early events of neuronal determination. Hence, the use of reporter genes under the control of the doublecortin promoter in NTERA-2 cells will help us to investigate factors involved early in the course of neuronal differentiation processes. Moreover the ease to detect the induction of a neuronal program in this model will permit to perform high throughput screening for compounds acting on the early neuronal differentiation mechanisms.

  7. Joint EEG/fMRI state space model for the detection of directed interactions in human brains—a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An often addressed challenge in neuroscience research is the assignment of different tasks to specific brain regions. In many cases several brain regions are activated during a single task. Therefore, one is also interested in the temporal evolution of brain activity to infer causal relations between activated brain regions. These causal relations may be described by a directed, task specific network which consists of activated brain regions as vertices and directed edges. The edges describe the causal relations. Inference of the task specific brain network from measurements like electroencephalography (EEG) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is challenging, due to the low spatial resolution of the former and the low temporal resolution of the latter. Here, we present a simulation study investigating a possible combined analysis of simultaneously measured EEG and fMRI data to address the challenge specified above. A nonlinear state space model is used to distinguish between the underlying brain states and the (simulated) EEG/fMRI measurements. We make use of a modified unscented Kalman filter and a corresponding unscented smoother for the estimation of the underlying neural activity. Model parameters are estimated using an expectation-maximization algorithm, which exploits the partial linearity of our model. Inference of the brain network structure is then achieved using directed partial correlation, a measure for Granger causality. The results indicate that the convolution effect of the fMRI forward model imposes a big challenge for the parameter estimation and reduces the influence of the fMRI in combined EEG–fMRI models. It remains to be investigated whether other models or similar combinations of other modalities such as, e.g., EEG and magnetoencephalography can increase the profit of the promising idea of combining various modalities

  8. How neurons migrate: a dynamic in-silico model of neuronal migration in the developing cortex

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Setty, Yaki

    2011-09-30

    Abstract Background Neuronal migration, the process by which neurons migrate from their place of origin to their final position in the brain, is a central process for normal brain development and function. Advances in experimental techniques have revealed much about many of the molecular components involved in this process. Notwithstanding these advances, how the molecular machinery works together to govern the migration process has yet to be fully understood. Here we present a computational model of neuronal migration, in which four key molecular entities, Lis1, DCX, Reelin and GABA, form a molecular program that mediates the migration process. Results The model simulated the dynamic migration process, consistent with in-vivo observations of morphological, cellular and population-level phenomena. Specifically, the model reproduced migration phases, cellular dynamics and population distributions that concur with experimental observations in normal neuronal development. We tested the model under reduced activity of Lis1 and DCX and found an aberrant development similar to observations in Lis1 and DCX silencing expression experiments. Analysis of the model gave rise to unforeseen insights that could guide future experimental study. Specifically: (1) the model revealed the possibility that under conditions of Lis1 reduced expression, neurons experience an oscillatory neuron-glial association prior to the multipolar stage; and (2) we hypothesized that observed morphology variations in rats and mice may be explained by a single difference in the way that Lis1 and DCX stimulate bipolar motility. From this we make the following predictions: (1) under reduced Lis1 and enhanced DCX expression, we predict a reduced bipolar migration in rats, and (2) under enhanced DCX expression in mice we predict a normal or a higher bipolar migration. Conclusions We present here a system-wide computational model of neuronal migration that integrates theory and data within a precise

  9. Modeling Model Slicers

    OpenAIRE

    Blouin A.; Combemale B.; Baudry B.; Beaudoux O.

    2011-01-01

    International audience Among model comprehension tools, model slicers are tools that extract a subset from a model, for a specific purpose. Model slicers are tools that let modelers rapidly gather relevant knowledge from large models. However, existing slicers are dedicated to one modeling language. This is an issue when we observe that new domain specific modeling languages (DSMLs), for which we want slicing abilities, are created almost on a daily basis. This paper proposes the Kompren l...

  10. Distinguishing mechanisms of gamma frequency oscillations in human current source signals using a computational model of a laminar neocortical network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane eLee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gamma frequency rhythms have been implicated in numerous studies for their role in healthy and abnormal brain function. The frequency band has been described to encompass as broad a range as 30–150 Hz. Crucial to understanding the role of gamma in brain function is an identification of the underlying neural mechanisms, which is particularly difficult in the absence of invasive recordings in macroscopic human signals such as those from magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG. Here, we studied features of current dipole (CD signals from two distinct mechanisms of gamma generation, using a computational model of a laminar cortical circuit designed specifically to simulate CDs in a biophysically principled manner (Jones et al., 2007; Jones et al., 2009. We simulated spiking pyramidal interneuronal gamma (PING whose period is regulated by the decay time constant of GABAA-mediated synaptic inhibition and also subthreshold gamma driven by gamma-periodic exogenous excitatory synaptic drive. Our model predicts distinguishable CD features created by spiking PING compared to subthreshold driven gamma that can help to disambiguate mechanisms of gamma oscillations in human signals. We found that gamma rhythms in neocortical layer 5 can obscure a simultaneous, independent gamma in layer 2/3. Further, we arrived at a novel interpretation of the origin of high gamma frequency rhythms (100–150 Hz, showing that they emerged from a specific temporal feature of CDs associated with single cycles of PING activity and did not reflect a separate rhythmic process. Last we show that the emergence of observable subthreshold gamma required highly coherent exogenous drive. Our results are the first to demonstrate features of gamma oscillations in human current source signals that distinguish cellular and circuit level mechanisms of these rhythms and may help guide understanding of their functional role.

  11. Testing the geomagnetic dipole and reversing dynamo models over Earth's cooling history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Evans, Ted

    2014-05-01

    Continental drift reconstructions rely on the assumption that Earth's mean magnetic field has been a geocentric axial dipole over geologic time. However, the coupled dynamics of mantle and core convection may have had profound effects on the magnetic field in the distant past. Previous dynamo models have linked differences between polar and equatorial mantle heat flow to apparently anomalous paleomagnetic fields, and changes in reversal frequency. Here we use the inclination test (Evans, 1976) to interpret observational magnetic field models and polarity-reversing numerical dynamos representing various convective states of the mantle and core. Dynamo models with uniform buoyancy flux represent three convective states of the mantle and core: (1) present era Earth, driven thermo-chemically at the inner core boundary; (2) mantle overturn, with elevated heat flux at the core-mantle boundary, and (3) ancient Earth prior to inner core nucleation, with buoyancy production solely at the CMB. Consistent with Earth's present magnetic field, dynamos driven by buoyancy due to inner core growth are nearly dipolar. In contrast, elevated CMB heat flow yields small to moderate inclination flattening due to a persistent octupole that reverses synchronously with the dipole. For the ancient Earth models the relatively strong octupole component tends to stabilize the dynamo and decrease the reversal frequency. Our results, along with evidence of a young inner core, imply that an entirely liquid core contributed to shallow inclinations in Precambrian time. We also run models with latitudinally variable heat flux boundary conditions to further investigate the relationship between dynamo flow fields, the octupole component, magnetic inclinations and reversal frequency. For models with increased polar CMB heat flux we find that the relative strength of the octupole component increases in proportion to latitudinal heat flux variation. On the other hand, models are very sensitive to

  12. Use of the isolated problem approach for multi-compartment BEM models of electro-magnetic source imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gencer, Nevzat G; Akalin-Acar, Zeynep [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Brain Research Laboratory, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-07-07

    The isolated problem approach (IPA) is a method used in the boundary element method (BEM) to overcome numerical inaccuracies caused by the high-conductivity difference in the skull and the brain tissues in the head. Haemaelaeinen and Sarvas (1989 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 36 165-71) described how the source terms can be updated to overcome these inaccuracies for a three-layer head model. Meijs et al (1989 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 36 1038-49) derived the integral equations for the general case where there are an arbitrary number of layers inside the skull. However, the IPA is used in the literature only for three-layer head models. Studies that use complex boundary element head models that investigate the inhomogeneities in the brain or model the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) do not make use of the IPA. In this study, the generalized formulation of the IPA for multi-layer models is presented in terms of integral equations. The discretized version of these equations are presented in two different forms. In a previous study (Akalin-Acar and Gencer 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 5011-28), we derived formulations to calculate the electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography transfer matrices assuming a single layer in the skull. In this study, the transfer matrix formulations are updated to incorporate the generalized IPA. The effects of the IPA are investigated on the accuracy of spherical and realistic models when the CSF layer and a tumour tissue are included in the model. It is observed that, in the spherical model, for a radial dipole 1 mm close to the brain surface, the relative difference measure (RDM*) drops from 1.88 to 0.03 when IPA is used. For the realistic model, the inclusion of the CSF layer does not change the field pattern significantly. However, the inclusion of an inhomogeneity changes the field pattern by 25% for a dipole oriented towards the inhomogeneity. The effect of the IPA is also investigated when there is an inhomogeneity in the brain. In addition

  13. A modelling study to inform specification and optimal electrode placement for imaging of neuronal depolarization during visual evoked responses by electrical and magnetic detection impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, O; Horesh, L; Holder, D S

    2009-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has the potential to achieve non-invasive functional imaging of fast neuronal activity in the human brain due to opening of ion channels during neuronal depolarization. Local changes of resistance in the cerebral cortex are about 1%, but the size and location of changes recorded on the scalp are unknown. The purpose of this work was to develop an anatomically realistic finite element model of the adult human head and use it to predict the amplitude and topography of changes on the scalp, and so inform specification for an in vivo measuring system. A detailed anatomically realistic finite element (FE) model of the head was produced from high resolution MRI. Simulations were performed for impedance changes in the visual cortex during evoked activity with recording of scalp potentials by electrodes or magnetic flux density by magnetoencephalography (MEG) in response to current injected with electrodes. The predicted changes were validated by recordings in saline filled tanks and with boundary voltages measured on the human scalp. Peak changes were 1.03 +/- 0.75 microV (0.0039 +/- 0.0034%) and 27 +/- 13 fT (0.2 +/- 0.5%) respectively, which yielded an estimated peak signal-to-noise ratio of about 4 for in vivo averaging over 10 min and 1 mA current injection. The largest scalp changes were over the occipital cortex. This modelling suggests, for the first time, that reproducible changes could be recorded on the scalp in vivo in single channels, although a higher SNR would be desirable for accurate image production. The findings suggest that an in vivo study is warranted in order to determine signal size but methods to improve SNR, such as prolonged averaging or other signal processing may be needed for accurate image production.

  14. Dynamic EEG-informed fMRI modeling of the pain matrix using 20-ms root mean square segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmeyer, Juergen; Mobascher, Arian; Warbrick, Tracy; Musso, Francesco; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Saleh, Andreas; Schnitzler, Alfons; Winterer, Georg

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies on the spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical pain processing using electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), or intracranial recordings point towards a high degree of parallelism, e.g. parallel instead of sequential activation of primary and secondary somatosensory areas or simultaneous activation of somatosensory areas and the mid-cingulate cortex. However, because of the inverse problem, EEG and MEG provide only limited spatial resolution and certainty about the generators of cortical pain-induced electromagnetic activity, especially when multiple sources are simultaneously active. On the other hand, intracranial recordings are invasive and do not provide whole-brain coverage. In this study, we thought to investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of cortical pain processing in 10 healthy subjects using simultaneous EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Voltages of 20 ms segments of the EEG root mean square (a global, largely reference-free measure of event-related EEG activity) in a time window 0-400 ms poststimulus were used to model trial-to-trial fluctuations in the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. EEG-derived regressors explained additional variance in the BOLD signal from 140 ms poststimulus onward. According to this analysis, the contralateral parietal operculum was the first cortical area to become activated upon painful laser stimulation. The activation pattern in BOLD analyses informed by subsequent EEG-time windows suggests largely parallel signal processing in the bilateral operculo-insular and mid-cingulate cortices. In that regard, our data are in line with previous reports. However, the approach presented here is noninvasive and bypasses the inverse problem using only temporal information from the EEG.

  15. Modeling Model Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Onatski, Alexei; Williams, Noah

    2003-01-01

    Recently there has been much interest in studying monetary policy under model uncertainty. We develop methods to analyze different sources of uncertainty in one coherent structure useful for policy decisions. We show how to estimate the size of the uncertainty based on time series data, and incorporate this uncertainty in policy optimization. We propose two different approaches to modeling model uncertainty. The first is model error modeling, which imposes additional structure on the errors o...

  16. Deficits of magnetoencephalography regional power in patients with major depressive disorder:an individual spectral analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤浩

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the discrepancies of individualized frequency and band power between major depressive disorder(MDD)and controls in resting state,and the association of abnormal spectral power with clinical severity of MDD.Methods Whole-head MEG recordings were collected in 19 patients with MDD and 19 non-depressed controls in eye-closed resting state.Individual spectral power of each subject was calculated based on

  17. A magnetoencephalography analysis of resting state power spectrum of inpatients with major depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤浩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the discrepancies of magne-toencephalography(MEG) spectral power between female patients with major depressive disorder and nondepressed subjects in resting state. Methods Whole head MEG recordings were obtained in 12 female patients with major

  18. The Unique Determination of Neuronal Currents in the Brain via Magnetoencephalography

    CERN Document Server

    Fokas, A S; Marinakis, V

    2004-01-01

    The problem of determining the neuronal current inside the brain from measurements of the induced magnetic field outside the head is discussed under the assumption that the space occupied by the brain is approximately spherical. By inverting the Geselowitz equation, the part of the current which can be reconstructed from the measurements is precisely determined. This actually consists of only certain moments of one of the two functions specifying the tangential part of the current. The other function specifying the tangential part of the current as well as the radial part of the current are completely arbitrary. However, it is also shown that with the assumption of energy minimization, the current can be reconstructed uniquely. A numerical implementation of this unique reconstruction is also presented.

  19. Age-Related Sex Differences in Language Lateralization: A Magnetoencephalography Study in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Vickie Y.; MacDonald, Matt J.; Oh, Anna; Hua, Gordon N.; De Nil, Luc F.; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2014-01-01

    It is well supported by behavioral and neuroimaging studies that typical language function is lateralized to the left hemisphere in the adult brain and this laterality is less well defined in children. The behavioral literature suggests there maybe be sex differences in language development, but this has not been examined systematically with…

  20. Direction of magnetoencephalography sources associated with feedback and feedforward contributions in a visual object recognition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlfors, Seppo P; Jones, Stephanie R; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Belliveau, John W; Bar, Moshe

    2015-01-12

    Identifying inter-area communication in terms of the hierarchical organization of functional brain areas is of considerable interest in human neuroimaging. Previous studies have suggested that the direction of magneto- and electroencephalography (MEG, EEG) source currents depend on the layer-specific input patterns into a cortical area. We examined the direction in MEG source currents in a visual object recognition experiment in which there were specific expectations of activation in the fusiform region being driven by either feedforward or feedback inputs. The source for the early non-specific visual evoked response, presumably corresponding to feedforward driven activity, pointed outward, i.e., away from the white matter. In contrast, the source for the later, object-recognition related signals, expected to be driven by feedback inputs, pointed inward, toward the white matter. Associating specific features of the MEG/EEG source waveforms to feedforward and feedback inputs could provide unique information about the activation patterns within hierarchically organized cortical areas.

  1. Tinnitus perception and distress is related to abnormal spontaneous brain activity as measured by magnetoencephalography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying tinnitus perception are not well understood. Surprisingly, there have been no group studies comparing abnormalities in ongoing, spontaneous neuronal activity in individuals with and without tinnitus perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that the spontaneous neuronal activity of a group of individuals with tinnitus (n = 17 is characterised by a marked reduction in alpha (8-12 Hz power together with an enhancement in delta (1.5-4 Hz as compared to a normal hearing control group (n = 16. This pattern was especially pronounced for temporal regions. Moreover, correlations with tinnitus-related distress revealed strong associations with this abnormal spontaneous activity pattern, particularly in right temporal and left frontal areas. Overall, effects were stronger for the alpha than for the delta frequency band. A data stream of 5 min, recorded with a whole-head neuromagnetometer under a resting condition, was sufficient to extract the marked differences. CONCLUSIONS: Despite some limitations, there are arguments that the regional pattern of abnormal spontaneous activity we found could reflect a tinnitus-related cortical network. This finding, which suggests that a neurofeedback approach could reduce the adverse effects of this disturbing condition, could have important implications for the treatment of tinnitus.

  2. 脑磁图及其应用%MAGNETOENCEPHALOGRAPHY AND IT'S APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯毅刚; 黄庆

    2002-01-01

      人脑上千亿神经细胞的电磁活动联系着人体内最复杂的信息处理系统.这些微弱的电磁信号有波形、幅度、能量、频率、相位、频谱等特性.获取和研究这些电磁信息,破译其中的奥秘,可了解大脑的功能、疾病的机理和生命的本质.……

  3. Steady-state visual-evoked response to upright and inverted geometrical faces: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruhara, Aki; Inui, Koji; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2014-03-01

    The face is one of the most important visual stimuli in human life, and inverted faces are known to elicit different brain responses than upright faces. This study analyzed steady-state visual-evoked magnetic fields (SSVEFs) in eleven healthy participants when they viewed upright and inverted geometrical faces presented at 6Hz. Steady-state visual-evoked responses are useful measurements and have the advantages of robustness and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Spectrum analysis revealed clear responses to both upright and inverted faces at the fundamental stimulation frequency (6 Hz) and harmonics, i.e. SSVEFs. No significant difference was observed in the SSVEF amplitude at 6 Hz between upright and inverted faces, which was different from the transient visual-evoked response, N170. On the other hand, SSVEFs were delayed with the inverted face in the right temporal area, which was similar to N170 and the results of previous steady-state visual-evoked potentials studies. These results suggest that different mechanisms underlie the larger amplitude and delayed latency observed with face inversion, though further studies are needed to fully elucidate these mechanisms. Our study revealed that SSVEFs, which have practical advantages for measurements, could provide novel findings in human face processing.

  4. Development of Theory of Mind Stimuli in Magnetoencephalography for Nursing Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwon Park

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the development of animation stimuli for theory of mind (ToM in magnetoencepalography (MEG. We will discuss apparatus for presenting animation stimuli and a technical problem like an eye movement signal generated from following triangles in the animations, and its rejection using independent component analysis (ICA. With the ToM animations and the apparatus, we conducted MEG measurements for 8 normal controls and 6 schizophrenic patients. We present a preliminary assessment result for the developed animation stimuli as a tool for ToM test, which has been obtained by scoring in the followingup interview after the MEG measurement.

  5. Look back to leap forward: The emerging new role of magnetoencephalography (MEG) in nonlesional epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagić, Anto

    2016-01-01

    This review considers accumulating evidence for a new role of MEG/MSI in increasing the diagnostic yield of supposedly negative MRIs, and suggests changes in the use of MEG/MSI in presurgical epilepsy evaluations. Specific alterations in practice protocols for both the MEG practitioner (i.e. physician magnetoencephalographer) and MEG user (i.e. referring physician) are proposed that should further enhance the overall value of MEG/MSI. Although advances in MEG analysis methods will likely become increasingly assisted by computers, interpretive competency and prudent clinical judgment remain irreplaceable.

  6. Treatment-related changes in functional connectivity in brain tumor patients : a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douw, Linda; Baayen, Hans; Bosma, Ingeborg; Klein, Martin; Vandertop, Peter; Heimans, Jan; Stam, Kees; de Munck, Jan; Reijneveld, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Widespread disturbances in resting state functional connectivity between remote brain areas have been demonstrated in patients with brain tumors. Functional connectivity has been associated with neurocognitive deficits in these patients. Thus far, it is unknown how (surgical) treatment affects funct

  7. Functional connectivity changes detected with magnetoencephalography after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Stavros I; Zouridakis, George; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may affect normal cognition and behavior by disrupting the functional connectivity networks that mediate efficient communication among brain regions. In this study, we analyzed brain connectivity profiles from resting state Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings obtained from 31 mTBI patients and 55 normal controls. We used phase-locking value estimates to compute functional connectivity graphs to quantify frequency-specific couplings between sensors at various frequency bands. Overall, normal controls showed a dense network of strong local connections and a limited number of long-range connections that accounted for approximately 20% of all connections, whereas mTBI patients showed networks characterized by weak local connections and strong long-range connections that accounted for more than 60% of all connections. Comparison of the two distinct general patterns at different frequencies using a tensor representation for the connectivity graphs and tensor subspace analysis for optimal feature extraction showed that mTBI patients could be separated from normal controls with 100% classification accuracy in the alpha band. These encouraging findings support the hypothesis that MEG-based functional connectivity patterns may be used as biomarkers that can provide more accurate diagnoses, help guide treatment, and monitor effectiveness of intervention in mTBI.

  8. Temporal processing of audiovisual stimuli is enhanced in musicians: evidence from magnetoencephalography (MEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Lu

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that the structural and functional differences between professional musicians and non-musicians are not only found within a single modality, but also with regard to multisensory integration. In this study we have combined psychophysical with neurophysiological measurements investigating the processing of non-musical, synchronous or various levels of asynchronous audiovisual events. We hypothesize that long-term multisensory experience alters temporal audiovisual processing already at a non-musical stage. Behaviorally, musicians scored significantly better than non-musicians in judging whether the auditory and visual stimuli were synchronous or asynchronous. At the neural level, the statistical analysis for the audiovisual asynchronous response revealed three clusters of activations including the ACC and the SFG and two bilaterally located activations in IFG and STG in both groups. Musicians, in comparison to the non-musicians, responded to synchronous audiovisual events with enhanced neuronal activity in a broad left posterior temporal region that covers the STG, the insula and the Postcentral Gyrus. Musicians also showed significantly greater activation in the left Cerebellum, when confronted with an audiovisual asynchrony. Taken together, our MEG results form a strong indication that long-term musical training alters the basic audiovisual temporal processing already in an early stage (direct after the auditory N1 wave, while the psychophysical results indicate that musical training may also provide behavioral benefits in the accuracy of the estimates regarding the timing of audiovisual events.

  9. Temporal processing of audiovisual stimuli is enhanced in musicians: evidence from magnetoencephalography (MEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Herholz, Sibylle C; Kuchenbuch, Anja; Pantev, Christo

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that the structural and functional differences between professional musicians and non-musicians are not only found within a single modality, but also with regard to multisensory integration. In this study we have combined psychophysical with neurophysiological measurements investigating the processing of non-musical, synchronous or various levels of asynchronous audiovisual events. We hypothesize that long-term multisensory experience alters temporal audiovisual processing already at a non-musical stage. Behaviorally, musicians scored significantly better than non-musicians in judging whether the auditory and visual stimuli were synchronous or asynchronous. At the neural level, the statistical analysis for the audiovisual asynchronous response revealed three clusters of activations including the ACC and the SFG and two bilaterally located activations in IFG and STG in both groups. Musicians, in comparison to the non-musicians, responded to synchronous audiovisual events with enhanced neuronal activity in a broad left posterior temporal region that covers the STG, the insula and the Postcentral Gyrus. Musicians also showed significantly greater activation in the left Cerebellum, when confronted with an audiovisual asynchrony. Taken together, our MEG results form a strong indication that long-term musical training alters the basic audiovisual temporal processing already in an early stage (direct after the auditory N1 wave), while the psychophysical results indicate that musical training may also provide behavioral benefits in the accuracy of the estimates regarding the timing of audiovisual events.

  10. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J.; Dijk, van B.; Postma, T.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain activ

  11. Primary and secondary somatosensory cortex responses to anticipation and pain: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Siân F; Hobson, Anthony R; Hall, Stephen D; Aziz, Qasim; Furlong, Paul L

    2011-03-01

    Several brain regions, including the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices (SI and SII, respectively), are functionally active during the pain experience. Both of these regions are thought to be involved in the sensory-discriminative processing of pain and recent evidence suggests that SI in particular may also be involved in more affective processing. In this study we used MEG to investigate the hypothesis that frequency-specific oscillatory activity may be differentially associated with the sensory and affective components of pain. In eight healthy participants (four male), MEG was recorded during a visceral pain experiment comprising baseline, anticipation, pain and post-pain phases. Pain was delivered via intraluminal oesophageal balloon distension (four stimuli at 1 Hz). Significant bilateral but asymmetrical changes in neural activity occurred in the β-band within SI and SII. In SI, a continuous increase in neural activity occurred during the anticipation phase (20-30 Hz), which continued during the pain phase but at a lower frequency (10-15 Hz). In SII, oscillatory changes only occurred during the pain phase, predominantly in the 20-30 Hz β band, and were coincident with the stimulus. These data provide novel evidence of functional diversity within SI, indicating a role in attentional and sensory aspects of pain processing. In SII, oscillatory changes were predominantly stimulus-related, indicating a role in encoding the characteristics of the stimulus. We therefore provide objective evidence of functional heterogeneity within SI and functional segregation between SI and SII, and suggest that the temporal and frequency dynamics within cortical regions may offer valuable insights into pain processing.

  12. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity : a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, I; Stam, C J; Douw, L; Bartolomei, F; Heimans, J J; van Dijk, B W; Postma, T J; Klein, M; Reijneveld, J C

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain activ

  13. Business models as models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Baden-Fuller; M.S. Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on research undertaken in the history and philosophy of science, with particular reference to the extensive literature which discusses the use of models in biology and economics, we explore the question ‘Are Business Models useful?’ We point out that they act as various forms of model: to pr

  14. Business Models as Models

    OpenAIRE

    Baden-Fuller, C.; Morgan, M S

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on research undertaken in the history and philosophy of science, with particular reference to the extensive literature which discusses the use of models in biology and economics, we explore the question ‘Are Business Models useful?’ We point out that they act as various forms of model: to provide means to describe and classify businesses; to operate as sites for scientific investigation; and to act as recipes for creative managers. We argue that studying business models as models is r...

  15. Model Transformations? Transformation Models!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bézivin, J.; Büttner, F.; Gogolla, M.; Jouault, F.; Kurtev, I.; Lindow, A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of the current work on model transformations seems essentially operational and executable in nature. Executable descriptions are necessary from the point of view of implementation. But from a conceptual point of view, transformations can also be viewed as descriptive models by stating only the

  16. Modelling SDL, Modelling Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Piefel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Today's software systems are too complex to implement them and model them using only one language. As a result, modern software engineering uses different languages for different levels of abstraction and different system aspects. Thus to handle an increasing number of related or integrated languages is the most challenging task in the development of tools. We use object oriented metamodelling to describe languages. Object orientation allows us to derive abstract reusable concept definitions (concept classes from existing languages. This language definition technique concentrates on semantic abstractions rather than syntactical peculiarities. We present a set of common concept classes that describe structure, behaviour, and data aspects of high-level modelling languages. Our models contain syntax modelling using the OMG MOF as well as static semantic constraints written in OMG OCL. We derive metamodels for subsets of SDL and UML from these common concepts, and we show for parts of these languages that they can be modelled and related to each other through the same abstract concepts.

  17. Actant Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Helle

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a functional modelling method called Actant Modelling rooted in linguistics and semiotics. Actant modelling can be integrated with Multilevel Flow Modelling (MFM) in order to give an interpretation of actants.......This paper presents a functional modelling method called Actant Modelling rooted in linguistics and semiotics. Actant modelling can be integrated with Multilevel Flow Modelling (MFM) in order to give an interpretation of actants....

  18. Modelling the models

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    By analysing the production of mesons in the forward region of LHC proton-proton collisions, the LHCf collaboration has provided key information needed to calibrate extremely high-energy cosmic ray models.   Average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of rapidity loss ∆y. Black dots represent LHCf data and the red diamonds represent SPS experiment UA7 results. The predictions of hadronic interaction models are shown by open boxes (sibyll 2.1), open circles (qgsjet II-03) and open triangles (epos 1.99). Among these models, epos 1.99 shows the best overall agreement with the LHCf data. LHCf is dedicated to the measurement of neutral particles emitted at extremely small angles in the very forward region of LHC collisions. Two imaging calorimeters – Arm1 and Arm2 – take data 140 m either side of the ATLAS interaction point. “The physics goal of this type of analysis is to provide data for calibrating the hadron interaction models – the well-known &...

  19. Harnessing Fluorine-Sulfur Contacts and Multipolar Interactions for the Design of p53 Mutant Y220C Rescue Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias R; Jones, Rhiannon N; Baud, Matthias G J; Wilcken, Rainer; Boeckler, Frank M; Fersht, Alan R; Joerger, Andreas C; Spencer, John

    2016-08-19

    Many oncogenic mutants of the tumor suppressor p53 are conformationally unstable, including the frequently occurring Y220C mutant. We have previously developed several small-molecule stabilizers of this mutant. One of these molecules, PhiKan083, 1-(9-ethyl-9H-carbazole-3-yl)-N-methylmethanamine, binds to a mutation-induced surface crevice with a KD = 150 μM, thereby increasing the melting temperature of the protein and slowing its rate of aggregation. Incorporation of fluorine atoms into small molecule ligands can substantially improve binding affinity to their protein targets. We have, therefore, harnessed fluorine-protein interactions to improve the affinity of this ligand. Step-wise introduction of fluorines at the carbazole ethyl anchor, which is deeply buried within the binding site in the Y220C-PhiKan083 complex, led to a 5-fold increase in affinity for a 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl anchor (ligand efficiency of 0.3 kcal mol(-1) atom(-1)). High-resolution crystal structures of the Y220C-ligand complexes combined with quantum chemical calculations revealed favorable interactions of the fluorines with protein backbone carbonyl groups (Leu145 and Trp146) and the sulfur of Cys220 at the mutation site. Affinity gains were, however, only achieved upon trifluorination, despite favorable interactions of the mono- and difluorinated anchors with the binding pocket, indicating a trade-off between energetically favorable protein-fluorine interactions and increased desolvation penalties. Taken together, the optimized carbazole scaffold provides a promising starting point for the development of high-affinity ligands to reactivate the tumor suppressor function of the p53 mutant Y220C in cancer cells. PMID:27267810

  20. Algorithmic complexity. A new approach of non-linear algorithms for the analysis of atrial signals from multipolar basket catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitschner, H F; Berkowitsch, A

    2001-01-01

    Symbolic dynamics as a non linear method and computation of the normalized algorithmic complexity (C alpha) was applied to basket-catheter mapping of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the right human atrium. The resulting different degrees of organisation of AF have been compared to conventional classification of Wells. Short time temporal and spatial distribution of the C alpha during AF and effects of propafenone on this distribution have been investigated in 30 patients. C alpha was calculated for a moving window. Generated C alpha was analyzed within 10 minutes before and after administration of propafenone. The inter-regional C alpha distribution was statistically analyzed. Inter-regional C alpha differences were found in all patients (p complexity areas according to individual patterns. A significant C alpha increase in cranio-caudal direction was confirmed inter-individually (p complexity.

  1. Preferred Ice Crystal Orientation Fabric Measurements within the Greenland Ice Sheet Using Multi-Polarization Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Gonzalez, J. A.; JiLu, L.; Leuschen, C.; Gogineni, P.; Van der Veen, C. J.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Drews, R.; Harish, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Discharge of ice from the Greenland Ice Sheet to the ocean has increased significantly over the last 25 years due to the acceleration of important outlet glaciers. It was reported that the Greenland Ice Sheet contributed about 2.5 m out of about 6 m of sea-level rise during the Eemian interglacial period. The temperatures during Eemian were reported to be about 8o×4o C higher than the mean of the past millennium. Laboratory measurements have shown that glacial ice, characterized by preferred crystal orientation fabric (COF), is three times more deformable than ice with randomly oriented crystalline structures. Layers characterized by preferred ice COF can influence the flow behavior of a glacier or ice sheet. However, COF measurements are typically obtained from ice cores, and thus are very spatially limited and mostly constrained to areas with little ice flow. A more efficient technique to map the extent of ice fabric over larger regions of ice sheets is needed to better understand the effects on large scale ice flow processes. Radar measurements are capable of discriminating between reflections caused by changes in density, electrical permittivity and COF by exploiting the anisotropic and birefringent properties of ice crystals. For this investigation two radar datasets were collected during the survey of the Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling Site (77.45°N 51.06°W) in August 2008, using a ground-based and chirped-pulse Multi-Channel Radar Depth Sounder (MCRDS) developed by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS). The radar used two transmit and eight receive antennas at the center frequency of 150 MHz with a bandwidth of 30 MHz. The first data set consisted of polarimatric measurements acquired in a circular pattern (radius: 35 m) with two co-polarized antenna orientations (one transmitter and four receivers oriented with 90° offsets in the directions of the incident H-Field and E-Field, respectively). Analysis of the circular data shows a periodic power variation with four distinct extinction patterns occurring at 90 degree intervals starting at approximately 700 m depth. Furthermore a 20 degree phase change is observed between the E- and H-field data. Both observations suggest that approximately 72% of the 2542m ice column exhibits birefringent anisotropy caused by preferred ice crystal orientation. The second dataset was acquired in a grid pattern consisting of twenty 10-Km 2D lines (NW to SE) spaced at 0.5-Km and three 10-Km lines (NE to SW) spaced at 2.5-Km. Both transmit and eight receive antenna were oriented parallel to the vehicle track, resulting in E-Field co-polarized data. We will determine the dominant COF relative to the ice divide for a 100 square Km region around the NEEM camp using the results from both datasets. The results of this investigation will be compared to the NEEM ice core observations to determine the accuracy of the analysis. In this investigation we will provide a brief overview of the system and experiments and present the results of data analysis.

  2. Modelling Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the practicalities of building, testing, deploying and maintaining models. It gives specific advice for each phase of the modelling cycle. To do this, a modelling framework is introduced which covers: problem and model definition; model conceptualization; model data...... requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...... years of experience is providing in directing the reader in their activities.Traps and pitfalls are discussed and strategies also given to improve model development towards “fit-for-purpose” models. The emphasis in this chapter is the adoption and exercise of a modelling methodology that has proven very...

  3. Model misinterpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    2012-01-01

    Models of myriad forms are rapidly becoming central to biology. This ranges from statistical models that are fundamental to the interpretation of experimental results to ODE models that attempt to describe the results in a mechanistic format. Models will be more and more essential to biologists but this growing importance requires all model users to become more sophisticated about what is in a model and how that limits the usability of the model. This review attempts to relay the potential pi...

  4. Promoting Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  5. 城镇化进程中老年照护服务社会支持体系实践模式探索%Study on the Practice Model of Social Supporting System on Aged Care Service in the Process of Urbanization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓华

    2014-01-01

    我国城镇化的发展与老龄社会的高龄化及高龄空巢家庭的增多几乎是同步的。与此相适应,建立以家庭成员角色亲情化、照护服务专业化、社区依托社会化、政府支持产业化为特色的老年照护社会支持体系实践模式。该模式赋予城镇化进程中家庭养老服务多角色、社区养老服务资源多渠道、政府支持与社会组织经营多样化、地区产业发展多极化、社区孝道文化传承化的格局。%The development of urbanization is accompanied by aging population and the increase of empty-nest families. This paper argues that a practice model of social supporting system on aged care service should be established. The model is characterized by emotional attachment within family members, professional care service, socialized community service and the industrialization of government support. It can bring positive effects including the multi-role family supporting service, multi-channel community service resource, diversiifcation of government support and social organization management, multi-polarity regional industrial development, as well as the heritage of iflial piety culture.

  6. High-order exact solutions for pseudo-plane ideal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Che

    2016-08-01

    A steady pseudo-plane ideal flow (PIF) model is derived from the 3D Euler equations under Boussinesq approximation. The model is solved analytically to yield high-degree polynomial exact solutions. Unlike quadratic flows, the cubic and quartic solutions display reduced geometry in the form of straightline jet, circular vortex, and multipolar strain field. The high-order circular-vortex solutions are vertically aligned and even the non-aligned multipolar strain-field solutions display vertical concentricity. Such geometry reduction is explained by an analytical theorem stating that only straightline jet and circular vortex have functional solutions to the PIF model.

  7. Model Warehouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This paper puts forward a new conception:model warehouse,analyzes the reason why model warehouse appears and introduces the characteristics and architecture of model warehouse.Last,this paper points out that model warehouse is an important part of WebGIS.

  8. Model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, CC

    2012-01-01

    Model theory deals with a branch of mathematical logic showing connections between a formal language and its interpretations or models. This is the first and most successful textbook in logical model theory. Extensively updated and corrected in 1990 to accommodate developments in model theoretic methods - including classification theory and nonstandard analysis - the third edition added entirely new sections, exercises, and references. Each chapter introduces an individual method and discusses specific applications. Basic methods of constructing models include constants, elementary chains, Sko

  9. Model error

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Simons

    1997-01-01

    Modern finance would not have been possible without models. Increasingly complex quantitative models drive financial innovation and the growth of derivatives markets. Models are necessary to value financial instruments and to measure the risks of individual positions and portfolios. Yet when used inappropriately, the models themselves can become an important source of risk. Recently, several well-publicized instances occurred of institutions suffering significant losses attributed to model er...

  10. Model cities

    OpenAIRE

    M Batty

    2007-01-01

    The term ?model? is now central to our thinking about how weunderstand and design cities. We suggest a variety of ways inwhich we use ?models?, linking these ideas to Abercrombie?sexposition of Town and Country Planning which represented thestate of the art fifty years ago. Here we focus on using models asphysical representations of the city, tracing the development ofsymbolic models where the focus is on simulating how functiongenerates form, to iconic models where the focus is on representi...

  11. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics. We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  12. Event Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss conceptual event modeling within a context of information modeling. Traditionally, information modeling has been concerned with the modeling of a universe of discourse in terms of information structures. However, most interesting universes of discourse...... are dynamic and we present a modeling approach that can be used to model such dynamics.We characterize events as both information objects and change agents (Bækgaard 1997). When viewed as information objects events are phenomena that can be observed and described. For example, borrow events in a library can...

  13. Modelling Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bjørn; Vesterager, Johan

    This report provides an overview of the existing models of global manufacturing, describes the required modelling views and associated methods and identifies tools, which can provide support for this modelling activity.The model adopted for global manufacturing is that of an extended enterprise....... One or more units from beyond the network may complement the extended enterprise. The common reference model for this extended enterprise will utilise GERAM (Generalised Enterprise Reference Architecture and Methodology) to provide an architectural framework for the modelling carried out within...

  14. Geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contributions to the workshop 'Geochemical modeling' from 19 to 20 September 1990 at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. The report contains the programme and a selection of the lectures held at the workshop 'Geochemical modeling'. (BBR)

  15. Battery Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the capacity of the employed batteries. The battery lifetime determines how long one can use a device. Battery modeling can help to predict, and possibly extend this lifetime. Many different battery models have been developed over the years. However, with these models one can only compute lifetimes for specific discharge profiles, and not for workloads in general. In this paper, we give an overview of the different battery models that are availabl...

  16. Computable models

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Computational models can be found everywhere in present day science and engineering. In providing a logical framework and foundation for the specification and design of specification languages, Raymond Turner uses this framework to introduce and study computable models. In doing so he presents the first systematic attempt to provide computational models with a logical foundation. Computable models have wide-ranging applications from programming language semantics and specification languages, through to knowledge representation languages and formalism for natural language semantics. They are al

  17. Magnetosphere models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the most recent magnetospheric models are reviewed. After a short overview of the particle environment, a synthetic survey of the problem is given. For each feature of magnetospheric modelling (boundary, current sheet, ring-current) the approaches used by different authors are described. In the second part a description is given of the magnetospheric models, divided into four groups. In the last part, the different uses of magnetospheric models are illustrated by means of examples

  18. Model Building

    OpenAIRE

    Frampton, Paul H.

    1997-01-01

    In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly...

  19. Constitutive Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Piccolo, Chiara; Heitzig, Martina;

    2011-01-01

    This chapter presents various types of constitutive models and their applications. There are 3 aspects dealt with in this chapter, namely: creation and solution of property models, the application of parameter estimation and finally application examples of constitutive models. A systematic...

  20. Phoenix model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix (formerly referred to as the Second Generation Model or SGM) is a global general equilibrium model designed to analyze energy-economy-climate related questions and policy implications in the medium- to long-term. This model disaggregates the global economy into 26 industr...

  1. Interface models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Anders P.; Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    This paper proposes a model for specifying interfaces between concurrently executing modules of a computing system. The model does not prescribe a particular type of communication protocol and is aimed at describing interfaces between both software and hardware modules or a combination of the two....... The model describes both functional and timing properties of an interface...

  2. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sclütter, Flemming; Frigaard, Peter; Liu, Zhou

    This report presents the model test results on wave run-up on the Zeebrugge breakwater under the simulated prototype storms. The model test was performed in January 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The detailed description of the model is given...

  3. Hydrological models are mediating models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, L. V.; Karssenberg, D.

    2013-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of models in hydrological research and decision-making processes, only few accounts of the nature and function of models exist in hydrology. Earlier considerations have traditionally been conducted while making a clear distinction between physically-based and conceptual models. A new philosophical account, primarily based on the fields of physics and economics, transcends classes of models and scientific disciplines by considering models as "mediators" between theory and observations. The core of this approach lies in identifying models as (1) being only partially dependent on theory and observations, (2) integrating non-deductive elements in their construction, and (3) carrying the role of instruments of scientific enquiry about both theory and the world. The applicability of this approach to hydrology is evaluated in the present article. Three widely used hydrological models, each showing a different degree of apparent physicality, are confronted to the main characteristics of the "mediating models" concept. We argue that irrespective of their kind, hydrological models depend on both theory and observations, rather than merely on one of these two domains. Their construction is additionally involving a large number of miscellaneous, external ingredients, such as past experiences, model objectives, knowledge and preferences of the modeller, as well as hardware and software resources. We show that hydrological models convey the role of instruments in scientific practice by mediating between theory and the world. It results from these considerations that the traditional distinction between physically-based and conceptual models is necessarily too simplistic and refers at best to the stage at which theory and observations are steering model construction. The large variety of ingredients involved in model construction would deserve closer attention, for being rarely explicitly presented in peer-reviewed literature. We believe that devoting

  4. Model Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Selén, Yngve

    2004-01-01

    Before using a parametric model one has to be sure that it offers a reasonable description of the system to be modeled. If a bad model structure is employed, the obtained model will also be bad, no matter how good is the parameter estimation method. There exist many possible ways of validating candidate models. This thesis focuses on one of the most common ways, i.e., the use of information criteria. First, some common information criteria are presented, and in the later chapters, various ext...

  5. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  6. Mathematical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten

    2004-01-01

    Developing competences for setting up, analysing and criticising mathematical models are normally seen as relevant only from and above upper secondary level. The general belief among teachers is that modelling activities presuppose conceptual understanding of the mathematics involved. Mathematical...... modelling, however, can be seen as a practice of teaching that place the relation between real life and mathematics into the centre of teaching and learning mathematics, and this is relevant at all levels. Modelling activities may motivate the learning process and help the learner to establish cognitive...... framework, which has been used for designing modelling courses, analysing students’ modelling activities, identifying learning obstacles in the modelling process and to guide the teachers interaction with the students during their work. This will be illustrated with an example from a developmental project...

  7. Cadastral Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Erik

    2005-01-01

    to the modeling of an industrial sector, as it aims at rendering the basic concepts that relate to the domain of real estate and the pertinent human activities. The palpable objects are pieces of land and buildings, documents, data stores and archives, as well as persons in their diverse roles as owners, holders...... to land. The paper advances the position that cadastral modeling has to include not only the physical objects, agents, and information sets of the domain, but also the objectives or requirements of cadastral systems.......Modeling is a term that refers to a variety of efforts, including data and process modeling. The domain to be modeled may be a department, an organization, or even an industrial sector. E-business presupposes the modeling of an industrial sector, a substantial task. Cadastral modeling compares...

  8. ICRF modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture provides a survey of the methods used to model fast magnetosonic wave coupling, propagation, and absorption in tokamaks. The validity and limitations of three distinct types of modelling codes, which will be contrasted, include discrete models which utilize ray tracing techniques, approximate continuous field models based on a parabolic approximation of the wave equation, and full field models derived using finite difference techniques. Inclusion of mode conversion effects in these models and modification of the minority distribution function will also be discussed. The lecture will conclude with a presentation of time-dependent global transport simulations of ICRF-heated tokamak discharges obtained in conjunction with the ICRF modelling codes. 52 refs., 15 figs

  9. Model choice versus model criticism

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Christian P.; Mengersen, Kerrie; Chen, Carla

    2009-01-01

    The new perspectives on ABC and Bayesian model criticisms presented in Ratmann et al.(2009) are challenging standard approaches to Bayesian model choice. We discuss here some issues arising from the authors' approach, including prior influence, model assessment and criticism, and the meaning of error in ABC.

  10. Mathematical modelling

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a thorough introduction to the challenge of applying mathematics in real-world scenarios. Modelling tasks rarely involve well-defined categories, and they often require multidisciplinary input from mathematics, physics, computer sciences, or engineering. In keeping with this spirit of modelling, the book includes a wealth of cross-references between the chapters and frequently points to the real-world context. The book combines classical approaches to modelling with novel areas such as soft computing methods, inverse problems, and model uncertainty. Attention is also paid to the interaction between models, data and the use of mathematical software. The reader will find a broad selection of theoretical tools for practicing industrial mathematics, including the analysis of continuum models, probabilistic and discrete phenomena, and asymptotic and sensitivity analysis.

  11. Turbulence modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-ε two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the 'standard' (Rij-ε) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called 'feasible'. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author)

  12. Logistic models

    OpenAIRE

    Sochůrková, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the compilation of an inventory management methods, describe their principles and assess the appropriateness of their use. In the introductory part of the work, "The nature and importance of inventory management" are briefly described the inventory management, the main objectives of inventory control models, the basic division of inventory species and costs of supply. The following chapter "Overview of inventory control models" includes a breakdown of models from dif...

  13. STEREOMETRIC MODELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Grimaldi, P.

    2012-01-01

    These mandatory guidelines are provided for preparation of papers accepted for publication in the series of Volumes of The The stereometric modelling means modelling achieved with : – the use of a pair of virtual cameras, with parallel axes and positioned at a mutual distance average of 1/10 of the distance camera-object (in practice the realization and use of a stereometric camera in the modeling program); – the shot visualization in two distinct windows &nda...

  14. Spherical models

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Magnus J

    2012-01-01

    Well-illustrated, practical approach to creating star-faced spherical forms that can serve as basic structures for geodesic domes. Complete instructions for making models from circular bands of paper with just a ruler and compass. Discusses tessellation, or tiling, and how to make spherical models of the semiregular solids and concludes with a discussion of the relationship of polyhedra to geodesic domes and directions for building models of domes. "". . . very pleasant reading."" - Science. 1979 edition.

  15. Why Model?

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Joshua M.

    2008-01-01

    This address treats some enduring misconceptions about modeling. One of these is that the goal is always prediction. The lecture distinguishes between explanation and prediction as modeling goals, and offers sixteen reasons other than prediction to build a model. It also challenges the common assumption that scientific theories arise from and 'summarize' data, when often, theories precede and guide data collection; without theory, in other words, it is not clear what data to collect. Among ot...

  16. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Wilbert A.; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user’s intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI’s data analytics of a subject’s MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  17. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  18. Natural Minor Scale is More Natural to the Brain than Harmonic Minor Scale as Revealed by Magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hiromitsu; Nemoto, Iku; Oda, Shoichiro

    Minor mode is known to elicit stronger emotional responses than major mode in the brain. The present work focused on the minor scales and natural and harmonic minor scales were compared in automatic brain responses in an oddball paradigm. The standard stimulus was either the natural or harmonic minor scale, and a deviant stimulus lacked one scale tone of the corresponding complete minor scale. The brain responded to omission of every tone but omission of the tone B flat in the natural minor experiment elicited larger response than that of the other tones. In particular, the response was significantly larger than that to omission of B in the harmonic minor experiment. This result suggested that the brain felt the natural minor scale to be actually more natural than the harmonic minor scale.

  19. 脑磁图在神经外科中的应用%Application of magnetoencephalography in neurosurgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龄; 朱丹; 张志强; 王焕明

    2002-01-01

    目的探讨脑磁图(MEG)在癫痫外科中的定位价值.方法本组26例癫痫患者,男18例,女8例,术前均行脑电图(EEG)检查和影像学检查,同时做了脑磁图(MEG)检查.所有患者手术均在MEG指导下进行,术中加用皮层脑电图(ECoG)监测.结果 26例患者均能通过MEG进行术前致痫灶与功能定位,其阳性率明显高于EEG和影像学检查.术后复查EEG,22例患者较好.短期随访1~3个月,25例患者癫痫发作完全消失.结论 MEG是一项术前致痫灶定位和功能保护的有效检查方法.

  20. Basic Concept and Clinical Application of Magnetoencephalography%脑磁图的原理和临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱明旺; 戴建平

    2001-01-01

    脑磁图是一种无创的脑功能检查技术,通过实时测量脑神经元功能活动产生的微弱电磁改变显示功能区的位置.脑磁图可用于神经外科手术前的脑功能定位诊断,评价脑部疾患的引起的功能改变,癫痫灶的精确定位等.脑磁图还可用于一系列的脑神经科学,精神医学和心理学方面的研究.本文就脑磁图系统的基本工作原理和临床应用现状进行了简介.

  1. Reconstructing coherent networks from electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography with reduced contamination from volume conduction or magnetic field spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Drakesmith

    Full Text Available Volume conduction (VC and magnetic field spread (MFS induce spurious correlations between EEG/MEG sensors, such that the estimation of functional networks from scalp recordings is inaccurate. Imaginary coherency [1] reduces VC/MFS artefacts between sensors by assuming that instantaneous interactions are caused predominantly by VC/MFS and do not contribute to the imaginary part of the cross-spectral densities (CSDs. We propose an adaptation of the dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS [2] - a method for reconstructing the CSDs between sources, and subsequently inferring functional connectivity based on coherences between those sources. Firstly, we reformulate the principle of imaginary coherency by performing an eigenvector decomposition of the imaginary part of the CSD to estimate the power that only contributes to the non-zero phase-lagged (NZPL interactions. Secondly, we construct an NZPL-optimised spatial filter with two a priori assumptions: (1 that only NZPL interactions exist at the source level and (2 the NZPL CSD at the sensor level is a good approximation of the projected source NZPL CSDs. We compare the performance of the NZPL method to the standard method by reconstructing a coherent network from simulated EEG/MEG recordings. We demonstrate that, as long as there are phase differences between the sources, the NZPL method reliably detects the underlying networks from EEG and MEG. We show that the method is also robust to very small phase lags, noise from phase jitter, and is less sensitive to regularisation parameters. The method is applied to a human dataset to infer parts of a coherent network underpinning face recognition.

  2. Effects of Phonological Contrast on Auditory Word Discrimination in Children with and without Reading Disability: A Magnetoencephalography (MEG) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Daniel T.; Ahlfors, Seppo P.; Mody, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Poor readers perform worse than their normal reading peers on a variety of speech perception tasks, which may be linked to their phonological processing abilities. The purpose of the study was to compare the brain activation patterns of normal and impaired readers on speech perception to better understand the phonological basis in reading…

  3. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbert A. McClay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user’s intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI’s data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject’s MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse.

  4. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-09-30

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse.

  5. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Frigaard, Peter

    This report presents the model on wave run-up and run-down on the Zeebrugge breakwater under short-crested oblique wave attacks. The model test was performed in March-April 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University.......This report presents the model on wave run-up and run-down on the Zeebrugge breakwater under short-crested oblique wave attacks. The model test was performed in March-April 2000 at the Hydraulics & Coastal Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University....

  6. Ventilation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  7. Ventilation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to

  8. Modeling Documents with Event Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhui Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently deep learning has made great breakthroughs in visual and speech processing, mainly because it draws lessons from the hierarchical mode that brain deals with images and speech. In the field of NLP, a topic model is one of the important ways for modeling documents. Topic models are built on a generative model that clearly does not match the way humans write. In this paper, we propose Event Model, which is unsupervised and based on the language processing mechanism of neurolinguistics, to model documents. In Event Model, documents are descriptions of concrete or abstract events seen, heard, or sensed by people and words are objects in the events. Event Model has two stages: word learning and dimensionality reduction. Word learning is to learn semantics of words based on deep learning. Dimensionality reduction is the process that representing a document as a low dimensional vector by a linear mode that is completely different from topic models. Event Model achieves state-of-the-art results on document retrieval tasks.

  9. Education models

    OpenAIRE

    Poortman, Sybilla; Sloep, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Educational models describes a case study on a complex learning object. Possibilities are investigated for using this learning object, which is based on a particular educational model, outside of its original context. Furthermore, this study provides advice that might lead to an increase in teachers’ motivation for using and sharing learning objects. This document is aimed at teachers and educational designers.

  10. Neurofuzzy Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    A neural network can approximate a function, but it is impossible to interpret the result in terms of natural language. The fusion of neural networks and fuzzy logic in neurofuzzy models provide learning as well as readability. Control engineers find this useful, because the models can...

  11. Modeling Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil Seok; Oh, Sung Jin

    2013-01-01

    Modeling in science has been studied by education researchers for decades and is now being applied broadly in school. It is among the scientific practices featured in the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS") (Achieve Inc. 2013). This article describes modeling activities in an extracurricular science club in a high…

  12. Didactical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Tomas; Hansen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Didactical Modelling as a research methodology in mathematics education. We compare the methodology with other approaches and argue that Didactical Modelling has its own specificity. We discuss the methodological “why” and explain why we find it useful...

  13. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  14. Martingale Model

    OpenAIRE

    Giandomenico, Rossano

    2006-01-01

    The model determines a stochastic continuous process as continuous limit of a stochastic discrete process so to show that the stochastic continuous process converges to the stochastic discrete process such that we can integrate it. Furthermore, the model determines the expected volatility and the expected mean so to show that the volatility and the mean are increasing function of the time.

  15. Scribe modeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løssing, Ulrik

    1986-01-01

    Ulrik Løssing har redigeret, illustreret og oversat: "Scribe Modeller System, Sheffield, november 1985" af forfatterne: Cedric Green, David Cooper og John Wells.......Ulrik Løssing har redigeret, illustreret og oversat: "Scribe Modeller System, Sheffield, november 1985" af forfatterne: Cedric Green, David Cooper og John Wells....

  16. Linguistic models and linguistic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedryez, W; Vasilakos, A V

    1999-01-01

    The study is concerned with a linguistic approach to the design of a new category of fuzzy (granular) models. In contrast to numerically driven identification techniques, we concentrate on budding meaningful linguistic labels (granules) in the space of experimental data and forming the ensuing model as a web of associations between such granules. As such models are designed at the level of information granules and generate results in the same granular rather than pure numeric format, we refer to them as linguistic models. Furthermore, as there are no detailed numeric estimation procedures involved in the construction of the linguistic models carried out in this way, their design mode can be viewed as that of a rapid prototyping. The underlying algorithm used in the development of the models utilizes an augmented version of the clustering technique (context-based clustering) that is centered around a notion of linguistic contexts-a collection of fuzzy sets or fuzzy relations defined in the data space (more precisely a space of input variables). The detailed design algorithm is provided and contrasted with the standard modeling approaches commonly encountered in the literature. The usefulness of the linguistic mode of system modeling is discussed and illustrated with the aid of numeric studies including both synthetic data as well as some time series dealing with modeling traffic intensity over a broadband telecommunication network.

  17. OSPREY Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2013-01-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to

  18. Stereometric Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, P.

    2012-07-01

    These mandatory guidelines are provided for preparation of papers accepted for publication in the series of Volumes of The The stereometric modelling means modelling achieved with : - the use of a pair of virtual cameras, with parallel axes and positioned at a mutual distance average of 1/10 of the distance camera-object (in practice the realization and use of a stereometric camera in the modeling program); - the shot visualization in two distinct windows - the stereoscopic viewing of the shot while modelling. Since the definition of "3D vision" is inaccurately referred to as the simple perspective of an object, it is required to add the word stereo so that "3D stereo vision " shall stand for "three-dimensional view" and ,therefore, measure the width, height and depth of the surveyed image. Thanks to the development of a stereo metric model , either real or virtual, through the "materialization", either real or virtual, of the optical-stereo metric model made visible with a stereoscope. It is feasible a continuous on line updating of the cultural heritage with the help of photogrammetry and stereometric modelling. The catalogue of the Architectonic Photogrammetry Laboratory of Politecnico di Bari is available on line at: http://rappresentazione.stereofot.it:591/StereoFot/FMPro?-db=StereoFot.fp5&-lay=Scheda&-format=cerca.htm&-view

  19. Model theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Wilfrid

    1993-01-01

    An up-to-date and integrated introduction to model theory, designed to be used for graduate courses (for students who are familiar with first-order logic), and as a reference for more experienced logicians and mathematicians.

  20. Paleoclimate Modeling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Computer simulations of past climate. Variables provided as model output are described by parameter keyword. In some cases the parameter keywords are a subset of...

  1. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  2. Radarsat-2 Backscattering for the Modeling of Biophysical Parameters of Regenerating Mangrove Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele F. Cougo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to understand the relationship between radar backscattering (σ°, β° and γ of a multi-polarized Radarsat-2 C-band image with the structural attributes of regenerating mangrove vegetation located at the mouth of the Amazon River. CBH (circumference at breast height, height and species data were collected to characterize vegetation structure and above-ground biomass (AGB at 17 plots with a total of 3090 measured individuals. Significant relationships between the linear σ° in VH (vertical transmit, horizontal receive cross-polarization produced r2 values of 0.63 for the average height, 0.53 for the DBH, 0.46 for the basal area (BA and 0.52 for the AGB. Using co-polarized HH (horizontal transmit, horizontal receive and VV (vertical transmit, vertical receive, r2 values increased to 0.81, 0.79, 0.67 and 0.79, respectively. Vegetation attribute maps of average canopy height, DBH and AGB were generated for the study area. We conclude that multi-polarized Radarsat-2 images were adequate for characterization of vegetation attributes in areas of mangrove regeneration.

  3. Accelerated life models modeling and statistical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bagdonavicius, Vilijandas

    2001-01-01

    Failure Time DistributionsIntroductionParametric Classes of Failure Time DistributionsAccelerated Life ModelsIntroductionGeneralized Sedyakin's ModelAccelerated Failure Time ModelProportional Hazards ModelGeneralized Proportional Hazards ModelsGeneralized Additive and Additive-Multiplicative Hazards ModelsChanging Shape and Scale ModelsGeneralizationsModels Including Switch-Up and Cycling EffectsHeredity HypothesisSummaryAccelerated Degradation ModelsIntroductionDegradation ModelsModeling the Influence of Explanatory Varia

  4. Modelling Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kindler, Ekkart

    2009-01-01

    There are many different notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and workflows. These notations and formalisms have been introduced with different purposes and objectives. Later, influenced by other notations, comparisons with other tools, or by standardization efforts, these no......There are many different notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and workflows. These notations and formalisms have been introduced with different purposes and objectives. Later, influenced by other notations, comparisons with other tools, or by standardization efforts......, these notations have been extended in order to increase expressiveness and to be more competitive. This resulted in an increasing number of notations and formalisms for modelling business processes and in an increase of the different modelling constructs provided by modelling notations, which makes it difficult...... to compare modelling notations and to make transformations between them. One of the reasons is that, in each notation, the new concepts are introduced in a different way by extending the already existing constructs. In this chapter, we go the opposite direction: We show that it is possible to add most...

  5. Model fit and model selection

    OpenAIRE

    Kocherlakota, Narayana R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses an example to show that a model that fits the available data perfectly may provide worse answers to policy questions than an alternative, imperfectly fitting model. The author argues that, in the context of Bayesian estimation, this result can be interpreted as being due to the use of an inappropriate prior over the parameters of shock processes. He urges the use of priors that are obtained from explicit auxiliary information, not from the desire to obtain identification.

  6. Model composition in model checking

    OpenAIRE

    Felscher, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Model-checking allows one to formally check properties of systems: these properties are modeled as logic formulas and the systems as structures like transition systems. These transition systems are often composed, i.e., they arise in form of products or sums. The composition technique allows us to deduce the truth of a formula in the composed system from "interface information": the truth of formulas for the component systems and information in which components which of these formulas hold. W...

  7. Modelling Defiguration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork Petersen, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    focus centres on how the catwalk scenography evokes a ‘defiguration’ of the walking models and to what effect. Vibskov’s mobile catwalk draws attention to the walk, which is a key element of models’ performance but which usually functions in fashion shows merely to present clothes in the most...... advantageous manner. Stepping on the catwalk’s sloping, moving surfaces decelerates the models’ walk and makes it cautious, hesitant and shaky: suddenly the models lack exactly the affirmative, staccato, striving quality of motion, and the condescending expression that they perform on most contemporary...... determines the models’ walk. Furthermore, letting the models set off sound through triggers with attached sound samples gives them an implied agency. This calls into question the designer’s unrestricted authorship....

  8. Persistent Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between representation and the represented is examined here through the notion of persistent modelling. This notion is not novel to the activity of architectural design if it is considered as describing a continued active and iterative engagement with design concerns – an evident...... characteristic of architectural practice. But the persistence in persistent modelling can also be understood to apply in other ways, reflecting and anticipating extended roles for representation. This book identifies three principle areas in which these extensions are becoming apparent within contemporary....... It also provides critical insight into the use of contemporary modelling tools and methods, together with an examination of the implications their use has within the territories of architectural design, realisation and experience....

  9. Inflatable Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Vasily Volkov

    2006-01-01

    A physically-based model is presented for the simulation of a new type of deformable objects-inflatable objects, such as shaped balloons, which consist of pressurized air enclosed by an elastic surface. These objects have properties inherent in both 3D and 2D elastic bodies, as they demonstrate the behaviour of 3D shapes using 2D formulations. As there is no internal structure in them, their behaviour is substantially different from the behaviour of deformable solid objects. We use one of the few available models for deformable surfaces, and enhance it to include the forces of internal and external pressure. These pressure forces may also incorporate buoyancy forces, to allow objects filled with a low density gas to float in denser media. The obtained models demonstrate rich dynamic behaviour, such as bouncing, floating, deflation and inflation.

  10. Supernova models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the 56Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed

  11. Cheating models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnoldi, Jakob

    The article discusses the use of algorithmic models for so-called High Frequency Trading (HFT) in finance. HFT is controversial yet widespread in modern financial markets. It is a form of automated trading technology which critics among other things claim can lead to market manipulation. Drawing on...... two cases, this article shows that manipulation more likely happens in the reverse way, meaning that human traders attempt to make algorithms ‘make mistakes’ or ‘mislead’ algos. Thus, it is algorithmic models, not humans, that are manipulated. Such manipulation poses challenges for security exchanges...

  12. Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When you submit the form on this page, which includes your email address

  13. Modelling language

    CERN Document Server

    Cardey, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    In response to the need for reliable results from natural language processing, this book presents an original way of decomposing a language(s) in a microscopic manner by means of intra/inter‑language norms and divergences, going progressively from languages as systems to the linguistic, mathematical and computational models, which being based on a constructive approach are inherently traceable. Languages are described with their elements aggregating or repelling each other to form viable interrelated micro‑systems. The abstract model, which contrary to the current state of the art works in int

  14. Molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to be tailored to decrease the harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modeling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported by the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  15. Lens Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, Ulrik William

    2014-01-01

    Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory of probabil......Firms consist of people who make decisions to achieve goals. How do these people develop the expectations which underpin the choices they make? The lens model provides one answer to this question. It was developed by cognitive psychologist Egon Brunswik (1952) to illustrate his theory...

  16. Smashnova Model

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaram, C.

    2007-01-01

    An alternate model for gamma ray bursts is suggested. For a white dwarf (WD) and neutron star (NS) very close binary system, the WD (close to Mch) can detonate due to tidal heating, leading to a SN. Material falling on to the NS at relativistic velocities can cause its collapse to a magnetar or quark star or black hole leading to a GRB. As the material smashes on to the NS, it is dubbed the Smashnova model. Here the SN is followed by a GRB. NS impacting a RG (or RSG) (like in Thorne-Zytkow ob...

  17. Building Models and Building Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj Asbjørn; Skauge, Jørn

    I rapportens indledende kapitel beskrives de primære begreber vedrørende bygningsmodeller og nogle fundamentale forhold vedrørende computerbaseret modulering bliver opstillet. Desuden bliver forskellen mellem tegneprogrammer og bygnings­model­lerings­programmer beskrevet. Vigtige aspekter om......­lering og bygningsmodeller. Det bliver understreget at modellering bør udføres på flere abstraktions­niveauer og i to dimensioner i den såkaldte modelleringsmatrix. Ud fra dette identificeres de primære faser af bygningsmodel­lering. Dernæst beskrives de basale karakteristika for bygningsmodeller. Heri...... inkluderes en præcisering af begreberne objektorienteret software og objektorienteret modeller. Det bliver fremhævet at begrebet objektbaseret modellering giver en tilstrækkelig og bedre forståelse. Endelig beskrives forestillingen om den ideale bygningsmodel som værende én samlet model, der anvendes gennem...

  18. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  19. Modelling Entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Bosma (Niels); G. de Wit (Gerrit); M.A. Carree (Martin)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTwo approaches can be distinguished with respect to modelling entrepreneurship: (i) the approach focusing on the net development of the number of entrepreneurs in an equilibrium framework and (ii) the approach focusing on the entries and exits of entrepreneurs. In this paper we unify the

  20. Why Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf eWolkenhauer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a renaissance of mining approaches. A comprehensive picture of the genetic landscape of an individual patient will be useful, for example, to identify groups of patients that do or do not respond to certain therapies. The high expectations may however not be satisfied if the number of patient groups with similar characteristics is going to be very large. I therefore doubt that mining sequence data will give us an understanding of why and when therapies work. For understanding the mechanisms underlying diseases, an alternative approach is to model small networks in quantitative mechanistic detail, to elucidate the role of gene and proteins in dynamically changing the functioning of cells. Here an obvious critique is that these models consider too few components, compared to what might be relevant for any particular cell function. I show here that mining approaches and dynamical systems theory are two ends of a spectrum of methodologies to choose from. Drawing upon personal experience in numerous interdisciplinary collaborations, I provide guidance on how to model by discussing the question Why model?

  1. Modeling Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  2. Painting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Donchyts, G.; van Dam, A.; Plieger, M.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of interactive art has blurred the line between electronic, computer graphics and art. Here we apply this art form to numerical models. Here we show how the transformation of a numerical model into an interactive painting can both provide insights and solve real world problems. The cases that are used as an example include forensic reconstructions, dredging optimization, barrier design. The system can be fed using any source of time varying vector fields, such as hydrodynamic models. The cases used here, the Indian Ocean (HYCOM), the Wadden Sea (Delft3D Curvilinear), San Francisco Bay (3Di subgrid and Delft3D Flexible Mesh), show that the method used is suitable for different time and spatial scales. High resolution numerical models become interactive paintings by exchanging their velocity fields with a high resolution (>=1M cells) image based flow visualization that runs in a html5 compatible web browser. The image based flow visualization combines three images into a new image: the current image, a drawing, and a uv + mask field. The advection scheme that computes the resultant image is executed in the graphics card using WebGL, allowing for 1M grid cells at 60Hz performance on mediocre graphic cards. The software is provided as open source software. By using different sources for a drawing one can gain insight into several aspects of the velocity fields. These aspects include not only the commonly represented magnitude and direction, but also divergence, topology and turbulence .

  3. Zeebrugge Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten S.; Frigaard, Peter

    In the following, results from model tests with Zeebrugge breakwater are presented. The objective with these tests is partly to investigate the influence on wave run-up due to a changing waterlevel during a storm. Finally, the influence on wave run-up due to an introduced longshore current...

  4. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  5. Modeling Minds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michael, John

    others' minds. Then (2), in order to bring to light some possible justifications, as well as hazards and criticisms of the methodology of looking time tests, I will take a closer look at the concept of folk psychology and will focus on the idea that folk psychology involves using oneself as a model...

  6. Logic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the NSPCC/University of Edinburgh Child Protection Research Centre. It highlights the Centre's work, approach, progress to date and direction of travel. The document includes the Centre's Logic Model which details types of research and outcomes.

  7. Model CAPM

    OpenAIRE

    Burianová, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Cílem první části této bakalářské práce je - pomocí analýzy výchozích textů - teoretické shrnutí ekonomických modelů a teorií, na kterých model CAPM stojí: Markowitzův model teorie portfolia (analýza maximalizace očekávaného užitku a na něm založený model výběru optimálního portfolia), Tobina (rozšíření Markowitzova modelu ? rozdělení výběru optimálního portfolia do dvou fází; nejprve určení optimální kombinace rizikových instrumentů a následná alokace dostupného kapitálu mezi tuto optimální ...

  8. Transport modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ There has been remarkable progress during the past decade in understanding and modeling turbulent transport in tokamaks. With some exceptions the progress is derived from the huge increases in computational power and the ability to simulate tokamak turbulence with ever more fundamental and physically realistic dynamical equations, e.g.

  9. Criticality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of

  10. Information Model for Product Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦国方; 刘慎权

    1992-01-01

    The Key problems in product modeling for integrated CAD ∥CAM systems are the information structures and representations of products.They are taking more and more important roles in engineering applications.With the investigation on engineering product information and from the viewpoint of industrial process,in this paper,the information models are proposed and the definitions of the framework of product information are given.And then,the integration and the consistence of product information are discussed by introucing the entity and its instance.As a summary,the information structures described in this paper have many advantage and natures helpful in engineering design.

  11. Molecular Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarti Sharma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The use of computational chemistry in the development of novel pharmaceuticals is becoming an increasingly important
    tool. In the past, drugs were simply screened for effectiveness. The recent advances in computing power and
    the exponential growth of the knowledge of protein structures have made it possible for organic compounds to tailored to
    decrease harmful side effects and increase the potency. This article provides a detailed description of the techniques
    employed in molecular modeling. Molecular modelling is a rapidly developing discipline, and has been supported from
    the dramatic improvements in computer hardware and software in recent years.

  12. Leadership model

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Leandro S.; José Fernando A. Cruz; Ferreira, Helena Isabel dos Santos Ribeiro; Pinto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior studies the decision-making mechanisms of individuals. We propose the Nash Equilibria as one, of many, possible mechanisms of transforming human intentions in behavior. This process corresponds to the best strategic individual decision taking in account the collective response. We built a game theoretical model to understand the role of leaders in decision-making of individuals or groups. We study the characteristics of the leaders that can have a...

  13. Model Uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde, Merlise; George, Edward I.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of Bayesian approaches for model uncertainty over the past decade has been remarkable. Catalyzed by advances in methods and technology for posterior computation, the scope of these methods has widened substantially. Major thrusts of these developments have included new methods for semiautomatic prior specification and posterior exploration. To illustrate key aspects of this evolution, the highlights of some of these developments are described.

  14. Modeling fatigue.

    OpenAIRE

    Sumner, Walton; Xu, Jin Zhong

    2002-01-01

    The American Board of Family Practice is developing a patient simulation program to evaluate diagnostic and management skills. The simulator must give temporally and physiologically reasonable answers to symptom questions such as "Have you been tired?" A three-step process generates symptom histories. In the first step, the simulator determines points in time where it should calculate instantaneous symptom status. In the second step, a Bayesian network implementing a roughly physiologic model...

  15. Modeling biomembranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plimpton, Steven James; Heffernan, Julieanne; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Frink, Laura J. Douglas

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the properties and behavior of biomembranes is fundamental to many biological processes and technologies. Microdomains in biomembranes or ''lipid rafts'' are now known to be an integral part of cell signaling, vesicle formation, fusion processes, protein trafficking, and viral and toxin infection processes. Understanding how microdomains form, how they depend on membrane constituents, and how they act not only has biological implications, but also will impact Sandia's effort in development of membranes that structurally adapt to their environment in a controlled manner. To provide such understanding, we created physically-based models of biomembranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT) calculations using these models were applied to phenomena such as microdomain formation, membrane fusion, pattern formation, and protein insertion. Because lipid dynamics and self-organization in membranes occur on length and time scales beyond atomistic MD, we used coarse-grained models of double tail lipid molecules that spontaneously self-assemble into bilayers. DFT provided equilibrium information on membrane structure. Experimental work was performed to further help elucidate the fundamental membrane organization principles.

  16. Technological Forecasting---Model Selection, Model Stability, and Combining Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nigel Meade; Towhidul Islam

    1998-01-01

    The paper identifies 29 models that the literature suggests are appropriate for technological forecasting. These models are divided into three classes according to the timing of the point of inflexion in the innovation or substitution process. Faced with a given data set and such a choice, the issue of model selection needs to be addressed. Evidence used to aid model selection is drawn from measures of model fit and model stability. An analysis of the forecasting performance of these models u...

  17. Model Construct Based Enterprise Model Architecture and Its Modeling Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to support enterprise integration, a kind of model construct based enterprise model architecture and its modeling approach are studied in this paper. First, the structural makeup and internal relationships of enterprise model architecture are discussed. Then, the concept of reusable model construct (MC) which belongs to the control view and can help to derive other views is proposed. The modeling approach based on model construct consists of three steps, reference model architecture synthesis, enterprise model customization, system design and implementation. According to MC based modeling approach a case study with the background of one-kind-product machinery manufacturing enterprises is illustrated. It is shown that proposal model construct based enterprise model architecture and modeling approach are practical and efficient.

  18. A Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhiyang

    2011-01-01

    Similar to ISO Technical Committees,SAC Technical Committees undertake the management and coordination of standard's development and amendments in various sectors in industry,playing the role as a bridge among enterprises,research institutions and the governmental standardization administration.How to fully play the essential role is the vital issue SAC has been committing to resolve.Among hundreds of SAC TCs,one stands out in knitting together those isolated,scattered,but highly competitive enterprises in the same industry with the "Standards" thread,and achieving remarkable results in promoting industry development with standardization.It sets a role model for other TCs.

  19. From model checking to model measuring

    OpenAIRE

    Henzinger, Thomas A.; Otop, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We define the model-measuring problem: given a model $M$ and specification~$\\varphi$, what is the maximal distance $\\rho$ such that all models $M'$ within distance $\\rho$ from $M$ satisfy (or violate)~$\\varphi$. The model measuring problem presupposes a distance function on models. We concentrate on automatic distance functions, which are defined by weighted automata. The model-measuring problem subsumes several generalizations of the classical model-checking problem, in particular, qu...

  20. Application of radar polarimetry to forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, S. L.; Zebker, H. A.; Vanzyl, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    In order to understand L-band multipolarization radar measurements of forested areas, a model for the forest polarization signature was developed. The model is based on backscatter from dielectric cylinders which represent branches and trunks. In the model the Stokes matrices corresponding to several different scattering mechanisms is calculated, combining the results to get the total Stokes matrix. Comparison of model predictions with radar measurements shows that the model can accurately predict the forest polarization signature.