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Sample records for magnetically labeled mesenchymal

  1. Magnetic labeling and in vitro MR imaging of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jinhua; Feng Gansheng; Wu Hanping; Wang Xin; Li Chuan; Zhao Jiannong; Guo Daqin; Yu Guorong; Liu Guanxing; Wang Shiyi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with feridex combined with poly-l-lysine (PLL), and to determine the feasibility of detection of magnetically labeled stem cells with MR imaging. Methods: Feridex were incubated with PLL for 1 hour to obtain a complex of feridex-PLL. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the bone marrows of Wistar rats were cultured and expanded. By the 4th passage, cells were co-incubated overnight with the feridex-PLL complex. Prussian blue staining for demonstrating intracytoplastic nanoparticles and trypan-blue exclusion test for cell viability were performed respectively at 24 h, 1 w, 2 w, 3 w after labeling. MR imaging of cell suspensions was performed by using T 1 WI, T 2 WI and T 2 * WI sequences at a clinical 1.5 T MR system. Results: Numerous intracytoplastic iron particles were stained with Prussian blue. With division of stern cells, the stained particles were seen decreased gradually. Trypan blue exclusion test at 24 h, 1 w, 2 w and 3 w showed that the viability of the labeled cells was 91.00%, 93.00%, 91.75%, and 92.50%, not significantly different with that of nonlabeled cells (P>0.05). For 10 3 , 10 4 and l0 5 cells, T 2 signal intensity decreased by 63.75%, 82.31% and 91.92% respectively, T 2 * signal intensity decreased by 68.24%, 83.01%, and 93.94% respectively. For 10 5 labeled cells, T 2 * signal intensity decreased by 93.75%, 75.92%, 41.75% and 8.83 % respectively at 24 h, 1 w, 2 w and 3 w after labeling. Conclusion: Magnetic labeling of rat bone marrow stem cells with feridex-PLL complex is feasible, efficient and safe. T 2 * WI is the most sensitive sequence to detect the labeled cells. The degree of T 2 signal decreasing may be related to the cell count and division phase. (authors)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of single co-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells after intracardial injection in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Peldschus, K.; Wicklein, D.; Schumacher, U.; Didie, M.; Lange, C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish co-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the detection of single MSC in-vivo by MRI and histological validation. Materials and Methods: Mouse MSC were co-labeled with fluorescent iron oxide micro-particles and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE). The cellular iron content was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Cell proliferation and expression of characteristic surface markers were determined by flow cytometry. The chondrogenic differentiation capacity was assessed. Different amounts of cells (n1 = 5000, n2 = 15 000, n3 = 50 000) were injected into the left heart ventricle of 12 mice. The animals underwent sequential MRI on a clinical 3.0T scanner (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). For histological validation cryosections were examined by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Magnetic and fluorescent labeling of MSC was established (mean cellular iron content 23.6 ± 3 pg). Flow cytometry showed similar cell proliferation and receptor expression of labeled and unlabeled MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation of labeled MSC was verified. After cell injection MRI revealed multiple signal voids in the brain and fewer signal voids in the kidneys. In the brain, an average of 4.6 ± 1.2 (n1), 9.0 ± 3.6 (n2) and 25.0 ± 1.0 (n3) signal voids were detected per MRI slice. An average of 8.7 ± 3.1 (n1), 22.0 ± 6.1 (n2) and 89.8 ± 6.5 (n3) labeled cells per corresponding stack of adjacent cryosections could be detected in the brain. Statistical correlation of the numbers of MRI signal voids in the brain and single MSC found by histology revealed a correlation coefficient of r = 0.91. Conclusion: The study demonstrates efficient magnetic and fluorescent co-labeling of MSC and their detection on a single cell level in mice by in-vivo MRI and histology. The described techniques may broaden the methods for in-vivo tracking of MSC. (orig.)

  3. Behaviour of adipose-derived canine mesenchymal stem cells after superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles labelling for magnetic resonance imaging

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    Kolecka, Malgorzata Anna; Arnhold, Stefan; Schmidt, Martin; Reich, Christine; Kramer, Martin; Failing, Klaus; von P?ckler, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported to provide beneficial effects in the treatment of neurological and orthopaedic disorders in dogs. The exact mechanism of action is poorly understood. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives the opportunity to observe MSCs after clinical administration. To visualise MSCs with the help of MRI, labelling with an MRI contrast agent is necessary. However, it must be clarified whether there is any negative influence on cell fun...

  4. The experimental study on tropism of magnetic labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuangqing; Wang Peijun; Li Minghua; Zhang Wei; Dai gonghua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and to explore the tropism of BMSCs for hepatocellular carcinoma cells after transplantation in vivo. Methods: BMSCs from bone marrow of Sprague-Dawly (SD) rats were cultured isolated and purified. Labeled BMSCs was achieved using Feridex. Twenty-four hepatocellular carcinoma models of SD rats were induced two weeks before transplantation. The models were divided into three groups in random: the labeled BMSCs and unlabeled BMSCs were transplanted respectively into the rat's livers of experimental group (n=12) and control group A (n=6) via spleens, and no transplant was done for control group B (n=6). MR imaging was performed to monitor the transplanted cells after 1,3,7,14 d using 1.5 T MR system. Signal intensity ratio (SI/SI * ) between tumor and hepatic tissue on T 2 * WI were measured and compared by one-factor analysis of variance. After MR imaging, Prussian blue staining was performed. MR imaging findings were compared with histological sections. Results: Prussian blue staining confirmed the labeling efficiency of BMSCs was above 90%. SI/SI * of experimental group before and 1, 3, 7, 14 d after transplantation were 3.18±0.21, 1.98±0.20, 2.38±0.28, 2.70±0.25 and 3.16±0.24 respectively. Following transplantation of BMSCs, signal intensity decrease was found in hepatocellular carcinoma of experimental group (F=56.65, P 2 * WI (P>0.05). A large number of Prussian blue staining positive cells were found in hepatocellular carcinoma in experimental group. Histological section with Prussian blue staining had a good correlation with the signal intensity changes on MR images at different time. Conclusion: BMSCs display significant tropism to hepatocellular carcinoma and may be an ideal gene therapy vehicle against hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  5. Optimized labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and in vivo visualization by magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising addition to traditional treatments for a number of diseases. However, harnessing the therapeutic potential of stem cells requires an understanding of their fate in vivo. Non-invasive cell tracking can provide knowledge about mechanisms responsible for functional improvement of host tissue. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been used to label and visualize various cell types with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study we performed experiments designed to investigate the biological properties, including proliferation, viability and differentiation capacity of mesenchymal cells (MSCs) labeled with clinically approved SPIONs. Results Rat and mouse MSCs were isolated, cultured, and incubated with dextran-covered SPIONs (ferumoxide) alone or with poly-L-lysine (PLL) or protamine chlorhydrate for 4 or 24 hrs. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by dextran immunocytochemistry and MRI. Cell proliferation and viability were evaluated in vitro with Ki67 immunocytochemistry and live/dead assays. Ferumoxide-labeled MSCs could be induced to differentiate to adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. We analyzed ferumoxide retention in MSCs with or without mitomycin C pretreatment. Approximately 95% MSCs were labeled when incubated with ferumoxide for 4 or 24 hrs in the presence of PLL or protamine, whereas labeling of MSCs incubated with ferumoxide alone was poor. Proliferative capacity was maintained in MSCs incubated with ferumoxide and PLL for 4 hrs, however, after 24 hrs it was reduced. MSCs incubated with ferumoxide and protamine were efficiently visualized by MRI; they maintained proliferation and viability for up to 7 days and remained competent to differentiate. After 21 days MSCs pretreated with mitomycin C still showed a large number of ferumoxide-labeled cells. Conclusions The efficient and long lasting uptake and retention of SPIONs by MSCs using a protocol employing ferumoxide and

  6. The long-term fate of mesenchymal stem cells labeled with magnetic resonance imaging-visible polymersomes in cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan X

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaohui Duan,1,* Liejing Lu,1,* Yong Wang,2 Fang Zhang,1 Jiaji Mao,1 Minghui Cao,1 Bingling Lin,1 Xiang Zhang,1 Xintao Shuai,2,3 Jun Shen1 1Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, 2PCFM Lab of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 3BME Center, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Understanding the long-term fate and potential mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs after transplantation is essential for improving functional benefits of stem cell-based stroke treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is considered an attractive and clinically translatable tool for longitudinal tracking of stem cells, but certain controversies have arisen in this regard. In this study, we used SPION-loaded cationic polymersomes to label green fluorescent protein (GFP-expressing MSCs to determine whether MRI can accurately reflect survival, long-term fate, and potential mechanisms of MSCs in ischemic stroke therapy. Our results showed that MSCs could improve the functional outcome and reduce the infarct volume of stroke in the brain. In vivo MRI can verify the biodistribution and migration of grafted cells when pre-labeled with SPION-loaded polymersome. The dynamic change of low signal volume on MRI can reflect the tendency of cell survival and apoptosis, but may overestimate long-term survival owing to the presence of iron-laden macrophages around cell graft. Only a small fraction of grafted cells survived up to 8 weeks after transplantation. A minority of these surviving cells were differentiated into astrocytes, but not into neurons. MSCs might exert their therapeutic effect via secreting paracrine factors rather than directing cell replacement through differentiation into neuronal and/or glial phenotypes. Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, magnetic resonance imaging, superparamagnetic iron oxide

  7. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibov TT

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tatiana T Sibov,1,2 Lorena F Pavon,1 Liza A Miyaki,1 Javier B Mamani,1 Leopoldo P Nucci,1,2 Larissa T Alvarim,1,3 Paulo H Silveira,1 Luciana C Marti,1 LF Gamarra1–31Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Departamento de Neurologia e Neurociências, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh, their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles, Rhodamine, magnetic resonance imaging, Parkinson's disease

  8. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, LF

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson’s disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model. PMID:24531365

  9. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, Lf

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 10(5) cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.

  10. In Vivo MR Imaging of Magnetically Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Renal Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sung Il [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyup [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Se Young; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Hoe Suk [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Sun [Dongguk University International Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Min Hoan [Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Kyu Ri; Sung, Chang Kyu [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This study was designed to evaluate in vivo MR imaging for the depiction of intraarterially injected superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an experimental rat model of renal ischemia. Left renal ischemia was induced in 12 male Sprague- Dawley rats by use of the catheter lodging method. In vivo MR signal intensity variations depicted on T2*-weighted sequences were evaluated in both the left and right kidneys prior to injection (n = 2), two hours (n = 4), 15 hours (n = 2), 30 hours (n = 2) and 72 hours (n = 2) after injection of SPIO-labeled MSCs in both kidneys. Signal intensity variations were correlated with the number of Prussian blue stain-positive cells as visualized in histological specimens. In an in vivo study, it was determined that there was a significant difference in signal intensity variation for both the left and right cortex (40.8 {+-} 4.12 and 26.4 {+-} 7.92, respectively) and for both the left and right medulla (23.2 {+-} 3.32 and 15.2 {+-} 3.31, respectively) until two hours after injection (p < 0.05). In addition, signal intensity variation in the left renal cortex was well correlated with the number of Prussian blue stain-positive cells per high power field (r = 0.98, p < 0.05). Intraarterial injected SPIO-labeled MSCs in an experimental rat model of renal ischemia can be detected with the use of in vivo MR imaging immediately after injection.

  11. Living labeling techniques of mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Qingyu; Chen Li

    2007-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known for their self-renew and multi- differentiation potentiality. With the transplantation of the MSCs which can promote the regeneration and repair of the injured tissue, a new route for the treatment of dieases is hopeful to be effective. To trace the distribution, migration, proliferation and differentiation of the implanted MSCs, there need effective labeling techniques, especially living labeling techniques. (authors)

  12. Magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging of brain tumor mediated by mesenchymal stem cell labeled with multifunctional nanoparticle introduced via carotid artery injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yang; Gumin, Joy; MacLellan, Christopher J.; Gao, Feng; Bouchard, Richard; Lang, Frederick F.; Stafford, R. Jason; Melancon, Marites P.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. To evaluate the feasibility of visualizing bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with a gold-coated magnetic resonance (MR)-active multifunctional nanoparticle and injected via the carotid artery for assessing the extent of MSC homing in glioma-bearing mice. Materials and methods. Nanoparticles containing superparamagnetic iron oxide coated with gold (SPIO@Au) with a diameter of ˜82 nm and maximum absorbance in the near infrared region were synthesized. Bone marrow-derived MSCs conjugated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were successfully labeled with SPIO@Au at 4 μg ml-1 and injected via the internal carotid artery in six mice bearing orthotopic U87 tumors. Unlabeled MSCs were used as a control. The ability of SPIO@Au-loaded MSCs to be imaged using MR and photoacoustic (PA) imaging at t = 0 h, 2 h, 24 h, and 72 h was assessed using a 7 T Bruker Biospec experimental MR scanner and a Vevo LAZR PA imaging system with a 5 ns laser as the excitation source. Histological analysis of the brain tissue was performed 72 h after MSC injection using GFP fluorescence, Prussian blue staining, and hematoxylin-and-eosin staining. Results. MSCs labeled with SPIO@Au at 4 μg ml-1 did not exhibit cell death or any adverse effects on differentiation or migration. The PA signal in tumors injected with SPIO@Au-loaded MSCs was clearly more enhanced post-injection, as compared with the tumors injected with unlabeled MSCs at t = 72 h. Using the same mice, T2-weighted MR imaging results taken before injection and at t = 2 h, 24 h, and 72 h were consistent with the PA imaging results, showing significant hypointensity of the tumor in the presence of SPIO@Au-loaded MSCs. Histological analysis also showed co-localization of GFP fluorescence and iron, thereby confirming that SPIO@Au-labeled MSCs continue to carry their nanoparticle payloads even at 72 h after injection. Conclusions. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of tracking carotid artery

  13. Comparison of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Labeling Efficiency between Poly-L-Lysine and Protamine Sulfate for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Quantitative Analysis Using Multi-Echo T2 Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Chang Kyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Jeong Kon

    2013-01-01

    To quantify in vitro labeling efficiency of protamine sulfate (PS) and poly-L-lysine (PLL) for labeling of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) using multi-echo T2 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 4.7 T. The hMSCs were incubated with SPIO-PS or SPIO-PLL complexes. Their effects on the cell metabolism and differentiation capability were evaluated, respectively. The decrease of iron concentrations in the labeled cells were assessed immediately, and at 4 d after labeling using multi-echo T2 MR imaging at 4.7 T. The results were compared with those of Prussian blue colorimetry. The hMSCs were labeled more efficiently by SPIO-PLL than SPIO-PS without any significant effect on cell metabolism and differentiation capabilities. It was feasible to quantify the iron concentrations in SPIO-agarose-phantoms and in agarose mixture with the labeled cells from T2 maps obtained from multi-echo T2 MRI. However, the iron concentration of the labeled cells was significantly higher by T2-maps than the results of Prussian blue colorimetry. The hMSCs can be effectively labeled with SPIO-PLL complexes more than with SPIO-PS without significant change in cell metabolism and differentiation. In vitro quantification of the iron concentrations of the labeled is feasible from multi-echo T2 MRI, but needs further investigation.

  14. Comparison of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Labeling Efficiency between Poly-L-Lysine and Protamine Sulfate for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Quantitative Analysis Using Multi-Echo T2 Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Chang Kyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Jeong Kon [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    To quantify in vitro labeling efficiency of protamine sulfate (PS) and poly-L-lysine (PLL) for labeling of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) using multi-echo T2 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 4.7 T. The hMSCs were incubated with SPIO-PS or SPIO-PLL complexes. Their effects on the cell metabolism and differentiation capability were evaluated, respectively. The decrease of iron concentrations in the labeled cells were assessed immediately, and at 4 d after labeling using multi-echo T2 MR imaging at 4.7 T. The results were compared with those of Prussian blue colorimetry. The hMSCs were labeled more efficiently by SPIO-PLL than SPIO-PS without any significant effect on cell metabolism and differentiation capabilities. It was feasible to quantify the iron concentrations in SPIO-agarose-phantoms and in agarose mixture with the labeled cells from T2 maps obtained from multi-echo T2 MRI. However, the iron concentration of the labeled cells was significantly higher by T2-maps than the results of Prussian blue colorimetry. The hMSCs can be effectively labeled with SPIO-PLL complexes more than with SPIO-PS without significant change in cell metabolism and differentiation. In vitro quantification of the iron concentrations of the labeled is feasible from multi-echo T2 MRI, but needs further investigation.

  15. Study of internalization and viability of multimodal nanoparticles for labeling of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in culture media for cell labeling, and to establish a study of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B detection at labeled cells evaluating they viability at concentrations of 10 μg Fe/mL and 100μg Fe/mL. Methods: We performed the analysis of stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in different culture media; the mesenchymal stem cells labeling with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B; the intracellular detection of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in mesenchymal stem cells, and assessment of the viability of labeled cells by kinetic proliferation. Results: The stability analysis showed that multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B had good stability in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium. The mesenchymal stem cell with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B described location of intracellular nanoparticles, which were shown as blue granules co-localized in fluorescent clusters, thus characterizing magnetic and fluorescent properties of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles Rhodamine B. Conclusion: The stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B found in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium assured intracellular mesenchymal stem cells labeling. This cell labeling did not affect viability of labeled mesenchymal stem cells since they continued to proliferate for five days. (author)

  16. Labeling mesenchymal cells with DMSA-coated gold and iron oxide nanoparticles: assessment of biocompatibility and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luisa H A; da Silva, Jaqueline R; Ferreira, Guilherme A; Silva, Renata C; Lima, Emilia C D; Azevedo, Ricardo B; Oliveira, Daniela M

    2016-07-18

    Nanoparticles' unique features have been highly explored in cellular therapies. However, nanoparticles can be cytotoxic. The cytotoxicity can be overcome by coating the nanoparticles with an appropriated surface modification. Nanoparticle coating influences biocompatibility between nanoparticles and cells and may affect some cell properties. Here, we evaluated the biocompatibility of gold and maghemite nanoparticles functionalized with 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), Au-DMSA and γ-Fe2O3-DMSA respectively, with human mesenchymal stem cells. Also, we tested these nanoparticles as tracers for mesenchymal stem cells in vivo tracking by computed tomography and as agents for mesenchymal stem cells magnetic targeting. Significant cell death was not observed in MTT, Trypan Blue and light microscopy analyses. However, ultra-structural alterations as swollen and degenerated mitochondria, high amounts of myelin figures and structures similar to apoptotic bodies were detected in some mesenchymal stem cells. Au-DMSA and γ-Fe2O3-DMSA labeling did not affect mesenchymal stem cells adipogenesis and osteogenesis differentiation, proliferation rates or lymphocyte suppression capability. The uptake measurements indicated that both inorganic nanoparticles were well uptaken by mesenchymal stem cells. However, Au-DMSA could not be detected in microtomograph after being incorporated by mesenchymal stem cells. γ-Fe2O3-DMSA labeled cells were magnetically responsive in vitro and after infused in vivo in an experimental model of lung silicosis. In terms of biocompatibility, the use of γ-Fe2O3-DMSA and Au-DMSA as tracers for mesenchymal stem cells was assured. However, Au-DMSA shown to be not suitable for visualization and tracking of these cells in vivo by standard computed microtomography. Otherwise, γ-Fe2O3-DMSA shows to be a promising agent for mesenchymal stem cells magnetic targeting.

  17. Study of internalization and viability of multimodal nanoparticles for labeling of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells; Estudo de internalizacao e viabilidade de nanoparticulas multimodal para marcacao de celulas-tronco mesenquimais de cordao umbilical humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi [Faculdade de Enfermagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel, E-mail: tatianats@einstein.br [Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Objective: To analyze multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in culture media for cell labeling, and to establish a study of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B detection at labeled cells evaluating they viability at concentrations of 10 {mu}g Fe/mL and 100{mu}g Fe/mL. Methods: We performed the analysis of stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in different culture media; the mesenchymal stem cells labeling with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B; the intracellular detection of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B in mesenchymal stem cells, and assessment of the viability of labeled cells by kinetic proliferation. Results: The stability analysis showed that multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B had good stability in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium. The mesenchymal stem cell with multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B described location of intracellular nanoparticles, which were shown as blue granules co-localized in fluorescent clusters, thus characterizing magnetic and fluorescent properties of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles Rhodamine B. Conclusion: The stability of multimodal magnetic nanoparticles-Rhodamine B found in cultured Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's-Low Glucose medium and RPMI 1640 medium assured intracellular mesenchymal stem cells labeling. This cell labeling did not affect viability of labeled mesenchymal stem cells since they continued to proliferate for five days. (author)

  18. The effect of nonuniform magnetic targeting of intracoronary-delivering mesenchymal stem cells on coronary embolisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheyong; Shen, Yunli; Pei, Ning; Sun, Aijun; Xu, Jianfeng; Song, Yanan; Huang, Gangyong; Sun, Xiaoning; Zhang, Shuning; Qin, Qing; Zhu, Hongming; Yang, Shan; Yang, Xiangdong; Zou, Yunzeng; Qian, Juying; Ge, Junbo

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic targeting has been recently introduced to enhance cell retention in animals with acute myocardial infarction. However, it is unclear whether the magnetic accumulation of intravascular cells increases the risk of coronary embolism. Upon finite element analysis, we found that the permanent magnetic field was nonuniform, manifestated as attenuation along the vertical axis and polarisation along the horizontal axis. In the in vitro experiments, iron-labelled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were accumulated in layers predominantly at the edge of the magnet. In an ischaemic rat model subjected to intracavitary MSCs injection, magnetic targeting induced unfavourable vascular embolisation and an inhomogeneous distribution of the donor cells, which prevented the enhanced cell retention from translating into additional functional benefit. These potential complications of magnetic targeting should be thoroughly investigated and overcome before clinical application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for MRI with single-cell sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariza de Schellenberger A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Angela Ariza de Schellenberger,1 Harald Kratz,1 Tracy D Farr,2,3 Norbert Löwa,4 Ralf Hauptmann,1 Susanne Wagner,1 Matthias Taupitz,1 Jörg Schnorr,1 Eyk A Schellenberger1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Experimental Neurology, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Medical School, Nottingham, UK; 4Department of Biomagnetic Signals, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin, Berlin, Germany Abstract: Sensitive cell detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important tool for the development of cell therapies. However, clinically approved contrast agents that allow single-cell detection are currently not available. Therefore, we compared very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP and new multicore carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (multicore particles, MCP designed by our department for magnetic particle imaging (MPI with discontinued Resovist® regarding their suitability for detection of single mesenchymal stem cells (MSC by MRI. We achieved an average intracellular nanoparticle (NP load of >10 pg Fe per cell without the use of transfection agents. NP loading did not lead to significantly different results in proliferation, colony formation, and multilineage in vitro differentiation assays in comparison to controls. MRI allowed single-cell detection using VSOP, MCP, and Resovist® in conjunction with high-resolution T2*-weighted imaging at 7 T with postprocessing of phase images in agarose cell phantoms and in vivo after delivery of 2,000 NP-labeled MSC into mouse brains via the left carotid artery. With optimized labeling conditions, a detection rate of ~45% was achieved; however, the experiments were limited by nonhomogeneous NP loading of the MSC population. Attempts should be made to achieve better cell separation for homogeneous NP loading and to thus improve NP

  20. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  1. Gadolinium and fluorescent bi-functionally labeling and in vitro MRI of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jun; Zhou Cuiping; Cheng Li'na; Duan Xiaohui; Liang Biling; Fu Yue; Bi Xiaobin; Liu Yu; Deng Yubin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of magnetically labeling and tracking mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro by using a gadolinium and fluorescent bi-functionally transfection agent of polyethylenimine. Methods: A gadolinium bifunctional transfection reagent complex was obtained after the linear polyethylenimine derivative (JetPEI-FluoR) was incubated with Gd-DTPA. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the bone marrows of SD rats were cultured and expanded. The mesenchymal stem cells were incubated with the bi-functional labeling agents. After labeling, the MSCs were examined with fluoroscope and electron microscope and the biological characters were detected including trypan blue exclusion test, MTT, and apoptosis detection. On a 1.5 T MR system, the labeled MSCs were examined with spin echo T 1 WI and T 2 WI and T 1 measurement with mixed sequence. After labeling, the cells were cultured and undergone routine passage. Prior MR examinations were repeated for each passage of labeled cells. All data was statistically prolessed with SPSS for Windows. Results: Of 5 x 10 5 MSCs incubated with the bi-functional agents, 4.25 x 10 5 MSCs were successfully labeled, the percentage of labeled MSCs was 85% fluoroscopically. The high density electron particles of gadolinium observed electron microscopically existed around cellular apparatuses, especially around Golgi apparatus. In trypan blue exclusion test, the exclusion rate of labeled MSCs with incubation duration of 3,6,12,24 h was (96.55±2.90)%, (94.17± 2.56)%, (97.16±3.12)% and (94.23±2.67)%, respectively. The corresponding exclusion rate of unlabeled MSCs was (95.86±2.67)%, (92.04±2.21)%, (93.38±3.64)% and (92.12±2.53)%, respectively. There was no statistical difference of trypan blue exclusion rate between labeled cells and control unlabeled cells within 24 hours of incubation (F=4.523, P>0.05). In the proliferation test, the optical absorption value of labeled MSC with 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0, 30.0 and 40

  2. Design and development of a magnetic device for mesenchymal stem cell retaining in deep targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banis, G. C.

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on the retaining of mesenchymal stem cells in blood flow conditions using the appropriate magnetic field. Mesenchymal stem cells can be tagged with magnetic nanoparticles and thus, they can be manipulated from distance, through the application of an external magnetic field. In this paper the case of kidney as target of the therapy is being studied.

  3. Characterization of magnetic labels for bioassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalatonne, Yoann; Benyettou, Farah; Bonnin, Dominique; Lievre, Nicole; Monod, Philippe; Lecouvey, Marc; Weinmann, Pierre; Motte, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles differing by their size have been synthesized to use them for multiparametric testing, based on their differing magnetic properties. The nanoparticle has two essential roles: to act as a probe owing to its specific magnetic properties and to carry on its surface precursor groups for the covalent coupling of biological recognition molecules, such as antibodies, nucleic acids. A totally unique, newly patented, method has been used to characterize magnetic signatures using the MIAplex technology. The MIAplex reader, developed by Magnisense, measures the non-linear response of the magnetic labels when they are exposed to a multi-frequency alternating magnetic field. This specific signature based on d 2 B(H)/dH 2 was correlated to other more conventional magnetic detection methods (superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID) and Moessbauer).

  4. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan

    2016-06-06

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation.

  5. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  6. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang; Lentijo Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschö pe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation.

  7. Optimization of in vitro cell labeling methods for human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R; Sun, T-J; Han, Y-Q; Xu, G; Liu, J; Han, Y-F

    2014-01-01

    Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are a novel source of seed cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. However, in vitro labeling methods for hUCMSCs need to be optimized for better detection of transplanted cells. To identify the most stable and efficient method for labeling hUCMSCs in vitro. hUCMSCs were isolated using a modified enzymatic digestion procedure and cultured. hUCMSCs of passage three (P3) were then labeled with BrdU, PKH26, or lentivirus-GFP and passaged further. Cells from the first labeled passage (LP1), the fourth labeled passage (LP4) and later passages were observed using a fluorescence microscope. The differentiation potential of LP4 cells was assessed by induction with adipogenic and osteogenic medium. Flow cytometry was used to measure the percentage of labeled cells and the percentage of apoptotic or dead cells. The labeling efficiencies of the three hUCMSC-labeling methods were compared in vitro. BrdU, PKH26, and lentivirus-GFP all labeled LP1 cells with high intensity and clarity. However, the BrdU labeling of the LP4 cells was vague and not localized to the cell nuclei; LP9 cells were not detected under a fluorescence microscope. There was also a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity of PKH26-labeled LP4 cells, and LP11 cells were not detected under a fluorescence microscope. However, the fluorescence of LP4 cells labeled with lentivirus-GFP remained strong, and cells labeled with lentivirus-GFP were detected up to LP14 under a fluorescence microscope. Statistical analyses indicated that percentages of LP1 cells labeled with PKH26 and lentivirus-GFP were significantly higher than that of cells labeled with BrdU (p 0.05) was observed between the death rates of labeled and unlabeled cells. Lentivirus-GFP is a valid method for long-term in vitro labeling, and it may be used as a long-term hUCMSC tracker following transplantation in vivo.

  8. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected 111In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbaek, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus S; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana

    2010-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In...

  9. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected (111)In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana

    2009-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In...

  10. Bone tissue engineering with human mesenchymal stem cell sheets constructed using magnetite nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Ito, Akira; Yoshida, Tatsuro; Yamada, Yoichi; Ueda, Minoru; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2007-08-01

    An in vitro reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues without the use of scaffolds may be an alternative strategy for tissue engineering. We have developed a novel tissue engineering strategy, termed magnetic force-based tissue engineering (Mag-TE), in which magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) with a positive charge at the liposomal surface, and magnetic force were used to construct 3D tissue without scaffolds. In this study, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) magnetically labeled with MCLs were seeded onto an ultra-low attachment culture surface, and a magnet (4000 G) was placed on the reverse side. The MSCs formed multilayered sheet-like structures after a 24-h culture period. MSCs in the sheets constructed by Mag-TE maintained an in vitro ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, or chondrocytes after a 21-day culture period using each induction medium. Using an electromagnet, MSC sheets constructed by Mag-TE were harvested and transplanted into the bone defect in the crania of nude rats. Histological observation revealed that new bone surrounded by osteoblast-like cells was formed in the defect area 14 days after transplantation with MSC sheets, whereas no bone formation was observed in control rats without the transplant. These results indicated that Mag-TE could be used for the transplantation of MSC sheets using magnetite nanoparticles and magnetic force, providing novel methodology for bone tissue engineering.

  11. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles labeling of bone marrow stromal (mesenchymal cells does not affect their "stemness".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Balakumaran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION are increasingly used to label human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called "mesenchymal stem cells" to monitor their fate by in vivo MRI, and by histology after Prussian blue (PB staining. SPION-labeling appears to be safe as assessed by in vitro differentiation of BMSCs, however, we chose to resolve the question of the effect of labeling on maintaining the "stemness" of cells within the BMSC population in vivo. Assays performed include colony forming efficiency, CD146 expression, gene expression profiling, and the "gold standard" of evaluating bone and myelosupportive stroma formation in vivo in immuncompromised recipients. SPION-labeling did not alter these assays. Comparable abundant bone with adjoining host hematopoietic cells were seen in cohorts of mice that were implanted with SPION-labeled or unlabeled BMSCs. PB+ adipocytes were noted, demonstrating their donor origin, as well as PB+ pericytes, indicative of self-renewal of the stem cell in the BMSC population. This study confirms that SPION labeling does not alter the differentiation potential of the subset of stem cells within BMSCs.

  12. In vivo ultrasound and photoacoustic monitoring of mesenchymal stem cells labeled with gold nanotracers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yun Nam

    Full Text Available Longitudinal monitoring of cells is required in order to understand the role of delivered stem cells in therapeutic neovascularization. However, there is not an imaging technique that is capable of quantitative, longitudinal assessment of stem cell behaviors with high spatial resolution and sufficient penetration depth. In this study, in vivo and in vitro experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided photoacoustic (US/PA imaging to monitor mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs labeled with gold nanotracers (Au NTs. The Au NT labeled MSCs, injected intramuscularly in the lower limb of the Lewis rat, were detected and spatially resolved. Furthermore, our quantitative in vitro cell studies indicate that US/PA imaging is capable of high detection sensitivity (1×10⁴ cells/mL of the Au NT labeled MSCs. Finally, Au NT labeled MSCs captured in the PEGylated fibrin gel system were imaged in vivo, as well as in vitro, over a one week time period, suggesting that longitudinal cell tracking using US/PA imaging is possible. Overall, Au NT labeling of MSCs and US/PA imaging can be an alternative approach in stem cell imaging capable of noninvasive, sensitive, quantitative, longitudinal assessment of stem cell behaviors with high spatial and temporal resolutions at sufficient depths.

  13. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  14. Micro-Computed Tomography Detection of Gold Nanoparticle-Labelled Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Rat Subretinal Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Pooi Ling; Leow, Sue Ngein; Koh, Avin Ee-Hwan; Mohd Nizam, Hairul Harun; Ding, Suet Lee Shirley; Luu, Chi; Ruhaslizan, Raduan; Wong, Hon Seng; Halim, Wan Haslina Wan Abdul; Ng, Min Hwei; Idrus, Ruszymah Binti Hj; Chowdhury, Shiplu Roy; Bastion, Catherine Mae-Lynn; Subbiah, Suresh Kumar; Higuchi, Akon; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Then, Kong Yong

    2017-02-08

    Mesenchymal stem cells are widely used in many pre-clinical and clinical settings. Despite advances in molecular technology; the migration and homing activities of these cells in in vivo systems are not well understood. Labelling mesenchymal stem cells with gold nanoparticles has no cytotoxic effect and may offer suitable indications for stem cell tracking. Here, we report a simple protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells using 80 nm gold nanoparticles. Once the cells and particles were incubated together for 24 h, the labelled products were injected into the rat subretinal layer. Micro-computed tomography was then conducted on the 15th and 30th day post-injection to track the movement of these cells, as visualized by an area of hyperdensity from the coronal section images of the rat head. In addition, we confirmed the cellular uptake of the gold nanoparticles by the mesenchymal stem cells using transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to other methods, the current protocol provides a simple, less labour-intensive and more efficient labelling mechanism for real-time cell tracking. Finally, we discuss the potential manipulations of gold nanoparticles in stem cells for cell replacement and cancer therapy in ocular disorders or diseases.

  15. Micro-Computed Tomography Detection of Gold Nanoparticle-Labelled Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Rat Subretinal Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooi Ling Mok

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells are widely used in many pre-clinical and clinical settings. Despite advances in molecular technology; the migration and homing activities of these cells in in vivo systems are not well understood. Labelling mesenchymal stem cells with gold nanoparticles has no cytotoxic effect and may offer suitable indications for stem cell tracking. Here, we report a simple protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells using 80 nm gold nanoparticles. Once the cells and particles were incubated together for 24 h, the labelled products were injected into the rat subretinal layer. Micro-computed tomography was then conducted on the 15th and 30th day post-injection to track the movement of these cells, as visualized by an area of hyperdensity from the coronal section images of the rat head. In addition, we confirmed the cellular uptake of the gold nanoparticles by the mesenchymal stem cells using transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to other methods, the current protocol provides a simple, less labour-intensive and more efficient labelling mechanism for real-time cell tracking. Finally, we discuss the potential manipulations of gold nanoparticles in stem cells for cell replacement and cancer therapy in ocular disorders or diseases.

  16. Micro-Computed Tomography Detection of Gold Nanoparticle-Labelled Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Rat Subretinal Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Pooi Ling; Leow, Sue Ngein; Koh, Avin Ee-Hwan; Mohd Nizam, Hairul Harun; Ding, Suet Lee Shirley; Luu, Chi; Ruhaslizan, Raduan; Wong, Hon Seng; Halim, Wan Haslina Wan Abdul; Ng, Min Hwei; Idrus, Ruszymah Binti Hj.; Chowdhury, Shiplu Roy; Bastion, Catherine Mae-Lynn; Subbiah, Suresh Kumar; Higuchi, Akon; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Then, Kong Yong

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are widely used in many pre-clinical and clinical settings. Despite advances in molecular technology; the migration and homing activities of these cells in in vivo systems are not well understood. Labelling mesenchymal stem cells with gold nanoparticles has no cytotoxic effect and may offer suitable indications for stem cell tracking. Here, we report a simple protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells using 80 nm gold nanoparticles. Once the cells and particles were incubated together for 24 h, the labelled products were injected into the rat subretinal layer. Micro-computed tomography was then conducted on the 15th and 30th day post-injection to track the movement of these cells, as visualized by an area of hyperdensity from the coronal section images of the rat head. In addition, we confirmed the cellular uptake of the gold nanoparticles by the mesenchymal stem cells using transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to other methods, the current protocol provides a simple, less labour-intensive and more efficient labelling mechanism for real-time cell tracking. Finally, we discuss the potential manipulations of gold nanoparticles in stem cells for cell replacement and cancer therapy in ocular disorders or diseases. PMID:28208719

  17. Larmor labeling by time-gradient magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, Alexander; Bodnarchuk, Victor; Bussmann, Klaus; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The Larmor labeling of neutrons, due to the Larmor precession of neutron spin in a magnetic field, opens the unique possibility for the development of neutron spin-echo (NSE) based on neutron scattering techniques, featuring an extremely high energy (momentum) resolution. Here, we present the experimental proof of a new method of the Larmor labeling using time-gradient magnetic fields

  18. [Ferumoxide labeled Flk1+ CD31- CD34- human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and its in vivo tracing in the brains of Macaca Fascicularis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ming; Wang, Ren-Zhi; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Chang-Jun; Wei, Jun-Ji; Lu, Shan; Li, Qin; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Han, Qin; Ma, Wen-Bin; Qin, Chuang; Zhao, Chun-Hua; An, Yi-Hua; Kong, Yan-Guo

    2008-10-01

    To explore the method for labeling Flk1+ CD31- CD34- human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) with ferumoxide-PLL and evaluate the feasibility of its tracing after transplantation into the brains of Macaca Fascicularis. The hBMSCs were incubated with ferumoxide-PLL. Trypan blue staining, Prussian blue staining, and transmission electron microscope were performed to show intracellular iron, marking efficiency, and the vigor of the labeled cells. After the hBMSCs were transplanted into the brains of cynomolgus monkeys by stereotaxis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to trace the cells in vivo. Cell survival and differentiation were studied with immunohistochemistry, Prussian blue staining, and HE staining. The marking efficiency of the ferumoxide-PLL was 96%. Iron particles were found intracytoplasmic of the hBMSCs by Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy. The relaxation rates of labeled cells in MRI were 4.4 and 4.2 times higher than those of the unlabeled cells. Hypointensity area was found by MRI three weeks after transplantation. Many hBMSCs and new vessels were found in the transplantation zone by pathological and immunofluorescence methods. Ferumoxide-PLL can effectively label hBMSCs and thus increase its contrast in MRI results. The cells can survive in the brains of cynomolgus monkeys. The labeled hBMSCs can be traced in vivo by MRI.

  19. Effects of iron oxide contrast agent in combination with various transfection agents during mesenchymal stem cells labelling: An in vitro toxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sushanta Kumar; Khushu, Subash; Gangenahalli, Gurudutta

    2018-03-22

    The use of iron oxide nanoparticles for different biomedical applications, hold immense promise to develop negative tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Previously, we have optimized the labelling of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with iron oxide nanoparticles complexed to different transfection agents like poly-l-lysine (IO-PLL) and protamine sulfate (Fe-Pro) on the basis of relaxation behaviour and its biological expressions. However, there is a distinct need to investigate the biocompatibility and biosafety concerns coupled with its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. This study was prepared to evaluate the viability of cells, generation of ROS, changes in actin cytoskeleton, investigation of cell death, level of GSH and TAC, activities of SOD and GPx, and stability of DNA in MSCs after labelling. Results demonstrated a marginal alteration in toxicological parameters like ROS generation, cell length, actin cytoskeleton, total apoptosis and DNA damage was detected after stem cell labelling. Insignificant depletion of GSH and SOD level, and increase in GPx and TAC level in MSCs were measured after labelling with IO-PLL and Fe-Pro complexes, which later on recovered and normalized to its baseline. This MSCs labelling could provide a reference guideline for toxicological analysis and relaxometry based in vivo MRI detection. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanganeria, Purva; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Khanna, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml-1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained.

  1. Evaluation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran and complexed with Poly-L-Lysine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Cardenas, Walter Humberto; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel; Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Oliveira, Daniela Mara de

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the labeling of umbilical cord vein derived mesenchymal stem cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran and complexed to a non-viral transfector agent transfector poly-L-lysine. Methods: The labeling of mesenchymal stem cells was performed using the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran complexed and not complexed to poly-L-lysine. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran was incubated with poly-L-lysine in an ultrasonic sonicator at 37 deg C for 10 minutes for complex formation superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/poly-L-lysine by electrostatic interaction. Then, the mesenchymal stem cells were incubated overnight with the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/poly-L-lysine and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran. After the incubation period the mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated by internalization of the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/polyL-lysine and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran by Prussian Blue stain. Cellular viability of labeled mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated by cellular proliferation assay using 5,6-carboxyfluorescein-succinimidyl ester method and apoptosis detection by Annexin V- Propidium Iodide assay. Results: mesenchymal stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/ dextran without poly-L-lysine not internalized efficiently the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles due to its low presence detected within cells. Mesenchymal stem cells labeled with the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/polyL-lysine efficiently internalized the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles due to greater presence in the cells interior. The viability and apoptosis assays demonstrated that the mesenchymal stem cells labeled and not labeled respectively with the superparamagnetic iron oxide

  2. Development of computational technique for labeling magnetic flux-surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunami, Masanori; Kanno, Ryutaro; Satake, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Takaya; Takamaru, Hisanori

    2006-03-01

    In recent Large Helical Device (LHD) experiments, radial profiles of ion temperature, electric field, etc. are measured in the m/n=1/1 magnetic island produced by island control coils, where m is the poloidal mode number and n the toroidal mode number. When the transport of the plasma in the radial profiles is numerically analyzed, an average over a magnetic flux-surface in the island is a very useful concept to understand the transport. On averaging, a proper labeling of the flux-surfaces is necessary. In general, it is not easy to label the flux-surfaces in the magnetic field with the island, compared with the case of a magnetic field configuration having nested flux-surfaces. In the present paper, we have developed a new computational technique to label the magnetic flux-surfaces. This technique is constructed by using an optimization algorithm, which is known as an optimization method called the simulated annealing method. The flux-surfaces are discerned by using two labels: one is classification of the magnetic field structure, i.e., core, island, ergodic, and outside regions, and the other is a value of the toroidal magnetic flux. We have applied the technique to an LHD configuration with the m/n=1/1 island, and successfully obtained the discrimination of the magnetic field structure. (author)

  3. Magnetically levitated mesenchymal stem cell spheroids cultured with a collagen gel maintain phenotype and quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Lewis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular spheroids are an established system for three-dimensional cell culture. Spheroids are typically generated using hanging drop or non-adherent culture; however, an emerging technique is to use magnetic levitation. Herein, mesenchymal stem cell spheroids were generated using magnetic nanoparticles and subsequently cultured within a type I collagen gel, with a view towards developing a bone marrow niche environment. Cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, and suspended beneath an external magnet, inducing self-assembly of multicellular spheroids. Cells in spheroids were viable and compared to corresponding monolayer controls, maintained stem cell phenotype and were quiescent. Interestingly, core spheroid necrosis was not observed, even with increasing spheroid size, in contrast to other commonly used spheroid systems. This mesenchymal stem cell spheroid culture presents a potential platform for modelling in vitro bone marrow stem cell niches, elucidating interactions between cells, as well as a useful model for drug delivery studies.

  4. Labeling Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Gold Nanocages for in vitro and in vivo Tracking by Two-Photon Microscopy and Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Shrike; Wang, Yu; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Yucai; Cai, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell tracking is a highly important subject. Current techniques based on nanoparticle-labeling, such as magnetic resonance imaging, fluorescence microscopy, and micro-computed tomography, are plagued by limitations including relatively low sensitivity or penetration depth, involvement of ionizing irradiation, and potential cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles. Here we introduce a new class of contrast agents based on gold nanocages (AuNCs) with hollow interiors and porous walls to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for both in vitro and in vivo tracking using two-photon microscopy and photoacoustic microscopy. As demonstrated by the viability assay, the AuNCs showed negligible cytotoxicity under a reasonable dose, and did not alter the differentiation potential of the hMSCs into desired lineages. We were able to image the cells labeled with AuNCs in vitro for at least 28 days in culture, as well as to track the cells that homed to the tumor region in nude mice in vivo. PMID:23946820

  5. Ultrastructural characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells labeled with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles for clinical tracking studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Hansen, Alastair B; Mathiasen, Anders B

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To evaluate survival and engraftment of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in vivo, it is necessary to track implanted cells non-invasively with a method, which does not influence cellular ultrastructure and functional characteristics. Iron-oxide particles have been applied for cell...... sequence of trans-activator of transcription (TAT) (IODEX-TAT) and evaluate the effect of labeling on ultrastructure, viability, phenotype and proliferative capacity of the cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs were labeled with 5 and 10 μg IODEX-TAT/10(5) cells for 2, 6 and 21 hours. IODEX-TAT uptake...... and cellular ultrastructure were determined by electron microscopy. Cell viability was determined by propidium iodide staining and cell proliferation capacity by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Maintenance of stem cell surface markers was determined by flow cytometry. Results. IODEX-TAT labeling...

  6. Improved Imaging of Magnetically Labeled Cells Using Rotational Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cimalla

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a reliable and robust method for magnetomotive optical coherence tomography (MM-OCT imaging of single cells labeled with iron oxide particles. This method employs modulated longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields to evoke alignment and rotation of anisotropic magnetic structures in the sample volume. Experimental evidence suggests that magnetic particles assemble themselves in elongated chains when exposed to a permanent magnetic field. Magnetomotion in the intracellular space was detected and visualized by means of 3D OCT as well as laser speckle reflectometry as a 2D reference imaging method. Our experiments on mesenchymal stem cells embedded in agar scaffolds show that the magnetomotive signal in rotational MM-OCT is significantly increased by a factor of ~3 compared to previous pulsed MM-OCT, although the solenoid’s power consumption was 16 times lower. Finally, we use our novel method to image ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelium cell line. Our results permit magnetomotive imaging with higher sensitivity and the use of low power magnetic fields or larger working distances for future three-dimensional cell tracking in target tissues and organs.

  7. Connective Tissue Growth Factor reporter mice label a subpopulation of mesenchymal progenitor cells that reside in the trabecular bone region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Strecker, Sara; Liu, Yaling; Wang, Liping; Assanah, Fayekah; Smith, Spenser; Maye, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Few gene markers selectively identify mesenchymal progenitor cells inside the bone marrow. We have investigated a cell population located in the mouse bone marrow labeled by Connective Tissue Growth Factor reporter expression (CTGF-EGFP). Bone marrow flushed from CTGF reporter mice yielded an EGFP+ stromal cell population. Interestingly, the percentage of stromal cells retaining CTGF reporter expression decreased with age in vivo and was half the frequency in females compared to males. In culture, CTGF reporter expression and endogenous CTGF expression marked the same cell types as those labeled using Twist2-Cre and Osterix-Cre fate mapping approaches, which previously had been shown to identify mesenchymal progenitors in vitro. Consistent with this past work, sorted CTGF+ cells displayed an ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes in vitro and into osteoblast, adipocyte, and stromal cell lineages after transplantation into a parietal bone defect. In vivo examination of CTGF reporter expression in bone tissue sections revealed that it marked cells highly localized to the trabecular bone region and was not expressed in the perichondrium or periosteum. Mesenchymal cells retaining high CTGF reporter expression were adjacent to, but distinct from mature osteoblasts lining bone surfaces and endothelial cells forming the vascular sinuses. Comparison of CTGF and Osterix reporter expression in bone tissue sections indicated an inverse correlation between the strength of CTGF expression and osteoblast maturation. Down-regulation of CTGF reporter expression also occurred during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. Collectively, our studies indicate that CTGF reporter mice selectively identify a subpopulation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells that reside in the trabecular bone region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tumorigenicity and Validity of Fluorescence Labelled Mesenchymal and Epithelial Human Oral Cancer Cell Lines in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xin Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenicity and metastatic activity can be visually monitored in cancer cells that were labelled with stable fluorescence. The aim was to establish and validate local and distant spread of subcutaneously previously injected fluorescence transduced human tongue cancer cell lines of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype in nude mice. A total of 32 four-week-old male athymic Balb/c nude mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n=8. A single dose of 0.3 mL PBS containing 1 × 107 of four different cancer cell-lines (UM1, UM1-GFP, UM2, and UM2-RFP was injected subcutaneously into the right side of their posterolateral back. Validity assessment of the labelled cancer cells’ tumorigenicity was assessed by physical examination, imaging, and histology four weeks after the injection. The tumor take rate of cancer cells was similar in animals injected with either parental or transduced cancer cells. Transduced cancer cells in mice were easily detectable in vivo and after cryosection using fluorescent imaging. UM1 cells showed increased tumor take rate and mean tumor volume, presenting with disorganized histopathological patterns. Fluorescence labelled epithelial and mesenchymal human tongue cancer cell lines do not change in tumorigenicity or cell phenotype after injection in vivo.

  9. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Runyang; Yang Jian; Wu, Ed X.; Lin Shuyu

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling. - Highlights: → High frequency focus ultrasound can be used as a safe method for instant magnetic labeling of cells. → 8-16 times increased efficiency can be gained by ultrasound versus that by transfection agents. → Calculation of shear stress around cells provide a quantitative design for ultrasound protocols.

  10. Surface-modified magnetic nanoparticles for cell labeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zasońska, Beata Anna; Patsula, Vitalii; Stoika, R.; Horák, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2014), s. 63-73 ISSN 2305-7815 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14318 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * surface-modified * cell labeling Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. In vivo tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchmal stem cells injected via renal arteries in kidney failure rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junhui; Teng Gaojun; Ju Shenghong; Ma Zhanlong; Mai Xiaoli; Zhang Yu; Ma Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo depiction and tracking for magnetically labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stern cells (MSCs) in a renal failure rat model injected intravascularly using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Methods: Rat MSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Prussian blue stain was employed for identifying intracellular irons. An acute renal failure in rat was induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol and MSCs were injected into renal arteries of 11 recipients (labeled cells in six, unlabeled cells in five). MR images of kidneys were obtained respectively before injection of MSCs, and immediately, 1, 3, 5, and 8 clays after transplantation. MR imaging findings were analyzed, which were correlated with histological findings. Results: Rat MSCs were successfully labeled, and labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Prussian blue staining of Fe 2 O 3 -PLL labeled cells revealed the presence of iron-containing vesicles or endosomes in the cytoplasm. In the renal failure model of rats, the labeled MSCs were demonstrated as signal intensity loss in renal cortex on T 2 * -weighted MR images. The signal intensity decrease was visualized up to days 8 after transplantation. Histological analyses showed that most Prussian blue staining-positive cells were well correlated with the area where a signal intensity loss was observed in MRI. Signal intensity decrease was not detected after transplantation of unlabeled cells. Conclusion: The rat MSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging seems to be a good technique to monitor the magnetically labeled MSCs in vivo in renal failure rat model intravascularly administered, which may have much more potential values for studying the engraftment of stem cells in kidneys. (authors)

  12. Effect of labeling with iron oxide particles or nanodiamonds on the functionality of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead P Blaber

    Full Text Available Stem cells are increasingly the focus of translational research as well as having emerging roles in human cellular therapy. To support these uses there is a need for improved methods for in vivo cell localization and tracking. In this study, we examined the effects of cell labeling on the in vitro functionality of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Our results provide a basis for future in vivo studies investigating implanted cell fate and longevity. In particular, we investigated the effects of two different particles: micron-sized (~0.9 µm fluorescently labeled (Dragon Green superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (M-SPIO particles; and, carboxylated nanodiamonds of ~0.25 µm in size. The effects of labeling on the functionality of adipose-derived MSCs were assessed by in vitro morphology, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential, CD marker expression, cytokine secretion profiling and quantitative proteomics of the intra-cellular proteome. The differentiation and CD marker assays for stem-like functionality were not altered upon label incorporation and no secreted or intra-cellular protein changes indicative of stress or toxicity were detected. These in vitro results indicate that the M-SPIO particles and nanodiamonds investigated in this study are biocompatible with MSCs and therefore would be suitable labels for cell localization and tracking in vivo.

  13. Highly efficient mesenchymal stem cell proliferation on poly-epsilon-caprolactone nanofibers with embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daňková, Jana; Buzgo, Matej; Vejpravová, Jana; Kubíčková, Simona; Sovková, Věra; Vysloužilová, L.; Mantlíková, Alice; Nečas, A.; Amler, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2015 (2015), s. 7307-7317 ISSN 1176-9114 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15697S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1508; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E12057 Grant - others:FP7 MULTIFUN(XE) 262943 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic particles * mesenchymal stem cells * nanofibers Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D)

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cell labeling by new uncoated superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles in comparison with commercial Resovist – an initial in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skopalik J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Josef Skopalik,1 Katerina Polakova,2 Marketa Havrdova,2 Ivan Justan,1 Massimiliano Magro,3 David Milde,2 Lucia Knopfova,4 Jan Smarda,4 Helena Polakova,1 Eva Gabrielova,5 Fabio Vianello,2,3 Jaroslav Michalek,1 Radek Zboril21Department of Pharmacology, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; 2Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; 3Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Padova, Italy; 4Department of Experimental Biology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; 5Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech RepublicObjective: Cell therapies have emerged as a promising approach in medicine. The basis of each therapy is the injection of 1–100×106 cells with regenerative potential into some part of the body. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are the most used cell type in the cell therapy nowadays, but no gold standard for the labeling of the MSCs for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is available yet. This work evaluates our newly synthesized uncoated superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles (surface-active maghemite nanoparticles – SAMNs as an MRI contrast intracellular probe usable in a clinical 1.5 T MRI system.Methods: MSCs from rat and human donors were isolated, and then incubated at different concentrations (10–200 µg/mL of SAMN maghemite nanoparticles for 48 hours. Viability, proliferation, and nanoparticle uptake efficiency were tested (using fluorescence microscopy, xCELLigence analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and advanced microscopy techniques. Migration capacity, cluster of differentiation markers, effect of nanoparticles on long-term viability, contrast properties in MRI, and cocultivation of labeled cells with myocytes were also studied.Results: SAMNs do not

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.

    2016-12-28

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  17. Labelling of cultured macrophages with novel magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, J.-K. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Tai, M.-F. [Department of Electronic Engineering and Graduate School of Opto-Mechatronics and Materials, WuFeng Institute of Technology, 117, Chian-Kuo Rd., Sec. 2, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-yi 621, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: mftai@mail.wfc.edu.tw; Lee, Y.-C. [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-yi 621, Taiwan (China); Yang, C.-Y. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-Y. [Department of Physics, National Chung Cheng University, Ming-Hsiung, Chia-yi 621, Taiwan (China); Liu, H.-M. [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Fang, J.-S. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.-T. [Musculoskeletal Disease Center, J.L. Pettis VA Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92357 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is capable of demonstrating human anatomy and pathological conditions. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in MR imaging as liver-specific contrast medium, cellular and molecular imaging probes. Because few studies focused on the MNPs other than iron oxides, we developed FeNi alloy MNPs coated with polyethylenimine (PEI). In this study, we demonstrated PEI-coated FeNi MNPs are able to label the cells, which could be detected in MR imaging. For labelling purpose, MNPs were incubated with mouse macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7) for 24 h and these PEI-labelled FeNi alloy MNPs can be uptaken by macrophages efficiently compared with Ferucarbotran, a commercialized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) under flow cytometry measurement. Besides, these cells labelled with MNPs could be imaged in MR with the identical potency as Ferucarbotran. Further investigation of the cells using Prussian blue staining revealed that FeNi alloy MNPs inside the cells is not oxidized. This phenomenon alleviated the consideration of potential risk of nickel toxicity. We conclude that PEI-coated FeNi MNPs could be candidate for MR contrast medium.

  18. Labelling of cultured macrophages with novel magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, J.-K.; Tai, M.-F.; Lee, Y.-C.; Yang, C.-Y.; Wang, H.-Y.; Liu, H.-M.; Fang, J.-S.; Chen, S.-T.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is capable of demonstrating human anatomy and pathological conditions. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in MR imaging as liver-specific contrast medium, cellular and molecular imaging probes. Because few studies focused on the MNPs other than iron oxides, we developed FeNi alloy MNPs coated with polyethylenimine (PEI). In this study, we demonstrated PEI-coated FeNi MNPs are able to label the cells, which could be detected in MR imaging. For labelling purpose, MNPs were incubated with mouse macrophage cell line (Raw 264.7) for 24 h and these PEI-labelled FeNi alloy MNPs can be uptaken by macrophages efficiently compared with Ferucarbotran, a commercialized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) under flow cytometry measurement. Besides, these cells labelled with MNPs could be imaged in MR with the identical potency as Ferucarbotran. Further investigation of the cells using Prussian blue staining revealed that FeNi alloy MNPs inside the cells is not oxidized. This phenomenon alleviated the consideration of potential risk of nickel toxicity. We conclude that PEI-coated FeNi MNPs could be candidate for MR contrast medium

  19. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-ping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T 7-8 . Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  20. Aptamer-based isolation and subsequent imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in ischemic myocard by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, R; Wiskirchen, J; Guo, K; Neumann, B; Kehlbach, R; Pintaske, J; Voth, V; Walker, T; Scheule, A M; Greiner, T O; Hermanutz-Klein, U; Claussen, C D; Northoff, H; Ziemer, G; Wendel, H P

    2007-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) seem to be a promising cell source for cellular cardiomyoplasty. We recently developed a new aptamer-based specific selection of MSC to provide "ready to transplant" cells directly after isolation. We evaluated MRI tracking of newly isolated and freshly transplanted MSC in the heart using one short ex vivo selection step combining specific aptamer-based isolation and labeling of the cells. Bone marrow (BM) was collected from healthy pigs. The animals were euthanized and the heart was placed in a perfusion model. During cold ischemia, immunomagnetic isolation of MSC from the BM by MSC-specific aptamers labeled with Dynabeads was performed within 2 h. For histological identification the cells were additionally stained with PKH26. Approx. 3 x 10(6) of the freshly aptamer-isolated cells were injected into the ramus interventricularis anterior (RIVA) and 5 x 10(5) cells were injected directly into myocardial tissue after damaging the respective area by freezing (cryo-scar). 3 x 10(6) of the aptamer-isolated cells were kept for further characterization (FACS and differentiation assays). 20 h after cell transplantation, MRI of the heart using a clinical 3.0 Tesla whole body scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens, Germany) was performed followed by histological examinations. The average yield of sorted cells from 120 ml BM was 7 x 10(6) cells. The cells were cultured and showed MSC-like properties. MRI showed reproducible artifacts within the RIVA-perfusion area and the cryo-scar with surprisingly excellent quality. The histological examination of the biopsies showed PKH26-positive cells within the areas which were positive in the MRI in contrast to the control biopsies. Immunomagnetic separation of MSC by specific aptamers linked to magnetic particles is feasible, effective and combines a specific separation and labeling technique to a "one stop shop" strategy.

  1. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy Morais, J.P.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Bao, S.N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall

  2. Nanoparticle Labeling of Bone Marrow-Derived Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Their Use in Differentiation and Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Akhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are promising candidates for cellular therapies due to their ability to migrate to damaged tissue without inducing immune reaction. Many techniques have been developed to trace MSCs and their differentiation efficacy; however, all of these methods have limitations. Conjugated polymer based water-dispersible nanoparticles (CPN represent a new class of probes because they offer high brightness, improved photostability, high fluorescent quantum yield, and noncytotoxicity comparing to conventional dyes and quantum dots. We aimed to use this tool for tracing MSCs’ fate in vitro and in vivo. MSC marker expression, survival, and differentiation capacity were assessed upon CPN treatment. Our results showed that after CPN labeling, MSC markers did not change and significant number of cells were found to be viable as revealed by MTT. Fluorescent signals were retained for 3 weeks after they were differentiated into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. We also showed that the labeled MSCs migrated to the site of injury and retained their labels in an in vivo liver regeneration model. The utilization of nanoparticle could be a promising tool for the tracking of MSCs in vivo and in vitro and therefore can be a useful tool to understand differentiation and homing mechanisms of MSCs.

  3. On the importance of sensor height variation for detection of magnetic labels by magnetoresistive sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Wang, Shan Xiang; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistive sensors are widely used for biosensing by detecting the signal from magnetic labels bound to a functionalized area that usually covers the entire sensor structure. Magnetic labels magnetized by a homogeneous applied magnetic field weaken and strengthen the applied field when...

  4. In vivo tracking of 111In-oxine labeled mesenchymal stem cells following infusion in patients with advanced cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Mirpour, Sahar; Bagheri, Mohammad; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Abdolahzadeh, Leila; Saghari, Mohsen; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several animal and few human studies suggest the beneficial role of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in liver cirrhosis. However, little is known about the fate of MSCs after infusion in cirrhotic patients. We evaluated stem cell biodistribution after peripheral infusion of MSCs in four cirrhotic patients. Methods: After three passages of MSCs, the patients received a total of 250-400x10 6 cells, of which only 50% of the cells were labeled. Specific activities of 0.21-0.67 MBq/10 6 cells were maintained for the injected labeled MSCs. Planar whole-body acquisitions (anterior/posterior projections) were acquired immediately following infusion as well as at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 7th and 10th days after cell infusion. Results: After intravenous infusion, the radioactivity was first observed to accumulate in the lungs. During the following hours to days, the radioactivity gradually increased in the liver and spleen, with spleen uptake exceeding that in the liver in all patients. Region-of-interest analysis showed that the percentage of cells homing to the liver (following decay and background corrections and geometric mean calculation) increased from 0.0%-2.8% at immediately post-infusion images to 13.0-17.4% in 10th-day post-infusion. Similarly, the residual activities in the spleen increased from 2.0%-10.2% at immediately post-infusion images to 30.1%-42.2% in 10th-day post-infusion. During the same period, the residual activities in the lungs decreased from 27.0-33.5% to 2.0-5.4%. Conclusion: The infusion of MSCs labeled with 111 In-oxine through a peripheral vein is safe in cirrhosis. Cell labeling with 111 In-oxine is a suitable method for tracking MSC distribution after infusion.

  5. In vivo tracking of {sup 111}In-oxine labeled mesenchymal stem cells following infusion in patients with advanced cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali, E-mail: agholam1@jhmi.edu [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirpour, Sahar [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Mohammad; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi [Digestive Disease Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alimoghaddam, Kamran [Hematology and BMT Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolahzadeh, Leila [Digestive Disease Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saghari, Mohsen [Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malekzadeh, Reza [Digestive Disease Research Center. Shariati Hospital. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Background: Several animal and few human studies suggest the beneficial role of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in liver cirrhosis. However, little is known about the fate of MSCs after infusion in cirrhotic patients. We evaluated stem cell biodistribution after peripheral infusion of MSCs in four cirrhotic patients. Methods: After three passages of MSCs, the patients received a total of 250-400x10{sup 6} cells, of which only 50% of the cells were labeled. Specific activities of 0.21-0.67 MBq/10{sup 6} cells were maintained for the injected labeled MSCs. Planar whole-body acquisitions (anterior/posterior projections) were acquired immediately following infusion as well as at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 7th and 10th days after cell infusion. Results: After intravenous infusion, the radioactivity was first observed to accumulate in the lungs. During the following hours to days, the radioactivity gradually increased in the liver and spleen, with spleen uptake exceeding that in the liver in all patients. Region-of-interest analysis showed that the percentage of cells homing to the liver (following decay and background corrections and geometric mean calculation) increased from 0.0%-2.8% at immediately post-infusion images to 13.0-17.4% in 10th-day post-infusion. Similarly, the residual activities in the spleen increased from 2.0%-10.2% at immediately post-infusion images to 30.1%-42.2% in 10th-day post-infusion. During the same period, the residual activities in the lungs decreased from 27.0-33.5% to 2.0-5.4%. Conclusion: The infusion of MSCs labeled with {sup 111}In-oxine through a peripheral vein is safe in cirrhosis. Cell labeling with {sup 111}In-oxine is a suitable method for tracking MSC distribution after infusion.

  6. Francisella tularensis detection using magnetic labels and a magnetic biosensor based on frequency mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Martin H.F.; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Hartmann, Markus; Miethe, Peter; Oster, Juergen; Keusgen, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A biosensor that uses resonant coils with a special frequency-mixing technique and magnetic beads as detectable labels has been established for the detection of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent for tularemia. The detection principle is based on a sandwich immunoassay using an anti-Ft antibody for immunofiltration immobilized to ABICAP[reg] polyethylene filters, and biotinylated with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads as labels. The linear detection range of this biosensor was found to be 10 4 -10 6 cfu F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) per ml. Tested sample matrices were physiological PBS buffer and rabbit serum

  7. Francisella tularensis detection using magnetic labels and a magnetic biosensor based on frequency mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Martin H.F. [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Krause, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Bio-and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Center Juelich (Germany); Hartmann, Markus [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Miethe, Peter [SENOVA GmbH, Jena (Germany); Oster, Juergen [chemagen GmbH, Baesweiler (Germany); Keusgen, Michael [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany)]. E-mail: Keusgen@staff.uni-marburg.de

    2007-04-15

    A biosensor that uses resonant coils with a special frequency-mixing technique and magnetic beads as detectable labels has been established for the detection of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent for tularemia. The detection principle is based on a sandwich immunoassay using an anti-Ft antibody for immunofiltration immobilized to ABICAP[reg] polyethylene filters, and biotinylated with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads as labels. The linear detection range of this biosensor was found to be 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cfu F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) per ml. Tested sample matrices were physiological PBS buffer and rabbit serum.

  8. Highly efficient magnetic targeting of mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněček, Václav; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Forostyak, Serhiy; Růžička, Jiří; Herynek, V.; Babič, Michal; Jendelová, Pavla; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr; Syková, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, 16 Jul (2012), s. 3719-3730 E-ISSN 1178-2013 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1370; GA ČR GAP304/11/0731; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0189; GA ČR GAP304/11/0653; GA AV ČR IAA500390902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703; CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : nanoparticles * mesenchymal stem cells * magnetic targeting Subject RIV: FH - Neurology; BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism (FZU-D); FH - Neurology (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 3.463, year: 2012

  9. Sensitive and rapid immunoassay for parathyroid hormone using magnetic particle labels and magnetic actuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittmer, W.U.; Kievit, de P.; Prins, M.W.J.; Vissers, J.L.M.; Mersch, M.E.C.; Martens, M.F.W.C.

    2008-01-01

    A rapid method for the sensitive detection of proteins using actuated magnetic particle labels, which are measured with a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) biosensor, is described. The technique involves a 1-step sandwich immunoassay with no fluid replacement steps. The various assay binding reactions

  10. Magnetic targeting as a strategy to enhance therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luisa H A; Cruz, Fernanda F; Morales, Marcelo M; Weiss, Daniel J; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2017-03-09

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. It is known that the success of MSC-based therapies depends primarily on effective cell delivery to the target site where they will secrete vesicles and soluble factors with immunomodulatory and potentially reparative properties. However, some lesions are located in sites that are difficult to access, such as the heart, spinal cord, and joints. Additionally, low MSC retention at target sites makes cell therapy short-lasting and, therefore, less effective. In this context, the magnetic targeting technique has emerged as a new strategy to aid delivery, increase retention, and enhance the effects of MSCs. This approach uses magnetic nanoparticles to magnetize MSCs and static magnetic fields to guide them in vivo, thus promoting more focused, effective, and lasting retention of MSCs at the target site. In the present review, we discuss the magnetic targeting technique, its principles, and the materials most commonly used; we also discuss its potential for MSC enhancement, and safety concerns that should be addressed before it can be applied in clinical practice.

  11. Detection of intramyocardially injected DiR-labeled mesenchymal stem cells by optical and optoacoustic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berninger, Markus T; Mohajerani, Pouyan; Wildgruber, Moritz; Beziere, Nicolas; Kimm, Melanie A; Ma, Xiaopeng; Haller, Bernhard; Fleming, Megan J; Vogt, Stephan; Anton, Martina; Imhoff, Andreas B; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Meier, Reinhard; Henning, Tobias D

    2017-06-01

    The distribution of intramyocardially injected rabbit MSCs, labeled with the near-infrared dye 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindotricarbo-cyanine-iodide (DiR) using hybrid Fluorescence Molecular Tomography-X-ray Computed Tomography (FMT-XCT) and Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) imaging technologies, was investigated. Viability and induction of apoptosis of DiR labeled MSCs were assessed by XTT- and Caspase-3/-7-testing in vitro . 2 × 10 6 , 2 × 10 5 and 2 × 10 4 MSCs labeled with 5 and 10 μg DiR/ml were injected into fresh frozen rabbit hearts. FMT-XCT, MSOT and fluorescence cryosection imaging were performed. Concentrations up to 10 μg DiR/ml did not cause apoptosis in vitro (p > 0.05). FMT and MSOT imaging of labeled MSCs led to a strong signal. The imaging modalities highlighted a difference in cell distribution and concentration correlated to the number of injected cells. Ex-vivo cryosectioning confirmed the molecular fluorescence signal. FMT and MSOT are sensitive imaging techniques offering high-anatomic resolution in terms of detection and distribution of intramyocardially injected stem cells in a rabbit model.

  12. In vivo quantification of magnetically labelled cells by MRI relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Lajous, Hélène; El Atifi, Michèle; Bidart, Marie; Auboiroux, Vincent; Fries, Pascal Henry; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Cellular MRI, which visualizes magnetically labelled cells (cells*), is an active research field for in vivo cell therapy and tracking. The simultaneous relaxation rate measurements (R 2 *, R 2 , R 1 ) are the basis of a quantitative cellular MRI method proposed here. U937 cells were labelled with Molday ION Rhodamine B, a bi-functional superparamagnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle (U937*). U937* viability and proliferation were not affected in vitro. In vitro relaxometry was performed in a cell concentration range of [2.5 × 10 4 -10 8 ] cells/mL. These measurements show the existence of complementary cell concentration intervals where these rates vary linearly. The juxtaposition of these intervals delineates a wide cell concentration range over which one of the relaxation rates in a voxel of an in vivo image can be converted into an absolute cell concentration. The linear regime was found at high concentrations for R 1 in the range of [10 6 - 2 × 10 8 ] cells/mL, at intermediate concentrations for R 2 in [2.5 × 10 5 - 5 × 10 7 ] cells/mL and at low concentrations for R 2 * in [8 × 10 4 - 5 × 10 6 ] cells/mL. In vivo relaxometry was performed in a longitudinal study, with labelled U937 cells injected into a U87 glioma mouse model. Using in vitro data, maps of in vivo U937* concentrations were obtained by converting one of the in vivo relaxation rates to cell concentration maps. MRI results were compared with the corresponding optical images of the same brains, showing the usefulness of our method to accurately follow therapeutic cell biodistribution in a longitudinal study. Results also demonstrate that the method quantifies a large range of magnetically labelled cells*. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Manganese–gold nanoparticles as an MRI positive contrast agent in mesenchymal stem cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunyadi Murph, Simona E.; Jacobs, Stephanie; Liu Jimei; Hu, Tom C.-C.; Siegfired, Matthew; Serkiz, Steven M.; Hudson, Joan

    2012-01-01

    We report a straightforward approach to prepare multifunctional manganese–gold nanoparticles by attaching Mn(II) ions onto the surface of 20 nm citrate-capped gold nanoparticles. In vitro MRI measurements made in agarose gel phantoms exhibited high relaxivity (18.26 ± 1.04 mmol −1 s −1 ). Controlled incubation of the nanoparticles with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was used to study cellular uptake of these particles and this process appeared to be controlled by the size of the nanoparticle aggregates in the extracellular solution. SEM images of live MSCs showed an increased concentration of particles near the cell membrane and a distribution of the size of particles within the cells. Survivability for MSCs in contact with Mn–Au NPs was greater than 97% over the 3-day period and up to the 1 mM Mn used in this study. The high relaxivity and low cell mortality are suggestive of an enhanced positive contrast agent for in vitro or in vivo applications.

  14. Simple optical measurement of the magnetic moment of magnetically labeled objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidsieck, Alexandra, E-mail: aheidsieck@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rudigkeit, Sarah [Physics Department, Technische Universität München (Germany); Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    The magnetic moment of magnetically labeled cells, microbubbles or microspheres is an important optimization parameter for many targeting, delivery or separation applications. The quantification of this property is often difficult, since it depends not only on the type of incorporated nanoparticle, but also on the intake capabilities, surface properties and internal distribution. We describe a method to determine the magnetic moment of those carriers using a microscopic set-up and an image processing algorithm. In contrast to other works, we measure the diversion of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in a static fluid. The set-up is optimized to achieve a homogeneous movement of the magnetic carriers inside the magnetic field. The evaluation is automated with a customized algorithm, utilizing a set of basic algorithms, including blob recognition, feature-based shape recognition and a graph algorithm. We present example measurements for the characteristic properties of different types of carriers in combination with different types of nanoparticles. Those properties include velocity in the magnetic field as well as the magnetic moment. The investigated carriers are adherent and suspension cells, while the used nanoparticles have different sizes and coatings to obtain varying behavior of the carriers. - Highlights: • Determination of the magnetic moment of magnetic carriers. • optimized set-up achieve a homogeneous movement. • Automated evaluation with a customized algorithm. • example measurements for the properties of nanoparticle-loaded cells.

  15. Aptamer-based isolation and subsequent imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in ischemic myocard by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, R.; Hermanutz-Klein, U.; Northoff, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Transfusionsmedizin; Wiskirchen, J.; Kehlbach, R.; Pintaske, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Guo, K.; Neumann, B.; Voth, V.; Walker, T.; Scheule, A.M.; Greiner, T.O.; Ziemer, G.; Wendel, H.P. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. fuer Thorax-, Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Radiologische Universitaetsklinik

    2007-10-15

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) seem to be a promising cell source for cellular cardiomyoplasty. We recently developed a new aptamer-based specific selection of MSC to provide ''ready to transplant'' cells directly after isolation. We evaluated MRI tracking of newly isolated and freshly transplanted MSC in the heart using one short ex vivo selection step combining specific aptamer-based isolation and labeling of the cells. Materials and Methods: Bone marrow (BM) was collected from healthy pigs. The animals were euthanized and the heart was placed in a perfusion model. During cold ischemia, immunomagnetic isolation of MSC from the BM by MSC-specific aptamers labeled with Dynabeads {sup registered} was performed within 2 h. For histological identification the cells were additionally stained with PKH26. Approx. 3 x 10{sup 6} of the freshly aptamer-isolated cells were injected into the ramus interventricularis anterior (RIVA) and 5 x 10{sup 5} cells were injected directly into myocardial tissue after damaging the respective area by freezing (cryo-scar). 3 x 10{sup 6} of the aptamer-isolated cells were kept for further characterization (FACS and differentiation assays). 20 h after cell transplantation, MRI of the heart using a clinical 3.0 Tesla whole body scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens, Germany) was performed followed by histological examinations. Results: The average yield of sorted cells from 120 ml BM was 7 x 10{sup 6} cells. The cells were cultured and showed MSC-like properties. MRI showed reproducible artifacts within the RIVA-perfusion area and the cryo-scar with surprisingly excellent quality. The histological examination of the biopsies showed PKH26-positive cells within the areas which were positive in the MRI in contrast to the control biopsies. Conclusion: Immunomagnetic separation of MSC by specific aptamers linked to magnetic particles is feasible, effective and combines a specific separation and labeling technique to a &apos

  16. Scaffold-free, label-free and nozzle-free biofabrication technology using magnetic levitational assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, Vladislav A; Koudan, Elizaveta V; Bulanova, Elena A; Karalkin, Pavel A; Pereira, Frederico DAS; Norkin, Nikita E; Knyazeva, Alisa D; Gryadunova, Anna A; Petrov, Oleg F; Vasiliev, M M; Myasnikov, Maxim; Chernikov, Valery P; Kasyanov, Vladimir A; Marchenkov, Artem Yu; Brakke, Kenneth A; Khesuani, Yusef D; Demirci, Utkan; Mironov, Vladimir A

    2018-05-31

    Tissue spheroids have been proposed as building blocks in 3D biofabrication. Conventional magnetic force-driven 2D patterning of tissue spheroids requires prior cell labeling by magnetic nanoparticles, meanwhile a label-free approach for 3D magnetic levitational assembly has been introduced. Here we present first-time report on rapid assembly of 3D tissue construct using scaffold-free, nozzle-free and label-free magnetic levitation of tissue spheroids. Chondrospheres of standard size, shape and capable to fusion have been biofabricated from primary sheep chondrocytes using non-adhesive technology. Label-free magnetic levitation was performed using a prototype device equipped with permanent magnets in presence of gadolinium (Gd3+) in culture media, which enables magnetic levitation. Mathematical modeling and computer simulations were used for prediction of magnetic field and kinetics of tissue spheroids assembly into 3D tissue constructs. First, we used polystyrene beads to simulate the assembly of tissue spheroids and to determine the optimal settings for magnetic levitation in presence of Gd3+. Second, we proved the ability of chondrospheres to assemble rapidly into 3D tissue construct in the permanent magnetic field in the presence of Gd3+. Thus, scaffold- and label-free magnetic levitation of tissue spheroids is a promising approach for rapid 3D biofabrication and attractive alternative to label-based magnetic force-driven tissue engineering. . © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Pulsed magnetic field enhances therapeutic efficiency of mesenchymal stem cells in chronic neuropathic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Tufan; Kurt, Akif Hakan; Altun, İdiris; Celik, Ahmet; Baran, Furkan; Gunay, Ismail

    2017-05-01

    Cell-based or magnetic field therapies as alternative approaches to pain management have been tested in several experimental pain models. The aim of this study therefore was to investigate the actions of the cell-based therapy (adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells; ADMSC) or pulsed magnetic field (PMF) therapy and magneto-cell therapy (combination of ADMSC and PMF) in chronic constriction nerve injury model (CCI). The actions of individual ADMSC (route dependent [systemic or local], time-dependent [a day or a week after surgery]), or PMF and their combination (magneto-cell) therapies on hyperalgesia and allodynia were investigated by using thermal plantar test and a dynamic plantar aesthesiometer, respectively. In addition, various cytokine levels (IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10) of rat sciatic nerve after CCI were analyzed. Following the CCI, both latency and threshold significantly decreased. ADMSC or PMF significantly increased latencies and thresholds. The combination of ADMSC with PMF even more significantly increased latency and threshold when compared with ADMSC alone. However, ADMSC-induced decrease in pro-inflammatory or increase in anti-inflammatory cytokines levels were partially prevented by PMF treatments. Present findings may suggest that both cell-based and magnetic therapies can effectively attenuate chronic neuropathic pain symptoms. Combined magneto-cell therapy may also efficiently reverse neuropathic signs. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:255-264, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. 188Re labeling and biodistribution of magnetic nanoparticles for the tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guiping; Zhang Hui; Wang Yongxian; Zhang Chunfu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To prepare 188 Re labeled monoclonal antibody (Herceptin)-coated magnetic nanoparticles for tumor targeting and to study its biodistribution in mice. Methods: Herceptin and histidine were covalently linked to the amine group upon silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles modified by N-[3-(trimethyoxysilyl)prowl]-ethylenediamine using glutaraldehyde method. The Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles and Herceptin were radiolabeled with 188 Re by a direct labelling method, whereas the histidine-coated magnetic nanoparticles was radiolabeled with 188 Re using fac-[ 188 Re(CO) 3 (H 2 0) 3 ] + as a precursor. The labelling efficiency and immunoreactivity as well as labelling stability were determined. Also, the biodistribution of 188 Re-magnetic and 188 Re-Herceptin-magnetic nanoparticles were observed in mice. Results: Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) with diameter about 60 nm, while histidine-coated magnetic nanoparticles about 30 nm. The labeling efficiency for 188 Re-Herceptin, 188 Re-magnetic nanoparticles and 188 Re-Herceptin-magnetic nanoparticles were all > 90% and had a better stability in vitro. The immunoreactivity of Herceptin linked to magnetic nanoparticles was still high. The biodistribution in mice was shown that 188 Re-magnetic nanoparticles and 188 Re-Herceptin- magnetic nanoparticles had higher radioactivity levels in blood. Magnetic nanoparticles with diameter of 30 or 60 nm had a long half-life in blood stream and were accumulated in liver. Conclusion: The efficiency and stability of labelling Herceptin-coated magnetic nanoparticles and labelling magnetic nanoparticles with 188 Re are suitable for in vivo study in tumor-beating nude mice models. (authors)

  19. Intraarticular and intravenous administration of 99MTc-HMPAO-labeled human mesenchymal stem cells (99MTC-AH-MSCS): In vivo imaging and biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meseguer-Olmo, Luis; Montellano, Antonio Jesús; Martínez, Teresa; Martínez, Carlos M.; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Roldán, Marta; Mora, Cristina Fuente; López-Lucas, Maria Dolores; Fuente, Teodomiro

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Therapeutic application of intravenous administered (IV) human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ahMSCs) appears to have as main drawback the massive retention of cells in the lung parenchyma, questioning the suitability of this via of administration. Intraarticular administration (IAR) could be considered as an alternative route for therapy in degenerative and traumatic joint lesions. Our work is outlined as a comparative study of biodistribution of 99m Tc-ahMSCs after IV and IAR administration, via scintigraphic study in an animal model. Methods: Isolated primary culture of adult human mesenchymal stem cells was labeled with 99m Tc-HMPAO for scintigraphic study of in vivo distribution after intravenous and intra-articular (knee) administration in rabbits. Results: IV administration of radiolabeled ahMSCs showed the bulk of radioactivity in the lung parenchyma while IAR images showed activity mainly in the injected cavity and complete absence of uptake in pulmonary bed. Conclusions: Our study shows that IAR administration overcomes the limitations of IV injection, in particular, those related to cells destruction in the lung parenchyma. After IAR administration, cells remain within the joint cavity, as expected given its size and adhesion properties. Advances in knowledge: Intra-articular administration of adult human mesenchymal stem cells could be a suitable route for therapeutic effect in joint lesions. Implications for patient care: Local administration of adult human mesenchymal stem cells could improve their therapeutic effects, minimizing side effects in patients.

  20. Sensitive and rapid immunoassay for parathyroid hormone using magnetic particle labels and magnetic actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, W U; de Kievit, P; Prins, M W J; Vissers, J L M; Mersch, M E C; Martens, M F W C

    2008-09-30

    A rapid method for the sensitive detection of proteins using actuated magnetic particle labels, which are measured with a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) biosensor, is described. The technique involves a 1-step sandwich immunoassay with no fluid replacement steps. The various assay binding reactions as well as the bound/free separation are entirely controlled by magnetic forces induced by electromagnets above and below the sensor chip. During the assay, particles conjugated with tracer antibodies are actuated through the sample for target capture, and rapidly brought to the sensor surface where they bind to immobilized capture antibodies. Weakly or unbound labels are removed with a magnetic force oriented away from the GMR sensor surface. For the measurement of parathyroid hormone (PTH), a detection limit in the 10 pM range is obtained with a total assay time of 15 min when 300 nm particles are used. The same sensitivity can be achieved in 5 min when 500 nm particles are used. If 500 nm particles are employed in a 15-minute assay, then 0.8 pM of PTH is detectable. The low sample volume, high analytical performance and high speed of the test coupled with the compact GMR biosensor make the system especially suitable for sensitive testing outside of laboratory environments.

  1. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats (p quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group (p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  2. Detection of magnetic-labeled antibody specific recognition events by combined atomic force and magnetic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Xia; Liu Yanmei; Li Jun; Guo Wei; Bai Yubai

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were developed to detect biomolecular specific interaction. Goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (anti-IgG) was covalently attached onto gold substrate modified by a self-assembly monolayer of thioctic acid via 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide (EDC) activation. Magnetic-labeled IgG then specifically adsorbed onto anti-IgG surface. The morphological variation was identified by AFM. MFM was proved to be a fine assistant tool to distinguish the immunorecognized nanocomposites from the impurities by detection of the magnetic signal from magnetic-labeled IgG. It would enhance the understanding of biomolecular recognition process.

  3. Detection of magnetic-labeled antibody specific recognition events by combined atomic force and magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Xia [Center for Advanced Optoelectronic Functional Materials Research, Key Laboratory of UV Light-Emitting Materials and Technology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)], E-mail: xiahong@nenu.edu.cn; Liu Yanmei; Li Jun; Guo Wei; Bai Yubai [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Atomic force (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were developed to detect biomolecular specific interaction. Goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (anti-IgG) was covalently attached onto gold substrate modified by a self-assembly monolayer of thioctic acid via 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide (EDC) activation. Magnetic-labeled IgG then specifically adsorbed onto anti-IgG surface. The morphological variation was identified by AFM. MFM was proved to be a fine assistant tool to distinguish the immunorecognized nanocomposites from the impurities by detection of the magnetic signal from magnetic-labeled IgG. It would enhance the understanding of biomolecular recognition process.

  4. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats ( p pancreas of rats in the diabetes group, and was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group ( p pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  5. Magnetic targeting of iron-oxide-labeled fluorescent hepatoma cells to the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciani, Alain [Universite Rene Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie, EA 4062, Paris (France); Imagerie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France); Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence [Universite Paris Diderot, Batiment Condorcet, Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes, CNRS-UMR 7057, Paris Cedex (France); Bruneval, Patrick [Anatomopathologie, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris (France); Cunin, Patrick [Unite de Recherche Clinique, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France); Autret, Gwennhael; Clement, Olivier [Universite Rene Descartes, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie, EA 4062, Paris (France); Rahmouni, Alain [Imagerie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine Paris XII, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil cedex (France)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an external magnet field can induce preferential trafficking of magnetically labeled Huh7 hepatoma cells to the liver following liver cell transplantation. Huh7 hepatoma cells were labeled with anionic magnetic nanoparticles (AMNP) and tagged with a fluorescent membrane marker (PKH67). Iron-uptake was measured by magnetophoresis. Twenty C57Bl6 mice received an intrasplenic injection of 2 x 10{sup 6} labeled cells. An external magnet (0.29 T; 25 T/m) was placed over the liver of 13 randomly selected animals (magnet group), while the remaining 7 animals served as controls. MRI (1.5 T) and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) were performed 10 days post-transplantation. The presence and location of labeled cells within the livers were compared in the magnet group and controls, and confronted with histological analysis representing the standard of reference. Mean iron content per cell was 6 pg. Based on histology, labeled cells were more frequently present within recipient livers in the magnet group (p < 0.01) where their distribution was preferentially peri-vascular (p<0.05). MRI and CFM gave similar results for the overall detection of transplanted cells (kappa=0.828) and for the identification of peri-vascular cells (kappa=0.78). Application of an external magnet can modify the trafficking of transplanted cells, especially by promoting the formation of perivascular aggregates. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic targeting of iron-oxide-labeled fluorescent hepatoma cells to the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciani, Alain; Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence; Bruneval, Patrick; Cunin, Patrick; Autret, Gwennhael; Clement, Olivier; Rahmouni, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an external magnet field can induce preferential trafficking of magnetically labeled Huh7 hepatoma cells to the liver following liver cell transplantation. Huh7 hepatoma cells were labeled with anionic magnetic nanoparticles (AMNP) and tagged with a fluorescent membrane marker (PKH67). Iron-uptake was measured by magnetophoresis. Twenty C57Bl6 mice received an intrasplenic injection of 2 x 10 6 labeled cells. An external magnet (0.29 T; 25 T/m) was placed over the liver of 13 randomly selected animals (magnet group), while the remaining 7 animals served as controls. MRI (1.5 T) and confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) were performed 10 days post-transplantation. The presence and location of labeled cells within the livers were compared in the magnet group and controls, and confronted with histological analysis representing the standard of reference. Mean iron content per cell was 6 pg. Based on histology, labeled cells were more frequently present within recipient livers in the magnet group (p < 0.01) where their distribution was preferentially peri-vascular (p<0.05). MRI and CFM gave similar results for the overall detection of transplanted cells (kappa=0.828) and for the identification of peri-vascular cells (kappa=0.78). Application of an external magnet can modify the trafficking of transplanted cells, especially by promoting the formation of perivascular aggregates. (orig.)

  7. Fe3O4/BSA particles induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells under static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pengfei; Zhang, Yixian; Zhu, Chaonan; Zhang, Wenjing; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2016-12-01

    Differentiation of stem cells is influenced by many factors, yet uptake of the magnetic particles with or without magnetic field is rarely tackled. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles-loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Fe 3 O 4 /BSA) particles were prepared, which showed a spherical morphology with a diameter below 200 nm, negatively charged surface, and tunable magnetic property. The particles could be internalized into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their release from the cells was significantly retarded under external magnetic field, resulting in almost twice intracellular amount of the particles within 21 d compared to that of the magnetic field free control. Uptake of the Fe 3 O 4 /BSA particles enhanced significantly the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under a static magnetic field, as evidenced by elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and expressions of collagen type I and osteocalcin at both mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, uptake of the Fe 3 O 4 /BSA particles brings significant influence on the differentiation of MSCs under magnetic field, and thereby should be paid great attention for practical applications. Differentiation of stem cells is influenced by many factors, yet uptake of the magnetic particles with or without magnetic field is rarely tackled. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles-loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) (Fe 3 O 4 /BSA) particles with a diameter below 200nm, negatively charged surface, tunable Fe 3 O 4 content and subsequently adjustable magnetic property were prepared. The particles could be internalized into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their release from the cells was significantly retarded under external magnetic field. Uptake of the Fe 3 O 4 /BSA particles enhanced significantly the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs under a constant static magnetic field, while the magnetic particles and external magnetic field alone do not influence significantly the

  8. Label-Free Alignment of Nonmagnetic Particles in a Small Uniform Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Rui Ge; Wang, Z P; Ramanujan, R V

    2018-01-01

    Label-free manipulation of biological entities can minimize damage, increase viability and improve efficiency of subsequent analysis. Understanding the mechanism of interaction between magnetic and nonmagnetic particles in an inverse ferrofluid can provide a mechanism of label-free manipulation of such entities in a uniform magnetic field. The magnetic force, induced by relative magnetic susceptibility difference between nonmagnetic particles and surrounding magnetic particles as well as particle-particle interaction were studied. Label-free alignment of nonmagnetic particles can be achieved by higher magnetic field strength (Ba), smaller particle spacing (R), larger particle size (rp1), and higher relative magnetic permeability difference between particle and the surrounding fluid (Rμr). Rμr can be used to predict the direction of the magnetic force between both magnetic and nonmagnetic particles. A sandwich structure, containing alternate layers of magnetic and nonmagnetic particle chains, was studied. This work can be used for manipulation of nonmagnetic particles in lab-on-a-chip applications.

  9. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun

    2012-01-01

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/√Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 μm with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 μm, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  10. Detecting molecules and cells labeled with magnetic particles using an atomic magnetometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Dindi; Ruangchaithaweesuk, Songtham; Yao Li; Xu Shoujun, E-mail: sxu7@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The detection of magnetically labeled molecules and cells involves three essential parameters: sensitivity, spatial resolution, and molecular specificity. We report on the use of atomic magnetometry and its derivative techniques to achieve high performance in terms of all these parameters. With a sensitivity of 80 fT/{radical}Hz for dc magnetic fields, we show that 7,000 streptavidin-conjugated magnetic microparticles magnetized by a permanent magnet produce a magnetic field of 650 pT; this result predicts that a single such particle can be detected during one second of signal averaging. Spatial information is obtained using a scanning magnetic imaging scheme. The spatial resolution is 20 {mu}m with a detection distance of more than 1 cm; this distance is much longer than that in previous reports. The molecular specificity is achieved using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy, which currently uses an atomic magnetometer for detection. As an example, we perform measurement of magnetically labeled human CD4+ T cells, whose count in the blood is the diagnostic criterion for human immunodeficiency virus infection. Magnetic particles that are specifically bound to the cells are resolved from nonspecifically bound particles and quantitatively correlate with the number of cells. The magnetic particles have an overall size of 2.8 {mu}m, with a magnetic core in nanometer regime. The combination of our techniques is predicted to be useful in molecular and cellular imaging.

  11. Combination of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy on mesenchymal stem cell line treated with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine magnetic-nanoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Leonardo B. de; Primo, Fernando L.; Pinto, Marcelo R.; Morais, Paulo C.

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports on the preparation and the cell viability assay of two nanoemulsions loaded with magnetic nanoparticle and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine. The preparations contain equal amount of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (0.05 mg/mL) but different contents of magnetic nanoparticle (0.15×10 13 or 1.50×10 13 particle/mL). The human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line was used as the model to assess the cell viability and this type of cell can be used as a model to mimic cancer stem cells. The cell viability assays were performed in isolated as well as under combined magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. We found from the cell viability assay that under the hyperthermia treatment (1 MHz and 40 Oe magnetic field amplitude) the cell viability reduction was about 10%, regardless the magnetic nanoparticle content within the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation. However, cell viability reduction of about 50% and 60% were found while applying the photodynamic therapy treatment using the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation containing 0.15×10 13 or 1.50×10 13 magnetic particle/mL, respectively. Finally, an average reduction in cell viability of about 66% was found while combining the hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. - Highlights: • Current protocols in nanotechnology allow for biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles being associated with photosensitizer photoactive drugs, which could lead to perfectly controlled drug release. • The combination of the HPT and PDT therapies can be useful to develop further protocols for both advanced in vitro and in vivo assays. • Magnetic nanodevices associated with therapies have led to the decreased of proliferation of cell population that provides a favorable environment for tumor progression

  12. Combination of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy on mesenchymal stem cell line treated with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine magnetic-nanoemulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Leonardo B. de [Departamento de Química, Centro de Nanotecnologia e Engenharia Tecidual, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Departamento de Genética, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14049-900 (Brazil); Primo, Fernando L. [Departamento de Química, Centro de Nanotecnologia e Engenharia Tecidual, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Nanophoton Company, SUPERA Innovation and Technology Park, Av. Doutora Nadir de Aguiar, 1805, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, P 14056-680 (Brazil); Pinto, Marcelo R. [Departamento de Química, Laboratório de Enzimologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); and others

    2015-04-15

    The present study reports on the preparation and the cell viability assay of two nanoemulsions loaded with magnetic nanoparticle and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine. The preparations contain equal amount of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (0.05 mg/mL) but different contents of magnetic nanoparticle (0.15×10{sup 13} or 1.50×10{sup 13} particle/mL). The human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line was used as the model to assess the cell viability and this type of cell can be used as a model to mimic cancer stem cells. The cell viability assays were performed in isolated as well as under combined magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. We found from the cell viability assay that under the hyperthermia treatment (1 MHz and 40 Oe magnetic field amplitude) the cell viability reduction was about 10%, regardless the magnetic nanoparticle content within the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation. However, cell viability reduction of about 50% and 60% were found while applying the photodynamic therapy treatment using the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation containing 0.15×10{sup 13} or 1.50×10{sup 13} magnetic particle/mL, respectively. Finally, an average reduction in cell viability of about 66% was found while combining the hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. - Highlights: • Current protocols in nanotechnology allow for biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles being associated with photosensitizer photoactive drugs, which could lead to perfectly controlled drug release. • The combination of the HPT and PDT therapies can be useful to develop further protocols for both advanced in vitro and in vivo assays. • Magnetic nanodevices associated with therapies have led to the decreased of proliferation of cell population that provides a favorable environment for tumor progression.

  13. Nanohybrids with Magnetic and Persistent Luminescence Properties for Cell Labeling, Tracking, In Vivo Real-Time Imaging, and Magnetic Vectorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teston, Eliott; Maldiney, Thomas; Marangon, Iris; Volatron, Jeanne; Lalatonne, Yoann; Motte, Laurence; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Autret, Gwennhael; Clément, Olivier; Scherman, Daniel; Gazeau, Florence; Richard, Cyrille

    2018-04-01

    Once injected into a living organism, cells diffuse or migrate around the initial injection point and become impossible to be visualized and tracked in vivo. The present work concerns the development of a new technique for therapeutic cell labeling and subsequent in vivo visualization and magnetic retention. It is hypothesized and subsequently demonstrated that nanohybrids made of persistent luminescence nanoparticles and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into a silica matrix can be used as an effective nanoplatform to label therapeutic cells in a nontoxic way in order to dynamically track them in real-time in vitro and in living mice. As a proof-of-concept, it is shown that once injected, these labeled cells can be visualized and attracted in vivo using a magnet. This first step suggests that these nanohybrids represent efficient multifunctional nanoprobes for further imaging guided cell therapies development. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Breast cancer cells synchronous labeling and separation based on aptamer and fluorescence-magnetic silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-Yue; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Xing-Lin; Kang, Yan-Jun

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an efficient method based on biotin-labeled aptamer and streptavidin-conjugated fluorescence-magnetic silica nanoprobes (FITC@Fe3O4@SiNPs-SA) has been established for human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells synchronous labeling and separation. Carboxyl-modified fluorescence-magnetic silica nanoparticles (FITC@Fe3O4@SiNPs-COOH) were first synthesized using the Stöber method. Streptavidin (SA) was then conjugated to the surface of FITC@Fe3O4@SiNPs-COOH. The MCF-7 cell suspension was incubated with biotin-labeled MUC-1 aptamer. After centrifugation and washing, the cells were then treated with FITC@Fe3O4@SiNPs-SA. Afterwards, the mixtures were separated by a magnet. The cell-probe conjugates were then imaged using fluorescent microscopy. The results show that the MUC-1 aptamer could recognize and bind to the targeted cells with high affinity and specificity, indicating the prepared FITC@Fe3O4@SiNPs-SA with great photostability and superparamagnetism could be applied effectively in labeling and separation for MCF-7 cell in suspension synchronously. In addition, the feasibility of MCF-7 cells detection in peripheral blood was assessed. The results indicate that the method above is also applicable for cancer cells synchronous labeling and separation in complex biological system.

  15. Increasing magnetite contents of polymeric magnetic particles dramatically improves labeling of neural stem cell transplant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher F; Rai, Ahmad; Sneddon, Gregor; Yiu, Humphrey H P; Polyak, Boris; Chari, Divya M

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic cells to sites of injury/disease in the central nervous system is a key goal for the translation of clinical cell transplantation therapies. Recently, 'magnetic cell localization strategies' have emerged as a promising and safe approach for targeted delivery of magnetic particle (MP) labeled stem cells to pathology sites. For neuroregenerative applications, this approach is limited by the lack of available neurocompatible MPs, and low cell labeling achieved in neural stem/precursor populations. We demonstrate that high magnetite content, self-sedimenting polymeric MPs [unfunctionalized poly(lactic acid) coated, without a transfecting component] achieve efficient labeling (≥90%) of primary neural stem cells (NSCs)-a 'hard-to-label' transplant population of major clinical relevance. Our protocols showed high safety with respect to key stem cell regenerative parameters. Critically, labeled cells were effectively localized in an in vitro flow system by magnetic force highlighting the translational potential of the methods used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved calculation of the equilibrium magnetization of arterial blood in arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Knutsson, Linda

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To propose and assess an improved method for calculating the equilibrium magnetization of arterial blood ( M0a), used for calibration of perfusion estimates in arterial spin labeling. METHODS: Whereas standard M0a calculation is based on dividing a proton density-weighted image by an ave...

  17. Magnetic and/or electric label assisted detection system and method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A detection system is described for detecting analytes in a fluid sample. The detection system comprises a transporting means for transporting magnetic and/or elec. labels after interaction between the sample fluid and the reagents towards a detection receptacle. The detection receptacle is

  18. Design of magnetic gene complexes as effective and serum resistant gene delivery systems for mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Jia-He; Xu, Qian-Hao; Wang, Xia-Rong; Lu, Jingxiong; Hu, Ying; Jo, Jun-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Ling, Daishun; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2017-03-30

    Gene engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as promising tools for their various applications in biomedicine. Nevertheless, the lack of an effective and safe way to genetically modify these stem cells is still a major obstacle in the current studies. Herein, we designed novel magnetic complexes by assembling cationized pullulan derivatives with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for delivering target genes to MSCs. Results showed that this complexes achieved effective gene expression with the assistance of external magnetic field, and resisted the adverse effect induced by serum proteins on the gene delivery. Moreover, neither significant cytotoxicity nor the interference on the osteogenic differentiation to MSCs were observed after magnetofection. Further studies revealed that this effective and serum resistant gene transfection was partly due to the accelerated and enhanced intracellular uptake process driven by external magnetic field. To conclude, the current study presented a novel option for genetic modification of MSCs in an effective, relatively safe and serum compatible way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic super-hydrophilic carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide composite as nanocarriers of mesenchymal stem cells: Insights into the time and dose dependences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Alessandro E C; Rodrigues, Bruno V M; Rodrigues-Junior, Dorival M; Marciano, Fernanda R; Lobo, Anderson O; Porcionatto, Marimelia A

    2016-10-01

    Among nanostructured materials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have demonstrated great potential for biomedical applications in recent years. After oxygen plasma etching, we can obtain super-hydrophilic MWCNT that contain graphene oxide (GO) at their tips. This material exhibits good dispersion in biological systems due to the presence of polar groups and its excellent magnetic properties due to metal particle residues from the catalyst that often remain trapped in its walls and tips. Here, we show for the first time a careful biological investigation using magnetic superhydrophilic MWCNT/GO (GCN composites). The objective of this study was to investigate the application of GCN for the in vitro immobilization of mesenchymal stem cells. Our ultimate goal was to develop a system to deliver mesenchymal stem cells to different tissues and organs. We show here that mesenchymal stem cells were able to internalize GCN with a consequent migration when subjected to a magnetic field. The cytotoxicity of GCN was time- and dose-dependent. We also observed that GCN internalization caused changes in the gene expression of the proteins involved in cell adhesion and migration, such as integrins, laminins, and the chemokine CXCL12, as well as its receptor CXCR4. These results suggest that GCN represents a potential new platform for mesenchymal stem cell immobilization at injury sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Labeling of macrophages using bacterial magnetosomes and their characterization by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, Annegret [Medical Physics Group, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Jena (Germany)]. E-mail: annegret.hartung@med.uni-jena.de; Lisy, Marcus R. [Experimental Radiology, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany); Herrmann, Karl-Heinz [Medical Physics Group, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany); Hilger, Ingrid [Experimental Radiology, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany); Schueler, Dirk [Max-Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (Germany); Lang, Claus [Max-Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen (Germany); Bellemann, Matthias E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Jena (Germany); Kaiser, Werner A. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany); Reichenbach, Juergen R. [Medical Physics Group, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller University, Jena (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    This work investigated macrophages labeled with magnetosomes for the possible detection of inflammations by MR molecular imaging. Pure magnetosomes and macrophages containing magnetosomes were analyzed using a clinical 1.5 T MR-scanner. Relaxivities of magnetosomes and relaxation rates of cells containing magnetosomes were determined. Peritonitis was induced in two mice. T {sub 1}, T {sub 2} and T {sub 2}* weighted images were acquired following injection of the probes. Pure magnetosomes and labeled cells showed slight effects on T {sub 1}, but strong effects on T {sub 2} and T {sub 2}* images. Labeled macrophages were located with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the colon area, thus demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  1. Evaluation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran and complexed with Poly-L-Lysine; Avaliacao da marcacao de celulas-tronco mesenquimais de cordao umbilical com nanoparticulas superparamagneticas de oxido de ferro recobertas com Dextran e complexadas a Poli-L-Lisina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Cardenas, Walter Humberto; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel, E-mail: tatianats@einstein.br [Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi [Faculdade de Enfermagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto [Centro de Pesquisa Experimental, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Daniela Mara de [Universidade de Brasilia - UnB, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the labeling of umbilical cord vein derived mesenchymal stem cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran and complexed to a non-viral transfector agent transfector poly-L-lysine. Methods: The labeling of mesenchymal stem cells was performed using the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran complexed and not complexed to poly-L-lysine. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran was incubated with poly-L-lysine in an ultrasonic sonicator at 37 deg C for 10 minutes for complex formation superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/poly-L-lysine by electrostatic interaction. Then, the mesenchymal stem cells were incubated overnight with the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/poly-L-lysine and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran. After the incubation period the mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated by internalization of the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/polyL-lysine and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran by Prussian Blue stain. Cellular viability of labeled mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated by cellular proliferation assay using 5,6-carboxyfluorescein-succinimidyl ester method and apoptosis detection by Annexin V- Propidium Iodide assay. Results: mesenchymal stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/ dextran without poly-L-lysine not internalized efficiently the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles due to its low presence detected within cells. Mesenchymal stem cells labeled with the complex superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/dextran/polyL-lysine efficiently internalized the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles due to greater presence in the cells interior. The viability and apoptosis assays demonstrated that the mesenchymal stem cells labeled and not labeled respectively with the superparamagnetic iron oxide

  2. Influence on bionomics of endothelial progenitor cells labeling with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Xiaoli; Teng Gaojun; Ma Zhanlong; Sun Junhui; Zhang Yu; Gu Ning

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of home synthesize magnetic iron oxide (called Fe 2 O 3 -PLL) labeling on peripheral blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) bionomics to provide experimental foundation for MR imaging ex and in vivo. Methods: Fe 2 O 3 was incubated with PLL for 2 hours to obtain a complex of Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and EPCs were selected by adherence method. Fe 2 O 3 -PLL was used to label EPCs. Prussian blue stain and electron microscope was used for showing intracellular iron. MTF assay was assessed to evaluate the difference of growth curve between unlabeled and labeled with 25 mg/L Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze cell cycle, cell apoptosis and the expression of surface markers of labeled and unlabeled cells. Expressions of eNOS, KDR and vWF at mRNA levels among unlabeled and labeled EPCs were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Calcium ion channel and membrane fluidity were observed and analyzed by laser confocal microscopy. Statistical analyses were used with ANOVA and t test. Results: Almost 100% cells were labeled by Fe 2 O 3 -PLL, iron-containing vesicles were intracytoplasma. There was no statistical difference in cells growth curve, cell life cycle [(93.74±3.52)%, (94.57±3.66)%] and cell apoptosis rate (12.89±1.81)%, (11.67±1.18)%) between labeling with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL at a concentration of 25 mg/L and unlabeled cells (t=0.283, P>0.05; t=0.977, P>0.05). There was also no statistical difference in relative amount of eNOS, KDR and vWF at mRNA levels and the expression of surface phenotypic markers (CD34, CD106, CD146 and KDR) between two groups (P>0.05). In addition, Labeling had little influence on calcium ion channel and didn't significantly alter cell membrane fluidity. Conclusions: The rabbit peripheral blood EPCs can be effective labeled with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL and without significant influence on cells bionomics at a low concentration of 25 mg

  3. Potentials and Challenges for Arterial Spin Labeling in Pharmacological Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Danny J. J.; Chen, Yufen; Fernández-Seara, María A.; Detre, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) is increasingly being used in drug discovery and development to speed the translation from the laboratory to the clinic. The two primary methods in phMRI include blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast and arterial spin-labeled (ASL) perfusion MRI. BOLD contrast has been widely applied in existing phMRI studies. However, because of the lack of absolute quantification and poor reproducibility over time scales longer than hours or across s...

  4. Magnetic separation of encapsulated islet cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nano particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Esther; Trenkler, Anja; Feilen, Peter J; Wiegand, Frederik; Fottner, Christian; Ehrhart, Friederike; Zimmermann, Heiko; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Dong Yun; Fischer, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M; Weber, Matthias M

    2013-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising option for the restoration of normal glucose homeostasis in patients with type 1 diabetes. Because graft volume is a crucial issue in islet transplantations for patients with diabetes, we evaluated a new method for increasing functional tissue yield in xenogeneic grafts of encapsulated islets. Islets were labeled with three different superparamagnetic iron oxide nano particles (SPIONs; dextran-coated SPION, siloxane-coated SPION, and heparin-coated SPION). Magnetic separation was performed to separate encapsulated islets from the empty capsules, and cell viability and function were tested. Islets labeled with 1000 μg Fe/ml dextran-coated SPIONs experienced a 69.9% reduction in graft volume, with a 33.2% loss of islet-containing capsules. Islets labeled with 100 μg Fe/ml heparin-coated SPIONs showed a 46.4% reduction in graft volume, with a 4.5% loss of capsules containing islets. No purification could be achieved using siloxane-coated SPIONs due to its toxicity to the primary islets. SPION labeling of islets is useful for transplant purification during islet separation as well as in vivo imaging after transplantation. Furthermore, purification of encapsulated islets can also reduce the volume of the encapsulated islets without impairing their function by removing empty capsules. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Synthesis of selectively 13C-labelled benzoic acid for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurement of glycine conjugation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Baba, Shigeo

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis of [4- 13 C]benzoic acid (BA) labelled in a single protonated carbon, for use as a probe to measure glycine conjugation activity by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, has been reported. The labelled compound was prepared by a seven-step synthetic scheme on a relatively small scale using [2- 13 C] acetone as the source of label in overall yield of 16%. The usefulness of [4- 13 C]BA was demonstrated by the NMR spectroscopic monitoring of urinary excretion of [4- 13 C]hippuric acid in the rat administered with the labelled BA. (Author)

  6. The effect of cryoprotection on the use of PLGA encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic cell labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Kevin S; Shapiro, Erik M; Hashmi, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic PLGA nanoparticles are a significant advancement in the quest to translate MRI-based cell tracking to the clinic. The benefits of these types of particles are that they encapsulate large amounts of iron oxide nanocrystals within an FDA-approved polymer matrix, combining the best aspects of inert micron-sized iron oxide particles, or MPIOs, and biodegradable small particles of iron oxide, or SPIOs. Practically, PLGA nanoparticle fabrication and storage requires some form of cryoprotectant to both protect the particle during freeze drying and to promote resuspension. While this is a commonly employed procedure in the fabrication of drug loaded PLGA nanoparticles, it has yet to be investigated for magnetic particles and what effect this might have on internalization of magnetic particles. As such, in this study, magnetic PLGA nanoparticles were fabricated with various concentrations of two common cryoprotectants, dextrose and sucrose, and analyzed for their ability to magnetically label cells. It was found that cryoprotection with either sugar significantly enhanced the ability to resuspend nanoparticles without aggregation. Magnetic cell labeling was impacted by sugar concentration, with higher sugar concentrations used during freeze drying more significantly reducing magnetic cell labeling than lower concentrations. These studies suggest that cryoprotection with 1% dextrose is an optimal compromise that preserves monodispersity following resuspension and high magnetic cell labeling. (paper)

  7. Tracking of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology after intralesional treatment of artificial equine tendon lesions--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geburek, Florian; Mundle, Kathrin; Conrad, Sabine; Hellige, Maren; Walliser, Ulrich; van Schie, Hans T M; van Weeren, René; Skutella, Thomas; Stadler, Peter M

    2016-02-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) are frequently used to treat equine tendinopathies. Up to now, knowledge about the fate of autologous AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) is very limited. The purpose of this study was to monitor the presence of intralesionally injected autologous AT-MSCs labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and green fluorescent protein (GFP) over a staggered period of 3 to 9 weeks with standing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Four adult warmblood horses received a unilateral injection of 10 × 10(6) autologous AT-MSCs into surgically created front-limb SDFT lesions. Administered AT-MSCs expressed lentivirally transduced reporter genes for GFP and were co-labelled with SPIO particles in three horses. The presence of AT-MSCs in SDFTs was evaluated by repeated examinations with standing low-field MRI in two horses and post-mortem in all horses with Prussian blue staining, fluorescence microscopy and with immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using anti-GFP antibodies at 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks after treatment. AT-MSCs labelled with SPIO particles were detectable in treated SDFTs during each MRI in T2*- and T1-weighted sequences until the end of the observation period. Post-mortem examinations revealed that all treated tendons contained high numbers of SPIO- and GFP-labelled cells. Standing low-field MRI has the potential to track SPIO-labelled AT-MSCs successfully. Histology, fluorescence microscopy, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry are efficient tools to detect labelled AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into surgically created equine SDFT lesions. Intralesional injection of 10 × 10(6) AT-MSCs leads to the presence of high numbers of AT-MSCs in and around surgically created tendon lesions for up to 9 weeks. Integration of injected AT-MSCs into healing tendon tissue is an essential pathway after intralesional

  8. Vitality of pancreatic islets labeled for magnetic resonance imaging with iron particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkova, Z; Kriz, J; Girman, P; Zacharovova, K; Koblas, T; Dovolilova, E; Saudek, F

    2005-10-01

    We previously described an in vivo method for pancreatic islet visualization using magnetic resonance imaging with the aid of superparamagnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide (Resovist) or by magnetic beads precoated with antibodies (Dynabeads). The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of islet labeling on their quality. Isolated rat islets were cultivated for 48 hours with a contrast agent or, in the case of magnetic antibody-coated beads, for only 2 hours. The ability to secrete insulin was tested by a static insulin release assay and the results were expressed as a stimulation index. Staining with propidium iodide and acridine orange was performed to determine the ratio of live to dead cells. Stimulation indices in the Resovist islets (n = 23) vs controls (n = 14) were 15.3 and 15.0, respectively, and in the Dynabeads islets (n = 15) vs controls (n = 12) 21.3 and 19.9, respectively. The vitality of the Resovist islets vs controls determined by live/dead cells ratio was 90.8% and 91.1%, respectively (n = 20), and in the Dynabeads islets vs controls was 89.4% and 91.8%, respectively (n = 11). Islet labeling with the contrast agent as well as with specific antibodies with iron beads did not change the vitality and insulin-secreting capacity assessed in vitro (P > .05). Magnetic resonance using iron nanoparticles represents the only method for in-vivo visualization of transplanted islets so far. Our data represent an important contribution for its clinical use.

  9. In vivo MR imaging of nanometer magnetically labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplanted via portal vein in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Wang Jianhua; Yan Zhiping; Hu Meiyu; Xu Pengju; Zhou Meiling; Ya Fuhua; Fan Sheung-tat; Luk John-m

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo magnetic resonance imaging with a conventional 1.5-T system for tracking of intra-portal vein transplantation nanometer magnetically labeled BMSCs in rat liver. Methods: BMSCs were isolated from 5 SD rats bone marrow with the density gradient centrifugation method. Then BMSCs were labeled with nanometer superpara-magnetic iron oxide and transfection agent. Cell labeling efficiency was assessed with determination of the percentage of Peris Prussian blue stain. Then BMSCs transplanted into normal rats' livers via portal vein. The receipts were divided into 5 groups ,including sham control,2 h ,3 d,7 d and 2 w after transplantation. Follow-up serial T 1 WI,T 2 WI and T 2 * -weighted gradient- echo MR imaging were performed at 1.5 T MRI system. MR imaging findings were compared with histology. Results: Cell labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Perls Prussian blue stain. After transplantation of labeled BMSCs via portal vein, liver's had diffuse granular signal intensity appearance in T 2 * WI MRI. Cells were detected for up to 2 w in receipts' liver's. At histologic analysis, signal intensity loss correlated with iron-loaded cells. Conclusion: MR imaging could aid in monitoring of magnetically labeled BMSCs administered via portal vein in vivo. (authors)

  10. Pineapple juice labeled with gadolinium: a convenient oral contrast for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, Emmanuel; Metens, Thierry; Winant, Catherine; Matos, Celso

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to prepare in vitro a pineapple juice (PJ) solution labeled with a minimal gadolinium concentration working as a negative contrast agent in heavily T2-weighted imaging and to assess that solution in vivo as a negative oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Three PJs were compared in vitro according to their T2. Increasing concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DOTA in PJ were assessed in vitro for T2 reduction. Single-shot turbo spin echo T2-weighted MR cholangiopancreatograms were obtained for 35 patients with suspected biliopancreatic duct disease, before and after ingestion of the PJ/Gd-DOTA solution. Signal intensity (SI) measurements of gastroduodenal lumens, pancreatobiliary ducts, and image quality scores were obtained systematically before and after contrast ingestion. The in vitro selected Gd-DOTA concentration in the PJ was 2.76 mmol/l. Ingestion of 180 ml of PJ labeled with 1 ml of Gd-DOTA eliminated efficiently the gastroduodenal SI in MRCP, improving significantly the rates of complete visualization of the pancreatobiliary ducts (P<0.01) and the MRCP image quality scores (P<0.05). All patients easily ingested the contrast solution and found the solution palatable. PJ labeled with gadolinium constituted an efficient and convenient negative oral contrast agent for MRCP. (orig.)

  11. Pineapple juice labeled with gadolinium: a convenient oral contrast for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Emmanuel; Metens, Thierry; Winant, Catherine; Matos, Celso [Hopital Erasme, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Department of Radiology, Division of Magnetic Resonance, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-10-01

    The aim of our study was to prepare in vitro a pineapple juice (PJ) solution labeled with a minimal gadolinium concentration working as a negative contrast agent in heavily T2-weighted imaging and to assess that solution in vivo as a negative oral contrast agent for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Three PJs were compared in vitro according to their T2. Increasing concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DOTA in PJ were assessed in vitro for T2 reduction. Single-shot turbo spin echo T2-weighted MR cholangiopancreatograms were obtained for 35 patients with suspected biliopancreatic duct disease, before and after ingestion of the PJ/Gd-DOTA solution. Signal intensity (SI) measurements of gastroduodenal lumens, pancreatobiliary ducts, and image quality scores were obtained systematically before and after contrast ingestion. The in vitro selected Gd-DOTA concentration in the PJ was 2.76 mmol/l. Ingestion of 180 ml of PJ labeled with 1 ml of Gd-DOTA eliminated efficiently the gastroduodenal SI in MRCP, improving significantly the rates of complete visualization of the pancreatobiliary ducts (P<0.01) and the MRCP image quality scores (P<0.05). All patients easily ingested the contrast solution and found the solution palatable. PJ labeled with gadolinium constituted an efficient and convenient negative oral contrast agent for MRCP. (orig.)

  12. Fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled, magnetic nanoparticles conjugated D-penicillamine-anti-metadherin and in vitro evaluation on breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akca, Ozlet; Unak, Perihan; Medine, E. Ylker; Sakarya, Serhan; Ozdemir, Caglar; Timur, Suna

    2011-01-01

    Silane modified magnetic nanoparticles were prepared after capped with silica generated from the hydrolyzation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Amino silane (SG-Si900) was added to this solution for surface modification of silica coated magnetic particles. Finally, D-penicillamine (D-PA)-antimetadherin (anti-MTDH) was covalently linked to the amine group using glutaraldehyde as cross-linker. Magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM results showed that particles are nearly monodisperse, and the average size of particles was 40 to 50 nm. An amino acid derivative D-PA was conjugated anti-MTDH, which results the increase of uptaking potential of a conjugated agent, labelled fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and then conjugated to the magnetic nanoparticles. In vitro evaluation of the conjugated D-PA-anti-MTDH-FITC to magnetic nanoparticle was studied on MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. Fluorescence microscopy images of cells after incubation of the sample were obtained to monitor the interaction of the sample with the cancerous cells. Incorporation on cells of FITC labeled and magnetic nanoparticles conjugated D-PA-anti-MTDH was found higher than FITC labeled D-PA-anti-MTDH. The results show that magnetic properties and application of magnetic field increased incorporation rates. The obtained D-PA-anti-MTDH-magnetic nanoparticles-FITC complex has been used for in vitro imaging of breast cancer cells. FITC labeled and magnetic nanoparticles conjugated D-PA-anti-MTDH may be useful as a new class of scintigraphic agents. Results of this study are sufficiently encouraging to bring about further evaluation of this and related compounds for ultraviolet magnetic resonance (UV-MR) dual imaging. (author)

  13. Evaluation of In-Situ Magnetic Signals from Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Labeled PC12 Cells by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Min, Yue; Wang, Zhigang; Riggio, Cristina; Calatayud, M Pilar; Pinkernelle, Josephine; Raffa, Vittoria; Goya, Gerardo F; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic signals from magnetite nanoparticle-labeled PC12 cells were assessed by magnetic force microscopy by deploying a localized external magnetic field to magnetize the nanoparticles and the magnetic tip simultaneously so that the interaction between the tip and PC12 cell-associated Fe3O4 nanoparticles could be detected at lift heights (the distance between the tip and the sample) larger than 100 nm. The use of large lift heights during the raster scanning of the probe eliminates the non-magnetic interference from the complex and rugged cell surface and yet maintains the sufficient sensitivity for magnetic detection. The magnetic signals of the cell-bound nanoparticles were semi-quantified by analyzing cell surface roughness upon three-dimensional reconstruction generated by the phase shift of the cantilever oscillation. The obtained data can be used for the evaluation of the overall cellular magnetization as well as the maximum magnetic forces from magnetic nanoparticle-labeled cells which is crucial for the biomedical application of these nanomaterials.

  14. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Olofsson, K; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neon......Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term...

  15. In Vivo Kinetics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted into the Knee Joint in a Rat Model Using a Novel Magnetic Method of Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Yasunari; Kamei, Naosuke; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a magnetic system for targeting cells in minimally invasive cell transplantation. Magnetically labeled MSCs (m-MSCs) with nanoscale iron particles can be guided into the desired region by magnetic force from an extracorporeal device. We reported that magnetic targeting of m-MSCs enhances cartilage repair in a mini-pig model. However, the detailed kinetics of these magnetically targeted m-MSCs remain unknown. For clinical use, this aspect should be clarified from a safety standpoint. We therefore investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of the fluorescently-labeled m-MSCs transplanted into the knee joint using in vivo fluorescence combined with three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in a rat model. Although the intraarticularly injected m-MSCs were spread throughout the joint cavity in the absence of magnetic force, the magnetic force caused the injected m-MSCs to accumulate around the chondral lesion. Further examinations including ex vivo imaging, histological assessments and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that transplanted MSCs were not present in any major organs after intraarticular administration, regardless of magnetic targeting. Our data suggest that m-MSCs can be accumulated efficiently into a chondral lesion using our magnetic targeting system, while none of the intraarticularly transplanted MSCs migrate to other major organs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Homing and Tracking of Iron Oxide Labelled Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Infusion in Traumatic Brain Injury Mice: a Longitudinal In Vivo MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sushanta Kumar; Khushu, Subash; Singh, Ajay K; Gangenahalli, Gurudutta

    2018-06-17

    Stem cells transplantation has emerged as a promising alternative therapeutic due to its potency at injury site. The need to monitor and non-invasively track the infused stem cells is a significant challenge in the development of regenerative medicine. Thus, in vivo tracking to monitor infused stem cells is especially vital. In this manuscript, we have described an effective in vitro labelling method of MSCs, a serial in vivo tracking of implanted stem cells at traumatic brain injury (TBI) site through 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Proper homing of infused MSCs was carried out at different time points using histological analysis and Prussian blue staining. Longitudinal in vivo tracking of infused MSCs were performed up to 21 days in different groups through MRI using relaxometry technique. Results demonstrated that MSCs incubated with iron oxide-poly-L-lysine complex (IO-PLL) at a ratio of 50:1.5 μg/ml and a time period of 6 h was optimised to increase labelling efficiency. T2*-weighted images and relaxation study demonstrated a significant signal loss and effective decrease in transverse relaxation time on day-3 at injury site after systemic transplantation, revealed maximum number of stem cells homing to the lesion area. MRI results further correlate with histological and Prussian blue staining in different time periods. Decrease in negative signal and increase in relaxation times were observed after day-14, may indicate damage tissue replacement with healthy tissue. MSCs tracking with synthesized negative contrast agent represent a great advantage during both in vitro and in vivo analysis. The proposed absolute bias correction based relaxometry analysis could be extrapolated for stem cell tracking and therapies in various neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Asynchronous Magnetic Bead Rotation (AMBR Microviscometer for Label-Free DNA Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzi Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a label-free viscosity-based DNA detection system, using paramagnetic beads as an asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR microviscometer. We have demonstrated experimentally that the bead rotation period is linearly proportional to the viscosity of a DNA solution surrounding the paramagnetic bead, as expected theoretically. Simple optical measurement of asynchronous microbead motion determines solution viscosity precisely in microscale volumes, thus allowing an estimate of DNA concentration or average fragment length. The response of the AMBR microviscometer yields reproducible measurement of DNA solutions, enzymatic digestion reactions, and PCR systems at template concentrations across a 5000-fold range. The results demonstrate the feasibility of viscosity-based DNA detection using AMBR in microscale aqueous volumes.

  18. Magnetic bead purification of labeled DNA fragments forhigh-throughput capillary electrophoresis sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkin, Christopher; Kapur, Hitesh; Smith, Troy; Humphries, David; Pollard, Martin; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor

    2001-09-15

    We have developed an automated purification method for terminator sequencing products based on a magnetic bead technology. This 384-well protocol generates labeled DNA fragments that are essentially free of contaminates for less than $0.005 per reaction. In comparison to laborious ethanol precipitation protocols, this method increases the phred20 read length by forty bases with various DNA templates such as PCR fragments, Plasmids, Cosmids and RCA products. Our method eliminates centrifugation and is compatible with both the MegaBACE 1000 and ABIPrism 3700 capillary instruments. As of September 2001, this method has produced over 1.6 million samples with 93 percent averaging 620 phred20 bases as part of Joint Genome Institutes Production Process.

  19. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for cell labeling: flux synthesis of manganite particles and novel functionalization of silica shell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kačenka, Michal; Kaman, Ondřej; Kikerlová, S.; Pavlů, B.; Jirák, Zdeněk; Jirák, D.; Herynek, Vít; Černý, J.; Chaput, F.; Laurent, S.; Lukeš, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, Jun (2015), s. 97-106 ISSN 0021-9797 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0807; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : manganites * magnetic nanoparticles * molten salt synthesis * silica coating * dual probes * MRI * cell labeling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.782, year: 2015

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging with superparamagnetic iron oxide fails to track the long-term fate of mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Cheng, Huaibing; Lu, Minjie; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Xiuyu; Yin, Gang; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Lianfeng; Meng, Xianmin; Tang, Yue; Zhao, Shihua

    2015-03-12

    MRI for in vivo stem cell tracking remains controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MRI can track the long-term fate of the superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labelled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) following intramyocardially injection in AMI rats. MSCs (1 × 10(6)) from male rats doubly labeled with SPIO and DAPI were injected 2 weeks after myocardial infarction. The control group received cell-free media injection. In vivo serial MRI was performed at 24 hours before cell delivery (baseline), 3 days, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after cell delivery, respectively. Serial follow-up MRI demonstrated large persistent intramyocardial signal-voids representing SPIO during the follow-up of 4 weeks, and MSCs did not moderate the left ventricular dysfunction. The TUNEL analysis confirmed that MSCs engrafted underwent apoptosis. The histopathological studies revealed that the site of cell injection was infiltrated by inflammatory cells progressively and the iron-positive cells were macrophages identified by CD68 staining, but very few or no DAPI-positive stem cells at 4 weeks after cells transplantation. The presence of engrafted cells was confirmed by real-time PCR, which showed that the amount of Y-chromosome-specific SRY gene was consistent with the results. MRI may not reliably track the long-term fate of SPIO-labeled MSCs engraftment in heart.

  1. Human Aortic Endothelial Cell Labeling with Positive Contrast Gadolinium Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 7 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Loai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive T1 contrast using gadolinium (Gd contrast agents can potentially improve detection of labeled cells on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Recently, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoparticles have shown promise as a sensitive T1 agent for cell labeling at clinical field strengths compared to conventional Gd chelates. The objective of this study was to investigate Gado CELLTrack, a commercially available Gd2O3 nanoparticle, for cell labeling and MRI at 7 T. Relaxivity measurements yielded r1 = 4.7 s−1 mM−1 and r2/r1 = 6.2. Human aortic endothelial cells were labeled with Gd2O3 at various concentrations and underwent MRI from 1 to 7 days postlabeling. The magnetic resonance relaxation times T1 and T2 of labeled cell pellets were measured. Cellular contrast agent uptake was quantified by inductively coupled plasma–atomic emission spectroscopy, which showed very high uptake compared to conventional Gd compounds. MRI demonstrated significant positive T1 contrast and stable labeling on cells. Enhancement was optimal at low Gd concentrations, attained in the 0.02 to 0.1 mM incubation concentration range (corresponding cell uptake was 7.26 to 34.1 pg Gd/cell. Cell viability and proliferation were unaffected at the concentrations tested and up to at least 3 days postlabeling. Gd2O3 is a promising sensitive and stable positive contrast agent for cellular MRI at 7 T.

  2. The synthesis, magnetic purification and evaluation of 99mTc-labeled microbubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarova, Neva; Causey, Patrick W.; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Czorny, Shannon K.; Forbes, John R.; Zlitni, Aimen; Genady, Afaf; Foster, F. Stuart; Valliant, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrasound (US) contrast agents based on microbubbles (MBs) are being investigated as platforms for drug and gene delivery. A methodology for determining the distribution and fate of modified MBs quantitatively in vivo can be achieved by tagging MBs directly with 99m Tc. This creates the opportunity to employ dual-modality imaging using both US and small animal SPECT along with quantitative ex vivo tissue counting to evaluate novel MB constructs. Methods: A 99m Tc-labeled biotin derivative ( 99m TcL1) was prepared and incubated with streptavidin-coated MBs. The 99m Tc-labeled bubbles were isolated using a streptavidin-coated magnetic-bead purification strategy that did not disrupt the MBs. A small animal scintigraphic/CT imaging study as well as a quantitative biodistribution study was completed using 99m TcL1 and 99m Tc-labeled bubbles in healthy C57Bl-6 mice. Results: The imaging and biodistribution data showed rapid accumulation and retention of 99m Tc-MBs in the liver (68.2±6.6 %ID/g at 4 min; 93.3±3.2 %ID/g at 60 min) and spleen (214.2±19.7 %ID/g at 4 min; 213.4±19.7 %ID/g at 60 min). In contrast, 99m TcL1 accumulated in multiple organs including the small intestine (22.5±3.6 %ID/g at 4 min; 83.4±5.9 %ID/g at 60 min) and bladder (184.0±88.1 %ID/g at 4 min; 24.2±17.7 %ID/g at 60 min). Conclusion: A convenient means to radiolabel and purify MBs was developed and the distribution of the labeled products determined. The result is a platform which can be used to assess the pharmacokinetics and fate of novel MB constructs both regionally using US and throughout the entire subject in a quantitative manner by employing small animal SPECT and tissue counting.

  3. Arterial spin labeling blood flow magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yupin P; Song, Rui; Liang, Chang hong; Chen, Xin; Liu, Bo

    2012-08-15

    A multitude of evidence suggests that iodinated contrast material causes nephrotoxicity; however, there have been no previous studies that use arterial spin labeling (ASL) blood flow functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the alterations in effective renal plasma flow between normointensive and hypertensive rats following injection of contrast media. We hypothesized that FAIR-SSFSE arterial spin labeling MRI may enable noninvasive and quantitative assessment of regional renal blood flow abnormalities and correlate with disease severity as assessed by histological methods. Renal blood flow (RBF) values of the cortex and medulla of rat kidneys were obtained from ASL images postprocessed at ADW4.3 workstation 0.3, 24, 48, and 72 h before and after injection of iodinated contrast media (6 ml/kg). The H&E method for morphometric measurements was used to confirm the MRI findings. The RBF values of the outer medulla were lower than those of the cortex and the inner medulla as reported previously. Iodinated contrast media treatment resulted in decreases in RBF in the outer medulla and cortex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), but only in the outer medulla in normotensive rats. The iodinated contrast agent significantly decreased the RBF value in the outer medulla and the cortex in SHR compared with normotensive rats after injection of the iodinated contrast media. Histological observations of kidney morphology were also consistent with ASL perfusion changes. These results demonstrate that the RBF value can reflect changes of renal perfusion in the cortex and medulla. ASL-MRI is a feasible and accurate method for evaluating nephrotoxic drugs-induced kidney damage.

  4. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Ruan, Jing; Yang, Meng; Pan, Fei; Gao, Guo; Qu, Su; Shen, You-Lan; Dang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Kan; Jin, Wei-Lin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer

  5. Detection of Repair of the Zone of Calcified Cartilage with Osteoarthritis through Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Ultrashort Echo Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quan; Li, Shao-Lin; Ma, Ya-Jun; de Tal, Vicki; Li, Wei; Zhao, Ying-Hua

    2018-05-05

    Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used imaging modality for observing the growth and development of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) after in vivo transplantation to treat osteoarthritis (OA). However, it is a challenge to accurately monitor the treatment effects of MSCs in the zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) with OA. This is especially true in the physiological and biochemical views that are not accurately detected by MRI contrast agents. In contrast, ultrashort time echo (UTE) MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of the ZCC, creating the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs. A special focus is given to the outlook of the use of UTE MRI to detect repair of the ZCC with OA through MSCs. The limitations of the current techniques for clinical applications and future directions are also discussed. Using the combined keywords: "osteoarthritis", "mesenchymal stem cells", "calcified cartilage", and "magnetic resonance imaging", the PubMed/MEDLINE literature search was conducted up to June 1, 2017. A total of 132 published articles were initially identified citations. Of the 132 articles, 48 articles were selected after further detailed review. This study referred to all the important English literature in full. In contrast, UTE MRI has been shown to be sensitive to the presence of the ZCC, creating the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs. The current studies showed that the ZCC could be described in terms of its histomorphology and biochemistry by UTE MRI. We prospected that UTE MRI has been shown the potential for more effectively observing the repair of the ZCC in OA by MSCs in vivo.

  6. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-06-15

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  7. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-06-01

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label.

  8. Integrable perturbed magnetic fields in toroidal geometry: An exact analytical flux surface label for large aspect ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallinikos, N.; Isliker, H.; Vlahos, L.; Meletlidou, E.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical description of magnetic islands is presented for the typical case of a single perturbation mode introduced to tokamak plasma equilibrium in the large aspect ratio approximation. Following the Hamiltonian structure directly in terms of toroidal coordinates, the well known integrability of this system is exploited, laying out a precise and practical way for determining the island topology features, as required in various applications, through an analytical and exact flux surface label

  9. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Hai; Xie Qiuping; Kang Muxing; Zhang Bo; Wu Yulian [Department of Surgery, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Zhang Hui; Chen Jin; Zhai Chuanxin; Yang Deren [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Jiang Biao, E-mail: wuyulian@medmail.com.c, E-mail: yulianwu2003@yahoo.c [Department of Radiology, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China)

    2009-09-09

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet {beta}-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into {beta}-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  10. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Hai; Xie Qiuping; Kang Muxing; Zhang Bo; Wu Yulian; Zhang Hui; Chen Jin; Zhai Chuanxin; Yang Deren; Jiang Biao

    2009-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet β-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into β-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  11. Magnetic cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of hepatocyte transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne R Roach

    Full Text Available Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this work, we describe culture conditions for magnetic cell labeling of cells from two different pig hepatocyte cell sources; primary pig hepatocytes (ppHEP and stem cell-derived hepatocytes (PICM-19FF. The magnetic particle is a micron-sized iron oxide particle (MPIO that has been extensively studied for magnetic cell labeling for MRI-based cell tracking. ppHEP could endocytose MPIO with labeling percentages as high as 70%, achieving iron content as high as ~55 pg/cell, with >75% viability. PICM-19FF had labeling >97%, achieving iron content ~38 pg/cell, with viability >99%. Extensive morphological and functional assays indicated that magnetic cell labeling was benign to the cells. The results encourage the use of MRI-based cell tracking for the development and clinical use of hepatocyte transplantation methodologies. Further, these results generally highlight the importance of functional cell assays in the evaluation of contrast agent biocompatibility.

  12. Architecture and dynamics of isotopically labelled macromolecules by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1979-01-01

    The use of 13 C is considered using NMR spectra of cell suspensions. Biochemical reaction kinetics are still unclear in the study of environmental and structural perturbations of amino acids and peptides; thus needs still exist for this labelling technique

  13. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with continuous arterial spin labeling: methods and clinical applications in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detre, John A. E-mail: detre@mail.med.upenn.edu; Alsop, David C

    1999-05-01

    Several methods are now available for measuring cerebral perfusion and related hemodynamic parameters using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One class of techniques utilizes electromagnetically labeled arterial blood water as a noninvasive diffusible tracer for blood flow measurements. The electromagnetically labeled tracer has a decay rate of T1, which is sufficiently long to allow perfusion of the tissue and microvasculature to be detected. Alternatively, electromagnetic arterial spin labeling (ASL) may be used to obtain qualitative perfusion contrast for detecting changes in blood flow, similar to the use of susceptibility contrast in blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI (BOLD fMRI) to detect functional activation in the brain. The ability to obtain blood flow maps using a non-invasive and widely available modality such as MRI should greatly enhance the utility of blood flow measurement as a means of gaining further insight into the broad range of hemodynamically related physiology and pathophysiology. This article describes the biophysical considerations pertaining to the generation of quantitative blood flow maps using a particular form of ASL in which arterial blood water is continuously labeled, termed continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL). Technical advances permit multislice perfusion imaging using CASL with reduced sensitivity to motion and transit time effects. Interpretable cerebral perfusion images can now be reliably obtained in a variety of clinical settings including acute stroke, chronic cerebrovascular disease, degenerative diseases and epilepsy. Over the past several years, the technical and theoretical foundations of CASL perfusion MRI techniques have evolved from feasibility studies into practical usage. Currently existing methodologies are sufficient to make reliable and clinically relevant observations which complement structural assessment using MRI. Future technical improvements should further reduce the acquisition times

  14. Paramagnetic particles carried by cell-penetrating peptide tracking of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, a research in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Guo Youmin; Wu Qifei; Yang Junle; Wang Peng; Wang Sicen; Guo Xiaojuan; Qiang Yongqian; Duan Xiaoyi

    2006-01-01

    The ability to track the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging of the mesenchymal stem cells. The mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow by Percoll and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cell-penetrating peptides labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and gadolinium were synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method and the relaxivity of cell-penetrating peptide-gadolinium paramagnetic conjugate on 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance was 5.7311 ± 0.0122 mmol -1 s -1 , higher than that of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (p < 0.05). Fluorescein imaging confirmed that this new peptide could internalize into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Gadolinium was efficiently internalized into mesenchymal stem cells by the peptide in a time- or concentration-dependent fashion, resulting in intercellular T1 relaxation enhancement, which was obviously detected by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis showed the intercellular contrast medium incorporation did not affect cell viability and membrane potential gradient. The research in vitro suggests that the newly constructed peptides could be a vector for tracking mesenchymal stem cells

  15. The role of the mesenchyme in cranial neural fold elevation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris-Wiman, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been previously postulated that the expansion of an hyaluronate-rich extracellular matrix in the fold mesenchyme is responsible for neural fold elevation. In this study we provide evidence that such expansions may play an important role in cranial neural fold elevation by pushing the folds towards the dorsal midline to assist in their elevation. For mesenchymal expansion to result in fold elevation, hyaluronate (HA) and mesenchymal cells must be non-randomly distributed within the mesenchyme. Patterns of mesenchymal cell distribution and cell proliferation were analyzed using the computer-assisted method of smoothed spatial averaging. The distribution of Alcian blue-stained and 3 H-glucosamine-labelled HA was also analyzed during cranial neural fold elevation using established image processing techniques. Analysis of the distribution of 3 H-thymidine-labelled mesenchymal cells indicated that differential mitotic activity was not responsible for decreased mesenchymal cell density. Likewise, analysis of distribution patterns of 3 H-glucosamine-labelled HA indicated that decreased HA concentration was not produced by regional differences in HA synthesis. These results suggest that decreases in mesenchymal cell density and HA concentration that occur during neural fold elevation are produced by mesenchymal expansion

  16. Pulsed magnetic therapy increases osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells only if they are pre-committed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Letizia; Tocco, Ilaria; De Pieri, Andrea; Menarin, Martina; Fermi, Enrico; Piattelli, Adriano; Gardin, Chiara; Zavan, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy has been documented to be an effective, non-invasive, safe treatment method for a variety of clinical conditions, especially in settings of recalcitrant healing. The underlying mechanisms on the different biological components of tissue regeneration are still to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of extremely low frequency (ELF)-PEMFs on commitment of mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) culture system, through the determination of gene expression pattern and cellular morphology. Human MSCs derived from adipose tissue (ADSCs) were cultured in presence of adipogenic, osteogenic, neural, or glial differentiative medium and basal medium, then exposed to ELF-PEMFs daily stimulation for 21days. Control cultures were performed without ELF-PEMFs stimulation for all cell populations. Effects on commitment were evaluated after 21days of cultures. The results suggested ELF-PEMFs does not influence ADSCs commitment and does not promote adipogenic, osteogenic, neural or glial differentiation. However, ELF-PEMFs treatment on ADSCs cultured in osteogenic differentiative medium markedly increased osteogenesis. We concluded that PEMFs affect the osteogenic differentiation of ADSCs only if they are pre-commitment and that this therapy can be an appropriate candidate for treatment of conditions requiring an acceleration of repairing process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Label-free morphology-based prediction of multiple differentiation potentials of human mesenchymal stem cells for early evaluation of intact cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Sasaki

    Full Text Available Precise quantification of cellular potential of stem cells, such as human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs, is important for achieving stable and effective outcomes in clinical stem cell therapy. Here, we report a method for image-based prediction of the multiple differentiation potentials of hBMSCs. This method has four major advantages: (1 the cells used for potential prediction are fully intact, and therefore directly usable for clinical applications; (2 predictions of potentials are generated before differentiation cultures are initiated; (3 prediction of multiple potentials can be provided simultaneously for each sample; and (4 predictions of potentials yield quantitative values that correlate strongly with the experimental data. Our results show that the collapse of hBMSC differentiation potentials, triggered by in vitro expansion, can be quantitatively predicted far in advance by predicting multiple potentials, multi-lineage differentiation potentials (osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic and population doubling potential using morphological features apparent during the first 4 days of expansion culture. In order to understand how such morphological features can be effective for advance predictions, we measured gene-expression profiles of the same early undifferentiated cells. Both senescence-related genes (p16 and p21 and cytoskeleton-related genes (PTK2, CD146, and CD49 already correlated to the decrease of potentials at this stage. To objectively compare the performance of morphology and gene expression for such early prediction, we tested a range of models using various combinations of features. Such comparison of predictive performances revealed that morphological features performed better overall than gene-expression profiles, balancing the predictive accuracy with the effort required for model construction. This benchmark list of various prediction models not only identifies the best morphological feature

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of mouse islet grafts labeled with novel chitosan-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyuhn-Huarng Juang

    Full Text Available To better understand the fate of islet isografts and allografts, we utilized a magnetic resonance (MR imaging technique to monitor mouse islets labeled with a novel MR contrast agent, chitosan-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (CSPIO nanoparticles.After being incubated with and without CSPIO (10 µg/ml, C57BL/6 mouse islets were examined under transmission electron microscope (TEM and their insulin secretion was measured. Cytotoxicity was examined in α (αTC1 and β (NIT-1 and βTC cell lines as well as islets. C57BL/6 mice were used as donors and inbred C57BL/6 and Balb/c mice were used as recipients of islet transplantation. Three hundred islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of each mouse and then MR was performed in the recipients periodically. At the end of study, the islet graft was removed for histology and TEM studies.After incubation of mouse islets with CSPIO (10 µg/mL, TEM showed CSPIO in endocytotic vesicles of α- and β-cells at 8 h. Incubation with CSPIO did not affect insulin secretion from islets and death rates of αTC1, NIT-1 and βTC cell lines as well as islets. After syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation, grafts of CSPIO-labeled islets were visualized on MR scans as persistent hypointense areas. At 8 weeks after syngeneic transplantation and 31 days after allogeneic transplantation, histology of CSPIO-labeled islet grafts showed colocalized insulin and iron staining in the same areas but the size of allografts decreased with time. TEM with elementary iron mapping demonstrated CSPIO distributed in the cytoplasm of islet cells, which maintained intact ultrastructure.Our results indicate that after syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation, islets labeled with CSPIO nanoparticles can be effectively and safely imaged by MR.

  19. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells as an effective vehicle for tracking the GFP gene marker using magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Mascheri, N; Dharmakumar, R; Fan, Z; Paunesku, T; Woloschak, G; Li, D

    2010-01-01

    Background Detection of a gene using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is hindered by the magnetic resonance (MR) targeting gene technique. Therefore it may be advantageous to image gene-expressing cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles by MRI. Methods The GFP-R3230Ac (GFP) cell line was incubated for 24 h using SPIO nanoparticles at a concentration of 20 μg Fe/mL. Cell samples were prepared for iron content analysis and cell function evaluation. The labeled cells were imaged using fluorescent microscopy and MRI. Results SPIO was used to label GFP cells effectively, with no effects on cell function and GFP expression. Iron-loaded GFP cells were successfully imaged with both fluorescent microscopy and T2*-weighted MRI. Prussian blue staining showed intracellular iron accumulation in the cells. All cells were labeled (100% labeling efficiency). The average iron content per cell was 4.75±0.11 pg Fe/cell (P<0.05 versus control). Discussion This study demonstrates that the GFP expression of cells is not altered by the SPIO labeling process. SPIO-labeled GFP cells can be visualized by MRI; therefore, GFP, a gene marker, was tracked indirectly with the SPIO-loaded cells using MRI. The technique holds promise for monitoring the temporal and spatial migration of cells with a gene marker and enhancing the understanding of cell- and gene-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:18956269

  20. Intermittent theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation for autism spectrum disorder: an open-label pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Abujadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Theta-burst stimulation (TBS modulates synaptic plasticity more efficiently than standard repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivery and may be a promising modality for neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD. At present there are few effective interventions for prefrontal cortex dysfunction in ASD. We report on an open-label, pilot study of intermittent TBS (iTBS to target executive function deficits and restricted, repetitive behaviors in male children and adolescents with ASD. Methods: Ten right-handed, male participants, aged 9-17 years with ASD were enrolled in an open-label trial of iTBS treatment. Fifteen sessions of neuronavigated iTBS at 100% motor threshold targeting the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were delivered over 3 weeks. Results: Parent report scores on the Repetitive Behavior Scale Revised and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale demonstrated improvements with iTBS treatment. Participants demonstrated improvements in perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and total time for the Stroop test. The iTBS treatments were well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that further controlled interventional studies of iTBS for ASD are warranted.

  1. Intermittent theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation for autism spectrum disorder: an open-label pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abujadi, Caio; Croarkin, Paul E; Bellini, Bianca B; Brentani, Helena; Marcolin, Marco A

    2017-12-11

    Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) modulates synaptic plasticity more efficiently than standard repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivery and may be a promising modality for neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). At present there are few effective interventions for prefrontal cortex dysfunction in ASD. We report on an open-label, pilot study of intermittent TBS (iTBS) to target executive function deficits and restricted, repetitive behaviors in male children and adolescents with ASD. Ten right-handed, male participants, aged 9-17 years with ASD were enrolled in an open-label trial of iTBS treatment. Fifteen sessions of neuronavigated iTBS at 100% motor threshold targeting the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were delivered over 3 weeks. Parent report scores on the Repetitive Behavior Scale Revised and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale demonstrated improvements with iTBS treatment. Participants demonstrated improvements in perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and total time for the Stroop test. The iTBS treatments were well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. These preliminary results suggest that further controlled interventional studies of iTBS for ASD are warranted.

  2. Magnetic Gold Nanoparticle-Labeled Heparanase Monoclonal Antibody and its Subsequent Application for Tumor Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Jie, Meng-Meng; Yang, Min; Tang, Li; Chen, Si-Yuan; Sun, Xue-Mei; Tang, Bo; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2018-04-01

    Heparanase (HPA) is ubiquitously expressed in various metastatic malignant tumors; previous studies have demonstrated that HPA was a potential tumor-associated antigen (TAA) for tumor immunotherapy. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of HPA as a common TAA for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumor metastasis and its potential application in tumor molecular imaging. We prepared a targeted probe based on magnetic gold nanoparticles coupled with an anti-HPA antibody for the specific detection of HPA by MRI. The specificity of the targeted probe was validated in vitro by incubation of the probe with various tumor cells, and the probe was able to selectively detect HPA (+) cells. We found the probes displayed significantly reduced signal intensity in several tumor cells, and the signal intensity decreased significantly after the targeted probe was injected in tumor-bearing nude mice. In the study, we demonstrated that the HPA&GoldMag probe had excellent physical and chemical properties and immune activities and could specifically target many tumor cell tissues both in vitro and in vivo. This may provide an experimental base for molecular imaging of tumor highly expressing heparanase using HPA mAbs.

  3. Label-free DNA quantification via a 'pipette, aggregate and blot' (PAB) approach with magnetic silica particles on filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyi; Liu, Qian; Alsamarri, Hussein; Lounsbury, Jenny A; Haversitick, Doris M; Landers, James P

    2013-03-07

    Reliable measurement of DNA concentration is essential for a broad range of applications in biology and molecular biology, and for many of these, quantifying the nucleic acid content is inextricably linked to obtaining optimal results. In its most simplistic form, quantitative analysis of nucleic acids can be accomplished by UV-Vis absorbance and, in more sophisticated format, by fluorimetry. A recently reported new concept, the 'pinwheel assay', involves a label-free approach for quantifying DNA through aggregation of paramagnetic beads in a rotating magnetic field. Here, we describe a simplified version of that assay adapted for execution using only a pipet and filter paper. The 'pipette, aggregate, and blot' (PAB) approach allows DNA to induce bead aggregation in a pipette tip through exposure to a magnetic field, followed by dispensing (blotting) onto filter paper. The filter paper immortalises the extent of aggregation, and digital images of the immortalized bead conformation, acquired with either a document scanner or a cell phone camera, allows for DNA quantification using a noncomplex algorithm. Human genomic DNA samples extracted from blood are quantified with the PAB approach and the results utilized to define the volume of sample used in a PCR reaction that is sensitive to input mass of template DNA. Integrating the PAB assay with paper-based DNA extraction and detection modalities has the potential to yield 'DNA quant-on-paper' devices that may be useful for point-of-care testing.

  4. Development and experimental basis of local subretinal technique of xenogenic’s injection stem cells labelled by magnetic perticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: is to develop a technique for local subretinal injection of xenogeneic stem cells labeled with magnetic particles and to prove experimentally its effectiveness.Material and methods: We used a line of stem cells HEK-293 GFP,labeled with magnetic particles. The study was made on 84 eyes of 42 chinchilla rabbits 6 months of age, the weight were from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. All right eyes were experimental (42 eyes and all left eyes (42 eyes were the control group. In the experimental group we used original complex of polymer elastic magnetic implant (PEMI with laser probe and fixed it to the sclera, then we made a median vitrectomy and injected HEK-293 GFP under the retina using a specially designed dispenser. In the control group PEMI was not fixed. We examined animals using biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, ultrasound scanning, optical coherence tomography  OCT, computer tomography (CT, morphological study (cryohistological sections in 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 day and 1 month after surgery.Results: According the results of biomicroscopy in observation periods up to 3 days the vascular injection was visualized in the area operation. According the results of ophthalmoscopy and ultrasound scanning in 1 day the local retinal detachment was visualized in the area of local injection of the stem cells, which was not visualized in terms of further observations. CT helped us to confirm the local place of PEMI fixation. The morphological study results showed that cells were located in the subretinal space up to 14 days in the experimental group, and only up 3 days in the control group.Conclusion: The suggested surgical technique enables to control the injection of cells into the subretinal space, reduces the risk of tissue damage and exit cells in the vitreous space. The suggested methodology allows the fixing of the cellular material in the local place of the injection and enables to predict cells`s movement.

  5. Chondrocytic Potential of Allogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted without Immunosuppression to Regenerate Physeal Defect in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gál

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from bone marrow are multipotent cells capable of forming cartilage, bone, and other connective tissues. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of allogenic mesenchymal stem cells could functionally heal a defect in the distal femoral physis in rabbits without the use of immunosuppressive therapy. A iatrogenic defect was created in the lateral femoral condyle of thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits, 7 weeks old, weighing 2.25 ± 0.24 kg. Each defect, 3.5 mm in width and 12 mm in length, in the right distal femoral physis was treated with allogenic mesenchymal stem cells in new composite hyaluronate/collagen type I/fibrin scaffold. The healing response was evaluated radiographically, by MRI (three weeks and four months after implantation and also histologically, by Pearl’s reaction and with immunofluorescence (four months after implantation. The results were compared with the data for the control defects (without stem cell implantation in left distal femoral physes. On average, right femurs with a damaged distal physis and transplanted MSCs grew more in length (0.55 ± 0.21 cm compared with left femurs with a physeal defect without stem cell transplantation (0.46 ± 0.23 cm. Valgus deformity of right femurs with a physeal defect and transplanted MSCs was mild (0.2 ± 0.1 °. On the contrary, left femurs with a physeal defect without transplanted MSCs showed a significant valgus deformity (2.7 ± 1.6 °. For defects treated with allogenic mesenchymal stem cell implants, no adverse immune response and implant rejection were detected in this model. Histologically, no lymphocytic infiltration occurred. At four months after transplantation, hyaline cartilage had formed throughout the defects treated with allogenic MSCs. Labelled mesenchymal stem cells/differentiated chondrocytes were detected in the physeal defects based on magnetic resonance imaging and immunofluorescence. The results of this study

  6. Carbon magnetic resonance spectroscopy on carbon-13-labeled uracil in 5S ribonucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamill, W.D.; Grant, D.M.; Cooper, R.B.; Harmon, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    The carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the 13 C-enriched C-4 uridine carbons in 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid of Salmonella typhimurium, strain JL-1055, was obtained. The most striking feature of the 5S RNA spectrum was the large number of well-resolved lines in the uridine band covering a chemical shift range of approximately 3.6 ppM. This data was used to obtain information on the secondary structure. The number of uridines involved in secondary interactions is estimated to be at least 75% and may be as high as 95%

  7. The use of oligoperoxide-coated magnetic nanoparticles to label stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šponarová, Daniela; Horák, Daniel; Trchová, Miroslava; Jendelová, Pavla; Herynek, V.; Mitina, N.; Zaichenko, A.; Stoika, R.; Lesný, Petr; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2011), s. 384-394 ISSN 1550-7033 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1242; GA ČR GAP503/10/0664; GA MŠk 1M0538; GA AV ČR KAN201110651; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN401220801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : magnetic * nanoparticles * stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.216, year: 2011

  8. Consequences of the magnetic field, sonic and radiofrequency waves and intense pulsed light on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Patricia Froes; Costa, Iris do Ceu Clara; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha; Bonelli, Ludmila

    2007-01-01

    Sources of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and pulsed light have been used in physiotherapy to treat different disorders. In nuclear medicine, blood constituents(Bl-Co) are labeled with technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) are used. This study evaluated the consequences of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and intense pulsed light sources on the labeling of Bl-Co with 99m Tc. Blood from Wistar rats was exposed to the cited sources. The labeling of Bl-Co with 99m Tc was performed. Blood not exposed to the physical agents was used(controls). Data showed that the exposure to the different studied sources did not alter significantly (p>0.05) the labeling of Bl-Co. Although the results were obtained with animals, the data suggest that no alteration on examinations performed with Bl-Co labeled with 99m Tc after exposition to the cited agents. The biological consequences associated with these agents would be not capable to interfere with some properties of the Bl-Co. (author)

  9. Consequences of the magnetic field, sonic and radiofrequency waves and intense pulsed light on the labeling of blood constituents with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Patricia Froes; Costa, Iris do Ceu Clara; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Medeiros, Aldo da Cunha [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias da Saude; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Adenilson de Souza da Fonseca; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Ariel Ronzio, Oscar [Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonelli, Ludmila [Universidade Salgado de Oliveira, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2007-09-15

    Sources of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and pulsed light have been used in physiotherapy to treat different disorders. In nuclear medicine, blood constituents(Bl-Co) are labeled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) are used. This study evaluated the consequences of magnetic field, radiofrequency and audible sonic waves and intense pulsed light sources on the labeling of Bl-Co with {sup 99m}Tc. Blood from Wistar rats was exposed to the cited sources. The labeling of Bl-Co with {sup 99m}Tc was performed. Blood not exposed to the physical agents was used(controls). Data showed that the exposure to the different studied sources did not alter significantly (p>0.05) the labeling of Bl-Co. Although the results were obtained with animals, the data suggest that no alteration on examinations performed with Bl-Co labeled with {sup 99m}Tc after exposition to the cited agents. The biological consequences associated with these agents would be not capable to interfere with some properties of the Bl-Co. (author)

  10. Chemiluminescent labels released from long spacer arm-functionalized magnetic particles: a novel strategy for ultrasensitive and highly selective detection of pathogen infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haowen; Liang, Wenbiao; He, Nongyue; Deng, Yan; Li, Zhiyang

    2015-01-14

    Previously, the unique advantages provided by chemiluminescence (CL) and magnetic particles (MPs) have resulted in the development of many useful nucleic acid detection methods. CL is highly sensitive, but when applied to MPs, its intensity is limited by the inner filter-like effect arising from excess dark MPs. Herein, we describe a modified strategy whereby CL labels are released from MPs to eliminate this negative effect. This approach relies on (1) the magnetic capture of target molecules on long spacer arm-functionalized magnetic particles (LSA-MPs), (2) the conjugation of streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase (SA-AP) to biotinylated amplicons of target pathogens, (3) the release of CL labels (specifically, AP tags), and (4) the detection of the released labels. CL labels were released from LSA-MPs through LSA ultrasonication or DNA enzymolysis, which proved to be the superior method. In contrast to conventional MPs, LSA-MPs exhibited significantly improved CL detection, because of the introduction of LSA, which was made of water-soluble carboxymethylated β-1,3-glucan. Detection of hepatitis B virus with this technique revealed a low detection limit of 50 fM, high selectivity, and excellent reproducibility. Thus, this approach may hold great potential for early stage clinical diagnosis of infectious diseases.

  11. The Use of Gadolinium-Carbon Nanostructures to Magnetically Enhance Stem Cell Retention for Cellular Cardiomyoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lesa A.; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Berlin, Ari N.; Zheng, Yi; Sampaio, Luiz; Bové, Christina; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the effectiveness of using Gadonanotubes (GNTs) with an external magnetic field to improve retention of transplanted adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during cellular cardiomyoplasty was evaluated. As a high-performance T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cell tracking label, the GNTs are gadolinium-loaded carbon nanotube capsules that render MSCs magnetic when internalized. MSCs were internally labeled with either superparamagnetic GNTs or colloidal diamagnetic lutetium (Lu). In vitro cell rolling assays and ex vivo cardiac perfusion experiments qualitatively demonstrated increased magnetic-assisted retention of GNT-labeled MSCs. Subsequent in vivo epicardial cell injections were performed around a 1.3 T NdFeB ring magnet sutured onto the left ventricle of female juvenile pigs (n = 21). Cell dosage, magnet exposure time, and endpoints were varied to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the proposed therapy. Quantification of retained cells in collected tissues by elemental analysis (Gd or Lu) showed that the external magnet helped retain nearly three times more GNT-labeled MSCs than Lu-labeled cells. The sutured magnet was tolerated for up to 168 hours; however, an inflammatory response to the magnet was noted after 48 hours. These proof-of-concept studies support the feasibility and value of using GNTs as a magnetic nanoparticle facilitator to improve cell retention during cellular cardiomyoplasty. PMID:24148239

  12. The use of gadolinium-carbon nanostructures to magnetically enhance stem cell retention for cellular cardiomyoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lesa A; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Berlin, Ari N; Zheng, Yi; Sampaio, Luiz; Bové, Christina; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graça; Willerson, James T; Perin, Emerson C; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the effectiveness of using Gadonanotubes (GNTs) with an external magnetic field to improve retention of transplanted adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during cellular cardiomyoplasty was evaluated. As a high-performance T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cell tracking label, the GNTs are gadolinium-loaded carbon nanotube capsules that render MSCs magnetic when internalized. MSCs were internally labeled with either superparamagnetic GNTs or colloidal diamagnetic lutetium (Lu). In vitro cell rolling assays and ex vivo cardiac perfusion experiments qualitatively demonstrated increased magnetic-assisted retention of GNT-labeled MSCs. Subsequent in vivo epicardial cell injections were performed around a 1.3 T NdFeB ring magnet sutured onto the left ventricle of female juvenile pigs (n = 21). Cell dosage, magnet exposure time, and endpoints were varied to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the proposed therapy. Quantification of retained cells in collected tissues by elemental analysis (Gd or Lu) showed that the external magnet helped retain nearly three times more GNT-labeled MSCs than Lu-labeled cells. The sutured magnet was tolerated for up to 168 h; however, an inflammatory response to the magnet was noted after 48 h. These proof-of-concept studies support the feasibility and value of using GNTs as a magnetic nanoparticle facilitator to improve cell retention during cellular cardiomyoplasty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Tracking of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Labeled with Alkyl-Polyethylenimine 2 kDa/Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide in a Mouse Lung Carcinoma Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in novel anticancer therapy and the repair of vascular injury has been increasingly recognized. In the present study, EPCs were labeled with N-alkyl-polyethylenimine 2 kDa (PEI2k-stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO to facilitate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of EPCs in a mouse lung carcinoma xenograft model. EPCs derived from human peripheral blood were labeled with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO. The viability and activity of labeled cells were evaluated using proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis assays. Alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO-labeled EPCs were injected intravenously (group 1 or mixed and injected together with A549 cells subcutaneously (group 2 into groups of six mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. The labeling efficiency with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO at 7 mg Fe/mL concentration was approximately 100%. Quantitative analysis of cellular iron was 6.062 ± 0.050 pg/cell. No significant effects on EPC proliferation, migration, or tubulogenesis were seen after labeling. Seventesla micro-MRI showed the presence of schistic or linear hypointense regions at the tumor margins starting from days 7 to 8 after EPC administration. This gradually extended into the inner tumor layers in group 1. In group 2, tumor growth was accompanied by dispersion of low-signal intensity regions inside the tumor. Iron-positive cells identified by Prussian blue dye were seen at the sites identified using MRI. Human CD31-positive cells and mouse CD31-positive cells were present in both groups. Labeling EPCs with alkyl-PEI2k/SPIO allows noninvasive magnetic resonance investigation of EPC involvement in tumor neovasculature and is associated with excellent biocompatibility and MRI sensitivity.

  14. Magnetic resonance studies of isotopically labeled paramagnetic proteins: (2FE-2S) ferredoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H.; Xia, B.; Chae, Y.K.; Westler, W.M.; Markley, J.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Recent developments in NMR spectroscopy, especially multidimensional, multinuclear NMR techniques, have made NMR the most versatile tool available for studying protein structure and function in solution. Unlike diamagnetic proteins, paramagnetic proteins contain centers with unpaired electrons. These unpaired electrons interact with magnetic nuclei either through chemical bonds by a contact mechanism or through space by a pseudocontact mechanism. Such interactions make the acquisition and analysis of NMR spectra of paramagnetic proteins more challenging than those of diamagnetic proteins. Some NMR signals from paramagnetic proteins are shifted outside the chemical shift region characteristic of diamagnetic proteins; these {open_quotes}hyperfine-shifted{close_quotes} resonances originate from nuclei that interact with unpaired electrons from the paramagnetic center. The large chemical shift dispersion in spectra of paramagnetic proteins makes it difficult to excite the entire spectral window and leads to distortions in the baseline. Interactions with paramagnetic centers shorten T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times of nuclei; the consequences are line broadening and lower spectral sensitivity. Scalar (through bond) and dipolar (through space) interactions between pairs of nuclei are what give rise to crosspeak signals in multi-dimensional NMR spectra of small diamagnetic proteins. When such interactions involve a nucleus that is strongly relaxed by interaction with a paramagnetic center, specialized methods may be needed for its detection or it may be completely undetectable by present nD NMR methods.

  15. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Maria J; Olofsson, Kern; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-09-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neonates. Examinations were performed on unsedated infants at postmenstrual age of 39-40 wk in both groups. Due to motion, reliable data were obtained from 23 preterm and 6 term infants. Perfusion in the basal ganglia (39 and 30 mL/100 g/min for preterm and term neonates, respectively) was significantly higher (p neonates at term-equivalent age and in term neonates. Perfusion was significantly higher (p = 0.01) in the preterm group than in the term infants, indicating that RCP may be influenced by developmental and postnatal ages. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that noninvasive ASL at 3T may be used to measure RCP in healthy unsedated preterm and term neonates. ASL is, therefore, a viable tool that will allow serial studies of RCP in high-risk neonates.

  16. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of auditory hallucinations: a preliminary open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Oded; Roth, Yiftach; Kotler, Moshe; Zangen, Abraham; Dannon, Pinhas

    2011-02-09

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and disabling disease that presents with delusions and hallucinations. Auditory hallucinations are usually expressed as voices speaking to or about the patient. Previous studies have examined the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the temporoparietal cortex on auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients. Our aim was to explore the potential effect of deep TMS, using the H coil over the same brain region on auditory hallucinations. Eight schizophrenic patients with refractory auditory hallucinations were recruited, mainly from Beer Ya'akov Mental Health Institution (Tel Aviv university, Israel) ambulatory clinics, as well as from other hospitals outpatient populations. Low-frequency deep TMS was applied for 10 min (600 pulses per session) to the left temporoparietal cortex for either 10 or 20 sessions. Deep TMS was applied using Brainsway's H1 coil apparatus. Patients were evaluated using the Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale (AHRS) as well as the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms scores (SAPS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale, and the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). This preliminary study demonstrated a significant improvement in AHRS score (an average reduction of 31.7% ± 32.2%) and to a lesser extent improvement in SAPS results (an average reduction of 16.5% ± 20.3%). In this study, we have demonstrated the potential of deep TMS treatment over the temporoparietal cortex as an add-on treatment for chronic auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients. Larger samples in a double-blind sham-controlled design are now being preformed to evaluate the effectiveness of deep TMS treatment for auditory hallucinations. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT00564096).

  17. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of auditory hallucinations: a preliminary open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangen Abraham

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a chronic and disabling disease that presents with delusions and hallucinations. Auditory hallucinations are usually expressed as voices speaking to or about the patient. Previous studies have examined the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS over the temporoparietal cortex on auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients. Our aim was to explore the potential effect of deep TMS, using the H coil over the same brain region on auditory hallucinations. Patients and methods Eight schizophrenic patients with refractory auditory hallucinations were recruited, mainly from Beer Ya'akov Mental Health Institution (Tel Aviv university, Israel ambulatory clinics, as well as from other hospitals outpatient populations. Low-frequency deep TMS was applied for 10 min (600 pulses per session to the left temporoparietal cortex for either 10 or 20 sessions. Deep TMS was applied using Brainsway's H1 coil apparatus. Patients were evaluated using the Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale (AHRS as well as the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms scores (SAPS, Clinical Global Impressions (CGI scale, and the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS. Results This preliminary study demonstrated a significant improvement in AHRS score (an average reduction of 31.7% ± 32.2% and to a lesser extent improvement in SAPS results (an average reduction of 16.5% ± 20.3%. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated the potential of deep TMS treatment over the temporoparietal cortex as an add-on treatment for chronic auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients. Larger samples in a double-blind sham-controlled design are now being preformed to evaluate the effectiveness of deep TMS treatment for auditory hallucinations. Trial registration This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT00564096.

  18. Sandwich immunoassay for alpha-fetoprotein in human sera using gold nanoparticle and magnetic bead labels along with resonance Rayleigh scattering readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yao; Huang, Xiangyi; Ren, Jicun

    2013-01-01

    We describe a sensitive sandwich immunoassay for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). It is making use of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and magnetic beads (MBs) as labels, and of resonance Rayleigh scattering for detection. Two antibodies were labeled with GNPs and MBs, respectively, and MB-antigen-GNP complexes were formed in the presence of antigens. The MB labels also serve as solid phase carriers that can be used to magnetically separate the immuno complex. The GNP labels are used as optical probes, and Rayleigh scattering was used to determine the concentration of free GNPs-antibody after separation of the MB-antigen-GNP complexes. The concentration of AFP is related to the intensity of light scattered by free GNPs in the 13.6 pM to 436 pM concentration range, and the limit of detection is 13.6 pM. The method was applied to the determination of AFP in sera of cancer patients, and the results agree well with those obtained by conventional ELISA. (author)

  19. Does an Injection of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Loaded in Fibrin Glue Influence Rotator Cuff Repair Outcomes? A Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Sung, Chang Hun; Chung, Sung Hoon; Kwak, Sang Joon; Koh, Yong Gon

    2017-07-01

    The mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue engineering approach has been developed to improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose was to determine the effect of an injection of adipose-derived MSCs loaded in fibrin glue during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair on clinical outcomes and to evaluate its effect on structural integrity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hypothesis was that the application of adipose-derived MSCs would improve outcomes after the surgical repair of a rotator cuff tear. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Among 182 patients treated with arthroscopic surgery for a rotator cuff tear, 35 patients treated with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair alone (conventional group) were matched with 35 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with an injection of adipose-derived MSCs loaded in fibrin glue (injection group) based on sex, age, and lesion size. Outcomes were assessed with respect to the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM) (including forward flexion, external rotation at the side, and internal rotation at the back), and functional measures of the Constant score and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale. Repaired tendon structural integrity was assessed by using MRI at a minimum of 12 months after surgery, and the mean clinical follow-up was 28.8 ± 4.2 months in the conventional group and 28.3 ± 3.8 months in the injection group. The mean VAS score at rest and during motion improved significantly in both groups after surgery. However, there were no significant differences between the groups at the final follow-up ( P = .256 and .776, respectively). Compared with preoperative measurements, forward flexion and external rotation at the side significantly improved at the final follow-up in both groups (all P rotation at the back were observed in either group ( P = .625 and .834 for the conventional and injection groups, respectively

  20. Novel Application of Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis of External Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Murayama, Kazuhiro; Adachi, Kazuhide; Kumai, Tadashi; Abe, Masato; Hirose, Yuichi

    2018-01-01

    Although a subdural fluid collection frequently is observed, diagnostic methods that differentiate between the subdural collection caused by external hydrocephalus and that caused by subdural hygroma have not been established. Here, we report a case of external hydrocephalus caused by Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis that has been previously reported in only 1 case and can be diagnosed by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse magnetic resonance imaging (time-SLIP MRI). A tumor located in the left temporal was detected incidentally in an 81-year-old man by examination of a head injury. The tumor was surgically resected and diagnosed as a high-grade glioma during the surgery; Gliadel wafers subsequently were implanted. Three weeks after the resection, the patient showed disturbed consciousness, and computed tomography revealed a subdural fluid collection. The out-flow of cerebrospinal through the resection cavity was detected by time-SLIP MRI. Cerebrospinal tests indicated high white blood cell counts and high protein levels, with more than 90% of the white blood cell count comprising eosinophils. Therefore, we suspected that the subdural fluid collection was caused by external hydrocephalus because of Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis. We surgically removed the Gliadel wafers and subsequently performed a surgery to insert a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Histologic examination indicated eosinophilic accumulation around the Gliadel wafers. The patient's symptoms improved after the insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. In the present case, time-SLIP MRI was a useful and noninvasive method for diagnosing external hydrocephalus which was caused by eosinophilic meningitis because of Gliadel-induced eosinophilic meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular transfer of magnetic nanoparticles via cell microvesicles: impact on cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda K Andriola; Wilhelm, Claire; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-05-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles can be used to monitor the fate of transplanted cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. However, nanoparticles initially internalized in administered cells might end up in other cells of the host organism. We investigated a mechanism of intercellular cross-transfer of magnetic nanoparticles to different types of recipient cells via cell microvesicles released under cellular stress. Three cell types (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial cells and macrophages) were labeled with 8-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. Then cells underwent starvation stress, during which they produced microvesicles that were subsequently transferred to unlabeled recipient cells. The analysis of the magnetophoretic mobility of donor cells indicated that magnetic load was partially lost under cell stress. Microvesicles shed by stressed cells participated in the release of magnetic label. Moreover, such microvesicles were uptaken by naïve cells, resulting in cellular redistribution of nanoparticles. Iron load of recipient cells allowed their detection by MRI. Cell microvesicles released under stress may be disseminated throughout the organism, where they can be uptaken by host cells. The transferred cargo may be sufficient to allow MRI detection of these secondarily labeled cells, leading to misinterpretations of the effectiveness of transplanted cells.

  2. Integrating Cell Phone Imaging with Magnetic Levitation (i-LEV) for Label-Free Blood Analysis at the Point-of-Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baday, Murat; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-03-02

    There is an emerging need for portable, robust, inexpensive, and easy-to-use disease diagnosis and prognosis monitoring platforms to share health information at the point-of-living, including clinical and home settings. Recent advances in digital health technologies have improved early diagnosis, drug treatment, and personalized medicine. Smartphones with high-resolution cameras and high data processing power enable intriguing biomedical applications when integrated with diagnostic devices. Further, these devices have immense potential to contribute to public health in resource-limited settings where there is a particular need for portable, rapid, label-free, easy-to-use, and affordable biomedical devices to diagnose and continuously monitor patients for precision medicine, especially those suffering from rare diseases, such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Here, a magnetic levitation-based diagnosis system is presented in which different cell types (i.e., white and red blood cells) are levitated in a magnetic gradient and separated due to their unique densities. Moreover, an easy-to-use, smartphone incorporated levitation system for cell analysis is introduced. Using our portable imaging magnetic levitation (i-LEV) system, it is shown that white and red blood cells can be identified and cell numbers can be quantified without using any labels. In addition, cells levitated in i-LEV can be distinguished at single-cell resolution, potentially enabling diagnosis and monitoring, as well as clinical and research applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-jing; Liu, Jian-min; Wei, Shu-ming; Zhang, Yun-hao; Qu, Zhen-hua; Chen, Shu-bo

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats. PMID:26487860

  4. Uterine mesenchymal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil A Sangle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine mesenchymal tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that can frequently be diagnostically challenging. Differentiation between the benign and malignant counterparts of mesenchymal tumors is significant due to differences in clinical outcome, and the role of the surgical pathologist in making this distinction (especially in the difficult cases cannot be underestimated. Although immunohistochemical stains are supportive toward establishing a final diagnosis, the morphologic features trump all the other ancillary techniques for this group of neoplasms. This review therefore emphasizes the key morphologic features required to diagnose and distinguish uterine mesenchymal tumors from their mimics, with a brief description of the relevant immunohistochemical features.

  5. Migration of iron-labeled KHYG-1 natural killer cells to subcutaneous tumors in nude mice, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Christiane L; McFadden, Catherine; Chen, Yuhua; Foster, Paula J

    2012-07-01

    A novel cell line of cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells, KHYG-1, was examined in vivo for immunotherapy against prostate cancer. The feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracking to monitor the fate of injected NK cells following intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration was assessed. PC-3M human prostate cancer cells were injected s.c. into the flank of nude mice (day 0). KHYG-1 NK cells were labeled with an iron oxide contrast agent and injected s.c., i.v. or i.p. on day 8. Mice were imaged by MRI on days 7, 9 and 12. Tumor sections were examined with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistologic staining for NK cells. NK cells were detected in the tumors by histology after all three administration routes. NK cells and fluorescence from the iron label were co-localized. Signal loss was seen in the areas around the tumors and between the tumor lobes in the s.c. group. We are the first to label this cell line of NK cells with an iron oxide contrast agent. Accumulation of NK cells was visualized by MRI after s.c. injection but not after i.v. and i.p. injection.

  6. Ultra-fast stem cell labelling using cationised magnetoferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Carreira, S.; Armstrong, J. P. K.; Seddon, A. M.; Perriman, A. W.; Hartley-Davies, R.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised magnetoferritin did not adversely affect the membrane integrity, proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation capacity of hMSCs, which provides the first detailed evidence for the biocompatibility of magnetoferritin. The combination of synthetic ease and flexibility, the rapidity of labelling and absence of cytotoxicity make this novel nanoparticle system an easily accessible and versatile platform for a range of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine.Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised

  7. Measurement of cerebral white matter perfusion using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling 3T magnetic resonance imaging--an experimental and theoretical investigation of feasibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chau Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study was aimed to experimentally and numerically investigate the feasibility of measuring cerebral white matter perfusion using pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at a relatively fine resolution to mitigate partial volume effect from gray matter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Institutional Research Ethics Committee approved this study. On a clinical 3T MR system, ten healthy volunteers (5 females, 5 males, age = 28 ± 3 years were scanned after providing written informed consent. PCASL imaging was performed with varied combinations of labeling duration (τ = 1000, 1500, 2000, and 2500 ms and post-labeling delay (PLD = 1000, 1400, 1800, and 2200 ms, at a spatial resolution (1.56 x 1.56 x 5 mm(3 finer than commonly used (3.5 x 3.5 mm(2, 5-8 mm in thickness. Computer simulations were performed to calculate the achievable perfusion-weighted signal-to-noise ratio at varied τ, PLD, and transit delay. RESULTS: Based on experimental and numerical data, the optimal τ and PLD were found to be 2000 ms and 1500-1800 ms, respectively, yielding adequate SNR (~2 to support perfusion measurement in the majority (~60% of white matter. The measurement variability was about 9% in a one-week interval. The measured white matter perfusion and perfusion ratio of gray matter to white matter were 15.8-27.5 ml/100ml/min and 1.8-4.0, respectively, depending on spatial resolution as well as the amount of deep white matter included. CONCLUSION: PCASL 3T MRI is able to measure perfusion in the majority of cerebral white matter at an adequate signal-to-noise ratio by using appropriate tagging duration and post-labeling delay. Although pixel-wise comparison may not be possible, region-of-interest based flow quantification is feasible.

  8. Clinically viable magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Dorit; Nkansah, Michael K.; Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Tang, Kevin S.; Markakis, Eleni A.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To design, fabricate, characterize and in vivo assay clinically viable magnetic particles for MRI-based cell tracking. Methods PLGA encapsulated magnetic nano- and microparticles were fabricated. Multiple biologically relevant experiments were performed to assess cell viability, cellular performance and stem cell differentiation. In vivo MRI experiments were performed to separately test cell transplantation and cell migration paradigms, as well as in vivo biodegradation. Results Highly magnetic nano- (~100 nm) and microparticles (~1–2 μm) were fabricated. Magnetic cell labeling in culture occurred rapidly achieving 3–50 pg Fe/cell at 3 hrs for different particles types, and >100 pg Fe/cell after 10 hours, without the requirement of a transfection agent, and with no effect on cell viability. The capability of magnetically labeled mesenchymal or neural stem cells to differentiate down multiple lineages, or for magnetically labeled immune cells to release cytokines following stimulation, was uncompromised. An in vivo biodegradation study revealed that NPs degraded ~80% over the course of 12 weeks. MRI detected as few as 10 magnetically labeled cells, transplanted into the brains of rats. Also, these particles enabled the in vivo monitoring of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration in rat brains over 2 weeks. Conclusion The robust MRI properties and benign safety profile of these particles make them promising candidates for clinical translation for MRI-based cell tracking. PMID:23568825

  9. Protein surface labeling reactivity of N-hydroxysuccinimide esters conjugated to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirani, Parisa; Patil, Ujwal S.; Apsunde, Tushar Dattu; Trudell, Mark L.; Cai, Yang, E-mail: ycai@chnola-research.org; Tarr, Matthew A., E-mail: mtarr@uno.edu [University of New Orleans, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester moiety is one of the most widely used amine reactive groups for covalent conjugation of proteins/peptides to other functional targets. In this study, a cleave-analyze approach was developed to quantify NHS ester groups conjugated to silica-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} MNPs). The fluorophore dansylcadaverine was attached to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via reaction with NHS ester groups, and then released from the MNPs by cleavage of the disulfide bond in the linker between the fluorophore and the MNPs moiety. The fluorophore released from Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} MNPs was fluorometrically measured, and the amount of fluorophore should be equivalent to the quantity of the NHS ester groups on the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} MNPs that participated in the fluorophore conjugation reaction. Another sensitive and semiquantitative fluorescence microscopic test was also developed to confirm the presence of NHS ester groups on the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} MNPs. Surface-conjugated NHS ester group measurements were primarily performed on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} MNPs of 100–150 nm in diameter and also on 20-nm nanoparticles of the same type but prepared by a different method. The efficiency of labeling native proteins by NHS ester-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} MNPs was explored in terms of maximizing the number of MNPs conjugated per BSA molecule or maximizing the number of BSA molecules conjugated per each nanoparticle. Maintaining the amount of fresh NHS ester moieties in the labeling reaction system was essential especially when maximizing the number of MNPs conjugated per protein molecule. The methodology demonstrated in this study can serve as a guide in labeling the exposed portions of proteins by bulky multivalent labeling reagents.

  10. Rhodamine bound maghemite as a long-term dual imaging nanoprobe of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Skopalik, Josef; Polakova, Katerina; Solar, Jan; Havrdova, Marketa; Milde, David; Justan, Ivan; Magro, Massimiliano; Starcuk, Zenon; Provaznik, Ivo

    2017-07-01

    In the last few years, magnetically labeled cells have been intensively explored, and non-invasive cell tracking and magnetic manipulation methods have been tested in preclinical studies focused on cell transplantation. For clinical applications, it is desirable to know the intracellular pathway of nanoparticles, which can predict their biocompatibility with cells and the long-term imaging properties of labeled cells. Here, we quantified labeling efficiency, localization, and fluorescence properties of Rhodamine derivatized superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles (SAMN-R) in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). We investigated the stability of SAMN-R in the intracellular space during a long culture (20 days). Analyses were based on advanced confocal microscopy accompanied by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and magnetic resonance imaging. SAMN-R displayed excellent cellular uptake (24 h of labeling), and no toxicity of SAMN-R labeling was found. 83% of SAMN-R nanoparticles were localized in lysosomes, only 4.8% were found in mitochondria, and no particles were localized in the nucleus. On the basis of the MSC fluorescence measurement every 6 days, we also quantified the continual decrease of SAMN-R fluorescence in the average single MSC during 18 days. An additional set of analyses showed that the intracellular SAMN-R signal decrease was minimally caused by fluorophore degradation or nanoparticles extraction from the cells, main reason is a cell division. The fluorescence of SAMN-R nanoparticles within the cells was detectable minimally for 20 days. These observations indicate that SAMN-R nanoparticles have a potential for application in transplantation medicine.

  11. Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Labels KidsHealth / For Teens / Food Labels What's in ... to have at least 95% organic ingredients. Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of interaction of ligands with Streptococcus faecium dihydrofolate reductase labeled with [#betta#-13C]tryptophan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.; Groff, J.P.; Cocco, L.; Blakley, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase from Streptococcus faecium has been labeled with [#betta#- 13 C]tryptophan. We have determined changes occurring in the chemical shifts and line widths of the four resonances of the 13 C NMR spectrum of the labeled enzyme, due to its interaction with various ligands. These include the coenzyme, NPDPH and related nucleotides, folate and its polyglutamate derivatives, and many inhibitors including methotrexate and trimethoprim. In addition, paramagnetic relaxation effects produced by a bound spin-labeled analogue of 2'-phosphoadenosine-5'-diphosphoribose on the tryptophan C/sup #betta#/ carbons have been measured. Distances calculated from the relaxation data have been compared with corresponding distances in the crystallographic model of the NADPH-methotrexate ternary complex of Lactobacillus casei reductase. The paramagnetic relaxation data indicate that the two downfield resonances (1 and 2) correspond to tryptophans (W/sub A/ and W/sub B/) that are more remote from the catalytic site, and from the crystallographic model these are seen to be Trp-115 and Trp-160. The upfield resonances (3 and 4) that show broadening due to chemical exchange correspond to closer residues (W/sub C/ and W/sub D/), and these are identified with Trp-6 and Trp-22. However, the relaxation data do not permit specific assignments within the nearer and farther pairs. Although resonance 3, which is split due to chemical exchange, was formerly assigned to Trp-6, data obtained for the enzyme in the presence of various ligands are better interpreted if resonance 3 is assigned to Trp-22, which is located on a loop that joins elements of secondary structure and forms one side of the ligand-binding cavity

  13. Longitudinal Assessment of Renal Perfusion and Oxygenation in Transplant Donor-Recipient Pairs Using Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, David J; Artz, Nathan S; Djamali, Arjang; Sadowski, Elizabeth A; Grist, Thomas M; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to assess renal function in kidney transplant recipients and their respective donors over 2 years using arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to prospectively evaluate the effect of losartan on functional MRI measures in recipients. The study included 15 matched pairs of renal transplant donors and recipients. Arterial spin labeling and BOLD MRI of the kidneys were performed on donors before transplant surgery (baseline) and on both donors and recipients at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after transplant. After 3 months, 7 of the 15 recipients were prescribed 25 to 50 mg/d losartan for the remainder of the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to evaluate perfusion, R2*, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and fractional excretion of sodium for changes across time or associated with losartan treatment. In donors, cortical perfusion in the remaining kidney decreased by 50 ± 19 mL/min per 100 g (11.8%) between baseline and 2 years (P donors and to 14.6 ± 4.3 mL/min per 1.73 m (33.3%; P donors, and they indicate a potentially beneficial effect of losartan in recipients.

  14. Core–shell Fe3O4–Au magnetic nanoparticles based nonenzymatic ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence immunosensor using quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet as labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Weiyan; Zhang, Yan; Ge, Shenguang; Song, Xianrang; Huang, Jiadong; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Core–shell Fe 3 O 4 –Au magnetic nanoparticles and P-GS@QDs were prepared to immobilize Ab 1 and Ab 2 respectively and combined to fabricate a novel sandwich-type ECL immunosensor for detecting CA125 at low concentration. Highlights: ► ECL immunosensor for CA125 based on a microfluidic strategy with a homemade ECL cell was proposed. ► Core–shell Fe 3 O 4 –Au magnetic nanoparticles were employed as the carriers of the primary antibodies. ► CdTe quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet were used for signal amplification. -- Abstract: In this paper, a novel, low-cost electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor using core–shell Fe 3 O 4 –Au magnetic nanoparticles (AuMNPs) as the carriers of the primary antibody of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) was designed. Graphene sheet (GS) with property of good conductivity and large surface area was a captivating candidate to amplify ECL signal. We successively synthesized functionalized GS by loading large amounts of quantum dots (QDs) onto the poly (diallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride) (PDDA) coated graphene sheet (P-GS@QDs) via self-assembly electrostatic reactions, which were used to label secondary antibodies. The ECL immunosensors coupled with a microfluidic strategy exhibited a wide detection range (0.005–50 U mL −1 ) and a low detection limit (1.2 mU mL −1 ) with the help of an external magnetic field to gather immunosensors. The method was evaluated with clinical serum sample, receiving good correlation with results from commercially available analytical procedure

  15. Alzheimer's disease biomarkers detection in human samples by efficient capturing through porous magnetic microspheres and labelling with electrocatalytic gold nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Escosura-Muniz, A.; Plichta, Zdeněk; Horák, Daniel; Merkoci, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 67, 15 May (2015), s. 162-169 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12053 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 246513 - NADINE Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : porous magnetic microspheres * gold nanoparticles * electrochemical immunoassay Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.476, year: 2015

  16. Dual-Modal Nanoprobes for Imaging of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplant by MRI and Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Chang Kyu; Hong, Kyung Ah; Lin, Shun Mei

    2009-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of labeling human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with bifunctional nanoparticles and assessing their potential as imaging probes in the monitoring of hMSC transplantation. The T1 and T2 relaxivities of the nanoparticles (MNP SiO 2 [RITC]-PEG) were measured at 1.5T and 3T magnetic resonance scanner. Using hMSCs and the nanoparticles, labeling efficiency, toxicity, and proliferation were assessed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to specify the intracellular localization of the endocytosed iron nanoparticles. We also observed in vitro and in vivo visualization of the labeled hMSCs with a 3T MR scanner and optical imaging. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG showed both superparamagnetic and fluorescent properties. The r 1 and r 2 relaxivity values of the MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG were 0.33 and 398 mM -1 s -1 at 1.5T, respectively, and 0.29 and 453 mM -1 s -1 at 3T, respectively. The effective internalization of MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG into hMSCs was observed by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. The transmission electron microscopy images showed that MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG was internalized into the cells and mainly resided in the cytoplasm. The viability and proliferation of MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were not significantly different from the control cells. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG-labeled hMSCs were observed in vitro and in vivo with optical and MR imaging. MNP SiO 2 (RITC)-PEG can be a useful contrast agent for stem cell imaging, which is suitable for a bimodal detection by MRI and optical imaging

  17. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  18. The role of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging in the differentiation of parasellar meningioma and cavernous haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Lou, Xin; Liu, Meng-Yu; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Shi, Kai-Ning; Ma, Lin

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging (3D-ASL) in distinguishing cavernous haemangioma from parasellar meningioma, using histological data as a reference standard. Patients with parasellar meningioma or parasellar cavernous haemangioma underwent conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by DWI and 3D-ASL using a 3.0 Tesla MRI. The minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (minADC) from DWI and the maximal normalized cerebral blood flow (nCBF) from 3D-ASL were measured in each tumour. Diagnosis was confirmed by histology. MinADC was significantly lower and nCBF significantly higher in meningioma (n = 19) than cavernous haemangioma (n = 15). There was a significant negative correlation between minADC and nCBF (r = -0.605). DWI and 3D-ASL are useful in differentiating cavernous haemangiomas from parasellar meningiomas, particularly in situations when the appearance on conventional MRI sequences is otherwise ambiguous. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  20. Managing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation and cellular uptake: a precondition for efficient stem-cell differentiation and MRI tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Delphine; Luciani, Nathalie; Lartigue, Lenaic; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-02-01

    The labeling of stem cells with iron oxide nanoparticles is increasingly used to enable MRI cell tracking and magnetic cell manipulation, stimulating the fields of tissue engineering and cell therapy. However, the impact of magnetic labeling on stem-cell differentiation is still controversial. One compromising factor for successful differentiation may arise from early interactions of nanoparticles with cells during the labeling procedure. It is hypothesized that the lack of control over nanoparticle colloidal stability in biological media may lead to undesirable nanoparticle localization, overestimation of cellular uptake, misleading MRI cell tracking, and further impairment of differentiation. Herein a method is described for labeling mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), in which the physical state of citrate-coated nanoparticles (dispersed versus aggregated) can be kinetically tuned through electrostatic and magnetic triggers, as monitored by diffusion light scattering in the extracellular medium and by optical and electronic microscopy in cells. A set of statistical cell-by-cell measurements (flow cytometry, single-cell magnetophoresis, and high-resolution MRI cellular detection) is used to independently quantify the nanoparticle cell uptake and the effects of nanoparticle aggregation. Such aggregation confounds MRI cell detection as well as global iron quantification and has adverse effects on chondrogenetic differentiation. Magnetic labeling conditions with perfectly stable nanoparticles-suitable for obtaining differentiation-capable magnetic stem cells for use in cell therapy-are subsequently identified. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Functionalized graphene oxide/Fe3O4 hybrids for cellular magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chaohui; Wu, Hui; Wang, Mingliang; Huang, Chusen; Yang, Dapeng; Jia, Nengqin

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we developed a T 2 -weighted contrast agent based on graphene oxide (GO)/Fe 3 O 4 hybrids for efficient cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The GO/Fe 3 O 4 hybrids were obtained by combining with co-precipitation method and pyrolysis method. The structural, surface and magnetic characteristics of the hybrids were systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), AFM, Raman, FT-IR and XRD. The GO/Fe 3 O 4 hybrids were functionalized by modifying with anionic and cationic polyelectrolyte through layer-by-layer assembling. The fluorescence probe fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was further loaded on the surface of functionalized GO/Fe 3 O 4 hybrids to trace the location of GO/Fe 3 O 4 hybrids in cells. Functionalized GO/Fe 3 O 4 hybrids possess good hydrophilicity, less cytotoxicity, high MRI enhancement with the relaxivity (r 2 ) of 493mM -1 s -1 as well as cellular MRI contrast effect. These obtained results indicated that the functionalized GO/Fe 3 O 4 hybrids could have great potential to be utilized as cellular MRI contrast agents for tumor early diagnosis and monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow in Chronic Kidney Disease Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-Ping; Tan, Huan; Thacker, Jon M; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ying; Kohn, Orly; Sprague, Stuart M; Prasad, Pottumarthi V

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is known to be associated with reduced renal blood flow. However, data to-date in humans is limited. In this study, non-invasive arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI data was acquired in 33 patients with diabetes and stage-3 CKD, and 30 healthy controls. A significantly lower renal blood flow both in cortex (108.4±36.4 vs . 207.3±41.8; pblood flow were correlated with eGFR, and cortical blood flow was found to be confounded by age and BMI. However, in a subset of subjects that were matched for age and BMI (n=6), the differences between CKD and control subjects remained significant both in cortex (107.4±42.8 vs . 187.51±20.44; p=0.002) and medulla (15.43±8.43 vs . 39.18±11.13; p=0.002). A threshold value to separate healthy and CKD was estimated to be Cor_BF=142.9 and Med_BF=24.1. These results support the use of ASL in the evaluation of renal blood flow in patients with moderate level of CKD. Whether these measurements can identify subjects at risk of progressive CKD requires further longitudinal follow-up.

  3. Biocompatibility of quantum dots (CdSe/ZnS ) in human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongping; Zeng, Guangwei; Wang, Caie; Wang, Huasheng; Yang, Bo; Guan, Fangxia; Li, Dongpeng; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2015-06-01

    Amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAM-dMSCs) are a potential source of mesenchymal stem cells which could be used to repair skin damage. The use of mesenchymal stem cells to repair skin damage requires safe, effective and biocompatible agents to evaluate the effectiveness of the result. Quantum dots (QDs) composed of CdSe/ZnS are semiconductor nanocrystals with broad excitation and narrow emission spectra, which have been considered as a new chemical and fluorescent substance for non-invasively labeling different cells in vitro and in vivo. This study investigated the cytotoxic effects of QDs on hAM-dMSCs at different times following labeling. Using 0.75, 1.5 and 3.0 μL between quantum dots, labeled human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells were collected on days 1, 2 and 4 and observed morphological changes, performed an MTT cell growth assay and flow cytometry for mesenchymal stem cells molecular markers. Quantum dot concentration 0.75 μg/mL labeled under a fluorescence microscope, cell morphology was observed, The MTT assay showed cells in the proliferative phase. Flow cytometry expression CD29, CD31, CD34, CD44, CD90, CD105 and CD106. Within a certain range of concentrations between quantum dots labeled human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells has good biocompatibility.

  4. Determination of avian influenza A (H9N2) virions by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry based magnetic immunoassay with gold nanoparticles labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guangyang; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Shi, Kaiwen; Zhang, Xing; Li, Xiaoting; Wu, Qiumei; Pang, Daiwen; Hu, Bin

    2017-12-01

    Avian influenza viruses are the pathogens of global poultry epidemics, and may even cause the human infections. Here, we proposed a novel inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) based immunoassay with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) labeling for the determination of H9N2 virions. Magnetic-beads modified with anti-influenza A H9N2 hemagglutinin mono-antibody (mAb-HA) were utilized for the capture of H9N2 virions in complex matrix; and Au NPs conjugated with mAb-HA were employed for the specific labeling of H9N2 virions for subsequent ICP-MS detection. With a sandwich immunoassay strategy, this method exhibited a high specificity for H9N2 among other influenza A virions such as H1N1 and H3N2. Under the optimized conditions, this method could detect as low as 0.63 ng mL- 1 H9N2 virions with the linear range of 2-400 ng mL- 1, the relative standard deviation for seven replicate detections of H9N2 virions was 7.2% (c = 10 ng mL- 1). The developed method was applied for the detection of H9N2 virions in real-world chicken dung samples, and the recovery for the spiking samples was 91.4-116.9%. This method is simple, rapid, sensitive, selective, reliable and has a good application potential for virions detection in real-world samples.

  5. Design principles and theory of paramagnetic fluorine-labelled lanthanide complexes as probes for (19)F magnetic resonance: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Kirsten H; De Luca, Elena; Hogg, Naomi H M; Kenwright, Alan M; Kuprov, Ilya; Parker, David; Botta, Mauro; Wilson, J Ian; Blamire, Andrew M

    2010-01-04

    The synthesis and spectroscopic properties of a series of CF(3)-labelled lanthanide(III) complexes (Ln=Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) with amide-substituted ligands based on 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane are described. The theoretical contributions of the (19)F magnetic relaxation processes in these systems are critically assessed and selected volumetric plots are presented. These plots allow an accurate estimation of the increase in the rates of longitudinal and transverse relaxation as a function of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the fluorine nucleus, the applied magnetic field, and the re-rotational correlation time of the complex, for a given Ln(III) ion. Selected complexes exhibit pH-dependent chemical shift behaviour, and a pK(a) of 7.0 was determined in one example based on the holmium complex of an ortho-cyano DO3A-monoamide ligand, which allowed the pH to be assessed by measuring the difference in chemical shift (varying by over 14 ppm) between two (19)F resonances. Relaxation analyses of variable-temperature and variable-field (19)F, (17)O and (1)H NMR spectroscopy experiments are reported, aided by identification of salient low-energy conformers by using density functional theory. The study of fluorine relaxation rates, over a field range of 4.7 to 16.5 T allowed precise computation of the distance between the Ln(III) ion and the CF(3) reporter group by using global fitting methods. The sensitivity benefits of using such paramagnetic fluorinated probes in (19)F NMR spectroscopic studies are quantified in preliminary spectroscopic and imaging experiments with respect to a diamagnetic yttrium(III) analogue.

  6. Recombinant high-density lipoprotein nanoparticles containing gadolinium-labeled cholesterol for morphologic and functional magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mengjie Rui,1 Wei Guo,2 Qian Ding,2 Xiaohui Wei,2 Jianrong Xu,3 Yuhong Xu21School of Life Science and Biotechnology, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital Affiliation with Medical School of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Natural high-density lipoproteins (HDL possess important physiological functions to the transport of cholesterol from the peripheral tissues to the liver for metabolic degradation and excretion in the bile.Methods and results: In this work, we took advantage of this pathway and prepared two different gadolinium (Gd-DTPA-labeled cholesterol-containing recombinant HDL nanoparticles (Gd-chol-HDL and Gd-(chol2-HDL as liver-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents. The reconstituted HDL nanoparticles had structural similarity to native HDL, and could be taken up by HepG2 cells via interaction with HDL receptors in vitro. In vivo MRI studies in rats after intravenous injections of 10 µmol gadolinium per kg of recombinant HDL nanoparticles indicated that both nanoparticles could provide signal enhancement in the liver and related organs. However, different T1-weighted image details suggested that they participated in different cholesterol metabolism and excretion pathways in the liver.Conclusion: Such information could be highly useful to differentiate functional changes as well as anatomic differences in the liver. These cholesterol-derived contrast agents and their recombinant HDL preparations may warrant further development as a new class of contrast agents for MRI of the liver and related organs.Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, apolipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, contrast agent, gadolinium, liver

  7. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-10-24

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included the conjugation of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS) to the surface of a water-soluble glycol chitosan (GC) polymer, which contains pH-titrable primary amines, followed by gadolinium complexation (GC-NH2-GdDOTA). GC-NH2-GdDOTA had a chelate-to-polymer ratio of approximately1:24 and a molar relaxivity of 9.1 mM(-1) s(-1). GC-NH2-GdDOTA demonstrated pH-dependent cellular association in vitro compared to the control. It also generated a 2.4-fold enhancement in signal in tumor-bearing mice 2 h postinjection. These findings suggest that glycol chitosan coupled with contrast agents can provide important diagnostic information about the tumor microenvironment.

  8. Fluorescent nanodiamonds enable quantitative tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in miniature pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Long-Jyun; Wu, Meng-Shiue; Hui, Yuen Yung; Chang, Be-Ming; Pan, Lei; Hsu, Pei-Chen; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Huang, Yen-Hua; Ling, Thai-Yen; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2017-03-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of human diseases. While the first use of cells for therapeutic purposes can be traced to the 19th century, there has been a lack of general and reliable methods to study the biodistribution and associated pharmacokinetics of transplanted cells in various animal models for preclinical evaluation. Here, we present a new platform using albumin-conjugated fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) as biocompatible and photostable labels for quantitative tracking of human placenta choriodecidual membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pcMSCs) in miniature pigs by magnetic modulation. With this background-free detection technique and time-gated fluorescence imaging, we have been able to precisely determine the numbers as well as positions of the transplanted FND-labeled pcMSCs in organs and tissues of the miniature pigs after intravenous administration. The method is applicable to single-cell imaging and quantitative tracking of human stem/progenitor cells in rodents and other animal models as well.

  9. Evaluation of the applicability of territorial arterial spin labeling in meningiomas for presurgical assessments compared with 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yiping; Wen, Jianbo; Geng, Daoying; Yin, Bo; Luan, Shihai; Liu, Li; Xiong, Ji; Qu, Jianxun

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the application of territorial arterial spin labelling (t-ASL) in comparison with unenhanced three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in the identification of the feeding vasculature of meningiomas. Thirty consecutive patients with suspected meningiomas underwent conventional MR imaging, unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and t-ASL scanning. Four experienced neuro-radiologists assessed the feeding vessels with different techniques separately. For the identification of the origin of the feeding arteries on t-ASL, the inter-observer agreement was excellent (κ = 0.913), while the inter-observer agreement of 3D-TOF-MRA was good (κ = 0.653). The inter-modality agreement between t-ASL and 3D-TOF-MRA for the feeding arteries was moderate (κ = 0.514). All 8 patients with motor or sensory disorders proved to have meningiomas supplied completely or partially by the internal carotid arteries, while all 14 patients with meningiomas supplied by the external carotid arteries or basilar arteries didn't show any symptoms concerning motor or sensory disorders (p = 0.003). T-ASL could complement unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and increase accuracy in the identification of the supplying arteries of meningiomas in a safe, intuitive, non-radioactive manner. The information about feeding arteries was potentially related to patients' symptoms and pathology, making it more crucial for neurosurgeons in planning surgery as well as evaluating prognosis. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of the applicability of territorial arterial spin labeling in meningiomas for presurgical assessments compared with 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yiping; Wen, Jianbo; Geng, Daoying; Yin, Bo [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Luan, Shihai [Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Liu, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Xiong, Ji [Fudan University, Department of Pathology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Qu, Jianxun [GE Healthcare, Department of MR Research, Shanghai (China)

    2017-10-15

    To prospectively evaluate the application of territorial arterial spin labelling (t-ASL) in comparison with unenhanced three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in the identification of the feeding vasculature of meningiomas. Thirty consecutive patients with suspected meningiomas underwent conventional MR imaging, unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and t-ASL scanning. Four experienced neuro-radiologists assessed the feeding vessels with different techniques separately. For the identification of the origin of the feeding arteries on t-ASL, the inter-observer agreement was excellent (κ = 0.913), while the inter-observer agreement of 3D-TOF-MRA was good (κ = 0.653). The inter-modality agreement between t-ASL and 3D-TOF-MRA for the feeding arteries was moderate (κ = 0.514). All 8 patients with motor or sensory disorders proved to have meningiomas supplied completely or partially by the internal carotid arteries, while all 14 patients with meningiomas supplied by the external carotid arteries or basilar arteries didn't show any symptoms concerning motor or sensory disorders (p = 0.003). T-ASL could complement unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and increase accuracy in the identification of the supplying arteries of meningiomas in a safe, intuitive, non-radioactive manner. The information about feeding arteries was potentially related to patients' symptoms and pathology, making it more crucial for neurosurgeons in planning surgery as well as evaluating prognosis. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of the degree of arteriovenous shunting in intracranial arteriovenous malformations using pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunwoo, Leonard; Park, Sun-Won [Seoul Metropolitan Government - Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Chul-Ho; Yun, Tae Jin; Choi, Seung Hong; Cho, Young Dae; Kim, Ji-hoon; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Young [Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Kyung Sik [Chungbuk National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Dong Gyu [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) display venous signals on arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging due to the presence of arteriovenous shunting. Our aim was to quantitatively correlate AVM signal intensity on ASL with the degree of arteriovenous shunting estimated on digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in AVMs. MR imaging including pseudo-continuous ASL at 3 T and DSA were obtained on the same day in 40 patients with intracranial AVMs. Two reviewers assessed the nidus and venous signal intensities on ASL images to determine the presence of arteriovenous shunting. Interobserver agreement on ASL between the reviewers was determined. ASL signal intensity of the AVM lesion was correlated with AVM size and the time difference between normal and AVM venous transit times measured from the DSA images. Interobserver agreement between two reviewers for nidus and venous signal intensities was excellent (κ = 0.80 and 1.0, respectively). Interobserver agreement regarding the presence of arteriovenous shunting was perfect (κ = 1.0). AVM signal intensity showed a positive relationship with the time difference between normal and AVM venous transit times (r = 0.638, P < 0.001). AVM signal intensity also demonstrated a positive relationship with AVM size (r = 0.561, P < 0.001). AVM signal intensity on ASL in patients with AVM correlates well with the degree of early vein opacification on DSA, which corresponds to the degree of arteriovenous shunting. (orig.)

  12. Thyroid perfusion imaging as a diagnostic tool in Graves' disease. Arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging vs. colour-coded Doppler ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muessig, K. [University Hospital of Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Metabolic Diseases; Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research, Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. for Clinical Diabetology; University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Div. of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nephrology, Angiology, and Clinical Chemistry; Schraml, C.; Schwenzer, N.F. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Section on Experimental Radiology; University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Rietig, R.; Balletshofer, B. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Div. of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Nephrology, Angiology, and Clinical Chemistry; Martirosian, P.; Haering, H.U.; Schick, F. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Section on Experimental Radiology; Claussen, C.D. [University Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Though increased thyroid perfusion assessed by colour-coded Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) is characteristic of Graves' disease (GD), sometimes perfusion assessment by CDUS is not possible. In these cases, arterial spin labelling (ASL), a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique allowing non-invasive thyroid perfusion quantification, may have additional diagnostic value. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ASL-MRI for assessment of increased blood perfusion in patients with GD compared to CDUS. Materials and Methods: Thyroid perfusion was measured by CDUS (volume flow rate calculated from pulsed wave Doppler signals and vessel diameter) and ASL-MRI at 1.5 T in 7 patients with GD and 10 healthy controls. Results: In patients with GD, average perfusion in both thyroid lobes was markedly increased compared to controls. Both techniques applied for volume related perfusion as well as absolute volume flow in thyroid feeding vessels provided similar results (all p = 0.0008). Using a cut-off value of 22 ml/min for the volume flow rate assessed by CDUS in the four feeding vessels allowed discrimination between patients with GD and controls in all cases. After adjusting thyroid perfusion for the differences in organ volume, both CDUS and ASL revealed also complete discrimination between health and disease. Conclusion: Thyroid perfusion measurement by ASL-MRI reliably discriminate GD from normal thyroid glands. In patients in whom thyroid arteries cannot be depicted by CDUS for technical or anatomical reasons, ASL-MRI may have additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  13. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of a well dispersed suspension of gallium-68-labeled magnetic nanosheets of graphene oxide for in vivo coincidence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Rahighi, Reza [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Tayyebi, Ahmad [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Engineering

    2017-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were hybridized with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) to form magnetic GO (MGO) and were further labeled by [{sup 68}Ga]GaCl{sub 3} as a potential drug delivery system. Paper chromatography, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized to characterize the trinary composite ([{sup 68}Ga] rate at MGO). Biological evaluations of the prepared nanocomposite were performed in normal Sprague Dawley rats and it was found to be a possible host for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The results showed that the grafting of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs on nanocomposite reduced the unwanted liver and spleen uptakes and increased the ratio of kidney/liver uptake from 0.037 to 1.07, leading to the fast removal of radioactive agent and less imposed radiation to patients. The high level of hydrogen bonding caused by the presence of functional groups is responsible for this effect. Considering the accumulation of the tracer in vital organs of rat (especially brain), efficient iron oxide grafting, fast wash-out, the short half-life gallium-68 and less imposed radiation doses to patients, this nanocomposite could be a suitable candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and imaging applications.

  14. An Open-Label Exploratory Study with Memantine: Correlation between Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Cognition in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc L. Gordon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To characterize progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS. Methods: Eleven subjects with mild to moderate AD underwent neurocognitive testing and single-voxel 1H MRS from the precuneus and posterior cingulate region at baseline, after 24 weeks of monotherapy with a cholinesterase inhibitor, and after another 24 weeks of combination therapy with open-label memantine and a cholinesterase inhibitor. Baseline metabolites [N-acetylaspartate (NAA, myo-inositol (mI, choline (Cho, and creatine (Cr] and their ratios in AD subjects were compared with those of an age-matched control group of 28 cognitively normal subjects. Results: AD subjects had significantly higher mI/Cr and lower NAA, NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho, and NAA/mI. Baseline Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL scores significantly correlated with NAA/Cr, mI/Cr, and NAA/mI. There was an increase in mI and a decrease in NAA/mI, but no significant change in other metabolites or ratios, or neurocognitive measures, when memantine was added to a cholinesterase inhibitor. Conclusion: Metabolite ratios significantly differed between AD and control subjects. Baseline metabolite ratios correlated with function (ADCS-ADL. There was an increase in mI and a decrease in NAA/mI, but no changes in other metabolites, ratios, or cognitive measures, when memantine was added to a cholinesterase inhibitor.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of a well dispersed suspension of gallium-68-labeled magnetic nanosheets of graphene oxide for in vivo coincidence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad; Rahighi, Reza; Tayyebi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were hybridized with Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles (NPs) to form magnetic GO (MGO) and were further labeled by ["6"8Ga]GaCl_3 as a potential drug delivery system. Paper chromatography, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized to characterize the trinary composite (["6"8Ga] rate at MGO). Biological evaluations of the prepared nanocomposite were performed in normal Sprague Dawley rats and it was found to be a possible host for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The results showed that the grafting of Fe_3O_4 NPs on nanocomposite reduced the unwanted liver and spleen uptakes and increased the ratio of kidney/liver uptake from 0.037 to 1.07, leading to the fast removal of radioactive agent and less imposed radiation to patients. The high level of hydrogen bonding caused by the presence of functional groups is responsible for this effect. Considering the accumulation of the tracer in vital organs of rat (especially brain), efficient iron oxide grafting, fast wash-out, the short half-life gallium-68 and less imposed radiation doses to patients, this nanocomposite could be a suitable candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and imaging applications.

  16. Benefits of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging of labeled islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Man; Oh, Seung-Hoon; Oh, Bae Jun; Suh, Sunghwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jung Hee; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang-Won; Kim, Jae Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    While a few studies have demonstrated the benefit of PEGylation in islet transplantation, most have employed renal subcapsular models and none have performed direct comparisons of islet mass in intraportal islet transplantation using islet magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, our aim was to demonstrate the benefit of PEGylation in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation with a novel algorithm for islet MRI. Islets were PEGylated after ferucarbotran labeling in a rat syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation model followed by comparisons of post-transplant glycemic levels in recipient rats infused with PEGylated (n = 12) and non-PEGylated (n = 13) islets. The total area of hypointense spots and the number of hypointense spots larger than 1.758 mm(2) of PEGylated and non-PEGylated islets were quantitatively compared. The total area of hypointense spots (P islet group 7 and 14 days post translation (DPT). These results translated into better post-transplant outcomes in the PEGylated islet group 28 DPT. In validation experiments, MRI parameters obtained 1, 7, and 14 DPT predicted normoglycemia 4 wk post-transplantation. We directly demonstrated the benefit of islet PEGylation in protection against nonspecific islet destruction in the early post-transplant period of intraportal islet transplantation using a novel algorithm for islet MRI. This novel algorithm could serve as a useful tool to demonstrate such benefit in future clinical trials of islet transplantation using PEGylated islets.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in children presenting migraine with aura: Association of hypoperfusion detected by arterial spin labelling and vasospasm on MR angiography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiot, Domitille; Longuet, Romain; Bruneau, Bertrand; Treguier, Catherine; Carsin-Vu, Aline; Corouge, Isabelle; Gomes, Constantin; Proisy, Maïa

    2018-04-01

    Objective A child presenting with a first attack of migraine with aura usually undergoes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to rule out stroke. The purpose of this study was to report vascular and brain perfusion findings in children suffering from migraine with aura on time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) and MR perfusion imaging using arterial spin labelling (ASL). Methods We retrospectively included all children who had undergone an emergency MRI examination with ASL and TOF-MRA sequences for acute neurological deficit and were given a final diagnosis of migraine with aura. The ASL perfusion maps and TOF-MRA images were independently assessed by reviewers blinded to clinical data. A mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) value was obtained for each cerebral lobe after automatic data post-processing. Results Seventeen children were finally included. Hypoperfusion was identified in one or more cerebral lobes on ASL perfusion maps by visual assessment in 16/17 (94%) children. Vasospasm was noted within the intracranial vasculature on the TOF-MRA images in 12/17 (71%) children. All (100%) of the abnormal TOF-MRA images were associated with homolateral hypoperfusion. Mean CBF values were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) in visually hypoperfused lobes than in normally perfused lobes. Conclusion ASL and TOF-MRA are two totally non-invasive, easy-to-use MRI sequences for children in emergency settings. Hypoperfusion associated with homolateral vasospasm may suggest a diagnosis of migraine with aura.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  19. Magnetic stem cell targeting to the inner ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, T. N.; Straatman, L.; Yanai, A.; Rahmanian, R.; Garnis, C.; Häfeli, U. O.; Poblete, T.; Westerberg, B. D.; Gregory-Evans, K.

    2017-12-01

    Severe sensorineural deafness is often accompanied by a loss of auditory neurons in addition to injury of the cochlear epithelium and hair cell loss. Cochlear implant function however depends on a healthy complement of neurons and their preservation is vital in achieving optimal results. We have developed a technique to target mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to a deafened rat cochlea. We then assessed the neuroprotective effect of systematically delivered MSCs on the survival and function of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). MSCs were labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, injected via the systemic circulation, and targeted using a magnetized cochlea implant and external magnet. Neurotrophic factor concentrations, survival of SGNs, and auditory function were assessed at 1 week and 4 weeks after treatments and compared against multiple control groups. Significant numbers of magnetically targeted MSCs (>30 MSCs/section) were present in the cochlea with accompanied elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor levels (p < 0.001). In addition we saw improved survival of SGNs (approximately 80% survival at 4 weeks). Hearing threshold levels in magnetically targeted rats were found to be significantly better than those of control rats (p < 0.05). These results indicate that magnetic targeting of MSCs to the cochlea can be accomplished with a magnetized cochlear permalloy implant and an external magnet. The targeted stem cells release neurotrophic factors which results in improved SGN survival and hearing recovery. Combining magnetic cell-based therapy and cochlear implantation may improve cochlear implant function in treating deafness.

  20. Nutrition Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G

    2013-01-01

    because consumers will avoid products that the label shows to be nutritionally deficient, but also because food producers will try to avoid marketing products that appear, according to the label, as nutritionally problematic, for example, because of a high content of saturated fat or salt. Nutrition......Nutrition labeling refers to the provision of information on a food product’s nutritional content on the package label. It can serve both public health and commercial purposes. From a public health perspective, the aim of nutrition labeling is to provide information that can enable consumers...... to make healthier choices when choosing food products. Nutrition labeling is thus closely linked to the notion of the informed consumer, that chooses products according to their aims, on the basis of the information at their disposal. Because many consumers are assumed to be interested in making healthy...

  1. Noninvasive in vivo tracking of mesenchymal stem cells and evaluation of cell therapeutic effects in a murine model using a clinical 3.0 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drey, Florian; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Neef, Klaus; Ewert, Birgit; Tenbrock, Arne; Treskes, Philipp; Bovenschulte, Henning; Liakopoulos, Oliver J; Brenkmann, Meike; Stamm, Christof; Wittwer, Thorsten; Wahlers, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising treatment approach for end-stage heart failure. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms and the fate of the transplanted cells. The objective of the presented work is to determine the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and in vivo monitoring after transplantation into infarcted mouse hearts using a clinical 3.0 T MRI device. The labeling procedure of bone marrow-derived MSCs with micron-sized paramagnetic iron oxide particles (MPIOs) did not affect the viability of the cells and their cell type-defining properties when compared to unlabeled cells. Using a clinical 3.0 T MRI scanner equipped with a dedicated small animal solenoid coil, 10(5) labeled MSCs could be detected and localized in the mouse hearts for up to 4 weeks after intramyocardial transplantation. Weekly ECG-gated scans using T1-weighted sequences were performed, and left ventricular function was assessed. Histological analysis of hearts confirmed the survival of labeled MSCs in the target area up to 4 weeks after transplantation. In conclusion, in vivo tracking of labeled MSCs using a clinical 3.0 T MRI scanner is feasible. In combination with assessment of heart function, this technology allows the monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy of regenerative therapies in a small animal model.

  2. Tracking of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology after intralesional treatment of artificial equine tendon lesions : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geburek, Florian; Mundle, Kathrin; Conrad, Sabine; Hellige, Maren; Walliser, Ulrich; van Schie, Hans T M; van Weeren, René; Skutella, Thomas; Stadler, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) are frequently used to treat equine tendinopathies. Up to now, knowledge about the fate of autologous AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) is very limited. The purpose of

  3. Private Labels

    OpenAIRE

    Kolmačková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    This Bachelor Thesis titled Private labels deals with distribution strategy based on the introduction of private labels especially in retail chains. At the beginning it is focused on the general concept of private label offered by retailers, where is mentioned basic characteristics, history and structuring of distribution brands. Subsequently this thesis informs readers about the introduction of new special distribution brands, which focus primarily on the new consumption habits of customers....

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  7. Sustainability Labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van Y.K.

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability labeling originated from a need to protect the identity of alternative systems of food production and to increase market transparency. From the 1980s onwards sustainability labeling has changed into a policy instrument replacing direct government regulation of the food market, and a

  8. In vivo MR detection of fluorine-labeled human MSC using the bSSFP sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribot EJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Emeline J Ribot,1 Jeffrey M Gaudet,1,2 Yuhua Chen,1 Kyle M Gilbert,1 Paula J Foster1,2 1Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON, Canada; 2Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are used to restore deteriorated cell environments. There is a need to specifically track these cells following transplantation in order to evaluate different methods of implantation, to follow their migration within the body, and to quantify their accumulation at the target. Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using fluorine-based nanoemulsions is a great means to detect these transplanted cells in vivo because of the high specificity for fluorine detection and the capability for precise quantification. This technique, however, has low sensitivity, necessitating improvement in MR sequences. To counteract this issue, the balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP imaging sequence can be of great interest due to the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Furthermore, it can be applied to obtain 3D images within short acquisition times. In this paper, bSSFP provided accurate quantification of samples of the perfluorocarbon Cell Sense-labeled cells in vitro. Cell Sense was internalized by human MSC (hMSC without adverse alterations in cell viability or differentiation into adipocytes/osteocytes. The bSSFP sequence was applied in vivo to track and quantify the signals from both Cell Sense-labeled and iron-labeled hMSC after intramuscular implantation. The fluorine signal was observed to decrease faster and more significantly than the volume of iron-associated voids, which points to the advantage of quantifying the fluorine signal and the complexity of quantifying signal loss due to iron. Keywords: bSSFP, fluorine MRI, mesenchymal stem cell, mouse, cell tracking

  9. The role of the mesenchyme in mouse neural fold elevation. II. Patterns of hyaluronate synthesis and distribution in embryos developing in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris-Wiman, J.; Brinkley, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    Hyaluronate (HA) distribution patterns were examined in the cranial mesenchyme underlying the mesencephalic neural folds of mouse embryos maintained in roller tube culture. Using standard image-processing techniques, the digitized images of Alcian blue-stained or 3H-glucosamine-labeled sections digested with an enzyme specific for HA, were subtracted from adjacent, undigested sections. The resultant difference picture images (DPI) accurately depicted the distribution of stained or labeled HA within the cranial mesenchyme. 3H-glucosamine-labeled HA was distributed uniformly throughout the cranial mesenchyme as 12, 18, and 24 hr of culture. By contrast, the mesenchyme was uniformly stained with Alcian blue at 12 hr, but stain intensity decreased in the central regions of the mesenchyme at 18 and 24 hr. HA distribution patterns were also examined in the cranial mesenchyme of embryos cultured in the presence of diazo-oxo-norleucine (DON), a glutamine analogue that inhibits glycosaminoglycan and glycoprotein synthesis. In DON-treated mesenchyme, Alcian blue staining of HA was decreased from that in controls at 12, 18, and 24 hr. However, incorporation of 3H-glucosamine into HA was increased. The distribution of labeled HA within treated mesenchyme as 12, 18, and 24 hr resembled that in controls at 12 hr. These results indicate that the distribution of HA within the cranial mesenchyme of normal mouse embryos during neural fold elevation and convergence is not determined solely by regional differences in HA synthesis. We propose that HA distribution patterns result from the expansion of the HA-rich extracellular matrix of the central mesenchyme regions. This expansion may play a major role in fold elevation. These results also suggest that DON treatment reversibly inhibits HA synthesis

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  14. Intracellular labeling and quantification process by magnetic resonance imaging using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in rat C6 glioma cell line; Marcacao intracelular e processo de quantificacao por imagem por ressonancia magnetica utilizando nanoparticulas magneticas de oxido de ferro em celulas da linhagem C6 de glioma de rato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamani, Javier Bustamante; Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Rossan, Fabiana; Silveira, Paulo Henrique; Cardenas, Walter Humberto; Gamarra, Lionel Fernel, E-mail: javierbm@einstein.br [Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miyaki, Liza Aya Mabuchi [Faculdade de Enfermagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaro Junior, Edson [Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem e Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    Objective: To assess intracellular labeling and quantification by magnetic resonance imaging using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles coated with biocompatible materials in rat C6 glioma cells in vitro. These methods will provide direction for future trials of tumor induction in vivo as well as possible magnetic hyperthermia applications. Methods: Aminosilane, dextran, polyvinyl alcohol, and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles were used in the qualitative assessment of C6 cell labeling via light microscopy. The influence of the transfection agent poly-L-lysine on cellular uptake was examined. The quantification process was performed by relaxometry analysis in T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} weighted phantom images. Results: Light microscopy revealed that the aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles alone or complexed with poly-L-lysine showed higher cellular uptake than did the uncoated magnetic particles. The relaxactivities of the aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter of 50nm to a 3-T field were r{sub 1}=(6.1 +- 0.3) x10{sup -5} ms{sup -1}mL/{mu}g, r{sub 2}=(5.3 +- 0.1) x 10{sup -4} ms{sup -1}mL/{mu}g, with a ratio of r{sub 2} / r{sub 1}{approx_equal} 9. The iron uptake in the cells was calculated by analyzing the relaxation rates (R{sub 1}and R{sub 2}) using a mathematical relationship. Conclusions: C6 glioma cells have a high uptake efficiency for aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles complexed with the transfection agent poly-L-lysine. The large ratio r{sub 2} / r{sub 1}{approx_equal} 9 indicates that these magnetic nanoparticles are ideal for quantification by magnetic resonance imaging with T{sub 2}-weighted imaging techniques. (author)

  15. Hyperthermia treatment of tumors by mesenchymal stem cell-delivered superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalber TL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tammy L Kalber,1,2,* Katherine L Ordidge,1,2,* Paul Southern,3 Michael R Loebinger,1 Panagiotis G Kyrtatos,2,3 Quentin A Pankhurst,3,* Mark F Lythgoe,2,* Sam M Janes1,* 1Lungs for Living Research Centre, UCL Respiratory, University College London, 2UCL Centre for Advanced Biomedical Imaging, Division of Medicine, University College London, 3Healthcare Biomagnetics Laboratory, University College London, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Magnetic hyperthermia – a potential cancer treatment in which superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs are made to resonantly respond to an alternating magnetic field (AMF and thereby produce heat – is of significant current interest. We have previously shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be labeled with SPIONs with no effect on cell proliferation or survival and that within an hour of systemic administration, they migrate to and integrate into tumors in vivo. Here, we report on some longer term (up to 3 weeks post-integration characteristics of magnetically labeled human MSCs in an immunocompromized mouse model. We initially assessed how the size and coating of SPIONs dictated the loading capacity and cellular heating of MSCs. Ferucarbotran® was the best of those tested, having the best like-for-like heating capability and being the only one to retain that capability after cell internalization. A mouse model was created by subcutaneous flank injection of a combination of 0.5 million Ferucarbotran-loaded MSCs and 1.0 million OVCAR-3 ovarian tumor cells. After 2 weeks, the tumors reached ~100 µL in volume and then entered a rapid growth phase over the third week to reach ~300 µL. In the control mice that received no AMF treatment, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data showed that the labeled MSCs were both incorporated into and retained within the tumors over the entire 3-week period. In the AMF-treated mice, heat increases of ~4°C were observed

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwood, Nicole J.; Dazzi, Francesco; Zaher, Walid

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are stem cell populations present among the bone marrow stroma and a number of other tissues that are capable of multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC provide supportive stroma for growth...... and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoiesis. These cells have been described as important immunoregulators due to their ability to suppress T cells proliferation. MSC can also directly contribute to tissue repair by migrating to sites of injury and providing a source of cells...... for differentiation and/or providing bystander support for resident stromal cells. This chapter discusses the cellular and molecular properties of MSC, the mechanisms by which they can modulate immune responses and the clinical applications of MSC in disorders such as graft-versus-host disease and aplastic anaemia...

  17. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  18. Design of biomimetic vascular grafts with magnetic endothelial patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Delphine; Le Visage, Catherine; Ino, Julia; Gazeau, Florence; Letourneur, Didier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The development of small diameter vascular grafts with a controlled pluricellular organization is still needed for effective vascular tissue engineering. Here, we describe a technological approach combining a tubular scaffold and magnetically labeled cells to create a pluricellular and organized vascular graft, the endothelialization of which could be monitored by MRI prior to transplantation. A novel type of scaffold was developed with a tubular geometry and a porous bulk structure enabling the seeding of cells in the scaffold pores. A homogeneous distribution of human mesenchymal stem cells in the macroporous structure was obtained by seeding the freeze-dried scaffold with the cell suspension. The efficient covering of the luminal surface of the tube was then made possible thanks to the implementation of a magnetic-based patterning technique. Human endothelial cells or endothelial progenitors were magnetically labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles and successfully attracted to the 2-mm lumen where they attached and formed a continuous endothelium. The combination of imaging modalities [fluorescence imaging, histology, and 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] evidenced the integrity of the vascular construct. In particular, the observation of different cell organizations in a vascular scaffold within the range of resolution of single cells by 4.7 T MRI is reported.

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  20. Pesticide Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  1. In vivo MR detection of fluorine-labeled human MSC using the bSSFP sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribot, Emeline J; Gaudet, Jeffrey M; Chen, Yuhua; Gilbert, Kyle M; Foster, Paula J

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are used to restore deteriorated cell environments. There is a need to specifically track these cells following transplantation in order to evaluate different methods of implantation, to follow their migration within the body, and to quantify their accumulation at the target. Cellular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using fluorine-based nanoemulsions is a great means to detect these transplanted cells in vivo because of the high specificity for fluorine detection and the capability for precise quantification. This technique, however, has low sensitivity, necessitating improvement in MR sequences. To counteract this issue, the balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging sequence can be of great interest due to the high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Furthermore, it can be applied to obtain 3D images within short acquisition times. In this paper, bSSFP provided accurate quantification of samples of the perfluorocarbon Cell Sense-labeled cells in vitro. Cell Sense was internalized by human MSC (hMSC) without adverse alterations in cell viability or differentiation into adipocytes/osteocytes. The bSSFP sequence was applied in vivo to track and quantify the signals from both Cell Sense-labeled and iron-labeled hMSC after intramuscular implantation. The fluorine signal was observed to decrease faster and more significantly than the volume of iron-associated voids, which points to the advantage of quantifying the fluorine signal and the complexity of quantifying signal loss due to iron.

  2. Labelling patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strudwick, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at how diagnostic radiographers label their patients. An ethnographic study of the workplace culture in one diagnostic imaging department was undertaken using participant observation for four months and semi-structured interviews with ten key informants. One of the key themes; the way in which radiographers label their patients, is explored in this article. It was found from the study that within the department studied the diagnostic radiographers labelled or categorised their patients based on the information that they had. This information is used to form judgements and these judgements were used to assist the radiographers in dealing with the many different people that they encountered in their work. This categorisation and labelling of the patient appears to assist the radiographer in their decision-making processes about the examination to be carried out and the patient they are to image. This is an important aspect of the role of the diagnostic radiographer. - Highlights: • I have studied the culture in one imaging department. • Radiographers label or categorise their patients. • These labels/categories are used to manage the patient. • This is an important aspect of the way in which radiographers work.

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  7. The sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for {alpha}-fetoprotein based on enrichment by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au magnetic nano probes and signal amplification by CdS-Au composite nanoparticles labeled anti-AFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Hankun [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Gan Ning, E-mail: ganning@nbu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Li Tianhua; Cao Yuting; Zeng Saolin [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zheng Lei, E-mail: nfyyzl@163.com [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Guo Zhiyong [State Key Laboratory Base of Novel Functional Materials and Preparation Science, Faculty of Material Science and Chemical Engineering of Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)

    2012-10-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sandwich immunoreaction, testing a large number of samples simultaneously. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic separation and enrichment by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au magnetic nano probes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplification of detection signal by CdS-Au composite nanoparticles labeled anti-AFP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost no background signal, which greatly improve the sensitivity of detection. - Abstract: A novel and sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for ultra trace levels of {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP) based on sandwich immunoreaction strategy by enrichment using magnetic capture probes and quantum dots coated with Au shell (CdS-Au) as the signal tag. The capture probe was prepared by immobilizing the primary antibody of AFP (Ab1) on the core/shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au nanoparticles, which was first employed to capture AFP antigens to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au/Ab1/AFP complex from the serum after incubation. The product can be separated from the background solution through the magnetic separation. Then the CdS-Au labeled secondary antibody (Ab2) as signal tag (CdS-Au/Ab2) was conjugated successfully with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au/Ab1/AFP complex to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-Au/Ab1/AFP/Ab2/CdS-Au), which can be further separated by an external magnetic field and produce ECL signals at a fixed voltage. The signal was proportional to a certain concentration range of AFP for quantification. Thus, an easy-to-use immunosensor with magnetic probes and a quantum dots signal tag was obtained. The immunosensor performed at a level of high sensitivity and a broad concentration range for AFP between 0.0005 and 5.0 ng mL{sup -1} with a detection limit of 0.2 pg mL{sup -1}. The use of magnetic probes was combined with pre-concentration and separation for trace levels of tumor markers in the serum. Due to the

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  10. Science to Practice: Can Stem Cells Be Labeled Inside the Body Instead of Outside?

    OpenAIRE

    Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Instead of conventional labeling ex vivo in cell culture, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were labeled in vivo with intravenous injection of ferumoxytol (Feraheme; AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Lexington, Mass), a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved intravenous iron supplement. After their isolation and processing from bone marrow, the same MSCs were injected in rats with an osteochondral defect, allowing MR monitoring of their engraftment for at least 4 weeks. This straightforward labeling app...

  11. Fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled, magnetic nanoparticles conjugated D-penicillamine-anti-metadherin and in vitro evaluation on breast cancer cells; Avaliacao do isotiocianato de fluoresceina marcado, das nanoparticulas magneticas conjugadas da D-penicilamina antimetaderina e in vitro nas celulas do cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akca, Ozlet; Unak, Perihan; Medine, E. Ylker [Ege University (Turkey). Institute of Nuclear Sciences. Department of Nuclear Applications; Sakarya, Serhan [Adnan Menderes University (Turkey). ADUBILTEM Science and Technology Research and Development Center; Ozdemir, Caglar; Timur, Suna [Ege University (Turkey). Science Faculty. Department of Nuclear Applications

    2011-07-01

    Silane modified magnetic nanoparticles were prepared after capped with silica generated from the hydrolyzation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Amino silane (SG-Si900) was added to this solution for surface modification of silica coated magnetic particles. Finally, D-penicillamine (D-PA)-antimetadherin (anti-MTDH) was covalently linked to the amine group using glutaraldehyde as cross-linker. Magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM results showed that particles are nearly monodisperse, and the average size of particles was 40 to 50 nm. An amino acid derivative D-PA was conjugated anti-MTDH, which results the increase of uptaking potential of a conjugated agent, labelled fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and then conjugated to the magnetic nanoparticles. In vitro evaluation of the conjugated D-PA-anti-MTDH-FITC to magnetic nanoparticle was studied on MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. Fluorescence microscopy images of cells after incubation of the sample were obtained to monitor the interaction of the sample with the cancerous cells. Incorporation on cells of FITC labeled and magnetic nanoparticles conjugated D-PA-anti-MTDH was found higher than FITC labeled D-PA-anti-MTDH. The results show that magnetic properties and application of magnetic field increased incorporation rates. The obtained D-PA-anti-MTDH-magnetic nanoparticles-FITC complex has been used for in vitro imaging of breast cancer cells. FITC labeled and magnetic nanoparticles conjugated D-PA-anti-MTDH may be useful as a new class of scintigraphic agents. Results of this study are sufficiently encouraging to bring about further evaluation of this and related compounds for ultraviolet magnetic resonance (UV-MR) dual imaging. (author)

  12. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Michael K.; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic micro- and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into micro- and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt% for PLGA and 69.6 wt% for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r2* values per millimole of iron (399 s-1mM-1 for cellulose and 505 s-1mM-1 for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for non-invasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long term (cellulose-based particles) experiments. PMID:21404328

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing for repair of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhanxiu; Zhao, Lili; Li, Hui; Wang, Suxia; Shen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that RNA interference to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells before transplantation might further improve neurological function in rats with spinal cord transection injury. After 2 weeks, the number of neurons and BrdU-positive cells in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group was higher than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly greater compared with the model group. After 4 weeks, behavioral performance was significantly enhanced in the model group. After 8 weeks, the number of horseradish peroxidase-labeled nerve fibers was higher in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly higher than in the model group. The newly formed nerve fibers and myelinated nerve fibers were detectable in the central transverse plane section in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group and in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group. PMID:25206893

  14. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  18. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Kun; Li, Jianding; Liu, Qiang; Xie, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and behaviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we injected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model of spinal cord injury. At 7 days after cell transplantation, a small number of dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows were observed in the spinal cord injury region, and at 14 days, the number of these shadows increased on T2-weighted imaging. Perl's Prussian blue staining detected dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows in the spinal cord injury region, indicative of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. These findings suggest that transplanted neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can migrate to the spinal cord injury region and can be tracked by magnetic resonance in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging represents an efficient noninvasive technique for visually tracking transplanted cells in vivo. PMID:25206659

  19. Food labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selsøe Sørensen, Henrik; Clement, Jesper; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2012-01-01

    evidence for dividing consumers into two profiles: one relying on general food knowledge and another using knowledge related to signpost labels. In a combined eyetracking and questionnaire survey we analyse the influence of background knowledge and identify different patterns of visual attention......The food industry develops tasty and healthy food but fails to deliver the message to all consumers. The consumers’ background knowledge is essential for how they find and decode relevant elements in the cocktail of signs which fight for attention on food labels. In this exploratory study, we find...... for the two consumer profiles. This underlines the complexity in choosing and designing the ‘right’ elements for a food package that consumers actually look at and are able to make rational use of. In spite of any regulation of food information provided by authorities, consumers will still be confronted...

  20. Origins and Properties of Dental, Thymic, and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells and Their Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Yukiya; Yamane, Toshiyuki; Kadota, Daiji; Isono, Kana; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells arise from the neural crest (NC) or mesoderm. However, it is difficult to distinguish NC-derived cells from mesoderm-derived cells. Using double-transgenic mouse systems encoding P0-Cre, Wnt1-Cre, Mesp1-Cre, and Rosa26EYFP, which enabled us to trace NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells as YFP-expressing cells, we demonstrated for the first time that both NC-derived (P0- or Wnt1-labeled) and mesoderm-derived (Mesp1-labeled) cells contribute to the development of dental, thymic, and bone marrow (BM) mesenchyme from the fetal stage to the adult stage. Irrespective of the tissues involved, NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells contributed mainly to perivascular cells and endothelial cells, respectively. Dental and thymic mesenchyme were composed of either NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells, whereas half of the BM mesenchyme was composed of cells that were not derived from the NC or mesoderm. However, a colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay indicated that CFU-Fs in the dental pulp, thymus, and BM were composed of NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells. Secondary CFU-F assays were used to estimate the self-renewal potential, which showed that CFU-Fs in the teeth, thymus, and BM were entirely NC-derived cells, entirely mesoderm-derived cells, and mostly NC-derived cells, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited drastically by the addition of anti-platelet–derived growth factor receptor-β antibody, regardless of the tissue and its origin. Furthermore, dental mesenchyme expressed genes encoding critical hematopoietic factors, such as interleukin-7, stem cell factor, and cysteine-X-cysteine (CXC) chemokine ligand 12, which supports the differentiation of B lymphocytes and osteoclasts. Therefore, the mesenchymal stem cells found in these tissues had different origins, but similar properties in each organ. PMID:23185234

  1. The sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for α-fetoprotein based on enrichment by Fe3O4-Au magnetic nano probes and signal amplification by CdS-Au composite nanoparticles labeled anti-AFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hankun; Gan, Ning; Li, Tianhua; Cao, Yuting; Zeng, Saolin; Zheng, Lei; Guo, Zhiyong

    2012-10-09

    A novel and sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for ultra trace levels of α-fetoprotein (AFP) based on sandwich immunoreaction strategy by enrichment using magnetic capture probes and quantum dots coated with Au shell (CdS-Au) as the signal tag. The capture probe was prepared by immobilizing the primary antibody of AFP (Ab1) on the core/shell Fe(3)O(4)-Au nanoparticles, which was first employed to capture AFP antigens to form Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP complex from the serum after incubation. The product can be separated from the background solution through the magnetic separation. Then the CdS-Au labeled secondary antibody (Ab2) as signal tag (CdS-Au/Ab2) was conjugated successfully with Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP complex to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex (Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP/Ab2/CdS-Au), which can be further separated by an external magnetic field and produce ECL signals at a fixed voltage. The signal was proportional to a certain concentration range of AFP for quantification. Thus, an easy-to-use immunosensor with magnetic probes and a quantum dots signal tag was obtained. The immunosensor performed at a level of high sensitivity and a broad concentration range for AFP between 0.0005 and 5.0 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.2 pg mL(-1). The use of magnetic probes was combined with pre-concentration and separation for trace levels of tumor markers in the serum. Due to the amplification of the signal tag, the immunosensor is highly sensitive, which can offer great promise for rapid, simple, selective and cost-effective detection of effective biomonitoring for clinical application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Intratumoral bidirectional transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mizuki; Sakane, Kota; Tominaga, Kana; Gotoh, Noriko; Niwa, Takayoshi; Kikuchi, Yasuko; Tada, Keiichiro; Goshima, Naoki; Semba, Kentaro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse process, mesenchymal-epithelial transition MET, are crucial in several stages of cancer metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition allows cancer cells to move to proximal blood vessels for intravasation. However, because EMT and MET processes are dynamic, mesenchymal cancer cells are likely to undergo MET transiently and subsequently re-undergo EMT to restart the metastatic process. Therefore, spatiotemporally coordinated mutual regulation between EMT and MET could occur during metastasis. To elucidate such regulation, we chose HCC38, a human triple-negative breast cancer cell line, because HCC38 is composed of epithelial and mesenchymal populations at a fixed ratio even though mesenchymal cells proliferate significantly more slowly than epithelial cells. We purified epithelial and mesenchymal cells from Venus-labeled and unlabeled HCC38 cells and mixed them at various ratios to follow EMT and MET. Using this system, we found that the efficiency of EMT is approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of MET and that the two populations significantly enhance the transition of cells from the other population to their own. In addition, knockdown of Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) or Zinc finger protein SNAI2 (SLUG) significantly suppressed EMT but promoted partial MET, indicating that ZEB1 and SLUG are crucial to EMT and MET. We also show that primary breast cancer cells underwent EMT that correlated with changes in expression profiles of genes determining EMT status and breast cancer subtype. These changes were very similar to those observed in EMT in HCC38 cells. Consequently, we propose HCC38 as a suitable model to analyze EMT-MET dynamics that could affect the development of triple-negative breast cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Label triangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Label Triangulation (LT) with neutrons allows the investigation of the quaternary structure of biological multicomponent complexes under native conditions. Provided that the complex can be fully separated into and reconstituted from its single - protonated and deuterated - components, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) can give selective information on shapes and pair distances of these components. Following basic geometrical rules, the spatial arrangement of the components can be reconstructed from these data. LT has so far been successfully applied to the small and large ribosomal subunits and the transcriptase of E. coli. (author)

  4. Design and preliminary assessment of 99mTc-labeled ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide-conjugated bevacizumab for single photon emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanzhao Zhao; Hui Tan; Bing Wu; Pengcheng Hu; Pengyue Wu; Yushen Gu; Dengfeng Cheng; Hongcheng Shi; Qi Yao; Chunfu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a very high incidence and mortality. Early diagnosis and timely treatments are therefore required to improve the quality of life and survival rate of HCC patients. Here, we developed a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-based multimodality imaging agent for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and used it to assess HCC mice and explore the combinative value of CT/MRI-based morphological imaging and SPECT functional imaging. HCC targeting with 125 I-labeled bevacizumab monoclonal antibody (mAb) was examined using SPECT/CT in HepG2 tumor-bearing mice after intravenous mAb injection. Based on this, an integrated, bimodal, VEGF-targeted, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO)-conjugated 99m Tc-labeled bevacizumab mAb was synthesized to increase tumor penetration and accumulations. The in vivo pharmacokinetics and HepG2 tumor targeting were explored through in vivo planar imaging and SPECT/CT using a mouse model of HepG2 liver cancer. The specificity of the radiolabeled nanoparticles for HepG2 HCC was verified using in vitro immunohistochemistry and Prussian blue staining. With diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid as a bifunctional chelating agent, USPIO-bevacizumab achieved a 99m Tc labeling efficiency of >90 %. The in vivo imaging results also exhibited the targeting of USPIO on HepG2 HCC. The specificity of these results was confirmed using in vitro immunohistochemistry and Prussian blue staining. Our preliminary findings showed the potential of USPIO as an imaging agent for the SPECT/MRI of HepG2 HCC. (author)

  5. Core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles based nonenzymatic ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence immunosensor using quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet as labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiyan; Zhang, Yan [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Ge, Shenguang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Song, Xianrang [Cancer Research Center, Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan 250012 (China); Huang, Jiadong [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yan, Mei, E-mail: chm_yanm@ujn.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yu, Jinghua [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2013-04-03

    Graphical abstract: Core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles and P-GS@QDs were prepared to immobilize Ab{sub 1} and Ab{sub 2} respectively and combined to fabricate a novel sandwich-type ECL immunosensor for detecting CA125 at low concentration. Highlights: ► ECL immunosensor for CA125 based on a microfluidic strategy with a homemade ECL cell was proposed. ► Core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles were employed as the carriers of the primary antibodies. ► CdTe quantum dots functionalized graphene sheet were used for signal amplification. -- Abstract: In this paper, a novel, low-cost electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor using core–shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Au magnetic nanoparticles (AuMNPs) as the carriers of the primary antibody of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) was designed. Graphene sheet (GS) with property of good conductivity and large surface area was a captivating candidate to amplify ECL signal. We successively synthesized functionalized GS by loading large amounts of quantum dots (QDs) onto the poly (diallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride) (PDDA) coated graphene sheet (P-GS@QDs) via self-assembly electrostatic reactions, which were used to label secondary antibodies. The ECL immunosensors coupled with a microfluidic strategy exhibited a wide detection range (0.005–50 U mL{sup −1}) and a low detection limit (1.2 mU mL{sup −1}) with the help of an external magnetic field to gather immunosensors. The method was evaluated with clinical serum sample, receiving good correlation with results from commercially available analytical procedure.

  6. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  7. Metabolic regulation in Streptomyces parvulus during actinomycin D synthesis, studied with 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors by 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inbar, L.; Lapidot, A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the onset of synthesis of actinomycin D in Streptomyces is due to a release from L-glutamate catabolic repression. In the present investigation we showed that S. parvulus has the capacity to maintain high levels of intracellular glutamate during the synthesis of actinomycin D. The results seem contradictory, since actinomycin D synthesis cannot start before a release from L-glutamate catabolic repression, but a relatively high intracellular pool of glutamate is needed for the synthesis of actinomycin D. Utilizing different labeled precursors, D-[U- 13 C]fructose and 13 C- and 15 N-labeled L-glutamate, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, we showed that carbon atoms of an intracellular glutamate pool of S. parvulus were not derived biosynthetically from the culture medium glutamte source but rather from D-fructose catabolism. A new intracellular pyrimidine derivative whose nitrogen and carbon skeletons were derived from exogenous L-glutamate was obtained as the main glutamate metabolite. Another new pyrimidine derivative that had a significantly reduced intracellular mobility and that was derived from D-fructose catabolism was identified in the cell extracts of S. parvulus during actinomycin D synthesis. These pyrimidine derivatives may serve as a nitrogen store for actinomycin D synthesis. In the present study, the N-trimethyl group of a choline derivative was observed by 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in growing S. parvulus cells. The choline group, as well as the N-methyl groups of sarcosine, N-methyl-valine, and the methyl groups of an actinomycin D chromophore, arose from D-fructose catabolism. The 13 C enrichments found in the peptide moieties of actinomycin D were in accordance with a mechanism of actinomycin D synthesis from L-glutamate and D-fructose

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance and LC/MS characterization of native and new mass-labeled fluorinated telomer alcohols, acids and unsaturated acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, G.; Chittim, B.; McAlees, A.; Yeo, B. [Wellington Laboratories Inc., Guelph, ON (Canada); Ellis, D.; Mabury, S.; Stock, N. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada); Halldorson, T.; Tomy, G. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); McCrindle, R. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada)

    2004-09-15

    A variety of fluorinated compounds are used in a multitude of consumer products because of their ability to repel water and oil, resistance to heat, and chemical inertness. Recently, scientists and regulators have begun raising concerns about the potential health and environmental impact of perfluorinated compounds. Exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids, such as Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), has been identified as a potential human health concern. A study has shown that telomer alcohols such as 2-perfluorooctylethanol can be metabolized by living organisms or biodegrade under environmental conditions to sequentially give the saturated fluorinated telomer acid (2- perfluorooctylethanoic acid), then the unsaturated telomer acid (2H-Perfluorooct-2-enoic acid), and eventually PFOA. Additional experimental work is necessary to determine the extent, if any, to which telomer product degradation may be a source of PFOA. The analysis for fluorinated compounds in environmental samples is performed, primarily, using LC/MS techniques. These analyses have been hindered by the lack of any commercially available mass-labeled fluorinated compounds for use as surrogates and thus may be restricting the amount of research conducted in this area. We have now synthesized the mass-labeled perfluoroalkyl telomer alcohols and the corresponding acids and unsaturated acids. We report in this study their 1H-, 2H-, 19F- and 13C-NMR characterizations along with GC/MS and LC/MS data and evaluation of their use as surrogate standards.

  9. Hypoxic preconditioning with cobalt of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells improves cell migration and enhances therapy for treatment of ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Yu

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC administration is known to enhance the recovery of the kidney following injury. Here we tested the potential of hypoxic-preconditioned-MSC transplantation to enhance the efficacy of cell therapy on acute kidney injury (AKI by improving MSC migration to the injured kidney. Cobalt was used as hypoxia mimetic preconditioning (HMP. MSC were subjected to HMP through 24 h culture in 200 µmol/L cobalt. Compared to normoxia cultured MSC (NP-MSC, HMP significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and CXCR4 in MSC and enhanced the migration of MSC in vitro. This effect was lost when MSC were treated with siRNA targeting HIF-1α or CXCR4 antagonist. SPIO labeled MSC were administered to rats with I/R injury followed immediately by magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging clearly showed that HMP-MSC exhibited greater migration and a longer retention time in the ischemic kidney than NP-MSC. Histological evaluation showed more HMP-MSC in the glomerular capillaries of ischemic kidneys than in the kidneys receiving NP-MSC. Occasional tubules showed iron labeling in the HMP group, while no tubules had iron labeling in NP group, indicating the possibility of tubular transdifferentiation after HMP. These results were also confirmed by fluorescence microscopy study using CM-DiI labeling. The increased recruitment of HMP-MSC was associated with reduced kidney injury and enhanced functional recovery. This effect was also related to the increased paracrine action by HMP-MSC. Thus we suggest that by enhancing MSC migration and prolonging kidney retention, hypoxic preconditioning of MSC may be a useful approach for developing AKI cell therapy.

  10. USPIO-labeling in M1 and M2-polarized macrophages: An in vitro study using a clinical magnetic resonance scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Chiara; Venneri, Mary A; Miglietta, Selenia; Caruso, Damiano; Porta, Natale; Isidori, Andrea M; Fiore, Daniela; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Laghi, Andrea

    2018-08-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate USPIO labeling in different macrophage populations using a clinical 3.0T MR unit with optical and electron microscopy as the gold standard. Human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells were differentiated into macrophages. Afterwards, M0 macrophages were incubated with IL-4 and IL-13 in order to obtain M2 polarized macrophages or with IFN-gamma and LPS for classical macrophage activation (M1). These groups were incubated with USPIO-MR contrast agent (P904) for 36 hr; M0, M0 + P904, M1 +  P904, and M2 + P904 were analyzed in gel phantoms with a 3.0T MR scanner. m-RNA of M1 and M2 markers confirmed the polarization of THP-1-derived macrophages. M2 + P904 showed a much higher T1 signal (p <  0.0001), a significantly lower (p < 0.0001) T2* signal, and significantly higher R* (p < 0.0001) compared to the other populations. Hystological analysis confirmed higher iron content in the M2-polarized population compared to both M1-polarized (p = 0.04) and M0-P904 (p = 0.003). Ultrastructure analysis demonstrated ubiquitous localization of P904 within the cellular compartments. Our results demonstrate that a selective USPIO-labeling of different macrophage populations can be detected in vitro using the 3.0T clinical scanner. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Pancreatic mesenchyme regulates epithelial organogenesis throughout development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limor Landsman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The developing pancreatic epithelium gives rise to all endocrine and exocrine cells of the mature organ. During organogenesis, the epithelial cells receive essential signals from the overlying mesenchyme. Previous studies, focusing on ex vivo tissue explants or complete knockout mice, have identified an important role for the mesenchyme in regulating the expansion of progenitor cells in the early pancreas epithelium. However, due to the lack of genetic tools directing expression specifically to the mesenchyme, the potential roles of this supporting tissue in vivo, especially in guiding later stages of pancreas organogenesis, have not been elucidated. We employed transgenic tools and fetal surgical techniques to ablate mesenchyme via Cre-mediated mesenchymal expression of Diphtheria Toxin (DT at the onset of pancreas formation, and at later developmental stages via in utero injection of DT into transgenic mice expressing the Diphtheria Toxin receptor (DTR in this tissue. Our results demonstrate that mesenchymal cells regulate pancreatic growth and branching at both early and late developmental stages by supporting proliferation of precursors and differentiated cells, respectively. Interestingly, while cell differentiation was not affected, the expansion of both the endocrine and exocrine compartments was equally impaired. To further elucidate signals required for mesenchymal cell function, we eliminated β-catenin signaling and determined that it is a critical pathway in regulating mesenchyme survival and growth. Our study presents the first in vivo evidence that the embryonic mesenchyme provides critical signals to the epithelium throughout pancreas organogenesis. The findings are novel and relevant as they indicate a critical role for the mesenchyme during late expansion of endocrine and exocrine compartments. In addition, our results provide a molecular mechanism for mesenchymal expansion and survival by identifying β-catenin signaling as an

  12. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cancer cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Study of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells is important for basic understanding and therapeutic management of cancer progression. We here used metabolic labeling and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a strategy of bioorthogonal chemical imaging, to directly visualize changes in anabolic metabolism during cancer EMT at a single-cell level. MCF-7 breast cancer cell is employed as a model system. Four types of metabolites (amino acids, glucose, fatty acids, and choline) are labeled with either deuterium or alkyne (C≡C) tag. Their intracellular incorporations into MCF-7 cells before or after EMT are visualized by SRS imaging targeted at the signature vibration frequency of C-D or C≡C bonds. Overall, after EMT, anabolism of amino acids, glucose, and choline is less active, reflecting slower protein and membrane synthesis in mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, we also observed less incorporation of glucose and palmitate acids into membrane lipids, but more of them into lipid droplets in mesenchymal cells. This result indicates that, although mesenchymal cells synthesize fewer membrane lipids, they are actively storing energy into lipid droplets, either through de novo lipogenesis from glucose or direct scavenging of exogenous free fatty acids. Hence, metabolic labeling coupled with SRS can be a straightforward method in imaging cancer metabolism.

  13. Using 18F FDG PET/CT to Detect an occult Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Oncogenic Osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate excretion, hypophosphatemia, and osteomalacia. This syndrome is often caused by tumors of mesenchymal origin. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia have abnormal bone mineralization, resulting in a high frequency of fractures. Tumor resection is the treatment of choice, as it will often correct the metabolic imbalance. Although oncogenic osteomalacia is a potentially curable disease, diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because of the small size and sporadic location of the tumor. Bone scintigraphy and radiography best characterize osteoma lacia; magnetic resonance imaging findings are nonspecific. Here, we report a case of oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor that was successfully detected by 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18F FDG PET/CT). This case illustrates the advantages of 18F FDG PET/CT in detecting the occult mesenchymal tumor that causes oncogenic osteomalacia.

  14. A Magnetic Sensor System for Biological Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic biosensors detect biological targets through sensing the stray field of magnetic beads which label the targets. Commonly, magnetic biosensors employ the “sandwich” method to immobilize biological targets, i.e., the targets are sandwiched

  15. Intraarterial route increases the risk of cerebral lesions after mesenchymal cell administration in animal model of ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argibay, Bárbara; Trekker, Jesse; Himmelreich, Uwe; Beiras, Andrés; Topete, Antonio; Taboada, Pablo; Pérez-Mato, María; Vieites-Prado, Alba; Iglesias-Rey, Ramón; Rivas, José; Planas, Anna M.; Sobrino, Tomás; Castillo, José; Campos, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising clinical therapy for ischemic stroke. However, critical parameters, such as the most effective administration route, remain unclear. Intravenous (i.v.) and intraarterial (i.a.) delivery routes have yielded varied outcomes across studies, potentially due to the unknown MSCs distribution. We investigated whether MSCs reached the brain following i.a. or i.v. administration after transient cerebral ischemia in rats, and evaluated the therapeutic effects of both routes. MSCs were labeled with dextran-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) cell tracking, transmission electron microscopy and immunohistological analysis. MSCs were found in the brain following i.a. but not i.v. administration. However, the i.a. route increased the risk of cerebral lesions and did not improve functional recovery. The i.v. delivery is safe but MCS do not reach the brain tissue, implying that treatment benefits observed for this route are not attributable to brain MCS engrafting after stroke.

  16. Direct monitoring by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the metabolism and metabolic rate of 13C-labeled compounds in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, K; Hidoh, O; Fukami, J; Kajiwara, M

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to observe the transformations of [1-13C]-D-glucose to [1,1'-13C2]-D-trehalose, and [3-13C]-L-alanine to [2-13C]-L-glutamic acid in the living body of Gryllodes sigillatus. [3-13C]-D-Alanine was not metabolized. The metabolic rate of [1-13C]-D-glucose was found to be altered by prior injection of boric acid.

  17. Dynamic MRI of ferumoxide-labeled bone mesenchmal stem cells after transplantation in infarcted myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiong; Zhao Shihua; Lu Minjie; Jiang Shiliang; Yan Chaowu; Zhang Yan; Meng Liang; Tang Yue; Meng Xianmin; Wei Yingjie; Wang Qingzhi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in tracking magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MR-MSCs) in a swine myocardial infarction (MI) model. Methods: Adult Chinese mini-pigs (n=6) were subjected to open-chest experimental MI operation. Their autogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was cultured and doubly labeled with ferumoxides and DAPI. On the 14 th day after MSCs transplantation, the size and location of the myocardial infarction were assessed by using delayed-enhancement MRI (DE-MRI). Then the labeled MSCs were injected intramyocardially into peri-infarct zone and normal myocardium. At 24 hrs and 3 weeks after injection, the contrast and the volume of the MR-MSCs hypointense lesion from the MR images were acquired, and the contrast was determined using the difference in signal intensity between the hypointense and normal myocardium divided by signal intensity of the normal region. After humane euthanasia, the heart was excised and histology corresponding to MRI slices that demonstrated MR-MSCs lesions was performed. Repeated-measures ANOVA and a paired t test were used for comparison of the contrast and the volume of the MR-MSCs hypointense lesion at different time points. Comparisons between independent groups were performed with the standard Student t test. Results: The labeling efficiency of ferumoxides and DAPI was 100%. On the 14 th day after the MI operation, the average percentage of infracted myocardial area was (33.6±8.9)%. Twenty- four hours after MSCs transplantation, MSCs injection sites appeared as ovoid hypointensive lesions with sharp border on T 2 * images. At 24 h after injection, the signal contrast [(67.00±5.48)% vs (61.92±7.76)%,t=1.65, P=0.1158] and the size [(0.56±0.24) cm 2 vs (0.52±0.25) cm 2 , t=0.39, P=0.7044] of the lesions showed no statistical difference between the peri-infarct zone and the normal myocardium. At 3 weeks after injection, the signal contrast

  18. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Tumor Compartments Exhibit In Vivo Complementary Patterns of Vascular Perfusion and Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transport and consumption are increased in tumors, and this is considered a diagnostic index of malignancy. However, there is recent evidence that carcinoma-associated stromal cells are capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption, at least partly because of their efficient vascular supply. In the present study, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET, we mapped in vivo the vascular supply and glucose metabolism in syngeneic experimental models of carcinoma and mesenchymal tumor. We found that in both tumor histotypes, regions with high vascular perfusion exhibited a significantly lower FDG uptake. This reciprocity was more conspicuous in carcinomas than in mesenchymal tumors, and regions with a high-vascular/low-FDG uptake pattern roughly overlapped with a stromal capsule and intratumoral large connectival septa. Accordingly, mesenchymal tumors exhibited a higher vascular perfusion and a lower FDG uptake than carcinomas. Thus, we provide in vivo evidence of vascular/metabolic reciprocity between epithelial and mesenchymal histotypes in tumors, suggesting a new intriguing aspect of epithelial-stromal interaction. Our results suggests that FDG-PET-based clinical analysis can underestimate the malignity or tumor extension of carcinomas exhibiting any trait of “mesenchymalization” such as desmoplasia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  19. Understanding Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy eating for girls Understanding food labels Understanding food labels There is lots of info on food ... need to avoid because of food allergies. Other food label terms top In addition to the Nutrition ...

  20. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  1. Differentiation of residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation necrosis with arterial spin labeling and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging-derived metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; El-Serougy, Lamiaa; Gaballa, Gada; Talaat, Mona [Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mansoura (Egypt); Abdelsalam, Mohamed [Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2018-02-15

    The aim of this study is to differentiate recurrent/residual gliomas from postradiation changes using arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived metrics. Prospective study was conducted upon 42 patients with high-grade gliomas after radiotherapy only or prior to other therapies that underwent routine MR imaging, ASL, and DTI. The tumor blood flow (TBF), fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) of the enhanced lesion and related edema were calculated. The lesion was categorized as recurrence/residual or postradiation changes. There was significant differences between residual/recurrent gliomas and postradiation changes of TBF (P = 0.001), FA (P = 0.001 and 0.04), and MD (P = 0.001) of enhanced lesion and related edema respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of TBF of enhanced lesion and related edema used to differentiate residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation changes were 0.95 and 0.93 and of MD were 0.95 and 0.81 and of FA were 0.81 and 0.695, respectively. Combined ASL and DTI metrics of the enhanced lesion revealed AUC of 0.98, accuracy of 95%, sensitivity of 93.8%, specificity of 95.8%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 93.8%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 95.8%. Combined metrics of ASL and DTI of related edema revealed AUC of 0.97, accuracy of 92.5%, sensitivity of 93.8%, specificity of 91.7%, PPV of 88.2%, and NPV of 95.7. Combined ASL and DTI metrics of enhanced lesion and related edema are valuable noninvasive tools in differentiating residual/recurrent gliomas from postradiation changes. (orig.)

  2. Central nervous system mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvati, M.; Frati, A.; Piccirilli, M.; Agrillo, A.; Brogna, C.; Occhiogrosso, G.; Giangaspero, F. [INM Neuromed IRCCS, Pozzilli (Italy). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Caroli, E. [Policlinico S. Andrea, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery

    2005-06-15

    Central nervous system mesenchymal chondrosarcomas are rare malignant tumors that constitute a separate entity from the classical chondrosarcoma and myxoid variant. Clinical behaviour of central nervous system chondrosarcomas is still unknown. We describe two rare examples of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma with a review of the literature, in an attempt to clarify the clinical characteristics, prognosis and treatment of choice of these unusual tumors. Among the 55 reported cases, 23 had postoperative radiotherapy. Although there is no statistical significance according to the Log-Rank test (p=0.7), the patients treated with radiation therapy seem to have a better chance of survival. Patients who had adjuvant chemotherapy (only 5) showed survival times similar to those patients who had none. Although clinical behaviour of central nervous system chondrosarcomas remains to be defined, data from our series as well as literature show that radical removal is the best therapeutic choice. In addition, patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy seem to show a trend toward increased survival.

  3. Central nervous system mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.; Frati, A.; Piccirilli, M.; Agrillo, A.; Brogna, C.; Occhiogrosso, G.; Giangaspero, F.; Caroli, E.

    2005-01-01

    Central nervous system mesenchymal chondrosarcomas are rare malignant tumors that constitute a separate entity from the classical chondrosarcoma and myxoid variant. Clinical behaviour of central nervous system chondrosarcomas is still unknown. We describe two rare examples of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma with a review of the literature, in an attempt to clarify the clinical characteristics, prognosis and treatment of choice of these unusual tumors. Among the 55 reported cases, 23 had postoperative radiotherapy. Although there is no statistical significance according to the Log-Rank test (p=0.7), the patients treated with radiation therapy seem to have a better chance of survival. Patients who had adjuvant chemotherapy (only 5) showed survival times similar to those patients who had none. Although clinical behaviour of central nervous system chondrosarcomas remains to be defined, data from our series as well as literature show that radical removal is the best therapeutic choice. In addition, patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy seem to show a trend toward increased survival

  4. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the supplementary motor area in treatment-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder: An open-label pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Ji; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Kim, Hye-Geum; Kim, Ji-Yean; Cheon, Eun-Jin

    2017-10-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severely distressing disorder represented by obsessions and compulsions. A significant proportion of OCD patients fail to improve with conventional treatment methods. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been proposed as an alternative for OCD treatment. Functional neuroimaging studies indicate that OCD is associated with increased activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA), a region that plays an important role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of augmentation with 1Hz rTMS over the SMA in treatment-resistant OCD patients. The participants received 1Hz rTMS over the SMA in 20 daily sessions for 4weeks. We observed significant reduction in Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) score at the 4th week of the treatment. Reduction in compulsion contributed to the reduction of global Y-BOCS whereas there was no significant reduction in obsession. Clinical global impression-global improvement also showed significant change at the 2nd and 4th week of the treatment. No additional significant changes or significant adverse effects were seen. These findings suggest that 1Hz rTMS over the SMA can be an efficient and safe add-on therapeutic method in treatment-resistant patients with OCD. Further controlled studies in larger samples are required to confirm the effect of 1Hz rTMS over the SMA in OCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Gopinath, T.; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Kitchen, Jason; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring 1 H- 15 N dipolar couplings (DC) and 15 N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles’ heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([ 1 H, 15 N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D 15 N/ 15 N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the 15 N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers.

  6. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Gopinath, T; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Kitchen, Jason; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-11-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings (DC) and (15)N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles' heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([(1)H,(15)N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D (15)N/(15)N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the (15)N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord ameliorate testicular dysfunction in a male rat hypogonadism model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deficiency is a physical disorder that not only affects adults but can also jeopardize children′s health. Because there are many disadvantages to using traditional androgen replacement therapy, we have herein attempted to explore the use of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of androgen deficiency. We transplanted CM-Dil-labeled human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into the testes of an ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS-induced male rat hypogonadism model. Twenty-one days after transplantation, we found that blood testosterone levels in the therapy group were higher than that of the control group (P = 0.037, and using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, we observed that some of the CM-Dil-labeled cells expressed Leydig cell markers for cytochrome P450, family 11, subfamily A, polypeptide 1, and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We then recovered these cells and observed that they were still able to proliferate in vitro. The present study shows that mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord may constitute a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of male hypogonadism patients.

  8. Stimulation of neural differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields incorporated with MNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Kyong; Lee, Dong Heon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Jung, Hyun; Park, Jung-Keug; Cho, Hyunjin

    2014-10-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) have been investigated as a new cell-therapeutic solution due to their capacity that could differentiate into neural-like cells. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) therapy has emerged as a novel technique, using mechanical stimulus to differentiate hBM-MSCs and significantly enhance neuronal differentiation to affect cellular and molecular reactions. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) have recently achieved widespread use for biomedical applications and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-labeled nanoparticles are used to increase their circulation time, aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, and nonspecific cellular uptake as well as to decrease immunogenicity. Many studies have used MNP-labeled cells for differentiation, but there have been no reports of MNP-labeled neural differentiation combined with EMFs. In this study, synthesized PEG-phospholipid encapsulated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are used on hBM-MSCs to improve their intracellular uptake. The PEGylated nanoparticles were exposed to the cells under 50 Hz of EMFs to improve neural differentiation. First, we measured cell viability and intracellular iron content in hBM-MSCs after treatment with MNPs. Analysis was conducted by RT-PCR, and immunohistological analysis using neural cell type-specific genes and antibodies after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields. These results suggest that electromagnetic fields enhance neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs incorporated with MNPs and would be an effective method for differentiating neural cells.

  9. Issues in Data Labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowie, Roddy; Cox, Cate; Martin, Jeam-Claude; Batliner, Anton; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Karpouzis, Kostas; Cowie, Roddy; Pelachaud, Catherine; Petta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Labelling emotion databases is not a purely technical matter. It is bound up with theoretical issues. Different issues affect labelling of emotional content, labelling of the signs that convey emotion, and labelling of the relevant context. Linked to these are representational issues, involving time

  10. SAIL--stereo-array isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Optimal stereospecific and regiospecific labeling of proteins with stable isotopes enhances the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for the determination of the three-dimensional protein structures in solution. Stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) offers sharpened lines, spectral simplification without loss of information and the ability to rapidly collect and automatically evaluate the structural restraints required to solve a high-quality solution structure for proteins up to twice as large as before. This review gives an overview of stable isotope labeling methods for NMR spectroscopy with proteins and provides an in-depth treatment of the SAIL technology.

  11. Left Gastric Vein Visualization with Hepatopetal Flow Information in Healthy Subjects Using Non-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Balanced Steady-State Free-Precession Sequence and Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Ayako; Yamashita, Rikiya; Arizono, Shigeki; Kido, Aki; Sakashita, Naotaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-01-01

    To selectively visualize the left gastric vein (LGV) with hepatopetal flow information by non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography under a hypothesis that change in the LGV flow direction can predict the development of esophageal varices; and to optimize the acquisition protocol in healthy subjects. Respiratory-gated three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession scans were conducted on 31 healthy subjects using two methods (A and B) for visualizing the LGV with hepatopetal flow. In method A, two time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP) were placed on the whole abdomen and the area from the gastric fornix to the upper body, excluding the LGV area. In method B, nonselective inversion recovery pulse was used and one Time-SLIP was placed on the esophagogastric junction. The detectability and consistency of LGV were evaluated using the two methods and ultrasonography (US). Left gastric veins by method A, B, and US were detected in 30 (97%), 24 (77%), and 23 (74%) subjects, respectively. LGV flow by US was hepatopetal in 22 subjects and stagnant in one subject. All hepatopetal LGVs by US coincided with the visualized vessels in both methods. One subject with non-visualized LGV in method A showed stagnant LGV by US. Hepatopetal LGV could be selectively visualized by method A in healthy subjects.

  12. Positron emission tomography/computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging in a murine model of progressive atherosclerosis using (64)Cu-labeled glycoprotein VI-Fc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Boris; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Andia, Marcelo E; Cooper, Margaret S; Schuster, Andreas; Schönberger, Tanja; Griessinger, Christoph M; Wurster, Thomas; Onthank, David; Ungerer, Martin; Gawaz, Meinrad; Nagel, Eike; Botnar, Rene M

    2013-11-01

    Plaque erosion leads to exposure of subendothelial collagen, which may be targeted by glycoprotein VI (GPVI). We aimed to detect plaque erosion using (64)Cu-labeled GPVI-Fc (fragment crystallized). Four-week-old male apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (n=6) were fed a high-fat diet for 12 weeks. C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice served as controls (n=6). Another group of WT mice received a ligation injury of the left carotid artery (n=6) or sham procedure (n=4). All mice received a total activity of ≈12 MBq (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc by tail vein injection followed by delayed (24 hours) positron emission tomography using a NanoPET/computed tomographic scanner (Mediso, Hungary; Bioscan, USA) with an acquisition time of 1800 seconds. Seventy-two hours after positron emission tomography/computed tomography, all mice were scanned 2 hours after intravenous administration of 0.2 mmol/kg body weight of a gadolinium-based elastin-specific MR contrast agent. MRI was performed on a 3-T clinical scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands). In ApoE(-/-) mice, the (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc uptake in the aortic arch was significantly higher compared with WT mice (ApoE(-/-): 13.2±1.5 Bq/cm(3) versus WT mice: 5.1±0.5 Bq/cm(3); P=0.028). (64)Cu-GPVI-Fc uptake was also higher in the injured left carotid artery wall compared with the intact right carotid artery of WT mice and as a trend compared with sham procedure (injured: 20.7±1.3 Bq/cm(3) versus intact: 2.3±0.5 Bq/cm(3); P=0.028 versus sham: 12.7±1.7 Bq/cm(3); P=0.068). Results were confirmed by ex vivo histology and in vivo MRI with elastin-specific MR contrast agent that measures plaque burden and vessel wall remodeling. Higher R1 relaxation rates were found in the injured carotid wall with a T1 mapping sequence (injured: 1.44±0.08 s(-1) versus intact: 0.91±0.02 s(-1); P=0.028 versus sham: 0.97±0.05 s(-1); P=0.068) and in the aortic arch of ApoE(-/-) mice compared with WT mice (ApoE(-/-): 1.49±0.05 s(-1) versus WT: 0.92±0.04 s

  13. Mixed Map Labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Löffler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Point feature map labeling is a geometric visualization problem, in which a set of input points must be labeled with a set of disjoint rectangles (the bounding boxes of the label texts. It is predominantly motivated by label placement in maps but it also has other visualization applications. Typically, labeling models either use internal labels, which must touch their feature point, or external (boundary labels, which are placed outside the input image and which are connected to their feature points by crossing-free leader lines. In this paper we study polynomial-time algorithms for maximizing the number of internal labels in a mixed labeling model that combines internal and external labels. The model requires that all leaders are parallel to a given orientation θ ∈ [0, 2π, the value of which influences the geometric properties and hence the running times of our algorithms.

  14. Assessing the efficacy of nano- and micro-sized magnetic particles as contrast agents for MRI cell tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Taylor

    Full Text Available Iron-oxide based contrast agents play an important role in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of labelled cells in vivo. Currently, a wide range of such contrast agents is available with sizes varying from several nanometers up to a few micrometers and consisting of single or multiple magnetic cores. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of these different particles for labelling and imaging stem cells, using a mouse mesenchymal stem cell line to investigate intracellular uptake, retention and processing of nano- and microsized contrast agents. The effect of intracellular confinement on transverse relaxivity was measured by MRI at 7 T and in compliance with the principles of the '3Rs', the suitability of the contrast agents for MR-based cell tracking in vivo was tested using a chick embryo model. We show that for all particles tested, relaxivity was markedly reduced following cellular internalisation, indicating that contrast agent relaxivity in colloidal suspension does not accurately predict performance in MR-based cell tracking studies. Using a bimodal imaging approach comprising fluorescence and MRI, we demonstrate that labelled MSC remain viable following in vivo transplantation and can be tracked effectively using MRI. Importantly, our data suggest that larger particles might confer advantages for longer-term imaging.

  15. Noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance renal angiography using a repetitive artery and venous labelling technique at 3 T: comparison with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in subjects with normal renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Yoon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, EunJu [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-13

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography (NC-MRA) using the repetitive artery and venous labelling (RAVEL) technique to evaluate renal arteries compared to contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Twenty-five subjects with normal renal function underwent NC-MRA using a RAVEL technique and CE-MRA at 3 T. Two independent readers analysed the MRA images. Image quality, number of renal arteries, presence or absence of an early branching vessel, and diameter of the main renal arteries were evaluated. The overall image quality of NC-MRA was fair or greater in 88 % of right and 92 % of left renal arteries, while it was 96 % in both sides with CE-MRA. On NC-MRA, the number of renal arteries in all subjects was perfectly predicted by both readers. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting early branching vessels were 82 % and 100 % for reader 1 and 82 % and 95 % for reader 2. Inter-modality agreement for comparing the diameters of main renal arteries was good or excellent at all segments for both readers. Inter-reader agreement was moderate or good at all segments except at the right distal segment on NC-MRA. NC-MRA with the RAVEL technique at 3 T may have comparable diagnostic feasibility for evaluating renal arteries compared to CE-MRA. (orig.)

  16. 101 labeled brain images and a consistent human cortical labeling protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno eKlein

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the Mindboggle-101 dataset, the largest and most complete set of free, publicly accessible, manually labeled human brain images. To manually label the macroscopic anatomy in magnetic resonance images of 101 healthy participants, we created a new cortical labeling protocol that relies on robust anatomical landmarks and minimal manual edits after initialization with automated labels. The Desikan-Killiany-Tourville (DKT protocol is intended to improve the ease, consistency, and accuracy of labeling human cortical areas. Given how difficult it is to label brains, the Mindboggle-101 dataset is intended to serve as brain atlases for use in labeling other brains, as a normative dataset to establish morphometric variation in a healthy population for comparison against clinical populations, and contribute to the development, training, testing, and evaluation of automated registration and labeling algorithms. To this end, we also introduce benchmarks for the evaluation of such algorithms by comparing our manual labels with labels automatically generated by probabilistic and multi-atlas registration-based approaches. All data and related software and updated information are available on the http://www.mindboggle.info/data/ website.

  17. 101 Labeled Brain Images and a Consistent Human Cortical Labeling Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Arno; Tourville, Jason

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the Mindboggle-101 dataset, the largest and most complete set of free, publicly accessible, manually labeled human brain images. To manually label the macroscopic anatomy in magnetic resonance images of 101 healthy participants, we created a new cortical labeling protocol that relies on robust anatomical landmarks and minimal manual edits after initialization with automated labels. The “Desikan–Killiany–Tourville” (DKT) protocol is intended to improve the ease, consistency, and accuracy of labeling human cortical areas. Given how difficult it is to label brains, the Mindboggle-101 dataset is intended to serve as brain atlases for use in labeling other brains, as a normative dataset to establish morphometric variation in a healthy population for comparison against clinical populations, and contribute to the development, training, testing, and evaluation of automated registration and labeling algorithms. To this end, we also introduce benchmarks for the evaluation of such algorithms by comparing our manual labels with labels automatically generated by probabilistic and multi-atlas registration-based approaches. All data and related software and updated information are available on the http://mindboggle.info/data website. PMID:23227001

  18. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma--a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi S

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A Case of extraosseous mesenchymal chondrosarcoma occurring in the occipital region in a 26 year old male is being reported. The patient remained free from recurrence on any metastasis even after 2 years of the tumor resection.

  19. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for laryngotracheal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kathrine Kronberg; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) can be either congenital or acquired. Laryngeal stenosis is most often encountered after prolonged intubation. The mechanism for stenosis following intubation is believed to be hypertrophic scarring. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy has shown...

  1. Noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance renal angiography using a repetitive artery and venous labelling technique at 3 T: comparison with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in subjects with normal renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Yoon; Kim, Chan Kyo; Kim, EunJu; Park, Byung Kwan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography (NC-MRA) using the repetitive artery and venous labelling (RAVEL) technique to evaluate renal arteries compared to contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Twenty-five subjects with normal renal function underwent NC-MRA using a RAVEL technique and CE-MRA at 3 T. Two independent readers analysed the MRA images. Image quality, number of renal arteries, presence or absence of an early branching vessel, and diameter of the main renal arteries were evaluated. The overall image quality of NC-MRA was fair or greater in 88% of right and 92% of left renal arteries, while it was 96% in both sides with CE-MRA. On NC-MRA, the number of renal arteries in all subjects was perfectly predicted by both readers. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting early branching vessels were 82% and 100% for reader 1 and 82% and 95% for reader 2. Inter-modality agreement for comparing the diameters of main renal arteries was good or excellent at all segments for both readers. Inter-reader agreement was moderate or good at all segments except at the right distal segment on NC-MRA. NC-MRA with the RAVEL technique at 3 T may have comparable diagnostic feasibility for evaluating renal arteries compared to CE-MRA. • Accurate pre-treatment evaluation of renal artery anatomy helps clinical decision-making. • NC-MRA using RAVEL offers acceptable imaging quality for renal artery evaluation. • The 3 T RAVEL technique provides excellent diagnostic performance for renal artery evaluation. • The 3 T RAVEL technique may be an alternative to contrast-enhanced MRA.

  2. Rhodamine bound maghemite as a long-term dual imaging nanoprobe of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cmiel, V.; Skopalík, J.; Poláková, K.; Solař, J.; Havrdová, M.; Milde, D.; Justan, I.; Magro, M.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Provazník, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, JUL (2017), s. 433-444 ISSN 0175-7571 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : intracellular fluorescent labels * stem cell tracking * dual contrast agents * iron oxide nanoparticles * confocal microscopy * mesenchymal stromal cells * rhodamine Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 1.472, year: 2016

  3. Succesful labelling schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Stacey, Julia

    2001-01-01

    . In the spring of 2001 MAPP carried out an extensive consumer study with special emphasis on the Nordic environmentally friendly label 'the swan'. The purpose was to find out how much consumers actually know and use various labelling schemes. 869 households were contacted and asked to fill in a questionnaire...... it into consideration when I go shopping. The respondent was asked to pick the most suitable answer, which described her use of each label. 29% - also called 'the labelling blind' - responded that they basically only knew the recycling label and the Government controlled organic label 'Ø-mærket'. Another segment of 6...

  4. Synthesizing labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.; Unkefer, C.J.; Walker, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    A metabolic study is presented of the chemical reactions provided by isotopic labeling and NMR spectroscopy. Synthesis of 13 C-labeled D-glucose, a 6-carbon sugar, involves adding a labeled nitrile group to the 5-carbon sugar D-arabinose by reaction with labeled hydrogen cyanide. The product of this reaction is then reduced and hydrolyzed to a mixture of the labeled sugars. The two sugars are separated by absorption chromotography. The synthesis of 13 C-labeled L-tyrosine, an amino acid, is also presented

  5. Nanoparticles for magnetic biosensing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V.; Novoselova, Iu.P.; Schupletsova, V.V.; Andrade, R.; Dunec, N.A.; Litvinova, L.S.; Safronov, A.P.; Yurova, K.A.; Kulesh, N.A.; Dzyuman, A.N.; Khlusov, I.A.

    2017-01-01

    The further development of magnetic biosensors requires a better understanding of the interaction between living systems and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We describe our experience of fabrication of stable ferrofluids (FF) using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. Their morphofunctional responses in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Stable ferrofluids (FF) were obtained using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. • Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. • Cells morphofunctional response in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. • The results can be used for magnetic biosensoring, as well as for an addressed design of cell delivery systems.

  6. Nanoparticles for magnetic biosensing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V., E-mail: galina@we.lc.ehu.es [Universidad del País Vasco BCMaterials UPV-EHU, Leioa, 48940 Spain (Spain); Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Novoselova, Iu.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Schupletsova, V.V. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Andrade, R. [SGIker, ServiciosGenerales de Investigación, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), Bilbao, 48080 Spain (Spain); Dunec, N.A.; Litvinova, L.S. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Safronov, A.P. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Division, RAS, Ekaterinburg, 620016 (Russian Federation); Yurova, K.A. [I.Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad, 23601 (Russian Federation); Kulesh, N.A. [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A.N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Khlusov, I.A. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    The further development of magnetic biosensors requires a better understanding of the interaction between living systems and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). We describe our experience of fabrication of stable ferrofluids (FF) using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. Their morphofunctional responses in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Stable ferrofluids (FF) were obtained using electrostatic or steric stabilization of iron oxide MNPs obtained by laser target evaporation. • Controlled amounts of FF were used for in vitro experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells. • Cells morphofunctional response in the Fe concentration range 2–1000 maximum tolerated dose revealed no cytotoxicity. • The results can be used for magnetic biosensoring, as well as for an addressed design of cell delivery systems.

  7. Differential marker expression by cultures rich in mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells have properties that make them amenable to therapeutic use. However, the acceptance of mesenchymal stem cells in clinical practice requires standardized techniques for their specific isolation. To date, there are no conclusive marker (s) for the exclusive isolation of mesenchymal stem cells. Our aim was to identify markers differentially expressed between mesenchymal stem cell and non-stem cell mesenchymal cell cultures. We compared and contrasted the phenotype of tissue cultures in which mesenchymal stem cells are rich and rare. By initially assessing mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, we established that bone marrow and breast adipose cultures are rich in mesenchymal stem cells while, in our hands, foreskin fibroblast and olfactory tissue cultures contain rare mesenchymal stem cells. In particular, olfactory tissue cells represent non-stem cell mesenchymal cells. Subsequently, the phenotype of the tissue cultures were thoroughly assessed using immuno-fluorescence, flow-cytometry, proteomics, antibody arrays and qPCR. Results Our analysis revealed that all tissue cultures, regardless of differentiation potential, demonstrated remarkably similar phenotypes. Importantly, it was also observed that common mesenchymal stem cell markers, and fibroblast-associated markers, do not discriminate between mesenchymal stem cell and non-stem cell mesenchymal cell cultures. Examination and comparison of the phenotypes of mesenchymal stem cell and non-stem cell mesenchymal cell cultures revealed three differentially expressed markers – CD24, CD108 and CD40. Conclusion We indicate the importance of establishing differential marker expression between mesenchymal stem cells and non-stem cell mesenchymal cells in order to determine stem cell specific markers. PMID:24304471

  8. Magnetic sensor device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a sensor device and a method for detg. the presence and/or amt. of target moieties in a sample fluid, the target moieties being labeled with magnetic or magnetizable objects. The sensor device comprises a magnetic field generating means adapted for applying a retention

  9. Cultivation and optimized tracing of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-hua HE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate labelling and tracing methods of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs of rat,and to optimize the trace labelling technique.Methods Rat MSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro.The surface antigens(CD29,CD34,CD45,CD90 of MSCs were identified by flow cytometry,and MSCs were labelled with BrdU,DAPI and GFP,respectively.The labelling efficiency of BrdU was aseessed with immunocytochemistry,and that of DAPI and GFP were observed under fluorescence microscope.The advantages and disadvantages of the three tracer techniques were analyzed.Results Flow cytometry showed that MSCs expressed CD29 and CD90 but not CD34 or CD45.The three kinds of markers showed no significant toxicity to the cells.The optimal dosage and timing of BrdU labeling were respectively 10 μmol/L and 48 hours.And that of DAPI labeling were 1μg/ml and 12 hours.The infected MSCs with lentivirus-GFP at MOI(multiplicity of infection = 8 for 12h expressed GFP with high efficiency(above 90%.Conclusion Comparison with the three tracing methods for MSCs,transfection with GFP gene is a stable,reliable,safe tracing method,and they are important in tracing adult stem cells.

  10. Nanoparticulated magnetic drug delivery systems: Preparation and magnetic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, P C, E-mail: pcmor@unb.b [Universidade de BrasIlia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, Brasilia DF 70910-900 (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes how magnetic resonance can be successfully used as a tool to help customize and quantify nanosized magnetic particles while labeling cells and administered in animals for targeting different biological sites. Customization of magnetic nanoparticles is addressed here in terms of production of complex magnetic drug delivery systems whereas quantification of magnetic nanoparticle in different biological compartments emerges as a key experimental information to assess time-dependent magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution profiles. Examples of using magnetic resonance in unfolding information regarding the pharmacokinetics of intravenously-injected surface-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in animals are included in the paper.

  11. Electronic Submission of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  12. Robust Active Label Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremer, Jan; Sha, Fei; Igel, Christian

    2018-01-01

    for the noisy data lead to different active label correction algorithms. If loss functions consider the label noise rates, these rates are estimated during learning, where importance weighting compensates for the sampling bias. We show empirically that viewing the true label as a latent variable and computing......Active label correction addresses the problem of learning from input data for which noisy labels are available (e.g., from imprecise measurements or crowd-sourcing) and each true label can be obtained at a significant cost (e.g., through additional measurements or human experts). To minimize......). To select labels for correction, we adopt the active learning strategy of maximizing the expected model change. We consider the change in regularized empirical risk functionals that use different pointwise loss functions for patterns with noisy and true labels, respectively. Different loss functions...

  13. Pesticide Product Label System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the...

  14. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  15. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  16. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  17. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  18. Possible mechanism of disintegrin/like domain in mesenchymal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Possible mechanism of disintegrin/like domain in mesenchymal stem cells homing in mice liver injury ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Mesenchymal Stem cells have opened a new approach to deal with liver fibrosis.

  19. A Label to Regulate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tricoire, Aurélie; Boxenbaum, Eva; Laurent, Brice

    This paper examines the role labelling plays in the government of the contemporary economy.1Drawing on a detailed study of BBC-Effinergy, a French label for sustainable construction, we showhow the adoption and evolution of voluntary labels can be seen as emblematic of a governmentthrough experim...

  20. Labelling subway lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrido, M.A.; Iturriaga, C.; Márquez, A.; Portillo, J.R.; Reyes, P.; Wolff, A.; Eades, P.; Takaoka, T.

    2001-01-01

    Graphical features on map, charts, diagrams and graph drawings usually must be annotated with text labels in order to convey their meaning. In this paper we focus on a problem that arises when labeling schematized maps, e.g. for subway networks. We present algorithms for labeling points on a line

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  13. Molecular fingerprinting of TGFbeta-treated embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, M M; Mukhopadhyay, P; Greene, R M

    2003-11-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF(beta)) family represents a class of signaling molecules that plays a central role in normal embryonic development, specifically in development of the craniofacial region. Members of this family are vital to development of the secondary palate where they regulate maxillary and palate mesenchymal cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. The function of this growth factor family is particularly critical in that perturbation of either process results in a cleft of the palate. While the cellular and phenotypic effects of TGF(beta) on embryonic craniofacial tissue have been extensively cataloged, the specific genes that function as downstream mediators of TGF(beta) in maxillary/palatal development are poorly defined. Gene expression arrays offer the ability to conduct a rapid, simultaneous assessment of hundreds to thousands of differentially expressed genes in a single study. Inasmuch as the downstream sequelae of TGF(beta) action are only partially defined, a complementary DNA (cDNA) expression array technology (Clontech's Atlas Mouse cDNA Expression Arrays), was utilized to delineate a profile of differentially expressed genes from TGF(beta)-treated primary cultures of murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells. Hybridization of a membrane-based cDNA array (1178 genes) was performed with 32P-labeled cDNA probes synthesized from RNA isolated from either TGF(beta)-treated or vehicle-treated embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells. Resultant phosphorimages were subject to AtlasImage analysis in order to determine differences in gene expression between control and TGF(beta)-treated maxillary mesenchymal cells. Of the 1178 arrayed genes, 552 (47%) demonstrated detectable levels of expression. Steady state levels of 22 genes were up-regulated, while those of 8 other genes were down-regulated, by a factor of twofold or greater in response to TGF(beta). Affected genes could be grouped into three general functional

  14. Using {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT to Detect an occult Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Oncogenic Osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate excretion, hypophosphatemia, and osteomalacia. This syndrome is often caused by tumors of mesenchymal origin. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia have abnormal bone mineralization, resulting in a high frequency of fractures. Tumor resection is the treatment of choice, as it will often correct the metabolic imbalance. Although oncogenic osteomalacia is a potentially curable disease, diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because of the small size and sporadic location of the tumor. Bone scintigraphy and radiography best characterize osteoma lacia; magnetic resonance imaging findings are nonspecific. Here, we report a case of oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor that was successfully detected by {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18F} FDG PET/CT). This case illustrates the advantages of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in detecting the occult mesenchymal tumor that causes oncogenic osteomalacia.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ian A.; Sanina, Cristina; Balkan, Wayne; Hare, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for more deaths globally than any other single disease. There are on average 1.5 million episodes of myocardial infarction (heart attack) each year in the United States alone with roughly one third resulting in death. There is therefore a major need for developing new and effective strategies to promote cardiac repair. Intramyocardial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has emerged as a leading contender in the pursuit of clinical intervention and therapy. MSCs are potent mediators of cardiac repair and are therefore an attractive tool in the development of pre-clinical and clinical trials. MSCs are capable of secreting a large array of soluble factors, which have had demonstrated effects on pathogenic cardiac remolding, fibrosis, immune activation and cardiac stem cell proliferation within the damaged heart. MSCs are also capable of differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, although the relative contribution of trilineage differentiation and paracrine effectors on cardiac repair remains the subject of active investigation. PMID:27236666

  16. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia de Vasconcellos Machado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine.

  17. Labeling and tracking exosomes within the brain using gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzer, Oshra; Perets, Nisim; Barnoy, Eran; Offen, Daniel; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2018-02-01

    Cell-to-cell communication system involves Exosomes, small, membrane-enveloped nanovesicles. Exosomes are evolving as effective therapeutic tools for different pathologies. These extracellular vesicles can bypass biological barriers such as the blood-brain barrier, and can function as powerful nanocarriers for drugs, proteins and gene therapeutics. However, to promote exosomes' therapy development, especially for brain pathologies, a better understanding of their mechanism of action, trafficking, pharmacokinetics and bio-distribution is needed. In this research, we established a new method for non-invasive in-vivo neuroimaging of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived exosomes, based on computed tomography (CT) imaging with glucose-coated gold nanoparticle (GNP) labeling. We demonstrated that the exosomes were efficiently and directly labeled with GNPs, via an energy-dependent mechanism. Additionally, we found the optimal parameters for exosome labeling and neuroimaging, wherein 5 nm GNPs enhanced labeling, and intranasal administration produced superior brain accumulation. We applied our technique in a mouse model of focal ischemia. Imaging and tracking of intranasally-administered GNP-labeled exosomes revealed specific accumulation and prolonged presence at the lesion area, up to 24 hrs. We propose that this novel exosome labeling and in-vivo neuroimaging technique can serve as a general platform for brain theranostics.

  18. Practical cell labeling with magnetite cationic liposomes for cell manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Nonogaki, Yurika; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-01

    Personalization of the cell culture process for cell therapy is an ideal strategy to obtain maximum treatment effects. In a previous report, we proposed a strategy using a magnetic manipulation device that combined a palm-top size device and a cell-labeling method using magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) to enable feasible personalized cell processing. In the present study, we focused on optimizing the MCL-labeling technique with respect to cell manipulation in small devices. From detailed analysis with different cell types, 4 pg/cell of MCL-label was found to be obtained immediately after mixing with MCLs, which was sufficient for magnetic cell manipulation. The amount of label increased within 24 h depending on cell type, although in all cases it decreased along with cell doubling, indicating that the labeling potential of MCLs was limited. The role of free MCLs not involved in labeling was also investigated; MCLs' role was found to be a supportive one that maximized the manipulation performance up to 100%. We also determined optimum conditions to manipulate adherent cells by MCL labeling using the MCL dispersed in trypsin solution. Considering labeling feasibility and practical performance with 10(3)-10(5) cells for personalized cell processing, we determined that 10 microg/ml of label without incubation time (0 h incubation) was the universal MCL-labeling condition. We propose the optimum specifications for a device to be combined with this method. 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Contribution of Fetal, but Not Adult, Pulmonary Mesothelium to Mesenchymal Lineages in Lung Homeostasis and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gise, Alexander; Stevens, Sean M; Honor, Leah B; Oh, Jin Hee; Gao, Chi; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T

    2016-02-01

    The lung is enveloped by a layer of specialized epithelium, the pulmonary mesothelium. In other organs, mesothelial cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition and contribute to organ stromal cells. The contribution of pulmonary mesothelial cells (PMCs) to the developing lung has been evaluated with differing conclusions. PMCs have also been indirectly implicated in lung fibrosis in the progressive, fatal lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We used fetal or postnatal genetic pulse labeling of PMCs to assess their fate in murine development, normal lung homeostasis, and models of pulmonary fibrosis. We found that most fetal PMC-derived mesenchymal cells (PMCDCs) expressed markers of pericytes and fibroblasts, only a small minority expressed smooth muscle markers, and none expressed endothelial cell markers. Postnatal PMCs did not contribute to lung mesenchyme during normal lung homeostasis or in models of lung fibrosis. However, fetal PMCDCs were abundant and actively proliferating within fibrotic regions in lung fibrosis models, suggesting that they actively participate in the fibrotic process. These data clarify the role of fetal and postnatal PMCDCs in lung development and disease.

  20. Magnetic microfluidic platform for biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Stipsitz, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Microfluidic platforms are well-suited for biomedical analysis and usually consist of a set of units which guarantee the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalyte in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for perfoming the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gainining interest. This is due to the fact that magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the diagnostic system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are used. In this paper, we present some of our most recent results in research towards a) microfluidic diagnostics using MR sensors and magnetic particles and b) single cell analysis using magnetic particles. We have successfully manipulated magnetically labeled bacteria and measured their response with integrated GMR sensors and we have also managed to separate magnetically labeled jurkat cells for single cell analysis. © 2015 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  1. Magnetic microfluidic platform for biomedical applications using magnetic nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Stipsitz, Martin; Kokkinis, Georgios; Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan; Kosel, Jü rgen; Cardoso, Susana; Cardoso, Filipe; Giouroudi, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms are well-suited for biomedical analysis and usually consist of a set of units which guarantee the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalyte in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for perfoming the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gainining interest. This is due to the fact that magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the diagnostic system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are used. In this paper, we present some of our most recent results in research towards a) microfluidic diagnostics using MR sensors and magnetic particles and b) single cell analysis using magnetic particles. We have successfully manipulated magnetically labeled bacteria and measured their response with integrated GMR sensors and we have also managed to separate magnetically labeled jurkat cells for single cell analysis. © 2015 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  2. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast epithelial cells treated with cadmium and the role of Snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengxi; Shan, Zhongguo; Shaikh, Zahir A

    2018-04-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have implicated cadmium (Cd) with breast cancer. In breast epithelial MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells, Cd has been shown to promote cell growth. The present study examined whether Cd also promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a hallmark of cancer progression. Human breast epithelial cells consisting of non-cancerous MCF10A, non-metastatic HCC 1937 and HCC 38, and metastatic MDA-MB-231 were treated with 1 or 3 μM Cd for 4 weeks. The MCF10A epithelial cells switched to a more mesenchymal-like morphology, which was accompanied by a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin and an increase in the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin. In both non-metastatic HCC 1937 and HCC 38 cells, treatment with Cd decreased the epithelial marker claudin-1. In addition, E-cadherin also decreased in the HCC 1937 cells. Even the mesenchymal-like MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited an increase in the mesenchymal marker vimentin. These changes indicated that prolonged treatment with Cd resulted in EMT in both normal and cancer-derived breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, both the MCF10A and MDA-MB-231 cells labeled with Zcad, a dual sensor for tracking EMT, demonstrated a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin and an increase in the mesenchymal marker ZEB-1. Treatment of cells with Cd significantly increased the level of Snail, a transcription factor involved in the regulation of EMT. However, the Cd-induced Snail expression was completely abolished by actinomycin D. Luciferase reporter assay indicated that the expression of Snail was regulated by Cd at the promotor level. Snail was essential for Cd-induced promotion of EMT in the MDA-MB-231 cells, as knockdown of Snail expression blocked Cd-induced cell migration. Together, these results indicate that Cd promotes EMT in breast epithelial cells and does so by modulating the transcription of Snail. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Probabilistic atlas based labeling of the cerebral vessel tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Giessen, Martijn; Janssen, Jasper P.; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Dijkstra, Jouke

    2015-03-01

    Preoperative imaging of the cerebral vessel tree is essential for planning therapy on intracranial stenoses and aneurysms. Usually, a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or computed tomography angiography (CTA) is acquired from which the cerebral vessel tree is segmented. Accurate analysis is helped by the labeling of the cerebral vessels, but labeling is non-trivial due to anatomical topological variability and missing branches due to acquisition issues. In recent literature, labeling the cerebral vasculature around the Circle of Willis has mainly been approached as a graph-based problem. The most successful method, however, requires the definition of all possible permutations of missing vessels, which limits application to subsets of the tree and ignores spatial information about the vessel locations. This research aims to perform labeling using probabilistic atlases that model spatial vessel and label likelihoods. A cerebral vessel tree is aligned to a probabilistic atlas and subsequently each vessel is labeled by computing the maximum label likelihood per segment from label-specific atlases. The proposed method was validated on 25 segmented cerebral vessel trees. Labeling accuracies were close to 100% for large vessels, but dropped to 50-60% for small vessels that were only present in less than 50% of the set. With this work we showed that using solely spatial information of the vessel labels, vessel segments from stable vessels (>50% presence) were reliably classified. This spatial information will form the basis for a future labeling strategy with a very loose topological model.

  4. Labelling of equipment dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, D C

    1993-01-01

    A new labelling system for use on medical equipment dispensers is tested. This system uses one of the objects stored in each unit of the dispenser as the 'label', by attaching it to the front of the dispenser with tape. The new system was compared to conventional written labelling by timing subjects asked to select items from two dispensers. The new system was 27% quicker than the conventional system. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8110335

  5. Deuterium labeled cannabinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driessen, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Complex reactions involving ring opening, ring closure and rearrangements hamper complete understanding of the fragmentation processes in the mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of cannabinoids. Specifically labelled compounds are very powerful tools for obtaining more insight into fragmentation mechanisms and ion structures and therefore the synthesis of specifically deuterated cannabinoids was undertaken. For this, it was necessary to investigate the preparation of cannabinoids, appropriately functionalized for specific introduction of deuterium atom labels. The results of mass spectrometry with these labelled cannabinoids are described. (Auth.)

  6. In Vivo Functional Selection Identifies Cardiotrophin-1 as a Cardiac Engraftment Factor for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Francesca; Ruozi, Giulia; Falcione, Antonella; Doimo, Sara; Dal Ferro, Matteo; Lesizza, Pierluigi; Zentilin, Lorena; Banks, Lawrence; Zacchigna, Serena; Giacca, Mauro

    2017-10-17

    Transplantation of cells into the infarcted heart has significant potential to improve myocardial recovery; however, low efficacy of cell engraftment still limits therapeutic benefit. Here, we describe a method for the unbiased, in vivo selection of cytokines that improve mesenchymal stromal cell engraftment into the heart both in normal conditions and after myocardial infarction. An arrayed library of 80 secreted factors, including most of the currently known interleukins and chemokines, were individually cloned into adeno-associated viral vectors. Pools from this library were then used for the batch transduction of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells ex vivo, followed by intramyocardial cell administration in normal and infarcted mice. Three weeks after injection, vector genomes were recovered from the few persisting cells and identified by sequencing DNA barcodes uniquely labeling each of the tested cytokines. The most effective molecule identified by this competitive engraftment screening was cardiotrophin-1, a member of the interleukin-6 family. Intracardiac injection of mesenchymal stromal cells transiently preconditioned with cardiotrophin-1 preserved cardiac function and reduced infarct size, parallel to the persistence of the transplanted cells in the healing hearts for at least 2 months after injection. Engraftment of cardiotrophin-1-treated mesenchymal stromal cells was consequent to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-mediated activation of the focal adhesion kinase and its associated focal adhesion complex and the consequent acquisition of adhesive properties by the cells. These results support the feasibility of selecting molecules in vivo for their functional properties with adeno-associated viral vector libraries and identify cardiotrophin-1 as a powerful cytokine promoting cell engraftment and thus improving cell therapy of the infarcted myocardium. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Effective sample labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, J.T.; Bryce, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Ground-water samples collected for hazardous-waste and radiological monitoring have come under strict regulatory and quality assurance requirements as a result of laws such as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. To comply with these laws, the labeling system used to identify environmental samples had to be upgraded to ensure proper handling and to protect collection personnel from exposure to sample contaminants and sample preservatives. The sample label now used as the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is a complete sample document. In the event other paperwork on a labeled sample were lost, the necessary information could be found on the label

  8. A case of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Masami; Tanji, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masakazu

    1981-01-01

    Intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is very rare, only 14 cases being reported in Europe and in the United States of America. Recently we experienced a case in which the follow-up indicating computed tomograms (CT) demonstrated interesting data on the radiosensitivity of this tumor. The patient, a 14-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with the complaint of left hemiplegia which had gradually progressed. CT revealed an area spreading upward from the right median base of the skull and consisted of two components showing (A) a density as high as that of calcium and (B) a density higher than that of surrounding brain tissue, but much lower than that of calcium. Temporoparietal craniotomy was performed to resect approximately one-half of the tumor. Histological finding revealed mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The component-A was though to be a cartilaginous tissue, and-B to be an undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue. Postoperative irradiation of 7,000 rad was initiated. The effect of radiotherapy as seen on computed tomograms is as follows, (1) decrease in the volume of the tumor by 26%, (2) decrease in density and enhancement of the area which is considered to be the undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, (3) mild reduction of the area which is considered to be the caltilaginous tissue, and (4) a very high density of the entire tumor similar in degree to that of the bone one year later. These results suggested that radiotherapy is effective for this tumor. (author)

  9. Andrographolide suppresses epithelial mesenchymal transition by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) may contribute to the development of posterior capsular opacification (PCO), which leads to visual impairment. Andrographolide has been shown to have therapeutic potential against various cancers. However, its effect on human LECs is still unknown.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells in oral reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Sørensen, J A; Kassem, M

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated clinical outcomes following intraoperative use of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in various oral reconstructive procedures. PubMed was searched without language restrictions from 2000 to 2011 using the search words stem cell, oral surgery, tissue engineering, sinus lift...

  11. Hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling requires recruitment of circulating mesenchymal precursors of a monocyte/macrophage lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Maria G; Brunetti, Jacqueline A; Burke, Danielle L; Carpenter, Todd C; Davie, Neil J; Reeves, John T; Roedersheimer, Mark T; van Rooijen, Nico; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2006-02-01

    Vascular remodeling in chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension includes marked fibroproliferative changes in the pulmonary artery (PA) adventitia. Although resident PA fibroblasts have long been considered the primary contributors to these processes, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling requires recruitment of circulating mesenchymal precursors of a monocyte/macrophage lineage, termed fibrocytes. Using two neonatal animal models (rats and calves) of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, we demonstrated a dramatic perivascular accumulation of mononuclear cells of a monocyte/macrophage lineage (expressing CD45, CD11b, CD14, CD68, ED1, ED2). Many of these cells produced type I collagen, expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin, and proliferated, thus exhibiting mesenchymal cell characteristics attributed to fibrocytes. The blood-borne origin of these cells was confirmed in experiments wherein circulating monocytes/macrophages of chronically hypoxic rats were in vivo-labeled with DiI fluorochrome via liposome delivery and subsequently identified in the remodeled pulmonary, but not systemic, arterial adventitia. The DiI-labeled cells that appeared in the vessel wall expressed monocyte/macrophage markers and procollagen. Selective depletion of this monocytic cell population, using either clodronate-liposomes or gadolinium chloride, prevented pulmonary adventitial remodeling (ie, production of collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin-C and accumulation of myofibroblasts). We conclude that circulating mesenchymal precursors of a monocyte/macrophage lineage, including fibrocytes, are essential contributors to hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface

  13. Accelerated stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovko, Daniel M.; Henning, Tobias; Bauer, Jan S. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Frenzel, Thomas [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Mayerhofer, Artur [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institute of Cell Biology, Munich (Germany); Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Medical Center, Contrast Agent Research Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-03-15

    To develop and characterize a clinically applicable, fast and efficient method for stem cell labeling with ferucarbotran and protamine for depiction with clinical MRI. The hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and relaxivities of ferucarbotran and varying concentrations of protamine were measured. Once the optimized ratio was found, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were labeled at varying incubation times (1-24 h). Viability was assessed via Trypan blue exclusion testing. 150,000 labeled cells in Ficoll solution were imaged with T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted sequences at 3 T, and relaxation rates were calculated. Varying the concentrations of protamine allows for easy modification of the physicochemical properties. Simple incubation with ferucarbotran alone resulted in efficient labeling after 24 h of incubation while assisted labeling with protamine resulted in similar results after only 1 h. Cell viability remained unaffected. R2 and R2* relaxation rates were drastically increased. Electron microscopy confirmed intracellular iron oxide uptake in lysosomes. Relaxation times correlated with results from ICP-AES. Our results show internalization of ferucarbotran can be accelerated in MSCs with protamine, an approved heparin antagonist and potentially clinically applicable uptake-enhancing agent. (orig.)

  14. Dynamic map labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Ken; Daiches, Eli; Yap, Chee

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of filtering, selecting and placing labels on a dynamic map, which is characterized by continuous zooming and panning capabilities. This consists of two interrelated issues. The first is to avoid label popping and other artifacts that cause confusion and interrupt navigation, and the second is to label at interactive speed. In most formulations the static map labeling problem is NP-hard, and a fast approximation might have O(nlogn) complexity. Even this is too slow during interaction, when the number of labels shown can be several orders of magnitude less than the number in the map. In this paper we introduce a set of desiderata for "consistent" dynamic map labeling, which has qualities desirable for navigation. We develop a new framework for dynamic labeling that achieves the desiderata and allows for fast interactive display by moving all of the selection and placement decisions into the preprocessing phase. This framework is general enough to accommodate a variety of selection and placement algorithms. It does not appear possible to achieve our desiderata using previous frameworks. Prior to this paper, there were no formal models of dynamic maps or of dynamic labels; our paper introduces both. We formulate a general optimization problem for dynamic map labeling and give a solution to a simple version of the problem. The simple version is based on label priorities and a versatile and intuitive class of dynamic label placements we call "invariant point placements". Despite these restrictions, our approach gives a useful and practical solution. Our implementation is incorporated into the G-Vis system which is a full-detail dynamic map of the continental USA. This demo is available through any browser.

  15. CD146 Expression Influences Periapical Cyst Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduano, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Palmieri, Francesca; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have identified a new human dental derived progenitor cell population with multi-lineage differentiation potential referred to as human periapical cyst mesenchymal stem cells (hPCy-MSCs). In the present study, we compared two subpopulations of hPCy-MSCs characterised by the low or high expression of CD146 to establish whether this expression can regulate their stem cell properties. Using flow cytometry, we evaluated the stem cell marker profile of hPCy-MSCs during passaging. Furthermore, CD146 Low and CD146 High cells were sorted by magnetic beads and subsequently both cell populations were evaluated for differences in their proliferation, self-renewal, stem cell surface markers, stemness genes expression and osteogenic differentiation potential.We found that hPCy-MSCs possessed a stable expression of several mesenchymal stem cell surface markers, whereas CD146 expression declined during passaging.In addition, sorted CD146 Low cells proliferated significantly faster, displayed higher colony-forming unit-fibroblast capacity and showed higher expression of Klf4 when compared to the CD146 High subset. Significantly, the osteogenic potential of hPCy-MSCs was greater in the CD146 Low than in CD146 High population. These results demonstrate that CD146 is spontaneously downregulated with passaging at both mRNA and protein levels and that the high expression of CD146 reduces the proliferative, self-renewal and osteogenic differentiation potential of hPCy-MSCs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that changes in the expression of CD146 can influence the stem cell properties of hPCy-MSCs.

  16. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, Ariel; Kinnunen, Paivo; McNaughton, Brandon; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  17. A simple method for stem cell labeling with fluorine 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Bing; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Dennis, James E.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Kilbourn, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Hexadecyl-4-[ 18 F]fluorobenzoate ([ 18 F]HFB), a long chain fluorinated benzoic acid ester, was prepared in a one-step synthesis by aromatic nucleophilic substitution of [ 18 F]fluoride ion on hexadecyl-4-(N,N,N-trimethylammonio)benzoate. The radiolabeled ester was obtained in good yields (52% decay corrected) and high purity (97%). [ 18 F]HFB was used to radiolabel rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by absorption into cell membranes. MicroPET imaging of [ 18 F]HFB-labeled MSCs following intravenous injection into the rat showed the expected high and persistent accumulation of radioactivity in the lungs. [ 18 F]HFB is thus simple to prepare and uses labeling agent for short-term distribution studies of injected stem cells

  18. A simple method for stem cell labeling with fluorine 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Bing [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hankenson, Kurt D. [Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Dennis, James E. [Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Caplan, Arnold I. [Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Goldstein, Steven A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kilbourn, Michael R. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Hexadecyl-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoate ([{sup 18}F]HFB), a long chain fluorinated benzoic acid ester, was prepared in a one-step synthesis by aromatic nucleophilic substitution of [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion on hexadecyl-4-(N,N,N-trimethylammonio)benzoate. The radiolabeled ester was obtained in good yields (52% decay corrected) and high purity (97%). [{sup 18}F]HFB was used to radiolabel rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by absorption into cell membranes. MicroPET imaging of [{sup 18}F]HFB-labeled MSCs following intravenous injection into the rat showed the expected high and persistent accumulation of radioactivity in the lungs. [{sup 18}F]HFB is thus simple to prepare and uses labeling agent for short-term distribution studies of injected stem cells.

  19. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  20. Cell surface of sea urchin micromeres and primary mesenchyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSimone, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The cell surface and extracellular matrix (ECM) of the sea urchin embryo were studied during the early morphogenetic events involved in the differentiation of the micromere cell lineage. Sixteen-cell and early cleavage stage blastomeres were isolated and the protein composition of their cell surfaces examined by 125 I-labelling followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Micromere-specific cell surface proteins are reported for Arbacia punctulata, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Cell surface glycoproteins were characterized on the basis of lectin binding specificity with a novel lectin affinity transfer technique. Using this procedure, cell-type specific surface proteins, which are also lectin-binding specific, can be detected. In addition, fluorescein conjugated lectins were microinjected into the blastocoels of living S. drobachiensis and Lytechinus pictus embryos and the patterns of lectin bindings observed by fluorescence microscopy. The evidence presented in this thesis suggests that the differentiation of the primary mesenchyme cells is correlated with changes in the molecular composition of the cell-surface and the ECM

  1. Edge colouring by total labellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Rautenbach, D.; Stiebitz, M.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the concept of an edge-colouring total k-labelling. This is a labelling of the vertices and the edges of a graph G with labels 1, 2, ..., k such that the weights of the edges define a proper edge colouring of G. Here the weight of an edge is the sum of its label and the labels of its...

  2. Radioiodine and its labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Ana Maria

    1994-01-01

    Chemical characteristics and their nuclear characteristics, types of labelled molecules,labelling procedures, direct labelling with various oxidizing agents, indirect labelling with various conjugates attached to protein molecules, purification and quality control. Iodination damage.Safe handling of labelling procedures with iodine radioisotopes.Bibliography

  3. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 'Naturemade' -- a new label

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederhaeusern, A.

    2001-01-01

    This short article discusses the introduction of the 'Naturemade' two-level labelling scheme in the Swiss electricity market, which is to help provide transparency in the market for green power and promote the building of facilities for its production. In the form of an interview with the CEO of Swissolar and the president of Greenpeace Switzerland, the pros and contras of these labels are discussed. In particular, the interview partners' opinions on the possible misuse of the less stringent label and the influence of the labels on the construction of new installations for the generation of electricity from renewable sources are presented. The basic principles of the promotional model behind the labels are listed

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review: clarity, accuracy, consistency with EPA policy, and enforceability.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is a quiz on Module 1.

  7. Regulation of proliferation of embryonic heart mesenchyme: Role of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and the interstitial matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, M.; Armstrong, M.T.; Armstrong, P.B.

    1990-01-01

    Proliferation of atrioventricular cushion mesenchyme of the embryonic avian heart maintained in three-dimensional aggregate culture is stimulated by interaction with the interstitial matrix. Chicken serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1, which stimulates proliferation, induces matrix deposition in regions of the aggregate showing high labeling indices with tritiated thymidine. Dispersed heart mesenchyme interstitial matrix introduced into serum-free culture is incorporated into the aggregate and stimulates cellular proliferation similar to serum or transforming growth factor-beta 1. Proliferation is reversibly inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. It is suggested that transforming growth factor-beta 1 stimulates the production of interstitial matrix and that a sufficient stimulus for proliferation in this system is the presence of the matrix, which acts as the adhesive support for cellular anchorage

  8. Indian hedgehog regulates intestinal stem cell fate through epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinski, C.; Stange, D.E.; Xu, C.; Chan, A.S.; Ho, C.; Yuen, S.T.; Mifflin, R.C.; Powell, D.W.; Clevers, H.; Leung, S.Y.; Chen, X.N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are regulated by the mesenchymal environment via physical interaction and diffusible factors. We examined the role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) in mesenchymal organization and the mechanisms by which perturbations in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions

  9. Soil Fumigant Labels - Methyl Bromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search soil fumigant pesticide labels by EPA registration number, product name, or company, and follow the link to The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  10. Radioactive labelled orgotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The preparation and use of radioactively labelled orgotein, i.e. water-soluble protein congeners in pure, injectable form, is described. This radiopharmaceutical is useful in scintigraphy, especially for visualization of the kidneys where the orgotein is rapidly concentrated. Details of the processes for labelling bovine orgotein with sup(99m)Tc, 60 Co, 125 I or 131 I are specified. The pharmaceutical preparation of the labelled orgotein for intravenous and parenteral administration is also described. Examples using either sup(99m)TC or 125 I-orgotein in scintiscanning dogs' kidneys are given. (UK)

  11. On Online Labeling with Polynomially Many Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babka, Martin; Bulánek, Jan; Cunat, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    be necessary to change the labels of some items; such changes may be done at any time at unit cost for each change. The goal is to minimize the total cost. An alternative formulation of this problem is the file maintenance problem, in which the items, instead of being labeled, are maintained in sorted order...... in an array of length m, and we pay unit cost for moving an item. For the case m = cn for constant c > 1, there are known algorithms that use at most O(n log(n)2) relabelings in total [9], and it was shown recently that this is asymptotically optimal [1]. For the case of m = θ(nC) for C > 1, algorithms...

  12. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  13. Controllable labelling of stem cells with a novel superparamagnetic iron oxide-loaded cationic nanovesicle for MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ruo Mi; Zhang, Fang; Wen, Xue Hua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Cao, Nuo; Wang, Yi Ru; Shuai, Xin Tao [Sun Yat-Sen University, BME Center, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the feasibility of highly efficient and controllable stem cell labelling for cellular MRI. A new class of cationic, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-loaded nanovesicles was synthesised to label rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells without secondary transfection agents. The optimal labelling conditions and controllability were assessed, and the effect of labelling on cell viability, proliferation activity and multilineage differentiation was determined. In 18 rats, focal ischaemic cerebral injury was induced and the rats randomly injected with 1 x 10{sup 6} cells labelled with 0-, 8- or 20-mV nanovesicles (n = 6 each). In vivo MRI was performed to follow grafted cells in contralateral striata, and results were correlated with histology. Optimal cell labelling conditions involved a concentration of 3.15 {mu}g Fe/mL nanovesicles with 20-mV positive charge and 1-h incubation time. Labelling efficiency showed linear change with an increase in the electric potentials of nanovesicles. Labelling did not affect cell viability, proliferation activity or multilineage differentiation capacity. The distribution and migration of labelled cells could be detected by MRI. Histology confirmed that grafted cells retained the label and remained viable. Stem cells can be effectively and safely labelled with cationic, SPION-loaded nanovesicles in a controllable way for cellular MRI. (orig.)

  14. Mesenchymal change and drug resistance in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiditch, Jessica A; Jie, Chunfa; Lautz, Timothy B; Yu, Songtao; Clark, Sandra; Voronov, Dimitry; Chu, Fei; Madonna, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic initiation has many phenotypic similarities to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including loss of cell-cell adhesion, increased invasiveness, and increased cell mobility. We have previously demonstrated that drug resistance is associated with a metastatic phenotype in neuroblastoma (NB). The purpose of this project was to determine if the development of doxorubicin resistance is associated with characteristics of mesenchymal change in human NB cells. Total RNA was isolated from wild type (WT) and doxorubicin-resistant (DoxR) human NB cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C) and analyzed using the Illumina Human HT-12 version 4 Expression BeadChip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Volcano plots and heat maps were generated. Genes of interest with a fold change in expression >1.5 and an adjusted P change via multiple pathways in the transition to a drug-resistant state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  16. Mesenchymal neoplasia and congenital pulmonary cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.G.; Currarino, G.; Moore, G.C.; Votteler, T.P.

    1980-01-01

    A malignant mesenchymoma exibiting a varied spectrum of differentation developed within a congenital pulmonary cyst 6 1/2 years after the cyst was first recognized. Related tumors with a similar gross appearance have been previously described and have included rhabdomyosarcomas and so-called pulmonary blastomas. There is a low but distinct risk for the developement of mesenchymal sarcomas within congenital peripheral pulmonary cysts. (orig.) [de

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell-educated macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Eggenhofer Elke; Hoogduijn Martin J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) mediate their immunosuppressive effects via a variety of mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves the induction of macrophages with immunomodulatory capacities. This effect of MSC may be exploited when MSC are used as a cell therapeutic product. Furthermore, MSC are resident in tissues where they may locally target infiltrating macrophages to adapt more regulatory properties. The present review discusses the interaction between MSC and macrophages, th...

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Angels or Demons?

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Rebecca S. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used in cell-based therapy in various disease conditions such as graft-versus-host and heart diseases, osteogenesis imperfecta, and spinal cord injuries, and the results have been encouraging. However, as MSC therapy gains popularity among practitioners and researchers, there have been reports on the adverse effects of MSCs especially in the context of tumour modulation and malignant transformation. These cells have been found to enhance tumour growth a...

  19. FDA Online Label Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The drug labels and other drug-specific information on this Web site represent the most recent drug listing information companies have submitted to the Food and Drug...

  20. Figuring Out Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It's also displayed in grocery stores near fresh foods, like fruits, vegetables, and fish. The nutrition facts label includes: a ... found in citrus fruits, other fruits, and some vegetables. Food companies might also list the amounts of other ...

  1. Energy efficiency labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This research assesses the likely effects on UK consumers of the proposed EEC energy-efficiency labeling scheme. Unless (or until) an energy-labeling scheme is introduced, it is impossible to do more than postulate its likely effects on consumer behavior. This report shows that there are indeed significant differences in energy consumption between different brands and models of the same appliance of which consumers are unaware. Further, the report suggests that, if a readily intelligible energy-labeling scheme were introduced, it would provide useful information that consumers currently lack; and that, if this information were successfully presented, it would be used and could have substantial effects in reducing domestic fuel consumption. Therefore, it is recommended that an energy labeling scheme be introduced.

  2. Like your labels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off.

  3. Mesenchymal dental stem cells in regenerative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Francisco-Javier; Insausti, Carmen-Luisa; Iniesta, Francisca; Blanquer, Miguel; Ramírez, María-del-Carmen; Meseguer, Luis; Meseguer-Henarejos, Ana-Belén; Marín, Noemí; Martínez, Salvador; Moraleda, José-María

    2012-11-01

    In the last decade, tissue engineering is a field that has been suffering an enormous expansion in the regenerative medicine and dentistry. The use of cells as mesenchymal dental stem cells of easy access for dentist and oral surgeon, immunosuppressive properties, high proliferation and capacity to differentiate into odontoblasts, cementoblasts, osteoblasts and other cells implicated in the teeth, suppose a good perspective of future in the clinical dentistry. However, is necessary advance in the known of growth factors and signalling molecules implicated in tooth development and regeneration of different structures of teeth. Furthermore, these cells need a fabulous scaffold that facility their integration, differentiation, matrix synthesis and promote multiple specific interactions between cells. In this review, we give a brief description of tooth development and anatomy, definition and classification of stem cells, with special attention of mesenchymal stem cells, commonly used in the cellular therapy for their trasdifferentiation ability, non ethical problems and acceptable results in preliminary clinical trials. In terms of tissue engineering, we provide an overview of different types of mesenchymal stem cells that have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs), and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAPs), growth factors implicated in regeneration teeth and types of scaffolds for dental tissue regeneration.

  4. Labelling of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettli, R.; Markard, J.

    2001-01-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents a possible course of action to be taken to provide a means of declaring the sources of electrical power, as is foreseen in the draft of new Swiss electricity market legislation. The report presents the basic ideas behind the idea and defines the terms used such as labelling, certificates and declarations. Also, the legal situation in the European Union and in Switzerland is examined and a quantitative overview of electricity production and consumption is presented. Suggestions for a labelling scheme are made and some of the problems to be expected are looked at. The report also presents a series of examples of labelling schemes already implemented in other countries, such as Austria, Great Britain, Sweden and Germany. Tradable certificates and tracking systems are discussed as are initial quality labels like the Swiss 'Naturemade' label for green power. A concrete recommendation for the declaration and labelling of electricity in Switzerland is presented and various factors to be considered such as import/export, pumped storage, distribution losses, small-scale producers as well as the time-scales for introduction are discussed

  5. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... raising of animals, such as ``no antibiotics administered'' or ``vegetarian fed''; (4) instructional or... Standards and Labeling Policy Book includes animal production claims; omega fatty acid guidance; allergen... inclusion of Country of Origin Labeling on all labels; the production and sale of labels by USDA; developing...

  6. Stereoselective synthesis of stable-isotope-labeled amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Lodwig, S.N. [Centralia College, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    For magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopies to reach their full potential, they must be used in combination with sophisticated site-specific stable isotope labeling of biological macromolecules. Labeled amino acids are required for the study of the structure and function of enzymes and proteins. Because there are 20 common amino acids, each with its own distinguishing chemistry, they remain a synthetic challenge. The Oppolzer chiral auxiliary provides a general tool with which to approach the synthesis of labeled amino acids. By using the Oppolzer auxiliary, amino acids can be constructed from several small molecules, which is ideal for stable isotope labeling. In addition to directing the stereochemistry at the {alpha}-carbon, the camphorsultam can be used for stereo-specific isotope labeling at prochiral centers in amino acids. By using the camphorsultam auxiliary we have the potential to synthesize virtually any isotopomer of all of the common amino acids.

  7. Stereoselective synthesis of stable-isotope-labeled amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkefer, C.J.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III; Lodwig, S.N.

    1994-01-01

    For magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopies to reach their full potential, they must be used in combination with sophisticated site-specific stable isotope labeling of biological macromolecules. Labeled amino acids are required for the study of the structure and function of enzymes and proteins. Because there are 20 common amino acids, each with its own distinguishing chemistry, they remain a synthetic challenge. The Oppolzer chiral auxiliary provides a general tool with which to approach the synthesis of labeled amino acids. By using the Oppolzer auxiliary, amino acids can be constructed from several small molecules, which is ideal for stable isotope labeling. In addition to directing the stereochemistry at the α-carbon, the camphorsultam can be used for stereo-specific isotope labeling at prochiral centers in amino acids. By using the camphorsultam auxiliary we have the potential to synthesize virtually any isotopomer of all of the common amino acids

  8. European consumers and nutrition labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wills, Josephine M.; Grunert, Klaus G.; Celemín, Laura Fernández

    2009-01-01

    Nutrition labelling of food in Europe is not compulsory, unless a nutrition or health claim is made for the product. The European Commission is proposing mandatory nutrition labelling, even front of pack labelling with nutrition information. Yet, how widespread is nutrition labelling in the EU...

  9. Genetic algorithms for map labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Steven Ferdinand van

    2001-01-01

    Map labeling is the cartographic problem of placing the names of features (for example cities or rivers) on the map. A good labeling has no intersections between labels. Even basic versions of the problem are NP-hard. In addition, realistic map-labeling problems deal with many cartographic

  10. Radioactive labelling of peptidic hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromageot, P.; Pradelles, P.; Morgat, J.L.; Levine, H.

    1976-01-01

    The labelling of peptidic hormones requires stability, specificity and sensitivity of the label. Introduction of a radioactive atome is one way to satisfy these criteria. Several processes have been described to prepare radioactive TRF: synthesis of the peptide with labelled aminoacids or introduction of the label into the hormone. In that approach, tritium can be substituted in the imidazole ring, via precursors activating the proper carbon. Monoiodo TRF leads essentially to tritium labelling of the 5 positions whereas monoazo TRF allows the preparation of 3 H TRF labelled in the 2 positions. Di-substituted TRF leads to labelling into the 2 and 5 carbons. Labelled analogs of TRF can be prepared with labelled iodine; further developments of peptide labelling, will be presented. In particular, the homolytic scission of the C-iodine, bond by photochemical activation. The nascent carbon radical can be stabilized by a tritiated scavenger. This approach eliminates the use of heavy metal catalysts

  11. Renal Extra Skeletal Mesenchymal Chondrosarcoma: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Hosseinzadeh, Masood; Sisakhti, Afshin Molaei; Parvin, Vahid Abdol Mohammadi; Sadraei, Amin; Adib, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Primary mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the Kidney is an extremely rare entity and very few cases have been reported in literature. We report a 22-year-old male with a right renal mass; after radical nephrectomy, pathologic examination revealed primary extra skeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma.

  12. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is associated with increased ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... Key words: SMMC-7721, cancer stem cells, side population cells, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition. INTRODUCTION. Invasion and metastasis are the most important biological ..... the metastatic phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells with- ... occludens-1 (ZO-1), and gain mesenchymal molecular.

  13. Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma: an imaging review of ten new patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, N.; Joyama, S.; Araki, N. [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, T.; Yoshikawa, H. [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka (Japan); Beppu, Y. [National Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tokyo (Japan); Tatezaki, S. [Chiba Cancer Center Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chiba (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tokyo (Japan); Nakanishi, K. [Osaka Seamen' s Insurance Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Tomita, Y. [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Osaka (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (EMC) is a rare soft-tissue tumor that most arises in young adults. Because of its rarity, few imaging studies have been reported to date. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the imaging features of this tumor. We conducted a multi-institutional study in cooperation with five referral cancer centers in Japan. Imaging findings of ten new EMC cases, including conventional radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed at each institute, were reviewed along with clinical features. Ten patients with EMC, who had been treated at each hospital from 1990 to 2001, participated in this study. Soft-tissue masses with well-demarcated, dense and granular calcification were most frequently observed on plain radiographs and CT scans. T2-weighted MR images most clearly depicted a two-component structure composed of calcified and uncalcified areas, and enhanced MRI showed inhomogeneous enhancement in both areas. Although the sensitivity and specificity of these findings are unknown, they might be characteristic and have diagnostic value for this rare tumor. (orig.)

  14. Radiopharmaceutical labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop methods of attaching radionuclides to monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments for use in tumor imaging and internal radiation therapy. Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments are of interest because they enable the selective targeting of tumors. The labeled antibodies could be employed as carriers to transport radioisotopes to tumors, thus minimizing total-body radiation dose and radiation damage to normal tissue. Because the time required for labeled antibodies to find the tumor antigen and deliver the dose to the tumor is estimated to be about 1-3 days, radionuclides with a l- to 3-day half-life would be optimum for this purpose. Two of the radionuclides produced at LAMPF, 67 Cu and 77 Br, have the suitable half-life and nuclear-decay properties for use in tumor imaging or therapy with radiolabeled antibodies. These radionuclides and the efforts to prepare radiolabeled antibodies with them are described. We have used three different approaches to meet this objective of labeling antibodies: (1) labeling chelating agents with metal radionuclides, then conjugating the labeled chelating agents to antibodies; (2) conjugating activated chelating agents to antibodies, followed by metalation with metal radionuclides; and (3) radiobrominating small molecules that can be conjugated to antibodies

  15. Mesomere-derived glutamate decarboxylase-expressing blastocoelar mesenchyme cells of sea urchin larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katow

    2013-12-01

    The ontogenetic origin of blastocoelar glutamate decarboxylase (GAD-expressing cells (GADCs in larvae of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus was elucidated. Whole-mount in situ hybridisation (WISH detected transcription of the gene that encodes GAD in H. pulcherrimus (Hp-gad in unfertilised eggs and all blastomeres in morulae. However, at and after the swimming blastula stage, the transcript accumulation was particularly prominent in clumps of ectodermal cells throughout the embryonic surface. During the gastrula stage, the transcripts also accumulated in the endomesoderm and certain blastocoelar cells. Consistent with the increasing number of Hp-gad transcribing cells, immunoblot analysis indicated that the relative abundance of Hp-Gad increased considerably from the early gastrula stage until the prism stage. The expression pattern of GADCs determined by immunohistochemistry was identical to the pattern of Hp-gad transcript accumulation determined using WISH. In early gastrulae, GADCs formed blastocoelar cell aggregates around the blastopore with primary mesenchyme cells. The increase in the number of blastocoelar GADCs was inversely proportional to the number of ectodermal GADCs ranging from a few percent of total GADCs in early gastrulae to 80% in late prism larvae; this depended on ingression of ectodermal GADCs into the blastocoel. Some of the blastocoelar GADCs were fluorescein-positive in the larvae that developed from the 16-cell stage chimeric embryos; these comprised fluorescein-labeled mesomeres and unlabelled macromeres and micromeres. Our finding indicates that some of the blastocoelar GADCs are derived from the mesomeres and thus they are the new group of mesenchyme cells, the tertiary mesenchyme cells.

  16. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M

    2012-08-15

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from "local epithelium", in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, well-characterized mouse lines, Wnt1-Cre and P0-Cre that express Cre recombinase in a NC-specific manner, in combination with two Cre reporter mouse lines, R26R and ZEG, and demonstrate a contribution of NC-derived cells to both tongue mesenchyme and epithelium including taste papillae and taste buds. In tongue mesenchyme, distribution of NC-derived cells is in close association with taste papillae. In tongue epithelium, labeled cells are observed in an initial scattered distribution and progress to a clustered pattern between papillae, and within papillae and early taste buds. This provides evidence for a contribution of NC to lingual epithelium. Together with previous reports for the origin of taste bud cells from local epithelium in postnatal mouse, we propose that NC cells migrate into and reside in the epithelium of the tongue primordium at an early embryonic stage, acquire epithelial cell phenotypes, and undergo cell proliferation and differentiation that is involved in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. Our findings lead to a new concept about derivation of taste bud cells that include a NC origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluorine-18 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijn, J.P. de

    1978-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis deals with the problems involved in the adaption of reactor-produced fluorine-18 to the synthesis of 18 F-labelled organic fluorine compounds. Several 18 F-labelling reagents were prepared and successfully applied. The limitations to the synthetic possibilities of reactor-produced fluoride- 18 become manifest in the last part of the thesis. An application to the synthesis of labelled aliphatic fluoro amino acids has appeared to be unsuccessful as yet, although some other synthetic approaches can be indicated. Seven journal articles (for which see the availability note) are used to compose the four chapters and three appendices. The connecting text gives a survey of known 18 F-compounds and methods for preparing such compounds. (Auth.)

  18. Synthesis of labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, T.W.

    1977-01-01

    Intermediate compounds labeled with 13 C included methane, sodium cyanide, methanol, ethanol, and acetonitrile. A new method for synthesizing 15 N-labeled 4-ethylsulfonyl-1-naphthalene-sulfonamide was developed. Studies were conducted on pathways to oleic-1- 13 C acid and a second pathway investigated was based on carbonation of 8-heptadecynylmagnesium bromide with CO 2 to prepare sterolic acid. Biosynthetic preparations included glucose- 13 C from starch isolated from tobacco leaves following photosynthetic incubation with 13 CO 2 and galactose- 13 C from galactosylglycerol- 13 C from kelp. Research on growth of organisms emphasized photosynthetic growth of algae in which all cellular carbon is labeled. Preliminary experiments were performed to optimize the growth of Escherichia coli on sodium acetate- 13 C

  19. Tooth engineering: searching for dental mesenchymal cells sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia eKeller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The implantation of cultured re-associations between embryonic dental mesenchymal cells and epithelial cells from mouse molars at ED14 allowed making full teeth with crown, root, periodontal ligament fibers and bone. Although representing valuable tools to set up methodologies embryonic cells are not easily available. This work thus aimed to replace the embryonic cells by dental mesenchymal cell lines or cultured expanded embryonic cells, and to test their ability to mediate tooth development in vitro when re-associated with a competent dental epithelium. Histology, immunostaining and RT-PCR allowed getting complementary sets of results. Two different immortalized cell lines from ED18 dental mesenchyme failed in mediating tooth formation. The potentialities of embryonic dental mesenchymal cells decreased from ED14 to ED16 and were lost at ED18. This is likely related to a change in the mesenchymal cell phenotype and/or populations during development. Attempts to cultivate ED14 or ED16 embryonic dental mesenchymal cells prior to re-association led to the loss of their ability to support tooth development. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of Fgf3 transcription. Supplementation of the culture medium with FGF2 allowed restoring Fgf3 expression, but not the ability of mesenchymal cells to engage in tooth formation. Altogether, these observations suggest that a competent cell population exists in the dental mesenchyme at ED14, progressively decreases during development, and cannot as such be maintained in vitro. This study evidenced the need for specific conditions to maintain the ability of dental mesenchymal cells to initiate whole tooth formation, when re-associated with an odontogenic epithelium. Efforts to improve the culture conditions will have to be combined with attempts to characterize the competent cells within the dental mesenchyme.

  20. The Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Caustic Esophagus Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kantarcioglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ingestion of corrosive substances may lead to stricture formation in esophagus as a late complication. Full thickness injury seems to exterminate tissue stem cells of esophagus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into specific cell lineages and have the capacity of homing in sites of injury. Aim and Methods. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of MSC transplantation, on prevention of esophageal damage and stricture formation after caustic esophagus injury in rats. 54 rats were allocated into four groups; 4 rats were sacrificed for MSC production. Group 1, untreated controls (n: 10. Group 2, membrane labeled MSCs-treated rats (n: 20. Group 3, biodistribution of fluorodeoxyglucose labeled MSCs via positron emission tomography (PET imaging (n: 10. Group 4, sham operated (n: 10. Standard caustic esophageal burns were created and MSCs were transplanted 24 hours after. All rats were sacrificed at the 21st days. Results. PET scan images revealed the homing behavior of MSCs to the injury site. The histopathology damage score was not significantly different from controls. However, we demonstrated Dil labeled epithelial and muscle cells which were originating from transplanted MSCs. Conclusion. MSC transplantation after caustic esophageal injury may be a helpful treatment modality; however, probably repeated infusions are needed.

  1. Evidence for Transfer of Membranes from Mesenchymal Stem Cells to HL-1 Cardiac Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Robert A; Geenen, David L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the interaction of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with cardiac HL-1 cells during coculture by fluorescent dye labeling and then flow cytometry. MSC were layered onto confluent HL-1 cell cultures in a 1 : 4 ratio. MSC gained gap junction permeant calcein from HL-1 cells after 4 hours which was partially reduced by oleamide. After 20 hours, 99% MSC gained calcein, unaffected by oleamide. Double-labeling HL-1 cells with calcein and the membrane dye DiO resulted in transfer of both calcein and DiO to MSC. When HL-1 cells were labeled with calcein and MSC with DiO, MSC gained calcein while HL-1 cells gained DiO. Very little fusion was observed since more than 90% Sca-1 positive MSC gained DiO from HL-1 cells while less than 9% gained gap junction impermeant CMFDA after 20 hours with no Sca-1 transfer to HL-1 cells. Time dependent transfer of membrane DiD was observed from HL-1 cells to MSC (100%) and vice versa (50%) after 20 hours with more limited transfer of CMFDA. These results demonstrate that MSC and HL-1 cells exchange membrane components which may account for some of the beneficial effect of MSC in the heart after myocardial infarction.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    10-1-0927 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Nerve Regeneration and Immunomodulation after Composite Tissue Allotransplantation...immunosuppression. Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are pluripotent cells, capable of differentiation along multiple mesenchymal lineages into...As part of implemented transition from University of Pittsburgh to Johns Hopkins University, we optimized our mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) isolation

  3. Environmental Labels and Declarations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Jeppe; Hansen, Lisbeth; Bonou, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    Based on the terminology and structure developed by the International Organization for Standardization, a description is given on the types of ecolabels that build on life cycle assessments. Focus is on type I labels that point out products and services with an overall environmental preferability...... of labelling, the use of ecolabels in marketing, and the way ecolabels help build a market for “greener products”. Type III labels—or Environmental Product Declarations—are also briefly described with indicative examples from the building sector, a declaration for office furniture, and an introduction is given...... to the European Commission’s programme for product—and organisational environmental footprints ....

  4. Semantic Role Labeling

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Martha; Xue, Nianwen

    2011-01-01

    This book is aimed at providing an overview of several aspects of semantic role labeling. Chapter 1 begins with linguistic background on the definition of semantic roles and the controversies surrounding them. Chapter 2 describes how the theories have led to structured lexicons such as FrameNet, VerbNet and the PropBank Frame Files that in turn provide the basis for large scale semantic annotation of corpora. This data has facilitated the development of automatic semantic role labeling systems based on supervised machine learning techniques. Chapter 3 presents the general principles of applyin

  5. Biodistribution of Liver-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Peripheral Injection in a Hemophilia A Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Etienne M; Lombard, Catherine Anne; Roelants, Véronique; Najimi, Mustapha; Varma, Sharat; Sargiacomo, Camillo; Ravau, Joachim; Mazza, Giuseppe; Jamar, François; Versavau, Julia; Jacobs, Vanessa; Jacquemin, Marc; Eeckhoudt, Stéphane; Lambert, Catherine; Stéphenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Hermans, Cédric

    2017-08-01

    With the exception of liver transplantation, there is no cure for hemophilia, which is currently managed by preemptive replacement therapy. Liver-derived stem cells are in clinical development for inborn and acquired liver diseases and could represent a curative treatment for hemophilia A. The liver is a major factor VIII (FVIII) synthesis site, and mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to control joint bleeding in animal models of hemophilia. Adult-derived human liver stem cells (ADHLSCs) have mesenchymal characteristics and have been shown able to engraft in and repopulate both animal and human livers. Thus, the objectives were to evaluate the potency of ADHLSCs to control bleeding in a hemophilia A patient and assess the biodistribution of the cells after intravenous injection. A patient suffering from hemophilia A was injected with repeated doses of ADHLSCs via a peripheral vein (35 million In-oxine-labeled cells, followed by 125 million cells the next day, and 3 infusions of 250 million cells every 2 weeks thereafter; total infusion period, 50 days). After cell therapy, we found a temporary (15 weeks) decrease in the patient's FVIII requirements and severe bleeding complications, despite a lack of increase in circulating FVIII. The cells were safely administered to the patient via a peripheral vein. Biodistribution analysis revealed an initial temporary entrapment of the cells in the lungs, followed by homing to the liver and to a joint afflicted with hemarthrosis. These results suggest the potential use of ADHLSCs in the treatment of hemophilia A.

  6. Intracardiac heterotopia--mesenchymal and endodermal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, S; Rafel, E; Castillo, J A; Garcia-Canton, J A

    1978-01-01

    A case is reported of an intracardiac 'epithelial heterotopia' with a predominant mesenchymal component. This is thought to have resulted from the differentiation of aberrant primitive cell(s) displaced into the heart during its development. Though microscopically resembling a myxoma, this lesion is clearly distinguished by the presence of glandular structures. The myxoid component exhibited a startling invasiveness which resulted in occlusion of the superior vena cava, causing symptoms very early in life and death at the age of 6 months. Images PMID:637987

  7. Synthesis of specifically 15N- and 13C-labeled antitumor (2-Haloethyl)nitrosoureas. The study of their conformations in solution by nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance and evidence for stereoelectronic control in their aqueous decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lown, J.W.; Chauhan, S.M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of certain specifically 15 N, 13 C, and 2 H isotope labeled 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-alkyl-1-nitrosoureas (CENUs) is described. Spectroscopic examination of CENUs and their isotope-labeled counterparts by 1 H, 15 N, and 13 C NMR and infrared spectra indicates that they adopt preferred conformations in nonpolar aprotic solvents in which the NO group is aligned toward the 2-chloroethyl group. The result is in accord with the conformation of MeCCNU in the crystalline state derived from X-ray diffraction. The chemical shifts and coupling constants in the CENUs change with both solvent polarity and basicity. In aqueous phosphate buffer there is evidence for the formation of a tetrahedral intermediate, the conformation of which alters according to the reaction conditions and ultimately controls the formation of the aqueous decomposition products of CENUs. This is revealed most clearly by 13 C NMR of carbonyl- 13 C- and nitroso- 15 N-labeled BCNU and CCNU where two distinct 15 N-coupled 13 C doublets with different chemical shifts are observed. The rate of conformational change is comparable with the rate of decomposition of CENUs (via the second conformer) and may therefore represent the critical initial step of the latter process in vivo. The intermediacy of the postulated tetrahedral intermediates for CENUs is supported by observed 18 O exchange into the carbonyl group in 18 O-enriched water. Consideration of the conformations of the intermediates and of the alignment of the heteroatom lone pairs provides a satisfactory interpretation of the reactions of CENUs in aqueous solution as well as their pH dependence in terms of strict steroelectronic control and accounts for the formation of the observed products

  8. Advances in stable isotope assisted labeling strategies with information science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigawa, Takanori

    2017-08-15

    Stable-isotope (SI) labeling of proteins is an essential technique to investigate their structures, interactions or dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The assignment of the main-chain signals, which is the fundamental first step in these analyses, is usually achieved by a sequential assignment method based on triple resonance experiments. Independently of the triple resonance experiment-based sequential assignment, amino acid-selective SI labeling is beneficial for discriminating the amino acid type of each signal; therefore, it is especially useful for the signal assignment of difficult targets. Various combinatorial selective labeling schemes have been developed as more sophisticated labeling strategies. In these strategies, amino acids are represented by combinations of SI labeled samples, rather than simply assigning one amino acid to one SI labeled sample as in the case of conventional amino acid-selective labeling. These strategies have proven to be useful for NMR analyses of difficult proteins, such as those in large complex systems, in living cells, attached or integrated into membranes, or with poor solubility. In this review, recent advances in stable isotope assisted labeling strategies will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells versus adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Fernandes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have confirmed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be used for treatment of several nervous system diseases. However, isolation of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs is an invasive and painful process and the yield is very low. Therefore, there is a need to search for other alterative stem cell sources. Adipose-derived MSCs (ADSCs have phenotypic and gene expression profiles similar to those of BMSCs. The production of ADSCs is greater than that of BMSCs, and ADSCs proliferate faster than BMSCs. To compare the effects of venous grafts containing BMSCs or ADSCs on sciatic nerve injury, in this study, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (only sciatic nerve exposed, Matrigel (MG; sciatic nerve injury + intravenous transplantation of MG vehicle, ADSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing ADSCs, and BMSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing BMSCs groups. Sciatic functional index was calculated to evaluate the function of injured sciatic nerve. Morphologic characteristics of nerves distal to the lesion were observed by toluidine blue staining. Spinal motor neurons labeled with Fluoro-Gold were quantitatively assessed. Compared with sham-operated rats, sciatic functional index was lower, the density of small-diameter fibers was significantly increased, and the number of motor neurons significantly decreased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. Neither ADSCs nor BMSCs significantly improved the sciatic nerve function of rats with sciatic nerve injury, increased fiber density, fiber diameters, axonal diameters, myelin sheath thickness, and G ratios (axonal diameter/fiber diameter ratios in the sciatic nerve distal to the lesion site. There was no significant difference in the number of spinal motor neurons among ADSCs, BMSCs and MG groups. These results suggest that neither BMSCs nor ADSCs provide satisfactory results for peripheral nerve repair when using MG as the conductor for

  10. Competing Environmental Labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Carolyn; Lyon, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    We study markets in which consumers prefer green products but cannot determine the environmental quality of any given firm's product on their own. A nongovernmental organization (NGO) can establish a voluntary standard and label products that comply with it. Alternatively, industry can create its

  11. The Language of Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Darcy

    2005-01-01

    The author describes how the language of labels and her own cultural biases affect how she approaches teaching her students with disabilities. The author examines how the mythopoetic narratives of our past force us to examine the underlying assumptions of our culture that are expressed within our language and how understanding our own linguistic…

  12. Labeling of Cosmetic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Lionetti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The labeling of cosmetic products provides a set of obligations, as reported in the Regulation 1223/2009, which came into force in Europe in July 2013. The indications reported on the label are intended to enable the clear identification of the functionality and proper use of cosmetics, ensure the protection of the consumer from the commercial aspects and, above all, from the safety point of view. Moreover, it should allow quick tracing of the product details and all info of toxicological relevance. However, the misuse of this tool often leads, on one side, to confusion among cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and biocides. On the other side, it gives rise to fanciful interpretations by a huge number of web users, who pretend to be able to judge the quality of a cosmetic product just by reading the ingredients list. This article points out the concrete purpose of cosmetic labels, in order to shed light on the use of certain categories of ‘controversial’ ingredients and on the real quality concepts of cosmetic products. Indeed, when properly interpreted, cosmetic labels represent a good tool for the professional investigation of adverse reactions to cosmetics.

  13. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page 7, Label Training, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  14. Bone Marrow Regeneration Promoted by Biophysically Sorted Osteoprogenitors From Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as “cell factories” that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies. PMID:25411477

  15. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  16. Strain and Vibration in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke McClarren

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into any mesenchymal tissue, including bone, cartilage, muscle, and fat. MSC differentiation can be influenced by a variety of stimuli, including environmental and mechanical stimulation, scaffold physical properties, or applied loads. Numerous studies have evaluated the effects of vibration or cyclic tensile strain on MSCs towards developing a mechanically based method of differentiation, but there is no consensus between studies and each investigation uses different culture conditions, which also influence MSC fate. Here we present an overview of the response of MSCs to vibration and cyclic tension, focusing on the effect of various culture conditions and strain or vibration parameters. Our review reveals that scaffold type (e.g., natural versus synthetic; 2D versus 3D can influence cell response to vibration and strain to the same degree as loading parameters. Hence, in the efforts to use mechanical loading as a reliable method to differentiate cells, scaffold selection is as important as method of loading.

  17. Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A rare case of histologically proven placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD with fetal omphalocele in a 22-year-old patient is reported. Material and Methods. Antenatal ultrasound of this patient showed hydropic placenta with a live fetus of 17 weeks period of gestation associated with omphalocele. Cordocentesis detected the diploid karyotype of the fetus. Patient, when prognosticated, choose to terminate the pregnancy in view of high incidence of fetal and placental anomalies. Subsequent histopathological examination of placenta established the diagnosis to be placental mesenchymal dysplasia. Conclusion. On clinical and ultrasonic grounds, suspicion of P.M.D. arises when hydropic placenta with a live fetus presents in second trimester of pregnancy. Cordocentesis can detect the diploid karyotype of the fetus in such cases. As this condition is prognostically better than triploid partial mole, continuation of pregnancy can sometimes be considered after through antenatal screening and patient counseling. However, a definite diagnosis of P.M.D. is made only on placental histology by absence of trophoblast hyperplasia and trophoblastic inclusions.

  18. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells influence early tendon-healing in a rabbit achilles tendon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alphonsus K S; Ang, Abel D; Goh, James C H; Hui, James H P; Lim, Aymeric Y T; Lee, Eng Hin; Lim, Beng Hai

    2007-01-01

    A repaired tendon needs to be protected for weeks until it has accrued enough strength to handle physiological loads. Tissue-engineering techniques have shown promise in the treatment of tendon and ligament defects. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells can accelerate tendon-healing after primary repair of a tendon injury in a rabbit model. Fifty-seven New Zealand White rabbits were used as the experimental animals, and seven others were used as the source of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The injury model was a sharp complete transection through the midsubstance of the Achilles tendon. The transected tendon was immediately repaired with use of a modified Kessler suture and a running epitendinous suture. Both limbs were used, and each side was randomized to receive either bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a fibrin carrier or fibrin carrier alone (control). Postoperatively, the rabbits were not immobilized. Specimens were harvested at one, three, six, and twelve weeks for analysis, which included evaluation of gross morphology (sixty-two specimens), cell tracing (twelve specimens), histological assessment (forty specimens), immunohistochemistry studies (thirty specimens), morphometric analysis (forty specimens), and mechanical testing (sixty-two specimens). There were no differences between the two groups with regard to the gross morphology of the tendons. The fibrin had degraded by three weeks. Cell tracing showed that labeled bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable and present in the intratendinous region for at least six weeks, becoming more diffuse at later time-periods. At three weeks, collagen fibers appeared more organized and there were better morphometric nuclear parameters in the treatment group (p tendon repair can improve histological and biomechanical parameters in the early stages of tendon-healing.

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Antineoplastic Drug Loading and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, Francesco; Rimoldi, Isabella; Rizzo, Stefania; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2017-11-23

    Mesenchymal stromal cells are a population of undifferentiated multipotent adult cells possessing extensive self-renewal properties and the potential to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal lineage cells. They express broad anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity on the immune system and after transplantation can interact with the surrounding microenvironment, promoting tissue healing and regeneration. For this reason, mesenchymal stromal cells have been widely used in regenerative medicine, both in preclinical and clinical settings. Another clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells is the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to neoplastic cells, maximizing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells and minimizing collateral damage to non-neoplastic tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells are home to the stroma of several primary and metastatic neoplasms and hence can be used as vectors for targeted delivery of antineoplastic drugs to the tumour microenvironment, thereby reducing systemic toxicity and maximizing antitumour effects. Paclitaxel and gemcitabine are the chemotherapeutic drugs best loaded by mesenchymal stromal cells and delivered to neoplastic cells, whereas other agents, like pemetrexed, are not internalized by mesenchymal stromal cells and therefore are not suitable for advanced antineoplastic therapy. This review focuses on the state of the art of advanced antineoplastic cell therapy and its future perspectives, emphasizing in vitro and in vivo preclinical results and future clinical applications.

  20. PHD-2 Suppression in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Enhances Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sae Hee; Nauta, Allison C; Morrison, Shane D; Hu, Michael S; Zimmermann, Andrew S; Chung, Michael T; Glotzbach, Jason P; Wong, Victor W; Walmsley, Graham G; Peter Lorenz, H; Chan, Denise A; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Giaccia, Amato J; Longaker, Michael T

    2018-01-01

    Cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells is a promising strategy for tissue repair. Restoration of blood flow to ischemic tissues is a key step in wound repair, and mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to be proangiogenic. Angiogenesis is critically regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) superfamily, consisting of transcription factors targeted for degradation by prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)-2. The aim of this study was to enhance the proangiogenic capability of mesenchymal stromal cells and to use these modified cells to promote wound healing. Mesenchymal stromal cells harvested from mouse bone marrow were transduced with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against PHD-2; control cells were transduced with scrambled shRNA (shScramble) construct. Gene expression quantification, human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation assays, and wound healing assays were used to assess the effect of PHD knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells on wound healing dynamics. PHD-2 knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells overexpressed HIF-1α and multiple angiogenic factors compared to control (p cells treated with conditioned medium from PHD-2 knockdown mesenchymal stromal cells exhibited increased formation of capillary-like structures and enhanced migration compared with human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with conditioned medium from shScramble-transduced mesenchymal stromal cells (p cells healed at a significantly accelerated rate compared with wounds treated with shScramble mesenchymal stromal cells (p cells (p cells augments their proangiogenic potential in wound healing therapy. This effect appears to be mediated by overexpression of HIF family transcription factors and up-regulation of multiple downstream angiogenic factors.

  1. Spin labels. Applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frangopol, T.P.; Frangopol, M.; Ionescu, S.M.; Pop, I.V.; Benga, G.

    1980-11-01

    The main applications of spin labels in the study of biomembranes, enzymes, nucleic acids, in pharmacology, spin immunoassay are reviewed along with the fundamentals of the spin label method. 137 references. (author)

  2. Dynamic multiphoton imaging of acellular dermal matrix scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells in diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jing; Shi, Panpan; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Jin, Ying; Liu, Hao; Chen, Maosheng; Han, Xue; Liu, Hanping

    2018-03-25

    Significantly effective therapies need to be developed for chronic nonhealing diabetic wounds. In this work, the topical transplantation of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded on an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) scaffold is proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic cutaneous wound healing. GFP-labeled MSCs were cocultured with an ADM scaffold that was decellularized from normal mouse skin. These cultures were subsequently transplanted as a whole into the full-thickness cutaneous wound site in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Wounds treated with MSC-ADM demonstrated an increased percentage of wound closure. The treatment of MSC-ADM also greatly increased angiogenesis and rapidly completed the reepithelialization of newly formed skin on diabetic mice. More importantly, multiphoton microscopy was used for the intravital and dynamic monitoring of collagen type I (Col-I) fibers synthesis via second harmonic generation imaging. The synthesis of Col-I fibers during diabetic wound healing is of great significance for revealing wound repair mechanisms. In addition, the activity of GFP-labeled MSCs during wound healing was simultaneously traced via two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging. Our research offers a novel advanced nonlinear optical imaging method for monitoring the diabetic wound healing process while the ADM and MSCs interact in situ. Schematic of dynamic imaging of ADM scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells in diabetic wound healing using multiphoton microscopy. PMT, photo-multiplier tube. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Human Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells plasticity augments scar-free skin wound healing with hair growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sabapathy

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising candidate for cell-based transplantation and regenerative medicine therapies. Thus in the present study Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells (WJ-MSCs have been derived from extra embryonic umbilical cord matrix following removal of both arteries and vein. Also, to overcome the clinical limitations posed by fetal bovine serum (FBS supplementation because of xenogeneic origin of FBS, usual FBS cell culture supplement has been replaced with human platelet lysate (HPL. Apart from general characteristic features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, wharton jelly-derived MSCs have the ability to maintain phenotypic attributes, cell growth kinetics, cell cycle pattern, in vitro multilineage differentiation plasticity, apoptotic pattern, normal karyotype-like intrinsic mesenchymal stem cell properties in long-term in vitro cultures. Moreover, the WJ-MSCs exhibited the in vitro multilineage differentiation capacity by giving rise to differentiated cells of not only mesodermal lineage but also to the cells of ectodermal and endodermal lineage. Also, WJ-MSC did not present any aberrant cell state upon in vivo transplantation in SCID mice and in vitro soft agar assays. The immunomodulatory potential assessed by gene expression levels of immunomodulatory factors upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines in the fetal WJ-MSCs was relatively higher compared to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs. WJ-MSCs seeded on decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold transplantation on the skin injury of SCID mice model demonstrates that combination of WJ-MSCs and decellularized amniotic membrane scaffold exhibited significantly better wound-healing capabilities, having reduced scar formation with hair growth and improved biomechanical properties of regenerated skin compared to WJ-MSCs alone. Further, our experimental data indicate that indocyanin green (ICG at optimal concentration can be resourcefully used for labeling of stem cells

  4. Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the carotid space: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Sun; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja; Park, Ji Sang; Jeong, Sun Hye

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a commonly encountered malignant cartilaginous tumor. However, only 1% of chondrosarcomas arise in the extraskeletal region. The pathologic types of this tumor include mesenchymal, myxoid, and low grade. A mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant cartilaginous tumor that is rarely encountered, and it shows similar imaging features to other malignant soft-tissue tumors. Here, we report a mesenchymal chondrosarcoma presenting as a palpable mass in the neck, arising in the carotid space, which is also known as the retrostyloid parapharyngeal space.

  5. Extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the carotid space: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Sun; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja; Park, Ji Sang; Jeong, Sun Hye [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Chondrosarcoma is a commonly encountered malignant cartilaginous tumor. However, only 1% of chondrosarcomas arise in the extraskeletal region. The pathologic types of this tumor include mesenchymal, myxoid, and low grade. A mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a rare, highly malignant cartilaginous tumor that is rarely encountered, and it shows similar imaging features to other malignant soft-tissue tumors. Here, we report a mesenchymal chondrosarcoma presenting as a palpable mass in the neck, arising in the carotid space, which is also known as the retrostyloid parapharyngeal space.

  6. Mesenchymal Tumors of the Breast: Imaging and the Histopathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bo Mi; Kim, Eun Kyung; You, Jae Kyoung; Kim, Yee Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Various benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors can occur in the breast. Most radiologists are unfamiliar with the imaging features of these tumors and the imaging features have not been described in the radiologic literature. It is important that radiologists should be familiar with the broad spectrum of imaging features of rare mesenchymal breast tumors. In this pictorial review, we demonstrate the sonographic findings and the corresponding pathologic findings of various mesenchymal tumors of the breast as defined by the World Health Organization classification system

  7. Modeling the effects of labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Fjord, Thomas Ahle; Poulsen, Carsten Stig

    A new approach to evaluate the consequences of labeling is presented and applied to test the potential effect of a label on fresh fish. Labeling effects on quality perceptions and overall quality are studied. The empirical study is based on an experimental design and nearly 500 respondents...

  8. Tracking and Functional Characterization of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Mesenchymal Tumor Cells During Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscetti, Marcus; Quach, Bill; Dadashian, Eman L.; Mulholland, David J.; Wu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been postulated as a mechanism by which cancer cells acquire the invasive and stem-like traits necessary for distant metastasis. However, direct in vivo evidence for the role of EMT in the formation of cancer stem-like cells (CSC) and the metastatic cascade remains lacking. Here we report the first isolation and characterization of mesenchymal and EMT tumor cells, which harbor both epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics, in an autochthonous murine model of prostate cancer. By crossing the established Pb-Cre+/−;PtenL/L;KrasG12D/+ prostate cancer model with a vimentin-GFP reporter strain, generating CPKV mice, we were able to isolate epithelial, EMT and mesenchymal cancer cells based on expression of vimentin and EpCAM. CPKV mice (but not mice with Pten deletion alone) exhibited expansion of cells with EMT (EpCAM+/Vim-GFP+) and mesenchymal (EpCAM−/Vim-GFP+) characteristics at the primary tumor site and in circulation. These EMT and mesenchymal tumor cells displayed enhanced stemness and invasive character compared to epithelial tumor cells. Moreover, they displayed an enriched tumor-initiating capacity and could regenerate epithelial glandular structures in vivo, indicative of epithelia-mesenchyme plasticity. Interestingly, while mesenchymal tumor cells could persist in circulation and survive in the lung following intravenous injection, only epithelial and EMT tumor cells could form macrometastases. Our work extends the evidence that mesenchymal and epithelial states in cancer cells contribute differentially to their capacities for tumor initiation and metastatic seeding, respectively, and that EMT tumor cells exist with plasticity that can contribute to multiple stages of the metastatic cascade. PMID:25948589

  9. Isotopically labelled benzodiazepines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebman, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the benzodiazepines which are a class of therapeutic agents. Improvements in the analytical methodology in the areas of biochemistry and pharmacology were significant, particularly in the application of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. In addition, the discovery and subsequent development of tritium and carbon-14 as an analytical tool in the biological sciences were essentially post-world war II phenomena. Thus, as these new chemical entities were found to be biologically active, they could be prepared in labeled form for metabolic study, biological half-life determination (pharmacokinetics), tissue distribution study, etc. This use of tracer methodology has been liberally applied to the benzodiazepines and also more recently to the study of receptor-ligand interactions, in which tritium, carbon-11 or fluorine-18 isotopes have been used. The history of benzodiazepines as medicinal agents is indeed an interesting one; an integral part of that history is their use in just about every conceivable labeled form

  10. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori, E-mail: kigawa@riken.jp [RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center (QBiC), Laboratory for Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as “encoding and decoding” processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells.

  11. Stable isotope labeling strategy based on coding theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Koshiba, Seizo; Yokoyama, Jun; Kigawa, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for stable isotope-aided protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis, called stable isotope encoding. The basic idea of this strategy is that amino-acid selective labeling can be considered as “encoding and decoding” processes, in which the information of amino acid type is encoded by the stable isotope labeling ratio of the corresponding residue and it is decoded by analyzing NMR spectra. According to the idea, the strategy can diminish the required number of labelled samples by increasing information content per sample, enabling discrimination of 19 kinds of non-proline amino acids with only three labeled samples. The idea also enables this strategy to combine with information technologies, such as error detection by check digit, to improve the robustness of analyses with low quality data. Stable isotope encoding will facilitate NMR analyses of proteins under non-ideal conditions, such as those in large complex systems, with low-solubility, and in living cells

  12. Mobility and height detection of particle labels in an optical evanescent wave biosensor with single-label resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ommering, Kim; Koets, Marjo; Schleipen, Jean J H B; Prins, Menno W J [Philips Research Laboratories, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Somers, Philip A; Van IJzendoorn, Leo J, E-mail: menno.prins@philips.co [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-04-21

    Particle labels are used in biosensors to detect the presence and concentration of analyte molecules. In this paper we demonstrate an optical technique to measure the mobility and height of bound particle labels on a biosensor surface with single-label resolution. The technique is based on the detection of the particle-induced light scattering in an optical evanescent field. We show that the thermal particle motion in the optical evanescent field leads to intensity fluctuations that can accurately be detected. The technique is demonstrated using 290 bp (99 nm) DNA as an analyte and using polystyrene particles and magnetic particles with diameters between 500 and 1000 nm as labels. The particle intensity histograms show that quantitative height measurements are obtained for particles with uniform optical properties, and the intensity versus position plots reflect the analyte-antibody orientation and the analyte flexibility. The novel optical detection technique will lead to biosensors with very high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are clonogenic, non-haematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages e.g. osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages e.g. neuronal-like cells. Several methods...... are currently available for isolation of the mesenchymal stem cells based on their physical and immunological characteristics. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, mesenchymal stem cells are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Recent...... studies have demonstrated that the life span of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro can be extended by increasing the levels of telomerase expression in the cells and thus allowing culture of large number of cells needed for therapy. In addition, it has been shown that it is possible to culture the cells...

  14. Research on human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research on human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells transfected with pIRES2-EGFP-VEGF165 using liposome. ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  15. Cryopreservation and revival of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising and innovative new treatment for different degenerative and autoimmune diseases, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow have demonstrated great therapeutic potential due to their immunosuppressive and regenerative capacities. The establishment ...

  16. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    initiated. As there has been a precedent for the use of bone marrow stem cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies and ischemic heart diseases through randomized clinical safety and efficacy trials, the development of new therapies based on culture-expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs......Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have been......) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...

  17. Receptor control in mesenchymal stem cell engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Matthew J.; García, Andrés J.; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel

    2018-03-01

    Materials science offers a powerful tool to control mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) growth and differentiation into functional phenotypes. A complex interplay between the extracellular matrix and growth factors guides MSC phenotypes in vivo. In this Review, we discuss materials-based bioengineering approaches to direct MSC fate in vitro and in vivo, mimicking cell-matrix-growth factor crosstalk. We first scrutinize MSC-matrix interactions and how the properties of a material can be tailored to support MSC growth and differentiation in vitro, with an emphasis on MSC self-renewal mechanisms. We then highlight important growth factor signalling pathways and investigate various materials-based strategies for growth factor presentation and delivery. Integrin-growth factor crosstalk in the context of MSC engineering is introduced, and bioinspired material designs with the potential to control the MSC niche phenotype are considered. Finally, we summarize important milestones on the road to MSC engineering for regenerative medicine.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Angels or Demons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Y. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been used in cell-based therapy in various disease conditions such as graft-versus-host and heart diseases, osteogenesis imperfecta, and spinal cord injuries, and the results have been encouraging. However, as MSC therapy gains popularity among practitioners and researchers, there have been reports on the adverse effects of MSCs especially in the context of tumour modulation and malignant transformation. These cells have been found to enhance tumour growth and metastasis in some studies and have been related to anticancer-drug resistance in other instances. In addition, various studies have also reported spontaneous malignant transformation of MSCs. The mechanism of the modulatory behaviour and the tumorigenic potential of MSCs, warrant urgent exploration, and the use of MSCs in patients with cancer awaits further evaluation. However, if MSCs truly play a role in tumour modulation, they can also be potential targets of cancer treatment.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells: angels or demons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used in cell-based therapy in various disease conditions such as graft-versus-host and heart diseases, osteogenesis imperfecta, and spinal cord injuries, and the results have been encouraging. However, as MSC therapy gains popularity among practitioners and researchers, there have been reports on the adverse effects of MSCs especially in the context of tumour modulation and malignant transformation. These cells have been found to enhance tumour growth and metastasis in some studies and have been related to anticancer-drug resistance in other instances. In addition, various studies have also reported spontaneous malignant transformation of MSCs. The mechanism of the modulatory behaviour and the tumorigenic potential of MSCs, warrant urgent exploration, and the use of MSCs in patients with cancer awaits further evaluation. However, if MSCs truly play a role in tumour modulation, they can also be potential targets of cancer treatment.

  20. Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Medici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT is a fundamental cellular mechanism that regulates embryonic development and diseases such as cancer and fibrosis. Recent developments in biomedical research have shown remarkable potential to harness the EndMT process for tissue engineering and regeneration. As an alternative to traditional or artificial stem cell therapies, EndMT may represent a safe method for engineering new tissues to treat degenerative diseases by mimicking a process that occurs in nature. This review discusses the signaling mechanisms and therapeutic inhibitors of EndMT, as well as the role of EndMT in development, disease, acquiring stem cell properties and generating connective tissues, and its potential as a novel mechanism for tissue regeneration.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for laryngotracheal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kathrine Kronberg; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David H

    2017-01-01

    studies addressing the effect of MSC therapy on the airway. We assessed effect on inflammation, fibrosis, and MSC as a component in tissue engineering for treating defects in the airway. RESULTS: We identified eleven studies (n = 256 animals) from eight countries evaluating the effect of MSCs......BACKGROUND: Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) can be either congenital or acquired. Laryngeal stenosis is most often encountered after prolonged intubation. The mechanism for stenosis following intubation is believed to be hypertrophic scarring. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy has shown...... promising results in regenerative medicine. We aimed to systematically review the literature on MSC therapy for stenosis of the conductive airways. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched from January 1980-January 2017 with the purpose of identifying all...

  2. Review of nutrition labeling formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, C J; Wyse, B W; Parent, C R; Hansen, R G

    1991-07-01

    This article examines nutrition labeling history as well as the findings of nine research studies of nutrition labeling formats. Nutrition labeling regulations were announced in 1973 and have been periodically amended since then. In response to requests from consumers and health care professionals for revision of the labeling system, the Food and Drug Administration initiated a three-phase plan for reform of nutrition labeling in 1990. President Bush signed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act in November 1990. Literature analysis revealed that only nine studies with an experimental design have focused on nutrition labeling since 1971. Four were conducted before 1975, which was the year that nutrition labeling was officially implemented, two were conducted in 1980, and three were conducted after 1986. Only two of the nine studies supported the traditional label format mandated by the Code of Federal Regulations, and one study partially supported it. Four of the nine studies that evaluated graphic presentations of nutrition information found that consumer comprehension of nutrition information was improved with a graphic format for nutrition labeling: three studies supported the use of bar graphs and one study supported the use of a pie chart. Full disclosure (ie, complete nutrient and ingredient labeling) was preferred by consumers in two of the three studies that examined this variable. The third study supported three types of information disclosure dependent upon socioeconomic class. In those studies that tested graphics, a bar graph format was significantly preferred and showed better consumer comprehension than the traditional format.

  3. Linerless label device and method

    KAUST Repository

    Binladen, Abdulkari

    2016-01-14

    This apparatus and method for applying a linerless label to an end user product includes a device with a printer for printing on a face surface of a linerless label, and a release coat applicator for applying a release coat to the face surface of the label; another device including an unwinder unit (103) to unwind a roll of printed linerless label; a belt (108); a glue applicator (102) for applying glue to the belt; a nip roller (106) for contacting and applying pressure to the face surface of the linerless label such that the glue on the belt transfers to the back surface of the linerless label; at least one slitting knife 105) positioned downstream the belt and a rewinder unit (104) positioned downstream the slitting knife; and a third device which die cuts and applies the linerless label to an end user object.

  4. Primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy in a preterm infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Joseph; Lara-Corrales, Irene; Cammisuli, Salvatore; Somers, Gino R; Pope, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy is a recently recognized entity that has been added to the differential diagnosis of myxoid tumors of the soft tissue. Few cases have been reported of this entity in the literature, but none presenting in a preterm infant. We present the case and clinical course of a preterm boy with a primitive myxoid mesenchymal tumor of infancy that occurred following excision of a congenital juvenile xanthogranuloma. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Montero-Menei, C.; Menei, P. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Cellular Vehicles for Delivery of Nanoparticles to Brain Tumors. Biomaterials 2010, 31, 8393... Stem Cells : Considerations for Regenerative Medicine Approaches. Tissue Eng. Part B. Rev. 2010, 16, 159–168. 55. Ellem, S. J.; Taylor, R. a.; Furic, L...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0304 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell -Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs CONTRACTING

  6. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the orbit: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.T., E-mail: cjr.yangbentao@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Wang, Y.Z.; Wang, X.Y.; Wang, Z.C. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To describe the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of orbital mesenchymal chondrosarcomas (MCSs). Materials and methods: Six patients with histology-confirmed MCSs of the orbit were retrospectively reviewed. All six patients underwent CT and MRI. Imaging studies were evaluated for the following: (a) tumour location, (b) configuration, size, and margin, (c) CT attenuation and MRI signal intensity, and (d) secondary manifestations. Additionally, the time-intensity curve (TIC) of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI were analysed in five patients. Results: Two MCSs arose in the right orbit and four in the left orbit. Five MCSs were located in the retrobulbar intraconal space and one in the extraconal space. All the lesions displayed a lobulate configuration and had a well-defined margin. The mean maximum diameter was 25.8 mm (range 15-36 mm). On unenhanced CT, the lesions appeared isodense to grey matter in six patients, with calcifications in five. Two patients showed inhomogeneous, moderate enhancement on enhanced CT. Six MCSs appeared isointense on T1-weighted imaging and heterogeneously isointense on T2-weighted imaging. The lesions showed significantly heterogeneous contrast enhancement. Five patients had DCE MRI and the TICs showed a rapidly enhancing and rapid washout pattern (type III). The following features were also detected: compression of the extra-ocular muscle (six patients, 100%); displacement of the optic nerve (five patients, 83.3%); and encasing globe (three patients, 50%). Conclusions: A well-defined, lobulate orbital mass with calcification on CT and, marked heterogeneous enhancement and type III TIC on MRI are highly suspicious of orbital MCSs.

  7. Labelled compounds. (Pt. B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncel, E.; Jones, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Since the end of World War II there has been a tremendous increase in the number of compounds that have been synthesized with radioactive or stable isotopes. They have found application in many diverse fields, so much so, that hardly a single area in pure and applied science has not benefited. Not surprisingly it has been reflected in appearance of related publications. The early proceedings of the Symposia on Advances in Trace Methodology were soon followed by various Euratom sponsored meetings in which methods of preparing and storing labelled compounds featured prominently. In due course a resurgence of interest in stable isotopes, brought about by their greater availability (also lower cost) and partly by development of new techniques such as gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (gc-ms), led to the publication of proceedings of several successful conferences. More recently conferences dealing with the synthesis and applications of isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds have been established on a regular basis. In addition to the proceedings of conferences and journal publications individuals left their mark by producing definitive texts, usually on specific nuclides. Only the classic two volume publication of Murray and Williams (Organic syntheses with isotopes, New York 1985), now over 30 years old and out of print, attempted to do justice to several nuclides. With the large amount of work that has been undertaken since then it seems unlikely that an updated edition could be produced. The alternative strategy was to ask scientists currently active to review specific areas and this is the approach adopted in the present series of monographs. In this way it is intended to cover the broad advances that have been made in the synthesis and applications of isotopes and isotopically labelled compounds in the physical and biomedical sciences. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  8. From Label to Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrkjeflot, Haldor; Strandgaard, Jesper; Svejenova, Silviya

    2013-01-01

    because NNC was conceived as an identity movement, triggered by active involvement of entrepreneurial leaders from the culinary profession, high-profile political supporters, legitimating scientists, disseminating media, and interpreting audiences. It was facilitated by three mechanisms: First, the use......This article examines the process of creation of new Nordic cuisine (NNC) as a culinary innovation, focusing on the main stages, actors, and mechanisms that shaped the new label and its practices and facilitated its diffusion in the region and internationally. Fast-paced diffusion was possible...

  9. MRI evaluation of frequent complications after intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namestnikova, D.; Gubskiy, I.; Gabashvili, A.; Sukhinich, K.; Melnikov, P.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Soloveva, A.; Vitushev, E.; Chekhonin, V.; Gubsky, L.; Yarygin, K.

    2017-08-01

    Intra-arterial transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is an effective delivery route for treatment of ischemic brain injury. Despite significant therapeutic effects and targeted cells delivery to the brain infraction, serious adverse events such as cerebral embolism have been reported and may restrict potential clinical applications of this method. In current study, we evaluate potential complications of intra-arterial MSCs administration and determine the optimum parameters for cell transplantation. We injected SPIO-labeled human MSCs via internal carotid artery with different infusion parameters and cell dose in intact rats and in rats with the middle cerebral occlusion stroke model. Cerebrovascular complications and labeled cells were visualized in vivo using MRI. We have shown that the incidence of cerebral embolic events depends on such parameters as cell dose, infusion rate and maintenance of blood flow in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Optimal parameters were considered to be 5×105 hMSC in 1 ml of PBS by syringe pump with velocity 100 μ/min and maintenance of blood flow in the ICA. Obtained data should be considered before planning experiments in rats and, potentially, can help in planning clinical trials in stroke patients.

  10. In vivo human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell tracking after intra-articular delivery in a rat osteoarthritis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs have shown efficacy in treating osteoarthritis (OA both preclinically and clinically via intra-articular (IA injection. However, understanding the mode of action of the cell therapy has been limited by cell tracking capability and correlation between the pharmacokinetics of the injected cells and the intended pharmacodynamics effect. This study aims to explore methodology and to understand in vivo biodistribution of clinical-grade haMSCs labeled with fluorescent dye and injected into an immunocompetent OA rat model. Methods haMSCs labeled with fluorescent dye were investigated for their proliferation and differentiation capabilities. Labeled cells were used to establish detection threshold of a noninvasive biofluorescent imaging system before the cells (2.5 × 106 were injected into a conventional rat OA model induced by medial meniscectomy for 8 weeks. We attempted to reveal the existence of labeled cells in vivo by imaging and a molecular biomarker approach, and to correlate with the in vivo efficacy and physical presence over a follow-up period up to 10 weeks. Results In vitro proliferation and differentiation of haMSCs were not affected by the labeling of DiD dye. Detection thresholds of the labeled cells in vitro and in vivo were determined to be 104 and 105 cells, respectively. When 2.5 × 106 haMSCs were injected into the joints of a rat OA model, fluorescent signals (or >105 cells lasted for about 10 weeks in the surgical knee joint at the same time as efficacy was observed. Signals in nonsurgical rats only lasted for 4 weeks. The human MSCs were shown to engraft to the rat joint tissues and were proliferative. Human FOXP2 gene was only detected in the knee joint tissue, suggesting limited biodistribution locally to the joints. Conclusions The current study represents the first attempt to correlate cell therapy efficacy on OA with the physical presence

  11. Improving labeling efficiency in automatic quality control of MRSI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa de Barros, Nuno; McKinley, Richard; Wiest, Roland; Slotboom, Johannes

    2017-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of the labeling task in automatic quality control of MR spectroscopy imaging data. 28'432 short and long echo time (TE) spectra (1.5 tesla; point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS); repetition time (TR)= 1,500 ms) from 18 different brain tumor patients were labeled by two experts as either accept or reject, depending on their quality. For each spectrum, 47 signal features were extracted. The data was then used to run several simulations and test an active learning approach using uncertainty sampling. The performance of the classifiers was evaluated as a function of the number of patients in the training set, number of spectra in the training set, and a parameter α used to control the level of classification uncertainty required for a new spectrum to be selected for labeling. The results showed that the proposed strategy allows reductions of up to 72.97% for short TE and 62.09% for long TE in the amount of data that needs to be labeled, without significant impact in classification accuracy. Further reductions are possible with significant but minimal impact in performance. Active learning using uncertainty sampling is an effective way to increase the labeling efficiency for training automatic quality control classifiers. Magn Reson Med 78:2399-2405, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Label and Label-Free Detection Techniques for Protein Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Syahir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein microarray technology has gone through numerous innovative developments in recent decades. In this review, we focus on the development of protein detection methods embedded in the technology. Early microarrays utilized useful chromophores and versatile biochemical techniques dominated by high-throughput illumination. Recently, the realization of label-free techniques has been greatly advanced by the combination of knowledge in material sciences, computational design and nanofabrication. These rapidly advancing techniques aim to provide data without the intervention of label molecules. Here, we present a brief overview of this remarkable innovation from the perspectives of label and label-free techniques in transducing nano‑biological events.

  13. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy--a single centre, open-label study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-01

    With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent.

  14. Distance labeling schemes for trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Gørtz, Inge Li; Bistrup Halvorsen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    We consider distance labeling schemes for trees: given a tree with n nodes, label the nodes with binary strings such that, given the labels of any two nodes, one can determine, by looking only at the labels, the distance in the tree between the two nodes. A lower bound by Gavoille et al. [Gavoille...... variants such as, for example, small distances in trees [Alstrup et al., SODA, 2003]. We improve the known upper and lower bounds of exact distance labeling by showing that 1/4 log2(n) bits are needed and that 1/2 log2(n) bits are sufficient. We also give (1 + ε)-stretch labeling schemes using Theta...

  15. Magnets and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, Ch.; Rifflet, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest highest-energy particle collider that the CERN plans to commission in 2008, gets a double boost from superconducting magnet technology. Superconducting magnets are first used to guide the particles scheduled for collision through the accelerator, and then to observe the events triggered by the collision inside giant detectors in a known magnetic field. Despite the installation's massive dimensions, all this is done with minimal expenditure of energy. (author)

  16. Co-Labeling for Multi-View Weakly Labeled Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinxing; Li, Wen; Xu, Dong; Tsang, Ivor W

    2016-06-01

    It is often expensive and time consuming to collect labeled training samples in many real-world applications. To reduce human effort on annotating training samples, many machine learning techniques (e.g., semi-supervised learning (SSL), multi-instance learning (MIL), etc.) have been studied to exploit weakly labeled training samples. Meanwhile, when the training data is represented with multiple types of features, many multi-view learning methods have shown that classifiers trained on different views can help each other to better utilize the unlabeled training samples for the SSL task. In this paper, we study a new learning problem called multi-view weakly labeled learning, in which we aim to develop a unified approach to learn robust classifiers by effectively utilizing different types of weakly labeled multi-view data from a broad range of tasks including SSL, MIL and relative outlier detection (ROD). We propose an effective approach called co-labeling to solve the multi-view weakly labeled learning problem. Specifically, we model the learning problem on each view as a weakly labeled learning problem, which aims to learn an optimal classifier from a set of pseudo-label vectors generated by using the classifiers trained from other views. Unlike traditional co-training approaches using a single pseudo-label vector for training each classifier, our co-labeling approach explores different strategies to utilize the predictions from different views, biases and iterations for generating the pseudo-label vectors, making our approach more robust for real-world applications. Moreover, to further improve the weakly labeled learning on each view, we also exploit the inherent group structure in the pseudo-label vectors generated from different strategies, which leads to a new multi-layer multiple kernel learning problem. Promising results for text-based image retrieval on the NUS-WIDE dataset as well as news classification and text categorization on several real-world multi

  17. The radioactive labeling of monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensing, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    With the aim of studying a possible relationship between circulating monocytes and Sternberg-Reed cells investigations were started on the specific labeling of monocytes. In this thesis the literature on the pertinent data has been reviewed and a series of experiments on the monocyte labeling procedure has been described. The principles of cell labeling with radioactive compounds were discussed. 1. Total separation of the particular cell population to be labeled and subsequent labeling with a non-specific radiopharmaceutical. 2. Specific cell labeling in a mixture of cell types based on a well defined affinity of the cell under study for the radiopharmaceutical used. Next the radionuclides that can be used for cell labeling purposes were discussed with special attention for 111 In and its chelates. The principles of radiodosimetry were also discussed shortly. This section was focussed on the radiation dose the labeled cells receive because of the intracellular localized radioactivity. The radiation burden is high in comparison to amounts of radiation known to affect cell viability. A newly developed method for labeling monocytes specifically by phagocytosis of 111 In-Fe-colloid without apparent loss of cells was described in detail. (Auth.)

  18. Labelled molecules, modern research implements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.; Langourieux, Y.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the synthesis of carbon 14- and tritium-labelled molecules are examined. Although the methods used are those of classical organic chemistry the preparation of carbon 14-labelled molecules differs in some respects, most noticeably in the use of 14 CO 2 which requires very special handling techniques. For the tritium labelling of organic molecules the methods are somewhat different, very often involving exchange reactions. The following are described in turn: the so-called Wilzbach exchange method; exchange by catalysis in solution; catalytic hydrogenation with tritium; reductions with borotritides. Some applications of labelled molecules in organic chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology are listed [fr

  19. Mesenchymal cells reactivate Snail1 expression to drive three-dimensional invasion programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, R.G.; Li, X.Y.; Hu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for mesodermal differentiation during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Snail1, can trigger EMT and is sufficient to transcriptionally reprogram epithelial cells toward a mesenchymal phenotype during neoplasia and fibrosis. Whet...

  20. New Developments in Spin Labels for Pulsed Dipolar EPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair J. Fielding

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spin labelling is a chemical technique that enables the integration of a molecule containing an unpaired electron into another framework for study. Given the need to understand the structure, dynamics, and conformational changes of biomacromolecules, spin labelling provides a relatively non-intrusive technique and has certain advantages over X-ray crystallography; which requires high quality crystals. The technique relies on the design of binding probes that target a functional group, for example, the thiol group of a cysteine residue within a protein. The unpaired electron is typically supplied through a nitroxide radical and sterically shielded to preserve stability. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR techniques allow small magnetic couplings to be measured (e.g., <50 MHz providing information on single label probes or the dipolar coupling between multiple labels. In particular, distances between spin labels pairs can be derived which has led to many protein/enzymes and nucleotides being studied. Here, we summarise recent examples of spin labels used for pulse EPR that serve to illustrate the contribution of chemistry to advancing discoveries in this field.

  1. Magnetism and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    It describes the actual status of physics in Brazil concerning the study of magnetism and magnetic materials. It gives an overview of different research groups in Brazil, their needs, as well as the investments needed to improve the area. (A.C.A.S.)

  2. Treatment of Arsenite Intoxication-Induced Peripheral Vasculopathy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Chiang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Arsenite (As, a notorious toxic metal, is ubiquitously distributed in the earth and poses a serious threat to human health. Histopathological lesions of As intoxication are known as thromboangiitis obliterans, which are resistant to current treatment and often lead to lower limb amputation. In this study, we attempt to find that treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs may be effective for As-induced vasculopathy. We first conducted an in vitro study with a co-culture system containing human MSCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and treated individual and co-cultured cells with various concentrations of arsenite. We also designed an in vivo study in which Sprague Dawley (SD rats received periodic intraperitoneal (IP injections of 16 ppm arsenite for 12 weeks. MSCs were harvested from BALB/c mice that were transplanted via tail vein injection. We found that there was significantly higher cellular viability in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs than in HUVECs under concentrations of arsenite between 15 and 25 μM. The Annexin V apoptosis assay further confirmed this finding. Cytokine array assay for As-conditioned media revealed an elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF level secreted by MSCs, which is crucial for HUVEC survival and was evaluated by an siRNA VEGF knockdown test. In the in vivo study, we demonstrated early apoptotic changes in the anterior tibial vessels of As-injected SD rats with a Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay, but these apoptotic changes were less frequently observed upon MSCs transplantation, indicating that the cytoprotective effect of MSCs successfully protected against As-induced peripheral vasculopathy. The feasibility of MSCs to treat and /or prevent the progression of As-induced vasculopathy is justified. Further clinical studies are required to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs in patients suffering from As intoxication with

  3. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells: Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerdt, van den A.J.; Veen, van der A.G.; Zuijlen, van P.P.; Reijnen, L.; Verkerk, M.; Bank, R.A.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  4. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells : Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; van der Veen, Vincent C.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Reijnen, Linda; Verkerk, Michelle; Bank, Ruud A.; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M. W.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savkovic, Vuk; Li, Hanluo; Seon, Jong-Keun; Hacker, Michael; Franz, Sandra; Simon, Jan-Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage provides life-long weight-bearing and mechanical lubrication with extraordinary biomechanical performance and simple structure. However, articular cartilage is apparently vulnerable to multifactorial damage and insufficient to self-repair, isolated in articular capsule without nerves or blood vessels. Osteoarthritis (OA) is known as a degenerative articular cartilage deficiency progressively affecting large proportion of the world population, and restoration of hyaline cartilage is clinical challenge to repair articular cartilage lesion and recreate normal functionality over long period. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are highly proliferative and multipotent somatic cells that are able to differentiate mesoderm-derived cells including chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Continuous endeavors in basic research and preclinical trial have achieved promising outcomes in cartilage regeneration using MSCs. This review focuses on rationale and technologies of MSC-based hyaline cartilage repair involving tissue engineering, 3D biomaterials and growth factors. By comparing conventional treatment and current research progress, we describe insights of advantage and challenge in translation and application of MSC-based chondrogenesis for OA treatment.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tissue Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M DiMarino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The advent of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based therapies for clinical therapeutics has been an exciting and new innovation for the treatment of a variety of diseases associated with inflammation, tissue damage and subsequent regeneration and repair. Application-based ability to measure MSC potency and fate of the cells post-MSC therapy are the variables that confound the use of MSCs therapeutics in human diseases. An evaluation of MSC function and applications with attention to detail in the preparation as well as quality control (QC and quality assurance (QA are only as good as the assays that are developed. In vivo measures of efficacy and potency require an appreciation of the overall pathophysiology of the model and standardization of outcome measures. The new concepts of how MSC’s participate in the tissue regeneration and wound repair process and further, how this is impacted by estimates of efficacy and potency Are important new topics. In this regard,,, this chapter will review some of the in vitro and in vivo assays for MSC function and activity and their application to the clinical arena.

  7. Application of mesenchymal stem cells in paediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wawryk-Gawda Ewelina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC were described by Friedenstein in the 1970s as being a group of bone marrow non-hematopoietic cells that are the source of fibroblasts. Since then, knowledge about the therapeutic potential of MSCs has significantly increased. MSCs are currently used for the treatment of many diseases, both in adults and children. MSCs are used successfully in the case of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatic diseases, diabetes mellitus type 1, gastroenterological and neurological diseases. Moreover, treatment of such organ disorders as damage or hypoxia through application of MSC therapy has shown to be satisfactory. In addition, there are some types of congenital disorders, including osteogenesis imperfecta and Spinal Muscular Atrophy, that may be treated with cellular therapy. Most studies showed no other adverse effects than fever. Our study is an analysis that particularly focuses on the registered trials and results of MSCs application to under 18 patients with acute, chronic, recurrent, resistance and corticosteroids types of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD. Stem cells currently play an important role in the treatment of many diseases. Long-term studies conducted on animals have shown that cell therapy is both effective and safe. The number of indications for use of these cells in the course of treatment of people is constantly increasing. The results of subsequent studies provide important data justifying the application of MSCs in the course of treatment of many diseases whose treatment is ineffective when utilizing other approaches.

  8. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Messina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, first found in bone marrow (BM, are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal. In Crohn’s disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn’s disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer.

  9. Transcriptional networks in epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Venkov

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT changes polarized epithelial cells into migratory phenotypes associated with loss of cell-cell adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal rearrangements. This form of plasticity is seen in mesodermal development, fibroblast formation, and cancer metastasis.Here we identify prominent transcriptional networks active during three time points of this transitional process, as epithelial cells become fibroblasts. DNA microarray in cultured epithelia undergoing EMT, validated in vivo, were used to detect various patterns of gene expression. In particular, the promoter sequences of differentially expressed genes and their transcription factors were analyzed to identify potential binding sites and partners. The four most frequent cis-regulatory elements (CREs in up-regulated genes were SRY, FTS-1, Evi-1, and GC-Box, and RNA inhibition of the four transcription factors, Atf2, Klf10, Sox11, and SP1, most frequently binding these CREs, establish their importance in the initiation and propagation of EMT. Oligonucleotides that block the most frequent CREs restrain EMT at early and intermediate stages through apoptosis of the cells.Our results identify new transcriptional interactions with high frequency CREs that modulate the stability of cellular plasticity, and may serve as targets for modulating these transitional states in fibroblasts.

  10. Mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling limits tooth number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Elina; Shimomura-Kuroki, Junko; Balic, Anamaria; Jussila, Maria; Thesleff, Irma

    2018-02-21

    Tooth agenesis is one of the predominant developmental anomalies in humans, usually affecting the permanent dentition generated by sequential tooth formation and, in most cases, caused by mutations perturbing epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In addition, loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt feedback inhibitor AXIN2 lead to human tooth agenesis. We have investigated the functions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling during sequential formation of molar teeth using mouse models. Continuous initiation of new teeth, which is observed after genetic activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the oral epithelium, was accompanied by enhanced expression of Wnt antagonists and a downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the dental mesenchyme. Genetic and pharmacological activation of mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling negatively regulated sequential tooth formation, an effect partly mediated by Bmp4. Runx2 , a gene whose loss-of-function mutations result in sequential formation of supernumerary teeth in the human cleidocranial dysplasia syndrome, suppressed the expression of Wnt inhibitors Axin2 and Drapc1 in dental mesenchyme. Our data indicate that increased mesenchymal Wnt signaling inhibits the sequential formation of teeth, and suggest that Axin2 / Runx2 antagonistic interactions modulate the level of mesenchymal Wnt/β-catenin signaling, underlying the contrasting dental phenotypes caused by human AXIN2 and RUNX2 mutations. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Maximum likelihood pixel labeling using a spatially variant finite mixture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, S.S.; Hebert, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a spatially-variant mixture model for pixel labeling. Based on this spatially-variant mixture model we derive an expectation maximization algorithm for maximum likelihood estimation of the pixel labels. While most algorithms using mixture models entail the subsequent use of a Bayes classifier for pixel labeling, the proposed algorithm yields maximum likelihood estimates of the labels themselves and results in unambiguous pixel labels. The proposed algorithm is fast, robust, easy to implement, flexible in that it can be applied to any arbitrary image data where the number of classes is known and, most importantly, obviates the need for an explicit labeling rule. The algorithm is evaluated both quantitatively and qualitatively on simulated data and on clinical magnetic resonance images of the human brain

  12. WHO Grade IV Gliofibroma: A Grading Label Denoting Malignancy for an Otherwise Commonly Misinterpreted Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A. Escalante Abril

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a 50-year-old woman with no relevant clinical history who presented with headache and loss of memory. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a left parieto-temporal mass with annular enhancement after contrast media administration, rendering a radiological diagnosis of high-grade astrocytic neoplasm. Tumour sampling was performed but the patient ultimately died as a result of disease. Microscopically, the lesion had areas of glioblastoma mixed with a benign mesenchymal constituent; the former showed hypercellularity, endothelial proliferation, high mitotic activity and necrosis, while the latter showed fascicles of long spindle cells surrounded by collagen and reticulin fibers. With approximately 40 previously reported cases, gliofibroma is a rare neoplasm defined as either glio-desmoplastic or glial/benign mesenchymal. As shown in our case, its prognosis is apparently determined by the degree of anaplasia of the glial component.

  13. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells

  14. A promising magnetic resonance stem cell tracer based on natural biomaterials in a biological system: manganese (II chelated to melanin nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu SJ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Shi-Jie Liu,1,2,* Ling-Jie Wang,1,* Ying Qiao,1 Hua Zhang,1 Li-Ping Li,1 Jing-Hua Sun,1 Sheng He,1 Wen Xu,1,2 Xi Yang,1 Wen-Wen Cai,2 Jian-Ding Li,1 Bin-Quan Wang,3 Rui-Ping Zhang2 1Medical Imaging Department, First Clinical Medical College of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 2Imaging Department, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 3Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, The First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China *These authors contributed equally to the paper Background: Melanin and manganese are both indispensable natural substances that play crucial roles in the human body. Melanin has been used as a multimodality imaging nanoplatform for biology science research because of its natural binding ability with metal ions (eg, 64Cu2+, Fe3+, and Gd3+. Because of its effects on T1 signal enhancement, Mn-based nanoparticles have been used in magnetic resonance (MR quantitative cell tracking in vivo. Stem cell tracking in vivo is an essential technology used to characterize engrafted stem cells, including cellular viability, biodistribution, differentiation capacity, and long-term fate.Methods: In the present study, manganese(II ions chelated to melanin nanoparticles [MNP-Mn(II] were synthesized. The characteristics, stem cell labeling efficiency, and cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles were evaluated. MR imaging of the labeled stem cells in vivo and in vitro were also further performed. In T1 relaxivity (r1, MNP-Mn(II were significantly more abundant than Omniscan. Bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs can be labeled easily by coincubating with MNP-Mn(II, suggesting that MNP-Mn(II had high biocompatibility.Results: Cell Counting Kit-8 assays revealed that MNP-Mn(II had almost no cytotoxicity when used to label BMSCs, even with a very high concentration (1,600 µg/mL. BMSCs labeled with MNP-Mn(II could generate a hyperintense T1 signal both in vitro

  15. Radioactive decay and labeled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter on radioactive decay and labeled compounds has numerous intext equations and worked, sample problems. Topics covered include the following: terms and mathematics of radioactive decay; examples of calculations; graphs of decay equations; radioactivity or activity; activity measurements; activity decay; half-life determinations; labeled compounds. A 20 problem set is also included. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Linerless label device and method

    KAUST Repository

    Binladen, Abdulkari

    2016-01-01

    This apparatus and method for applying a linerless label to an end user product includes a device with a printer for printing on a face surface of a linerless label, and a release coat applicator for applying a release coat to the face surface

  17. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  18. 188Re labeled MPEG-modified superparamagnetic nanogels: preparation and preliminary application in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hanwen; Gong Peijun; Liu Xiuqing; Hong Jun; Xu Dongmei; Zhang Chunfu; Wang Yongxian; Yao Side

    2005-01-01

    Superparamagnetic poly(acrylamide) magnetic nanogels produced via photochemical method have been developed. After Hoffmann degradation of carbonyl, the nanogels with amino groups, or poly(acrylamide-vinyl amine) magnetic nanogels, were also obtained. And the magnetic nanogels were further modified by methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) for higher dispersibility and stability. The MPEG-modified magnetic nanogels were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photo correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The MPEG-modified magnetic nanogels were labeled by 188 Re radiopharmaceuticals and intravenously injected into tails of mice in the presence and absence of a 0.5 T external magnetic field targeted on the bellies. The radioactivity distribution was monitored in vivo. In the absence of magnetic field, the radioactivity was mainly distributed in liver, spleen, kidney, stomach and lung. In the presence of the magnetic field, the radioactivity was mainly accumulated on the targeted point, verifying the magnetically targeted character. (authors)

  19. Detection of magnetic nanoparticles with magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Wenyan [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Xu, Guizhi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin, 300130 (China); Sclabassi, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Zhu Jiangang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Melon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Bagic, Anto [Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Sun Mingui [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)], E-mail: mrsun@neuronet.pitt.edu

    2008-04-15

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been widely utilized in biomedical applications due to their extremely high sensitivity to magnetic signals. The present study explores the feasibility of a new type of nanotechnology-based imaging method using standard clinical magnetoencephalographic (MEG) systems equipped with SQUID sensors. Previous studies have shown that biological targets labeled with non-toxic, magnetized nanoparticles can be imaged by measuring the magnetic field generated by these particles. In this work, we demonstrate that (1) the magnetic signals from certain nanoparticles can be detected without magnetization using standard clinical MEG, (2) for some types of nanoparticles, only bound particles produce detectable signals, and (3) the magnetic field of particles several hours after magnetization is significantly stronger than that of un-magnetized particles. These findings hold promise in facilitating the potential application of magnetic nanoparticles to in vivo tumor imaging. The minimum amount of nanoparticles that produce detectable signals is predicted by theoretical modeling and computer simulation.

  20. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the calcium content per...

  1. 49 CFR 172.450 - EMPTY label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EMPTY label. 172.450 Section 172.450... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.450 EMPTY label. (a) Each EMPTY label, except for size, must be as follows....) in height. (2) The label must be white with black printing. (b) [Reserved] ...

  2. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full...

  3. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CORROSIVE label. 172.442 Section 172.442... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label must... CORROSIVE label must be white in the top half and black in the lower half. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66259, Dec...

  4. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labels. 460.12 Section 460.12 Commercial....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must... chart. Labels for these products must state the minimum net weight of the insulation in the package. You...

  5. 49 CFR 172.441 - FISSILE label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FISSILE label. 172.441 Section 172.441... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.441 FISSILE label. (a) Except for size and color, the FISSILE label must be... FISSILE label must be white. [69 FR 3669, Jan. 26, 2004] ...

  6. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OXIDIZER label. 172.426 Section 172.426... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be... OXIDIZER label must be yellow. [Amdt. 172-123, 56 FR 66257, Dec. 20, 1991] ...

  7. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecourt, Severine, E-mail: severine.lecourt@sls.aphp.fr [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Marolleau, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: Marolleau.Jean-Pierre@chu-amiens.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); CHU Amiens Hopital Sud, Service d' Hematologie Clinique, UPJV, Amiens (France); Fromigue, Olivia, E-mail: olivia.fromigue@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vauchez, Karine, E-mail: k.vauchez@institut-myologie.org [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Genzyme S.A.S., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Andriamanalijaona, Rina, E-mail: rinandria@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Ternaux, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.ternaux@orange.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Lacassagne, Marie-Noelle, E-mail: mnlacassagne@free.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Robert, Isabelle, E-mail: isa-robert@hotmail.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Boumediene, Karim, E-mail: karim.boumediene@unicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Chereau, Frederic, E-mail: fchereau@pervasistx.com [Myosix S.A., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Marie, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.marie@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); and others

    2010-09-10

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56{sup +} cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15{sup +} cells emerged, partly from CD56{sup +} cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56{sup +} and CD15{sup +} cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56{sup +} cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15{sup +} cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  8. A better carbon footprint label

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John; Nielsen, Kristian S.

    2016-01-01

    , participants saw the original Carbon Trust label and in the other condition they saw the same label, but with traffic light colors added to communicate the product’s relative performance in terms of carbon footprint. All included attributes were found to have a significant impact on consumer choices....... As expected, price and carbon footprint were negatively related to choice. Further, participants preferred organic to non-organic coffee and certification by a public authority. The effect of the carbon label is significantly stronger the more environmentally concerned the consumer is. Using colors...... to indicate relative carbon footprint significantly increases carbon label effectiveness. Hence, a carbon footprint label is more effective if it uses traffic light colors to communicate the product’s relative performance....

  9. 3D additive-manufactured nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds: Effect of the application mode of a time-dependent magnetic field on hMSCs behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo D'Amora

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of the application mode of a time-dependent magnetic field on the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs seeded on 3D additive-manufactured poly(ɛ-caprolactone/iron-doped hydroxyapatite (PCL/FeHA nanocomposite scaffolds.

  10. Life on magnets: stem cell networking on micro-magnet arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii Zablotskii

    Full Text Available Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field's value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  11. Life on magnets: stem cell networking on micro-magnet arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka; Le-Roy, Damien; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Givord, Dominique; Dempsey, Nora M; Syková, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between a micro-magnet array and living cells may guide the establishment of cell networks due to the cellular response to a magnetic field. To manipulate mesenchymal stem cells free of magnetic nanoparticles by a high magnetic field gradient, we used high quality micro-patterned NdFeB films around which the stray field's value and direction drastically change across the cell body. Such micro-magnet arrays coated with parylene produce high magnetic field gradients that affect the cells in two main ways: i) causing cell migration and adherence to a covered magnetic surface and ii) elongating the cells in the directions parallel to the edges of the micro-magnet. To explain these effects, three putative mechanisms that incorporate both physical and biological factors influencing the cells are suggested. It is shown that the static high magnetic field gradient generated by the micro-magnet arrays are capable of assisting cell migration to those areas with the strongest magnetic field gradient, thereby allowing the build up of tunable interconnected stem cell networks, which is an elegant route for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  12. Application of magnetic carriers to two examples of quantitative cell analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Chen; Qian, Zhixi; Choi, Young Suk; David, Allan E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Todd, Paul, E-mail: pwtodd@hotmail.com [Techshot, Inc., 7200 Highway 150, Greenville, IN 47124 (United States); Hanley, Thomas R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The use of magnetophoretic mobility as a surrogate for fluorescence intensity in quantitative cell analysis was investigated. The objectives of quantitative fluorescence flow cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in fluorescence activated cell sorters (FACS) and the determination of levels of uptake of fluorescently labeled substrates by living cells. Likewise, the objectives of quantitative magnetic cytometry include establishing a level of labeling for the setting of parameters in flowing magnetic cell sorters and the determination of levels of uptake of magnetically labeled substrates by living cells. The magnetic counterpart to fluorescence intensity is magnetophoretic mobility, defined as the velocity imparted to a suspended cell per unit of magnetic ponderomotive force. A commercial velocimeter available for making this measurement was used to demonstrate both applications. Cultured Gallus lymphoma cells were immunolabeled with commercial magnetic beads and shown to have adequate magnetophoretic mobility to be separated by a novel flowing magnetic separator. Phagocytosis of starch nanoparticles having magnetic cores by cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, a CHO line, was quantified on the basis of magnetophoretic mobility. - Highlights: • Commercial particle tracking velocimetry measures magnetophoretic mobility of labeled cells. • Magnetically labeled tumor cells were shown to have adequate mobility for capture in a specific sorter. • The kinetics of nonspecific endocytosis of magnetic nanomaterials by CHO cells was characterized. • Magnetic labeling of cells can be used like fluorescence flow cytometry for quantitative cell analysis.

  13. Recurrent malignant variant of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor with oncogenic osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogose, A.; Hotta, Tetsuo; Hatano, Hiroshi; Endo, Naoto; Emura, Iwao; Umezu, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiya

    2001-01-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor is a rare neoplasm which causes osteomalacia or rickets. The tumor typically follows a benign clinical course. Even in the rare malignant cases, local recurrence and distant metastasis are uncommon. We report on an example of a malignant phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor which recurred several times over 16 years concurrently causing hypophosphatemia, bone pain, and osteomalacia. Following each surgery, symptoms and hypophosphatemia improved. The patient died of disease 17 years after the first surgery. Histologically, the initial tumor was composed of small spindle cells with clusters of giant cells, prominent blood vessels, poorly formed cartilaginous areas, and crystalline material. Cytological atypia was minimal. Following multiple recurrences, the tumor demonstrated areas of high-grade sarcoma exhibiting marked pleomorphism, numerous mitotic figures, and p53 overexpression. This case illustrates the potential lethality of incompletely removed phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors. (orig.)

  14. Recurrent malignant variant of phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor with oncogenic osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogose, A.; Hotta, Tetsuo; Hatano, Hiroshi; Endo, Naoto [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Niigata University School of Medicine, Asahimachi, Niigata (Japan); Emura, Iwao; Umezu, Hajime [Dept. of Pathology, Niigata University School of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Inoue, Yoshiya [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor is a rare neoplasm which causes osteomalacia or rickets. The tumor typically follows a benign clinical course. Even in the rare malignant cases, local recurrence and distant metastasis are uncommon. We report on an example of a malignant phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor which recurred several times over 16 years concurrently causing hypophosphatemia, bone pain, and osteomalacia. Following each surgery, symptoms and hypophosphatemia improved. The patient died of disease 17 years after the first surgery. Histologically, the initial tumor was composed of small spindle cells with clusters of giant cells, prominent blood vessels, poorly formed cartilaginous areas, and crystalline material. Cytological atypia was minimal. Following multiple recurrences, the tumor demonstrated areas of high-grade sarcoma exhibiting marked pleomorphism, numerous mitotic figures, and p53 overexpression. This case illustrates the potential lethality of incompletely removed phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors. (orig.)

  15. Primary extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma arising from the iliac vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The iliac vein is an extremely rare site for mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, and patients with primary extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma arising from a vein always suffer a very poor prognosis. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented with a 5-month history of left leg edema in 2015. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a large mass in the left iliac vein with scattered calcifications. Wide-margin resection was performed, and histopathologic and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of intraluminal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma with local invasion out of the vein wall. Due to poor patient compliance, postoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy were not started, and a bone scan performed 16 weeks postoperatively showed multiple bone metastases. The patient died on the twenty-fourth postoperative week.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and the Origin of Ewing's Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of Ewing's sarcoma is a subject of much debate. Once thought to be derived from primitive neuroectodermal cells, many now believe it to arise from a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC. Expression of the EWS-FLI1 fusion gene in MSCs changes cell morphology to resemble Ewing's sarcoma and induces expression of neuroectodermal markers. In murine cells, transformation to sarcomas can occur. In knockdown experiments, Ewing's sarcoma cells develop characteristics of MSCs and the ability to differentiate into mesodermal lineages. However, it cannot be concluded that MSCs are the cell of origin. The concept of an MSC still needs to be rigorously defined, and there may be different subpopulations of mesenchymal pluripotential cells. Furthermore, EWS-FLI1 by itself does not transform human cells, and cooperating mutations appear to be necessary. Therefore, while it is possible that Ewing's sarcoma may originate from a primitive mesenchymal cell, the idea needs to be refined further.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and the Origin of Ewing's Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Patrick P.; Wang, Yongxing; Lozano, Guillermina

    2011-01-01

    The origin of Ewing's sarcoma is a subject of much debate. Once thought to be derived from primitive neuroectodermal cells, many now believe it to arise from a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). Expression of the EWS-FLI1 fusion gene in MSCs changes cell morphology to resemble Ewing's sarcoma and induces expression of neuroectodermal markers. In murine cells, transformation to sarcomas can occur. In knockdown experiments, Ewing's sarcoma cells develop characteristics of MSCs and the ability to differentiate into mesodermal lineages. However, it cannot be concluded that MSCs are the cell of origin. The concept of an MSC still needs to be rigorously defined, and there may be different subpopulations of mesenchymal pluripotential cells. Furthermore, EWS-FLI1 by itself does not transform human cells, and cooperating mutations appear to be necessary. Therefore, while it is possible that Ewing's sarcoma may originate from a primitive mesenchymal cell, the idea needs to be refined further. PMID:20953407

  18. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy - a single centre, open-label study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-27

    Abstract Introduction With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with PsA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsies and MRI scans of an inflamed knee joint at baseline and 12 weeks after starting treatment with either anakinra (first 10 patients) or etanercept (subsequent 15 patients) in two sequential studies of identical design. DAS28 scores were measured at both time points. Immunohistochemical staining for CD3, CD68 and Factor VIII (FVIII) was performed on synovial samples and scored by digital image analysis (DIA). MRI scans performed at baseline and at 12 weeks were scored for synovitis semi-quantitatively. The ΔDAS28 of the European League Against Rheumatism good response definition (>1.2) was chosen to divide patients into responder and non-responder groups. Differences between groups (Mann Whitney U test) and correlations between ΔDAS28 with change in immunohistochemical and MRI synovitis scores (Spearman\\'s rho test) were calculated. Results Paired synovial samples and MRI scans were available for 21 patients (8 anakinra, 13 etanercept) and 23 patients (8 anakinra, 15 etanercept) respectively. Change in CD3 (ΔCD3) and CD68 expression in the synovial sublining layer (ΔCD68sl) was significantly greater in

  19. Applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankhurst, Q A; Connolly, J; Jones, S K; Dobson, J

    2003-01-01

    The physical principles underlying some current biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles are reviewed. Starting from well-known basic concepts, and drawing on examples from biology and biomedicine, the relevant physics of magnetic materials and their responses to applied magnetic fields are surveyed. The way these properties are controlled and used is illustrated with reference to (i) magnetic separation of labelled cells and other biological entities; (ii) therapeutic drug, gene and radionuclide delivery; (iii) radio frequency methods for the catabolism of tumours via hyperthermia; and (iv) contrast enhancement agents for magnetic resonance imaging applications. Future prospects are also discussed. (topical review)

  20. Visualization of antigen-specific human cytotoxic T lymphocytes labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Ambros J. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Holzapfel, Konstantin; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Neudorfer, Juliana; Kroenig, Holger; Peschel, Christian; Bernhard, Helga [TUM, Munich, Department of Hematology/Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [TUM, Munich, Division of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    New technologies are needed to characterize the migration and survival of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. In this study, we developed a novel technique for the labeling of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles and the subsequent depiction with a conventional 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes were labeled with ferucarbotran by lipofection. The uptake of ferucarbotran was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy using a dextran-specific antibody, and the intracellular enrichment of iron was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The imaging of T cells was performed by magnetic resonance on day 0, 2, 7 and 14 after the labeling procedure. On day 0 and 2 post labeling, a pronounced shortening of T2*-relaxation times was observed, which diminished after 7 days and was not detectable anymore after 14 days, probably due to the retained mitotic activity of the labeled T cells. Of importance, the antigen-specific cytolytic activity of the T cells was preserved following ferucarbotran labeling. Efficient ferucarbotran labeling of functionally active T lymphocytes and their detection by magnetic resonance imaging allows the in vivo monitoring of T cells and, subsequently, will impact the further development of T cell-based therapies. (orig.)

  1. Visualization of antigen-specific human cytotoxic T lymphocytes labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, Ambros J.; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Neudorfer, Juliana; Kroenig, Holger; Peschel, Christian; Bernhard, Helga; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    New technologies are needed to characterize the migration and survival of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. In this study, we developed a novel technique for the labeling of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles and the subsequent depiction with a conventional 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Antigen-specific CD8 + T lymphocytes were labeled with ferucarbotran by lipofection. The uptake of ferucarbotran was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy using a dextran-specific antibody, and the intracellular enrichment of iron was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The imaging of T cells was performed by magnetic resonance on day 0, 2, 7 and 14 after the labeling procedure. On day 0 and 2 post labeling, a pronounced shortening of T2*-relaxation times was observed, which diminished after 7 days and was not detectable anymore after 14 days, probably due to the retained mitotic activity of the labeled T cells. Of importance, the antigen-specific cytolytic activity of the T cells was preserved following ferucarbotran labeling. Efficient ferucarbotran labeling of functionally active T lymphocytes and their detection by magnetic resonance imaging allows the in vivo monitoring of T cells and, subsequently, will impact the further development of T cell-based therapies. (orig.)

  2. Effects of dexamethasone on palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulleit, R.F.; Zimmerman, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    Corticosteroids will induce cleft palate in mice. One suggested mechanism for this effect is through inhibition of phospholipase activity. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the effects of dexamethasone, a synthetic corticosteroid, on phospholipase activity in cultures of palate mesenchymal cells. Palate mesenchymal cells were prelabeled with [3H]arachidonic acid. The cells were subsequently treated with various concentrations of dexamethasone. Concurrently, cultures of M-MSV-transformed 3T3 cells were prepared identically. After treatment, phospholipase activity was stimulated by the addition of serum or epidermal growth factor (EGF), and radioactivity released into the medium was taken as a measure of phospholipase activity. Dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) or 1 X 10(-4) M) could inhibit serum-stimulated phospholipase activity in transformed 3T3 cells after 1 to 24 hr of treatment. However, no inhibition of activity was measured in palate mesenchymal cells following this period of treatment. Not until 120 hr of treatment with dexamethasone (1 X 10(-4) M) was any significant inhibition of serum-stimulated phospholipase activity observed in palate mesenchymal cells. When EGF was used to stimulate phospholipase activity, dexamethasone (1 X 10(-5) M) caused an increase in phospholipase activity in palate mesenchymal cells. These observations suggested that phospholipase in transformed 3T3 cells was sensitive to inhibition by dexamethasone. However, palate mesenchymal cell phospholipase is only minimally sensitive to dexamethasone, and in certain instances can be enhanced. These results cannot support the hypothesis that corticosteroids mediate their teratogenic effect via inhibition of phospholipase activity

  3. Photothermal optical coherence tomography for depth-resolved imaging of mesenchymal stem cells via single wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Connolly, Emma; Murphy, Mary; Barron, Valerie; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The progress in stem cell research over the past decade holds promise and potential to address many unmet clinical therapeutic needs. Tracking stem cell with modern imaging modalities are critically needed for optimizing stem cell therapy, which offers insight into various underlying biological processes such as cell migration, engraftment, homing, differentiation, and functions etc. In this study we report the feasibility of photothermal optical coherence tomography (PT-OCT) to image human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) labeled with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for in vitro cell tracking in three dimensional scaffolds. PT-OCT is a functional extension of conventional OCT with extended capability of localized detection of absorbing targets from scattering background to provide depth-resolved molecular contrast imaging. A 91 kHz line rate, spectral domain PT-OCT system at 1310nm was developed to detect the photothermal signal generated by 800nm excitation laser. In general, MSCs do not have obvious optical absorption properties and cannot be directly visualized using PT-OCT imaging. However, the optical absorption properties of hMSCs can me modified by labeling with SWNTs. Using this approach, MSC were labeled with SWNT and the cell distribution imaged in a 3D polymer scaffold using PT-OCT.

  4. Self-assessed performance improves statistical fusion of image labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, Frederick W.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Allen, Wade M.; Reich, Daniel S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Expert manual labeling is the gold standard for image segmentation, but this process is difficult, time-consuming, and prone to inter-individual differences. While fully automated methods have successfully targeted many anatomies, automated methods have not yet been developed for numerous essential structures (e.g., the internal structure of the spinal cord as seen on magnetic resonance imaging). Collaborative labeling is a new paradigm that offers a robust alternative that may realize both the throughput of automation and the guidance of experts. Yet, distributing manual labeling expertise across individuals and sites introduces potential human factors concerns (e.g., training, software usability) and statistical considerations (e.g., fusion of information, assessment of confidence, bias) that must be further explored. During the labeling process, it is simple to ask raters to self-assess the confidence of their labels, but this is rarely done and has not been previously quantitatively studied. Herein, the authors explore the utility of self-assessment in relation to automated assessment of rater performance in the context of statistical fusion. Methods: The authors conducted a study of 66 volumes manually labeled by 75 minimally trained human raters recruited from the university undergraduate population. Raters were given 15 min of training during which they were shown examples of correct segmentation, and the online segmentation tool was demonstrated. The volumes were labeled 2D slice-wise, and the slices were unordered. A self-assessed quality metric was produced by raters for each slice by marking a confidence bar superimposed on the slice. Volumes produced by both voting and statistical fusion algorithms were compared against a set of expert segmentations of the same volumes. Results: Labels for 8825 distinct slices were obtained. Simple majority voting resulted in statistically poorer performance than voting weighted by self-assessed performance

  5. Self-assessed performance improves statistical fusion of image labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Frederick W., E-mail: frederick.w.bryan@vanderbilt.edu; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Allen, Wade M. [Electrical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Reich, Daniel S. [Translational Neuroradiology Unit, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Landman, Bennett A. [Electrical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); and Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Expert manual labeling is the gold standard for image segmentation, but this process is difficult, time-consuming, and prone to inter-individual differences. While fully automated methods have successfully targeted many anatomies, automated methods have not yet been developed for numerous essential structures (e.g., the internal structure of the spinal cord as seen on magnetic resonance imaging). Collaborative labeling is a new paradigm that offers a robust alternative that may realize both the throughput of automation and the guidance of experts. Yet, distributing manual labeling expertise across individuals and sites introduces potential human factors concerns (e.g., training, software usability) and statistical considerations (e.g., fusion of information, assessment of confidence, bias) that must be further explored. During the labeling process, it is simple to ask raters to self-assess the confidence of their labels, but this is rarely done and has not been previously quantitatively studied. Herein, the authors explore the utility of self-assessment in relation to automated assessment of rater performance in the context of statistical fusion. Methods: The authors conducted a study of 66 volumes manually labeled by 75 minimally trained human raters recruited from the university undergraduate population. Raters were given 15 min of training during which they were shown examples of correct segmentation, and the online segmentation tool was demonstrated. The volumes were labeled 2D slice-wise, and the slices were unordered. A self-assessed quality metric was produced by raters for each slice by marking a confidence bar superimposed on the slice. Volumes produced by both voting and statistical fusion algorithms were compared against a set of expert segmentations of the same volumes. Results: Labels for 8825 distinct slices were obtained. Simple majority voting resulted in statistically poorer performance than voting weighted by self-assessed performance

  6. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit T-cell lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Chae, Ji-Sang; Coh, Ye-Rin; Jung, Woo-Sung; Lee, Hee-Woo; Shin, Il-Seob; Kang, Sung-Keun; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2014-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are thought to be one of the most reliable stem cell sources for a variety of cell therapies. This study investigated the anti-tumor effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSCs) on EL4 murine T-cell lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. The growth-inhibitory effect of hAT-MSCs on EL4 tumor cells was evaluated using a WST-1 cell proliferation assay. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry and western blot. To evaluate an anti-tumor effect of hAT-MSCs on T-cell lymphoma in vivo, CM-DiI-labeled hAT-MSCs were circumtumorally injected in tumor-bearing nude mice, and tumor size was measured. hAT-MSCs inhibited T-cell lymphoma growth by altering cell-cycle progression and inducing apoptosis in vitro. hAT-MSCs inhibited tumor growth in tumor-bearing nude mice and prolonged survival time. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that hAT-MSCs migrated to tumor sites. hAT-MSCs suppress the growth of T-cell lymphoma, suggesting a therapeutic option for T-cell lymphoma. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Nanoscale Mechanical Stimulation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nikukar

    2014-05-01

    We observed significant responses after 1 and 2-week stimulations in cell number, cell shapes and phenotypical markers. Microarray was performed for all groups. Cell count showed normal cell growth with stimulation. However, cell surface area, cell perimeter, and arboration after 1-week stimulation showed significant increases. Immunofluorescent studies have showed significant increase in osteocalcin production after stimulation. Conclusions: Nanoscale mechanical vibration showed significant changes in human mesenchymal stem cell behaviours. Cell morphology changed to become more polygonal and increased expression of the osteoblast markers were noted. These findings with gene regulation changes suggesting nanoscale mechanostimulation has stimulated osteoblastogenesis.  Keywords:  Mesenchymal, Nanoscale, Stem Cells.

  8. Primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu-Hua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yao, Xiao-Hong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Pathology, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2007-11-15

    We report a primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a 3-year-old girl. MRI revealed a markedly enhancing oval mass associated with focal areas of low signal intensity extending from T11 to L1. The lesion was located posterolateral to the right side of the spinal cord, pushing the conus medullaris and cauda equina anteriorly and to the left. The adjacent spinal cord also showed serpiginous areas of flow void. The mass was completely removed. Microscopic examination and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The patient was free of symptoms after surgery. (orig.)

  9. Primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yu-Hua; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We report a primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a 3-year-old girl. MRI revealed a markedly enhancing oval mass associated with focal areas of low signal intensity extending from T11 to L1. The lesion was located posterolateral to the right side of the spinal cord, pushing the conus medullaris and cauda equina anteriorly and to the left. The adjacent spinal cord also showed serpiginous areas of flow void. The mass was completely removed. Microscopic examination and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The patient was free of symptoms after surgery. (orig.)

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, an ideal cell source for regenerative therapy with no ethical issues, play an important role in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU. Growing evidence has demonstrated that MSCs transplantation can accelerate wound closure, ameliorate clinical parameters, and avoid amputation. In this review, we clarify the mechanism of preclinical studies, as well as safety and efficacy of clinical trials in the treatment of DFU. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs, compared with MSCs derived from other tissues, may be a suitable cell type that can provide easy, effective, and cost-efficient transplantation to treat DFU and protect patients from amputation.

  11. Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a physiologic process that allows morphological and genetic changes of carcinoma cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype, which is the basis of the high metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells. EMT is triggered by various tumor microenvironmental factors, including cytokines, growth factors, and chemotherapeutic agents. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that support pancreatic cancer EMT and the evidences that support its involvement in invasiveness/aggressiveness, and the drug resistance of pancreatic cancer cells.

  12. Microencapsulation of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael P H; Montanari, Elisa; Morel, Philippe; Pimenta, Joël; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Wandrey, Christine; Gerber-Lemaire, Sandrine; Mahou, Redouan; Bühler, Leo H

    2017-01-01

    Encapsulated hepatocyte transplantation and encapsulated mesenchymal stem cell transplantation are newly developed potential treatments for acute and chronic liver diseases, respectively. Cells are microencapsulated in biocompatible semipermeable alginate-based hydrogels. Microspheres protect cells against antibodies and immune cells, while allowing nutrients, small/medium size proteins and drugs to diffuse inside and outside the polymer matrix. Microencapsulated cells are assessed in vitro and designed for experimental transplantation and for future clinical applications.Here, we describe the protocol for microencapsulation of hepatocytes and mesenchymal stem cells within hybrid poly(ethylene glycol)-alginate hydrogels.

  13. [Mesenchymal stroma cells and their niche].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R K

    2013-11-01

    Stem cells reside in a highly specialized, complex microenvironment that is known as the stem cell niche. The stem cell niche can be described as an anatomically defined space where the stem cell is localized and nourished and stem cell quiescence, proliferation and differentiation are maintained. Tissue engineering aims to imitate the stem cell niche to (I) induce a directed differentiation, (II) maintain the self-renewal capacity or (III) find a regulated balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) can differentiate in three-dimensional collagen gels into functional osteoblasts when subjected to a phosphate-rich cultivation medium. Furthermore, they acquire a prosynthetic, matrix remodeling, contractile phenotype. Medial artery calcification in patients with chronic kidney disease also proceeds through intramembranous ossification resulting from osteoblast-induced calcification of the collagen extracellular matrix. Thus, the influence of uremic cultivation conditions as a pathophysiological stimulus on MSC and endothelial cells was analyzed with special regards to matrix remodeling, vascularization and calcification. The results showed that BMP-2/4 mediated MSC (mal)differentiation into osteoblasts with acquired matrix remodeling phenotype and loss of proangiogenic capacity. These studies have led to the conclusion that uremia has detrimental effects on the stem cell niche and promotes the continuous calcification by osteogenic (mal)differentiation. In summary, recent studies have shown the conducting and regulating effect of the stem cell niche under physiological conditions that can be applied and mimicked for tissue engineering applications. However, under pathological conditions the stem cell niche can have detrimental effects on stem cell function and can promote disease progression.

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of bacteriorhodopsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Weidong; Tsipouras, Athanasios; Ok, Hyun; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Gawinowicz, M.A.; Nakanishi, Koji

    1990-01-01

    14 C-Labeled optically pure 3S- and 3R-(diazoacetoxy)-all-trans-retinals were incorporated separately into bacterioopsin to reconstitute functional bacteriorhodopsin (bR) analogues, 3S- and 3R-diazo-bRs. UV irradiation at 254 nm generated highly reactive carbenes, which cross-linked the radiolabeled retinals to amino acid residues in the vicinity of the β-ionone ring. The 3S- and 3R-diazo analogues were found to cross-link, respectively, to cyanogen bromide fragments CN 7/CN 9 and CN 8/CN 9. More specifically, Thr121 and Gly122 in fragment CN 7 were found to be cross-linked to the 3S-diazo analogue. The identification of cross-linked residues and fragments favors assignments of the seven helices A-G-F-E-D-C-B or B-C-D-E-F-G-A to helices 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 in the two-dimensional electron density map. The present results show that the chromophore chain is oriented with the ionone ring inclined toward the outside of the membrane (the 9-methyl group also faces the extracellular side of the membrane)

  15. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dimethyl Disulfide (DMDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for label details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  16. Mobile Application for Pesticide Label Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    The label matching application will give inspectors the ability to instantly compare pesticide product labels against state and federal label databases via their cell phone, tablet or other mobile device.

  17. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Under Control Figuring Out Food Labels Healthy Food Shopping If My Child Has Food Allergies, What Should ... for Parents Figuring Out Food Labels Smart Supermarket Shopping Figuring Out Fat and Calories Food Labels View ...

  18. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Location and size of symbol on label and labeling... AND PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 1302.04 Location and size of symbol on label and labeling. The symbol shall be prominently located on the label or the labeling of the commercial...

  19. Regularized Label Relaxation Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaozhao; Xu, Yong; Li, Xuelong; Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Fang, Bingwu

    2018-04-01

    Linear regression (LR) and some of its variants have been widely used for classification problems. Most of these methods assume that during the learning phase, the training samples can be exactly transformed into a strict binary label matrix, which has too little freedom to fit the labels adequately. To address this problem, in this paper, we propose a novel regularized label relaxation LR method, which has the following notable characteristics. First, the proposed method relaxes the strict binary label matrix into a slack variable matrix by introducing a nonnegative label relaxation matrix into LR, which provides more freedom to fit the labels and simultaneously enlarges the margins between different classes as much as possible. Second, the proposed method constructs the class compactness graph based on manifold learning and uses it as the regularization item to avoid the problem of overfitting. The class compactness graph is used to ensure that the samples sharing the same labels can be kept close after they are transformed. Two different algorithms, which are, respectively, based on -norm and -norm loss functions are devised. These two algorithms have compact closed-form solutions in each iteration so that they are easily implemented. Extensive experiments show that these two algorithms outperform the state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of the classification accuracy and running time.

  20. A comparison between placental and amniotic mesenchymal stem cells for transamniotic stem cell therapy (TRASCET) in experimental spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Christina; D Graham, Christopher; Connors, John Patrick; Brazzo, Joseph; Zurakowski, David; Fauza, Dario O

    2016-06-01

    We compared placental-derived and amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs and afMSCs, respectively) in transamniotic stem cell therapy (TRASCET) for experimental spina bifida. Pregnant dams (n=29) exposed to retinoic acid for the induction of fetal spina bifida were divided into four groups. Three groups received volume-matched intraamniotic injections of either saline (n=38 fetuses) or a suspension of 2×10(6) cells/mL of syngeneic, labeled afMSCs (n=73) or pMSCs (n=115) on gestational day 17 (term=21-22days). Untreated fetuses served as controls. Animals were killed before term. Statistical comparisons were by Fisher's exact test (pcell source for TRASCET as a potential alternative in the prenatal management of spina bifida. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.