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Sample records for magnetically induced hyperthermia

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Local Gene Expression Induced by Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Sandre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to demonstrate that colloidal dispersions of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dextran macromolecules placed in an alternating magnetic field can not only produce heat, but also that these particles could be used in vivo for local and noninvasive deposition of a thermal dose sufficient to trigger thermo-induced gene expression. Iron oxide nanoparticles were first characterized in vitro on a bio-inspired setup, and then they were assayed in vivo using a transgenic mouse strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter. Iron oxide nanoparticles dispersions were applied topically on the mouse skin or injected subcutaneously with Matrigel™ to generate so-called pseudotumors. Temperature was monitored continuously with a feedback loop to control the power of the magnetic field generator and to avoid overheating. Thermo-induced luciferase expression was followed by bioluminescence imaging 6 h after heating. We showed that dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle dispersions were able to induce in vivo mild hyperthermia compatible with thermo-induced gene expression in surrounding tissues and without impairing cell viability. These data open new therapeutic perspectives for using mild magnetic hyperthermia as noninvasive modulation of tumor microenvironment by local thermo-induced gene expression or drug release.

  2. Hyperthermia with rotating magnetic nanowires inducing heat into tumor by fluid friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egolf, Peter W.; Pawlowski, Anne-Gabrielle; Tsague, Paulin; Marco, Bastien de; Bovy, William; Tucev, Sinisa [Institute of Thermal Sciences and Engineering, University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, CH 1401 Yverdon-les-Bains (Switzerland); Shamsudhin, Naveen, E-mail: snaveen@ethz.ch; Pané, Salvador; Pokki, Juho; Ansari, M. H. D.; Nelson, Bradley J. [Multi-Scale Robotics Lab, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH Zurich, CH 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Vuarnoz, Didier [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), EPFL Fribourg, CH 1701 Fribourg (Switzerland)

    2016-08-14

    A magnetic hyperthermia cancer treatment strategy that does not operate by means of conventional heating mechanisms is presented. The proposed approach consists of injecting a gel with homogeneously distributed magnetic nanowires into a tumor. Upon the application of a low-frequency rotating or circularly polarized magnetic field, nanowires spin around their center of viscous drag due to torque generated by shape anisotropy. As a result of external rotational forcing and fluid friction in the nanoparticle's boundary layer, heating occurs. The nanowire dynamics is theoretically and experimentally investigated, and different feasibility proofs of the principle by physical modeling, which adhere to medical guidelines, are presented. The magnetic nanorotors exhibit rotations and oscillations with quite a steady center of gravity, which proves an immobile behavior and guarantees a time-independent homogeneity of the spatial particle distribution in the tumor. Furthermore, a fluid dynamic and thermodynamic heating model is briefly introduced. This model is a generalization of Penne's model that for this method reveals theoretic heating rates that are sufficiently high, and fits well into medical limits defined by present standards.

  3. Magnetic hyperthermia with hard-magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashevsky, Bronislav E., E-mail: bekas@itmo.by [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashevsky, Sergey B.; Korenkov, Victor S. [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Istomin, Yuri P. [N. N. Alexandrov National Cancer Center of Belarus, Lesnoy-2, Minsk 223040 (Belarus); Terpinskaya, Tatyana I.; Ulashchik, Vladimir S. [Institute of Physiology, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Akademicheskaya str. 28, Minsk 220072 (Belarus)

    2015-04-15

    Recent clinical trials of magnetic hyperthermia have proved, and even hardened, the Ankinson-Brezovich restriction as upon magnetic field conditions applicable to any site of human body. Subject to this restriction, which is harshly violated in numerous laboratory and small animal studies, magnetic hyperthermia can relay on rather moderate heat source, so that optimization of the whole hyperthermia system remains, after all, the basic problem predetermining its clinical perspectives. We present short account of our complex (theoretical, laboratory and small animal) studies to demonstrate that such perspectives should be related with the hyperthermia system based on hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlfarth type) nanoparticles and strong low-frequency fields rather than with superparamagnetic (Brownian or Neél) nanoparticles and weak high-frequency fields. This conclusion is backed by an analytical evaluation of the maximum absorption rates possible under the field restriction in the ideal hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlarth) and the ideal superparamagnetic (single relaxation time) systems, by theoretical and experimental studies of the dynamic magnetic hysteresis in suspensions of movable hard-magnetic particles, by producing nanoparticles with adjusted coercivity and suspensions of such particles capable of effective energy absorption and intratumoral penetration, and finally, by successful treatment of a mice model tumor under field conditions acceptable for whole human body. - Highlights: • Hard-magnetic nanoparticles are shown superior for hyperthetmia to superparamagnetic. • Optimal system parameters are found from magnetic reversal model in movable particle. • Penetrating suspension of HM particles with aggregation-independent SAR is developed. • For the first time, mice with tumors are healed in AC field acceptable for human body.

  4. Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia in the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazú V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available V Grazú,1 AM Silber,2 M Moros,1 L Asín,1 TE Torres,1,3,5 C Marquina,3,4 MR Ibarra,1,3 GF Goya1,31Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; 2Departamento de Parasitologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; 4Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA, CSIC, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; 5Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, SpainBackground: Magnetic hyperthermia is currently a clinical therapy approved in the European Union for treatment of tumor cells, and uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs under time-varying magnetic fields (TVMFs. The same basic principle seems promising against trypanosomatids causing Chagas disease and sleeping sickness, given that the therapeutic drugs available have severe side effects and that there are drug-resistant strains. However, no applications of this strategy against protozoan-induced diseases have been reported so far. In the present study, Crithidia fasciculata, a widely used model for therapeutic strategies against pathogenic trypanosomatids, was targeted with Fe3O4 MNPs in order to provoke cell death remotely using TVMFs.Methods: Iron oxide MNPs with average diameters of approximately 30 nm were synthesized by precipitation of FeSO4 in basic medium. The MNPs were added to C. fasciculata choanomastigotes in the exponential phase and incubated overnight, removing excess MNPs using a DEAE-cellulose resin column. The amount of MNPs uploaded per cell was determined by magnetic measurement. The cells bearing MNPs were submitted to TVMFs using a homemade AC field applicator (f = 249 kHz, H = 13 kA/m, and the temperature variation during the experiments was measured. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess morphological changes after the TVMF

  5. Hyperthermia-induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, E.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of studies that investigated several aspects of heat-induced apoptosis in human lymphoid malignancies. Cells harbour both pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and the balance between these proteins determines whether a cell is susceptible to undergo apoptosis. In this

  6. Temperature mapping of laser-induced hyperthermia in an ocular phantom using magnetic resonance thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswadi, Saher M; Dodd, Stephen J; Gao, Jia-Hong; Glickman, Randolph D

    2004-01-01

    Laser-induced heating in an ocular phantom is measured with magnetic resonance thermography (MRT) using temperature-dependent phase changes in proton resonance frequency. The ocular phantom contains a layer of melanosomes isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium. The phantom is heated by the 806-nm output of a continuous wave diode laser with an irradiance of 2.4 to 21.6 W/cm2 in a beam radius of 0.8 or 2.4 mm, depending on the experiment. MRT is performed with a 2 T magnet, and a two-turn, 6-cm-diam, circular radio frequency coil. Two-dimensional temperature gradients are measured within the plane of the melanin layer, as well as normal to it, with a temperature resolution of 1 degrees C or better. The temperature gradients extending within the melanin layer are broader than those orthogonal to the layer, consistent with the higher optical absorption and consequent heating in the melanin. The temperature gradients in the phantom measured by MRT closely approximate the predictions of a classical heat diffusion model. Three-dimensional temperature maps with a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in all directions are also made. Although the temporal resolution is limited in the prototype system (22.9 s for a single image "slice"), improvements in future implementations are likely. These results indicate that MRT has sufficient spatial and temperature resolution to monitor target tissue temperature during transpupillary thermotherapy in the human eye.

  7. Magnetic Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Efficient Hyperthermia

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    Ihab M. Obaidat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized magnetic hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs under the application of small magnetic fields is a promising tool for treating small or deep-seated tumors. For this method to be applicable, the amount of MNPs used should be minimized. Hence, it is essential to enhance the power dissipation or heating efficiency of MNPs. Several factors influence the heating efficiency of MNPs, such as the amplitude and frequency of the applied magnetic field and the structural and magnetic properties of MNPs. We discuss some of the physics principles for effective heating of MNPs focusing on the role of surface anisotropy, interface exchange anisotropy and dipolar interactions. Basic magnetic properties of MNPs such as their superparamagnetic behavior, are briefly reviewed. The influence of temperature on anisotropy and magnetization of MNPs is discussed. Recent development in self-regulated hyperthermia is briefly discussed. Some physical and practical limitations of using MNPs in magnetic hyperthermia are also briefly discussed.

  8. Heating efficiency in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deatsch, Alison E.; Evans, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermic treatment of cancers have gained significant attention in recent years. In magnetic hyperthermia, three independent mechanisms result in thermal energy upon stimulation: Néel relaxation, Brownian relaxation, and hysteresis loss. The relative contribution of each is strongly dependent on size, shape, crystalline anisotropy, and degree of aggregation or agglomeration of the nanoparticles. We review the effects of each of these physical mechanisms in light of recent experimental studies and suggest routes for progress in the field. Particular attention is given to the influence of the collective behaviors of nanoparticles in suspension. A number of recent studies have probed the effect of nanoparticle concentration on heating efficiency and have reported superficially contradictory results. We contextualize these studies and show that they consistently indicate a decrease in magnetic relaxation time with increasing nanoparticle concentration, in both Brownian- and Néel-dominated regimes. This leads to a predictable effect on heating efficiency and alleviates a significant source of confusion within the field. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. • Heating depends on individual properties and collective properties. • We review recent studies with respect to loss mechanisms. • Collective behavior is a key source of confusion in the field. • We contextualize recent studies to elucidate consistencies and alleviate confusion

  9. Surface functionalized biocompatible magnetic nanospheres for cancer hyperthermia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Novosad, V.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Chen, H.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Torno, M.; Bader, S. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Univ. Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

    2007-06-01

    We report a simplified single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation protocol to synthesize surface functionalized biocompatible magnetic nanospheres by using highly concentrated hydrophobic magnetite (gel) and a mixture of poly(D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(lactic acid-block-polyethylene glycol-maleimide) (PLA-PEG-maleimide) (10:1 by mass) polymers. The as-synthesized particles are approximately spherical with an average diameter of 360-370 nm with polydispersity index of 0.12-0.18, are surface-functionalized with maleimide groups, and have saturation magnetization values of 25-40 emu/g. The efficiency of the heating induced by 400-kHz oscillating magnetic fields is compared for two samples with different magnetite loadings. Results show that these nanospheres have the potential to provide an efficient cancer-targeted hyperthermia.

  10. Magnetic hyperthermia of laponite based ferrofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamantopoulos, G., E-mail: gior15@ims.demokritos.gr [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Basina, G.; Tzitzios, V.; Karakosta, E.; Fardis, M. [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Jaglicic, Z. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodesy and Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lazaridis, N. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Chemistry Department, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papavassiliou, G. [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece)

    2013-06-15

    Magnetic Hyperthermia experiments have been performed on different concentrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles immobilized on nano-clay disks. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured in AC field amplitudes H{sub 0} from 7 to 30 kA/m. At low field amplitudes, SAR followed the usual H{sub 0}{sup 2} law whereas for higher field amplitudes a linear dependence was found for the higher concentrations. Measurements at three different field amplitudes were also performed for a wide range of iron oxide concentrations in order to determine the effect of the Brownian relaxation time to SAR. A field dependent maximum was observed and for fields up to 20 kA/m the power dissipation losses were well explained according to theoretical predictions. - Highlights: ► Influence of the AC field to the specific absorption rates (SAR). ► Transition point from the expected square dependence to a linear law between SAR and AC field amplitude. ► A field dependent maximum of the SAR values versus iron oxide concentration is observed. ► Experimental validation of the existing theoretical work.

  11. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Ruan, Jing; Yang, Meng; Pan, Fei; Gao, Guo; Qu, Su; Shen, You-Lan; Dang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Kan; Jin, Wei-Lin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer

  12. A novel hyperthermia treatment for bone metastases using magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumine, Akihiko; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Matsubara, Takao; Nakamura, Tomoki; Uchida, Atsumasa; Sudo, Akihiro; Takegami, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Patients with bone metastases in the extremities sometimes require surgical intervention to prevent deterioration of quality of life due to a pathological fracture. The use of localized radiotherapy combined with surgical reinforcement has been a gold standard for the treatment of bone metastases. However, radiotherapy sometimes induces soft tissue damage, including muscle induration and joint contracture. Moreover, cancer cells are not always radiosensitive. Hyperthermia has been studied since the 1940s using an experimental animal model to treat various types of advanced cancer, and studies have now reached the stage of clinical application, especially in conjunction with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Nevertheless, bone metastases have several special properties which discourage oncologists from developing hyperthermic therapeutic strategies. First, the bone is located deep in the body, and has low thermal conductivity due to the thickness of cortical bone and the highly vascularized medulla. To address these issues, we developed new hyperthermic strategies which generate heat using magnetic materials under an alternating electromagnetic field, and started clinical application of this treatment modality. The purpose of this review is to summarize the latest studies on hyperthermic treatment in the field of musculoskeletal tumors, and to introduce the treatment strategy employing our novel hyperthermia approach. (author)

  13. Hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.A.; Emami, B.; Nussbaum, G.; Sapareto, S.

    1987-01-01

    The effect on heat on malignant tumors was first reported by Hippocrates. In 1856 another described the disappearance of a soft tissue sarcoma following high fever in a patient with erysipelas. Later, another induced fever by injecting bacterial toxins, and others used localized hyperthermia to produce tumor regression in patients. There were 32 patients with advanced cancer of various types treated with a combination of heat, induced with pyrogenic substances, and x-ray therapy. Twenty-nine of these patients improved for 1 to 6 months. In the past 10 years interest has been rekindled to the clinical application of this modality because numerous papers have indicated that there may be a significant advantage to the use of heat alone or combined with irradiation and cytotoxic drugs to enhance the killing of tumor cells. The clinical use of heat has been hampered by a lack of adequate equipment to deliver effective heat in deep-seated lesions and of thermometry techniques that provide reliable information on heat distribution in target tissues. However, significant progress has been made. About 30% to 50% of patients with solid tumors have recurrences at the primary site. Many of these patients have regional lymph node recurrences. Both failure patterns could be improved if effective radiation sensitizers are developed

  14. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, A; Arcos, D; Vallet-Regí, M

    2013-01-01

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia. (topical review)

  15. Comparison of microwave and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia radiosensitization in murine breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Hoopes, Paul J.

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer. Its utility as a clinical modality has been limited by a minimally selective tumor sensitivity and the inability to be delivered in a tumor-specific manner. Recent in vivo studies (rodent and human) have shown that cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity can be effectively and safely delivered via iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) and an appropriately matched noninvasive alternating magnetic field (AMF). To explore the tumor radiosensitization potential of mNP hyperthermia we used a syngeneic mouse breast cancer model, dextran-coated 110 nm hydrodynamic diameter mNP and a 169 kHz / 450 Oe (35.8 kA/m) AMF. Intradermally implanted (flank) tumors (150 +/- 40 mm3) were treated by injection of 0.04 ml mNP (7.5 mg Fe) / cm3 into the tumor and an AMF (35.8 kA/m and 169 kHz) exposure necessary to achieve a CEM (cumulative equivalent minute) thermal dose of 60 (CEM 60). Tumors were treated with mNP hyperthermia (CEM 60), radiation alone (15 Gy, single dose) and in combination. Compared to the radiation and heat alone treatments, the combined treatment resulted in a greater than two-fold increase in tumor regrowth tripling time (tumor treatment efficacy). None of the treatments resulted in significant normal tissue toxicity or morbidity. Studies were also conducted to compare the radiosensitization effect of mNP hyperthermia with that of microwave-induced hyperthermia. The effects of incubation of nanoparticles within tumors (to allow nanoparticles to be endocytosed) before application of AMF and radiation were determined. This preliminary information suggests cancer cell specific hyperthermia (i.e. antibody-directed or anatomically-directed mNP) is capable of providing significantly greater radiosensitization / therapeutic ratio enhancement than other forms of hyperthermia delivery.

  16. The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence: magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian; Fiering, Steve N; Griswold, Karl E; Hoopes, P Jack; Kekalo, Katerina; Ndong, Christian; Paulsen, Keith; Petryk, Alicea A; Pogue, Brian; Shubitidze, Fridon; Weaver, John

    2015-01-01

    The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence - one of nine funded by the National Cancer Institute as part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - focuses on the use of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer diagnostics and hyperthermia therapy. It brings together a diverse team of engineers and biomedical researchers with expertise in nanomaterials, molecular targeting, advanced biomedical imaging and translational in vivo studies. The goal of successfully treating cancer is being approached by developing nanoparticles, conjugating them with Fabs, hyperthermia treatment, immunotherapy and sensing treatment response.

  17. Gelatine-assisted synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, André F.; Mendo, Sofia G. [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Ferreira, Liliana P. [Universidade de Lisboa, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Mendonça, Maria Helena [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Ferreira, Paula [University of Aveiro, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, CICECO - Aveiro Institute of Materials (Portugal); Godinho, Margarida; Cruz, Maria Margarida [Universidade de Lisboa, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal); Carvalho, Maria Deus, E-mail: mdcarvalho@ciencias.ulisboa.pt [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências (Portugal)

    2016-01-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method exploring the use of gelatine and agar as additives. For comparison, magnetite nanoparticles were also prepared by standard co-precipitation, by co-precipitation with the addition of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate) and by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Their magnetic properties were studied by SQUID magnetometry and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The nanoparticles potential for applications in magnetic hyperthermia was evaluated through heating efficiency under alternating magnetic field. The results show that all synthesis methods produce Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with similar sizes. The nanoparticles synthesized in the gelatine medium display the narrowest particle size distribution, the lowest oxidation degree, one of the highest saturation magnetization values and the best hyperthermia efficiency, proving that this gelatine-assisted synthesis is an efficient, environmental friendly, and low-cost method to produce magnetite nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract: A new gelatine-assisted method is an efficient and low-cost way to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic hyperthermia.

  18. Computational evaluation of amplitude modulation for enhanced magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Frederik; Dupré, Luc; Ivkov, Robert; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can interact with alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) to deposit localized energy for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. Hyperthermia is useful in the context of multimodality treatments with radiation or chemotherapy to enhance disease control without increased toxicity. The unique attributes of heat deposition and transfer with MNPs have generated considerable attention and have been the focus of extensive investigations to elucidate mechanisms and optimize performance. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations are often conducted with the finite element method (FEM) using the Pennes' bioheat equation. In the current study, the Pennes' equation was modified to include a thermal damage-dependent perfusion profile to improve model predictions with respect to known physiological responses to tissue heating. A normal distribution of MNPs in a model liver tumor was combined with empirical nanoparticle heating data to calculate tumor temperature distributions and resulting survival fraction of cancer cells. In addition, calculated spatiotemporal temperature changes were compared among magnetic field amplitude modulations of a base 150-kHz sinusoidal waveform, specifically, no modulation, sinusoidal, rectangular, and triangular modulation. Complex relationships were observed between nanoparticle heating and cancer tissue damage when amplitude modulation and damage-related perfusion profiles were varied. These results are tantalizing and motivate further exploration of amplitude modulation as a means to enhance efficiency of and overcome technical challenges associated with magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNH).

  19. An induction heating device using planar coil with high amplitude alternating magnetic fields for magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zuhe; Zhuo, Zihang; Cai, Dongyang; Wu, Jian'an; Wang, Jie; Tang, Jintian

    2015-01-01

    Induction heating devices using the induction coil and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are the way that the magnetic hyperthermia is heading. To facilitate the induction heating of in vivo magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia experiments on large animals. An induction heating device using a planar coil was designed with a magnetic field frequency of 328 kHz. The coil's magnetic field distribution and the device's induction heating performance on different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were measured. The alternating magnetic field produced in the axis position 165 mm away from the coil center is 40 Gs in amplitude; magnetic nanoparticles with a concentration higher than 80 mg. mL-1 can be heated up rapidly. Our results demonstrate that the device can be applied not only to in vitro and in small animal experiments of magnetic hyperthermia using MNPs, but also in large animal experiments.

  20. Investigation properties of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and magnetic field-dependent hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatnasab, Z.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. Wan

    2018-03-01

    The application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles as heating agents in hyperthermia therapy has made a therapeutic breakthrough in cancer treatment. The high efficiency of this magnetic hyperthermia therapy has derived from a great capability of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to generate focused heat in inaccessible tumors being effectively inactivated. The main challenges of this therapy are the improvement of the induction heating power of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the control of the hyperthermia temperature in a secure range of 42 °C to 47 °C, at targeted area. The variation of these hyperthermia properties is principally dependent on the magnetic nanoparticles as well as the magnetic field leading to enhance the efficiency of magnetic hyperthermia therapy at targeted area and also avoid undue heating to healthy cells. The present study evaluates the magnetic hyperthermia therapy through the determination of superparamagnetic nanoparticles properties and magnetic field’ parameters.

  1. Magnetic nanowires and hyperthermia: How geometry and material affect heat production efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.; Zaher, A.; Perez, Jose E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia, which refers to the production of heat by magnetic nanostructures under an alternating magnetic field (AMF), has been previously investigated with superparamagnetic nanobeads as a cancer therapy method. Magnetic nanowires (NWs

  2. Social factors modulate restraint stress induced hyperthermia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-10-22

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) was examined in three different social conditions in mice by thermographic measurement of the body surface temperature. Placing animals in cylindrical holders induced restraint stress. I examined the effect of the social factors in SIH using the thermograph (body surface temperature). Mice restrained in the holders alone showed SIH. Mice restrained in the holders at the same time as other similarly restrained cage mates (social equality condition) showed less hyperthermia. Interestingly, restrained mice with free moving cage mates (social inequality condition) showed the highest hyperthermia. These results are consistent with a previous experiment measuring the memory-enhancing effects of stress and the stress-induced elevation of corticosterone, and suggest that social inequality enhances stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nano-magnetite coated with gold: alternative oncological therapy with magnetic hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordova F, T.; Jimenez G, O.; Basurto I, G.; Martinez E, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Localized hyperthermia performed through the use of nanoparticles is one of the most promising procedures for the cancer treatment. In this work, the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (Fe 2 O 3 ) was carried out using the thermal decomposition method. Subsequently, these nanoparticles were coated with gold and suspended in aqueous phase. As a result, nanoparticles capable of being heated by the application of an alternating magnetic field or through the use of infrared radiation were obtained. As an additional feature, these nanoparticles are biocompatible thanks to their golden coating. The synthesized nanoparticles can be functionalized by the conjugation of a molecule (aptamer, antibody, peptide, etc.) whose target is a cancer cell in order to adhere to it the nanoparticle-marker complex, to subsequently carry out a heating with the objective of induce cell death. In conclusion, the synthesized nanoparticles allow providing an alternative treatment for cancer through the use of localized hyperthermia, either using magnetic or infrared heating. (Author)

  4. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Oxidative Damage to DNA of Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cellai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is addressing major urgent needs for cancer treatment. We conducted a study to compare the frequency of 3-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentafuranosylpyrimido[1,2-α]purin-10(3H-one deoxyguanosine (M1dG and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG adducts, biomarkers of oxidative stress and/or lipid peroxidation, on human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells exposed to increasing levels of Fe3O4-nanoparticles (NPs versus untreated cells at different lengths of incubations, and in the presence of increasing exposures to an alternating magnetic field (AMF of 186 kHz using 32P-postlabeling. The levels of oxidative damage tended to increase significantly after ≥24 h of incubations compared to controls. The oxidative DNA damage tended to reach a steady-state after treatment with 60 μg/mL of Fe3O4-NPs. Significant dose–response relationships were observed. A greater adduct production was observed after magnetic hyperthermia, with the highest amounts of oxidative lesions after 40 min exposure to AMF. The effects of magnetic hyperthermia were significantly increased with exposure and incubation times. Most important, the levels of oxidative lesions in AMF exposed NP treated cells were up to 20-fold greater relative to those observed in nonexposed NP treated cells. Generation of oxidative lesions may be a mechanism by which magnetic hyperthermia induces cancer cell death.

  5. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Oxidative Damage to DNA of Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellai, Filippo; Munnia, Armelle; Viti, Jessica; Doumett, Saer; Ravagli, Costanza; Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Polvani, Simone; Giese, Roger W; Baldi, Giovanni; Galli, Andrea; Peluso, Marco E M

    2017-04-29

    Nanotechnology is addressing major urgent needs for cancer treatment. We conducted a study to compare the frequency of 3-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentafuranosyl)pyrimido[1,2-α]purin-10(3 H )-one deoxyguanosine (M₁dG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts, biomarkers of oxidative stress and/or lipid peroxidation, on human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells exposed to increasing levels of Fe₃O₄-nanoparticles (NPs) versus untreated cells at different lengths of incubations, and in the presence of increasing exposures to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) of 186 kHz using 32 P-postlabeling. The levels of oxidative damage tended to increase significantly after ≥24 h of incubations compared to controls. The oxidative DNA damage tended to reach a steady-state after treatment with 60 μg/mL of Fe₃O₄-NPs. Significant dose-response relationships were observed. A greater adduct production was observed after magnetic hyperthermia, with the highest amounts of oxidative lesions after 40 min exposure to AMF. The effects of magnetic hyperthermia were significantly increased with exposure and incubation times. Most important, the levels of oxidative lesions in AMF exposed NP treated cells were up to 20-fold greater relative to those observed in nonexposed NP treated cells. Generation of oxidative lesions may be a mechanism by which magnetic hyperthermia induces cancer cell death.

  6. Effects of Radiofrequency Induced local Hyperthermia on Normal Canine Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Ok; Loh, John J. K.; Seong, Jin Sil

    1991-01-01

    In order to assess the effects of radiofrequency-induced local hyperthermia on the normal liver, histopathologic findings and biochemical changes after localized hyperthermia in canine liver were studied. Hyperthermia was externally administered using the Thermotron RF-8 (Yamamoto Vinyter Co., Japan; Capacitive type heating machine) with parallel opposed electrodes. Thirteen dogs were used and allocated into one control group (N=3) and two treatment groups according to the treatment temperature. Group I (N=5) was heated with 42.5±0.5.deg.C for 30 minutes, and Group(N=5) was heated with 45±0.5.deg.C for 15-30 minutes. Samples of liver tissue were obtained through a needle biopsy immediately after hyperthermia and 7, 14 and 28 days after treatment and examined for SGOT, SGPT and alkaline phosphatase. Although SGOT and SGPT were elevated after hyperthermia in both groups (three of five in each group), there was no liver cell necrosis or hyperthermia related mortality in Group I. A hydropic swelling of hepatocytes was prominent histologic finding. Hyperthermia with 45.deg.C for 30 minutes was fatal and showed extensive liver cell necrosis. In conclusion, liver damage day heat of 42.5±0.5.deg.C for 30 minutes is reversible, and liver damage by heat of 45±0.5.deg.C for 30 minutes can be fatal or irreversible. However, these results cannot be applied directly to human trial. Therefore, in order to apply hyperthermic treatment on human liver tumor safely, close observation of temperature with proper thermometry is mandatory. Hyperthermic treatment should be confined to the tumor area while sparing a normal liver as much as possible

  7. Magnetic and in vitro heating properties of implants formed in situ from injectable formulations and containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) embedded in silica microparticles for magnetically induced local hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Renard, Pol-Edern; Lortz, Rolf; Senatore, Carmine; Rapin, Jean-Philippe; Buchegger, Franz; Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich; Doelker, Eric; Jordan, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The biological and therapeutic responses to hyperthermia, when it is envisaged as an anti-tumor treatment modality, are complex and variable. Heat delivery plays a critical role and is counteracted by more or less efficient body cooling, which is largely mediated by blood flow. In the case of magnetically mediated modality, the delivery of the magnetic particles, most often superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), is also critically involved. We focus here on the magnetic characterization of two injectable formulations able to gel in situ and entrap silica microparticles embedding SPIONs. These formulations have previously shown suitable syringeability and intratumoral distribution in vivo. The first formulation is based on alginate, and the second on a poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVAL). Here we investigated the magnetic properties and heating capacities in an alternating magnetic field (141 kHz, 12 mT) for implants with increasing concentrations of magnetic microparticles. We found that the magnetic properties of the magnetic microparticles were preserved using the formulation and in the wet implant at 37 o C, as in vivo. Using two orthogonal methods, a common SLP (20 W g -1 ) was found after weighting by magnetic microparticle fraction, suggesting that both formulations are able to properly carry the magnetic microparticles in situ while preserving their magnetic properties and heating capacities. - Research highlights: → Magnetic formulations that form implants on injection into tissues are proposed for hyperthermia. → Superparamagnetic properties of the SPION-silica composite microparticles are preserved in the wet implants. → Heat-dissipating properties (SLP of 20 W/g of implant) support in vivo use.

  8. Stress-induced hyperthermia in translational stress research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinkers, C.H.; Penning, R.; Ebbens, M.M.; Helhammer, J.; Verster, J.C.; Kalkman, C.J.; Olivier, B.

    2010-01-01

    The stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) response is the transient change in body temperature in response to acute stress. This body temperature response is part of the autonomic stress response which also results in tachycardia and an increased blood pressure. So far, a SIH response has been found in

  9. Targeting to carcinoma cells with chitosan- and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-01-01

    The delivery of hyperthermic thermoseeds to a specific target site with minimal side effects is an important challenge in targeted hyperthermia, which employs magnetic method and functional polymers. An external magnetic field is used to control the site-specific targeting of the magnetic nanoparticles. Polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles can confer a higher affinity to the biological cell membranes. In this study, uncoated, chitosan-coated, and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized for use as a hyperthermic thermoseed. Each sample was examined with respect to their applications to hyperthermia using XRD, VSM, and FTIR. In addition, the temperature changes under an alternating magnetic field were observed. As in vitro tests, the magnetic responsiveness of chitosan- and starch-coated magnetite was determined by a simple blood vessel model under various intensities of magnetic field. L929 normal cells and KB carcinoma cells were used to examine the cytotoxicity and affinity of each sample using the MTT method. The chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles generated a higher DeltaT of 23 degrees C under an AC magnetic field than the starch-coated magnetite, and the capturing rate of the particles was 96% under an external magnetic field of 0.4 T. The highest viability of L929 cells was 93.7%. Comparing the rate of KB cells capture with the rate of L929 cells capture, the rate of KB cells capture relatively increased with 10.8% in chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles are biocompatible and have a selective affinity to KB cells. The targeting of magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia was improved using a controlled magnetic field and a chitosan-coating. Therefore, chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles are expected to be promising materials for use in magnetic targeted hyperthermia. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A system for the treatment of cancer by magnetically mediated arterial embolisation hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.; Moroz, P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Sirtex Medical Limited is developing new technology to treat cancer by induced hyperthermia. A wealth of scientific data from laboratory and animal experimentation has shown that if the temperature of cancerous tissue is maintained for some time above about 42 deg C then that cancer will be destroyed. In current clinical practice, hyperthermia therapy is mostly used as an adjunct to radiotherapy in the treatment of superficial and other easily accessible tumour sites. Restrictions to the wider application of hyperthermia to the treatment of tumours located at deep body sites are technological in nature. There are presently no reliable non-invasive techniques that can be used to deliver an adequate heat dose to a deep seated tumour in an organ such as the liver without risking unacceptable heating of overlying and surrounding normal tissue. The Sirtex technology uses the heat generated in small magnetic particles when exposed to a high frequency magnetic field. The particles are delivered to the tumour via arterially infused microspheres which eventually embolise the tumour vasculature. The enhanced concentration of microspheres around the tumour ensures only the diseased tissue is heated. This paper reviews the current status of this research and presents recent experimental results including the differential heating and consequent destruction of experimental animal tumours. The pathway to clinical application will be discussed in light of these results

  11. Ferromagnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia and thermoablation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Eiji; Kayano, Takeru; Sato, Suguru; Minagawa, Makoto; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kishimoto, Mikio [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Shinji; Yamada, Keiichi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro [Department of Surgery, Advanced Biomedical Applications, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575 (Japan); Mitsumata, Chiharu, E-mail: kita@bk.tsukuba.ac.j [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2010-12-01

    The use of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia and thermoablation therapies has shown great promise in the field of nanobiomedicine. Even local hyperthermia offers numerous advantages as a novel cancer therapy; however, it requires a remarkably high heating power of more than 1 kW g{sup -1} for heat agents. As a candidate for high heat generation, we focus on ferromagnetic nanoparticles and compare their physical properties with those of superparamagnetic substances. Numerical simulations for ideal single-domain ferromagnetic nanoparticles with cubic and uniaxial magnetic symmetries were carried out and MH curves together with minor loops were obtained. From the simulation, the efficient use of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) having a limited amplitude was discussed. Co-ferrite nanoparticles with various magnitudes of coercive force were produced by co-precipitation and a hydrothermal process. A maximum specific loss power of 420 W g{sup -1} was obtained using an AMF at 117 kHz with H{sub 0} = 51.4 kA m{sup -1} (640 Oe). The relaxation behaviour in the ferromagnetic state below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature was examined by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  12. Magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics for hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretcanu, O.; Verne, E.; Coeisson, M.; Tiberto, P.; Allia, P.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic materials play a key-role in magnetic induction hyperthermia for the treatment of cancer. In this paper, we analyse the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics with the composition in the system SiO 2 -Na 2 O-CaO-P 2 O 5 -FeO-Fe 2 O 3 , as a function of the melting temperature. These materials were obtained by melting of commercial reagents in the temperature range of 1400-1550 o C. Room-temperature magnetic measurements were performed by means of a vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature. The power loss was determined from calorimetric measurements, using a magnetic induction furnace. The highest power loss (61 W/g) has been obtained for samples melted at 1500 o C. The heat generation of the ferrimagnetic glass-ceramics prepared by two different synthesis methods (traditional melting and coprecipitation-derived) will be compared. These materials are expected to be useful in the localised treatment of cancer

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with a Thermosensitive Polymer with Hyperthermia Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felisa Reyes-Ortega

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been widely used to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, largely through passive accumulation provided by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Their incorporation into biopolymer coatings enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive, biocompatible nanoparticles that are well dispersed in aqueous media. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare functionalized, stable magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs coated with a temperature-responsive polymer, by means of the hydrothermal method combined with an oil/water (o/w emulsion process. The effects of both pH and temperature on the electrophoretic mobility and surface charge of these MNPs are investigated. The magnetite/polymer composition of these systems is detected by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and quantified by thermogravimetric analysis. The therapeutic possibilities of the designed nanostructures as effective heating agents for magnetic hyperthermia are demonstrated, and specific absorption rates as high as 150 W/g, with 20 mT magnetic field and 205 kHz frequency, are obtained. This magnetic heating response could provide a promising nanoparticle system for combined diagnostics and cancer therapy.

  14. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Radiation Therapy: Radiobiological Principles and Current Practice †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridon V. Spirou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia, though by itself generally non-curative for cancer, can significantly increase the efficacy of radiation therapy, as demonstrated by in vitro, in vivo, and clinical results. Its limited use in the clinic is mainly due to various practical implementation difficulties, the most important being how to adequately heat the tumor, especially deep-seated ones. In this work, we first review the effects of hyperthermia on tissue, the limitations of radiation therapy and the radiobiological rationale for combining the two treatment modalities. Subsequently, we review the theory and evidence for magnetic hyperthermia that is based on magnetic nanoparticles, its advantages compared with other methods of hyperthermia, and how it can be used to overcome the problems associated with traditional techniques of hyperthermia.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia as an adjuvant cancer therapy with chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Alicia Ailie

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) is an emerging cancer therapy which has shown to be most effective when applied in the adjuvant setting with chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Although mNPH employs heat as a primary therapeutic modality, conventional heat may not be the only cytotoxic effect. As such, my studies have focused on the mechanism and use of mNPH alone and in conjunction with cisplatinum chemotherapy in murine breast cancer cells and a related in vivo model. MNPH was compared to conventional microwave tumor heating, with results suggesting that mNPH (mNP directly injected into the tumor and immediately activated) and 915 MHz microwave hyperthermia, at the same thermal dose, result in similar tumor regrowth delay kinetics. However, mNPH shows significantly less peri-tumor normal tissue damage. MNPH combined with cisplatinum also demonstrated significant improvements in regrowth delay over either modality applied as a monotherapy. Additional studies demonstrated that a relatively short tumor incubation time prior to AMF exposure (less than 10 minutes) as compared to a 4-hour incubation time, resulted in faster heating rates, but similar regrowth delays when treated to the same thermal dose. The reduction of heating rate correlated well with the observed reduction in mNP concentration in the tumor observed with 4 hour incubation. The ability to effectively deliver cytotoxic mNPs to metastatic tumors is the hope and goal of systemic mNP therapy. However, delivering relevant levels of mNP is proving to be a formidable challenge. To address this issue, I assessed the ability of cisplatinum to simultaneously treat a tumor and improve the uptake of systemically delivered mNPs. Following a cisplatinum pretreatment, systemic mNPs uptake was increased by 3.1 X, in implanted murine breast tumors. Additional in vitro studies showed the necessity of a specific mNP/ Fe architecture and spatial relation for heat-based cytotoxicity in cultured cells.

  16. Hyperthermia-induced alteration of yeast susceptibility to mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Morrison, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    Diploid yeast (s. cerevisiae) were examined for alterations in susceptibility to induced mutation following hyperthermia treatment. In cells grown at 23 0 C, a non-lethal heat exposure (38 0 C, 30 min) markedly suppressed mutation induced by a subsequent non-killing dose of MNNG of MNU. Mutation by ENU, 8-MOP + UVA, or γ-rays was not affected. An intermediate level of mutation suppression was observed for mutation by 254nm UV or MMS. Mutation by MNNG was not suppressed by the same heat treatment delivered after the mutagen exposure. In a split dose experiment (two MNNG treatments separated by a heat exposure) no suppression of mutation was observed. Treatment with cycloheximide mimicked the effect of heat treatment. These data suggest that mutation induction by MNNG or MNU is protein synthesis dependent, i.e. an error-prone repair system is induced by exposure to MNNG or MNU but not by ENU, 8-MOP+UVA or γ-irradiation. We propose that hyperthermia treatment, by inducing stress protein synthesis at the expense of normal protein synthesis, precludes induction of this error-prone system. Therefore, in heat treated cells, DNA lesions produced by MNNG or MNU exposure must be resolved by an essentially constitutive system which is less error-prone than the inducible one

  17. Description and characterization of the novel hyperthermia- and thermoablation-system MFHregistered300F for clinical magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gneveckow, Uwe; Jordan, Andreas; Scholz, Regina; Bruess, Volker; Waldoefner, Norbert; Ricke, Jens; Feussner, Annelie; Hildebrandt, Bert; Rau, Beate; Wust, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a new approach to deposit heat power in deep tissues by overcoming limitations of conventional heat treatments. After infiltration of the target tissue with nanosized magnetic particles, the power of an alternating magnetic field is transformed into heat. The combination of the 100 kHz magnetic field applicator MFH registered 300F and the magnetofluid (MF), which both are designed for medical use, is investigated with respect to its dosage recommendations and clinical applicability. We found a magnetic field strength of up to 18 kA/m in a cylindrical treatment area of 20 cm diameter and aperture height up to 300 mm. The specific absorption rate (SAR) can be controlled directly by the magnetic field strength during the treatment. The relationship between magnetic field strength and the iron normalized SAR (SAR Fe ) is only slightly depending on the concentration of the MF and can be used for planning the target SAR. The achievable energy absorption rates of the MF distributed in the tissue is sufficient for either hyperthermia or thermoablation. The fluid has a visible contrast in therapeutic concentrations on a CT scanner and can be detected down to 0.01 g/l Fe in the MRI. The system has proved its capability and practicability for heat treatment in deep regions of the human body

  18. Predicting thermal history a-priori for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia of internal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Purbarun; Sirisha Maganti, Lakshmi

    2017-08-01

    This article proposes a simplistic and realistic method where a direct analytical expression can be derived for the temperature field within a tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. The approximated analytical expression for thermal history within the tumour is derived based on the lumped capacitance approach and considers all therapy protocols and parameters. The present method is simplistic and provides an easy framework for estimating hyperthermia protocol parameters promptly. The model has been validated with respect to several experimental reports on animal models such as mice/rabbit/hamster and human clinical trials. It has been observed that the model is able to accurately estimate the thermal history within the carcinoma during the hyperthermia therapy. The present approach may find implications in a-priori estimation of the thermal history in internal tumours for optimizing magnetic hyperthermia treatment protocols with respect to the ablation time, tumour size, magnetic drug concentration, field strength, field frequency, nanoparticle material and size, tumour location, and so on.

  19. Self-regulated magnetic fluid hyperthermia: A potential cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaria, Hitesh Ghanshyam

    An emerging cancer therapy, self-regulated magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH), is the motivation for this work. In this therapy, cancer is annihilated by heating the tumor to desired therapeutic temperatures (˜45°C) by using magnetic nanoparticles of controlled Curie temperatures (Tc). This work was aimed at preparing and characterizing FePt, NiPd and NiPt nanoparticles for self-regulated MFH because their Tc could be tuned by changing their composition. Based on the excellent colloidal stability, size tunability and toxicity considerations, FePt was an obvious choice for self-regulated MFH. The 3.2 nm Fe61Pt39 particles displayed a Tc of 151°C, which is well below the Tc of bulk Fe61Pt39 (˜327°C). To reach the desired Tc of 45°C the composition of iron needs to be increased. However, a major obstacle was the formation of iron oxide shells with increase in iron composition of the particles. A recent finding that the composition of individual FePt particles deviated significantly from the average value encouraged us to study the mechanism of formation of FePt particles. Our analysis showed that early in the reaction the particles were Pt-rich and as the reaction proceeded the Fe content increased. It was found that the wide distribution in the composition of individual particles started early in the synthesis, suggesting that the compositional variability may be attributed to the Pt nuclei. The synthesized FePt particles are unsuitable for biological applications because of their hydrophobic surface. Hence, their surface was modified by ligand exchange with mercapto alkanoic acids. After ligand exchange, stable FePt dispersions could be formed in alkaline water. The study revealed that both the carboxylate and thiol groups were required to form stable FePt dispersions. In addition, 15 nm gold particles were successfully conjugated to genetically modified adenoviruses that selectively bind to cancer tumors. We also modeled the thermal transport in tissues during

  20. Hyperthermia: an effective strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kanwal; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Heat has been used as a medicinal and healing modality throughout human history. The combination of hyperthermia (HT) with radiation and anticancer agents has been used clinically and has shown positive results to a certain extent. However, the clinical results of HT treatment alone have been only partially satisfactory. Cell death following HT treatment is a function of both temperature and treatment duration. HT induces cancer cell death through apoptosis; the degree of apoptosis and the apoptotic pathway vary in different cancer cell types. HT-induced reactive oxygen species production are responsible for apoptosis in various cell types. However, the underlying mechanism of signal transduction and the genes related to this process still need to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by HT, enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis, and the genetic network involved in HT-induced apoptosis.

  1. Magnetic nanowires and hyperthermia: How geometry and material affect heat production efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia, which refers to the production of heat by magnetic nanostructures under an alternating magnetic field (AMF), has been previously investigated with superparamagnetic nanobeads as a cancer therapy method. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) used in hyperthermia can be very promising, as it has been shown that they have a larger magnetic moment per unit of volume compared to the nanobeads. Moreover, Fe NWs proved to have a higher heating efficiency compared to Fe nanobeads, when exposed to an AMF at the same concentration [1].

  2. Magnetomotive Optical Coherence Elastography for Magnetic Hyperthermia Dosimetry Based on Dynamic Tissue Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Pande, Paritosh; Ahmad, Adeel; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used in many diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications over the past few decades to enhance imaging contrast, steer drugs to targets, and treat tumors via hyperthermia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical biomedical imaging modality that relies on the detection of backscattered light to generate high-resolution cross-sectional images of biological tissue. MNPs have been utilized as imaging contrast and perturbative mechanical agents in OCT in techniques called magnetomotive OCT (MM-OCT) and magnetomotive elastography (MM-OCE), respectively. MNPs have also been independently used for magnetic hyperthermia treatments, enabling therapeutic functions such as killing tumor cells. It is well known that the localized tissue heating during hyperthermia treatments result in a change in the biomechanical properties of the tissue. Therefore, we propose a novel dosimetric technique for hyperthermia treatment based on the viscoelasticity change detected by MM-OCE, further enabling the theranostic function of MNPs. In this paper, we first review the basic principles and applications of MM-OCT, MM-OCE, and magnetic hyperthermia, and present new preliminary results supporting the concept of MM-OCE-based hyperthermia dosimetry. PMID:28163565

  3. Magnetic study of iron-containing carbon nanotubes: Feasibility for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupskaya, Y. [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, 01171 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: y.krupskaya@ifw-dresden.de; Mahn, C.; Parameswaran, A. [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Taylor, A.; Kraemer, K. [Department of Urology, Dresden University of Technology, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Hampel, S.; Leonhardt, A.; Ritschel, M.; Buechner, B.; Klingeler, R. [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, 01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    We present a detailed magnetic study of iron containing carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNT), which highlights their potential for contactless magnetic heating in hyperthermia cancer treatment. Magnetic field dependent AC inductive heating experiments on Fe-CNT dispersions show a substantial temperature increase of Fe-CNT dispersions in applied AC magnetic fields. DC and AC magnetization studies have been done in order to elucidate the heating mechanism. We observe a different magnetic response of Fe-CNT powder compared to Fe-CNT dispersed in aqueous solution, e.g., ferromagnetic Fe-CNT in powder do not show any hysteresis when being dispersed in liquid. Our data indicate the motion of Fe-CNT in liquid in applied magnetic fields.

  4. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  5. Model for hyperthermia with arrays of magnetic nanoparticles: spatial and time temperature distributions in tumor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Lunov, O.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2010), 690-695 ISSN 1533-4880 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : interstitial hyperthermia * thermometry * magnetic nanoparticles * radiotherapy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.351, year: 2010

  6. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  7. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Paula I.P. [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Laia, César A.T. [Laboratório Associado para a Química Verde (LAQV), REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, Alexandra [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pereira, Laura C.J.; Coutinho, Joana T. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Ferreira, Isabel M.M., E-mail: imf@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Novo, Carlos M.M. [Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, IHMT/UNL, 1349-008 Lisboa (Portugal); Borges, João Paulo, E-mail: jpb@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized with oleic acid. • Maximum stabilization was achieved at neutral pH. • Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications were tested. • The produced nanoparticles are viable for both biomedical applications. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of −120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  8. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Paula I.P.; Laia, César A.T.; Carvalho, Alexandra; Pereira, Laura C.J.; Coutinho, Joana T.; Ferreira, Isabel M.M.; Novo, Carlos M.M.; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized with oleic acid. • Maximum stabilization was achieved at neutral pH. • Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications were tested. • The produced nanoparticles are viable for both biomedical applications. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe_3O_4, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of −120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  9. Optimal design of implants for magnetically mediated hyperthermia: A wireless power transfer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hans-Dieter; Sarris, Costas D.

    2017-09-01

    In magnetically mediated hyperthermia (MMH), an externally applied alternating magnetic field interacts with a mediator (such as a magnetic nanoparticle or an implant) inside the body to heat up the tissue in its proximity. Producing heat via induced currents in this manner is strikingly similar to wireless power transfer (WPT) for implants, where power is transferred from a transmitter outside of the body to an implanted receiver, in most cases via magnetic fields as well. Leveraging this analogy, a systematic method to design MMH implants for optimal heating efficiency is introduced, akin to the design of WPT systems for optimal power transfer efficiency. This paper provides analytical formulas for the achievable heating efficiency bounds as well as the optimal operating frequency and the implant material. Multiphysics simulations validate the approach and further demonstrate that optimization with respect to maximum heating efficiency is accompanied by minimizing heat delivery to healthy tissue. This is a property that is highly desirable when considering MMH as a key component or complementary method of cancer treatment and other applications.

  10. The Application of Carbon Nanotubes in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Raniszewski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the results of the investigation into the applications of carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic nanoparticles as nanoheaters for targeted thermal ablation of cancer cells. Relevant nanoparticles’ characteristics were exploited in terms of their functionality for biomedical applications and their magnetic properties were examined to determine heat generation efficiency induced by the exposure of the particles to an alternating magnetic field. The influence of the electromagnetic field on the human body tissues was assessed, providing quantitative measures of the interaction. The behavior of a liquid containing magnetic particles, during the exposure to the alternating magnetic field, was verified. As for the application for the ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes, the authors investigated temperature distribution in human liver tumor together with Arrhenius tissue damage model and the thermal dose concept.

  11. Immunohistochemical study on the fetal rat pituitary in hyperthermia-induced exencephaly

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Yuichi G.; 渡辺, 勇一

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia of fetal rats is known to cause malformations of various organs including brain. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of the hyperthermia-induced brain damages on the development of the adenohypophysis. Mother rats of Day 9.5 of pregnancy were anesthetized and immersed in hot water (43℃) for 15 min. At Day 21.5 of gestation, fetuses were removed by caesarian section and examined for exencephaly. Hyperthermal stress induced varying degrees of exencephaly in ...

  12. Clinical investigation of the safety and efficacy of a cervical intraepithelial neoplasia treatment using a hyperthermia device that uses heat induced by alternating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Koji; Fujioka, Toru; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Inoue, Aya; Uchikura, Yuka; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takagi, Katsuko; Mori, Miki; Koizumi, Masae; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsubara, Yuko; Matsubara, Keiichi; Nawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been used for the conservative treatment of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-CIN) in women of fertile age. Conization has been associated with stenosis of the cervix and a decrease in cervical mucus secretion, in addition to the increase in the risk of cervical canal shortening and problems during the perinatal period, including premature birth and premature rupture of membranes. Although the laser transpiration technique does not cause shortening of the cervical canal, it is associated with the recurrent risk of deep residual disease. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic safety and efficacy of the therapy performed using the transaction magnetic field induction heating device, AMTC400, in fertile patients with HG-CIN (excluding carcinoma in situ). Four premenopausal patients with CIN3 and high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive were treated using an AMTC400. Chronological colposcopic findings, high-risk HPV, final histological findings with conization and follow-up data were evaluated. All the treatments were successfully performed on the in-patients without anesthesia. Intra- and postoperative complications included minor pain and bleeding in all cases. Two of the cases (50%) were high-risk HPV-negative following the treatments. All cases exhibited a change in the observed color (to white), and subsequent epithelization following treatment. Although cytological analysis at 5 weeks following the treatment confirmed the cases were negative for intraepithelial lesions and malignancies, a definitive histology with conization 6 weeks following the treatment confirmed CIN1 and koilocytosis in all cases. The assessment of treatment effectiveness was determined as a moderate improvement in all cases. In conclusion, thermotherapy applied using AMTC400 represented a safe and effective treatment for HG-CIN in women of fertile age. However, additional improvements associated with the site of puncture needles

  13. Synthesis of FeCo magnetic nanoalloys and investigation of heating properties for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Özer; Fırat, Tezer

    2018-06-01

    In this study, size controlled FeCo colloidal magnetic nanoalloys in the range of 11.5-37.2 nm were synthesized by surfactant assistant ball milling method. Magnetic separation technique was performed subsequent to synthesis process so as to obtain magnetic nanoalloy fluid with narrow size distribution. Particle distribution was determined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) while X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements verified FeCo alloy formation as BCC structure. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) method was used to investigate magnetic properties of nanoalloys. Maximum saturation magnetization and maximum coercivity were obtained as 172 Am2/kg for nanoparticles with the mean size of 37.2 nm and 19.4 mT for nanoparticles with the mean size of 13.3 nm, respectively. The heating ability of FeCo magnetic nanoalloys was determined through calorimetrical measurements for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) applications. Heat generation mechanisms were investigated by using linear response theory and Stoner-Wohlfarth (S-W) model. Specific absorption rate (SAR) values were obtained in the range of 2-15 W/g for magnetic field frequency of 171 kHz and magnetic field strength in between 6 and 14 mT.

  14. Hysteresis losses and specific absorption rate measurements in magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Martino, Luca; Kane, Shashank N; Raghuvanshi, Saroj; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic hysteresis loops areas and hyperthermia on magnetic nanoparticles have been studied with the aim of providing reliable and reproducible methods of measuring the specific absorption rate (SAR). The SAR of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with two different mean sizes, and Ni 1-x Zn x Fe 2 O 4 ferrites with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8 has been measured with three approaches: static hysteresis loops areas, dynamic hysteresis loops areas and hyperthermia of a water solution. For dynamic loops and thermometric measurements, specific experimental setups have been developed, that operate at comparable frequencies (≈ 69kHz and ≈ 100kHz respectively) and rf magnetic field peak values (up to 100mT). The hyperthermia setup has been fully modelled to provide a direct measurement of the SAR of the magnetic nanoparticles by taking into account the heat exchange with the surrounding environment in non-adiabatic conditions and the parasitic heating of the water due to ionic currents. Dynamic hysteresis loops are shown to provide an accurate determination of the SAR except for superparamagnetic samples, where the boundary with a blocked regime could be crossed in dynamic conditions. Static hysteresis loops consistently underestimate the specific absorption rate but can be used to select the most promising samples. A means of reliably measure SAR of magnetic nanoparticles by different approaches for hyperthermia applications is presented and its validity discussed by comparing different methods. This work fits within the general subject of metrological traceability in medicine with a specific focus on magnetic hyperthermia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editor: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperthermia in low aspect-ratio magnetic nanotubes for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Guzman, D. F.; Lizardi, L. I.; Otálora, J. A.; Landeros, P.

    2017-03-01

    A simple model for the magnetization reversal process of low aspect-ratio ferromagnetic nanotubes (MNTs) is presented. Because of advantages over other geometries, these structures are interesting for biomedical applications, such as magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, where the heat released during magnetic reversal is used to destroy tumors. For example, the tubular geometry provides two independent functional surfaces that may be selectively manipulated and also gives a storage cavity. Owing to their large surface to weight ratio and low mass density, MNTs are not decanted by gravity. We calculated magnetic phase diagrams, energy barriers, nucleation fields, and the amount of dissipated heat and specific absorption rate for magnetite nanotubes. The geometrical parameters were varied, and simple formulae were used to optimize the tube response under alternating excitation, as required for magnetic hyperthermia applications.

  16. Large specific absorption rates in the magnetic hyperthermia properties of metallic iron nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdaoui, B.; Meffre, A.; Lacroix, L.-M. [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Carrey, J., E-mail: julian.carrey@insa-toulouse.f [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Lachaize, S. [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Gougeon, M. [Institut CARNOT-CIRIMAT-UMR 5085, Batiment 2R1, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Respaud, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, LPCNO (Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie des Nano-Objets), 135 avenue de Rangueil, F-31077 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5215, LPCNO, F-31077 Toulouse (France); Chaudret, B. [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination-CNRS, 205 rte de Narbonne, 31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2010-10-15

    We report on the magnetic hyperthermia properties of chemically synthesized ferromagnetic 11 and 16 nm Fe(0) nanoparticles of cubic shape displaying the saturation magnetization of bulk iron. The specific absorption rate measured on 16 nm nanocubes is 1690{+-}160 W/g at 300 kHz and 66 mT. This corresponds to specific losses-per-cycle of 5.6 mJ/g, largely exceeding the ones reported in other systems. A way to quantify the degree of optimization of any system with respect to hyperthermia applications is proposed. Applied here, this method shows that our nanoparticles are not fully optimized, probably due to the strong influence of magnetic interactions on their magnetic response. Once protected from oxidation and further optimized, such nano-objects could constitute efficient magnetic cores for biomedical applications requiring very large heating power.

  17. Dynamical Origin of Highly Efficient Energy Dissipation in Soft Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kwan; Sim, Jaegun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2018-05-01

    We explore robust magnetization-dynamic behaviors in soft magnetic nanoparticles in single-domain states and find their related high-efficiency energy-dissipation mechanism using finite-element micromagnetic simulations. We also make analytical derivations that provide deeper physical insights into the magnetization dynamics associated with Gilbert damping parameters under applications of time-varying rotating magnetic fields of different strengths and frequencies and static magnetic fields. Furthermore, we find that the mass-specific energy-dissipation rate at resonance in the steady-state regime changes remarkably with the strength of rotating fields and static fields for given damping constants. The associated magnetization dynamics are well interpreted with the help of the numerical calculation of analytically derived explicit forms. The high-efficiency energy-loss power can be obtained using soft magnetic nanoparticles in the single-domain state by tuning the frequency of rotating fields to the resonance frequency; what is more, it is controllable via the rotating and static field strengths for a given intrinsic damping constant. We provide a better and more efficient means of achieving specific loss power that can be implemented in magnetic hyperthermia applications.

  18. The effect of hypofractionated radiation and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia on tumor immunogenicity and overall treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Wagner, Robert J.; Song, Ailin; Osterberg, Bjorn; Gladstone, David J.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Fiering, Steven N.; Giustini, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    It is now known that many tumors develop molecular signals (immune checkpoint modulators) that inhibit an effective tumor immune response. New information also suggest that even well-known cancer treatment modalities such as radiation and hyperthermia generate potentially beneficial immune responses that have been blocked or mitigated by such immune checkpoints, or similar molecules. The cancer therapy challenge is to; a) identify these treatment-based immune signals (proteins, antigens, etc.); b) the treatment doses or regimens that produce them; and c) the mechanisms that block or have the potential to promote them. The goal of this preliminary study, using the B6 mouse - B16 tumor model, clinically relevant radiation doses and fractionation schemes (including those used clinically in hypofractionated radiation therapy), magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) and sophisticated protein, immune and tumor growth analysis techniques and modulators, is to determine the effect of specific radiation or hyperthermia alone and combined on overall treatment efficacy and immunologic response mechanisms. Preliminary analysis suggests that radiation dose (10 Gy vs. 2 Gy) significantly alters the mechanism of cell death (apoptosis vs. mitosis vs. necrosis) and the resulting immunogenicity. Our hypothesis and data suggest this difference is protein/antigen and immune recognition-based. Similarly, our evidence suggest that radiation doses larger than the conventional 2 Gy dose and specific hyperthermia doses and techniques (including mNP hyperthermia treatment) can be immunologically different, and potentially superior to, the radiation and heat therapy regimens that are typically used in research and clinical practice.

  19. Physics responsible for heating efficiency and self-controlled temperature rise of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles as heat-generating nanosources in hyperthermia treatment are still faced with many drawbacks for achieving sufficient clinical potential. In this context, increase in heating ability of magnetic nanoparticles in a biologically safe alternating magnetic field and also approach to a precise control on temperature rise are two challenging subjects so that a significant part of researchers' efforts has been devoted to them. Since a deep understanding of Physics concepts of heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is essential to develop hyperthermia as a cancer treatment with non-adverse side effects, this review focuses on different mechanisms responsible for heat dissipation in a radio frequency magnetic field. Moreover, particular attention is given to ferrite-based nanoparticles because of their suitability in radio frequency magnetic fields. Also, the key role of Curie temperature in suppressing undesired temperature rise is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.dupuis@upmc.fr

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH. - Highlights: • Dynamic hysteresis measurements are a promising tool to study magnetic hyperthermia. • Dynamic hysteresis cycles can be reproduced using a simple model. • The effect of viscosity on hyperthermia of maghemite is weaker than expected.

  1. nNOS inhibitors attenuate methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity but not hyperthermia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhak, Y; Martin, J L; Ail, S F

    2000-09-11

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is associated with hyperthermia. We investigated the effect of several neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitors on METH-induced hyperthermia and striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Administration of METH (5 mg/kg; q. 3 h x 3) to Swiss Webster mice produced marked hyperthermia and 50-60% depletion of striatal dopaminergic markers 72 h after METH administration. Pretreatment with the nNOS inhibitors S-methylthiocitrulline (SMTC; 10 mg/kg) or 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole (3-Br-7-NI; 20 mg/kg) before each METH injection did not affect the persistent hyperthermia produced by METH, but afforded protection against the depletion of dopaminergic markers. A low dose (25 mg/kg) of the nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) did not affect METH-induced hyperthermia, but a high dose (50 mg/kg) produced significant hypothermia. These findings indicate that low dose of selective nNOS inhibitors protect against METH-induced neurotoxicity with no effect on body temperature and support the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite have a major role in METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

  2. Evaluation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) combined with external radiation in an orthotopic rat model of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, M.; Thiesen, B.; Taymoorian, K.; Gneveckow, U.; Waldoefner, N.; Koch, M.; Scholz, R.; Lein, M.; Jung, K.; Loening, S.A.; Jordan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a new concept of cancer treatment based on AC magnetic field-induced excitation of biocompatible superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Preliminary studies of MFH using nanoscaled aminosilan-coated magnetites have demonstrated the feasibility of minimally invasive MFH in the Dunning tumor model. Here we evaluated the effect of two sequential MFH treatments, combined with external radiation, in an orthotopic Dunning R3327-MatLyLu prostate cancer model. MFH led to a significant growth inhibition in this orthotopic model of the aggressive MatLyLu tumor variant. Furthermore, combined MFH and radiation with 20 Gy equally effective in inhibiting tumor growth as radiation with 60 Gy, suggesting a significant synergistic effect. Intratumoral deposition of magnetic fluids was found to be stable, allowing for serial MFH treatments without repeated injection. The optimal treatment schedules of this combination regarding temperatures, sequencing and fractionation need to be defined in further experimental studies. (author)

  3. Indomethacin attenuation of radiation-induced hyperthermia does not modify radiation-induced motor hypoactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, J.L.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Harris, A.H.; Davis, H.D.; Landauer, M.R. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Exposure of rats to 5-10 Gy of ionizing radiation produces hyperthermia and reduces motor activity. Previous studies suggested that radiation-induced hyperthermia results from a relatively direct action on the brain and is mediated by prostaglandins. To test the hypothesis that hypoactivity may be, in part, a thermoregulatory response to this elevation in body temperature, adult male rats were given indomethacin (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), a blocker of prostaglandin synthesis, and were either irradiated (LINAC 18.6 MeV (nominal) high-energy electrons, 10 Gy at 10 Gy/min, 2.8 {mu}sec pulses at 2 Hz) or sham-irradiated. The locomotor activity of all rats was then measured for 30 min in a photocell monitor for distance traveled and number of vertical movements. Rectal temperatures of irradiated rats administered vehicle only were elevated by 0.9{+-}0.2degC at the beginning and the end of the activity session. Although indomethacin, at the two higher doses tested, attenuated the hyperthermia in irradiated rats by 52-75%, it did not attenuate radiation-induced reductions in motor activity. These results indicate that motor hypoactivity after exposure to 10 Gy of high-energy electrons is not due to elevated body temperature or to the increased synthesis of prostaglandins. (author)

  4. Indomethacin attenuation of radiation-induced hyperthermia does not modify radiation-induced motor hypoactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.L.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Harris, A.H.; Davis, H.D.; Landauer, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 5-10 Gy of ionizing radiation produces hyperthermia and reduces motor activity. Previous studies suggested that radiation-induced hyperthermia results from a relatively direct action on the brain and is mediated by prostaglandins. To test the hypothesis that hypoactivity may be, in part, a thermoregulatory response to this elevation in body temperature, adult male rats were given indomethacin (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), a blocker of prostaglandin synthesis, and were either irradiated (LINAC 18.6 MeV (nominal) high-energy electrons, 10 Gy at 10 Gy/min, 2.8 μsec pulses at 2 Hz) or sham-irradiated. The locomotor activity of all rats was then measured for 30 min in a photocell monitor for distance traveled and number of vertical movements. Rectal temperatures of irradiated rats administered vehicle only were elevated by 0.9±0.2degC at the beginning and the end of the activity session. Although indomethacin, at the two higher doses tested, attenuated the hyperthermia in irradiated rats by 52-75%, it did not attenuate radiation-induced reductions in motor activity. These results indicate that motor hypoactivity after exposure to 10 Gy of high-energy electrons is not due to elevated body temperature or to the increased synthesis of prostaglandins. (author)

  5. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice: pharmacological profile of protective and nonprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, D S; Sonsalla, P K

    1995-12-01

    Neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine (METH) can cause hyperthermia in experimental animals. Damage sustained to dopaminergic nerve terminals by this stimulant can be reduced by environmental cooling or by pharmacological manipulation which attenuates the hyperthermia. Many pharmacological agents with very diverse actions protect against METH-induced neuropathology. Several of these compounds, as well as drugs which do not protect, were investigated to determine if there was a relationship between protection and METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice received METH with or without concurrent administration of other drugs and core (i.e., colonic) temperature was monitored during treatment. The animals were sacrificed > or = 5 days later and neostriatal tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine were measured. Core temperature was significantly elevated (> or = 2 degrees C) in mice treated with doses of METH which produced > or = 90% losses in striatal dopamine but not in mice less severally affected (only 50% loss of dopamine). Concurrent treatment of mice with METH and pharmacological agents which protected partially or completely from METH-induced toxicity also prevented the hyperthermic response (i.e., dopamine receptor antagonists, fenfluramine, dizocilpine, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, phenytoin, aminooxyacetic acid and propranol). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the hyperthermia produced by METH contributes to its neuropathology. However, studies with reserpine, a compound which dramatically lowers core temperature, demonstrated that hyperthermia per se is not a requirement for METH-induced neurotoxicity. Although core temperature was elevated in reserpinized mice treated with METH as compared with reserpinized control mice, their temperatures remained significantly lower than in nonreserpinized control mice. However, the hypothermic state produced in the reserpinized mice did not provide protection from METH-induced toxicity. These data demonstrate

  6. Water dispersible superparamagnetic Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salunkhe, Ashwini B. [Centre for advanced materials research, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Soft matter and molecular biophysics group, Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Khot, Vishwajeet M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Ruso, Juan M. [Soft matter and molecular biophysics group, Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Patil, S.I., E-mail: patil@physics.unipune.ac.in [Centre for advanced materials research, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of Cobalt iron oxide (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) are synthesized chemically, and dispersed in an aqueous suspension for hyperthermia therapy application. Different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, particle concentration which regulates the competence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle as a heating agents in hyperthermia are investigated. Specific absorption rate (SAR) decreases with increase in the particle concentration and increases with increase in applied magnetic field intensity. Highest value of SAR is found to be 91.84 W g{sup −1} for 5 mg. mL{sup −1} concentration. Oleic acid conjugated polyethylene glycol (OA-PEG) coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have shown superior cyto-compatibility over uncoated nanoparticles to L929 mice fibroblast cell lines for concentrations below 2 mg. mL{sup −1}. Present work provides the underpinning for the use of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as a potential heating mediator for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic, water dispersible CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs were synthesized by simple and cost effective Co precipitation route. • Effect of coating on various physical and chemical properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs were studied. • The effect of coating on induction heating as well as biocompatibility of NPs were studied.

  7. Mild hyperthermia can induce adaptation to cytogenetic damage caused by subsequent X irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Lu.; Jiang, Jie.

    1995-01-01

    Many low-level environmental agents are able to induce an increased resistance to subsequent mutagenic effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper, an induced cytogenetic adaptation to radiation in human lymphocytes was studied with mild hyperthermia as the adaptive treatment and compared with that induced by low-dose radiation. We found that this adaptation could be induced not only in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes (at 14, 38 and 42 h after addition of PHA), but also in unstimulated G 0 -phase cells (before addition of PHA) by mild hyperthermia (41 degrees C for 1 h) as well as 50 mGy X rays. When the two adaptive treatments were combined, no additive effects on the magnitude of the adaptation induced were observed, suggesting that low-dose radiation and hyperthermia may share one mechanism of induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage. Some mechanisms which may be involved in the induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage by low-dose radiation are discussed and compared with the effects of mild hyperthermia in inducing thermotolerance and radioresistance. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Nanosized As2O3/Fe2O3 complexes combined with magnetic fluid hyperthermia selectively target liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Yu; Song, Jian; Zhang, Dong-Sheng

    2009-06-28

    To study the methods of preparing the magnetic nano-microspheres of Fe(2)O(3) and As(2)O(3)/Fe(2)O(3) complexes and their therapeutic effects with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). Nanospheres were prepared by chemical co-precipitation and their shape and diameter were observed. Hemolysis, micronucleus, cell viability, and LD(50) along with other in vivo tests were performed to evaluate the Fe(2)O(3) microsphere biocompatibility. The inhibition ratio of tumors after Fe(2)O(3) and As(2)O(3)/Fe(2)O(3) injections combined with induced hyperthermia in xenograft human hepatocarcinoma was calculated. Fe(2)O(3) and As(2)O(3)/Fe(2)O(3) particles were round with an average diameter of 20 nm and 100 nm as observed under transmission electron microscope. Upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF), the temperature of the suspension of magnetic particles increased to 41-51 degrees C, depending on different particle concentrations, and remained stable thereafter. Nanosized Fe(2)O(3) microspheres are a new kind of biomaterial without cytotoxic effects. The LD(50) of both Fe(2)O(3) and As(2)O(3)/Fe(2)O(3) in mice was higher than 5 g/kg. One to four weeks after Fe(2)O(3) and As(2)O(3)/Fe(2)O(3) complex injections into healthy pig livers, no significant differences were found in serum AST, ALT, BUN and Cr levels among the pigs of all groups (P > 0.05), and no obvious pathological alterations were observed. After exposure to alternating magnetic fields, the inhibition ratio of the tumors was significantly different from controls in the Fe(2)O(3) and As(2)O(3)/Fe(2)O(3) groups (68.74% and 82.79%, respectively; P < 0.01). Tumors of mice in treatment groups showed obvious necrosis, while normal tissues adjoining the tumor and internal organs did not. Fe(2)O(3) and As(2)O(3)/Fe(2)O(3) complexes exerted radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia and drug toxicity on tumors without any liver or kidney damage. Therefore, nanospheres are ideal carriers for tumor-targeted therapy.

  9. Precise determination of the heat delivery during in vivo magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia with infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Harley F.; Capistrano, Gustavo; Mello, Francyelli M.; Zufelato, Nicholas; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela; Bakuzis, Andris F.

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive and real-time monitoring of the heat delivery during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNH) is of fundamental importance to predict clinical outcomes for cancer treatment. Infrared thermography (IRT) can determine the surface temperature due to three-dimensional heat delivery inside a subcutaneous tumor, an argument that is supported by numerical simulations. However, for precise temperature determination, it is of crucial relevance to use a correct experimental configuration. This work reports an MNH study using a sarcoma 180 murine tumor containing 3.9 mg of intratumorally injected manganese-ferrite nanoparticles. MNH was performed at low field amplitude and non-uniform field configuration. Five 30 min in vivo magnetic hyperthermia experiments were performed, monitoring the surface temperature with a fiber optical sensor and thermal camera at distinct angles with respect to the animal’s surface. The results indicate that temperature errors as large as 7~\\circ C can occur if the experiment is not properly designed. A new IRT error model is found to explain the data. More importantly, we show how to precisely monitor temperature with IRT during hyperthermia, which could positively impact heat dosimetry and clinical planning.

  10. Clinical hyperthermia of prostate cancer using magnetic nanoparticles - preliminary experience with a new interstitial technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, M.; Gneveckow, U.; Eckelt, L.; Feussner, A.; Waldoefner, N.; Scholz, R.; Deger, S.; Wust, P.; Loening, S.A.; Jordan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Thermotherapy using biocompatible superparamagnetic nanoparticles, also referred to as magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH), has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth in the Dunning rat model. Here we present the first clinical application of interstitial hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles in locally recurrent prostate cancer. Treatment planning was carried out using computerized tomography (CT) of the prostate. Based on the individual anatomy of the prostate and the estimated specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic fluids in prostatic tissue, the number and position of magnetic fluid depots required for sufficient heat deposition was calculated using the AMIRA software and a newly developed prostate module. Nanoparticle suspensions (MagForce MFL AS, MagForce Nanotechnologies GmbH, Berlin, Germany) were injected transperineally into the prostate under transrectal ultrasound and flouroscopy guidance. Treatments were delivered in the first magnetic field applicator for use in humans (MFH300F, MagForce Nanotechnologies GmbH, Berlin), using an alternating magnetic field with a frequency of 100 kHz and variable field strength (0-18 kA/m). Invasive thermometry of the prostate was carried out in the first and last of 6 weekly hyperthermia sessions of 60 min duration. CT-scans of the prostate were repeated following the first and last hyperthermia treatment to document magnetic nanoparticle distribution and the position of the thermometry probes in the prostate. Nanoparticles were retained in the prostate during the treatment interval of 6 weeks, as documented by CT. Treatment was well tolerated. During the first treatment, maximum intra-prostatic temperatures measured by 4 thermometry probes at a magnetic field strength of 4.0-5.0 kA/m were 48.5, 43.0, 43.7 and 43.6 o C, whereas minimal temperatures were 41.2, 40.3, 40.0 and 41.1 o C, respectively. During the sixth and last treatment of the same patient, maximum intraprostatic temperatures were 42

  11. Preparation and characterization of magnetic chitosan particles for hyperthermia application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji-Ho; Im, Ki-Hyeong; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Doug-Youn; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-01-01

    The size and shape of magnetic chitosan particles were found to be dependent on both the barium ferrite/chitosan (BF/C) ratio and viscosity of a chitosan solution. The saturation magnetization of magnetic chitosan particles varied directly with the BF/C ratio, while coercivity remained almost constant. Notably, incorporated chitosan was shown to exert substantial activity with regard to low cytotoxicity and high heating rate

  12. Relating Magnetic Properties and High Hyperthermia Performance of Iron Oxide Nanoflowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Philipp; Fock, Jeppe; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    We investigated in depth the interrelations among structure, magnetic properties, relaxation dynamics and magnetic hyperthermia performance of magnetic nanoflowers. The nanoflowers are about 39 nm in size, and consist of densely packed iron oxide cores. They display a remanent magnetization, which...... we explain by the exchange coupling between the cores, but we observe indications for internal spin disorder. By polarized small angle neutron scattering we unambiguously confirm that on average the nanoflowers are preferentially magnetized along one direction. The extracted discrete relaxation time...... distribution of the colloidally dispersed particles indicates the presence of three distinct relaxation contributions. We can explain the two slower processes by Brownian and classical Néel relaxation, respectively. The additionally observed very fast relaxation contributions are attributed by us...

  13. A newly developed Fe-doped calcium sulfide nanoparticles with magnetic property for cancer hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Steven Yueh-Hsiu; Tseng, Ching-Li; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a magnetic iron-doped calcium sulfide (Fe-CaS) nanoparticle was newly developed and studied for the purpose of hyperthermia due to its promising magnetic property, adequate biodegradation rate, and relatively good biocompatibility. Fe-CaS nanoparticles were synthesized by a wet chemical co-precipitation process with heat treatment in a N2 atmosphere, and were subsequently cooled in N2 and exposed to air at a low temperature. The crystal structure of the Fe-CaS nanoparticles was similar to that of the CaS, which was identified by an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The particle size was less than 40 nm based on a Debye-Scherrer equation and transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination. Magnetic properties obtained from the SQUID magnetometer demonstrated that the synthesized CaS was a diamagnetic property. Once the Fe ions were doped, the synthesized Fe-CaS converted into paramagnetism which showed no hysteresis loop. Having been heated above 600 °C in N2, the Fe-CaS showed a promising magnetic property to produce enough energy to increase the temperature for hyperthermia. 10 mg/ml of the Fe-CaS was able to generate heat to elevate the media temperature over 42.5 °C within 6 min. The area of the hysteresis loop increased with the increasing of the treated temperature, especially at 800 °C for 1 h. This is because more Fe ions replaced Ca ions in the lattice at the higher heat treatment temperature. The heat production was also increasing with the increasing of heat treatment temperature, which resulted in an adequate specific absorption ratio (SAR) value, which was found to be 45.47 W/g at 37 °C under an alternative magnetic field of f = 750 KHz , H = 10 Oe. The in vitro biocompatibility test of the synthesized Fe-CaS nanoparticles examined by the LDH assay showed no cytotoxicity to 3T3 fibroblast. The result of in vitro cell hyperthermia shows that under magnetic field the Fe-CaS nanoparticles were able to generate heat and kill the CT-26 cancer

  14. A newly developed Fe-doped calcium sulfide nanoparticles with magnetic property for cancer hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Steven Yueh-Hsiu; Tseng, Ching-Li; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a magnetic iron-doped calcium sulfide (Fe-CaS) nanoparticle was newly developed and studied for the purpose of hyperthermia due to its promising magnetic property, adequate biodegradation rate, and relatively good biocompatibility. Fe-CaS nanoparticles were synthesized by a wet chemical co-precipitation process with heat treatment in a N 2 atmosphere, and were subsequently cooled in N 2 and exposed to air at a low temperature. The crystal structure of the Fe-CaS nanoparticles was similar to that of the CaS, which was identified by an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The particle size was less than 40 nm based on a Debye-Scherrer equation and transmission electron microscope (TEM) examination. Magnetic properties obtained from the SQUID magnetometer demonstrated that the synthesized CaS was a diamagnetic property. Once the Fe ions were doped, the synthesized Fe-CaS converted into paramagnetism which showed no hysteresis loop. Having been heated above 600 o C in N 2 , the Fe-CaS showed a promising magnetic property to produce enough energy to increase the temperature for hyperthermia. 10 mg/ml of the Fe-CaS was able to generate heat to elevate the media temperature over 42.5 o C within 6 min. The area of the hysteresis loop increased with the increasing of the treated temperature, especially at 800 o C for 1 h. This is because more Fe ions replaced Ca ions in the lattice at the higher heat treatment temperature. The heat production was also increasing with the increasing of heat treatment temperature, which resulted in an adequate specific absorption ratio (SAR) value, which was found to be 45.47 W/g at 37 o C under an alternative magnetic field of f = 750 KHz, H = 10 Oe. The in vitro biocompatibility test of the synthesized Fe-CaS nanoparticles examined by the LDH assay showed no cytotoxicity to 3T3 fibroblast. The result of in vitro cell hyperthermia shows that under magnetic field the Fe-CaS nanoparticles were able to generate heat and kill the CT-26

  15. Effects of hyperthermia on radiation-induced chromosome breakage and loss in excision repair deficient Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittler, S.

    1986-01-01

    Hyperthermia increased radiosensitivity with respect to γ-ray induced chromosome loss and breakage in all stages of spermatogenesis in the wild type Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster, whereas hyperthermia increased radiosensitivity to a lesser extent in cn mus(2) 201sup(D1), an excision repair mutant with 0 per cent excision capacity and in mus(3) 308sup(D1), a strain with 24 per cent excision capacity. The differences in hyperthermia-induced radiation sensitivity between the excision repair mutants and the wild strain may be due to the hyperthermia affecting the excision repair mechanism, suggesting that one of the possible mechanisms involved in hyperthermia-increased radiosensitivity is an effect on excision repair. (author)

  16. Improvement of drug delivery by hyperthermia treatment using magnetic cubic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chaitali, E-mail: chaitalidey29@gmail.com [Centre for Research in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, Block-JD-2, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Baishya, Kaushik [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Ghosh, Arup [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Pune, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Goswami, Madhuri Mandal, E-mail: madhuri@bose.res.in [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Ghosh, Ajay [Dept. of Applied Optics and Photonics, University of Calcutta, Block-JD-2, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Mandal, Kalyan [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India)

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we report a novel synthesis method, characterization and application of a new class of ferromagnetic cubic cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for hyperthermia therapy and temperature triggered drug release. The MNPs are characterized by XRD, TEM, FESEM, AC magnetic hysteresis and VSM. These MNPs were coated with folic acid and loaded with an anticancer drug. The drug release studies were done at two different temperatures (37 °C and 44 °C) with progress of time. It was found that higher release of drug took place at elevated temperature (44 °C). We have developed a temperature sensitive drug delivery system which releases the heat sensitive drug selectively as the particles are heated up under AC magnetic field and controlled release is possible by changing the external AC magnetic field.

  17. Effects of hyperthermia on repair of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, M.D.; Meyn, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested a relationship between the heat-induced changes in nucleoprotein and the hyperthermic enhancement of radiation sensitivity. In an effort to further understand these relationships, we measured the level of initial DNA strand break damage and the DNA strand break rejoining kinetics in Chinese hamster ovary cells following combined hyperthermia and ionizing radiation treatments. The amount of protein associated with DNA measured as the ratio of [ 3 H)leucine to [ 14 C]thymidine was also compared in chromatin isolated from both heated and unheated cells. The results of these experiments show that the initial level of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks is significantly enhanced by a prior hyperthermia treatment of 43 0 C for 30 min. Treatments at higher temperatures and longer treatments at the same temperature magnified this effect. Hyperthermia was also shown to cause a substantial inhibition of the DNA strand break rejoining after irradiation. Both the initial level of DNA damage and the rejoining kinetics recovered to normal levels with incubation at 37 0 C between the hyperthermia and radiation treatments. Recovery of these parameters coincided with the return of the amount of protein associated with DNA to normal values, further suggesting a relationship between the changes in nucleoprotein and the hyperthermic enhancement of radiation sensivivity

  18. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Ganguly, Ranjan [Department of Power Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700098 (India); Puri, Ishwar K., E-mail: ikpuri@vt.ed [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Peclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Peclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction I{sub T} of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio I{sub N} of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters I{sub T}and I{sub N} but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged. - Research highlights: > Analytical model of magnetic fluid hyperthermia of tumor tissue perfused with magnetic nanoparticles that is surrounded

  19. Parametric investigation of heating due to magnetic fluid hyperthermia in a tumor with blood perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment that can selectively elevate the tumor temperature without significantly damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. Optimal MFH design requires a fundamental parametric investigation of the heating of soft materials by magnetic fluids. We model the problem of a spherical tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue that are heated by exciting a homogeneous dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles infused only into the tumor with an external AC magnetic field. The key dimensionless parameters influencing thermotherapy are the Peclet, Fourier, and Joule numbers. Analytical solutions for transient and steady hyperthermia provide correlations between these parameters and the portions of tumor and healthy tissue that are subjected to a threshold temperature beyond which they are damaged. Increasing the ratio of the Fourier and Joule numbers also increases the tumor temperature, but doing so can damage the healthy tissue. Higher magnetic heating is required for larger Peclet numbers due to the larger convection heat loss that occurs through blood perfusion. A comparison of the model predictions with previous experimental data for MFH applied to rabbit tumors shows good agreement. The optimal MFH conditions are identified based on two indices, the fraction I T of the tumor volume in which the local temperature is above a threshold temperature and the ratio I N of the damaged normal tissue volume to the tumor tissue volume that also lies above it. The spatial variation in the nanoparticle concentration is also considered. A Gaussian distribution provides efficacy while minimizing the possibility of generating a tumor hot spot. Varying the thermal properties of tumor and normal tissue alters I T and I N but the nature of the temperature distribution remains unchanged. - Research Highlights: →Analytical model of magnetic fluid hyperthermia of tumor tissue perfused with magnetic nanoparticles that is surrounded by healthy tissue

  20. Inducible protective processes in animal systems XV: Hyperthermia enhances the Ethyl methanesulfonate induced adaptive response in meiotic cells of grasshopper Poecilocerus pictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Venu

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: There is a protection against EMS induced anomalies by hyperthermia in in vivo P. pictus. As far as our knowledge is concerned, this is the first report to demonstrate that hyperthermia enhances the EMS induced adaptive response in in vivo meiotic cells.

  1. Magnetic induction of hyperthermia by a modified self-learning fuzzy temperature controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Tai, Cheng-Chi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study involved developing a temperature controller for magnetic induction hyperthermia (MIH). A closed-loop controller was applied to track a reference model to guarantee a desired temperature response. The MIH system generated an alternating magnetic field to heat a high magnetic permeability material. This wireless induction heating had few side effects when it was extensively applied to cancer treatment. The effects of hyperthermia strongly depend on the precise control of temperature. However, during the treatment process, the control performance is degraded due to severe perturbations and parameter variations. In this study, a modified self-learning fuzzy logic controller (SLFLC) with a gain tuning mechanism was implemented to obtain high control performance in a wide range of treatment situations. This implementation was performed by appropriately altering the output scaling factor of a fuzzy inverse model to adjust the control rules. In this study, the proposed SLFLC was compared to the classical self-tuning fuzzy logic controller and fuzzy model reference learning control. Additionally, the proposed SLFLC was verified by conducting in vitro experiments with porcine liver. The experimental results indicated that the proposed controller showed greater robustness and excellent adaptability with respect to the temperature control of the MIH system.

  2. Magnetic hyperthermia properties of iron oxide nanoparticles: The effect of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimisadr, Saeid; Aslibeiki, Bagher; Asadi, Reza

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the effect of concentration on magnetic hyperthermia properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). The NPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method at 80 °C. Scanning electron microscope image showed that the mean diameter of NPs is about 18 nm. The XRD pattern indicated that the sample is pure Fe3O4 with spinel structure and the FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed formation of metal-oxygen bonds in the octahedral and tetrahedral spinel sub-lattice which further confirmed crystalline structure of the sample. The hyperthermia property of Fe3O4 NPs was investigated via an induction heater generating alternating magnetic field with frequency of 92 kHz. The temperature rise (ΔT) of suspension in the AC magnetic field was studied on different concentrations of NPs and the specific absorption rate (SAR) was obtained from Box-Lucas equation and linear fitting of ΔT-time curve. The results showed that the ΔT sharply increases with increasing the NPs concentration while the SAR remains almost constant.

  3. Acute whole-body cooling for exercise-induced hyperthermia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Brendon P; Casa, Douglas J; Ganio, Matthew S; Lopez, Rebecca M; Yeargin, Susan W; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2009-01-01

    To assess existing original research addressing the efficiency of whole-body cooling modalities in the treatment of exertional hyperthermia. During April 2007, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, SportDiscus, CINAHL, and Cochrane Reviews databases as well as ProQuest for theses and dissertations to identify research studies evaluating whole-body cooling treatments without limits. Key words were cooling, cryotherapy, water immersion, cold-water immersion, ice-water immersion, icing, fanning, bath, baths, cooling modality, heat illness, heat illnesses, exertional heatstroke, exertional heat stroke, heat exhaustion, hyperthermia, hyperthermic, hyperpyrexia, exercise, exertion, running, football, military, runners, marathoner, physical activity, marathoning, soccer, and tennis. Two independent reviewers graded each study on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Seven of 89 research articles met all inclusion criteria and a minimum score of 4 out of 10 on the PEDro scale. After an extensive and critical review of the available research on whole-body cooling for the treatment of exertional hyperthermia, we concluded that ice-water immersion provides the most efficient cooling. Further research comparing whole-body cooling modalities is needed to identify other acceptable means. When ice-water immersion is not possible, continual dousing with water combined with fanning the patient is an alternative method until more advanced cooling means can be used. Until future investigators identify other acceptable whole-body cooling modalities for exercise-induced hyperthermia, ice-water immersion and cold-water immersion are the methods proven to have the fastest cooling rates.

  4. Magnetic hyperthermia heating of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles prepared by low temperature ferrous sulfate based method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejabhiram Yadavalli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A facile low temperature co-precipitation method for the synthesis of crystalline cobalt ferrite nanostructures using ferrous sulfate salt as the precursor has been discussed. The prepared samples were compared with nanoparticles prepared by conventional co-precipitation and hydrothermal methods using ferric nitrate as the precursor. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of cubic spinel cobalt ferrites when dried at 110 °C as opposed to conventional methods which required higher temperatures/pressure for the formation of the same. Field emission scanning electron microscope studies of these powders revealed the formation of nearly spherical nanostructures in the size range of 20-30 nm which were comparable to those prepared by conventional methods. Magnetic measurements confirmed the ferromagnetic nature of the cobalt ferrites with low magnetic remanance. Further magnetic hyperthermia studies of nanostructures prepared by low temperature method showed a rise in temperature to 50 °C in 600 s.

  5. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) as an alternative option in the treatment of recurrent malignant gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Hauff, K.; Jordan, A.; Nestler, D.; Scholz, R.; Feussner, A.; Gneveckow, U.; Wust, P.; Felix, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The prognosis of glioblastoma (GB) remains poor despite the better neuro-imaging modalities and neurosurgical techniques. The survival of patients (PTS) depends on local tumor control, which is not guaranteed by the actual standard therapy. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) in combination with external irradiation (RT) is a worldwide new method, which heats up selectively tumor tissue coupling a magnetic field to the applicated magnetic fluid (MF). In a phase I study with 16 PTS the applicability and tolerance of MFH combined with RT was evaluated. We present our preliminary results in 16 PTS. Depending on the tumor volume we implanted navigated 1-4 ml MF in the tumor area. The MF consists of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a MG-specific shell dispersed in water. When the particles are exposed to an externally applied AC magnetic field, intratumoral steady-state temperatures of 43-50 o C or even higher for thermo ablation, were achieved during 60 minutes. The target temperature was measures continuously on-line by a 0.5 mm fibre optic invasive thermometry and controlled by the field strength of the AC magnetic field applicator. Four days after surgery irradiation was applied with 2 Gy / fraction 5 times a week plus 2 sessions of hyperthermia per week over 3 weeks. Because tumor power absorption was highly reproducible in each session, only the first six MFH treatments required thermometry. Further MFH applications were completely non-invasive. In 16 PTS 98 MFH therapies were done without side effects. In-vivo measured temperatures of 46 - 50 o C were highly reproducible in the target volume. In 16 cases MFH has been completed. During actual 15 months follow-up, 10 PTS showed no tumor progress where as in five PTS the tumor volume increased. Five PTS died of non tumor related complications and two PTS of tumor progress. The magnetic fluid hyperthermia in combination with radiation is a useful method for an intensified local treatment of recurrent

  6. Stabilization of temperature during magnetic hyperthermia by Ce substituted magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, S.K.; Alla, S.K. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Meena, S.S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mandal, R.K. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Prasad, N.K., E-mail: nandkp.met@iitbhu.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Ce{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} (0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) nanoparticles below 15 nm were synthesized by microwave refluxing method. • The saturation magnetization decreased with increased Ce concentration. • The sample displayed stabilization of temperature near 42 °C during magnetic hyperthermia. - Abstract: We report here magnetic hyperthermia using nanoparticles of Ce{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5) during which temperature was found to be stabilizing near 42 °C. This happens despite of their high saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) and Curie temperature (T{sub C}) values. It was observed that by selecting an appropriate magnetic field the temperature can be rose exactly near the therapeutic temperature and thus it will help to selectively kill the cancerous cells leaving normal cells unaffected. These nanoparticles (size around 8–15 nm) were produced by single step microwave refluxing technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis demonstrates that samples were essentially single phase except for x = 0.5 sample. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study for the samples demonstrated that Ce was present in both Ce{sup 3+} and Ce{sup 4+} states. The saturation magnetization value of the samples decreased sharply from 62 Am{sup 2}/kg for x = 0.01 to 19 Am{sup 2}/kg for x = 0.1. This value further decreased with increased Ce doping.

  7. Recommendations for In Vitro and In Vivo Testing of Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Combined with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridon V. Spirou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP-mediated hyperthermia (MH coupled with radiation therapy (RT is a novel approach that has the potential to overcome various practical difficulties encountered in cancer treatment. In this work, we present recommendations for the in vitro and in vivo testing and application of the two treatment techniques. These recommendations were developed by the members of Working Group 3 of COST Action TD 1402: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia and Indirect Radiation Therapy (“Radiomag”. The purpose of the recommendations is not to provide definitive answers and directions but, rather, to outline those tests and considerations that a researcher must address in order to perform in vitro and in vivo studies. The recommendations are divided into 5 parts: (a in vitro evaluation of MNPs; (b in vitro evaluation of MNP-cell interactions; (c in vivo evaluation of the MNPs; (d MH combined with RT; and (e pharmacokinetic studies of MNPs. Synthesis and characterization of the MNPs, as well as RT protocols, are beyond the scope of this work.

  8. Specific absorption rate determination of magnetic nanoparticles through hyperthermia measurements in non-adiabatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coïsson, M. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Barrera, G. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); University of Torino, Chemistry Department, via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Celegato, F.; Martino, L.; Vinai, F. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Martino, P. [Politronica srl, via Livorno 60, 10144 Torino (Italy); Ferraro, G. [Center for Space Human Robotics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia - IIT, corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Tiberto, P. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for magnetic hyperthermia operating in non-adiabatic conditions is described. A thermodynamic model that takes into account the heat exchanged by the sample with the surrounding environment is developed. A suitable calibration procedure is proposed that allows the experimental validation of the model. Specific absorption rate can then be accurately determined just from the measurement of the sample temperature at the equilibrium steady state. The setup and the measurement procedure represent a simplification with respect to other systems requiring calorimeters or crucial corrections for heat flow. Two families of magnetic nanoparticles, one superparamagnetic and one characterised by larger sizes and static hysteresis, have been characterised as a function of field intensity, and specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power have been obtained. - Highlights: • Development and thermodynamic modelling of a hyperthermia setup operating in non-adiabatic conditions. • Calibration of the experimental setup and validation of the model. • Accurate measurement of specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power in non-adiabatic conditions.

  9. Can magneto-plasmonic nanohybrids efficiently combine photothermia with magnetic hyperthermia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Ana; Bugnet, Mathieu; Radtke, Guillaume; Neveu, Sophie; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Wilhelm, Claire; Abou-Hassan, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Multifunctional hybrid-design nanomaterials appear to be a promising route to meet the current therapeutics needs required for efficient cancer treatment. Herein, two efficient heat nano-generators were combined into a multifunctional single nanohybrid (a multi-core iron oxide nanoparticle optimized for magnetic hyperthermia, and a gold branched shell with tunable plasmonic properties in the NIR region, for photothermal therapy) which impressively enhanced heat generation, in suspension or in vivo in tumours, opening up exciting new therapeutic perspectives.Multifunctional hybrid-design nanomaterials appear to be a promising route to meet the current therapeutics needs required for efficient cancer treatment. Herein, two efficient heat nano-generators were combined into a multifunctional single nanohybrid (a multi-core iron oxide nanoparticle optimized for magnetic hyperthermia, and a gold branched shell with tunable plasmonic properties in the NIR region, for photothermal therapy) which impressively enhanced heat generation, in suspension or in vivo in tumours, opening up exciting new therapeutic perspectives. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06168g

  10. Exercise-Induced Rhabdomyolysis and Stress-Induced Malignant Hyperthermia Events, Association with Malignant Hyperthermia Susceptibility, and RYR1 Gene Sequence Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Carsana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER and stress-induced malignant hyperthermia (MH events are syndromes that primarily afflict military recruits in basic training and athletes. Events similar to those occurring in ER and in stress-induced MH events are triggered after exposure to anesthetic agents in MH-susceptible (MHS patients. MH is an autosomal dominant hypermetabolic condition that occurs in genetically predisposed subjects during general anesthesia, induced by commonly used volatile anesthetics and/or the neuromuscular blocking agent succinylcholine. Triggering agents cause an altered intracellular calcium regulation. Mutations in RYR1 gene have been found in about 70% of MH families. The RYR1 gene encodes the skeletal muscle calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, commonly known as ryanodine receptor type 1 (RYR1. The present work reviews the documented cases of ER or of stress-induced MH events in which RYR1 sequence variations, associated or possibly associated to MHS status, have been identified.

  11. Morphologic categorization of cell death induced by mild hyperthermia and comparison with death induced by ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, D.J.; Harmon, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the morphological categorization of cell death, results of two in vivo studies on the cell death induced by mild hyperthermia in rat small intestine and mouse mastocytoma, and a comparison of the cell death induced by hyperthermia, radiation and cytotoxic drugs. Two distinct forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis, can be recognized on morphologic grounds. Apoptosis appears to be a process of active cellular self-destruction to which a biologically meaningful role can usually be attributed, whereas necrosis is a passive degenerative phenomenon that results from irreversible cellular injury. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies showed that lower body hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 30 min) induced only apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, and of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. In the mastocytoma, hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 15 min) produced widespread tumor necrosis and also enhanced apoptosis of tumor cells. Ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs are also known to induce apoptosis in a variety of tissues. It is attractive to speculate that DNA damage by each agent is the common event which triggers the same process of active cellular self-destruction that characteristically effects selective cell deletion in normal tissue homeostasis

  12. Magnetic hyperthermia dosimetry by biomechanical properties revealed in magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been utilized in magnetic hyperthermia to treat solid tumors. Under an appropriate AC magnetic field, energy can be transferred to the MNPs to heat up the intended tissue target while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of MNP thermal therapy is desirable in order to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. Typical hyperthermia dosimetry often relies on changes in imaging properties or temperature measurements based on the thermal distribution. Alternative dosimetric indicators can include the biomechanical properties of the tissue, reflecting the changes due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration during hyperthermia treatments. Tissue stiffness can be probed by elastography modalities including MRI, ultrasound imaging, and optical coherence elastography (OCE), with OCE showing the highest displacement sensitivity (tens of nanometers). Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) is one type of OCE that utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the tissue stiffness. Therefore, we examined the feasibility of evaluating the hyperthermia dose based on the elasticity changes revealed by MM-OCE. Superparamagnetic MNPs were applied to ex vivo tissue specimens for both magnetic hyperthermia and MM-OCE experiments, where temperature and elastic modulus were obtained. A correlation between temperature rise and measured stiffness was observed. In addition, we found that with repetitive sequential treatments, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results potentially suggest that MM-OCE could indicate the irreversible changes the tissue undergoes during thermal therapy, which supports the idea for MM-OCE-based hyperthermia dosage control in future applications.

  13. Local radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia using CuNi nanoparticles with therapeutically suitable Curie temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Leontiev, Vladimir G.; Brukvin, Vladimir A.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Kogan, Boris Ya.; Shlyakhtin, Oleg A.; Yunin, Alexander M.; Tsybin, Oleg I.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2007-01-01

    Copper-nickel (CuNi) alloy nanoparticles with Curie temperatures (T c ) from 40 to 60 o C were synthesized by several techniques. Varying the synthesis parameters and post-treatment, as well as separations by size and T c , allow producing mediator nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia with parametric feedback temperature control with desired parameters. In vitro and in vivo animal experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the temperature-controlled heating of the tissue, laden with the particles, by an external alternating magnetic field

  14. Local radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia using CuNi nanoparticles with therapeutically suitable Curie temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Leontiev, Vladimir G. [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Brukvin, Vladimir A. [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Vorozhtsov, Georgy N. [NIOPIK Organic Intermediates and Dyes Institute, Moscow 103787 (Russian Federation); Kogan, Boris Ya. [NIOPIK Organic Intermediates and Dyes Institute, Moscow 103787 (Russian Federation); Shlyakhtin, Oleg A. [Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Yunin, Alexander M. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Tsybin, Oleg I. [Institute of Metallurgy, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Oleg A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: kuznetsov_oa@yahoo.com

    2007-04-15

    Copper-nickel (CuNi) alloy nanoparticles with Curie temperatures (T{sub c}) from 40 to 60{sup o}C were synthesized by several techniques. Varying the synthesis parameters and post-treatment, as well as separations by size and T{sub c}, allow producing mediator nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia with parametric feedback temperature control with desired parameters. In vitro and in vivo animal experiments have demonstrated the feasibility of the temperature-controlled heating of the tissue, laden with the particles, by an external alternating magnetic field.

  15. Threshold heating temperature for magnetic hyperthermia: Controlling the heat exchange with the blocking temperature of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, B.; Caraballo-Vivas, R. J.; Checca, N. R.; Zverev, V. I.; Salakhova, R. T.; Makarova, L. A.; Pyatakov, A. P.; Perov, N. S.; Tishin, A. M.; Shtil, A. A.; Rossi, A. L.; Reis, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    La0.75Sr0.25MnO3 nanoparticles with average diameter close to 20.9 nm were synthesized using a sol-gel method. Measurements showed that the heating process stops at the blocking temperaturesignificantly below the Curie temperature. Measurements of Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) as a function of AC magnetic field revealed a superquadratic power law, indicating that, in addition to usual Néel and Brown relaxation, the hysteresis also plays an important role in the mechanism of heating. The ability to control the threshold heating temperature, a low remanent magnetization and a low field needed to achieve the magnetic saturation are the advantages of this material for therapeutic magnetic hyperthermia.

  16. Shielding of Sensitive Electronic Devices in Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Using Arrays of Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirou, S V; Tsialios, P; Loudos, G

    2015-01-01

    In Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia (MNH) an externally applied electromagnetic field transfers energy to the magnetic nanoparticles in the body, which in turn convert this energy into heat, thus locally heating the tissue they are located in. This external electromagnetic field is sufficiently strong so as to cause interference and affect sensitive electronic equipment. Standard shielding of magnetic fields involves Faraday cages or coating with high-permeability shielding alloys; however, these techniques cannot be used with optically sensitive devices, such as those employed in Optical Coherence Tomography or radionuclide imaging. In this work we present a method to achieve magnetic shielding using an array of coils. The magnetic field generated by a single coil was calculated using the COMSOL physics simulation toolkit. Software was written in C/C++ to import the single-coil data, and then calculate the positions, number of turns and currents in the shielding coils in order to minimize the magnetic field strength at the desired location. Simulations and calculations have shown that just two shielding coils can reduce the magnetic field by 2-3 orders of magnitude. (paper)

  17. Shielding of Sensitive Electronic Devices in Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Using Arrays of Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirou, S. V.; Tsialios, P.; Loudos, G.

    2015-09-01

    In Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia (MNH) an externally applied electromagnetic field transfers energy to the magnetic nanoparticles in the body, which in turn convert this energy into heat, thus locally heating the tissue they are located in. This external electromagnetic field is sufficiently strong so as to cause interference and affect sensitive electronic equipment. Standard shielding of magnetic fields involves Faraday cages or coating with high-permeability shielding alloys; however, these techniques cannot be used with optically sensitive devices, such as those employed in Optical Coherence Tomography or radionuclide imaging. In this work we present a method to achieve magnetic shielding using an array of coils. The magnetic field generated by a single coil was calculated using the COMSOL physics simulation toolkit. Software was written in C/C++ to import the single-coil data, and then calculate the positions, number of turns and currents in the shielding coils in order to minimize the magnetic field strength at the desired location. Simulations and calculations have shown that just two shielding coils can reduce the magnetic field by 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  18. Materials Characterization of Feraheme/Ferumoxytol and Preliminary Evaluation of Its Potential for Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Dobson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Feraheme, is a recently FDA-cleared superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION-based MRI contrast agent that is also employed in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Feraheme nanoparticles have a hydrodynamic diameter of 30 nm and consist of iron oxide crystallites complexed with a low molecular weight, semi-synthetic carbohydrate. These features are attractive for other potential biomedical applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH, since the carboxylated polymer coating affords functionalization of the particle surface and the size allows for accumulation in highly vascularized tumors via the enhanced permeability and retention effect. This work presents morphological and magnetic characterization of Feraheme by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID magnetometry. Additionally, the results of an initial evaluation of the suitability of Feraheme for MFH applications are described, and the data indicate the particles possess promising properties for this application.

  19. Thermo-responsive magnetic liposomes for hyperthermia-triggered local drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Min; Wu, Cong; Fang, Hong-Ming; Li, Li; Yan, Jia-Bao; Zeng, Dan-Lin; Zou, Tao

    2017-06-01

    We prepared and characterised thermo-responsive magnetic liposomes, which were designed to combine features of magnetic targeting and thermo-responsive control release for hyperthermia-triggered local drug delivery. The particle size and zeta-potential of the thermo-responsive magnetic ammonium bicarbonate (MagABC) liposomes were about 210 nm and -14 mV, respectively. The MagABC liposomes showed encapsulation efficiencies of about 15% and 82% for magnetic nanoparticles (mean crystallite size 12 nm) and doxorubicin (DOX), respectively. The morphology of the MagABC liposomes was visualised using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The MagABC liposomes showed desired thermo-responsive release. The MagABC liposomes, when physically targeted to tumour cells in culture by a permanent magnetic field yielded a substantial increase in intracellular accumulation of DOX as compared to non-magnetic ammonium bicarbonate (ABC) liposomes. This resulted in a parallel increase in cytotoxicity for DOX loaded MagABC liposomes over DOX loaded ABC liposomes in tumour cells.

  20. Non-Invasive Radiofrequency-Induced Targeted Hyperthermia for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Raoof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted biological therapies for hepatocellular cancer have shown minimal improvements in median survival. Multiple pathways to oncogenesis leading to rapid development of resistance to such therapies is a concern. Non-invasive radiofrequency field-induced targeted hyperthermia using nanoparticles is a radical departure from conventional modalities. In this paper we underscore the need for innovative strategies for the treatment of hepatocellular cancer, describe the central paradigm of targeted hyperthermia using non-invasive electromagnetic energy, review the process of characterization and modification of nanoparticles for the task, and summarize data from cell-based and animal-based models of hepatocellular cancer treated with non-invasive RF energy. Finally, future strategies and challenges in bringing this modality from bench to clinic are discussed.

  1. Intra-operative placement of catheters for interstitial microwave-induced hyperthermia and iridium brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, C.T.; Wong, T.Z.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Colacchio, T.A.; Belch, R.Z.; Sutton, J.E. Jr.; Douple, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have previously described a system for delivery of microwave-induced hyperthermia utilizing flexible coaxial cables that are modified to serve as microwave antennas. These small (--1.6mm o.d.) antennas ae introduced into 2mm o.d. nylon catheters implanted in the tumor. This system has been further modified for use in the treatment of surgically unresectible abdominal, pelvic, and head and neck tumors. The modifications are described that were used to treat two pelvic, one upper abdominal, and one base of tongue tumor. The nylon catheters are implanted during surgery. After a short recovery period, the microwave antennas are inserted and the tumor region is heated for --1hr. The antennas are removed, iridium-192 seeds are placed in the catheters, 2800 - 5000 rad (CGy) doses are delivered, followed by a 1hr hyperthermia treatment. The temperature distributions and future applications are discussed

  2. Inhibition by hyperthermia of repair synthesis and chromatin reassembly of ultraviolet-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hyperthermia treatment on sequential steps of the repair of UV-induced DNA damage in HeLa cells. DNA repair synthesis was inhibited by 40% after 15 min of hyperthermia treatment at 45 0 C; greater inhibition of repair synthesis occurred with prolonged incubation at 45 0 C. Enzymatic digestion of repair-labeled DNA with Exonuclease III indicated that once DNA repair was initiated, the DNA repair patch was synthesized to completion and that ligation of the DNA repair patch occurred. Thus, the observed inhibition of UV-induced DNA repair synthesis by hyperthermia treatment may be the result of inhibition of enzymes involved in the initiating steps(s) of DNA repair. DNA repair patches synthesized in UV-irradiated cells labeled at 37 0 C with[ 3 H]Thd were 2.2-fold more sensitive to micrococcal nuclease digestion than was parental DNA; if the length of the labeling period was prolonged, the nuclease sensitivity of the repair patch synthesized approached that of the parental DNA. DNA repair patches synthesized at 45 0 C, however, remained sensitive to micrococcal nuclease digestion even after long labeling periods, indicating that heat treatment inhibits the reassembly of the DNA repair patch into nucleosomal structures. 23 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  3. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, N. Narayana, E-mail: nagireddynarayana@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Biomaterials for Healthcare, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia@CRIB, Largo Barsanti e Matteucci 53, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Ravindra, S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Reddy, N. Madhava [Department of Environmental Science, Gates Institute of Technology, NH-7, Gooty, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Rajinikanth, V. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa); Raju, K. Mohana [Synthetic Polymer Laboratory, Department of Polymer Science & Technology, S.K. University, Anantapuram, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1709 (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel.

  4. Temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites for hyperthermia and metal extraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, N. Narayana; Ravindra, S.; Reddy, N. Madhava; Rajinikanth, V.; Raju, K. Mohana; Vallabhapurapu, Vijaya Srinivasu

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with the development of temperature and magnetic responsive hydrogel networks based on poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)/acrylamido propane sulfonic acid. The hydrogel matrices are synthesized by polymerizing N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) monomer in the presence of acrylamido propane sulphonicacid (AMPS) using a cross-linker (N,N-methylenebisacrylamide, MBA) and redox initiating system [ammonium persulphate (APS)/tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)]. The magnetic nanoparticles are generated throughout the hydrogel networks using in situ method by incorporating iron ions and subsequent treatment with ammonia. A series of hydrogel-magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are developed by varying AMPS composition. The synthesized hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) are characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermal Analyses and Electron Microscopy analysis (Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope). The metal extraction capacities of the prepared hydrogel (HG) and hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNC) were studied at different temperatures. The results suggest that HGMNCs have higher extraction capacity compared to HG and HG loaded iron ions. This data also reveals that the extraction of metals by hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites (HGMNCs) is higher at higher temperatures than room temperature. The prepared HGMNCs are also subjected to hyperthermia (cancer therapy) studies. - Highlights: • We have developed temperature responsive hydrogel magnetic nanocomposites. • Addition of AMPS monomer to this magnetic hydrogel enhances the temperature sensitivity to 40–43 °C. • Similarly the sulfonic groups present in the AMPS units enhances the swelling ratio of magnetic hydrogels. • AMPS acts as good stabilizing agent for nanoparticles in the magnetic nanogel

  5. alpha-Phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone attenuates methamphetamine-induced depletion of striatal dopamine without altering hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappon, G D; Broening, H W; Pu, C; Morford, L; Vorhees, C V

    1996-10-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) administration to adult rats (4 x 10 mg/kg s.c.) induces neurotoxicity predominately characterized by a persistent reduction of neostriatal dopamine (DA) content. Hyperthermia following MA administration potentiates the resulting DA depletion. DA-derived free radicals are postulated to be a mechanism through which MA-induced neurotoxicity is produced. The spin trapping agent PBN reacts with free radicals to form nitroxyl adducts, thereby preventing damaging free radical reactions with cellular substrates. MA with saline pretreatment (Sal-MA) reduced neostriatal DA by 55% (P protection. PBN pretreatment did not alter MA-induced hyperthermia. Thus, PBN does not attenuate MA-induced neurotoxicity by reducing MA-induced hyperthermia. These results support a role for free radicals in the generation of MA-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

  6. In vitro application of Fe/MgO nanoparticles as magnetically mediated hyperthermia agents for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalkidou, A. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Theagenio Cancer Hospital, Alexandrou Simeonidi Street 2, 54 007 Thessaloniki (Greece); Simeonidis, K. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Angelakeris, M., E-mail: agelaker@auth.g [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Samaras, T. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Martinez-Boubeta, C. [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Balcells, Ll. [ICMAB-CSIC, Campus UAB, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Papazisis, K. [Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Theagenio Cancer Hospital, Alexandrou Simeonidi Street 2, 54 007 Thessaloniki (Greece); Dendrinou-Samara, C. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, O. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54 124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-03-15

    In this work we study the heating efficiency of Fe/MgO magnetic core/biocompatible shell nanoparticles and their in vitro application in magnetic hyperthermia on cancer cells. Different human breast cancer cell lines were used to assess the suitability of nanoparticles for in vivo application. The experiments revealed a very good cytotoxicity profile and significant uptake efficiency together with relatively high specific absorption rates and fast thermal response, features that are crucial for adequate thermal efficiency and minimum duration of treatment. - Research highlights: > Fe/MgO magnetic core/shell nanoparticles and their in vitro application for magnetic hyperthermia. > Very good cytotoxicity profile and significant uptake efficiency in three human breast cancer cell lines. > SAR values and fast thermal response guarantee adequate thermal efficiency and minimum treatment duration.

  7. Properties of nanoparticles prepared from NdFeB-based compound for magnetic hyperthermia application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périgo, E A; Silva, S C; de Sousa, E M B; Freitas, A A; Cohen, R; Nagamine, L C C M; Takiishi, H; Landgraf, F J G

    2012-05-04

    Nanoparticles were prepared from a NdFeB-based alloy using the hydrogen decrepitation process together with high-energy ball milling and tested as heating agent for magnetic hyperthermia. In the milling time range evaluated (up to 10 h), the magnetic moment per mass at H = 1.59 MA m(-1) is superior than 70 A m(2) kg(-1); however, the intrinsic coercivity might be inferior than 20 kA m(-1). The material presents both ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic particles constituted by a mixture of phases due to the incomplete disproportionation reaction of Nd(2)Fe(14)BH(x) during milling. Solutions prepared with deionized water and magnetic particles exposed to an AC magnetic field (H(max) ~ 3.7 kA m(-1) and f = 228 kHz) exhibited 26 K ≤ ΔT(max) ≤ 44 K with a maximum estimated specific absorption rate (SAR) of 225 W kg(-1). For the pure magnetic material milled for the longest period of time (10 h), the SAR was estimated as ~2500 W kg(-1). In vitro tests indicated that the powders have acceptable cytotoxicity over a wide range of concentration (0.1-100 µg ml(-1)) due to the coating applied during milling.

  8. Synthesis and magnetic hyperthermia studies on high susceptible Fe1-xMgxFe2O4 superparamagnetic nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, A.; Krishnamoorthi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Majority studies on magnetic hyperthermia properties were carried out by modifying the saturation mass magnetization (Ms) of the samples. Here efforts were made to enhance the specific heat generation rate (SHGR) of single domain superparamagnetic (SP) material by modifying its magnetic susceptibility. Well crystallined, inverse spinel structured and close to monosize Fe1-xMgxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, & 0.5) compounds with nanosphere geometry (diameter 10 nm) were synthesized by solvothermal reflux method at ≈ 300 °C . In the literature it is reported that magnesium ferrites synthesized at high temperatures yield mixed (normal & inverse) spinel structures. The inverse spinel structure was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), lattice vibrations and magnetic characteristics of the compounds. The Ms of the compounds decrease with increase of substituent Mg2+ concentration. Under high excitation energy the inter-valance charge transfer whereas under low excitation energy the intra-valance charge transfer process were predominant. The as-synthesized nanospheres were encapsulated by hydrophobic oleic acid and were exchanged by hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) by chemical exchange process. Estimated magnetic hyperthermia power or SHGR of the x = 0, 0.3 & 0.5 were 11, 11.4 & 22.4 W per gram of respective compounds, respectively, under 63.4 kA m-1 field amplitude and 126 kHz frequency. The SHGR enhances with Mg2+ concentration though its Ms reduces and is attributed to reduced spin-orbital coupling in the compounds with enhanced Mg2+ concentration. This may pave a new way to develop magnetic hyperthermia material by modifying magnetic susceptibility of the compounds against to the reported Ms modification approach. The obtained high SHGR of the biocompatible compounds could be used in magnetic hyperthermia applications in biomedical field.

  9. Chemotherapy and Radiofrequency-Induced Mild Hyperthermia Combined Treatment of Orthotopic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Agha, Mahdi S; Ho, Jason Chak-Shing; Ware, Matthew J; Law, Justin J; Newton, Jared M; Nguyen, Lam; Curley, Steven A; Corr, Stuart J

    2018-04-02

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) have one of the poorest survival rates of all cancers. The main reason for this is related to the unique tumor stroma and poor vascularization of PDAC. As a consequence, chemotherapeutic drugs, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine, cannot efficiently penetrate into the tumor tissue. Non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) mild hyperthermia treatment was proposed as a synergistic therapy to enhance drug uptake into the tumor by increasing tumor vascular inflow and perfusion, thus, increasing the effect of chemotherapy. RF-induced hyperthermia is a safer and non-invasive technique of tumor heating compared to conventional contact heating procedures. In this study, we investigated the short- and long-term effects (~20 days and 65 days, respectively) of combination chemotherapy and RF hyperthermia in an orthotopic PDAC model in mice. The benefit of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine treatment was confirmed in mice; however, the effect of treatment was statistically insignificant in comparison to saline treated mice during long-term observation. The benefit of RF was minimal in the short-term and completely insignificant during long-term observation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hyperthermia-induced disruption of functional connectivity in the human brain network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Sun

    executive control reaction time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We first identified the hyperthermia-induced altered functional connectivity patterns. The changes in the functional connectivity network might be a possible explanation for the cognitive performance and work behavior alteration.

  11. Magnetic, structural and magnetocaloric properties of Ni-Si and Ni-Al thermoseeds for self-controlled hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sudip; Quetz, Abdiel; Aryal, Anil; Dubenko, Igor; Mazumdar, Dipanjan; Stadler, Shane; Ali, Naushad

    2017-11-01

    Self-controlled hyperthermia is a non-invasive technique used to kill or destroy cancer cells while preserving normal surrounding tissues. We have explored bulk magnetic Ni-Si and Ni-Al alloys as a potential thermoseeds. The structural, magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of the samples were investigated, including saturation magnetisation, Curie temperature (T C ), and magnetic and thermal hysteresis, using room temperature X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. The annealing time, temperature and the effects of homogenising the thermoseeds were studied to determine the functional hyperthermia applications. The bulk Ni-Si and Ni-Al binary alloys have Curie temperatures in the desired range, 316 K-319 K (43 °C-46 °C), which is suitable for magnetic hyperthermia applications. We have found that T C strictly follows a linear trend with doping concentration over a wide range of temperature. The magnetic ordering temperature and the magnetic properties can be controlled through substitution in these binary alloys.

  12. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH.

  13. Boosted Hyperthermia Therapy by Combined AC Magnetic and Photothermal Exposures in Ag/Fe3O4 Nanoflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R; Rinaldi-Montes, N; Alonso, J; Amghouz, Z; Garaio, E; García, J A; Gorria, P; Blanco, J A; Phan, M H; Srikanth, H

    2016-09-28

    Over the past two decades, magnetic hyperthermia and photothermal therapy are becoming very promising supplementary techniques to well-established cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These techniques have dramatically improved their ability to perform controlled treatments, relying on the procedure of delivering nanoscale objects into targeted tumor tissues, which can release therapeutic killing doses of heat either upon AC magnetic field exposure or laser irradiation. Although an intense research effort has been made in recent years to study, separately, magnetic hyperthermia using iron oxide nanoparticles and photothermal therapy based on gold or silver plasmonic nanostructures, the full potential of combining both techniques has not yet been systematically explored. Here we present a proof-of-principle experiment showing that designing multifunctional silver/magnetite (Ag/Fe3O4) nanoflowers acting as dual hyperthermia agents is an efficient route for enhancing their heating ability or specific absorption rate (SAR). Interestingly, the SAR of the nanoflowers is increased by at least 1 order of magnitude under the application of both an external magnetic field of 200 Oe and simultaneous laser irradiation. Furthermore, our results show that the synergistic exploitation of the magnetic and photothermal properties of the nanoflowers reduces the magnetic field and laser intensities that would be required in the case that both external stimuli were applied separately. This constitutes a key step toward optimizing the hyperthermia therapy through a combined multifunctional magnetic and photothermal treatment and improving our understanding of the therapeutic process to specific applications that will entail coordinated efforts in physics, engineering, biology, and medicine.

  14. Investigation of temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in Fe3O4 ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemala, Humeshkar Bhaskar

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of Fe3O4 and gamma-Fe2O3 have been exploited in the biomedical fields for imaging, targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT), the production of heat using ferrofluids, colloidal suspensions of MNPs, in an external AC magnetic field (amplitude, 100-500 Oe and frequency 50 kHz -1MHz), has been explored by many researchers, both in vitro and in vivo, as an alternative viable option to treat cancer. The heat energy generated by Neel and Brownian relaxation processes of the internal magnetic spins could be used to elevate local tissue temperature to about 46 ˚C to arrest cancerous growth. MHT, due to its local nature of heating, when combined with other forms of treatment such as chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, it could become an effective therapy for cancer treatment. The efficiency of heat production in MHT is quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), defined as the power output per gram of the MNPs used. In this thesis, ferrofluids consisting of Fe3O4 MNPs of three different sizes (˜ 10 - 13 nm) coated with two different biocompatible surfactants, dextran and polyethylene glycol (PEG), have been investigated. The structural and magnetic characterization of the MNPs were done using XRD, TEM, and DC magnetization measurements. While XRD revealed the crystallite size, TEM provided the information about morphology and physical size distribution of the MNPs. Magnetic measurements of M-vs-H curves for ferrofluids provided information about the saturation magnetization (Ms) and magnetic core size distribution of MNPs. Using MHT measurements, the SAR has been studied as a function of temperature, taking into account the heat loss due to non-adiabatic nature of the experimental set-up. The observed SAR values have been interpreted using the theoretical framework of linear response theory (LRT). We found the SAR values depend on particle size distribution of MNPs, Ms (65-80 emu/g) and the magnetic

  15. Pulmonary Stress Induced by Hyperthermia: Role of Airway Sensory Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Myers AC, Kajekar R, Undem BJ. Allergic inflammation-induced neuropeptide production in rapidly adapting afferent nerves in guinea pig airways. Am J...induced neuro- peptide production in rapidly adapting afferent nerves in guinea pig airways. Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell. Mol. Physiol. 282, L775–L781...co-localization of transient receptor po- tential vanilloid (trpv)1 and sensory neuropeptides in the guinea - pig respiratory system. Neuroscience

  16. Fe-Doped Sol-Gel Glasses and Glass-Ceramics for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Baino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the synthesis and characterization of novel Fe-containing sol-gel materials obtained by modifying the composition of a binary SiO2-CaO parent glass with the addition of Fe2O3. The effect of different processing conditions (calcination in air vs. argon flowing on the formation of magnetic crystalline phases was investigated. The produced materials were analyzed from thermal (hot-stage microscopy, differential thermal analysis, and differential thermal calorimetry and microstructural (X-ray diffraction viewpoints to assess both the behavior upon heating and the development of crystalline phases. N2 adsorption–desorption measurements allowed determining that these materials have high surface area (40–120 m2/g and mesoporous texture with mesopore size in the range of 18 to 30 nm. It was assessed that the magnetic properties can actually be tailored by controlling the Fe content and the environmental conditions (oxidant vs. inert atmosphere during calcination. The glasses and glass-ceramics developed in this work show promise for applications in bone tissue healing which require the use of biocompatible magnetic implants able to elicit therapeutic actions, such as hyperthermia for bone cancer treatment.

  17. Combination of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy on mesenchymal stem cell line treated with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine magnetic-nanoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Leonardo B. de; Primo, Fernando L.; Pinto, Marcelo R.; Morais, Paulo C.

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports on the preparation and the cell viability assay of two nanoemulsions loaded with magnetic nanoparticle and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine. The preparations contain equal amount of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (0.05 mg/mL) but different contents of magnetic nanoparticle (0.15×10 13 or 1.50×10 13 particle/mL). The human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line was used as the model to assess the cell viability and this type of cell can be used as a model to mimic cancer stem cells. The cell viability assays were performed in isolated as well as under combined magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. We found from the cell viability assay that under the hyperthermia treatment (1 MHz and 40 Oe magnetic field amplitude) the cell viability reduction was about 10%, regardless the magnetic nanoparticle content within the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation. However, cell viability reduction of about 50% and 60% were found while applying the photodynamic therapy treatment using the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation containing 0.15×10 13 or 1.50×10 13 magnetic particle/mL, respectively. Finally, an average reduction in cell viability of about 66% was found while combining the hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. - Highlights: • Current protocols in nanotechnology allow for biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles being associated with photosensitizer photoactive drugs, which could lead to perfectly controlled drug release. • The combination of the HPT and PDT therapies can be useful to develop further protocols for both advanced in vitro and in vivo assays. • Magnetic nanodevices associated with therapies have led to the decreased of proliferation of cell population that provides a favorable environment for tumor progression

  18. Combination of hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy on mesenchymal stem cell line treated with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine magnetic-nanoemulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Leonardo B. de [Departamento de Química, Centro de Nanotecnologia e Engenharia Tecidual, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Departamento de Genética, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14049-900 (Brazil); Primo, Fernando L. [Departamento de Química, Centro de Nanotecnologia e Engenharia Tecidual, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Nanophoton Company, SUPERA Innovation and Technology Park, Av. Doutora Nadir de Aguiar, 1805, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, P 14056-680 (Brazil); Pinto, Marcelo R. [Departamento de Química, Laboratório de Enzimologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); and others

    2015-04-15

    The present study reports on the preparation and the cell viability assay of two nanoemulsions loaded with magnetic nanoparticle and chloroaluminum phthalocyanine. The preparations contain equal amount of chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (0.05 mg/mL) but different contents of magnetic nanoparticle (0.15×10{sup 13} or 1.50×10{sup 13} particle/mL). The human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell line was used as the model to assess the cell viability and this type of cell can be used as a model to mimic cancer stem cells. The cell viability assays were performed in isolated as well as under combined magnetic hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. We found from the cell viability assay that under the hyperthermia treatment (1 MHz and 40 Oe magnetic field amplitude) the cell viability reduction was about 10%, regardless the magnetic nanoparticle content within the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation. However, cell viability reduction of about 50% and 60% were found while applying the photodynamic therapy treatment using the magnetic nanoparticle/chloroaluminum phthalocyanine formulation containing 0.15×10{sup 13} or 1.50×10{sup 13} magnetic particle/mL, respectively. Finally, an average reduction in cell viability of about 66% was found while combining the hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy treatments. - Highlights: • Current protocols in nanotechnology allow for biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles being associated with photosensitizer photoactive drugs, which could lead to perfectly controlled drug release. • The combination of the HPT and PDT therapies can be useful to develop further protocols for both advanced in vitro and in vivo assays. • Magnetic nanodevices associated with therapies have led to the decreased of proliferation of cell population that provides a favorable environment for tumor progression.

  19. Thermo-sensitively and magnetically ordered mesoporous carbon nanospheres for targeted controlled drug release and hyperthermia application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Huan; Zheng, Jing; Yu, Shiping; Du, Jinglei; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang

    2018-03-01

    A multifunctional nanoplatform based on thermo-sensitively and magnetically ordered mesoporous carbon nanospheres (TMOMCNs) is developed for effective targeted controlled release of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and hyperthermia in this work. The morphology, specific surface area, porosity, thermo-stability, thermo-sensitivity, as well as magnetism properties of TMOMCNs were verified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, Brunauer-Emmeltt-Teller surface area analysis, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometry measurement. The results indicate that TMOMCNs have an average diameter of ~146nm with a lower critical solution temperature at around 39.5°C. They are superparamagnetic with a magnetization of 10.15emu/g at 20kOe. They generate heat when inductive magnetic field is applied to them and have a normalized specific absorption rate of 30.23W/g at 230kHz and 290Oe, showing good potential for hyperthermia. The DOX loading and release results illustrate that the loading capacity is 135.10mg/g and release performance could be regulated by changing pH and temperature. The good targeting, DOX loading and release and hyperthermia properties of TMOMCNs offer new probabilities for high effectiveness and low toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic SiO{sub 2} gel microspheres for arterial embolization hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhixia; Kawashita, Masakazu [Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-1306-1, Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Araki, Norio [National Hospital Organization Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto 612-8555 (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Doi, Masaaki, E-mail: zhixia@ecei.tohoku.ac.j, E-mail: zhixiali@hotmail.co [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We have prepared magnetic SiO{sub 2} microspheres with a diameter of 20-30 {mu}m as thermoseeds for hyperthermia of cancer. These were prepared by directly introducing preformed magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) into microspheres of a SiO{sub 2} gel matrix derived from the hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) in a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. Dimethylformamide (DMF) was used as a stabilizer, methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) as a dispersant and ammonia (NH{sub 4}OH) as the catalyst for the formation of the spherical particles in the aqueous phase of the W/O emulsion. The magnetic IONPs were synthesized hydrochemically in an aqueous system composed of ferrous chloride, sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide. Mono-dispersed magnetic SiO{sub 2} gel microspheres with a diameter of approximately 20 {mu}m were successfully obtained by adding a determined amount of solution with a molar ratio of TMOS/DMF/CH{sub 3}OH/H{sub 2}O/NH{sub 4}OH = 1:1.4:9:20:0.03 to kerosene with a surfactant (sorbitan monooleate/sorbitan monostearate = 3:1 by weight ratio) that was 30 wt% of the total amount of the oil phase. These were estimated to contain up to 60 wt% of IONPs that consisted mainly of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and showed a higher specific absorption rate (SAR = 27.9-43.8 W g{sup -1}) than that of the starting IONPs (SAR = 25.3 W g{sup -1}) under an alternating current magnetic field of 300 Oe and 100 kHz.

  1. Magnetic SiO2 gel microspheres for arterial embolization hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhixia; Kawashita, Masakazu; Araki, Norio; Mitsumori, Michihide; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Doi, Masaaki

    2010-01-01

    We have prepared magnetic SiO 2 microspheres with a diameter of 20-30 μm as thermoseeds for hyperthermia of cancer. These were prepared by directly introducing preformed magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) into microspheres of a SiO 2 gel matrix derived from the hydrolysis of tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) in a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. Dimethylformamide (DMF) was used as a stabilizer, methanol (CH 3 OH) as a dispersant and ammonia (NH 4 OH) as the catalyst for the formation of the spherical particles in the aqueous phase of the W/O emulsion. The magnetic IONPs were synthesized hydrochemically in an aqueous system composed of ferrous chloride, sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide. Mono-dispersed magnetic SiO 2 gel microspheres with a diameter of approximately 20 μm were successfully obtained by adding a determined amount of solution with a molar ratio of TMOS/DMF/CH 3 OH/H 2 O/NH 4 OH = 1:1.4:9:20:0.03 to kerosene with a surfactant (sorbitan monooleate/sorbitan monostearate = 3:1 by weight ratio) that was 30 wt% of the total amount of the oil phase. These were estimated to contain up to 60 wt% of IONPs that consisted mainly of Fe 3 O 4 and showed a higher specific absorption rate (SAR = 27.9-43.8 W g -1 ) than that of the starting IONPs (SAR = 25.3 W g -1 ) under an alternating current magnetic field of 300 Oe and 100 kHz.

  2. Theoretical evaluations of magnetic nanoparticle-enhanced heating on tumor embedded with large blood vessels during hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Deng, Z. S.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    The large blood vessels surrounding the tumor would significantly result in heat sink, and thus seriously limit the thermal ablative area during tumor hyperthermia. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was recently identified as an important heating enhancer to improve the treatment efficiency. It will not only help to absorb more energy under the irradiation of external magnetic field, but also can block the blood flow and subsequently weaken the heat sink effect of large vessels. In this study, these two critical factors, reserved to be undisclosed before in theory, were comprehensively investigated through three-dimensional numerical simulation. The results suggested that concerning the contribution to temperature increase in the tissues surrounding large vessel, the factor of blood flow blocking is more effective than that of energy absorption. Therefore, selective loading of MNPs to the target sites is expected to serve as a promising method to perform successful hyperthermia treatment for tumor tissues embedded with large blood vessels.

  3. Theoretical evaluations of magnetic nanoparticle-enhanced heating on tumor embedded with large blood vessels during hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q. [Tsinghua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine (China); Deng, Z. S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (China); Liu, J., E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine (China)

    2012-07-15

    The large blood vessels surrounding the tumor would significantly result in heat sink, and thus seriously limit the thermal ablative area during tumor hyperthermia. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was recently identified as an important heating enhancer to improve the treatment efficiency. It will not only help to absorb more energy under the irradiation of external magnetic field, but also can block the blood flow and subsequently weaken the heat sink effect of large vessels. In this study, these two critical factors, reserved to be undisclosed before in theory, were comprehensively investigated through three-dimensional numerical simulation. The results suggested that concerning the contribution to temperature increase in the tissues surrounding large vessel, the factor of blood flow blocking is more effective than that of energy absorption. Therefore, selective loading of MNPs to the target sites is expected to serve as a promising method to perform successful hyperthermia treatment for tumor tissues embedded with large blood vessels.

  4. Optimal size for heating efficiency of superparamagnetic dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles for application in magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-06-01

    Dextran-coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with average particle sizes of 4 and 19 nm were synthesized through in situ and semi-two-step co-precipitation methods, respectively. The experimental results confirm the formation of pure phase of magnetite as well as the presence of dextran layer on the surface of modified magnetite nanoparticles. The results also reveal that both samples have the superparamagnetic behavior. Furthermore, calorimetric measurements show that the dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with an average size of 4 nm cannot produce any appreciable heat under a biologically safe alternating magnetic field used in hyperthermia therapy; whereas, the larger ones (average size of 19 nm) are able to increase the temperature of their surrounding medium up to above therapeutic range. In addition, measured specific absorption rate (SAR) values confirm that magnetite nanoparticles with an average size of 19 nm are very excellent candidates for application in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

  5. Preparation of Multifunctional Fe@Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles with Surface Grafting as a Potential Treatment for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Jei Chung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron core gold shell nanoparticles grafted with Methotrexate (MTX and indocyanine green (ICG were synthesized for the first time in this study, and preliminarily evaluated for their potential in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. The core-shell Fe@Au nanoparticles were prepared via the microemulsion process and then grafted with MTX and ICG using hydrolyzed poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid (PSMA to obtain core-shell Fe@Au-PSMA-ICG/MTX nanoparticles. MTX is an anti-cancer therapeutic, and ICG is a fluorescent dye. XRD, TEM, FTIR and UV-Vis spectrometry were performed to characterize the nanoparticles. The data indicated that the average size of the nanoparticles was 6.4 ± 09 nm and that the Au coating protected the Fe core from oxidation. MTX and ICG were successfully grafted onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Under exposure to high frequency induction waves, the superparamagnetic nanoparticles elevated the temperature of a solution in a few minutes, which suggested the potential for an application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. The in vitro studies verified that the nanoparticles were biocompatible; nonetheless, the Fe@Au-PSMA-ICG/MTX nanoparticles killed cancer cells (Hep-G2 via the magnetic hyperthermia mechanism and the release of MTX.

  6. Preparation of Multifunctional Fe@Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles with Surface Grafting as a Potential Treatment for Magnetic Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ren-Jei; Shih, Hui-Ting

    2014-01-24

    Iron core gold shell nanoparticles grafted with Methotrexate (MTX) and indocyanine green (ICG) were synthesized for the first time in this study, and preliminarily evaluated for their potential in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. The core-shell Fe@Au nanoparticles were prepared via the microemulsion process and then grafted with MTX and ICG using hydrolyzed poly(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA) to obtain core-shell Fe@Au-PSMA-ICG/MTX nanoparticles. MTX is an anti-cancer therapeutic, and ICG is a fluorescent dye. XRD, TEM, FTIR and UV-Vis spectrometry were performed to characterize the nanoparticles. The data indicated that the average size of the nanoparticles was 6.4 ± 09 nm and that the Au coating protected the Fe core from oxidation. MTX and ICG were successfully grafted onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Under exposure to high frequency induction waves, the superparamagnetic nanoparticles elevated the temperature of a solution in a few minutes, which suggested the potential for an application in magnetic hyperthermia treatment. The in vitro studies verified that the nanoparticles were biocompatible; nonetheless, the Fe@Au-PSMA-ICG/MTX nanoparticles killed cancer cells (Hep-G2) via the magnetic hyperthermia mechanism and the release of MTX.

  7. Magnetic hyperthermia studies on water-soluble polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna Surendra, M. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India); Annapoorani, S. [Anna University of Technology, Department of Nanotechnology (India); Ansar, Ereath Beeran; Harikrishna Varma, P. R. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Bioceramics Laboratory (India); Ramachandra Rao, M. S., E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India)

    2014-12-15

    We report on synthesis and hyperthermia studies in the water-soluble ferrofluid made of polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with different particle sizes. Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method and particle size was varied as 6, 10, and 14 nm by varying the precursor to surfactant concentration. PAA surfactant bonding and surfactant thickness were studied by FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis. At room temperature, nanoparticles show superparamagnetism and saturation magnetization was found to vary from 33 to 44 emu/g with increase in the particle size from 6 to 14 nm, and this increase was attributed to the presence of a magnetic inert layer of 4 Å thick. Effect of particle size, concentration, and alternating magnetic field strength at 275 kHz on specific absorption rate were studied by preparing ferrofluids in deionized water at different concentrations. Ferrofluids at a concentration of 1.25 g/L, with 10 min of AMF exposure of strength ∼15.7 kA/m show stable temperatures ∼48, 58, and 68 °C with increase in the particle sizes 6, 10, and 14 nm. A maximum specific absorption rate of 251 W/g for ferrofluid with a particle size of 10 nm at 1.25 g/L, 15.7 kA/m, and 275 kHz was observed. Viability of L929 fibroblasts is measured by MTT assay cytotoxicity studies using the polyacrylic acid-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles.

  8. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William, E-mail: William.Chu@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Staruch, Robert M. [Clinical Sites Research Program, Philips Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Pichardo, Samuel [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Physics and Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O. [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); Huang, Yuexi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ylihautala, Mika [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); McGuffin, Merrylee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  9. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, William; Staruch, Robert M.; Pichardo, Samuel; Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O.; Huang, Yuexi; Ylihautala, Mika; McGuffin, Merrylee; Czarnota, Gregory; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  10. Nano-magnetite coated with gold: alternative oncological therapy with magnetic hyperthermia; Nanomagnetita recubierta de oro: terapia oncologica alternativa con hipertermia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordova F, T.; Jimenez G, O.; Basurto I, G. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Martinez E, J. C., E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao de la Victoria, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    Localized hyperthermia performed through the use of nanoparticles is one of the most promising procedures for the cancer treatment. In this work, the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was carried out using the thermal decomposition method. Subsequently, these nanoparticles were coated with gold and suspended in aqueous phase. As a result, nanoparticles capable of being heated by the application of an alternating magnetic field or through the use of infrared radiation were obtained. As an additional feature, these nanoparticles are biocompatible thanks to their golden coating. The synthesized nanoparticles can be functionalized by the conjugation of a molecule (aptamer, antibody, peptide, etc.) whose target is a cancer cell in order to adhere to it the nanoparticle-marker complex, to subsequently carry out a heating with the objective of induce cell death. In conclusion, the synthesized nanoparticles allow providing an alternative treatment for cancer through the use of localized hyperthermia, either using magnetic or infrared heating. (Author)

  11. Identification of infusion strategy for achieving repeatable nanoparticle distribution and quantification of thermal dosage using micro-CT Hounsfield unit in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBrun, Alexander; Joglekar, Tejashree; Bieberich, Charles; Ma, Ronghui; Zhu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify an injection strategy leading to repeatable nanoparticle deposition patterns in tumours and to quantify volumetric heat generation rate distribution based on micro-CT Hounsfield unit (HU) in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. In vivo animal experiments were performed on graft prostatic cancer (PC3) tumours in immunodeficient mice to investigate whether lowering ferrofluid infusion rate improves control of the distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in tumour tissue. Nanoparticle distribution volume obtained from micro-CT scan was used to evaluate spreading of the nanoparticles from the injection site in tumours. Heating experiments were performed to quantify relationships among micro-CT HU values, local nanoparticle concentrations in the tumours, and the ferrofluid-induced volumetric heat generation rate (q(MNH)) when nanoparticles were subject to an alternating magnetic field. An infusion rate of 3 µL/min was identified to result in the most repeatable nanoparticle distribution in PC3 tumours. Linear relationships have been obtained to first convert micro-CT greyscale values to HU values, then to local nanoparticle concentrations, and finally to nanoparticle-induced q(MNH) values. The total energy deposition rate in tumours was calculated and the observed similarity in total energy deposition rates in all three infusion rate groups suggests improvement in minimising nanoparticle leakage from the tumours. The results of this study demonstrate that micro-CT generated q(MNH) distribution and tumour physical models improve predicting capability of heat transfer simulation for designing reliable treatment protocols using magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  12. Exchange-coupled Fe3O4/CoFe2O4 nanoparticles for advanced magnetic hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassell, M.; Robles, J.; Das, R.; Phan, M. H.; Srikanth, H.

    Iron oxide nanoparticles especially Fe3O4, γ-Fe2O3 have been extensively studied for magnetic hyperthermia because of their tunable magnetic properties and stable suspension in superparamagnetic regime. However, their relatively low heating capacity hindered practical application. Recently, a large improvement in heating efficiency has been reported in exchange-coupled nanoparticles with exchange coupling between soft and hard magnetic phases. Here, we systematically studied the effect of core and shell size on the heating efficiency of the Fe3O4/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized using thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed formation of spherical shaped Fe3O4 and Fe3O-/CoFe2O4 nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed high magnetization (≅70 emu/g) and superparamagnetic behavior for the nanoparticles at room temperature. Magnetic hyperthermia results showed a large increase in specific absorption rate (SAR) for 8nm Fe3O4/CoFe2O4 compared to Fe3O4 nanoparticles of the same size. The heating efficiency of the Fe3O4/CoFe2O4 with 1 nm CoFe2O4 (shell) increased from 207 to 220 W/g (for 800 Oe) with increase in core size from 6 to 8 nm. The heating efficiency of the Fe3O4/CoFe2O4 with 2 nm CoFe2O4 (shell) and core size of 8 nm increased from 220 to 460 W/g (for 800 Oe). These exchange-coupled Fe3O4/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanoparticles can be a good candidate for advanced hyperthermia application.

  13. Hyperthermia-enhanced TRAIL- and mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death is mediated through mitochondria in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinxin; Kim, Han-Cheon; Kim, Seog-Young; Basse, Per; Park, Bae-Hang; Lee, Byeong-Chel; Lee, Yong J

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; death usually results from uncontrolled metastatic disease. Previously, we developed a novel strategy of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) in combination with hyperthermia to treat hepatic colorectal metastases. However, previous studies suggest a potential hepatocyte cytotoxicity with TRAIL. Unlike TRAIL, anti-human TRAIL receptor antibody induces apoptosis without hepatocyte toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the anti-tumor efficacy of humanized anti-death receptor 4 (DR4) antibody mapatumumab (Mapa) by comparing it with TRAIL in combination with hyperthermia. TRAIL, which binds to both DR4 and death receptor 5 (DR5), was approximately tenfold more effective than Mapa in inducing apoptosis. However, hyperthermia enhances apoptosis induced by either agent. We observed that the synergistic effect was mediated through elevation of reactive oxygen species, c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, Bax oligomerization, and translocalization to the mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c to cytosol, activation of caspases, and increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. We believe that the successful outcome of this study will support the application of Mapa in combination with hyperthermia to colorectal hepatic metastases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Acute volume expansion attenuates hyperthermia-induced reductions in cerebral perfusion during simulated hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlader, Zachary J; Seifert, Thomas; Wilson, Thad E

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthermia reduces the capacity to withstand a simulated hemorrhagic challenge, but volume loading preserves this capacity. This study tested the hypotheses that acute volume expansion during hyperthermia increases cerebral perfusion and attenuates reductions in cerebral perfusion during...... infusion while hyperthermic. Primary dependent variables were mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAvmean), serving as an index of cerebral perfusion; mean arterial pressure (MAP); and cardiac output (thermodilution). During baseline, hyperthermia reduced MCAvmean (P = 0.001) by 12 ± 9% relative...

  15. Hyperthermia enhances radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells through ROS inducing autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Ming-Chen; Long, Hui; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Yin-Bing; Zhang, Bo-Huo; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Yu, Fei-Hong; Cui, Shu-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) enhances the anti-cancer effects of radiotherapy (RT), but the precise biochemical mechanisms involved are unclear. This study was aim to investigate if mild HT sensitizes colorectal cancer cells to RT through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducing autophagic cell death in a mice model of HCT116 human colorectal cancer. HCT116 mice model were randomly divided into five groups: mock group, hyperthermia group (HT), radiotherapy group (RT), HT + RT group, and HT + RT +N-acetyl L-cysteine (NAC) group (HT + CT + NAC). After four weeks of treatment, cancer growth inhibition, rate and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured with MTT and JC-1 assays, respectively, while ROS were estimated fluorimetrically. The relationship of these parameters to expressions of autophagy-related genes Beclin1, LC3B, and mTOR was analyzed. Gene expression was measured by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There were significant increases in ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential in the HT + RT group. ROS levels in the HT + RT group increased more significantly than in any other group. In contrast, ROS levels in the HT + RT + NAC group were significantly decreased relative to the HT + RT group. The number of autophagic bodies in HT + RT group was higher than that of mock group. There were significant increases in the expression of Beclin1 and LC3B genes, while mTOR expression was significantly decreased in the HT + CT group. Treatment with NAC reversed the pattern of these changes. These results indicate that HT enhances the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to RT through ROS inducing autophagic cell death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Optimizing Cold Water Immersion for Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Davis, Jon-Kyle; Casa, Douglas J; Bishop, Phillip A

    2015-11-01

    Cold water immersion (CWI) provides rapid cooling in events of exertional heat stroke. Optimal procedures for CWI in the field are not well established. This meta-analysis aimed to provide structured analysis of the effectiveness of CWI on the cooling rate in healthy adults subjected to exercise-induced hyperthermia. An electronic search (December 2014) was conducted using the PubMed and Web of Science. The mean difference of the cooling rate between CWI and passive recovery was calculated. Pooled analyses were based on a random-effects model. Sources of heterogeneity were identified through a mixed-effects model Q statistic. Inferential statistics aggregated the CWI cooling rate for extrapolation. Nineteen studies qualified for inclusion. Results demonstrate CWI elicited a significant effect: mean difference, 0.03°C·min(-1); 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.04°C·min(-1). A conservative, observed estimate of the CWI cooling rate was 0.08°C·min(-1) across various conditions. CWI cooled individuals twice as fast as passive recovery. Subgroup analyses revealed that cooling was more effective (Q test P immersion water temperature ≤10°C, ambient temperature ≥20°C, immersion duration ≤10 min, and using torso plus limbs immersion. There is insufficient evidence of effect using forearms/hands CWI for rapid cooling: mean difference, 0.01°C·min(-1); 95% confidence interval, -0.01°C·min(-1) to 0.04°C·min(-1). A combined data summary, pertaining to 607 subjects from 29 relevant studies, was presented for referencing the weighted cooling rate and recovery time, aiming for practitioners to better plan emergency procedures. An optimal procedure for yielding high cooling rates is proposed. Using prompt vigorous CWI should be encouraged for treating exercise-induced hyperthermia whenever possible, using cold water temperature (approximately 10°C) and maximizing body surface contact (whole-body immersion).

  17. Mg shallow doping effects on the ac magnetic self-heating characteristics of γ-Fe2O3 superparamagnetic nanoparticles for highly efficient hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jung-tak; Bae, Seongtae

    2017-10-01

    The effects of Mg doping on the magnetic and AC self-heating temperature rising characteristics of γ-Fe2O3 superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNPs) were investigated for hyperthermia applications in biomedicine. The doping concentration of nonmagnetic Mg2+ cation was systematically controlled from 0 to 0.15 at. % in Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs during chemically and thermally modified one-pot thermal decomposition synthesis under bubbling O2/Ar gas mixture. It was empirically observed that the saturation magnetization (Ms) and the out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility ( χm″)of Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs were increased by increasing the Mg2+ cation doping concentration from 0.05 to 0.13 at. %. Correspondingly, the AC magnetically induced self-heating temperature (Tac,max) in solid state and the intrinsic loss power in water were increased up to 184 °C and 14.2 nH m2 kg-1 (Mgx-γFe2O3, x = 0.13), respectively, at the biologically and physiologically safe range of AC magnetic field (Happl × fappl = 1.2 × 109 A m-1 s-1). All the chemically and physically analyzed results confirmed that the dramatically improved AC magnetic induction heating characteristics and the magnetic properties of Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs (x = 0.13) are primarily due to the significantly enhanced magnetic susceptibility (particularly, χm″) and the improved AC/DC magnetic softness (lower AC/DC magnetic anisotropy) resulting from the systematically controlled nonmagnetic Mg2+ cation concentrations and distributions (occupation ratio) in the Fe vacancy sites of γ-Fe2O3 (approximately 12% vacancy), instead of typically well-known Fe3O4 (no vacancy) SPNPs. The cell viability and biocompatibility with U87 MG cell lines demonstrated that Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs (x = 0.13) has promising bio-feasibility for hyperthermia agent applications.

  18. A wide-frequency range AC magnetometer to measure the specific absorption rate in nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garaio, E.; Collantes, J.M.; Garcia, J.A.; Plazaola, F.; Mornet, S.; Couillaud, F.; Sandre, O.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles is crucial to assert their potential for magnetic hyperthermia. To perform this task, calorimetric methods are widely used. However, those methods are not very accurate and are difficult to standardize. In this paper, we present AC magnetometry results performed with a lab-made magnetometer that is able to obtain dynamic hysteresis-loops in the AC magnetic field frequency range from 50 kHz to 1 MHz and intensities up to 24 kA m −1 . In this work, SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in water are measured by AC magnetometry. The so-obtained values are compared with the SAR measured by calorimetric methods. Both measurements, by calorimetry and magnetometry, are in good agreement. Therefore, the presented AC magnetometer is a suitable way to obtain SAR values of magnetic nanoparticles. - Highlights: • We propose AC magnetometry as a method to measure the specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic nanoparticles suitable for magnetic hyperthermia therapy. • We have built a lab-made AC magnetometer, which is able to measure magnetic dynamic hysteresis-loops of nanoparticle dispersions. • The device works with AC magnetic field intensities up to 24 kA m −1 in a frequency range from 75 kHz to 1 MHz. • The SAR values of maghemite nanoparticles around 12 nm in magnetic diameter dispersed in water are measured by the lab-made magnetometer and different calorimetric methods. • Although all methods are in good agreement, several factors (probe location, thermal inertia, losses, etc.) make calorimetric method less accurate than AC magnetometry

  19. One-step microwave-assisted synthesis of water-dispersible Fe3O4 magnetic nanoclusters for hyperthermia applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya, Ayyappan; Kalyani, S.; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-10-01

    To realize magnetic hyperthermia as an alternate stand-alone therapeutic procedure for cancer treatment, magnetic nanoparticles with optimal performance, within the biologically safe limits, are to be produced using simple, reproducible and scalable techniques. Herein, we present a simple, one-step approach for synthesis of water-dispersible magnetic nanoclusters (MNCs) of superparamagnetic iron oxide by reducing of Fe2(SO4)3 in sodium acetate (alkali), poly ethylene glycol (capping ligand), and ethylene glycol (solvent and reductant) in a microwave reactor. The average size and saturation magnetization of the MNC's are tuned from 27 to 52 nm and 32 to 58 emu/g by increasing the reaction time from 10 to 600 s. Transmission electron microscopy images reveal that each MNC composed of large number of primary Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The synthesised MNCs show excellent colloidal stability in aqueous phase due to the adsorbed PEG layer. The highest SAR value of 215 ± 10 W/gFe observed in 52 nm size MNC at a frequency of 126 kHz and field of 63 kA/m suggest the potential use of these MNC in hyperthermia applications. This study further opens up the possibilities to develop metal ion-doped MNCs with tunable sizes suitable for various biomedical applications using microwave assisted synthesis.

  20. Dopamine D(3) receptors contribute to methamphetamine-induced alterations in dopaminergic neuronal function: role of hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Michelle G; Newman, Amy H; Nielsen, Shannon M; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2014-06-05

    Methamphetamine administration causes long-term deficits to dopaminergic systems that, in humans, are thought to be associated with motor slowing and memory impairment. Methamphetamine interacts with the dopamine transporter (DAT) and increases extracellular concentrations of dopamine that, in turn, binds to a number of dopamine receptor subtypes. Although the relative contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of methamphetamine is not fully known, non-selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists can attenuate methamphetamine-induced changes to dopamine systems. The present study extended these findings by testing the role of the dopamine D3 receptor subtype in mediating the long-term dopaminergic, and for comparison serotonergic, deficits caused by methamphetamine. Results indicate that the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist, PG01037, attenuated methamphetamine-induced decreases in striatal DAT, but not hippocampal serotonin (5HT) transporter (SERT), function, as assessed 7 days after treatment. However, PG01037 also attenuated methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. When methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia was maintained by treating rats in a warm ambient environment, PG01037 failed to attenuate the effects of methamphetamine on DAT uptake. Furthermore, PG01037 did not attenuate methamphetamine-induced decreases in dopamine and 5HT content. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that dopamine D3 receptors mediate, in part, the long-term deficits in DAT function caused by methamphetamine, and that this effect likely involves an attenuation of methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dopamine D3 receptors contribute to methamphetamine-induced alterations in dopaminergic neuronal function: Role of hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baladi, Michelle G.; Newman, Amy H.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine administration causes long-term deficits to dopaminergic systems that, in humans, are thought to be associated with motor slowing and memory impairment. Methamphetamine interacts with the dopamine transporter (DAT) and increases extracellular concentrations of dopamine that, in turn, binds to a number of dopamine receptor subtypes. Although the relative contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of methamphetamine is not fully known, non-selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists can attenuate methamphetamine-induced changes to dopamine systems. The present study extended these findings by testing the role of the dopamine D3 receptor subtype in mediating the long-term dopaminergic, and for comparison serotonergic, deficits caused by methamphetamine. Results indicate that the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist, PG01037, attenuated methamphetamine-induced decreases in striatal DAT, but not hippocampal serotonin (5HT) transporter (SERT), function, as assessed 7 days after treatment. However, PG01037 also attenuated methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. When methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia was maintained by treating rats in a warm ambient environment, PG01037 failed to attenuate the effects of methamphetamine on DAT uptake. Furthermore, PG01037 did not attenuate methamphetamine-induced decreases in dopamine and 5HT content. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that dopamine D3 receptors mediate, in part, the long-term deficits in DAT function caused by methamphetamine, and that this effect likely involves an attenuation of methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. PMID:24685638

  2. Hyperthermia enhances mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death through ubiquitin-mediated degradation of cellular FLIP(long) in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X; Kim, S-Y; Zhou, Z; Lagasse, E; Kwon, Y T; Lee, Y J

    2013-04-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; the main cause of death of colorectal cancer is hepatic metastases, which can be treated with hyperthermia using isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP). In this study, we report that mild hyperthermia potently reduced cellular FLIP(long), (c-FLIP(L)), a major regulator of the death receptor (DR) pathway of apoptosis, thereby enhancing humanized anti-DR4 antibody mapatumumab (Mapa)-mediated mitochondria-independent apoptosis. We observed that overexpression of c-FLIP(L) in CX-1 cells abrogated the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia, whereas silencing of c-FLIP in CX-1 cells enhanced Mapa-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia altered c-FLIP(L) protein stability without concomitant reductions in FLIP mRNA. Ubiquitination of c-FLIP(L) was increased by hyperthermia, and proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented heat-induced downregulation of c-FLIP(L). These results suggest the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in this process. We also found lysine residue 195 (K195) to be essential for c-FLIP(L) ubiquitination and proteolysis, as mutant c-FLIP(L) lysine 195 arginine (arginine replacing lysine) was left virtually un-ubiquitinated and was refractory to hyperthermia-triggered degradation, and thus partially blocked the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia. Our observations reveal that hyperthermia transiently reduced c-FLIP(L) by proteolysis linked to K195 ubiquitination, which contributed to the synergistic effect between Mapa and hyperthermia. This study supports the application of hyperthermia combined with other regimens to treat colorectal hepatic metastases.

  3. Hyperthermia-induced degradation of BRCA2 : from bedside to bench and back again

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van den Tempel (Nathalie)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractLocal hyperthermia, a method during which the temperature of a tumor is elevated, clinically increases the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, without increasing side-effects. One of the reasons that explains why hyperthermia increases effectivity of these therapies is that it

  4. Folic acid-conjugated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia and MRI in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Q.L.; Zheng, S.W.; Hong, R.Y.; Deng, S.M.; Guo, L.; Hu, R.L.; Gao, B.; Huang, M.; Cheng, L.F.; Liu, G.H.; Wang, Y.Q.

    2014-01-01

    The folic acid (FA)-conjugated Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe 3+ and Fe 2+ solution followed by surface modification with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) to form carboxymethyl group terminated MNPs, then FA was conjugated with the carboxyl group functionalized MNPs. The morphology and properties of obtained nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV–visible spectra (UV–vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The FA-conjugated MNPs exhibited relatively high saturation magnetization and fast magneto-temperature response which could be applied to hyperthermia therapy. To determine the accurate targeting effect of FA, we chose FA-conjugated MNPs as MRI contrast enhancement agent for detection of KB cells with folate receptor over-expression in vitro and in vivo. The results show that these magnetic nanoparticles appear to be the promising materials for local hyperthermia and MRI.

  5. Physical aspects of magnetic hyperthermia: Low-frequency ac field absorption in a magnetic colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raikher, Yu. L.; Stepanov, V.I.

    2014-01-01

    A uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic particle suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to an ac field is considered. Consistently taking into account both internal (Néel) and external (Brownian) magnetic relaxations, a simple expression for the dynamic susceptibility is obtained. This result, with regard to the ac field energy absorption, is compared to the common heuristic approach. This is done for a model polydisperse colloid containing maghemite nanoparticles, which are assumed to posses either bulk or surface magnetic anisotropy. It is shown that viscous losses caused by the particle motion in a fluid matrix make important contribution to the full magnetic response of a ferrocolloid and, thus, its ability to absorb the ac field energy. The obtained exact expression, which takes in both dissipation mechanisms, paves the way to correct optimization of the nanoparticle-mediated heating effect. - Highlights: • A uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic particle suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to an ac field is considered. • Consistently taking into account both internal (Néel) and external (Brownian) magnetic relaxations, a simple expression for the dynamic susceptibility is obtained. • This result, with regard to the ac field energy absorption, is compared to the common heuristic approach using as a benchmark a model polydisperse colloid containing maghemite nanoparticles, which are assumed to posses either bulk or surface magnetic anisotropy. • It is shown that viscous losses caused by the particle motion in a fluid matrix make important contribution to the full magnetic response of a ferrocolloid and, thus, its ability to absorb the ac field energy. • The obtained exact expression, which takes in both dissipation mechanisms, paves the way to correct optimization of the nanoparticle-mediated heating effect

  6. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia

    KAUST Repository

    Casula, Maria F.

    2016-06-10

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  7. Manganese doped-iron oxide nanoparticle clusters and their potential as agents for magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia

    KAUST Repository

    Casula, Maria F.; Conca, Erika; Bakaimi, Ioanna; Sathya, Ayyappan; Materia, Maria Elena; Casu, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea; Sogne, Elisa; Pellegrino, Teresa; Kanaras, Antonios G.

    2016-01-01

    A simple, one pot method to synthesize water-dispersible Mn doped iron oxide colloidal clusters constructed of nanoparticles arranged into secondary flower-like structures was developed. This method allows the successful incorporation and homogeneous distribution of Mn within the nanoparticle iron oxide clusters. The formed clusters retain the desired morphological and structural features observed for pure iron oxide clusters, but possess intrinsic magnetic properties that arise from Mn doping. They show distinct performance as imaging contrast agents and excellent characteristics as heating mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia. It is expected that the outcomes of this study will open up new avenues for the exploitation of doped magnetic nanoparticle assemblies in biomedicine. © the Owner Societies 2016.

  8. Improved magnetic induction heating of nanoferrites for hyperthermia applications: Correlation with colloidal stability and magneto-structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khot, V.M., E-mail: wish_khot@yahoo.co.in [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur 416006 (India); Salunkhe, A.B. [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule University of Pune (India); Ruso, J.M. [Soft Matter and Molecular Biophysics Group, Applied Physics Department, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pawar, S.H. [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur 416006 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Nanoferrites with compositions Mn{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Co{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.4}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (MZF, CZF and NZF respectively) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared in a single step. These nanoparticles are highly water dispersible with zeta potential values between 14 and 21 mV. Magnetic induction heating characteristics of these NPs have been studied as a function of magnetic field amplitude from 6.7 to 26.7 kA m{sup −1} (at fixed frequency 265 kHz) and concentration of nanoparticles. Notable enhancement in specific absorption rate (334.5 W g{sup −1}) by CZF nanoparticles has been observed. This enhanced induction heating properties have been studied and correlated with colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as tuned magnetic anisotropy arising from zinc substitution. Cytotoxicity of synthesized mixed ferrites has been evaluated in vitro on HeLa cell lines using MTT assay to explore their use as heating agents in magnetic hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoferrites (sizes 8–12 nm) with improved specific absorption rate (334.5 W g{sup −1}) at lowest particle concentration have been prepared • The results have been explained by correlating colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as magnetocrystalline anisotropy. • It has been shown that substitution of zinc tunes anisotropy of cobalt iron oxide within the value optimized previously in achieving high throughput in magnetic induction heating. • In vitro cytotoxicity proves nanoparticles are non-toxic suggesting their use as a potential heating agent in hyperthermia therapy.

  9. Improved magnetic induction heating of nanoferrites for hyperthermia applications: Correlation with colloidal stability and magneto-structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khot, V.M.; Salunkhe, A.B.; Ruso, J.M.; Pawar, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoferrites with compositions Mn 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 , Co 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 , Ni 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 (MZF, CZF and NZF respectively) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared in a single step. These nanoparticles are highly water dispersible with zeta potential values between 14 and 21 mV. Magnetic induction heating characteristics of these NPs have been studied as a function of magnetic field amplitude from 6.7 to 26.7 kA m −1 (at fixed frequency 265 kHz) and concentration of nanoparticles. Notable enhancement in specific absorption rate (334.5 W g −1 ) by CZF nanoparticles has been observed. This enhanced induction heating properties have been studied and correlated with colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as tuned magnetic anisotropy arising from zinc substitution. Cytotoxicity of synthesized mixed ferrites has been evaluated in vitro on HeLa cell lines using MTT assay to explore their use as heating agents in magnetic hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoferrites (sizes 8–12 nm) with improved specific absorption rate (334.5 W g −1 ) at lowest particle concentration have been prepared • The results have been explained by correlating colloidal stability and magnetostructural properties such as magnetocrystalline anisotropy. • It has been shown that substitution of zinc tunes anisotropy of cobalt iron oxide within the value optimized previously in achieving high throughput in magnetic induction heating. • In vitro cytotoxicity proves nanoparticles are non-toxic suggesting their use as a potential heating agent in hyperthermia therapy

  10. Physical mechanism and modeling of heat generation and transfer in magnetic fluid hyperthermia through Néelian and Brownian relaxation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyanto; Ng, E Y K; Kumar, S D

    2017-03-23

    Current clinically accepted technologies for cancer treatment still have limitations which lead to the exploration of new therapeutic methods. Since the past few decades, the hyperthermia treatment has attracted the attention of investigators owing to its strong biological rationales in applying hyperthermia as a cancer treatment modality. Advancement of nanotechnology offers a potential new heating method for hyperthermia by using nanoparticles which is termed as magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). In MFH, superparamagnetic nanoparticles dissipate heat through Néelian and Brownian relaxation in the presence of an alternating magnetic field. The heating power of these particles is dependent on particle properties and treatment settings. A number of pre-clinical and clinical trials were performed to test the feasibility of this novel treatment modality. There are still issues yet to be solved for the successful transition of this technology from bench to bedside. These issues include the planning, execution, monitoring and optimization of treatment. The modeling and simulation play crucial roles in solving some of these issues. Thus, this review paper provides a basic understanding of the fundamental and rationales of hyperthermia and recent development in the modeling and simulation applied to depict the heat generation and transfer phenomena in the MFH.

  11. In vivo hyperthermia effect induced by high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei-Cheng; Tu Juan; Li Qian; Fan Ting-Bo; Zhang Dong; Chen Wei-Zhong; Joo-Ha Hwang; Chen Jing-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthermia effects (39–44 °C) induced by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have been regarded as a promising therapeutic tool for boosting immune responses or enhancing drug delivery into a solid tumor. However, previous studies also reported that the cell death occurs when cells are maintained at 43 °C for more than 20 minutes. The aim of this study is to investigate thermal responses inside in vivo rabbit auricular veins exposed to pulsed HIFU (1.17 MHz, 5300 W/cm 2 , with relatively low-duty ratios (0.2%–4.3%). The results show that: (1) with constant pulse repetition frequency (PRF) (e.g., 1 Hz), the thermal responses inside the vessel will increase with the increasing duty ratio; (2) a temperature elevation to 43 °C can be identified at the duty ratio of 4.3%; (3) with constant duty ratios, the change of PRF will not significantly affect the temperature measurement in the vessel; (4) as the duty ratios lower than 4.3%, the presence of microbubbles will not significantly enhance the thermal responses in the vessel, but will facilitate HIFU-induced inertial cavitation events. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. PET measurements of hyperthermia-induced suppression of protein synthesis in tumors in relation to effects on tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, B.J.; Elsinga, P.H.; Mooibroek, J.; Paans, A.M.; Wieringa, A.R.; Konings, A.W.; Vaalburg, W.

    1991-01-01

    Hyperthermia-induced metabolic changes in tumor tissue have been monitored by PET. Uptake of L-[1-11C]tyrosine in rhabdomyosarcoma tissue of Wag/Rij rats was dose-dependently reduced after local hyperthermia treatment at 42, 45, or 47 degrees C. Tumor blood flow, as measured by PET with 13NH3, appeared to be unchanged. The L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data were compared to uptake data of L-[1-14C]tyrosine and with data on the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins. After intravenous injection, the 14C data were obtained from dissected tumor tissue. Heat-induced inhibition of the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins tallied with the L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data. Heat-induced inhibition of amino acid uptake in the tumor correlated well with regression of tumor growth. It is concluded that PET using L-[1-11C]tyrosine is eligible for monitoring the effect of hyperthermia on tumor growth

  13. Critical Role of Peripheral Vasoconstriction in Fatal Brain Hyperthermia Induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under Conditions That Mimic Human Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Albert H.; Wakabayashi, Ken T.; Baumann, Michael H.; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed “rave” parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22−23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ∼1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues. PMID:24899699

  14. Induced apoptosis by mild hyperthermia occurs via telomerase inhibition on the three human myeloid leukemia cell lines: TF-1, K562, and HL-60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deezagi, Abdolkhaleg; Manteghi, Sanaz; Khosravani, Pardis; Vaseli-Hagh, Neda; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand the effect of hyperthermia on the telomerase activity in human leukemic cell lines (HL-60, K562, and TF-1). The cells were treated by hyperthermia at the range of 41-44 degrees C for 120 min and incubated for 96 h. Then telomerase activity, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. The results indicated that hyperthermia significantly induced apoptosis on the cells. The cells exhibited pre-apoptotic pattern at 41 and 42 degrees C at 60-120 min and apoptotic pattern at 43 and 44 degrees C over 30 min after hyperthermia. Telomerase activity (that was assayed immediately after hyperthermia) was stable at 41-42 degrees C for 60 min but decreased to 35-40% at 120 min. However, at severe hyperthermia (43-44 degrees C) telomerase activity was decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Following hyperthermia (41-44 degrees C up to 120 min), the cells were incubated for 96 h. In these conditions, the telomerase activity was decreased by about 60-80% in comparison with that untreated control cells.

  15. Mechanisms of hyperthermia induced radiatiosensitization for treatment of human papillomavirus positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei, Arlene; Leeuwen, Caspar van; Stalpers, Lukas; Rodermond, Hans; Kok, Petra; Crezee, Hans; Franken, Nicolaas

    2016-01-01

    HPV is associated with cervical cancer, the third most common cancer in women. In over 70% of cervical cancers, the high-risk HPV-types 16 and 18 are found. In these tumors, functionality of p53 is suppressed by the presence of protein E6. Hyperthermia is a clinical application of heat in which tumour temperatures are raised to 40-43°C and combined hyperthermia with radiation is very effective in the treatment of cervical cancer

  16. Fish can show emotional fever: stress-induced hyperthermia in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Sonia; Huntingford, Felicity A; Boltaña, Sebastian; Vargas, Reynaldo; Knowles, Toby G; Mackenzie, Simon

    2015-11-22

    Whether fishes are sentient beings remains an unresolved and controversial question. Among characteristics thought to reflect a low level of sentience in fishes is an inability to show stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH), a transient rise in body temperature shown in response to a variety of stressors. This is a real fever response, so is often referred to as 'emotional fever'. It has been suggested that the capacity for emotional fever evolved only in amniotes (mammals, birds and reptiles), in association with the evolution of consciousness in these groups. According to this view, lack of emotional fever in fishes reflects a lack of consciousness. We report here on a study in which six zebrafish groups with access to a temperature gradient were either left as undisturbed controls or subjected to a short period of confinement. The results were striking: compared to controls, stressed zebrafish spent significantly more time at higher temperatures, achieving an estimated rise in body temperature of about 2-4°C. Thus, zebrafish clearly have the capacity to show emotional fever. While the link between emotion and consciousness is still debated, this finding removes a key argument for lack of consciousness in fishes. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Argon laser-induced damage in the goldfish (C. auratus) retina following whole-body hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Michael A.; Lund, David J.; Schuschereba, Steven T.; Dahlberg, Ann M.; Cowan, Beth L.; Lester, Paul; Odom, Daniel G.

    1990-07-01

    The heat shock response is a phenomenon common to all cells and is characterized by an increase in the rate of synthesis of intracellular heat shock proteins (HSPs) . The response occurs following rapid transient increases in terrerature sufficient to cause stress but not cell death. HSPs appear to perform protective functions that raise the cell''s tolerance to diverse noxious stimuli. Thus we postulated that we could limit laser-induced retinal darriage through induction of the heat shock -response. Corrmon goldfish (C. auratus) made hyperthermic by immersion in 35C water for 15 minutes and radiolabeled with [355]methionine showed retinal liSPs with apparent molecular weights of 110 90 70 and 35 kilodaltons. To test the protective effects of HSPs against laser injury goldfish were made hyperthermic and 4 and 24 hr later their retinas were irradiated with argon laser light (51 4 . 5 nm spot size at the cornea 3. 0 mm irradiance 125 mW/cm2) . NonhyperLhermic animals served as controls. Following 24 hr of recovery fish were terminated and retinas fixed for histology. Fundus photographs were taken irrunediately after laser exposure . Lesion diameters were measured from fundus photographs and evaluated statistically. The mean retinal lesion diameters of fish not subjected to hyperthermJ. a laser exposed 4 hr post hyperLhermia and laser exposed 24 hr post hyperthermia were 10. 25 1. 4 SD 8. 82 2. 1 SD and 6. 78

  18. Curcumin and 5-Fluorouracil-loaded, folate- and transferrin-decorated polymeric magnetic nanoformulation: a synergistic cancer therapeutic approach, accelerated by magnetic hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sivakumar Balasubramanian,1 Aswathy Ravindran Girija,1 Yutaka Nagaoka,1 Seiki Iwai,1 Masashi Suzuki,1 Venugopal Kizhikkilot,2 Yasuhiko Yoshida,1 Toru Maekawa,1 Sakthikumar Dasappan Nair1 1Bio Nano Electronics Research Center, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary New Science, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Japan; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sooriya Hospital, Chennai, India Abstract: The efficient targeting and therapeutic efficacy of a combination of drugs (curcumin and 5-Fluorouracil [5FU] and magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles, functionalized with two cancer-specific ligands are discussed in our work. This multifunctional, highly specific nanoconjugate resulted in the superior uptake of nanoparticles by cancer cells. Upon magnetic hyperthermia, we could harness the advantages of incorporating magnetic nanoparticles that synergistically acted with the drugs to destroy cancer cells within a very short period of time. The remarkable multimodal efficacy attained by this therapeutic nanoformulation offers the potential for targeting, imaging, and treatment of cancer within a short period of time (120 minutes by initiating early and late apoptosis. Keywords: nanotechnology, curcumin, 5FU, folate, transferrin, PLGA nanoparticle, magnetic hyperthermia

  19. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  20. Contributions of different modes of TRPV1 activation to TRPV1 antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garami, Andras; Shimansky, Yury P; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2010-01-27

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) antagonists are widely viewed as next-generation pain therapeutics. However, these compounds cause hyperthermia, a serious side effect. TRPV1 antagonists differentially block three modes of TRPV1 activation: by heat, protons, and chemical ligands (e.g., capsaicin). We asked what combination of potencies in these three modes of TRPV1 activation corresponds to the lowest potency of a TRPV1 antagonist to cause hyperthermia. We studied hyperthermic responses of rats, mice, and guinea pigs to eight TRPV1 antagonists with different pharmacological profiles and used mathematical modeling to find a relative contribution of the blockade of each activation mode to the development of hyperthermia. We found that the hyperthermic effect has the highest sensitivity to the extent of TRPV1 blockade in the proton mode (0.43 to 0.65) with no to moderate sensitivity in the capsaicin mode (-0.01 to 0.34) and no sensitivity in the heat mode (0.00 to 0.01). We conclude that hyperthermia-free TRPV1 antagonists do not block TRPV1 activation by protons, even if they are potent blockers of the heat mode, and that decreasing the potency to block the capsaicin mode may further decrease the potency to cause hyperthermia.

  1. A/C magnetic hyperthermia of melanoma mediated by iron(0)/iron oxide core/shell magnetic nanoparticles: a mouse study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balivada, Sivasai; Koper, Olga B; Tamura, Masaaki; Chikan, Viktor; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L; Rachakatla, Raja Shekar; Wang, Hongwang; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Dani, Raj Kumar; Pyle, Marla; Kroh, Franklin O; Walker, Brandon; Leaym, Xiaoxuan

    2010-01-01

    There is renewed interest in magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer, especially when it is combined with other more traditional therapeutic approaches, such as the co-delivery of anticancer drugs or photodynamic therapy. The influence of bimagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) combined with short external alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure on the growth of subcutaneous mouse melanomas (B16-F10) was evaluated. Bimagnetic Fe/Fe 3 O 4 core/shell nanoparticles were designed for cancer targeting after intratumoral or intravenous administration. Their inorganic center was protected against rapid biocorrosion by organic dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. TCPP (4-tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin) units were attached to the dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. The magnetic hyperthermia results obtained after intratumoral injection indicated that micromolar concentrations of iron given within the modified core-shell Fe/Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles caused a significant anti-tumor effect on murine B16-F10 melanoma with three short 10-minute AMF exposures. We also observed a decrease in tumor size after intravenous administration of the MNPs followed by three consecutive days of AMF exposure 24 hrs after the MNPs injection. These results indicate that intratumoral administration of surface modified MNPs can attenuate mouse melanoma after AMF exposure. Moreover, we have found that after intravenous administration of micromolar concentrations, these MNPs are capable of causing an anti-tumor effect in a mouse melanoma model after only a short AMF exposure time. This is a clear improvement to state of the art

  2. Core-shell La.sub.1-x./sub.Sr.sub.x./sub.MnO.sub.3./sub. nanoparticles as colloidal mediators for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pollert, Emil; Kaman, Ondřej; Veverka, Pavel; Veverka, Miroslav; Maryško, Miroslav; Závěta, Karel; Kačenka, M.; Lukeš, I.; Jendelová, Pavla; Kašpar, P.; Burián, M.; Herynek, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 368, č. 1927 (2010), s. 4389-4405 ISSN 1364-503X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200200651; GA AV ČR KAN201110651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : magnetic fluid hyperthermia * manganese perovskites * nanoparticles Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.457, year: 2010

  3. Numerical analysis of temperature field improvement with nanoparticles designed to achieve critical power dissipation in magnetic hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yundong; Flesch, Rodolfo C. C.; Jin, Tao

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) hyperthermia is a promising emerging therapy for cancer treatment that is minimally invasive and has been successfully used to treat different types of tumors. The power dissipation of MNPs, which is one of the most important factors during a hyperthermia treatment, is determined by the properties of MNPs and characteristics of the magnetic field. This paper proposes a method based on the finite element analysis for determining the value of the power dissipation of particles (PDP) that can maximize the average temperature of the tumor during treatment and at the same time guarantee that the maximum temperature is within the therapeutic range. The application of the critical PDP value can improve the effectiveness of the treatment since it increases the average temperature in the tumor region while limiting the damage to the healthy tissue that surrounds it. After the critical PDP is determined for a specific model, it is shown how the properties of the MNPs can be chosen to achieve the desired PDP value. The transient behavior of the temperature distribution for two different models considering blood vessels is analyzed as a case study, showing that the presence of a blood vessel inside the tumor region can significantly decrease the uniformity of the temperature field and also increase the treatment duration given its cooling effects. To present a solution that does not depend upon a good model of the tumor region, an alternative method that uses MNPs with low Curie temperature is proposed, given the temperature self-regulating properties of such MNPs. The results demonstrate that the uniformity of the temperature field can be significantly increased by combining the optimization procedure proposed in this paper with the use of low-Curie-temperature MNPs.

  4. MDMA, Methylone, and MDPV: Drug-Induced Brain Hyperthermia and Its Modulation by Activity State and Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn E

    2017-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants are frequently used by humans to intensify the subjective experience of different types of social interactions. Since psychomotor stimulants enhance metabolism and increase body temperatures, their use under conditions of physiological activation and in warm humid environments could result in pathological hyperthermia, a life-threatening symptom of acute drug intoxication. Here, we will describe the brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA, MDPV, and methylone, three structurally related recreational drugs commonly used by young adults during raves and other forms of social gatherings. After a short introduction on brain temperature and basic mechanisms underlying its physiological fluctuations, we will consider how MDMA, MDPV, and methylone affect brain and body temperatures in awake freely moving rats. Here, we will discuss the role of drug-induced heat production in the brain due to metabolic brain activation and diminished heat dissipation due to peripheral vasoconstriction as two primary contributors to the hyperthermic effects of these drugs. Then, we will consider how the hyperthermic effects of these drugs are modulated under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and warm ambient temperature). Since social interaction results in brain and body heat production, coupled with skin vasoconstriction that impairs heat loss to the external environment, these physiological changes interact with drug-induced changes in heat production and loss, resulting in distinct changes in the hyperthermic effects of each tested drug. Finally, we present our recent data, in which we compared the efficacy of different pharmacological strategies for reversing MDMA-induced hyperthermia in both the brain and body. Specifically, we demonstrate increased efficacy of the centrally acting atypical neuroleptic compound clozapine over the peripherally acting vasodilator drug, carvedilol. These data could be important for understanding the potential

  5. Therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, S.Y.; Chen, M.M.; Fan, J.G.; Wang, Y.Q.; Hu, Y.; Xu, L.M., E-mail: leiming.xu@aliyun.com.cn, E-mail: huying@sohu.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Du, Y.Q. [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-15

    This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic mechanism of treating SMMC-7721 liver cancer cells with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells cultured in vitro were treated with ferrofluid containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles and irradiated with an alternating radio frequency magnetic field. The influence of the treatment on the cells was examined by inverted microscopy, MTT and flow cytometry. To study the therapeutic mechanism of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH, Hsp70, Bax, Bcl-2 and p53 were detected by immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It was shown that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH could cause cellular necrosis, induce cellular apoptosis, and significantly inhibit cellular growth, all of which appeared to be dependent on the concentration of the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Immunocytochemistry results showed that MFH could induce high expression of Hsp70 and Bax, decrease the expression of mutant p53, and had little effect on Bcl-2. RT-PCR indicated that Hsp70 expression was high in the early stage of MFH (,24 h) and became low or absent after 24 h of MFH treatment. It can be concluded that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH significantly inhibited the proliferation of in vitro cultured liver cancer cells (SMMC-7721), induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} MFH can induce high Hsp70 expression at an early stage, enhance the expression of Bax, and decrease the expression of mutant p53, which promotes the apoptosis of tumor cells. (author)

  6. Effects of Social Interaction and Warm Ambient Temperature on Brain Hyperthermia Induced by the Designer Drugs Methylone and MDPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) are new drugs of abuse that have gained worldwide popularity. These drugs are structurally similar to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and share many of its physiological and behavioral effects in humans, including the development of hyperthermia during acute intoxication. Here, we examined the effects of methylone (1–9 mg/kg, s.c.) or MDPV (0.1–1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on brain temperature homeostasis in rats maintained in a standard laboratory environment (single-housed in a quiet rest at 22 °C) and under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and 29 °C ambient temperature). By simultaneously monitoring temperatures in the nucleus accumbens, temporal muscle, and facial skin, we assessed the effects of methylone and MDPV on intra-brain heat production and cutaneous vascular tone, two critical factors that control brain temperature responses. Both methylone and MDPV dose-dependently increased brain temperature, but even at high doses that induced robust locomotor activation, hyperthermia was modest in magnitude (up to ∼2 °C). Both drugs also induced dose-dependent peripheral vasoconstriction, which appears to be a primary mechanism determining the brain hyperthermic responses. In contrast to the powerful potentiation of MDMA-induced hyperthermia by social interaction and warm ambient temperature, such potentiation was absent for methylone and minimal for MDPV. Taken together, despite structural similarities to MDMA, exposure to methylone or MDPV under conditions commonly associated with human drug use does not lead to profound elevations in brain temperature and sustained vasoconstriction, two critical factors associated with MDMA toxicity. PMID:25074640

  7. Synthesis and magnetic properties of Co.sub.1-x./sub.Zn.sub.x./sub.Fe.sub.2./sub.O.sub.4+γ./sub. nanoparticles as materials for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veverka, Miroslav; Veverka, Pavel; Jirák, Zdeněk; Kaman, Ondřej; Knížek, Karel; Maryško, Miroslav; Pollert, Emil; Závěta, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 322, č. 16 (2010), s. 2386-2389 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200200651; GA AV ČR KJB100100701; GA MŠk MEB090901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticle * cobalt zinc ferrite * precipitation * magnetic behavior * magnetic fluid hyperthermia Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.689, year: 2010

  8. Micelles driven magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) hollow spheres and a study on AC magnetic properties for hyperthermia application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, Madhuri Mandal, E-mail: madhuri@bose.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Dey, Chaitali [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); CRNN, University of Calcutta, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Ayan [CRNN, University of Calcutta, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Sarkar, Debasish [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Ahir, Manisha [CRNN, University of Calcutta, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India)

    2016-11-01

    Here we have discussed about designing the magnetic particles for hyperthermia therapy and done some studies in this direction. We have used oleylamine micelles as template to synthesize hollow–nanospheres (HNS) of magnetite by solvo-thermal technique. We have shown that oleylamine plays an important role to generate hollow particles. Structural analysis was done by XRD measurement and morphological measurements like SEM and TEM was performed to confirm the shape and size of hollow sphere particles. The detail magnetic measurements give an idea about the application of these HNS for magnetic heating in hyperthermia therapy. In vitro cytotoxicity studies reveal that tolerable dose rate for these particles can be significantly high and particles are non-toxic in nature. Being hollow in structure and magnetic in nature such materials will also be useful in other application fields like in drug delivery, drug release, arsenic and heavy metal removal by adsorption technique, magnetic separation etc. - Graphical abstract: Oleylamine micelles driven easy synthesis of hollow nanosphere (HNS) magnetite for hyperthermia therapy. - Highlights: • We have reported a new method of synthesis of hollow spheres of magnetite using micelles as model core and removal of micelles evolve the hollow like structure by relocating the core particles to the edge one. • Size can be controlled by varying the micellar concentration. • The detail magnetic measurements give an idea of applicability of these nano hollow spheres (NHS) in hyperthermia therapy. • Cyto-toxicity study reveals that these particles are highly biofriendly and dose rate can be increased upto a significant amount.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  10. Surrogate MRI markers for hyperthermia-induced release of doxorubicin from thermosensitive liposomes in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Michael; Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Dietrich, Olaf; Ingrisch, Michael; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H

    2016-09-10

    The efficacy of systemically applied, classical anti-cancer drugs is limited by insufficient selectivity to the tumor and the applicable dose is limited by side effects. Efficacy could be further improved by targeting of the drug to the tumor. Using thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as a drug carrier, targeting is achieved by control of temperature in the target volume. In such an approach, effective local hyperthermia (40-43°C) (HT) of the tumor is considered essential but technically challenging. Thus, visualization of local heating and drug release using TSL is considered an important tool for further improvement. Visualization and feasibility of chemodosimetry by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has previously been demonstrated using TSL encapsulating both, contrast agent (CA) and doxorubicin (DOX) simultaneously in the same TSL. Dosimetry has been facilitated using T1-relaxation time change as a surrogate marker for DOX deposition in the tumor. To allow higher loading of the TSL and to simplify clinical development of new TSL formulations a new approach using a mixture of TSL either loaded with DOX or MRI-CA is suggested. This was successfully tested using phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) in Brown Norway rats with syngeneic soft tissue sarcomas (BN175) implanted at both hind legs. After intravenous application of DOX-TSL and CA-TSL, heating of one tumor above 40°C for 1h using laser light resulted in highly selective DOX uptake. The DOX-concentration in the heated tumor tissue compared to the non-heated tumor showed an almost 10-fold increase. T1 and additional MRI surrogate parameters such as signal phase change were correlated to intratumoral DOX concentration. Visualization of DOX delivery in the sense of a chemodosimetry was demonstrated. Although phase-based MR-thermometry was affected by CA-TSL, phase information was found suitable for DOX concentration assessment. Local differences of DOX concentration in the tumors indicated the need for

  11. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Water-dispersible sugar-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. An evaluation of their relaxometric and magnetic hyperthermia properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartigue, Lenaic; Innocenti, Claudia; Kalaivani, Thangavel; Awwad, Azzam; Sanchez Duque, Maria del Mar; Guari, Yannick; Larionova, Joulia; Guérin, Christian; Montero, Jean-Louis Georges; Barragan-Montero, Véronique; Arosio, Paolo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Gatteschi, Dante; Sangregorio, Claudio

    2011-07-13

    Synthesis of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications represents a current challenge. In this paper we present the synthesis and characterization of water-dispersible sugar-coated iron oxide NPs specifically designed as magnetic fluid hyperthermia heat mediators and negative contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, the influence of the inorganic core size was investigated. To this end, iron oxide NPs with average size in the range of 4-35 nm were prepared by thermal decomposition of molecular precursors and then coated with organic ligands bearing a phosphonate group on one side and rhamnose, mannose, or ribose moieties on the other side. In this way a strong anchorage of the organic ligand on the inorganic surface was simply realized by ligand exchange, due to covalent bonding between the Fe(3+) atom and the phosphonate group. These synthesized nanoobjects can be fully dispersed in water forming colloids that are stable over very long periods. Mannose, ribose, and rhamnose were chosen to test the versatility of the method and also because these carbohydrates, in particular rhamnose, which is a substrate of skin lectin, confer targeting properties to the nanosystems. The magnetic, hyperthermal, and relaxometric properties of all the synthesized samples were investigated. Iron oxide NPs of ca. 16-18 nm were found to represent an efficient bifunctional targeting system for theranostic applications, as they have very good transverse relaxivity (three times larger than the best currently available commercial products) and large heat release upon application of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic radiation with amplitude and frequency close to the human tolerance limit. The results have been rationalized on the basis of the magnetic properties of the investigated samples.

  13. The effects of isatin (indole-2, 3-dione on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-induced hyperthermia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Gábor

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that centrally administered natriuretic peptides and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP-38 have hyperthermic properties. Isatin (indole-2, 3-dione is an endogenous indole that has previously been found to inhibit hyperthermic effects of natriuretic peptides. In this study the aim was to investigate the effects of isatin on thermoregulatory actions of PACAP-38, in rats. Results One μg intracerebroventricular (icv. injection of PACAP-38 had hyperthermic effect in male, Wistar rats, with an onset of the effect at 2 h and a decline by the 6th h after administration. Intraperitoneal (ip. injection of different doses of isatin (25-50 mg/kg significantly decreased the hyperthermic effect of 1 μg PACAP-38 (icv., whereas 12.5 mg/kg isatin (ip. had no inhibiting effect. Isatin alone did not modify the body temperature of the animals. Conclusion The mechanisms that participate in the mediation of the PACAP-38-induced hyperthermia may be modified by isatin. The capability of isatin to antagonize the hyperthermia induced by all members of the natriuretic peptide family and by PACAP-38 makes it unlikely to be acting directly on receptors for natriuretic peptides or on those for PACAP in these hyperthermic processes.

  14. Modeling skin cooling using optical windows and cryogens during laser induced hyperthermia in a multilayer vascularized tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rupesh; Das, Koushik; Okajima, Junnosuke; Maruyama, Shigenao; Mishra, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the spatial and the temporal evolution of tissue temperature during skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia. Three different skin surface cooling methodologies viz., optical window contact cooling, cryogenic spray cooling and cryogen cooled optical window contact cooling are considered. Sapphire, yttrium aluminum garnet, lithium tantalate, and magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate are the considered optical windows. The cryogens considered are liquid CO_2 and R1234yf. Heat transfer in the multilayer skin tissue embedded with thermally significant blood vessels pairs is modeled using the Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equations. Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equation is used for the vascularized tissue. Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using the radiative transfer equation. Axial and radial (skin surface) temperature distributions for different combinations of optical windows and cryogens are analyzed. Liquid CO_2 cooled yttrium aluminum garnet is found to be the best surface cooling mechanism. - Highlights: • Skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia is studied. • A multi-layer 2-D cylindrical tissue geometry is considered. • Both Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat models are considered. • Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using discrete ordinate method. • Results for 4 optical windows and 2 cryogens for skin cooling are presented.

  15. Physiologic and Perceptual Responses to Cold-Shower Cooling After Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Cory L; McDermott, Brendon P; Buening, Brian J; Bonacci, Jeffrey A; Ganio, Matthew S; Adams, J D; Tucker, Matthew A; Kavouras, Stavros A

    2016-03-01

    Exercise conducted in hot, humid environments increases the risk for exertional heat stroke (EHS). The current recommended treatment of EHS is cold-water immersion; however, limitations may require the use of alternative resources such as a cold shower (CS) or dousing with a hose to cool EHS patients. To investigate the cooling effectiveness of a CS after exercise-induced hyperthermia. Randomized, crossover controlled study. Environmental chamber (temperature = 33.4°C ± 2.1°C; relative humidity = 27.1% ± 1.4%). Seventeen participants (10 male, 7 female; height = 1.75 ± 0.07 m, body mass = 70.4 ± 8.7 kg, body surface area = 1.85 ± 0.13 m(2), age range = 19-35 years) volunteered. On 2 occasions, participants completed matched-intensity volitional exercise on an ergometer or treadmill to elevate rectal temperature to ≥39°C or until participant fatigue prevented continuation (reaching at least 38.5°C). They were then either treated with a CS (20.8°C ± 0.80°C) or seated in the chamber (control [CON] condition) for 15 minutes. Rectal temperature, calculated cooling rate, heart rate, and perceptual measures (thermal sensation and perceived muscle pain). The rectal temperature (P = .98), heart rate (P = .85), thermal sensation (P = .69), and muscle pain (P = .31) were not different during exercise for the CS and CON trials (P > .05). Overall, the cooling rate was faster during CS (0.07°C/min ± 0.03°C/min) than during CON (0.04°C/min ± 0.03°C/min; t16 = 2.77, P = .01). Heart-rate changes were greater during CS (45 ± 20 beats per minute) compared with CON (27 ± 10 beats per minute; t16 = 3.32, P = .004). Thermal sensation was reduced to a greater extent with CS than with CON (F3,45 = 41.12, P < .001). Although the CS facilitated cooling rates faster than no treatment, clinicians should continue to advocate for accepted cooling modalities and use CS only if no other validated means of cooling are available.

  16. A/C magnetic hyperthermia of melanoma mediated by iron(0/iron oxide core/shell magnetic nanoparticles: a mouse study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koper Olga B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is renewed interest in magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer, especially when it is combined with other more traditional therapeutic approaches, such as the co-delivery of anticancer drugs or photodynamic therapy. Methods The influence of bimagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs combined with short external alternating magnetic field (AMF exposure on the growth of subcutaneous mouse melanomas (B16-F10 was evaluated. Bimagnetic Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles were designed for cancer targeting after intratumoral or intravenous administration. Their inorganic center was protected against rapid biocorrosion by organic dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. TCPP (4-tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin units were attached to the dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. Results The magnetic hyperthermia results obtained after intratumoral injection indicated that micromolar concentrations of iron given within the modified core-shell Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles caused a significant anti-tumor effect on murine B16-F10 melanoma with three short 10-minute AMF exposures. We also observed a decrease in tumor size after intravenous administration of the MNPs followed by three consecutive days of AMF exposure 24 hrs after the MNPs injection. Conclusions These results indicate that intratumoral administration of surface modified MNPs can attenuate mouse melanoma after AMF exposure. Moreover, we have found that after intravenous administration of micromolar concentrations, these MNPs are capable of causing an anti-tumor effect in a mouse melanoma model after only a short AMF exposure time. This is a clear improvement to state of the art.

  17. Transient mild hyperthermia induces E-selectin mediated localization of mesoporous silicon vectors in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson K Kirui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperthermia treatment has been explored as a strategy to overcome biological barriers that hinder effective drug delivery in solid tumors. Most studies have used mild hyperthermia treatment (MHT to target the delivery of thermo-sensitive liposomes carriers. Others have studied its application to permeabilize tumor vessels and improve tumor interstitial transport. However, the role of MHT in altering tumor vessel interfacial and adhesion properties and its relationship to improved delivery has not been established. In the present study, we evaluated effects of MHT treatment on tumor vessel flow dynamics and expression of adhesion molecules and assessed enhancement in particle localization using mesoporous silicon vectors (MSVs. We also determined the optimal time window at which maximal accumulation occur. RESULTS: In this study, using intravital microscopy analyses, we showed that temporal mild hyperthermia (∼1 W/cm(2 amplified delivery and accumulation of MSVs in orthotopic breast cancer tumors. The number of discoidal MSVs (1000×400 nm adhering to tumor vasculature increased 6-fold for SUM159 tumors and 3-fold for MCF-7 breast cancer tumors. By flow chamber experiments and Western blotting, we established that a temporal increase in E-selectin expression correlated with enhanced particle accumulation. Furthermore, MHT treatment was shown to increase tumor perfusion in a time-dependent fashion. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that well-timed mild hyperthermia treatment can transiently elevate tumor transport and alter vascular adhesion properties and thereby provides a means to enhance tumor localization of non-thermally sensitive particles such as MSVs. Such enhancement in accumulation could be leveraged to increase therapeutic efficacy and reduce drug dosing in cancer therapy.

  18. Field dependent transition to the non-linear regime in magnetic hyperthermia experiments: Comparison between maghemite, copper, zinc, nickel and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Verde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Further advances in magnetic hyperthermia might be limited by biological constraints, such as using sufficiently low frequencies and low field amplitudes to inhibit harmful eddy currents inside the patient's body. These incite the need to optimize the heating efficiency of the nanoparticles, referred to as the specific absorption rate (SAR. Among the several properties currently under research, one of particular importance is the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime that takes place as the field amplitude is increased, an aspect where the magnetic anisotropy is expected to play a fundamental role. In this paper we investigate the heating properties of cobalt ferrite and maghemite nanoparticles under the influence of a 500 kHz sinusoidal magnetic field with varying amplitude, up to 134 Oe. The particles were characterized by TEM, XRD, FMR and VSM, from which most relevant morphological, structural and magnetic properties were inferred. Both materials have similar size distributions and saturation magnetization, but strikingly different magnetic anisotropies. From magnetic hyperthermia experiments we found that, while at low fields maghemite is the best nanomaterial for hyperthermia applications, above a critical field, close to the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime, cobalt ferrite becomes more efficient. The results were also analyzed with respect to the energy conversion efficiency and compared with dynamic hysteresis simulations. Additional analysis with nickel, zinc and copper-ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes confirmed the importance of the magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor. Further, the analysis of the characterization parameters suggested core-shell nanostructures, probably due to a surface passivation process during the nanoparticle synthesis. Finally, we discussed the effect of particle-particle interactions and its consequences, in particular regarding discrepancies between estimated

  19. Investigation of magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles using temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemala, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Lawes, G.; Naik, R., E-mail: rnaik@wayne.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Naik, V. M. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States); Vaishnava, P. P. [Department of Physics, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    Rate of heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a ferrofluid is affected by their magnetic properties, temperature, and viscosity of the carrier liquid. We have investigated temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia in ferrofluids, consisting of dextran coated superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, subjected to external magnetic fields of various frequencies (188–375 kHz) and amplitudes (140–235 Oe). Transmission electron microscopy measurements show that the nanoparticles are polydispersed with a mean diameter of 13.8 ± 3.1 nm. The fitting of experimental dc magnetization data to a standard Langevin function incorporating particle size distribution yields a mean diameter of 10.6 ± 1.2 nm, and a reduced saturation magnetization (∼65 emu/g) compared to the bulk value of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (∼95 emu/g). This is due to the presence of a finite surface layer (∼1 nm thickness) of non-aligned spins surrounding the ferromagnetically aligned Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core. We found the specific absorption rate, measured as power absorbed per gram of iron oxide nanoparticles, decreases monotonically with increasing temperature for all values of magnetic field and frequency. Using the size distribution of magnetic nanoparticles estimated from the magnetization measurements, we have fitted the specific absorption rate versus temperature data using a linear response theory and relaxation dissipation mechanisms to determine the value of magnetic anisotropy constant (28 ± 2 kJ/m{sup 3}) of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles.

  20. Intramuscular injection of malignant hyperthermia trigger agents induces hypermetabolism in susceptible and nonsusceptible individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metterlein, Thomas; Schuster, Frank; Kranke, Peter; Roewer, Norbert; Anetseder, Martin

    2010-01-01

    A new minimally invasive metabolic test for the diagnosis of susceptibility for malignant hyperthermia measuring intramuscular p(CO(2)) and lactate following local application of caffeine and halothane in humans was recently proposed. The present study tested the hypothesis that a more simplified test protocol allows a differentiation between malignant hyperthermia susceptible (MHS) and malignant hyperthermia nonsusceptible (MHN) and control individuals. With approval of the local ethics committee and informed consent, microdialysis and p(CO(2)) probes with attached microtubing were placed into the lateral vastus muscle of six MHS, seven MHN and seven control individuals. Following equilibration, boluses of 500 microl caffeine 80 mmol l(-1) and halothane 10 vol% dissolved in soybean oil were injected locally. p(CO(2)) and lactate were measured spectrophotometrically. The maximal rate of p(CO(2)) increase was significantly higher in MHS than in MHN and control individuals following application of halothane and caffeine, respectively. Intramuscular caffeine injection leads to a significantly higher increase of local lactate levels in MHS than in MHN and control individuals, whereas halothane increased local lactate levels in all investigated groups. Haemodynamic and systemic metabolic parameters did not differ between the investigated groups. Local caffeine and halothane injection increased intramuscular metabolism in MHS individuals significantly more than in the two other groups. In contrast to previous investigations, direct injection of the concentrations of halothane described here increased lactate and p(CO(2)) even in MHN skeletal muscle.

  1. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-07-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is known to enhance neuronal excitability. Here we show that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis in the immature brain, with a threshold of 0.2-0.3 pH units for seizure induction. Suppressing alkalosis with 5% ambient CO2 abolished seizures within 20 s. CO2 also prevented two long-term effects of hyperthermic seizures in the hippocampus: the upregulation of the I(h) current and the upregulation of CB1 receptor expression. The effects of hyperthermia were closely mimicked by intraperitoneal injection of bicarbonate. Our work indicates a mechanism for triggering hyperthermic seizures and suggests new strategies in the research and therapy of fever-related epileptic syndromes.

  2. Magnetic hyperthermia properties of nanoparticles inside lysosomes using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations: Influence of key parameters and dipolar interactions, and evidence for strong spatial variation of heating power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, R. P.; Carrey, J.; Respaud, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the influence of dipolar interactions in magnetic hyperthermia experiments is of crucial importance for fine optimization of nanoparticle (NP) heating power. In this study we use a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to calculate hysteresis loops that correctly account for both time and temperature. This algorithm is shown to correctly reproduce the high-frequency hysteresis loop of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic NPs without any ad hoc or artificial parameters. The algorithm is easily parallelizable with a good speed-up behavior, which considerably decreases the calculation time on several processors and enables the study of assemblies of several thousands of NPs. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic NPs dispersed inside spherical lysosomes is studied as a function of several key parameters: volume concentration, applied magnetic field, lysosome size, NP diameter, and anisotropy. The influence of these parameters is illustrated and comprehensively explained. In summary, magnetic interactions increase the coercive field, saturation field, and hysteresis area of major loops. However, for small amplitude magnetic fields such as those used in magnetic hyperthermia, the heating power as a function of concentration can increase, decrease, or display a bell shape, depending on the relationship between the applied magnetic field and the coercive/saturation fields of the NPs. The hysteresis area is found to be well correlated with the parallel or antiparallel nature of the dipolar field acting on each particle. The heating power of a given NP is strongly influenced by a local concentration involving approximately 20 neighbors. Because this local concentration strongly decreases upon approaching the surface, the heating power increases or decreases in the vicinity of the lysosome membrane. The amplitude of variation reaches more than one order of magnitude in certain conditions. This transition occurs on a thickness corresponding to approximately

  3. Measurement of the distribution of anisotropy constants in magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhie, A. A.; Marquina, C.; O'Grady, K.; Vallejo-Fernandez, G.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we have applied theoretical calculations to new experimental measurements of the effect of the anisotropy distribution in magnetite nanoparticles, which in turn controls hysteresis heating for hyperthermia applications. Good agreement between theory and experiment is reported where the theoretical calculation is based upon the detailed measurement of the particle elongation generally observed in the nanoparticles. The elongation has been measured from studies via transmission electron microscopy. We find that particle elongation is responsible for the anisotropy dispersion, which can be obtained by analysis and fitting to a measurement of the temperature decay of remanence. A median value of the anisotropy constant of 1.5  ×  105 erg/cc was obtained. A very wide distribution of anisotropy constants is present with a Gaussian standard deviation of 1.5  ×  105 erg/cc. From our measurements, deviations in the value of the saturation magnetisation from particle to particle are most likely the main factor giving rise to this large distribution, with 33% arising from the error in the measured elongation. The lower limit to the anisotropy constant of the nanoparticles is determined by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the material, 1.1  ×  105 erg/cc for magnetite, which was studied in this work.

  4. Whole Body Hyperthermia in Mice Confers Delayed Radioprotection at Cellular and Tissue Levels: Inducible Heat Shock Proteins as Endogenous Radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malytina, Y. V.; Sements, T. N.; Semina, O. V.; Mosin, A. F.; Kabakov, A.

    2004-01-01

    It was previously shown on heat shock protein (Hsp)-over expressing cell lines that the increased intracellular content of Hsp 70 or Hsp27 is associated with the elevated radioresistance. However, it was so far unknown whether the in vivo Fsp induction by stressful preconditioning can confer radioprotection at the tissue and cellular levels. In the present study, we examined how the in vivo up-regulation of the Hsp expression in response to mild whole body hyperthermia (42 degrees C, 10 min) in mice changes susceptibility of their bone marrow stem cells and thymocytes to subsequent gamma-irradiation. to assess the expectable contribution of stress-inducible Hsp we used injections with Quercetin, a flavonoid inhibiting the stress-responsive Hsp induction. The results demonstrate that the bone marrow stem cells and thymocytes from heat-preconditioned mice were more radioresistant than those from the non-preconditioned animals. the radioprotection was well manifested if mice or their isolated thymocytes were irradiated 18-25 h after the in vivo hyperthermia. This delayed radioprotection resulting from the heat preconditioning was suppressed in Quercetin-injected mice. The revealed correlation between the intracellular Hsp accumulation and the acquired Quercetin-sensitive radioprotection suggests a beneficial role of Hsps as of endogenous radioprotectors. Our finding discovers new ways for artificial modulation of effects of irradiation on target cells via manipulating the Hsp expression. (Author) 17 refs

  5. Hyperthermia generated by Foucault currents for oncological treatments with COMSOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero C, R. L.; Cordova F, T.; Basurto I, G.; Guzman C, R.; Castro L, J.

    2017-10-01

    The hyperthermia generated by variable magnetic fields is a promising power method for oncological therapy, because apoptosis is induced in tumor cells at temperatures between 42 and 45 degrees Celsius. It is known that an alternating magnetic field on the FeO 4 magnetite particles produces heat through three paths: is generated by parasitic currents, lost in hysteresis cycles and losses by magnetization relaxation; taking advantage of the energy losses through the joule effect and the transformation into heat, a simulation is shown in COMSOL about the temporal distribution of temperature in transformed biological systems, to have an estimate of the properties and behavior of the temperature gradient when magnetic hyperthermia is generated in human transformed tissue. (Author)

  6. Biological effects of hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    Biological effects of hyperthermia and application of hyperthermia to cancer therapy were outlined. As to independent effects of hyperthermia, heat sensitivity of cancer cells, targets of hyperthermia, thermal tolerance of cancer cells, effects of pH on hyperthermic cell survival, effects of hyperthermia on normal tissues, and possibility of clinical application of hyperthermia were described. Combined effect of hyperthermia and x-irradiation to enhance radiosensitivity of cancer cells, its mechanism, effects of oxygen on cancer cells treated with hyperthermia and irradiation, and therapeutic ratio of combined hyperthermia and irradiation were also described. Finally, sensitizers were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  7. Thermo-induced modifications and selective accumulation of glucose-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles in vivo in rats - increasing the effectiveness of magnetic-assisted therapy - pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traikov, L; Antonov, I; Gerou, A; Vesselinova, L; Hadjiolova, R; Raynov, J

    2015-09-01

    Ferro-Magnetic nanoparticles (Fe-MNP) have gained a lot of attention in biomedical and industrial applications due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and paramagnetic properties. The basic idea of our study is whether it is possible to use glucose-conjugate Fe-MNP (Glc-Fe-MNP) for targeting and more accurate focusing in order to increase the effect of high-frequency electromagnetic fields induced hyperthermia in solid tumors. Tumors demonstrate high metabolic activity for glucose in comparison with other somatic cells.Increasing of accumulation of glucose conjugated (Glc)-Fe-MNP on tumor site and precision of radio frequency electro-magnetic field (RF-EMF) energy absorption in solid tumors, precede RF-EMF induced hyperthermia. Rat model for monitoring the early development of breast cancer. Twenty female Wistar rats (MU-line-6171) were divided into two groups of 10 rats that were either treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea to induce breast cancer and 10 with carrageenan to induce inflammation (control). Glc-Fe-MNP can offer a solution to increase hyperthermia effect to the desired areas in the body by accumulation and increasing local concentration due to high tissue metabolic assimilation. In this condition, it is considered that the magnetization of the nanoparticles is a single-giant magnetic moment, the sum of all the individual magnetic moments and is proportional to the concentration of Glc-Fe-MNP.

  8. Influence of local hyperthermia induced by micro-waves and X-rays on the Walker carcinoma of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, V.; Zywietz, F.; Jung, H.

    1979-01-01

    The authors studied the influence on the solid Walker carcinoma in the rat exerted by a slight hyperthermia induced by micro-waves, which was applied alone and combined with X-ray irradiations. It could be demonstrated that the tumor has the same temperature as the sub-peritoneal region. Thus the final temperature reached by the treatment with microwaves can be exactly controlled. Heating up to 41 0 C for 30 minutes produces an increase of the survival rate of animals with tumors of 2 to 6 grams from 17% to 27%, whereas the healing rate is 57% after an X-ray irradiation with 1130 rad and 75% after the combined treatment. Each of the three therapy methods produces a significant prolongation of the survival time of the dying animals. The disadvantes of an anisologic tumor-host system are discussed on the basis of the results achieved. (orig.) [de

  9. Implantation of the maxillary antrum for delivery of iridium brachytherapy and microwave induced hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, C.T.; Wong, T.Z.; Geurkink, N.

    1985-01-01

    A 63 year-old male was referred tp Dartmouth in March 1984 for a locally advanced recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the left maxillary antrum. This had been initially diagnosed in January 1983 by a Caldwell-Luc procedure and had failed partial resection, external radiation therapy, and multiagent chemotherapy. Our initial evaluation revealed disease replacing the left maxillary antrum, extending into the pterygomaxillary fossa, the lateral aspect of the superior alveloar ridge, and into the soft palate. He was taken to the operating room and under general anesthesia was implanted the 7 catheters through this tumor volume. Two days later a therapeutic (>42 0 C for 1 hour) hyperthermia treatment was administered followed by iridium placement. A second heating was performed upon removal of the iridium and was accomplished without major side effects. Thermometry data and follow-up are presented

  10. Effect of hyperthermia on epithelial microneoplastic cell populations induced by irradiation of rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gragtmans, N.J.; McGregor, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Two groups of male rats of the Charles River CD stock received a dose of 1,600 rad beta-radiation (700 rad/min) on the skin of the dorsum. Two months later, the site of irradiation of one of the groups was treated with hyperthermia at 44 degrees C for 2.5 minutes. A third control group received only the hyperthermic treatment. Over 90% of the animals in the 2 irradiated groups developed skin tumors (benign and malignant epithelial) at the irradiated site. There was no significant difference between these 2 groups in incidence of animals with tumors, incidence of tumors, distribution of tumor types, or rate of tumor appearance. The incidence of animals with tumors in the control group was less than 4% at any time

  11. The magnetic and hyperthermia studies of bare and silica-coated La.sub.0.75./sub.Sr.sub.0.25./sub.MnO.sub.3./sub. nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaman, Ondřej; Veverka, Pavel; Jirák, Zdeněk; Maryško, Miroslav; Knížek, Karel; Veverka, Miroslav; Kašpar, P.; Burian, M.; Šepelák, V.; Pollert, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2011), s. 1237-1252 ISSN 1388-0764 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : perovskite manganite * magnetic nanoparticles * hyperthermia * size distribution * synthesis * nanomedicine Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.287, year: 2011

  12. A method for increasing the homogeneity of the temperature distribution during magnetic fluid hyperthermia with a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy in the presence of blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yundong [College of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116 (China); Flesch, Rodolfo C.C. [Departamento de Automação e Sistemas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Jin, Tao, E-mail: jintly@fzu.edu.cn [College of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The effects of blood vessels on temperature field distribution are investigated. • The critical thermal energy of hyperthermia is computed by the Finite Element Analysis. • A treatment method is proposed by using the MNPs with low Curie temperature. • The cooling effects due to the blood flow can be controlled. - Abstract: Magnetic hyperthermia ablates tumor cells by absorbing the thermal energy from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under an external alternating magnetic field. The blood vessels (BVs) within tumor region can generally reduce treatment effectiveness due to the cooling effect of blood flow. This paper aims to investigate the cooling effect of BVs on the temperature field of malignant tumor regions using a complex geometric model and numerical simulation. For deriving the model, the Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow is combined with Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for human tissue. The effects on treatment temperature caused by two different BV distributions inside a mammary tumor are analyzed through numerical simulation under different conditions of flow rate considering a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy, which has low Curie temperature ranging from 42 °C to 45 °C. Numerical results show that the multi-vessel system has more obvious cooling effects than the single vessel one on the temperature field distribution for hyperthermia. Besides, simulation results show that the temperature field within tumor area can also be influenced by the velocity and diameter of BVs. To minimize the cooling effect, this article proposes a treatment method based on the increase of the thermal energy provided to MNPs associated with the adoption of low Curie temperature particles recently reported in literature. Results demonstrate that this approach noticeably improves the uniformity of the temperature field, and shortens the treatment time in a Fe-Cr-Nb-B system, thus reducing the side effects to the patient.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng; An, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression. (paper)

  14. Simultaneous hyperthermia and doxorubicin delivery from polymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, G.R., E-mail: iglesias@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Delgado, A.V.; González-Caballero, F. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Ramos-Tejada, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Jaén, Linares 23700 (Spain)

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the hyperthermia response, (i.e., heating induced by an externally applied alternating magnetic field) and the simultaneous release of an anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin) by polymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles have been investigated. After describing the setup for hyperthermia measurements in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles, the hyperthermia (represented by the rate of suspension heating and, ultimately, by the specific absorption rate or SAR) of magnetite nanoparticles (both bare and polymer-coated as drug nanocarriers) is discussed. The effect of the applied ac magnetic field on doxorubicin release is also studied, and it is concluded that the field does not interfere with the release process, demonstrating the double functionality of the investigated particles. - Highlights: • Magnetite NPs coated with polymers are used for drug delivery and hyperthermia. • The SAR of polyelectrolyte-coated NPs is larger because of their improved stability. • The antitumor drug doxorubicin is adsorbed on the coated particles. • The release rate of the drug is not affected by the ac magnetic field used in hyperthermia.

  15. Folic acid-conjugated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia and MRI in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Q.L.; Zheng, S.W. [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hong, R.Y., E-mail: rhong@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Deng, S.M.; Guo, L. [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215011 (China); Hu, R.L. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Gao, B.; Huang, M.; Cheng, L.F. [College of Medicine, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, G.H. [Respiration Department, Suzhou Municipal Hospital (East-Section), Suzhou 215001 (China); Wang, Y.Q. [Key Laboratory of Environmental Materials and Engineering of Jiangsu Province, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2014-07-01

    The folic acid (FA)-conjugated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} solution followed by surface modification with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) to form carboxymethyl group terminated MNPs, then FA was conjugated with the carboxyl group functionalized MNPs. The morphology and properties of obtained nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV–visible spectra (UV–vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The FA-conjugated MNPs exhibited relatively high saturation magnetization and fast magneto-temperature response which could be applied to hyperthermia therapy. To determine the accurate targeting effect of FA, we chose FA-conjugated MNPs as MRI contrast enhancement agent for detection of KB cells with folate receptor over-expression in vitro and in vivo. The results show that these magnetic nanoparticles appear to be the promising materials for local hyperthermia and MRI.

  16. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitspatrick, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hyperthermia and radiotherapy have for long been used to assist in the control of tumours, either as separate entities, or, in a combined treatment scheme. This paper outlines why hyperthermia works, thermal dose and the considerations required in the timing when hyperthermia is combined with radiotherapy. Previously reported results for hyperthermia and radiotherapy used together are also presented. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  17. Exercise-induced hyperthermia syndrome (canine stress syndrome in four related male English springer spaniels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thrift E

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Thrift,1 Justin A Wimpole,2 Georgina Child,2 Narelle Brown,1 Barbara Gandolfi,3 Richard Malik4 1Animal Referral Hospital, 2Small Animal Specialist Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA; 4Centre for Veterinary Education, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Objective: This retrospective study describes the signalment, clinical presentation, diagnostic findings, and mode of inheritance in four young male English springer spaniel dogs with presumptive canine stress syndrome.Materials and methods: Appropriate cases were located through medical searches of medical records of two large private referral centers. Inclusion criteria comprised of English springer spaniel dogs with tachypnea and hyperthermia that subsequently developed weakness or collapse, with or without signs of hemorrhage, soon after a period of mild-to-moderate exercise. The pedigrees of the four affected dogs, as well as eleven related English springer spaniels, were then analyzed to determine a presumptive mode of genetic inheritance.Results: Four dogs met the inclusion criteria. All four were male, suggesting the possibility of a recessive sex-linked heritable disorder. Pedigree analysis suggests that more dogs may be potentially affected, although these dogs may have never had the concurrent triggering drug/activity/event to precipitate the clinical syndrome. There was complete resolution of clinical signs in three of the four dogs with aggressive symptomatic and supportive therapy, with one dog dying during treatment.Conclusion: Dogs with canine stress syndrome have the potential for rapid recovery if treated aggressively and the complications of the disease (eg, coagulopathy are anticipated. All four dogs were male, suggesting the possibility of a recessive sex-linked mode of inheritance. Further genetic analyses should be strongly considered by those

  18. Experimental ex-vivo validation of PMMA-based bone cements loaded with magnetic nanoparticles enabling hyperthermia of metastatic bone tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem Harabech

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty comprises the injection of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA bone cement into vertebrae and can be used for the treatment of compression fractures of vertebrae. Metastatic bone tumors can cause such compression fractures but are not treated when injecting PMMA-based bone cement. Hyperthermia of tumors can on the other hand be attained by placing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs in an alternating magnetic field (AMF. Loading the PMMA-based bone cement with MNPs could both serve vertebra stabilization and metastatic bone tumor hyperthermia when subjecting this PMMA-MNP to an AMF. A dedicated pancake coil is designed with a self-inductance of 10 μH in series with a capacitance of 0.1 μF that acts as resonant inductor-capacitor circuit to generate the AMF. The thermal rise is appraised in beef vertebra placed at 10 cm from the AMF generating circuit using optical temperatures sensors, i.e. in the center of the PMMA-MNP bone cement, which is located in the vicinity of metastatic bone tumors in clinical applications; and in the spine, which needs to be safeguarded to high temperature exposures. Results show a temperature rise of about 7 °C in PMMA-MNP whereas the temperature rise in the spine remains limited to 1 °C. Moreover, multicycles heating of PMMA-MNP is experimentally verified, validating the technical feasibility of having PMMA-MNP as basic component for percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with hyperthermia treatment of metastatic bone tumors.

  19. Utility and translatability of mathematical modeling, cell culture and small and large animal models in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Pearce, John A.; Ryan, Thomas P.

    2015-03-01

    For more than 50 years, hyperthermia-based cancer researchers have utilized mathematical models, cell culture studies and animal models to better understand, develop and validate potential new treatments. It has been, and remains, unclear how and to what degree these research techniques depend on, complement and, ultimately, translate accurately to a successful clinical treatment. In the past, when mathematical models have not proven accurate in a clinical treatment situation, the initiating quantitative scientists (engineers, mathematicians and physicists) have tended to believe the biomedical parameters provided to them were inaccurately determined or reported. In a similar manner, experienced biomedical scientists often tend to question the value of mathematical models and cell culture results since those data typically lack the level of biologic and medical variability and complexity that are essential to accurately study and predict complex diseases and subsequent treatments. Such quantitative and biomedical interdependence, variability, diversity and promise have never been greater than they are within magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment. The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and, recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. The goal of this paper is to use proven concepts and current research to address the potential pathobiology, modeling and quantification of the effects of treatment as pertaining to the similarities and differences in energy delivered by known external delivery techniques and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  20. Evaluation of ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions for the site-specific radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia of MX11 sarcoma cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusentsov, Nikolai A.; Gogosov, V.V.; Brusentsova, T.N.; Sergeev, A.V.; Jurchenko, N.Y.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A. E-mail: oleg@louisiana.edu; Shumakov, L.I

    2001-07-01

    Seventeen different ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions were prepared and evaluated for application in radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia. Specific power absorption rates were measured at 0.88 MHz to range from 0 to 240 W per gram of iron for different preparations. Survival of MX11 cells mixed with ferrofluids and subjected to radiofrequency was much lower than with RF without ferrofluid or ferrofluid alone.

  1. Evaluation of ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions for the site-specific radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia of MX11 sarcoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusentsov, Nikolai A.; Gogosov, V.V.; Brusentsova, T.N.; Sergeev, A.V.; Jurchenko, N.Y.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Shumakov, L.I.

    2001-01-01

    Seventeen different ferromagnetic fluids and suspensions were prepared and evaluated for application in radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia. Specific power absorption rates were measured at 0.88 MHz to range from 0 to 240 W per gram of iron for different preparations. Survival of MX11 cells mixed with ferrofluids and subjected to radiofrequency was much lower than with RF without ferrofluid or ferrofluid alone

  2. Thermal dosimetry studies of ultrasonically induced hyperthermia in normal dog brain and in experimental brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, R.H.; Pounds, D.W.; Stuart, J.S.; Lyons, B.E.; Saxer, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a series of 16 acute experiments on pentobarbital anesthetized dogs, thermal distributions generated by ultrasonic heating using a 1 MHz PZT transducer were compared with intensity distributions mapped in a test tank. Relatively flat distributions from 1 to 3 cm have been mapped in normal dog brain using ''shaped'' intensity distributions generated from ultrasonic emission patterns which are formed by the interaction between compressional, transverse and flexural modes activated within the crystal. In contrast, these same intensity distributions generated marked temperature variations in 3 malignant brain tumors presumably due to variations in tumor blood flow. The results of this study suggest that a practical clinical system for uniform heating of large tumor volumes with varying volumes and geometries is not an achievable goal. The author's laboratory is developing a scanning ultrasonic rapid hyperthermia treatment system which will be able to sequentially heat small volume of tumor tissue either to temperatures which will sterilize tumor or to a more conventional thermal dose. Time-temperature studies of threshold for thermal damage in normal dog brain are currently in progress

  3. Hyperthermia-induced micronucleus formation in a human keratinocyte cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzsche, Henning; Riese, Thorsten; Stopper, Helga

    2012-01-01

    Elevated temperature can cause biological effects in vitro and in vivo. Many studies on effects of hypo- and hyperthermia have been conducted, but only few studies systematically investigated the formation of genomic damage in the micronucleus test in human cells in vitro as a consequence of different temperatures. In the present study, HaCaT human keratinocytes were exposed to different temperatures from 37 °C to 42 °C for 24 h in a regular cell culture incubator. Micronucleus frequency as a marker of genomic damage was elevated in a temperature-dependent and statistically significant manner. Apoptosis occurred at temperatures of 39 °C or higher. Cell proliferation was unaffected up to 40 °C and decreased at 41 °C and 42 °C. Expression of the heat shock protein Hsp70 was elevated, particularly at temperatures of 40 °C and higher. These findings are in agreement with several in vivo studies and some in vitro studies looking at single, specific temperatures, but a systematically investigated temperature-dependent increase of genomic damage in human keratinocytes in vitro is demonstrated for the first time here.

  4. High doses of L-naloxone but neither D-naloxone nor beta-funaltrexamine prevent hyperthermia-induced seizures in rat pups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laorden, M L; Miralles, F S; Puig, M M

    1988-03-01

    The effects of the non-specific opiate antagonist L-naloxone and the inactive isomer D-naloxone, as well as the specific mu receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine, have been examined on hyperthermia-induced seizures in unrestrained 15 days old rats. Saline-injected animals exposed to an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C showed a gradual increase in body temperature reaching a maximum of 42 +/- 0.1 degrees C at 50 min exposure. At this time all the pups had seizures and died. Similar results were obtained when the animals were pretreated with different doses of D-naloxone and beta-funaltrexamine. Rats pretreated with L-naloxone also showed an increase in rectal temperature; but the temperature was lower than in saline-injected animals. Only high doses of L-naloxone prevented seizures and deaths. These data indicate that endogenous opioid peptides may play a role in seizures induced by hyperthermia and that receptors other than mu receptors could be involved in hyperthermia-induced seizures.

  5. Hyperthermia: clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicher, H.I.

    1982-01-01

    A large number of patients have now been entered into a phase I/II protocol to examine the effects of fractionated hyperthermia and radiation on tumor response. Included in the study were 11 different histologies with anatomical locations varying between peripheral and superficial metastases to deep-seated, solid tumors. Patients were treated with four fractions of microwave-induced hyperthermia (45.0 +- 0.5 0 C), each separated by intervals of 72 hours. Microwaves at frequencies of 915 MHz or 300 MHz were employed, Patients were given a one week rest following the first four treatments, following which a second series of four fractions were administered, again at 72 hour intervals. Each of these fractions consisted of a 400 rad dose of radiation followed within 20 min by hyperthermia (42.5 +- 5 0 C) for 1.5 hours. To date 121 fields have been treated by 82 patients. Total regression is seen in 65% of all cases, partial regression in 35% and no response is seen in only 5% of treatments. Adverse effects were rare. Site specific trials are currently in progress to study the feasibility of deep-seated heating with intracavitary antennae as well as to assess tumor response. In addition, a randomized trial to examine the clinical relevance of thermotolerance has been started

  6. The proliferation induced by hyperthermia in NB69 cells is offset by a radar-like signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo Ruiz, M. A.; Martinez Pascual, M. A.; Cid Torres, M. A.; Pague de la Vega, J. E.; Chacon Vargas, L.; Ubeda Maeso, A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the proliferative response of the cell line NB69 human neuroblastoma, the simultaneous exposure to two physical agents: mild hyperthermia (+1 degree centigrade) and a pulsed RF signal subtermica.

  7. Inhibition of heat-shock protein 90 sensitizes liver cancer stem-like cells to magnetic hyperthermia and enhances anti-tumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Tang, Qiusha; Miao, Fengqin; An, Yanli; Li, Mengfei; Han, Yong; Wang, Xihui; Wang, Juan; Liu, Peidang; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the thermoresistance and expression of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in magnetic hyperthermia-treated human liver cancer stem-like cells (LCSCs) and the effects of a heat-shock protein HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxgeldanamycin (17-AAG) on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice. Methods CD90+ LCSCs were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from BEL-7404. Spheroid formation, proliferation, differentiation, drug resistance, and tumor formation assays were performed to identify stem cell characteristics. CD90-targeted thermosensitive magnetoliposomes (TMs)-encapsulated 17-AAG (CD90@17-AAG/TMs) was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation and its characteristics were studied. Heat tolerance in CD90+ LCSCs and the effect of CD90@17-AAG/TMs-mediated heat sensitivity were examined in vitro and in vivo. Results CD90+ LCSCs showed significant stem cell-like properties. The 17-AAG/TMs were successfully prepared and were spherical in shape with an average size of 128.9±7.7 nm. When exposed to magnetic hyperthermia, HSP90 was up-regulated in CD90+ LCSCs. CD90@17-AAG/TMs inhibited the activity of HSP90 and increased the sensitivity of CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia. Conclusion The inhibition of HSP90 could sensitize CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia and enhance its anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26677324

  8. Cooling Effectiveness of a Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method After Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhring, Katherine E; Butts, Cory L; Smith, Cody R; Bonacci, Jeffrey A; Ylanan, Ramon C; Ganio, Matthew S; McDermott, Brendon P

    2016-11-01

     Recommended treatment for exertional heat stroke includes whole-body cold-water immersion (CWI). However, remote locations or monetary or spatial restrictions can challenge the feasibility of CWI. Thus, the development of a modified, portable CWI method would allow for optimal treatment of exertional heat stroke in the presence of these challenges.  To determine the cooling rate of modified CWI (tarp-assisted cooling with oscillation [TACO]) after exertional hyperthermia.  Randomized, crossover controlled trial.  Environmental chamber (temperature = 33.4°C ± 0.8°C, relative humidity = 55.7% ± 1.9%).  Sixteen volunteers (9 men, 7 women; age = 26 ± 4.7 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass = 72.5 ± 9.0 kg, body fat = 20.7% ± 7.1%) with no history of compromised thermoregulation.  Participants completed volitional exercise (cycling or treadmill) until they demonstrated a rectal temperature (T re ) ≥39.0°C. After exercise, participants transitioned to a semirecumbent position on a tarp until either T re reached 38.1°C or 15 minutes had elapsed during the control (no immersion [CON]) or TACO (immersion in 151 L of 2.1°C ± 0.8°C water) treatment.  The T re , heart rate, and blood pressure (reported as mean arterial pressure) were assessed precooling and postcooling. Statistical analyses included repeated-measures analysis of variance with appropriate post hoc t tests and Bonferroni correction.  Before cooling, the T re was not different between conditions (CON: 39.27°C ± 0.26°C, TACO: 39.30°C ± 0.39°C; P = .62; effect size = -0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.2, 0.1). At postcooling, the T re was decreased in the TACO (38.10°C ± 0.16°C) compared with the CON condition (38.74°C ± 0.38°C; P < .001; effect size = 2.27; 95% CI = 0.4, 0.9). The rate of cooling was greater during the TACO (0.14 ± 0.06°C/min) than the CON treatment (0.04°C/min ± 0.02°C/min; t 15 = -8.84; P < .001; effect size = 2.21; 95% CI = -0.13, -0

  9. Hyperthermia induced after recirculation triggers chronic neurodegeneration in the penumbra zone of focal ischemia in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Favero-Filho

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative processes have been identified in the rat forebrain after prolonged survival following hyperthermia (HT initiated a few hours after transient global ischemia. Since transient global ischemia and ischemic penumbra share pathophysiological similarities, this study addressed the effects of HT induced after recirculation of focal brain ischemia on infarct size during long survival times. Adult male Wistar rats underwent intra-luminal occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery for 60 min followed by HT (39.0-39.5°C or normothermia. Control procedures included none and sham surgery with and without HT, and middle cerebral artery occlusion alone. Part I: 6-h HT induced at recirculation. Part II: 2-h HT induced at 2-, 6-, or 24-h recirculation. Part III: 2-h HT initiated at recirculation or 6-h HT initiated at 2-, 6- or 24-h recirculation. Survival periods were 7 days, 2 or 6 months. The effects of post-ischemic HT on cortex and striatum were evaluated histopathologically by measuring the area of remaining tissue in the infarcted hemisphere at -0.30 mm from bregma. Six-hour HT initiated from 6-h recirculation caused a significant decrease in the remaining cortical tissue between 7-day (N = 8 and 2-month (N = 8 survivals (98.46 ± 1.14 to 73.62 ± 8.99%, respectively. When induced from 24-h recirculation, 6-h HT caused a significant reduction of the remaining cortical tissue between 2- (N = 8 and 6-month (N = 9 survivals (94.97 ± 5.02 vs 63.26 ± 11.97%, respectively. These data indicate that post-ischemic HT triggers chronic neurodegenerative processes in ischemic penumbra, suggesting that similar fever-triggered effects may annul the benefit of early recirculation in stroke patients over the long-term.

  10. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adibzadeh, F; Verhaart, R F; Rijnen, Z; Franckena, M; Van Rhoon, G C; Paulides, M M; Verduijn, G M; Fortunati, V

    2015-01-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H and N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H and N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR 10g ) in the brains of 16 selected H and N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR 10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF. (paper)

  11. Effect of perphenazine enanthate on open-field test behaviour and stress-induced hyperthermia in domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedernera-Romano, Cecilia; Ruiz de la Torre, José L; Badiella, Llorenç; Manteca, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The open-field test (OFT) and stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) have been used to measure individual differences in fear. The present study has been designed as a pharmacological validation of OFT and SIH as indicators of fear in sheep using perphenazine enanthate (PPZ), a long-acting neuroleptic. Twenty four ewes of two breeds, Lacaune and Ripollesa, were tested in an arena measuring 5mx2.5m. Treatment group received one dose of 1.5mg/kg of PPZ and control group received sterile sesame oil. All animals were tested for 10min and behaviours were recorded. Rectal temperature was measured at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the test. SIH was defined as the difference between T2 and T1. Sheep were tested on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 9 after PPZ injection. Variables were analysed using a mixed model. PPZ decreased bleats on days 2, 3, 4 and the SIH response on days 2 and 3. Breed differences were observed. Treated animals showed positive correlations between SIH and bleats; squares entered; attempts to escape and negative correlation between SIH and visits to the food bucket. Our results suggest that behaviour and SIH on the OFT are useful measures of fear in sheep.

  12. Magnetically induced vacuum decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Shesheng

    2003-01-01

    We study the fermionic vacuum energy of vacua with and without application of an external magnetic field. The energetic difference of two vacua leads to the vacuum decaying and the vacuum energy being released. In the context of quantum field theories, we discuss why and how the vacuum energy can be released by spontaneous photon emission and/or paramagnetically screening the external magnetic field. In addition, we quantitatively compute the vacuum energy released, the paramagnetic screening effect, and the rate and spectrum of spontaneous photon emission. The possibilities of experimentally detecting such an effect of vacuum-energy release and that this effect accounts for the anomalous x-ray pulsar are discussed

  13. A method for increasing the homogeneity of the temperature distribution during magnetic fluid hyperthermia with a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy in the presence of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yundong; Flesch, Rodolfo C. C.; Jin, Tao

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia ablates tumor cells by absorbing the thermal energy from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under an external alternating magnetic field. The blood vessels (BVs) within tumor region can generally reduce treatment effectiveness due to the cooling effect of blood flow. This paper aims to investigate the cooling effect of BVs on the temperature field of malignant tumor regions using a complex geometric model and numerical simulation. For deriving the model, the Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow is combined with Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for human tissue. The effects on treatment temperature caused by two different BV distributions inside a mammary tumor are analyzed through numerical simulation under different conditions of flow rate considering a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy, which has low Curie temperature ranging from 42 °C to 45 °C. Numerical results show that the multi-vessel system has more obvious cooling effects than the single vessel one on the temperature field distribution for hyperthermia. Besides, simulation results show that the temperature field within tumor area can also be influenced by the velocity and diameter of BVs. To minimize the cooling effect, this article proposes a treatment method based on the increase of the thermal energy provided to MNPs associated with the adoption of low Curie temperature particles recently reported in literature. Results demonstrate that this approach noticeably improves the uniformity of the temperature field, and shortens the treatment time in a Fe-Cr-Nb-B system, thus reducing the side effects to the patient.

  14. The protective role of nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthases in whole-body hyperthermia-induced hepatic injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Fuh; Wang, David; Leu, Fur-Jiang; Chen, Hsing I

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the role of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS)-derived NO and heat-shock protein (Hsp70) in a rat model of whole-body hyperthermia (WBH)-induced liver injury. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blot were used to observe the mRNA and protein expression of eNOS, iNOS and Hsp70. Rats were exposed to hyperthermia by immersion for 60 min at a conscious state in a water bath maintained at 41°C. Plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were used to assess liver injury 15 h after the hyperthermia challenge. Nitrosative and oxidative mediators, particularly NO and hydroxyl radical were measured. Plasma AST, ALT, hydroxyl radical, and NO were significantly increased after WBH. There were 4.14 ± 0.42, 2.82 ± 0.34 and 2.91 ± 0.16-fold increases in the mRNA expression of eNOS, iNOS and Hsp70. Immunohistochemistry and western blot showed up-regulation of eNOS, iNOS and Hsp70 protein. An eNOS inhibitor (N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)), or an iNOS inhibitor (aminoguanidine (AG)), significantly aggravated the liver injury. On the contrary, administration of NO precursor, L-arginine (L-ARG), attenuated the liver injury. Hsp70 inhibitor quercetin reduced Hsp70, while aggravating the WBH-induced hepatic changes. WBH induces increases in eNOS, iNOS and Hsp70 expression with increase in NO release. The deleterious effects of L-NAME and AG and the protective effects of L-ARG and Hsp70 inhibitor on the liver function and pathology suggest that NO and heat shock protein play a beneficial role in the WBH-induced hepatic injury.

  15. Malignant hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollock Neil

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant hyperthermia (MH is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle that presents as a hypermetabolic response to potent volatile anesthetic gases such as halothane, sevoflurane, desflurane and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine, and rarely, in humans, to stresses such as vigorous exercise and heat. The incidence of MH reactions ranges from 1:5,000 to 1:50,000–100,000 anesthesias. However, the prevalence of the genetic abnormalities may be as great as one in 3,000 individuals. MH affects humans, certain pig breeds, dogs, horses, and probably other animals. The classic signs of MH include hyperthermia to marked degree, tachycardia, tachypnea, increased carbon dioxide production, increased oxygen consumption, acidosis, muscle rigidity, and rhabdomyolysis, all related to a hypermetabolic response. The syndrome is likely to be fatal if untreated. Early recognition of the signs of MH, specifically elevation of end-expired carbon dioxide, provides the clinical diagnostic clues. In humans the syndrome is inherited in autosomal dominant pattern, while in pigs in autosomal recessive. The pathophysiologic changes of MH are due to uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes related to muscle activation. Due to ATP depletion, the muscle membrane integrity is compromised leading to hyperkalemia and rhabdomyolysis. In most cases, the syndrome is caused by a defect in the ryanodine receptor. Over 90 mutations have been identified in the RYR-1 gene located on chromosome 19q13.1, and at least 25 are causal for MH. Diagnostic testing relies on assessing the in vitro contracture response of biopsied muscle to halothane, caffeine, and other drugs. Elucidation of the genetic changes has led to the introduction, on a limited basis so far, of genetic testing for susceptibility to MH. As the sensitivity of genetic testing increases, molecular genetics will be used for identifying those at risk with

  16. Potential use of SERS-assisted theranostic strategy based on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell nanocomposites for bio-detection, MRI, and magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yu; Lei, Sheng-lan [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Lu, Jian-hua [Department of Electronic Science, College of Physical Science and Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); He, Yuan [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Chen, Zhi-wei, E-mail: chenzhiwei@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Electronic Science, College of Physical Science and Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Ren, Lei, E-mail: renlei@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Collaborative Innovation Center for Exploitation and Utilization of Marine Biological Resources, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhou, Xi [Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Fire Retardant Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Fujian Collaborative Innovation Center for Exploitation and Utilization of Marine Biological Resources, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-07-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-assisted theranostic strategy was designed based on a synthesized multifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell nanocomposite. This theranostic strategy was used for free prostate specific antigen (free-PSA) detection, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic hyperthermia. The lowest protein concentration detected was 1 ng mL{sup −1}, and the limit of detection (LOD) of the calculated PSA was 0.75 ng mL{sup −1}. Then, MRI was carried out to visualize the tumor cell. Lastly, magnetic hyperthermia was employed and revealed a favorable killing effect for the tumor cells. Thus, this SERS-assisted strategy based on a Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell nanocomposite showed great advantages in theranostic treatment. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au cluster/shell composite can be used for specific protein detection, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia therapy. - Highlights: • We designed a SERS-assisted theranostic strategy based on the mutifunctional nanocomposites using gold shelled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} clusters. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Au nanoparticles with theranostics and SERS for early diagnosis of PSA were reported for the first time. • The LOD of detection for PSA was lowed as 0.75 ng mL{sup −1}, and the total detection time was shorten to less than 1 h. • Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} clusters had spin-spin (T{sub 2}) contrast enhancement and increased magnetic response. • Gold nanoshells supplied excellent chemical stability, biocompatibility, better heating property for magnetic hyperthermia.

  17. A role of prostaglandin E/sub2/ in radiation-induced hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernak, I.; Stanimirovic, D.; Simovic, M.; Ivanovic, L.; Markovic, M.; Savic, J.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation-induced (6.7 Gy X-ray) changes in body temperature were investigated in rats exposed to: whole body irradiation pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg/kg b.w.) 30 min before whole body irradiation and irradiation of the body with protected head. Content of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 3 ) was measured in the rat brain hypothalamic regions and compared to correspondent body temperature. Hypothalamic PGE 2 content strongly correlated with body temperature (r=0.79, p 2 in the hypothalamus is presumed as a putative mediator of radiation-induced changes in body temperature. (author). 8 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  18. 31P-MRS study for the assessment of tumor response after radiotherapy and/or hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hirohiko; Itho, Satoshi; Nakatsugawa, Sigekazu; Maeda, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Toshiko; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Ishii, Yasushi

    1992-01-01

    The metabolic changes of human lung cancer implanted in nude mice were studied by the use of in vivo 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) after radiotherapy, hyperthermia or the combined therapy of radiation and hyperthermia. 31 P-MRS of the tumors showed increased Pi/β-NTP ratio and acidic pH value on 1 day after hyperthermia, that indicated metabolic decline caused by hyperthermia. On the other hand, lower Pi/β-NTP ratios during 3 to 10 days after irradiation suggested metabolic activation of the tumors. In the tumors treated with the combined therapy, 31 P-MRS revealed increase of Pi/β-NTP ratio within 1 day and its decrease subsequent 6 to 10 days after treatment, that indicated additive bi-phasic changes induced by radiation and hyperthermia, respectively. Since Pi/β-NTP ratio had significant correlation to the tumor blood perfusion measured by hydrogen gas clearance studies, these bi-phasic changes were considered to correspond to two different physiological states, namely, ischemic and reperfused states. 31 P-MRS obtained from tumors could be useful to asses the physiological consequence following radiation, hyperthermia or the combined therapy. (author)

  19. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x-y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  20. Anisotropy effects in magnetic hyperthermia: A comparison between spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshid, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Nemati, Z.; Phan, M. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Alonso, J. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Barandiarán, J. M. [BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Depto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa 48940 (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    Spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, with different FeO:Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ratios, have been prepared by a thermal decomposition method to probe anisotropy effects on their heating efficiency. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanoparticles are composed of FeO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases, with an average size of ∼20 nm. Magnetometry and transverse susceptibility measurements show that the effective anisotropy field is 1.5 times larger for the cubes than for the spheres, while the saturation magnetization is 1.5 times larger for the spheres than for the cubes. Hyperthermia experiments evidence higher values of the specific absorption rate (SAR) for the cubes as compared to the spheres (200 vs. 135 W/g at 600 Oe and 310 kHz). These observations point to an important fact that the saturation magnetization is not a sole factor in determining the SAR and the heating efficiency of the magnetic nanoparticles can be improved by tuning their effective anisotropy.

  1. The influence of hyperthermia and irradiation on some bioelectric parameters of the cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solic, F.; Milotic, B.; Stipcic-Solic, N.

    1986-01-01

    The simultaneously influence of hyperthermia and low intensity gamma irradiation on the biopotential and the resistance of Nitella cells were investigated. The effect induced by irradiation and hyperthermia is manifested as membrane repolarization while hyperthermia alone induced depolarization. The resistance of cells is in positive correlation with membrane potential. (author)

  2. Neuronal Rat Brain Damage Caused by Endogenous and Exogenous Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aydın

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hyperthermia may induce pathologic alterations within body systems and organs including brain. In this study, neuronal effects of endogenous and exogenous hyperthermia (41°C were studied in rats. METHODS: The endogenous hyperthermia (41°C was induced by lipopolysaccharide and the exogenous by an (electric heater. Possible neuronal damage was evaluated by examining healthy, apoptotic and necrotic cells, and heat shock proteins (HSP 27, HSP 70 in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hypothalamus RESULTS: At cellular level, when all neuronal tissues are taken into account; (i a significant increase in the necrotic cells was observed in the both groups (p0.05. CONCLUSION: The neural tissue of brain can show different degree of response to hyperthermia. But we can conclude that endogenous hyperthermia is more harmful to central nervous system than exogenous hyperthermia

  3. Whole-body fluid distribution in humans during dehydration and recovery, before and after humid-heat acclimation induced using controlled hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M J; Stocks, J M; Taylor, N A S

    2014-04-01

    This experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that the plasma volume is not selectively defended during exercise- and heat-induced dehydration following humid-heat acclimation. Eight physically active males were heat acclimated (39.8 °C, relative humidity 59.2%) using 17 days of controlled hyperthermia (core temperature: 38.5 °C). Inter-compartmental fluid losses and movements were tracked (radioisotopes and Evans blue dye) during progressive dehydration (cycling) in these same conditions and also during a resting recovery without fluid replacement (28 °C), before (day 1), during (day 8) and after heat acclimation (day 22). On days 8 and 22, there were significant increases in total body water, interstitial fluid and plasma volume (P 0.05). The baseline plasma volume remained expanded throughout: 43.4 [±2.6 (day 1)], 49.1 [±2.4 (day 8); P recovery, plasma volume restoration commenced, with the intracellular fluid contribution becoming more pronounced as acclimation progressed. It is concluded that the plasma volume was not defended more vigorously following humid-heat acclimation. Indeed, a greater fluid loss may well underlie the mechanisms for enhancing plasma volume recovery when heat acclimation is induced using the controlled-hyperthermia technique. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hyperthermia and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The present review addresses mechanisms of importance for hyperthermia-induced fatigue during short intense activities and prolonged exercise in the heat. Inferior performance during physical activities with intensities that elicit maximal oxygen uptake is to a large extent related to perturbation...... of the cardiovascular function, which eventually reduces arterial oxygen delivery to the exercising muscles. Accordingly, aerobic energy turnover is impaired and anaerobic metabolism provokes peripheral fatigue. In contrast, metabolic disturbances of muscle homeostasis are less important during prolonged exercise...... in the heat, because increased oxygen extraction compensates for the reduction in systemic blood flow. The decrease in endurance seems to involve changes in the function of the central nervous system (CNS) that lead to fatigue. The CNS fatigue appears to be influenced by neurotransmitter activity...

  5. Ccl22/MDC, is a prostaglandin dependent pyrogen, acting in the anterior hypothalamus to induce hyperthermia via activation of brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Olivia; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Dubins, Jeffrey S; Gonzalez, Alejandro Sanchez; Morrison, Brad; Hadcock, John R; Bartfai, Tamas

    2011-03-01

    CC Chemokine ligand 22 (Ccl22) is a selective, high affinity ligand at the CC chemokine receptor 4 (Ccr4). We have identified cDNAs encoding both ligand and receptor of the Ccl22-Ccr4 pair in cDNA libraries of the anterior hypothalamus/pre-optic area (AH/POA) by PCR. The AH/POA is the key brain region where endogenous pyrogens have been shown to act on warm sensitive neurons to affect thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and other thermogenically responsive tissues. We show that functional Ccr4 receptors are present in the AH/POA neurons as injection of Ccl22 into the POA but not to other hypothalamic nuclei induces an increase in core body temperature as measured by radiotelemetry. Indomethacin (5 mg/kg s.c) pre-treatment markedly reduced the hyperthermia evoked by POA injection of Ccl22 (10 ng/0.5 ul) and thus suggests that this hyperthermia is mediated through cyclooxygenase activation and thus likely through the formation and action of the pyrogen prostaglandin E2. The temperature elevation involves a decrease in the respiratory exchange ratio and increased activation of the brown adipose tissue as demonstrated by ¹⁸F-FDG-PET imaging. We describe a novel role to the ligand Ccl22 and its receptor Ccr4 in the anterior hypothalamus in temperature regulation that depends on the synthesis of the endogenous pyrogen, prostaglandin E2. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimizing magnetic anisotropy of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Amin ur [Magnetism Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Applied Physical and Material Sciences, University of Swat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Manzoor, Sadia, E-mail: sadia_manzoor@comsats.edu.pk [Magnetism Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-12-15

    Maximizing the magnetothermal response of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's) for hyperthermia applications is a complex problem, because it depends sensitively upon interrelated magnetic and structural parameters. The task is somewhat simpler for systems with fixed composition, e.g. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} or CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, in which the particle size is the only means of modifying the magnetic anisotropy, and hence the magnetothermal response. In the La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} system however, the magnetic interactions as well as the particle size both change with the Sr concentration x, which makes it a much more complex system for which to optimize the hyperthermia response. We have investigated the effect of magnetic anisotropy on the magnetothermal response of La{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} nanoparticles as a function of the particle size as well as the Sr concentration x where 0.20≤x≤0.45. The optimum particle size range is 25–30 nm for all concentrations, where the specific absorption rate (SAR) has a maximum. The linear response theory (LRT) has been applied to this system and good agreement has been found between the experimental and theoretically determined values of the SAR for samples lying in the single domain regime and having large enough anisotropy energies. The agreement is much better for the intermediate concentrations of 0.27 and 0.33, because of their large anisotropy as compared to other concentrations. It is concluded that the LRT can be successfully used to predict the SAR of these nanoparticles, provided they possess large enough effective anisotropies. Values of the ILP have been obtained for these samples and found to be comparable to those of magnetite and some commercial ferrofluids. - Highlights: • For La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} system, the magnetic anisotropy is determined not only by the particle size, but also by the strontium content x, we made a systematic study of both these parameters on its magnetothermal

  7. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase increases caffeine- and halothane-induced contractures in muscle bundles of malignant hyperthermia susceptible and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roewer Norbert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant hyperthermia (MH is triggered by halogenated anaesthetics and depolarising muscle relaxants, leading to an uncontrolled hypermetabolic state of skeletal muscle. An uncontrolled sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release is mediated via the ryanodine receptor. A compensatory mechanism of increased sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase activity was described in pigs and in transfected cell lines. We hypothesized that inhibition of Ca2+ reuptake via the sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced muscle contractures in MH susceptible more than in non-susceptible skeletal muscle. Methods With informed consent, surplus muscle bundles of 7 MHS (susceptible, 7 MHE (equivocal and 16 MHN (non-susceptible classified patients were mounted to an isometric force transducer, electrically stimulated, preloaded and equilibrated. Following 15 min incubation with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA 25 μM, the European MH standard in-vitro-contracture test protocol with caffeine (0.5; 1; 1.5; 2; 3; 4 mM and halothane (0.11; 0.22; 0.44; 0.66 mM was performed. Data as median and quartiles; Friedman- and Wilcoxon-test for differences with and without CPA; p Results Initial length, weight, maximum twitch height, predrug resting tension and predrug twitch height of muscle bundles did not differ between groups. CPA increased halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures significantly. This increase was more pronounced in MHS and MHE than in MHN muscle bundles. Conclusion Inhibition of the SERCA activity by CPA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures especially in MHS and MHE skeletal muscle and may help for the diagnostic assignment of MH susceptibility. The status of SERCA activity may play a significant but so far unknown role in the genesis of malignant hyperthermia.

  8. Hyperthermia treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagendijk, J.J.W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of hyperthermia, the treatment of tumours with elevated temperatures in the range of 40-44 deg. C with treatment times over 30 min, greatly benefits from the development of hyperthermia treatment planning. This review briefly describes the state of the art in hyperthermia technology, followed by an overview of the developments in hyperthermia treatment planning. It particularly highlights the significant problems encountered with heating realistic tissue volumes and shows how treatment planning can help in designing better heating technology. Hyperthermia treatment planning will ultimately provide information about the actual temperature distributions obtained and thus the tumour control probabilities to be expected. This will improve our understanding of the present clinical results of thermoradiotherapy and thermochemotherapy, and will greatly help both in optimizing clinical heating technology and in designing optimal clinical trials. (author)

  9. Synthesis of oleic acid functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles and studying their interaction with tumor cells for potential hyperthermia applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Neena V; Prasad, Amresh I; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, R; Dhara, Sangita; Babu, K R; Prajapat, C L; Misra, N L; Ningthoujam, R S; Pandey, B N; Vatsa, R K

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, oleic acid (OA) functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MN) were synthesized following modified wet method of MN synthesis. The optimum amount of OA required for capping of MN and the amount of bound and unbound/free OA was determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Further, we have studied the effect of water molecules, associated with MN, on the variation in their induction heating ability under alternating current (AC) magnetic field conditions. We have employed a new approach to achieve dispersion of OA functionalized MN (MN-OA) in aqueous medium using sodium carbonate, which improves their biological applicability. Interactions amongst MN, OA and sodium carbonate were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Intracellular localization of MN-OA was studied in mouse fibrosarcoma cells (WEHI-164) by prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) using nile blue A as a fluorescent probe. Results showed MN-OA to be interacting mainly with the cell membrane. Their hyperthermic killing ability was evaluated in WEHI-164 cells by trypan blue method. Cells treated with MN-OA in combination with induction heating showed decreased viability as compared to respective induction heating controls. These results were supported by altered cellular morphology after treatment of MN-OA in combination with induction heating. Further, the magnitude of apoptosis was found to be ~5 folds higher in cells treated with MN-OA in combination with induction heating as compared to untreated control. These results suggest the efficacy of MN-OA in killing of tumor cells by cellular hyperthermia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hyperthermia generated by Foucault currents for oncological treatments with COMSOL; Hipertermia generada por corrientes Foucault para tratamientos oncologicos con COMSOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero C, R. L.; Cordova F, T.; Basurto I, G. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Leon, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Guzman C, R. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus Irapuato-Salamanca, Division de Ingenierias, Carretera Salamanca-Valle de Santiago Km 3.5, Comunidad de Palo Blanco, 36885 Salamanca, Guanajuato (Mexico); Castro L, J., E-mail: rosariolrc@gmail.com [Universidad del Mar, Campus Puerto Angel, Carretera a Zipolite Km 1.5, Col. Puerto Angel, 70902 San Pedro Pochutla, Oaxaca (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    The hyperthermia generated by variable magnetic fields is a promising power method for oncological therapy, because apoptosis is induced in tumor cells at temperatures between 42 and 45 degrees Celsius. It is known that an alternating magnetic field on the FeO{sub 4} magnetite particles produces heat through three paths: is generated by parasitic currents, lost in hysteresis cycles and losses by magnetization relaxation; taking advantage of the energy losses through the joule effect and the transformation into heat, a simulation is shown in COMSOL about the temporal distribution of temperature in transformed biological systems, to have an estimate of the properties and behavior of the temperature gradient when magnetic hyperthermia is generated in human transformed tissue. (Author)

  11. Effect of SPIO Nanoparticle Concentrations on Temperature Changes for Hyperthermia via MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsayed A. M. Elsherbini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs are being developed for a wide range of biomedical applications. In particular, hyperthermia involves heating the MNPs through exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF. These materials offer the potential for selectively by heating cancer tissue locally and at the cellular level. This may be a successful method if there are enough particles in a tumor possessing sufficiently high specific absorption rate (SAR to deposit heat quickly while minimizing thermal damage to surrounding tissue. The current research aim is to study the influence of super paramagnetic iron oxides Fe3O4 (SPIO NPs concentration on the total heat energy dose and the rate of temperature change in AMF to induce hyperthermia in Ehrlich carcinoma cells implanted in female mice. The results demonstrated a linearly increasing trend between these two factors.

  12. Influence of the aggregation, concentration, and viscosity on the nanomagnetism of iron oxide nanoparticle colloids for magnetic hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, David; Camarero, Julio; Ortega, Daniel; Teran, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have become ubiquitous in many biomedical applications, acting as core elements in an increasing number of therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. These applications mainly rely on their static and dynamic magnetic properties, through which they can be remotely actuated. However, little attention has been paid to understand the variation of the magnetic response of nanoparticles inside cells or tissues, despite of the remarkable changes reported to date. In this article, we provide some hints to analyze the influence of the biological matrix on the magnetism of iron oxide nanoparticles. To this aim, we propose the assessment of the heating efficiency of magnetic colloids against nanoparticle aggregation, concentration, and viscosity in order to mimic the fate of nanoparticles upon cell internalization

  13. Influence of the aggregation, concentration, and viscosity on the nanomagnetism of iron oxide nanoparticle colloids for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, David; Camarero, Julio; Ortega, Daniel; Teran, Francisco J., E-mail: francisco.teran@imdea.org [Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, IMDEA Nanociencia (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have become ubiquitous in many biomedical applications, acting as core elements in an increasing number of therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. These applications mainly rely on their static and dynamic magnetic properties, through which they can be remotely actuated. However, little attention has been paid to understand the variation of the magnetic response of nanoparticles inside cells or tissues, despite of the remarkable changes reported to date. In this article, we provide some hints to analyze the influence of the biological matrix on the magnetism of iron oxide nanoparticles. To this aim, we propose the assessment of the heating efficiency of magnetic colloids against nanoparticle aggregation, concentration, and viscosity in order to mimic the fate of nanoparticles upon cell internalization.

  14. Investigations on magnetic field induced optical transparency in magnetic nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Dillip Kumar; Philip, John

    2018-02-01

    We study the magnetic field induced optical transparency and its origin in magnetic nanoemulsion of droplets of average size ∼200 nm containing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Beyond a certain volume fraction (Φ > 0.0021) of magnetic nanoemulsion and a critical magnetic field (Hc1), the transmitted light intensity increases drastically and reaches a maximum at another critical magnetic field (Hc2), beyond which the transmitted light intensity decreases and reaches a plateau. Interestingly, the transmitted light intensity at Hc2 is found to increase linearly with Φ and the critical magnetic fields Hc1 and Hc2 follow power law decay with Φ (i.e. Hc ∼ Φ-x), with exponents 0.48 and 0.27, respectively. The light intensity recovers to its initial value when the magnetic field is switched off, indicating the perfect reversibility of the field induced transparency process. The observed straight line scattered patterns above Hc2, on a screen placed perpendicular to the incident beam, confirms the formation of rod like anisotropic nanostructures perpendicular to the direction of light propagation. The magneto-optical measurements in the emulsion confirm that the observed field induced transparency in magnetic emulsions for Φ > 0.0021 is due to the optical birefringence caused by the rod like nanostructures. The reduced birefringence is found to be proportional to the square of the applied magnetic field. This finding offers several possibilities in using magnetic nanofluids in tunable optical devices.

  15. Hyperthermia quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, P.N.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthermia Physics Center (HPC) operating under contract with the National Cancer Institute is developing a Quality Assurance program for local and regional hyperthermia. The major clinical problem in hyperthermia treatments is that they are extremely difficult to plan, execute, monitor and reproduce. A scientific basis for treatment planning can be established only after ensuring that the performance of heat generating and temperature monitoring systems are reliable. The HPC is presently concentrating on providing uniform NBS traceable calibration of thermometers and evaluation of reproducibility for power generator operation, applicator performance, phanta compositions, system calibrations and personnel shielding. The organizational plan together with recommended evaluation measurements, procedures and criteria are presented

  16. Examination of the magnetic hyperthermia and other magnetic properties of CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 nanoparticles using external field Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongho; Choi, Hyunkyung; Kim, Sam Jin; Kim, Chul Sung

    2018-05-01

    CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 core/shell nanoparticles were synthesized by high temperature thermal decomposition with seed-mediated growth. The crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were investigated using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and Mössbauer spectrometry. The magnetic hyperthermia properties were investigated using a MagneTherm device. Analysis of the XRD patterns showed that CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 had a cubic spinel crystal structure with space group Fd-3m and a lattice constant (a0) of 8.3686 Å. The size and morphology of the CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 nanoparticles were confirmed by HR-TEM. The VSM measurements showed that the saturation magnetization (MS) of CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 was 77.9 emu/g. The self-heating temperature of CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 was 37.8 °C at 112 kHz and 250 Oe. The CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 core/shell nanoparticles showed the largest saturation magnetization value, while their magnetic hyperthermia properties were between those of the CoFe2O4 and MgFe2O4 nanoparticles. In order to investigate the hyperfine interactions of CoFe2O4, MgFe2O4, and CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4, we performed Mössbauer spectrometry at various temperatures. In addition, Mössbauer spectrometry of CoFe2O4@MgFe2O4 was performed at 4.2 K with applied fields of 0-4.5 T, and the results were analyzed with sextets for the tetrahedral A-site and sextets for the octahedral B-site.

  17. Thermosensitive polymer-grafted iron oxide nanoparticles studied by in situ dynamic light backscattering under magnetic hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemery, Gauvin; Garanger, Elisabeth; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Wong, Andrew D.; Gillies, Elizabeth R.; Pedrono, Boris; Bayle, Thomas; Jacob, David; Sandre, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Thermometry at the nanoscale is an emerging area fostered by intensive research on nanoparticles (NPs) that are capable of converting electromagnetic waves into heat. Recent results suggest that stationary gradients can be maintained between the surface of NPs and the bulk solvent, a phenomenon sometimes referred to as ‘cold hyperthermia’. However, the measurement of such highly localized temperatures is particularly challenging. We describe here a new approach to probing the temperature at the surface of iron oxide NPs and enhancing the understanding of this phenomenon. This approach involves the grafting of thermosensitive polymer chains to the NP surface followed by the measurement of macroscopic properties of the resulting NP suspension and comparison to a calibration curve built up by macroscopic heating. Superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs were prepared by the coprecipitation of ferrous and ferric salts and functionalized with amines, then azides using a sol-gel route followed by a dehydrative coupling reaction. Thermosensitive poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) with an alkyne end-group was synthesized by controlled radical polymerization and was grafted using a copper assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. Measurement of the colloidal properties by dynamic light scattering (DLS) indicated that the thermosensitive NPs exhibited changes in their Zeta potential and hydrodynamic diameter as a function of pH and temperature due to the grafted PDMAEMA chains. These changes were accompanied by changes in the relaxivities of the NPs, suggesting application as thermosensitive contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, a new fibre-based backscattering setup enabled positioning of the DLS remote-head as close as possible to the coil of a magnetic heating inductor to afford in situ probing of the backscattered light intensity, hydrodynamic diameter, and temperature. This approach provides a promising platform for

  18. Induction heating studies of combustion synthesized MgFe2O4 nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khot, V.M.; Salunkhe, A.B.; Thorat, N.D.; Phadatare, M.R.; Pawar, S.H.

    2013-01-01

    The structural, magnetic and ac magnetically induced heating characteristics of combustion synthesized MgFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles have been investigated for application in magnetic particle hyperthermia. As prepared nanoparticles showed ferrimagnetic behavior at room temperature with magnetization of about 33.83 emu/g at ±15 kOe. The solid state MgFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles exhibited specific absorption rate (SAR) of about 297 W/g at physiological safe range of frequency and amplitude. The increase in SAR and heating temperature in ac magnetic field was thought to be due to enhancement in magnetic hysteresis loss caused by dipole–dipole interactions in combustion synthesized MgFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles. - Highlights: ► Highly crystalline pure MgFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were synthesized by low temperature combustion. ► Effect of ac magnetic field and nanoparticles concentration on heating characteristics of MgFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles was studied. ► Combustion synthesized MgFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles show highest specific absorption rate of 297 Wg −1 . ► The reported high value of specific absorption rate is advantageous for its use in magnetic particle hyperthermia

  19. Imaging and modification of the tumor vascular barrier for improvement in magnetic nanoparticle uptake and hyperthermia treatment efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Petryk, Alicia A.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Savellano, Mark S.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Stan, Radu V.; Gimi, Barjor; Garwood, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The predicted success of nanoparticle based cancer therapy is due in part to the presence of the inherent leakiness of the tumor vascular barrier, the so called enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Although the EPR effect is present in varying degrees in many tumors, it has not resulted in the consistent level of nanoparticle-tumor uptake enhancement that was initially predicted. Magnetic/iron oxide nanoparticles (mNPs) have many positive qualities, including their inert/nontoxic nature, the ability to be produced in various sizes, the ability to be activated by a deeply penetrating and nontoxic magnetic field resulting in cell-specific cytotoxic heating, and the ability to be successfully coated with a wide variety of functional coatings. However, at this time, the delivery of adequate numbers of nanoparticles to the tumor site via systemic administration remains challenging. Ionizing radiation, cisplatinum chemotherapy, external static magnetic fields and vascular disrupting agents are being used to modify the tumor environment/vasculature barrier to improve mNP uptake in tumors and subsequently tumor treatment. Preliminary studies suggest use of these modalities, individually, can result in mNP uptake improvements in the 3-10 fold range. Ongoing studies show promise of even greater tumor uptake enhancement when these methods are combined. The level and location of mNP/Fe in blood and normal/tumor tissue is assessed via histopathological methods (confocal, light and electron microscopy, histochemical iron staining, fluorescent labeling, TEM) and ICP-MS. In order to accurately plan and assess mNP-based therapies in clinical patients, a noninvasive and quantitative imaging technique for the assessment of mNP uptake and biodistribution will be necessary. To address this issue, we examined the use of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and Sweep Imaging With Fourier Transformation (SWIFT), an MRI technique which provides a

  20. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Shen, W.; Stoneking, M.

    1993-11-01

    The local electron energy flux produced by magnetic fluctuations has been measured directly in the MST reversed field pinch (over the radial range r/a > 0.75). The flux, produced by electrons traveling parallel to a fluctuating magnetic field, is obtained from correlation between the fluctuations in the parallel heat flux and the radial magnetic field. The fluctuation induced flux is large (100 kW/cm 2 ) in the ''core'' (r/a 2 ) in the edge

  1. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description.

  2. Magnetic-flutter-induced pedestal plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.; Cole, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can limit reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields δB on rational magnetic flux surfaces. Hence it causes the induced radial perturbations δB ρ to be small there, thereby inhibiting magnetic island formation and stochasticity at the top of pedestals in high (H-mode) confinement tokamak plasmas. However, the δB ρ s induced by RMPs increase away from rational surfaces and are shown to induce significant sinusoidal radial motion (flutter) of magnetic field lines with a radial extent that varies linearly with δB ρ and inversely with distance from the rational surface because of the magnetic shear. This produces a radial electron thermal diffusivity that is (1/2)(δB ρ /B 0 ) 2 times a kinetically derived, electron-collision-induced, magnetic-shear-reduced, effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity in the absence of magnetic stochasticity. These low collisionality flutter-induced transport processes and thin magnetic island effects are shown to be highly peaked in the vicinity of rational surfaces at the top of low collisionality pedestals. However, the smaller but finite level of magnetic-flutter-induced electron heat transport midway between rational surfaces is the primary factor that determines the electron temperature difference between rational surfaces at the pedestal top. The magnetic-flutter-induced non-ambipolar electron density transport can be large enough to push the plasma toward an electron density transport root. Requiring ambipolar density transport is shown to determine the radial electric field, the plasma toroidal rotation (via radial force balance), a reduced electron thermal diffusivity and increased ambipolar density transport in the pedestal. At high collisionality the various flutter effects are less strongly peaked at rational surfaces and generally less significant. They are thus less likely to exhibit flutter-induced resonant behaviour and transition toward an

  3. Magnetic-flutter-induced pedestal plasma transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2013-11-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can limit reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields δB on rational magnetic flux surfaces. Hence it causes the induced radial perturbations δBρ to be small there, thereby inhibiting magnetic island formation and stochasticity at the top of pedestals in high (H-mode) confinement tokamak plasmas. However, the δBρs induced by RMPs increase away from rational surfaces and are shown to induce significant sinusoidal radial motion (flutter) of magnetic field lines with a radial extent that varies linearly with δBρ and inversely with distance from the rational surface because of the magnetic shear. This produces a radial electron thermal diffusivity that is (1/2)(δBρ/B0)2 times a kinetically derived, electron-collision-induced, magnetic-shear-reduced, effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity in the absence of magnetic stochasticity. These low collisionality flutter-induced transport processes and thin magnetic island effects are shown to be highly peaked in the vicinity of rational surfaces at the top of low collisionality pedestals. However, the smaller but finite level of magnetic-flutter-induced electron heat transport midway between rational surfaces is the primary factor that determines the electron temperature difference between rational surfaces at the pedestal top. The magnetic-flutter-induced non-ambipolar electron density transport can be large enough to push the plasma toward an electron density transport root. Requiring ambipolar density transport is shown to determine the radial electric field, the plasma toroidal rotation (via radial force balance), a reduced electron thermal diffusivity and increased ambipolar density transport in the pedestal. At high collisionality the various flutter effects are less strongly peaked at rational surfaces and generally less significant. They are thus less likely to exhibit flutter-induced resonant behaviour and transition toward an electron

  4. Coulomb blockade induced by magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusmartsev, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors found that a Coulomb blockade can be induced by magnetic field. The authors illustrated this effect on the example of a ring consisting of two and many Josephson junctions. For the ring with two junctions we present an exact solution. The transition into Coulomb blockade state on a ring transforms into a linear array of Josephson junctions, although in latter case the effect of magnetic field disappears. In the state of Coulomb blockade the magnetization may be both diamagnetic and paramagnetic. The Coulomb blockade may also be removed by external magnetic field

  5. Voluntary suppression of hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation mitigates the reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Bun; Honda, Yasushi; Ikebe, Yusuke; Fujii, Naoto; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2015-04-15

    Hyperthermia during prolonged exercise leads to hyperventilation, which can reduce arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2 ) and, in turn, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and thermoregulatory response. We investigated 1) whether humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise and 2) the effects of voluntary breathing control on PaCO2 , CBF, sweating, and skin blood flow. Twelve male subjects performed two exercise trials at 50% of peak oxygen uptake in the heat (37°C, 50% relative humidity) for up to 60 min. Throughout the exercise, subjects breathed normally (normal-breathing trial) or they tried to control their minute ventilation (respiratory frequency was timed with a metronome, and target tidal volumes were displayed on a monitor) to the level reached after 5 min of exercise (controlled-breathing trial). Plotting ventilatory and cerebrovascular responses against esophageal temperature (Tes) showed that minute ventilation increased linearly with rising Tes during normal breathing, whereas controlled breathing attenuated the increased ventilation (increase in minute ventilation from the onset of controlled breathing: 7.4 vs. 1.6 l/min at +1.1°C Tes; P flow velocity (MCAV) with rising Tes, but controlled breathing attenuated those reductions (estimated PaCO2 -3.4 vs. -0.8 mmHg; MCAV -10.4 vs. -3.9 cm/s at +1.1°C Tes; P = 0.002 and 0.011, respectively). Controlled breathing had no significant effect on chest sweating or forearm vascular conductance (P = 0.67 and 0.91, respectively). Our results indicate that humans can voluntarily suppress hyperthermic hyperventilation during prolonged exercise, and this suppression mitigates changes in PaCO2 and CBF. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Amphetamine and environmentally induced hyperthermia differentially alter the expression of genes regulating vascular tone and angiogenesis in the meninges and associated vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Monzy; George, Nysia I; Patterson, Tucker A; Bowyer, John F

    2009-10-01

    An amphetamine (AMPH) regimen that does not produce a prominent blood-brain barrier breakdown was shown to significantly alter the expression of genes regulating vascular tone, immune function, and angiogenesis in vasculature associated with arachnoid and pia membranes of the forebrain. Adult-male Sprague-Dawley rats were given either saline injections during environmentally-induced hyperthermia (EIH) or four doses of AMPH with 2 h between each dose (5, 7.5, 10, and 10 mg/kg d-AMPH, s.c.) that produced hyperthermia. Rats were sacrificed either 3 h or 1 day after dosing, and total RNA and protein was isolated from the meninges, arachnoid and pia membranes, and associated vasculature (MAV) that surround the forebrain. Vip, eNos, Drd1a, and Edn1 (genes regulating vascular tone) were increased by either EIH or AMPH to varying degrees in MAV, indicating that EIH and AMPH produce differential responses to enhance vasodilatation. AMPH, and EIH to a lesser extent, elicited a significant inflammatory response at 3 h as indicated by an increased MAV expression of cytokines Il1b, Il6, Ccl-2, Cxcl1, and Cxcl2. Also, genes related to heat shock/stress and disruption of vascular homeostasis such as Icam1 and Hsp72 were also observed. The increased expression of Ctgf and Timp1 and the decreased expression of Akt1, Anpep, and Mmp2 and Tek (genes involved in stimulating angiogenesis) from AMPH exposure suggest that angiogenesis was arrested or disrupted in MAV to a greater extent by AMPH compared to EIH. Alterations in vascular-related gene expression in the parietal cortex and striatum after AMPH were less in magnitude than in MAV, indicating less of a disruption of vascular homeostasis in these two regions. Changes in the levels of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins Igfbp1, 2, and 5 in MAV, compared to those in striatum and parietal cortex, imply an interaction between these regions to regulate the levels of insulin-like growth factor after AMPH damage. Thus, the

  7. Therapeutic tests on methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma and transplanted fibrosarcoma of the mouse - clostridial oncolysis and its enhancement by high-frequency hyperthermia and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirlet, T.

    1982-01-01

    Tests aimed at a conditioning of tumours by means of x-ray irradiation and high-frequency hyperthermia. Methyl cholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma (IMCM) and its transplant version (T-IMCM) produced at the neck of NMRI-mice at a critical localization immediately next to vital organs, served as a test system since it is almost resistant to simple oncolysis. Individual therapy components were compared for their mutual enhancement of efficacy in 16 test groups, and the triple combination (Cl + X-ray + HFH) was tested in relapse application as well. A 2000-R-x-ray irradiation was followed by almost simultaneous 4 min HF heating and i.v. spore administration at 12 h intervals. Assessment criteria were tumour growth, survival rates and times, absence of recidivity and healing, analysis of post-mortem findings and dimension or duration of lyses. In addition, the two tumour types of induction and transplant tumour were compared. The typical course of clostridial oncolysis can be confirmed in principle. Results show that it is possible by means of additional physical methods as were applied, to increase the systemically apathogenic and selective therapy principle of rather negligible oncolysis to over 80% (IMCM) or 97% (T-IMCM). Concerning the MCA fibrosarcoma which is very resistant to clostridial oncolysis in this mouse-tumour model, marked prolongations of survival or healing are possible even in extremely critical localization. In principle, this provides the preconditions for including oncolysis in clinical studies in human medicine. (orig./MG) [de

  8. Interface-Induced Phenomena in Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, Axel; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S D; Fullerton, Eric E; Leighton, Chris; MacDonald, Allan H; Ralph, Daniel C; Arena, Dario A; Dürr, Hermann A; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V; Koopmans, Bert; Krivorotov, Ilya N; May, Steven J; Petford-Long, Amanda K; Rondinelli, James M; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K; Slavin, Andrei N; Stiles, Mark D; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially-driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin transfer torque, and spin pumping. An overview is provided to the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange spring magnets, spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. The article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and non-collinear spin textures, non-linear dynamics including spin torque transfer and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.

  9. Morphologic alterations in normal and neoplastic tissues following hyperthermia treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badylak, S.F.; Babbs, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The sequential morphologic alterations in normal skeletal muscle in rats, Walker 256 tumors in rats, and transmissible venereal tumors (TVT) in dogs following microwave-induced hyperthermia (43 0 C and 45 0 for 20 minutes) were studied by light and electron microscopy. Normal muscle and Walker 256 tumors showed vascular damage at 5 minutes post-heating (PH), followed by suppuration and thrombosis at 6 and 48 hours PH, and by regeneration and repair at 7 days PH. Endothelial damage and parenchymal degeneration were present 5 minutes PH. Progressive ischemic injury occurred for at least 48 hours PH. Two hyperthermia treatments, separated by a 30 or 60 minute cooling interval, were applied to rats implanted with Walker 256 tumors. Increased selective heating of tumor tissue versus surrounding normal tissue, and increased intratumoral temperatures were found during the second hyperthermia treatment. Canine TVTs were resistant to hyperthermia damage. These results characterized the sequential morphologic alterations following hyperthermia treatment and showed that: 1) vascular damage contributed to the immediate and latent cytotoxic effects of hyperthermia, 2) selective heating occurred in the neoplastic tissue disrupted by prior heat treatment, and 3) not all neoplasms are responsive to hyperthermia treatment

  10. Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticle solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S. Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brown, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Coopersmith, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fulmer, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Sessions, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Ali, M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-12-02

    Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticles (NP) provides a useful advantage for many energy transfer applications. This study aims to gain an understanding of the key parameters responsible for maximizing the energy transfer leading to nanoparticle heating through the use of simulations and experimental results. It was found that magnetic field strength, NP concentration, NP composition, and coil size can be controlled to generate accurate temperature profiles in NP aqueous solutions.

  11. Magnetoresistance and ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeink, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the combination of the magnetic patterning of the unidirectional anisotropy and the tunnel magnetoresistance effect is investigated. In my diploma thesis, it has been shown that it is in principle possible to use the magnetic patterning by ion bombardment to magnetically structure the pinned layer in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with alumina barrier. Furthermore, it has been shown that the side effects which have been observed after this treatment can be at least reduced by an additional heating step. Starting from this point, the applicability of ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning (IBMP) in general and the combination of IBMP and MTJs in particular is investigated and new applications are developed. (orig.)

  12. Nanotechnology in hyperthermia cancer therapy: From fundamental principles to advanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beik, Jaber; Abed, Ziaeddin; Ghoreishi, Fatemeh S; Hosseini-Nami, Samira; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali; Kamrava, S Kamran

    2016-08-10

    In this work, we present an in-depth review of recent breakthroughs in nanotechnology for hyperthermia cancer therapy. Conventional hyperthermia methods do not thermally discriminate between the target and the surrounding normal tissues, and this non-selective tissue heating can lead to serious side effects. Nanotechnology is expected to have great potential to revolutionize current hyperthermia methods. To find an appropriate place in cancer treatment, all nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods and their risks/benefits must be thoroughly understood. In this review paper, we extensively examine and compare four modern nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods. For each method, the possible physical mechanisms of heat generation and enhancement due to the presence of nanoparticles are explained, and recent in vitro and in vivo studies are reviewed and discussed. Nano-Photo-Thermal Therapy (NPTT) and Nano-Magnetic Hyperthermia (NMH) are reviewed as the two first exciting approaches for targeted hyperthermia. The third novel hyperthermia method, Nano-Radio-Frequency Ablation (NaRFA) is discussed together with the thermal effects of novel nanoparticles in the presence of radiofrequency waves. Finally, Nano-Ultrasound Hyperthermia (NUH) is described as the fourth modern method for cancer hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hyperthermia: Clinical promise and current challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Local-regional hyperthermia (HT) when used in conjunction with radiation therapy (XRT), has been shown in numerous clinical trials to result in considerable improvement in response rates and local tumor control rates when compared with treatment by XRT alone. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the biological basis for hyperthermia induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, additional research remains in establishing the optimal treatment schedules for the clinical utilization of HT-XRT. The number of HT treatments; the sequencing of HT and XRT; the frequency of administration of HT; and the ideal temperature-time parameters all remain to be better defined for the clinical setting. The role of tumor blood flow on the thermal distributions also warrants further investigation. In addition, considerable effort is needed to improve hyperthermia equipment in order to provide more uniform therapeutic temperature distributions (temperatures ≥42.5%C). Better heating equipment is particularly needed for the treatment of deep seeted tumors. Pertinent clinical literature will be presented summarizing the clinical promise of hyperthermia and the above mentioned clinical challenges

  14. ADPRT inhibitors and hyperthermia as radiosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    Hyperthermia given in combination with gamma radiation has given considerable improvement in the therapeutic results for treatment of malignant tumors. The mechanism behind the hyperthermia effect is probably operative at the tissue level as well as at the molecular level. The metabolism of NAD + in relation to the activity of the chromosomal enzyme ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT) has been studied as a possible molecular mechanism for this effect. The ADPRT activity was measured after radiosensitization with both hyperthermia and nicotinamide, which is a potent inhibitor of ADPRT. The results indicate that hyperthermia can improve the effect of radiotherapy by reducing the supply of NAD + , which is a co-substrate for ADPRT, while nicotinamide functions as a radiosensitizing agent by direct inhibition of the enzyme. The hypothesis is discussed in the thesis where inhibition of ADPRT might increase the radiosensitivity because the radiation-induced DNA damage can not be repaired with normal efficiency. The function of nicotinamide as a radiosensitizer was verified by studies on C3H mice with transplanted spontaneous mammary tumors. Because nicotinamide is not toxic, it seems quite attractive to test this vitamin as a radiosensitizing agent against human tumors. (251 refs.) (author)

  15. A smart magnetic nanoplatform for synergistic anticancer therapy: manoeuvring mussel-inspired functional magnetic nanoparticles for pH responsive anticancer drug delivery and hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikala, Arathyram Ramachandra Kurup; Ghavaminejad, Amin; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Thomas, Reju George; Moon, Myeongju; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2015-10-01

    We report the versatile design of a smart nanoplatform for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. For the first time in the literature, our design takes advantage of the outstanding properties of mussel-inspired multiple catecholic groups - presenting a unique copolymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-dopamine methacrylamide) p(HEMA-co-DMA) to surface functionalize the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as well as to conjugate borate containing anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) in a pH-dependent manner for the synergistic anticancer treatment. The unique multiple anchoring groups can be used to substantially improve the affinity of the ligands to the surfaces of the nanoparticles to form ultrastable iron oxide nanoparticles with control over their hydrodynamic diameter and interfacial chemistry. Thus the BTZ-incorporated-bio-inspired-smart magnetic nanoplatform will act as a hyperthermic agent that delivers heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied while the BTZ-bound catechol moieties act as chemotherapeutic agents in a cancer environment by providing pH-dependent drug release for the synergistic thermo-chemotherapy application. The anticancer efficacy of these bio-inspired multifunctional smart magnetic nanoparticles was tested both in vitro and in vivo and found that these unique magnetic nanoplatforms can be established to endow for the next generation of nanomedicine for efficient and safe cancer therapy.We report the versatile design of a smart nanoplatform for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. For the first time in the literature, our design takes advantage of the outstanding properties of mussel-inspired multiple catecholic groups - presenting a unique copolymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-dopamine methacrylamide) p(HEMA-co-DMA) to surface functionalize the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as well as to conjugate borate containing anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) in a pH-dependent manner for the synergistic

  16. Magnetic field aberration induced by cycle stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang En; Li Luming; Chen Xing

    2007-01-01

    Magneto-mechanical effect has been causing people's growing interest because of its relevance to several technology problems. One of them is the variation of surface magnetic field induced by stress concentration under the geomagnetic field. It can be used as an innovative, simple and convenient potential NDE method, called as magnetic memory method. However, whether and how this can be used as a quantitative measurement method, is still a virginal research field where nobody sets foot in. In this paper, circle tensile stress within the elastic region was applied to ferromagnetic sample under geomagnetic field. Experiment results on the relation between surface magnetic field and elastic stress were presented, and a simple model was derived. Simulation of the model was reconciled with the experimental results. This can be of great importance for it provides a brighter future for the promising Magnetic Memory NDE method-the potential possibility of quantitative measurement

  17. Interstitial microwave hyperthermia treatment investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siauve, N; Lormel, C

    2012-01-01

    Microwave ablation also called interstitial hyperthermia is a medical procedure used in the treatment of many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. With this medical therapy, an electromagnetic source (antenna) is directly positioned in the target tissue and a sufficient power is injected to necrosis the tissue. The aim of this study is to propose a design procedure and develop the associated tools, for determining the optimal shape, dimensions, type and operating frequency of antenna according to the target volume. In this context, a 3D numerical predictive model of temperature elevation induced by the electric fields and two benches for thermal and electrical tissues properties characterization have been developed. To validate the procedure and the different tools, an experimental bench test which includes interstitial antenna, external microwave generator, phantom that represents the target tissue and measurement system of temperature and electric field has been elaborated.

  18. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, F.

    1979-01-01

    Of decisive importance for superadditive enhancement is the close temporal correlation of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. It is recommended to first irradiate and then use heat treatment in order to ensure that dividable tumour cells are irradiated before hyperthermia. To achieve an optimal enhancing effect, temperatures of appr. 42 0 are sufficient. In order to be able to neglect temperature regulation and convection effects, hyperthermia for clinical use must be carried out in doses high enough to ensure that it can be finished within 3-4 minutes. It is necessary to make efforts to find out which forms of application can be realised in order to reach deeper tissue regions, thus making possible at least a half-depth-therapy. Up to day, only the 2 cm near to the surface can be heated in a sufficiently homogeneous way. In the FRG, there are more than 200 high-volt-therapy systems, including electron accelerators and telegamma systems. This is a dense network of radiation-therapeutical supply. An improved therapy effect of loose ionising rays which, with the help of the hypertherming, would almost be equal to irradiation with high ionisation density, is not only of scientific interest, but also of high interest for public health. (orig./MG) 891 MG/orig.- 892 RDG [de

  19. Terbium doped SnO2 nanoparticles as white emitters and SnO2:5Tb/Fe3O4 magnetic luminescent nanohybrids for hyperthermia application and biocompatibility with HeLa cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Laishram Priyobarta; Singh, Ningthoujam Premananda; Srivastava, Sri Krishna

    2015-04-14

    SnO2:5Tb (SnO2 doped with 5 at% Tb(3+)) nanoparticles were synthesised by a polyol method and their luminescence properties at different annealing temperatures were studied. Characterization of nanomaterials was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD studies indicate that the prepared nanoparticles were of tetragonal structures. Upon Tb(3+) ion incorporation into SnO2, Sn(4+) changes to Sn(2+) and, on annealing again at higher temperature, Sn(2+) changes to Sn(4+). The prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape. Sn-O vibrations were found from the FTIR studies. In photoluminescence studies, the intensity of the emission peaks of Tb(3+) ions increases with the increase of annealing temperature, and emission spectra lie in the region of white emission in the CIE diagram. CCT calculations show that the SnO2:5Tb emission lies in cold white emission. Quantum yields up to 38% can be obtained for 900 °C annealed samples. SnO2:5Tb nanoparticles were well incorporated into the PVA polymer and such a material incorporated into the polymer can be used for display devices. The SnO2:5Tb/Fe3O4 nanohybrid was prepared and investigated for hyperthermia applications at different concentrations of the nanohybrid. This achieves a hyperthermia temperature (42 °C) under an AC magnetic field. The hybrid nanomaterial SnO2:5Tb/Fe3O4 was found to exhibit biocompatibility with HeLa cells (human cervical cancer cells) at concentrations up to 74% for 100 μg L(-1). Also, this nanohybrid shows green emission and thus it will be helpful in tracing magnetic nanoparticles through optical imaging in vivo and in vitro application.

  20. Electrically induced magnetic fields; a consistent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batell, Brian; Ferstl, Andrew

    2003-09-01

    Electromagnetic radiation exists because changing magnetic fields induce changing electric fields and vice versa. This fact often appears inconsistent with the way some physics textbooks solve particular problems using Faraday's law. These types of problems often ask students to find the induced electric field given a current that does not vary linearly with time. A typical example involves a long solenoid carrying a sinusoidal current. This problem is usually solved as an example or assigned as a homework exercise. The solution offered by many textbooks uses the approximation that the induced, changing electric field produces a negligible magnetic field, which is only valid at low frequencies. If this approximation is not explicitly acknowledged, then the solution appears inconsistent with the description of electromagnetic radiation. In other cases, when the problem is solved without this approximation, the electric and magnetic fields are derived from the vector potential. We present a detailed calculation of the electric and magnetic fields inside and outside the long solenoid without using the vector potential. We then offer a comparison of our solution and a solution given in an introductory textbook.

  1. Photon-Induced Magnetization Reversal in Single Molecule Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Mustafa

    2005-03-01

    Single-molecule magnets (SMM) have been the subject of intensive research for more than a decade now because of their unique properties such as macroscopic quantum tunneling. Recent work in this area is focused on whether SMM are potential qubits, as proposed theoretically [1]. We use continuous millimeter wave radiation to manipulate the populations of the energy levels of a single crystal molecular magnet Fe8 [2]. When radiation is in resonance with the transitions between energy levels, the steady state magnetization exhibits dips. As expected, the magnetic field locations of these dips vary linearly with the radiation frequency. We will describe our experimental results, which provide a lower bound of 0.17 ns for transverse relaxation time. Transitions between excited states are found even though these states have negligible population at the experimental temperature. We find evidence that the sample heating is significant when the resonance condition is satisfied. Recent experiments are concentrated on the spin dynamics of Fe8 induced by pulsed radiation and results of these studies will also be presented. [1] Leuenberger, M. N. and Loss, D., Nature 410, 789 (2001). [2] M. Bal et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 100408(R) (2004).

  2. Role of blood flow and blood flow modifiers in clinical hyperthermia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the effect of localized magnetic-loop hyperthermia on blood flow was performed on 12 patients (19 tumor studies) using the Xenon-133 clearance method. After it was discovered that blood flow in most of the tumors increased in response to needle injection, a physiologically based, one compartment model was developed that included both a hyperemic (transient) and a steady state component. In the tumors of six patients, increases in blood flow induced by heat were also observed. The same model was used to describe the measured clearance data for both types of hyperemic response. The ability of tumor vessels to respond dynamically to stress and the degree of response may be predictive of tumor heating efficiency and subsequent therapeutic response. Many tumors treated by hyperthermia, therefore, do not reach therapeutic temperatures (42 0 C). One explanation for this may be that some tumors react to thermal stress in a manner similar to normal tissues; i.e., they increase blood flow during hyperthermia in order to dissipate heat. Higher temperatures might be achieved in these heat-resistant tumors by administering vasoconstrictive agents in an effort to reduce blood flow. In the second part of this research study, the extent to which pharmacologic inhibition of local blood flow might allow higher temperatures to develop in normal muscles exposed to localized radiofrequency hyperthermia was determined. It was found that the local muscle temperature rise could be increased by at least 90% in dogs and rabbits with the use of a local vasoconstrictive drug

  3. Thermo-radiosensitivity of the granulocyte and macrophage precursor cells of mice. I.-Development of the in vivo culture and effects induced by the hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueren, J. A.; Nieto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The present report shows the agar diffusion chamber technique for culturing granulocyte- macrophage precursor cells, obtained from mice bone marrow. Diffusion chambers containing the bone marrow suspension are implanted intraperitoneally Into mice and constitute a compartment which avoids the migration of cells, but allows the transit of the mouse biological fluxes, necessary for the cellular proliferation. By means of this technique, we studied the lethal effects of the hyperthermia on the precursors and their capacity to repair sublethal damage. (Author) 129 refs

  4. On the temperature control in self-controlling hyperthermia therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Mahyar, E-mail: ebrahimi_m@mehr.sharif.ir

    2016-10-15

    In self-controlling hyperthermia therapy, once the desired temperature is reached, the heat generation ceases and overheating is prevented. In order to design a system that generates sufficient heat without thermal ablation of surrounding healthy tissue, a good understanding of temperature distribution and its change with time is imperative. This study is conducted to extend our understanding about the heat generation and transfer, temperature distribution and temperature rise pattern in the tumor and surrounding tissue during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. A model consisting of two concentric spheres that represents the tumor and its surrounding tissue is considered and temperature change pattern and temperature distribution in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. After describing the model and its governing equations and constants precisely, a typical numerical solution of the model is presented. Then it is showed that how different parameters like Curie temperature of nanoparticles, magnetic field amplitude and nanoparticles concentration can affect the temperature change pattern during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. The model system herein discussed can be useful to gain insight on the self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia while applied to cancer treatment in real scenario and can be useful for treatment strategy determination. - Highlights: • Temperature change pattern in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. • The model system herein can be useful for treatment strategy determination. • In the work described herein, emphasis is on the effect of low Curie temperature. • If the equilibrium temperature can be tuned appropriately, the stay time will be infinite.

  5. On the temperature control in self-controlling hyperthermia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Mahyar

    2016-01-01

    In self-controlling hyperthermia therapy, once the desired temperature is reached, the heat generation ceases and overheating is prevented. In order to design a system that generates sufficient heat without thermal ablation of surrounding healthy tissue, a good understanding of temperature distribution and its change with time is imperative. This study is conducted to extend our understanding about the heat generation and transfer, temperature distribution and temperature rise pattern in the tumor and surrounding tissue during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. A model consisting of two concentric spheres that represents the tumor and its surrounding tissue is considered and temperature change pattern and temperature distribution in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. After describing the model and its governing equations and constants precisely, a typical numerical solution of the model is presented. Then it is showed that how different parameters like Curie temperature of nanoparticles, magnetic field amplitude and nanoparticles concentration can affect the temperature change pattern during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. The model system herein discussed can be useful to gain insight on the self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia while applied to cancer treatment in real scenario and can be useful for treatment strategy determination. - Highlights: • Temperature change pattern in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. • The model system herein can be useful for treatment strategy determination. • In the work described herein, emphasis is on the effect of low Curie temperature. • If the equilibrium temperature can be tuned appropriately, the stay time will be infinite.

  6. Hyperthermia and hyperglycemia in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhavrid, Eh.A.; Osinskij, S.P.; Fradkin, S.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to publication data and results of author's investigations into the effect of hyperthermia and hyperglycemia on physico-chemical characteristics and growth of various experimental tumors. Factors, modifying thermosensitivity, mechanisms of hyperthermia effect, various aspects of thermochimio- and thermoradiotherapy have been analyzed. Effect of artificial hyperglycemia on metabolism and kinetics of tumor and some normal cells is considered in detail. Many data, testifying to sufficient growth of efficiency of oncologic patient treatment under conditions of multimodality therapy including hyperthermia and hyperglycemia are presented

  7. RF and magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcheon, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Examples of how applied radiofrequency and magnet technology are used, and could be used, in the nuclear medical field are presented. Specific examples are: 1) the THERAC 25 electron accelerator project; 2) large, high field magnet systems for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); 3) the superconducting cyclotron; and 4. hyperthermia treatment. Emphasis is placed on the example of hyperthermia treatment

  8. Outcomes after environmental hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVecchio, Frank; Pizon, Anthony F; Berrett, Christopher; Balls, Adam

    2007-05-01

    This study was conducted to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with presumed environmental hyperthermia. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2 institutions with patients who were seen in the ED and had a discharge diagnosis of hyperthermia, heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Exclusion criteria were an alternative diagnosis potentially explaining the hyperthermia (pneumonia, etc). Research assistants, who were blinded to the purpose of the study, performed a systematic chart review after a structured training session. If necessary, a third reviewer acted as a tiebreaker. Data regarding patient demographics, comorbidities, vital signs, laboratory results, and short-term outcome were collected. Data were analyzed with Excel and STATA software. We enrolled 52 patients with a mean age of 42.6 years (range, 0.4-81 years) from August 1, 2003 to August 31, 2005. The mean high daily temperature was 103.6 degrees F (range, 88-118 degrees F). At presentation, the mean body temperature was 105.1 degrees F (range, 100.2-111.2 degrees F) and the Glasgow Coma Scale score was less than 14 in 36 (69.2%) patients. Laboratory results demonstrated that 21 (40.4%) patients had a creatinine level of more than 1.5 mg/dL, 35 (67.3%) patients had a creatine kinase (CK) of more than 200 U/L, 30 patients (57.7%) had a prothrombin time of more than 13 seconds, 29 (55.8%) patients had an aspartate aminotransferase (AST) of more than 45 U/L, and only 3 patients (5.7%) had a glucose of less than 60 mg/dL. Ethanol or illicit drugs were involved in 18 (34.6%) cases. The mean hospital stay was 4.7 days (range, 1-30 days), and there were 15 deaths (28.8%). A kappa score for interreviewer reliability was 0.69. Major limitations were the retrospective nature and lack of homogeneity in patient evaluation and test ordering. Hyperthermic patients with higher initial temperatures, hypotension, or low Glasgow Coma Scale

  9. Genetics Home Reference: malignant hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1722-30. Review. Citation on PubMed Litman RS, Rosenberg H. Malignant hyperthermia: update on susceptibility testing. JAMA. ... 27(10):977-89. Review. Citation on PubMed Rosenberg H, Davis M, James D, Pollock N, Stowell ...

  10. Induced remanent magnetization of social insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wajnberg, E.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Esquivel, D.M.S. E-mail: darci@cbpf.br

    2001-05-01

    The induced remanent magnetization (IRM) of honeybees Apis mellifera and ants as Pachycondyla marginata, a migratory species, and Solenopsis sp., a fire ant, was obtained using a SQUID magnetometer from 10 to 300 K. An anomalous sharp change of the remanent magnetization is observed at 67{+-}0.2 K for migratory ants. The IRM at room temperature indicates the presence of at least 10 times lower concentration of magnetic material in the whole fire ant as compared to the migratory ant abdomen (0.22{+-}0.33x10{sup -6} emu/ant, and 2.8{+-}1.2x10{sup -6} emu/abdomen, respectively). Our results in honeybee abdomen (4.6{+-}0.9x10{sup -6} emu/abdomen) agree with other reported values. IRM at room temperature in ants and honeybees indicates the presence of single domain (SD) or aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles. The loss of remanence from 77 to 300 K can be related to the stable-superparamagnetic (SPM) transition of small particles (less than ca. 30 nm). From these values and considering their estimated volumes an upper limit 10{sup 10} SPM and 10{sup 9} SD or aggregate particles are obtained in these insects.

  11. Induced remanent magnetization of social insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wajnberg, E.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Esquivel, D.M.S.

    2001-01-01

    The induced remanent magnetization (IRM) of honeybees Apis mellifera and ants as Pachycondyla marginata, a migratory species, and Solenopsis sp., a fire ant, was obtained using a SQUID magnetometer from 10 to 300 K. An anomalous sharp change of the remanent magnetization is observed at 67±0.2 K for migratory ants. The IRM at room temperature indicates the presence of at least 10 times lower concentration of magnetic material in the whole fire ant as compared to the migratory ant abdomen (0.22±0.33x10 -6 emu/ant, and 2.8±1.2x10 -6 emu/abdomen, respectively). Our results in honeybee abdomen (4.6±0.9x10 -6 emu/abdomen) agree with other reported values. IRM at room temperature in ants and honeybees indicates the presence of single domain (SD) or aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles. The loss of remanence from 77 to 300 K can be related to the stable-superparamagnetic (SPM) transition of small particles (less than ca. 30 nm). From these values and considering their estimated volumes an upper limit 10 10 SPM and 10 9 SD or aggregate particles are obtained in these insects

  12. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  13. Water flow patterns induced by bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subjected to alternating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Nix, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of water flow induced by the bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subject to an external alternating magnetic field. The magnetic fluid bridge is formed in the space between a pair of identical coaxial cylindrical permanent magnets submerged in water. The direction of alternating magnetic field is parallel /antiparallel to the magnetic field produced by two permanent magnets. The magnetic fluid bridge responds to the external alternating magnetic field with harmonic oscillation. The oscillation of magnetic fluid bridge generates water flow around the bridge. Water flow is visualized using a thin milk film at the container bottom. Water flows are observed with a high-speed video camera analysis system. The experimental results show that the flow pattern induced by the bridge oscillation depends on the Keulegan–Carpenter number.

  14. Water flow patterns induced by bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subjected to alternating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Seiichi, E-mail: sudo@akita-pu.ac.jp [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kazuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Nix, Stephanie [Faculty of Systems Science and Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Ebinokuchi 84-4, Yurihonjo 015-0055 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of water flow induced by the bridge oscillation of magnetic fluid between two permanent magnets subject to an external alternating magnetic field. The magnetic fluid bridge is formed in the space between a pair of identical coaxial cylindrical permanent magnets submerged in water. The direction of alternating magnetic field is parallel /antiparallel to the magnetic field produced by two permanent magnets. The magnetic fluid bridge responds to the external alternating magnetic field with harmonic oscillation. The oscillation of magnetic fluid bridge generates water flow around the bridge. Water flow is visualized using a thin milk film at the container bottom. Water flows are observed with a high-speed video camera analysis system. The experimental results show that the flow pattern induced by the bridge oscillation depends on the Keulegan–Carpenter number.

  15. Present clinical status of hyperthermia associated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaulerry, C.; Bataini, J.P.; Brunin, F.; Gaboriaud, G.

    1981-01-01

    Improved techniques for inducing heat: ultrasound, microwaves, diathermy with different application modalities, capable of producing localized superficial or deep, regional or total body hyperthermia have been responsible for the multiplication of clinical trials. These studies have confirmed the tumoricidal effect of hyperthermia alone, or more especially when combined with radiotherapy, and the good tolerance of normal tissues to localized temperatures of 42 to 43.5 0 C even in previously irradiated cases. Localized heating does not seem to increase the incidence of metastasis. Enhancement ratios and therapeutic gain with respect to normal tissues are not yet well documented. Many problems, including the heterogenicity of tissues to be heated, difficulties with temperature monitoring, and selection of appropriate sequential scheduling of radiation and hyperthermia remain unsolved and further investigationss are required [fr

  16. Thermosensitive Nanostructured Media for imaging and Hyperthermia Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been used for many years to treat a wide variety of tumors in patients. The most commonly applied method of hyperthermia is capacitive heating by using microwave. Magnetic fluids based on iron oxide (Fe3O4), stabilized by biocompatible surfactants are typically used as heating agent. However, significant limitations of using commercial available magnetic particles are non-selectivity and overheating of surrounding normal tissues. To improve the efficacy of hyperthermia treatment we intend to develop Curie temperature (Tc)-tuned nanostructured media having T2 relaxation response on MRI for selective and self-controlled hyperthermia cancer treatment. As an active part of this media we fabricated superparamagnetic, biocompatible and dextran coated ferrite nanoparticles Mg1+xTixFe2(1-x)O4 at 0.3 x connected to a hydrocarbon chain, such as glycine, hydrazine, or urea. Our experiments revealed that ferrite with formula Mg1.35Ti0.35Fe1.3O4 appears with Curie temperature within 46-50rC. NSF, grant # 0933140.

  17. Immunohistochemical Study on the Fetal Rat Pituitary in Hyperthermia-lnduced Exencephaly(Endocrinology)

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichi G., Watanabe; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia of fetal rats is known to cause malformations of various organs including brain. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of the hyperthermia-induced brain damages on the development of the adenohypophysis. Mother rats of Day 9.5 of pregnancy were anesthetized and immersed in hot water (43℃) for 15 min. At Day 21.5 of gestation, fetuses were removed by caesarian section and examined for exencephaly. Hyperthermal stress induced varying degrees of exencephaly in ...

  18. Induced Magnetic Moment in Defected Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a large induced magnetic moment in defect single-walled carbon nanotube(SWNT) is predicted using the Green's function method. Specific to this magnetic moment of defect SWNT is its magnitude which is several orders of magnitude larger than that of perfect SWNT. The induced magnetic moment also shows certain remarkable features. Therefore, we suggest that two pair-defect orientations in SWNT can be distinguished in experiment through the direction of the induced magnetic moment at some Specific energy points

  19. Ultrasonic system for hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppi, E.J.; Shapiro, E.G.; Zitelli, L.T.

    1985-01-01

    A system using ultrasound has been developed for hyperthermia application. It consists of a water bed containing a large ultrasound transducer array for heat application, an annular imaging transducer for alignment and treatment monitoring, and a 30-channel monitoring system for invasive temperature measurements. The heat applicator array contains 30 transducers mounted in a hexagonal configuration. Four subsets of transducers in the array can be remotely mechanically driven in such a way as to allow control of the distribution and diameter of ultrasound power at the effective focus of the array. The array can be remotely translated in three dimensions and can be rotated about its axis of symmetry. These motions allow positioning of the focal area of the array at the desired location. Each transducer of the array is powered by an individual amplifier and can be controlled in intensity and phase. The system can operate at variable ultrasound frequencies. An imaging transducer located at the center of the heat applicator array is used to collect data for ultrasound imaging and other purposes. Ultrasound images are displayed along with marks indicating the location of the heat applicator focal region for setup and for monitoring during treatment. The entire system is under computer control. This allows for operator ease in the control of the numerous parameters involved in the operation of the system

  20. Hyperthermia, immunity and metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatin, V.F.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of literature data concerning local hyperthermia effects shows that temperatures over 41-42 deg C (in the whole tumor volume), causing tumor growth inhibition and cell injury, can change antigenic nature of a malignant tissue. The tumor injured by thermal effect is able probably the full length of time of injured tissue resorption to maintain at a sufficiently high level antitumoral immunity and lay obstacles to emergence of metastases or even cause regression of those tumoral foci which have not been exposed to direct effect of the injuring agent. The facts of tumoral foci regression take place also upon radiation effect which is associated as well with participation of immune mechanisms. In.experiments with animals an essential increase of immunogenic character of malignant cells exposed to ionizing radiation effect has been observed. It follows that radiation injury of tumoral tissue as well as thermal one is able to stimulate antitumoral immunity and reduce the probability of emergence of metastases. But in case of radiotherapy immunosuppression effect of ionizing radiation (at the expense of inhibition of proliferation and death of immunocompetent cells) can essentially overlap immunostimulating effect related to the changes in antigenic character of tumoral cells

  1. A rare case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome presenting with serious hyperthermia treated with a non-invasive cooling device: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A rare side effect of antipsychotic medication is neuroleptic malignant syndrome, mainly characterized by hyperthermia, altered mental state, haemodynamic dysregulation, elevated serum creatine kinase and rigor. There may be multi-organ dysfunction including renal and hepatic failure as well as serious rhabdomyolysis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The prevalence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome is between 0.02% and 2.44% for patients taking neuroleptics and it is not necessary to fulfil all cardinal features characterizing the syndrome to be diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Because of other different life-threatening diseases matching the various clinical findings, the correct diagnosis can sometimes be hard to make. A special problem of intensive care treatment is the management of severe hyperthermia. Lowering of body temperature, however, may be a major clinical problem because hyperthermia in neuroleptic malignant syndrome is typically unresponsive to antipyretic agents while manual cooling proves difficult due to peripheral vasoconstriction. Case presentation A 22-year-old Caucasian man was admitted unconscious with a body temperature of 42°C, elevated serum creatine phosphokinase, tachycardia and hypotonic blood pressure. In addition to intensive care standard therapy for coma and shock, a non-invasive cooling device (Arctic Sun 2000®, Medivance Inc., USA, originally designed to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, was used to lower body temperature. After successful treatment it became possible to obtain information from the patient about his recent ambulant treatment with Olanzapin (Zyprexa® for schizophrenia. Conclusion Numerous case reports have been published about patients who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome due to Olanzapin (Zyprexa® medication. Frequently hyperthermia has been observed

  2. Strategies to reduce hyperthermia in ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Cox, Mary Jude; Long, William B; Winters, Kathryne L; Becker, Daniel G

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 Americans have multiple sclerosis. Worldwide, multiple sclerosis affects 2.5 million individuals. Multiple sclerosis affects two to three times as many women as men. The adverse effects of hyperthermia in patients with multiple sclerosis have been known since 1890. While most patients with multiple sclerosis experience reversible worsening of their neurologic deficits, some patients experience irreversible neurologic deficits. In fact, heat-induced fatalities have been encountered in multiple sclerosis patients subjected to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia can be caused through sun exposure, exercise, and infection. During the last 50 years, numerous strategies have evolved to reduce hyperthermia in individuals with multiple sclerosis, such as photoprotective clothing, sunglasses, sunscreens, hydrotherapy, and prevention of urinary tract infections. Hydrotherapy has become an essential component of rehabilitation for multiple sclerosis patients in hospitals throughout the world. On the basis of this positive hospital experience, hydrotherapy has been expanded through the use of compact aquatic exercise pools at home along with personal cooling devices that promote local and systemic hypothermia in multiple sclerosis patients. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America and NASA have played leadership roles in developing and recommending technology that will prevent hyperthermia in multiple sclerosis patients and should be consulted for new technological advances that will benefit the multiple sclerosis patient. In addition, products recommended for photoprotection by The Skin Cancer Foundation may also be helpful to the multiple sclerosis patient's defense against hyperthermia. Infections in the urinary tract, especially detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia, are initially managed conservatively with intermittent self-catheterization and pharmacologic therapy. In those cases, refractory to conservative therapy, transurethral external

  3. Numerical modeling for an electric-field hyperthermia applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chou, C. K.; Chan, K. W.; Mcdougall, J.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperthermia, in conjunction with radiation and chemotherapy for treatment of cancers, is an area of current concern. Experiments have shown that hyperthermia can increase the potency of many chemotherapy drugs and the effectiveness of radiation for treating cancer. A combination of whole body or regional hyperthermia with chemotherapy or radiation should improve treatment results. Conventional methods for inducing whole body hyperthermia, such as exposing a patient in a radiant cabinet or under a hot water blanket, conduct heat very slowly from the skin to the body core. Thus a more efficient system, such as the three-plate electric-field hyperthermia applicator (EHA), is developed. This three-plate EHA has one top plate over and two lower plates beneath the patient. It is driven at 27.12 MHz with 500 Watts through a matching circuit. Using this applicator, a 50 kg pig was successfully heated to 42 C within 45 minutes. However, phantom and animal studies have indicated non-uniform heating near the side of the body. In addition, changes in the size and distance between the electrode plates can affect the heating (or electromagnetic field) pattern. Therefore, numerical models using the method of moments (MOM) or the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique are developed to optimize the heating pattern of this EHA before it is used for human trials. The accuracy of the numerical modeling has been achieved by the good agreement between the MOM and FDTD results for the three-plate EHA without a biological body. The versatile FDTD technique is then applied to optimize the EHA design with a human body. Both the numerical and measured data in phantom blocks will be presented. The results of this study will be used to design an optimized system for whole body or regional hyperthermia.

  4. Gender differences in hyperthermia and regional 5-HT and 5-HIAA depletion in the brain following MDMA administration in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, Alinde E.; Grahlmann, Carolin; Granneman, Ramon A.; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Buwalda, Bauke

    2011-01-01

    In the present research the role of gender in MDMA-induced hyperthermia and serotonin depletion is studied by injecting male and female male rats with MDMA or saline 3 times (i.p.) with 3 h interval at dosages of 0.3, 1, 3 or 9 mg/kg at an ambient temperature of 25 degrees C. The acute hyperthermia

  5. Oscillatory interlayer magnetic coupling and induced magnetism in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    lating interlayer magnetic coupling (IMC) (Grunberg et al 1986; Parkin et al 1990; Unguris et al 1991) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR). Such oscillations in interlayer magnetic coupling and the saturation magnetoresistance were reported by Parkin et al (1990) with a period 15–. 20 Å in Fe/Cr, Co/Cr, Co/Ru multilayers.

  6. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Combined hyperthermia (HT 45 min once or twice per week) and low dose radiotherapy (LDRT 30-34.5 Gy in 2-3 weeks) have been given to 182 locally recurrent or metastatic superficial tumours in 133 patients. Tumour response was analysed in 137 tumours in 100 patients. The overall complete response (CR) was 50% with a median duration (DCR) of 13±3 months. When mammary carcinoma, representing 62% of the treated tumours, were analysed, CR was 62% with a DCR of 14±4 months. In a comparative, non-randomized study, on 34 matched tumour pairs in 24 patients, treatment was given with LDRT+HT to the larger and the same LDRT to the smaller tumour, the patients acting as their own control. A significant difference in CR was obtained in favour of the combined treatment (p=0.0013 all diagnosis and p=0.0027 mammary carcinoma). There was no significant difference in DCR between the two modalities. No significant difference in CR was seen when tumours were randomely treated with HT once (CR 56%) or twice (CR 69%) per week combined with the same LDRT. Predictive factors for CR, multivariately analysed (15 parameters), in mammary carcinoma recurring in earlier irradiated regions, were; the present LDRT absorbed dose (p=0.02) and the average minimum temperature in the best HT session (p=0.03). Significant skin toxicity was seen in 28% of all the 182 heated regions. Prognostic factors for skin damage, multivariately analysed, were; the extension of the heated region (p=0.007) and the highest average maximum temperature in any of the HT sessions (p=0.04). Pain was in some way correlated to severe toxicity but was not considered to be an optimal monitor for HT as many patients with severe and moderate pain were without any serious skin reactions, while slight or no pain sometimes were associated with severe reactions. 401 refs

  7. Floating and flying ferrofluid bridges induced by external magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rongchao; Zhou, Yixin; Liu, Jing

    2015-04-01

    A ferrofluid is a mixture that exhibits both magnetism and fluidity. This merit enables the ferrofluid to be used in a wide variety of areas. Here we show that a floating ferrofluid bridge can be induced between two separated boards under a balanced external magnetic field generated by two magnets, while a flying ferrofluid bridge can be induced under an unbalanced external magnetic field generated by only one magnet. The mechanisms of the ferrofluid bridges were discussed and the corresponding mathematical equations were also established to describe the interacting magnetic force between the ferro particles inside the ferrofluid. This work answered a basic question that, except for the well-known floating water bridges that are related to electricity, one can also build up a liquid bridge that is related to magnetism.

  8. Radiation induced structural and magnetic transformations in nanoparticle MnxZn(1−x)Fe2O4 ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, P.P.; Tangsali, R.B.; Sonaye, B.; Sugur, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle magnetic materials are suitable for multiple modern high end medical applications like targeted drug delivery, gene therapy, hyperthermia and MR thermometry imaging. Majority of these applications are confined to use of Mn–Zn ferrite nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are normally left in the body after their requisite application. Preparing these nanoparticles is usually a much involved job. However with the development of the simple technique Mn x Zn 1−x Fe 2 O 4 nanoparticles could be prepared with much ease. The nanoparticles of Mn x Zn 1−x Fe 2 O 4 with (x=1.0, 0.7, 0.5, 0.3, 0.0) were prepared and irradiated with gamma radiation of various intensities ranging between 500 R to 10,000 R, after appropriate structural and magnetic characterization. Irradiated samples were investigated for structural and magnetic properties, as well as for structural stability and cation distribution. The irradiated nanoparticles exhibited structural stability with varied cation distribution and magnetic properties, dependent on gamma radiation dose. Surprisingly samples also exhibited quenching of lattice parameter and particle size. The changes introduced in the cation distribution, lattice constant, particle size and magnetic properties were found to be irreversible with time lapse and were of permanent nature exhibiting good stability even after several months. Thus the useful properties of nanoparticles could be enhanced on modifying the cation distribution inside the nanoparticles by application of gamma radiation. - Highlights: • Mn x Zn 1−x Fe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were synthesized using auto combustion method. • The irradiated samples showed a change in cation distribution. • Lattice shrinkage observed due to radiation induced change in cation distribution. • Reduction in particle size was also observed due to gamma exposure. • An enhancement in saturation magnetization was observed in irradiated samples

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles for application in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Banobre-Lopez, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pineiro-Redondo, Y. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Rivas, B., E-mail: jose.rivas@usc.es [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lopez-Quintela, M.A. [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Magnetic particles play nowadays an important role in different technological areas with potential applications in fields such as electronics, energy and biomedicine. In this report we will focus on the hyperthermia properties of magnetite nanoparticles and the effect of several chemical/physical parameters on their heating properties. We will discuss about the need of searching new smaller magnetic systems in order to fulfill the required physical properties which allow treating tumoral tissues more efficiently by means of magnetically induced heat. Preliminary results will be shown about the effect of a biocompatible shell of core-shell magnetite NPs on the heating properties by application of a RF magnetic field.

  10. The Role of Diffusion-Controlled Growth in the Formation of Uniform Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with a Link to Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolková, I. S.; Kazantseva, N.E.; Babayan, V.; Vilcakova, J.; Pizúrová, Naděžda; Sáha, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2017), s. 2323-2332 ISSN 1528-7483 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : DIPOLAR INTERACTIONS * MONODISPERSE NANOCRYSTALS * HEAT-GENERATION * FIELD * PARTICLES * MODEL * THERMOTHERAPY * OPTIMIZATION * FEASIBILITY * ASSEMBLIES Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.055, year: 2016

  11. Magnetic field induced incommensurate resonance in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingge; Cheng Li; Guo Huaiming; Feng Shiping

    2009-01-01

    The influence of a uniform external magnetic field on the dynamical spin response of cuprate superconductors in the superconducting state is studied based on the kinetic energy driven superconducting mechanism. It is shown that the magnetic scattering around low and intermediate energies is dramatically changed with a modest external magnetic field. With increasing the external magnetic field, although the incommensurate magnetic scattering from both low and high energies is rather robust, the commensurate magnetic resonance scattering peak is broadened. The part of the spin excitation dispersion seems to be an hourglass-like dispersion, which breaks down at the heavily low energy regime. The theory also predicts that the commensurate resonance scattering at zero external magnetic field is induced into the incommensurate resonance scattering by applying an external magnetic field large enough

  12. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dongwook, E-mail: dongwookleedl324@gmail.com [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Seo, Jiwon, E-mail: jiwonseo@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physics and IPAP, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin [Division of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Cole, Jacqueline M. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Argonne National Laboratory, 9700S Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  13. Regional hyperthermia of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, Z.; Langholz, B.; Astrahan, M.; Emami, B.; Oleson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    From 1981 through 1986, 49 patients with metastatic liver tumors received deep regional hyperthermia in phase I protocols in six major medical centers in the United States. Adenocarcinoma was seen in 80% of patients with colon as the primary site in 26%. The remaining patients had the following histological diagnoses: Soft tissue sarcoma in seven, malignant melanoma in two and transitional cell carcinoma in one. Deep regional hyperthermia treatments with a BSD-1000 annular phased array were given once or twice a week with a total of 167 treatment sessions, mean 3.4 (range 1 to 8). In addition to deep regional hyperthermia, 17 patients received radiotherapy, and 14 received chemotherapy. The median survival for all patients was 25 weeks. Complete response was obtained in two patients and partial response in four patients. An additional ten patients had nominal response. There was no complete or partial response among the 14 hyperthermia alone treated patients. Of the 26 patients who presented with severe pain, five had complete pain relief, five had partial relief and the majority had a lesser degree of pain relief or no pain relief. Acute treatment toxicity consisted of pain in ten, systemic temperature increase to 39 0 C in four tachycardia in two, claustrophobia in one. The majority of patients did not experience acute toxicity. No late toxicity was recorded in this group of 49 patients. (orig./MG)

  14. Partial body hyperthermia: a potent radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydoun, S.; Alya, GH.; Taleb, M.; Mohammad, A.

    1995-12-01

    With the aim to investigate the potential role of some radioprotectors, partial body hyperthermia (PBH) was tested as a protector against the lethality induced by γ irradiation. Two groups of Wistar rats [gr.(1): Females and gr.(2): Males] were treated with PBH by 'dipping' the lower parts of the animals in water-bath at 43 C for 1 hr. Animals were, then, irradiated with a lethal dose of γ radiation (9 Gy) 20 hrs post PBH. Our results show that: -PHB has a protecting role against the lethality induced by γ irradiation with a protection factor [Survival in rats treated with PBH and radiation / survival in rats treated with radiation] of 10 in gr.(1) and 7 in gr.(2) - The role of PBH was more enhanced in females As compared with males. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Partial Body Hyperthermia: A Potent radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydoun, S.A.; Mohammad, A.; Alya, Gh.; Taleb, M.

    1998-01-01

    With the aim to investigate the potential role of some radioprotectors, partial body hyperthermia (PBH) was tested as a protector against the lethality induced by gamma-irradiation. Two groups of Wistar rats [ gr. (1): females and gr. (2): males] were treated with PBH by dipping the lower parts of the animals in water-bath at 43 degree for 1 hr. Animals were, then, irradiated with a lethal dose of gamma-radiation (9 Gy) 20 hr s post PBH. Our results show that: PBH has a protecting role against the lethality induced by gamma-irradiation with a protection factor [survival in rats treated with PBH and radiation/ survival in rats treated with radiation] of 10 in gr.(1) and 7 in gr. (2). The role of PBH was more enhanced in females as compared with males

  16. Correlation between physical structure and magnetic anisotropy of a magnetic nanoparticle colloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, C. L.; Jackson, A. J.; Borchers, J. A.; Gruettner, C.; Ivkov, R.

    2018-05-01

    We show the effects of a time-invariant magnetic field on the physical structure and magnetic properties of a colloid comprising 44 nm diameter magnetite magnetic nanoparticles, with a 24 nm dextran shell, in water. Structural ordering in this colloid parallel to the magnetic field occurs simultaneously with the onset of a colloidal uniaxial anisotropy. Further increases in the applied magnetic field cause the nanoparticles to order perpendicular to the field, producing unexpected colloidal unidirectional and trigonal anisotropies. This magnetic behavior is distinct from the cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the magnetite and has its origins in the magnetic interactions among the mobile nanoparticles within the colloid. Specifically, these field-induced anisotropies and colloidal rearrangements result from the delicate balance between the magnetostatic and steric forces between magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetic and structural rearrangements are anticipated to influence applications that rely upon time-dependent relaxation of the magnetic colloids and fluid viscosity, such as magnetic hyperthermia and shock absorption.

  17. γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by sol–gel with large nanoparticles size for magnetic hyperthermia application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemine, O.M., E-mail: leminej@yahoo.com [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Omri, K. [Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Faculty of Sciences in Gabes, Gabes (Tunisia); Iglesias, M.; Velasco, V. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC (Spain); Crespo, P.; Presa, P. de la [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-ADIF-CSIC (Spain); Dpto. Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); El Mir, L. [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Faculty of Sciences in Gabes, Gabes (Tunisia); Bouzid, Houcine [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Laboratoire des Matériaux Ferroélectriques, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Route Soukra Km 3 5, B.P. 802, F-3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Yousif, A. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Code 123, Al Khoud (Oman); Al-Hajry, Ali [Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Iron oxides nanoparticles with different sizes are successfully synthesized using sol–gel method. • The obtained nanoparticles are mainly composed of maghemite phase (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). • A non-negligible coercive field suggests that the particles are ferromagnetic. • A mean heating efficiency of 30 W/g is obtained for the smallest particles at 110 kHz and 190 Oe. - Abstract: Iron oxides nanoparticles with different sizes are successfully synthesized using sol–gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy show that the obtained nanoparticles are mainly composed of maghemite phase (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results suggest that the nanoparticles have sizes ranging from 14 to 30 nm, which are indeed confirmed by large magnetic saturation and high blocking temperature. At room temperature, the observation of a non-negligible coercive field suggests that the particles are ferro/ferrimagnetic. The specific absorption rate (SAR) under an alternating magnetic field is investigated as a function of size, frequency and amplitude of the applied magnetic field. A mean heating efficiency of 30 W/g is obtained for the smallest particles at 110 kHz and 190 Oe, whereas further increase of particle size does not improve significantly the heating efficiency.

  18. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Anthony C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Cooley, Victoria [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC-type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first-order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  19. Interface-induced phenomena in magnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellman, Frances; Hoffmann, A.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Beach, Geoffrey S.D.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Leighton, Chris; Macdonald, Allan H.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Arena, Dario A.; Dürr, Hermann A.; Fischer, Peter; Grollier, Julie; Heremans, Joseph P.; Jungwirth, Tomas; Kimel, Alexey V.; Koopmans, B.; Krivorotov, Ilya N.; May, Steven J.; Petford-Long, Amanda K.; Rondinelli, James M.; Samarth, Nitin; Schuller, Ivan K.; Slavin, Andrei N.; Stiles, Mark D.; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Thiaville, André; Zink, Barry L.

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on

  20. Magnetic and bioactivity evaluation of ferrimagnetic ZnFe 2O 4 containing glass ceramics for the hyperthermia treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Hashmi, M. U.; Alam, S.; Shamim, A.

    2010-02-01

    Glass ceramics of the composition xZnO·25Fe 2O 3·(40- x)SiO 2·25CaO·7P 2O 5·3Na 2O were prepared by the melt-quench method using oxy-acetylene flame. Glass-powder compacts were sintered at 1100 °C for 3 h and then rapidly cooled at -10 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed 3 prominent crystalline phases: ZnFe 2O 4, CaSiO 3 and Ca 10(PO 4) 6(OH) 2. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) data at 10 KOe and 500 Oe showed that saturation magnetization, coercivity and hence hysteresis area increased with the increase in ZnO content. Nano-sized ZnFe 2O 4 crystallites were of pseudo-single domain structure and thus coercivity increased with the increase in crystallite size. ZnFe 2O 4 exhibited ferrimagnetism due to the random distribution of Zn 2+ and Fe 3+ cations at tetrahedral A sites and octahedral B sites. This inversion/random distribution of cations was probably due to the surface effects of nano-ZnFe 2O 4 and rapid cooling of the material from 1100 °C (thus preserving the high temperature state of the random distribution of cations). Calorimetric measurements were carried out using magnetic induction furnace at 500 Oe magnetic field and 400 KHz frequency. The data showed that maximum specific power loss and temperature increase after 2 min were 26 W/g and 37 °C, respectively for the sample containing 10% ZnO. The samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 3 weeks. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and XRD results confirmed the growth of precipitated hydroxyapatite phase after immersion in SBF, suggesting that the ferrimagnetic glass ceramics were bioactive and could bond to the living tissues in physiological environment.

  1. Magnetic and bioactivity evaluation of ferrimagnetic ZnFe2O4 containing glass ceramics for the hyperthermia treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Hashmi, M.U.; Alam, S.; Shamim, A.

    2010-01-01

    Glass ceramics of the composition xZnO.25Fe 2 O 3 .(40-x)SiO 2 .25CaO.7P 2 O 5 .3Na 2 O were prepared by the melt-quench method using oxy-acetylene flame. Glass-powder compacts were sintered at 1100 deg. C for 3 h and then rapidly cooled at -10 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed 3 prominent crystalline phases: ZnFe 2 O 4 , CaSiO 3 and Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) data at 10 KOe and 500 Oe showed that saturation magnetization, coercivity and hence hysteresis area increased with the increase in ZnO content. Nano-sized ZnFe 2 O 4 crystallites were of pseudo-single domain structure and thus coercivity increased with the increase in crystallite size. ZnFe 2 O 4 exhibited ferrimagnetism due to the random distribution of Zn 2+ and Fe 3+ cations at tetrahedral A sites and octahedral B sites. This inversion/random distribution of cations was probably due to the surface effects of nano-ZnFe 2 O 4 and rapid cooling of the material from 1100 deg. C (thus preserving the high temperature state of the random distribution of cations). Calorimetric measurements were carried out using magnetic induction furnace at 500 Oe magnetic field and 400 KHz frequency. The data showed that maximum specific power loss and temperature increase after 2 min were 26 W/g and 37 deg. C, respectively for the sample containing 10% ZnO. The samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 3 weeks. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and XRD results confirmed the growth of precipitated hydroxyapatite phase after immersion in SBF, suggesting that the ferrimagnetic glass ceramics were bioactive and could bond to the living tissues in physiological environment.

  2. Hyaluronic Acid-Modified Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for MR Imaging of Surgically Induced Endometriosis Model in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Guofu; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine, which may affect nearly 60% of women in reproductive age. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) defined as an endometriotic lesion penetrating into the retroperitoneal space or the wall of the pelvic organs to a depth of at least 5 mm represents the most diagnostic challenge. Herein, we reported the use of hyaluronic acid (HA)-modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (HA-Fe3O4 NPs) for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of endometriotic lesions in the rodent model. Sixteen endometriotic lesions were surgically induced in eight rats by autologous transplantation. Four weeks after lesion induction, three rats were scanned via MR imaging after tail vein injection of the HA-Fe3O4 NPs. Accordingly, the remaining five mice were sacrificed in the corresponding time points. The ectopic uterine tissues (EUTs) were confirmed by histological analysis. Quantification of Fe in the EUT was also performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Our results showed that by using the HA-Fe3O4 NPs, the EUTs were able to be visualized via T2-weighted MR imaging at 2 hours post injection, corroborating the Prussian blue staining results. The developed HA-Fe3O4 NPs could be used as negative contrast agents for sensitively detecting endometriosis in a mouse model and may be applied for future hyperthermia treatment of endometriosis. PMID:24722347

  3. Hyaluronic acid-modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MR imaging of surgically induced endometriosis model in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhang

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is defined as the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine, which may affect nearly 60% of women in reproductive age. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE defined as an endometriotic lesion penetrating into the retroperitoneal space or the wall of the pelvic organs to a depth of at least 5 mm represents the most diagnostic challenge. Herein, we reported the use of hyaluronic acid (HA-modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (HA-Fe3O4 NPs for magnetic resonance (MR imaging of endometriotic lesions in the rodent model. Sixteen endometriotic lesions were surgically induced in eight rats by autologous transplantation. Four weeks after lesion induction, three rats were scanned via MR imaging after tail vein injection of the HA-Fe3O4 NPs. Accordingly, the remaining five mice were sacrificed in the corresponding time points. The ectopic uterine tissues (EUTs were confirmed by histological analysis. Quantification of Fe in the EUT was also performed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Our results showed that by using the HA-Fe3O4 NPs, the EUTs were able to be visualized via T2-weighted MR imaging at 2 hours post injection, corroborating the Prussian blue staining results. The developed HA-Fe3O4 NPs could be used as negative contrast agents for sensitively detecting endometriosis in a mouse model and may be applied for future hyperthermia treatment of endometriosis.

  4. Current-induced magnetization dynamics in nanomagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertotti, G.; Serpico, C.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Bonin, R.; D'Aquino, M.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of the various approaches that have been proposed for the interpretation of spin-transfer-driven magnetization dynamics. Models of critical currents and critical fields for switching as well as for the onset of magnetization oscillations are discussed, together with methods for the construction of field-current stability diagrams. Finally, the role of thermal fluctuations is analyzed. Particular emphasis is given to the study of uniformly magnetized nanomagnets, which represents an essential step before moving to the numerical computation of more complex micromagnetic configurations

  5. Current-induced magnetization dynamics in nanomagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertotti, G. [INRIM-Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy)]. E-mail: g.bertotti@inrim.it; Serpico, C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Universita degli Studi Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Mayergoyz, I.D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bonin, R. [INRIM-Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); D' Aquino, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Universita degli Studi Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    An overview is given of the various approaches that have been proposed for the interpretation of spin-transfer-driven magnetization dynamics. Models of critical currents and critical fields for switching as well as for the onset of magnetization oscillations are discussed, together with methods for the construction of field-current stability diagrams. Finally, the role of thermal fluctuations is analyzed. Particular emphasis is given to the study of uniformly magnetized nanomagnets, which represents an essential step before moving to the numerical computation of more complex micromagnetic configurations.

  6. Magnetic and bioactivity evaluation of ferrimagnetic ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} containing glass ceramics for the hyperthermia treatment of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Saqlain A., E-mail: saqlain007pk@hotmail.co [Biomaterials Lab, Department of Physics, GC University Lahore (Pakistan); Hashmi, M.U. [Biomaterials Lab, Department of Physics, GC University Lahore (Pakistan); Alam, S. [PITMAEM, PCSIR Lahore (Pakistan); Shamim, A. [Biomaterials Lab, Department of Physics, GC University Lahore (Pakistan)

    2010-02-15

    Glass ceramics of the composition xZnO.25Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.(40-x)SiO{sub 2}.25CaO.7P{sub 2}O{sub 5}.3Na{sub 2}O were prepared by the melt-quench method using oxy-acetylene flame. Glass-powder compacts were sintered at 1100 deg. C for 3 h and then rapidly cooled at -10 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed 3 prominent crystalline phases: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CaSiO{sub 3} and Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) data at 10 KOe and 500 Oe showed that saturation magnetization, coercivity and hence hysteresis area increased with the increase in ZnO content. Nano-sized ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystallites were of pseudo-single domain structure and thus coercivity increased with the increase in crystallite size. ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} exhibited ferrimagnetism due to the random distribution of Zn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} cations at tetrahedral A sites and octahedral B sites. This inversion/random distribution of cations was probably due to the surface effects of nano-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and rapid cooling of the material from 1100 deg. C (thus preserving the high temperature state of the random distribution of cations). Calorimetric measurements were carried out using magnetic induction furnace at 500 Oe magnetic field and 400 KHz frequency. The data showed that maximum specific power loss and temperature increase after 2 min were 26 W/g and 37 deg. C, respectively for the sample containing 10% ZnO. The samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 3 weeks. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and XRD results confirmed the growth of precipitated hydroxyapatite phase after immersion in SBF, suggesting that the ferrimagnetic glass ceramics were bioactive and could bond to the living tissues in physiological environment.

  7. Preparation of magnetic and bioactive calcium zinc iron silicon oxide composite for hyperthermia treatment of bone cancer and repair of bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yumin; Ou, Jun; Zhang, Zhanhe; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, a calcium zinc iron silicon oxide composite (CZIS) was prepared using the sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was then employed to test the CZIS composite. The results from the test showed that the CZIS had three prominent crystalline phases: Ca(2)Fe(1.7)Zn(0.15)Si(0.15)O(5), Ca(2)SiO(4), and ZnFe(2)O(4). Calorimetric measurements were then performed using a magnetic induction furnace. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis were conducted to confirm the growth of a precipitated hydroxyapatite phase after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Cell culture experiments were also carried out, showing that the CZIS composite more visibly promoted osteoblast proliferation than ZnFe(2)O(4) glass ceramic and HA, and osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surfaces of composite samples.

  8. Synthesis of aqueous ferrofluids of ZnxFe3−xO4 nanoparticles by citric acid assisted hydrothermal-reduction route for magnetic hyperthermia applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behdadfar, Behshid; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Mozaffari, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic and monodispersed aqueous ferrofluids of Zn substituted magnetite nanoparticles (Zn x Fe 3−x O 4 , x=0, 0.25, 0.3, 0.37 and 0.4) were synthesized via hydrothermal-reduction route in the presence of citric acid, which is a facile, low energy and environmental friendly method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and the dynamic light scattering (DLS) method. The results showed that a certain amount of citric acid was required to obtain single phase Zn substituted magnetite nanoparticles. Citric acid acted as a modulator and reducing agent in the formation of spinel structure and controlled nanoparticle size and crystallinity. Mean particle sizes of the prepared nanoparticles were around 10 nm. The results that are obtained from XRD, magnetic and power loss measurements showed that the crystallinity, saturation magnetization (M S ) and loss power of the synthesized ferrofluids were all influenced by the substitution of Zn in the structure of magnetite. The Zn substituted magnetite nanoparticles obtained by this route showed a good stability in aqueous medium (pH 7) and hydrodynamic sizes below 100 nm and polydispersity indexes below 0.2. The calculated intrinsic loss power (ILP) for the sample x=0.3 (e.g. 2.36 nH m 2 /kg) was comparable to ILP of commercial ferrofluids with similar hydrodynamic sizes. - Highlights: ► We synthesized Zn substituted magnetite nanoparticles via hydrothermal-reduction route. ► We used citric acid as a reducing agent in this route. ► This route is a facile, low energy and environmental friendly method. ► The nanoparticles obtained by this route were superparamagnetic and stable in water. ► The calculated intrinsic loss power for the sample x=0.3 was 2.36 nH m 2 /kg.

  9. Can earth's magnetic micropulsations induce brain activities modifications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Altair Souza de

    2008-01-01

    Full text: We present in this paper preliminary study on which level earth's magnetic micro pulsations might interact with human brain activities. Magnetic micro pulsations are magnetospheric plasma wave Eigenmodes that are generated at the earth's magnetosphere and, via magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling induce ionospheric currents, and this ionospheric current pattern creates surface geomagnetic perturbations, which induce earth's surface electrical currents, and they are easily detected by earth's based magnetometers. These Eigenmodes are basically of Alfven type, and can be generated, for instance, by magnetic storms, situation where they are more intense and, in principle, might be felt by a more sensible human brain. Here, we also show how the modes are generated and present theirs basic physical properties. Finally, we compare the magnetic field level at the brain with the micro pulsation magnetic intensity. (author)

  10. Current-induced switching in a magnetic insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Can Onur; Quindeau, Andy; Pai, Chi-Feng; Mann, Maxwell; Caretta, Lucas; Tang, Astera S.; Onbasli, Mehmet C.; Ross, Caroline A.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2017-03-01

    The spin Hall effect in heavy metals converts charge current into pure spin current, which can be injected into an adjacent ferromagnet to exert a torque. This spin-orbit torque (SOT) has been widely used to manipulate the magnetization in metallic ferromagnets. In the case of magnetic insulators (MIs), although charge currents cannot flow, spin currents can propagate, but current-induced control of the magnetization in a MI has so far remained elusive. Here we demonstrate spin-current-induced switching of a perpendicularly magnetized thulium iron garnet film driven by charge current in a Pt overlayer. We estimate a relatively large spin-mixing conductance and damping-like SOT through spin Hall magnetoresistance and harmonic Hall measurements, respectively, indicating considerable spin transparency at the Pt/MI interface. We show that spin currents injected across this interface lead to deterministic magnetization reversal at low current densities, paving the road towards ultralow-dissipation spintronic devices based on MIs.

  11. Functionalization of Strongly Interacting Magnetic Nanocubes with (Thermo)responsive Coating and their Application in Hyperthermia and Heat-Triggered Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Kakwere, Hamilton

    2015-04-03

    Herein we prepare nanohybrids by incorporating iron oxide nanocubes (cubic-IONPs) within a thermo-responsive polymer shell that can act as drug carriers for doxorubicin(doxo). The cubic-shaped nanoparticles employed are at the interface between superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behavior and have an exceptionally high specific absorption rate (SAR) but their functionalization is extremely challenging compared to bare superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as they strongly interact with each other. By conducting the polymer grafting reaction using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization in a viscous solvent medium, we have here developed a facile approach to decorate the nanocubes with stimuli-responsive polymers. When the thermo-responsive shell is composed of poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-polyethylene glycolmethylether acrylate), nanohybrids have a phase transition temperature, the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), above 37 °C in physiological conditions. Doxo loaded nanohybrids exhibited a negligible drug release below 37 °C but showed a consistent release of their cargo on demand by exploiting the capability of the nanocubes to generate heat under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Moreover, the drug free nanocarrier does not exhibit cytotoxicity even when administered at high concentration of nanocubes (1g/L of iron) and internalized at high extent (260 pg of iron per cell). We have also implemented the synthesis protocol to decorate the surface of nanocubes with poly(vinylpyridine) polymer and thus prepare pH-responsive shell coated nanocubes.

  12. Functionalization of Strongly Interacting Magnetic Nanocubes with (Thermo)responsive Coating and their Application in Hyperthermia and Heat-Triggered Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Kakwere, Hamilton; Pernia Leal, Manuel; Materia, Maria-Elena; Curcio, Alberto; Guardia, Pablo; Niculaes, Dina; Marotta, Roberto; Falqui, Andrea; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Herein we prepare nanohybrids by incorporating iron oxide nanocubes (cubic-IONPs) within a thermo-responsive polymer shell that can act as drug carriers for doxorubicin(doxo). The cubic-shaped nanoparticles employed are at the interface between superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behavior and have an exceptionally high specific absorption rate (SAR) but their functionalization is extremely challenging compared to bare superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as they strongly interact with each other. By conducting the polymer grafting reaction using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization in a viscous solvent medium, we have here developed a facile approach to decorate the nanocubes with stimuli-responsive polymers. When the thermo-responsive shell is composed of poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-polyethylene glycolmethylether acrylate), nanohybrids have a phase transition temperature, the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), above 37 °C in physiological conditions. Doxo loaded nanohybrids exhibited a negligible drug release below 37 °C but showed a consistent release of their cargo on demand by exploiting the capability of the nanocubes to generate heat under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Moreover, the drug free nanocarrier does not exhibit cytotoxicity even when administered at high concentration of nanocubes (1g/L of iron) and internalized at high extent (260 pg of iron per cell). We have also implemented the synthesis protocol to decorate the surface of nanocubes with poly(vinylpyridine) polymer and thus prepare pH-responsive shell coated nanocubes.

  13. A review of radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Adib J.

    2018-05-01

    Radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent magnets is important for a number of applications including space missions, particle accelerators and robots designed to carry out rescue missions at nuclear accidents where magnet failure can lead to serious consequences. This topic has been studied by several investigators over the past three decades and in this work, a review of the available literature is conducted and some general conclusions and trends are presented. In short, it can be gleaned that magnetism loss is dependent on the type of radiation, the energy of the incoming particle and the overall dose or fluence. Furthermore, magnetism loss also shows a dependence on the type of the irradiated magnet, the coercivity of the magnet, the demagnetizing field and the temperature of irradiation.

  14. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  15. Detection of the Magnetic Easy Direction in Steels Using Induced Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard M. Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional manufacturing processes cause plastic deformation that leads to magnetic anisotropy in processed materials. A deeper understanding of materials characterization under rotational magnetization enables engineers to optimize the overall volume, mass, and performance of devices such as electrical machines in industry. Therefore, it is important to find the magnetic easy direction of the magnetic domains in a simple and straightforward manner. The Magnetic easy direction can be obtained through destructive tests such as the Epstein frame method and the Single Sheet Tester by taking measurements in regions of irreversible magnetization usually called domains. In the present work, samples of rolled SAE 1045 steel (formed by perlite and ferrite microstructures were submitted to induced magnetic fields in the reversibility region of magnetic domains to detect the magnetic easy direction. The magnetic fields were applied to circular samples with different thicknesses and angles varying from 0° to 360° with steps of 45°. A square sample with a fixed thickness was also tested. The results showed that the proposed non-destructive approach is promising to evaluate the magnetic anisotropy in steels independently of the geometry of the sample. The region studied presented low induction losses and was affected by magnetic anisotropy, which did not occur in other works that only took into account regions of high induction losses.

  16. Magnetic memory signals variation induced by applied magnetic field and static tensile stress in ferromagnetic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haihong; Yang, Cheng; Qian, Zhengchun; Han, Gang; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Stress can induce a spontaneous magnetic field in ferromagnetic steel under the excitation of geomagnetic field. In order to investigate the impact of applied magnetic field and tensile stress on variation of the residual magnetic signals on the surface of ferromagnetic materials, static tensile tests of Q235 structural steel were carried out, with the normal component of the residual magnetic signals, H p (y), induced by applied magnetic fields with different intensities measured through the tensile tests. The H p (y), its slope coefficient K S and maximum gradient K max changing with the applied magnetic field H and tensile stress were observed. Results show that the magnitude of H p (y) and its slope coefficient K S increase linearly with the increase of stress in the elastic deformation stage. Under yield stress, H p (y) and K S reach its maximum, and then decrease slightly with further increase of stress. Applied magnetic field affects the magnitude of H p (y) instead of changing the signal curve′s profile; and the magnitude of H p (y), K S , K max and the change rate of K S increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. The phenomenon is also discussed from the viewpoint of magnetic charge in ferromagnetic materials. - Highlights: • We investigated how applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact H p (y) signals. • Magnitude of H p (y), K S and K max increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. • Both applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact material magnetic permeability. • Applied magnetic field can help to evaluate the stress distribution of components.

  17. Magnetic memory signals variation induced by applied magnetic field and static tensile stress in ferromagnetic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haihong, E-mail: huanghaihong@hfut.edu.cn; Yang, Cheng; Qian, Zhengchun; Han, Gang; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-10-15

    Stress can induce a spontaneous magnetic field in ferromagnetic steel under the excitation of geomagnetic field. In order to investigate the impact of applied magnetic field and tensile stress on variation of the residual magnetic signals on the surface of ferromagnetic materials, static tensile tests of Q235 structural steel were carried out, with the normal component of the residual magnetic signals, H{sub p}(y), induced by applied magnetic fields with different intensities measured through the tensile tests. The H{sub p}(y), its slope coefficient K{sub S} and maximum gradient K{sub max} changing with the applied magnetic field H and tensile stress were observed. Results show that the magnitude of H{sub p}(y) and its slope coefficient K{sub S} increase linearly with the increase of stress in the elastic deformation stage. Under yield stress, H{sub p}(y) and K{sub S} reach its maximum, and then decrease slightly with further increase of stress. Applied magnetic field affects the magnitude of H{sub p}(y) instead of changing the signal curve′s profile; and the magnitude of H{sub p}(y), K{sub S}, K{sub max} and the change rate of K{sub S} increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. The phenomenon is also discussed from the viewpoint of magnetic charge in ferromagnetic materials. - Highlights: • We investigated how applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact H{sub p}(y) signals. • Magnitude of H{sub p}(y), K{sub S} and K{sub max} increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. • Both applied magnetic field and tensile stress impact material magnetic permeability. • Applied magnetic field can help to evaluate the stress distribution of components.

  18. Interface-induced phenomena in magnetism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellman, F.; Hoffmann, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Beach, G.S. D.; Fullerton, E.E.; Leighton, Ch.; MacDonald, A. H.; Ralph, D.C.; Arena, D.A.; Dürr, H.A.; Fischer, P.; Grollier, J.; Heremans, J.P.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Kimel, A.V.; Koopmans, B.; Krivorotov, I.N.; May, S.J.; Petford-Long, A.K.; Rondinelli, J.M.; Samarth, N.; Schuller, I.K.; Slavin, A.N.; Stiles, M.D.; Tchernyshyov, O.; Thiaville, A.; Zink, B.L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-79, č. článku 025006. ISSN 0034-6861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetism * interface s * spin-dynamics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 36.917, year: 2016

  19. Thermal and magnetic properties of iron oxide colloids: influence of surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I P Soares, Paula; Lochte, Frederik; Echeverria, Coro; M M Ferreira, Isabel; P M R Borges, João; C J Pereira, Laura; T Coutinho, Joana; M M Novo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively studied in the last few decades for several biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic drug delivery and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is a technique used for cancer treatment which consists in inducing a temperature of about 41–45 °C in cancerous cells through magnetic NPs and an external magnetic field. Chemical precipitation was used to produce iron oxide NPs 9 nm in size coated with oleic acid and trisodium citrate. The influence of both stabilizers on the heating ability and in vitro cytotoxicity of the produced iron oxide NPs was assessed. Physicochemical characterization of the samples confirmed that the used surfactants do not change the particles’ average size and that the presence of the surfactants has a strong effect on both the magnetic properties and the heating ability. The heating ability of Fe_3O_4 NPs shows a proportional increase with the increase of iron concentration, although when coated with trisodium citrate or oleic acid the heating ability decreases. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that both pristine and trisodium citrate Fe_3O_4 samples do not reduce cell viability. However, oleic acid Fe_3O_4 strongly reduces cell viability, more drastically in the SaOs-2 cell line. The produced iron oxide NPs are suitable for cancer hyperthermia treatment and the use of a surfactant brings great advantages concerning the dispersion of NPs, also allowing better control of the hyperthermia temperature. (paper)

  20. Depth of origin of ocean-circulation-induced magnetic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgang, Christopher; Saynisch-Wagner, Jan; Thomas, Maik

    2018-01-01

    As the world ocean moves through the ambient geomagnetic core field, electric currents are generated in the entire ocean basin. These oceanic electric currents induce weak magnetic signals that are principally observable outside of the ocean and allow inferences about large-scale oceanic transports of water, heat, and salinity. The ocean-induced magnetic field is an integral quantity and, to first order, it is proportional to depth-integrated and conductivity-weighted ocean currents. However, the specific contribution of oceanic transports at different depths to the motional induction process remains unclear and is examined in this study. We show that large-scale motional induction due to the general ocean circulation is dominantly generated by ocean currents in the upper 2000 m of the ocean basin. In particular, our findings allow relating regional patterns of the oceanic magnetic field to corresponding oceanic transports at different depths. Ocean currents below 3000 m, in contrast, only contribute a small fraction to the ocean-induced magnetic signal strength with values up to 0.2 nT at sea surface and less than 0.1 nT at the Swarm satellite altitude. Thereby, potential satellite observations of ocean-circulation-induced magnetic signals are found to be likely insensitive to deep ocean currents. Furthermore, it is shown that annual temporal variations of the ocean-induced magnetic field in the region of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current contain information about sub-surface ocean currents below 1000 m with intra-annual periods. Specifically, ocean currents with sub-monthly periods dominate the annual temporal variability of the ocean-induced magnetic field.

  1. Magnetic vortices in nanocaps induced by curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgawad, Ahmed M.; Nambiar, Nikhil; Bapna, Mukund; Chen, Hao; Majetich, Sara A.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with room temperature remanent magnetic vortices stabilized by their curvature are very intriguing due to their potential use in biomedicine. In the present study, we investigate room temperature magnetic chirality in 100 nm diameter permalloy spherical caps with 10 nm and 30 nm thicknesses. Micromagnetic OOMMF simulations predict the equilibrium spin structure for these caps to form a vortex state. We fabricate the permalloy caps by sputtering permalloy on both close-packed and sparse arrays of polystyrene nanoparticles. Magnetic force microscopy scans show a clear signature of a vortex state in close-packed caps of both 10 nm and 30 nm thicknesses. Alternating gradient magnetometry measurements of the caps are consistent with a remnant vortex state in 30 nm thick caps and a transition to an onion state followed by a vortex state in 10 nm thick caps. Out-of-plane measurements supported by micromagnetic simulations shows that an out-of-plane field can stabilize a vortex state down to a diameter of 15 nm.

  2. Desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in vitro by thymus and spleen cells of the rat after hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempel, K.; Spath, A.

    1988-03-01

    The inhibition of the semiconservative and restorative DNA synthesis caused by hyperthermia (30 to 60 min, 43/sup 0/C) was significantly higher in spleen cells than in thymus cells. The DNA repair synthesis of thymus cells measured at 37/sup 0/C was increased by about two times the initial value after a pre-incubation of 30 to 90 min and 30 to 60 min, respectively, with 37 and 43/sup 0/C, respectively. Under the same conditions, the /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of spleen cells diminished proportionally to the pre-incubation time after a pre-incubation of 30 and 45 min, respectively, with 43 and 37/sup 0/C, respectively. When hyperthermia and inhibitors of DNA synthesis or DNA repair (hydroxyurea, 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, 3', 5'-didesoxythymidine, and 3-aminobenzamide) were combined, overadditive effects - without cellspecific particularities - were seen only in the case of 3-aminobenzamide. Only in thymus cells, the inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II novobiocin caused an overadditive reinforcement of the inhibition induced by hyperthermia of the semiconservative DNA synthesis. The stimulation of DNA repair synthesis in thymus cells caused by novobiocin with the aid of DNA polymerase ..beta.. could be compensated by hyperthermia. The sedimentation of thymus and spleen cell nucleoids was increased after hyperthermia. The results suggest a special importance of DNA topology and of the DNA polymerase ..beta.. activity for the cellular effect of hyperthermia.

  3. Effect of hyperthermia in combination with radiation therapy in a rat glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Masaru; Zama, Akira; Kunimine, Hideo; Tamaki, Yoshio; Niibe, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    Rat glioma model was used to evaluate the effect of hyperthermia with and without radiation therapy. The animal model was induced by left frontal burr hole opening and inoculation of a small piece of G-XII glioma tissue to 6- to 8-week-old rats. The therapeutical experiments were given 10 - 14 days after inoculation of the tumor. Interstitial heating at 44 and 45 deg C at the surface of the inserting probe using 2450 MHz microwave was delivered for 30 minutes. Deep X-ray whole head irradiation of 800 R using Stabilipan 2 (Siemens) was given just after the hyperthermia therapy. The survival of treated animals of hyperthermia, radiation, and combination of hyperthermia and radiation was significantly superior to that of non-treated control group. There was no significant difference of survival among the treated groups, though median survival was longest in the group of combination therapy of hyperthermia and radiation. Large tumors developed at the time of death in all the control and the treated animals. Histological examination showed some tendencies of macrophage infiltration in tumor tissue of hyperthermia therapy. (author)

  4. The individual and combined effects of γ rays and hyperthermia on the development of embryonic brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yepeng; Ruan Ming; Liu Jingyuan; Hong Min; Lu Chunlin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To observe the individual and combined effects of exposure to γ rays and hyperthermia on the development of embryonic brains. Methods: the pregnant LACA mice were exposed to 1.0 Gy 60 Co-γ rays, 42 degree C hyperthermia for 10 minutes or the two treatments combined together on day 9 of pregnancy. The females were sacrificed on day 18 of pregnancy and the fetuses were gained by cesarean section. The appearance of fetuses was observed and, then, the weight of fetal brains, the cell number of whole brains, the contents of nucleic acid and protein in brain tissue and the activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) in brain tissue as a marker for cholinergic neurons were determined. Results: Nervous tube defects did not occur in all groups. Compared with the control group, all the indices determined significantly declined in the radiation group while the cell number of whole brains and the AChE activity in brain tissue significantly decreased in the hyperthermia group. In the group of hyperthermia in advance, 4 hours later, followed by exposure to radiation, the AChE activity in brain tissue was significantly higher than the single radiation group. In the group of prior radiation exposure, 4 hours later, followed by hyperthermia, all the indices did not present significant difference from the single radiation group. Conclusion: The effects of 42 degree C hyperthermia for 10 minutes on the development of mouse embryo's brains are much weaker than 1.0 Gy γ radiation. It seems that the hyperthermia in advance can induce mouse fetuses to produce the cross adaptability to the following exposure to radiation. Exposure to γ radiation followed by hyperthermia does not present and additive action or a synergistic action

  5. On the improvement of regional hyperthermia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia is an adjuvant treatment modality to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, with the aim of increasing the tumour killing effect of the treatment. It involves the elevation of the tumour temperature to ~ 42oC. Radiofrequent heating is a practical method for hyperthermia: a number of

  6. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenxian, E-mail: wl240@uowmail.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751 (Australia); Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tian, Dongliang [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  7. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  8. Magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coatings from one-pot synthesized hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hongxia; Xue, Yuhua; Wang, Xungai; Lin, Tong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we report on the production of superhydrophobic coatings on various substrates (e.g., glass slide, silicon wafer, aluminum foil, plastic film, nanofiber mat, textile fabrics) using hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles and a magnet-assembly technique. Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with a thin layer of fluoroalkyl silica on the surface were synthesized by one-step coprecipitation of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) under an alkaline condition in the presence of a fluorinated alkyl silane. Under a magnetic field, the magnetic nanoparticles can be easily deposited on any solid substrate to form a thin superhydrophobic coating with water contact angle as high as 172 degrees , and the surface superhydrophobicity showed very little dependence on the substrate type. The particulate coating showed reasonable durability because of strong aggregation effect of nanoparticles, but the coating layer can be removed (e.g., by ultrasonication) to restore the original surface feature of the substrates. By comparison, the thin particle layer deposited under no magnetic field showed much lower hydrophobicity. The main reason for magnet-induced superhydrophobic surfaces is the formation of nano- and microstructured surface features. Such a magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coating may have wide applications in electronic, biomedical, and defense-related areas.

  9. Disorder-induced microscopic magnetic memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, M.S.; Buechler, C.R.; Sorensen, L.B.; Turner, J.J.; Kevan, S.D.; Jagla, E.A.; Deutsch, J.M.; Mai, T.; Narayan, O.; Davies, J.E.; Liu, K.; Dunn, J. Hunter; Chesnel, K.M.; Kortright, J.B.; Hellwig, O.; Fullerton, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    Using coherent x-ray speckle metrology, we have measured the influence of disorder on major loop return point memory (RPM) and complementary point memory (CPM) for a series of perpendicular anisotropy Co/Pt multilayer films. In the low disorder limit, the domain structures show no memory with field cycling - no RPM and no CPM. With increasing disorder, we observe the onset and the saturation of both the RPM and the CPM. These results provide the first direct ensemble-sensitive experimental study of the effects of varying disorder on microscopic magnetic memory and are compared against the predictions of existing theories

  10. Preferential radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Samuel; Brown, Stephen L.; Kim, Sang-Hie; Khil, Mark S.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Recent cell culture studies by us and others suggest that some human carcinoma cells are more sensitive to heat than are rodent cells following mild hyperthermia. In studying the cellular mechanism of enhanced thermosensitivity of human tumor cells to hyperthermia, prostatic carcinoma cells of human origin were found to be more sensitive to mild hyperthermia than other human cancer cells. The present study was designed to determine the magnitude of radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia and to examine whether the thermal radiosensitization is related to the intrinsic thermosensitivity of cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Two human prostatic carcinoma cell lines (DU-145 and PC-3) and other carcinoma cells of human origin, in particular, colon (HT-29), breast (MCF-7), lung (A-549), and brain (U-251) were exposed to temperatures of 40-41 deg. C. Single acute dose rate radiation and fractionated radiation were combined with mild hyperthermia to determine thermal radiosensitization. The end point of the study was the colony-forming ability of single-plated cells. Results: DU-145 and PC-3 cells were found to be exceedingly thermosensitive to 41 deg. C for 24 h, relative to other cancer cell lines. Ninety percent of the prostatic cancer cells were killed by a 24 h heat exposure. Prostatic carcinoma cells exposed to a short duration of heating at 41 deg. C for 2 h resulted in a substantial enhancement of radiation-induced cytotoxicity. The thermal enhancement ratios (TERs) of single acute dose radiation following heat treatment 41 deg. C for 2 h were 2.0 in DU-145 cells and 1.4 in PC-3 cells. The TERs of fractionated irradiation combined with continuous heating at 40 deg. C were similarly in the range of 2.1 to 1.4 in prostate carcinoma cells. No significant radiosensitization was observed in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells under the same conditions. Conclusion: The present data suggest that a significant radiosensitization of

  11. Targeted Magnetic Hyperthermia for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    1171:583- 590 . 32. Colell, A., Ricci, J.E., Tait, S., Milasta, S., Maurer, U., Bouchier-Hayes, L., Fitzgerald, P., Guio-Carrion, A., Waterhouse, N.J...and spectroscopic detection with surface-enhanced Raman nanoparticle tags. Nat Biotechnol 2008;26(1):83e90. [7] Lee H, Lee E, Kim do K, Jang NK, Jeong

  12. Magnetic levitation by induced eddy currents in non-magnetic conductors and conductivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iniguez, J; Raposo, V; Flores, A G; Zazo, M; Hernandez-Lopez, A

    2005-01-01

    We report a study on magnetic levitation by induced ac currents in non-magnetic conductors at low frequencies. Our discussion, based on Faraday's induction law, allows us to distinguish the two components of the current responsible for levitation and heating, respectively. The experimental evaluation of the levitation force in a copper ring revealed the accuracy of our analysis, clearly illustrating its asymptotic behaviour versus frequency, and validating it for the qualitative analysis of magnetic levitation and heating in conductors of different shapes such as tubes and discs, composed of collections of conductive loops. The analysis of the results allows precise values of its electrical conductivity to be found. With the help of a simulation technique, this work also reveals the progressive deformation undergone by magnetic induction lines due to magnetic screening when frequency increases

  13. Magnetic levitation by induced eddy currents in non-magnetic conductors and conductivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iniguez, J; Raposo, V; Flores, A G; Zazo, M; Hernandez-Lopez, A [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37071, Salamanca (Spain)

    2005-11-01

    We report a study on magnetic levitation by induced ac currents in non-magnetic conductors at low frequencies. Our discussion, based on Faraday's induction law, allows us to distinguish the two components of the current responsible for levitation and heating, respectively. The experimental evaluation of the levitation force in a copper ring revealed the accuracy of our analysis, clearly illustrating its asymptotic behaviour versus frequency, and validating it for the qualitative analysis of magnetic levitation and heating in conductors of different shapes such as tubes and discs, composed of collections of conductive loops. The analysis of the results allows precise values of its electrical conductivity to be found. With the help of a simulation technique, this work also reveals the progressive deformation undergone by magnetic induction lines due to magnetic screening when frequency increases.

  14. Large-angle magnetization dynamics investigated by vector-resolved magnetization-induced optical second-harmonic generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, T.; Silva, T.J.; Nibarger, J.P.; Rasing, T.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the relationship between nonlinear magnetic responses and the change in the Gilbert damping parameter alpha for patterned and unpatterned thin Permalloy films when subjected to pulsed magnetic fields. An improved magnetization-vector-resolved technique utilizing magnetization-induced

  15. Focused-ion-beam induced interfacial intermixing of magnetic bilayers for nanoscale control of magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, D M; Atkinson, D; Hase, T P A

    2014-01-01

    Modification of the magnetic properties in a thin-film ferromagnetic/non-magnetic bilayer system by low-dose focused ion-beam (FIB) induced intermixing is demonstrated. The highly localized capability of FIB may be used to locally control magnetic behaviour at the nanoscale. The magnetic, electronic and structural properties of NiFe/Au bilayers were investigated as a function of the interfacial structure that was actively modified using focused Ga + ion irradiation. Experimental work used MOKE, SQUID, XMCD as well as magnetoresistance measurements to determine the magnetic behavior and grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity to elucidate the interfacial structure. Interfacial intermixing, induced by low-dose irradiation, is shown to lead to complex changes in the magnetic behavior that are associated with monotonic structural evolution of the interface. This behavior may be explained by changes in the local atomic environment within the interface region resulting in a combination of processes including the loss of moment on Ni and Fe, an induced moment on Au and modifications to the spin-orbit coupling between Au and NiFe. (paper)

  16. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-10-26

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  17. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Upadhyay Kahaly, M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  18. Pressure-induced magnetic transition in CeP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naka, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Mori, N.; Okayama, Y.; Haga, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    1997-01-01

    Pressure dependence of magnetization in CeP is investigated up to 2 GPa. Multi-step transitions are induced by pressure. An antiferromagnetic transition at T N =11 K below 0.1 GPa develops into two (magnetic) transitions at T L and T H in the region of 0.1 L , T H and T d above 1.3 GPa. For decreasing temperature an abrupt increase of magnetization, M(T), has been observed below T H and a round maximum of magnetization appears at T L for P≥0.4 GPa. Above 1.3 GPa, an anomalous decrease of M(T) begins at T d =10 K. Using previously reported 31 P-NMR shift data it is shown that the pressure dependence of a characteristic temperature, which is proportional to the crystal field splitting in the paramagnetic temperature region, decreases rapidly with increasing pressure. (orig.)

  19. Typhoon-Induced Magnetic Disturbances: Cases in the Western Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Hung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three typhoons occurred over the western Pacific in September 2008 and were enhanced beyond category 3 as they approached Taiwan. The geomagnetic total intensity field recorded at 2 local monitoring stations in Taiwan and 1 remote station in Japan was utilized to examine the magnetic disturbances induced by these typhoons. Analytical results show that amplitude changes in the frequency domain, which are retrieved from the total intensity data via the Fourier transform, at the monitoring and remote stations were consistent, even though magnetic storms strongly affected the magnetic field. However, obvious discrepancies were repeatedly found in the amplitudes in the frequency band between 0.0025 - 0.007 Hz, when typhoons of category > 3 were the closest to the monitoring stations. The frequency band is different from the induction fields from either oceanic storm waves or swells, and is consistent with that of magnetic pulsations triggered by acoustic waves from upward air motion during typhoons.

  20. Persistent optically induced magnetism in oxygen-deficient strontium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, W D; Ambwani, P; Bombeck, M; Thompson, J D; Haugstad, G; Leighton, C; Crooker, S A

    2014-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. Although its bulk electronic and optical properties are rich and have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research catalysed in part by the discovery of superconductivity and magnetism at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other non-magnetic oxides. Here we illustrate a new aspect to the phenomenology of magnetism in SrTiO3 by reporting the observation of an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. This zero-field magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable by means of the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects occur only in crystals containing oxygen vacancies, revealing a detailed interplay between magnetism, lattice defects, and light in an archetypal complex oxide material.

  1. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  2. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ~25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and the

  3. Uncertainties in the estimation of specific absorption rate during radiofrequency alternating magnetic field induced non-adiabatic heating of ferrofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, B B; Ranoo, Surojit; Philip, John

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is becoming a viable cancer treatment methodology where the alternating magnetic field induced heating of magnetic fluid is utilized for ablating the cancerous cells or making them more susceptible to the conventional treatments. The heating efficiency in MFH is quantified in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR), which is defined as the heating power generated per unit mass. In majority of the experimental studies, SAR is evaluated from the temperature rise curves, obtained under non-adiabatic experimental conditions, which is prone to various thermodynamic uncertainties. A proper understanding of the experimental uncertainties and its remedies is a prerequisite for obtaining accurate and reproducible SAR. Here, we study the thermodynamic uncertainties associated with peripheral heating, delayed heating, heat loss from the sample and spatial variation in the temperature profile within the sample. Using first order approximations, an adiabatic reconstruction protocol for the measured temperature rise curves is developed for SAR estimation, which is found to be in good agreement with those obtained from the computationally intense slope corrected method. Our experimental findings clearly show that the peripheral and delayed heating are due to radiation heat transfer from the heating coils and slower response time of the sensor, respectively. Our results suggest that the peripheral heating is linearly proportional to the sample area to volume ratio and coil temperature. It is also observed that peripheral heating decreases in presence of a non-magnetic insulating shielding. The delayed heating is found to contribute up to ∼25% uncertainties in SAR values. As the SAR values are very sensitive to the initial slope determination method, explicit mention of the range of linear regression analysis is appropriate to reproduce the results. The effect of sample volume to area ratio on linear heat loss rate is systematically studied and

  4. Solution of magnetic field and eddy current problem induced by rotating magnetic poles (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. J.; Low, T. S.

    1996-04-01

    The magnetic field and eddy current problems induced by rotating permanent magnet poles occur in electromagnetic dampers, magnetic couplings, and many other devices. Whereas numerical techniques, for example, finite element methods can be exploited to study various features of these problems, such as heat generation and drag torque development, etc., the analytical solution is always of interest to the designers since it helps them to gain the insight into the interdependence of the parameters involved and provides an efficient tool for designing. Some of the previous work showed that the solution of the eddy current problem due to the linearly moving magnet poles can give satisfactory approximation for the eddy current problem due to rotating fields. However, in many practical cases, especially when the number of magnet poles is small, there is significant effect of flux focusing due to the geometry. The above approximation can therefore lead to marked errors in the theoretical predictions of the device performance. Bernot et al. recently described an analytical solution in a polar coordinate system where the radial field is excited by a time-varying source. A discussion of an analytical solution of the magnetic field and eddy current problems induced by moving magnet poles in radial field machines will be given in this article. The theoretical predictions obtained from this method is compared with the results obtained from finite element calculations. The validity of the method is also checked by the comparison of the theoretical predictions and the measurements from a test machine. It is shown that the introduced solution leads to a significant improvement in the air gap field prediction as compared with the results obtained from the analytical solution that models the eddy current problems induced by linearly moving magnet poles.

  5. Magnetostrictive hypersound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bychkov, Igor V. [Chelyabinsk State University, 129 Br. Kashirinykh Str., Chelyabinsk 454001 (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), 76 Lenin Prospekt, Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, Dmitry A., E-mail: kuzminda@csu.ru [Chelyabinsk State University, 129 Br. Kashirinykh Str., Chelyabinsk 454001 (Russian Federation); South Ural State University (National Research University), 76 Lenin Prospekt, Chelyabinsk 454080 (Russian Federation); Kamantsev, Alexander P.; Koledov, Victor V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G. [Kotelnikov Institute of Radio-engineering and Electronics of RAS, Mokhovaya Street 11-7, Moscow 125009 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    In present work we have investigated magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition from spiral to collinear state. We found that such magnets may generate transverse sound waves with the wavelength equal to the spiral period. We have examined two types of spiral magnetic structures: with inhomogeneous exchange and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions. Frequency of the waves from exchange-caused spiral magnetic structure may reach some THz, while in case of Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction-caused spiral it may reach some GHz. These waves will be emitted like a sound pulses. Amplitude of the waves is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. Some aspects of microwaves to hypersound transformation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of phase transition have been investigated as well. Results of the work may be interesting for investigation of phase transition kinetics as well, as for various hypersound applications. - Highlights: • Magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets at phase transition (PT) is studied. • Spiral magnets during PT may generate transverse sound with wavelength equal to spiral period. • Amplitude of the sound is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. • Microwave-to-sound transformation in the vicinity of PT is investigated as well.

  6. The effect of magnetic field induced aggregates on ultrasound propagation in aqueous magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R.V.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in the aqueous magnetic fluid is investigated for different particle concentrations. The sound velocity decreases while acoustic impedance increases with increasing concentrations. The velocity anisotropy is observed upon application of magnetic field. The velocity anisotropy fits with Tarapov’s theory suggests the presence of aggregates in the system. We report that these aggregates are thermodynamically unstable and the length of aggregate changes continuously with increasing concentration and, or magnetic field and resulted in a decrease in effective magnetic moment. The Taketomi's theory fits well with the experimental data suggesting that the particle clusters are aligned in the direction of the magnetic field. The radius of cluster found to increase with increasing concentration, and then decreases whereas the elastic force constant increases and then becomes constant. The increase in cluster radius indicates elongation of aggregate length due to tip-to-tip interaction of aggregates whereas for higher concentration, the lateral alignment is more favorable than tip-to-tip alignment of aggregates which reduces the cluster radius making elastic force constant to raise. Optical images show that the chains are fluctuating and confirming the lateral alignment of chains at higher fields. - Highlights: • Magnetic field induced aggregates investigated using ultrasonic wave in aqueous magnetic fluid. • Velocity anisotropy induces upon applications of magnetic field. • Tarapov’s theory fit shows reduction in effective magnetic moment as concentration increases. • Taketomi's theory shows alignment of clusters in field direction. • Cluster radius increases and then decreases with increasing volume fractions. • Optical images show that fluctuating chains and lateral alignment of chains at higher fields.

  7. The effect of magnetic field induced aggregates on ultrasound propagation in aqueous magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parekh, Kinnari, E-mail: kinnariparekh.rnd@charusat.ac.in [Dr. KC Patel R& D Center, Charotar University of Science & Technology, Changa, 388421 Dist. Anand, Gujarat (India); Upadhyay, R.V. [PD Patel Institute of Applied Sciences, Charotar University of Science & Technology, Changa, 388421 Dist. Anand, Gujarat (India)

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in the aqueous magnetic fluid is investigated for different particle concentrations. The sound velocity decreases while acoustic impedance increases with increasing concentrations. The velocity anisotropy is observed upon application of magnetic field. The velocity anisotropy fits with Tarapov’s theory suggests the presence of aggregates in the system. We report that these aggregates are thermodynamically unstable and the length of aggregate changes continuously with increasing concentration and, or magnetic field and resulted in a decrease in effective magnetic moment. The Taketomi's theory fits well with the experimental data suggesting that the particle clusters are aligned in the direction of the magnetic field. The radius of cluster found to increase with increasing concentration, and then decreases whereas the elastic force constant increases and then becomes constant. The increase in cluster radius indicates elongation of aggregate length due to tip-to-tip interaction of aggregates whereas for higher concentration, the lateral alignment is more favorable than tip-to-tip alignment of aggregates which reduces the cluster radius making elastic force constant to raise. Optical images show that the chains are fluctuating and confirming the lateral alignment of chains at higher fields. - Highlights: • Magnetic field induced aggregates investigated using ultrasonic wave in aqueous magnetic fluid. • Velocity anisotropy induces upon applications of magnetic field. • Tarapov’s theory fit shows reduction in effective magnetic moment as concentration increases. • Taketomi's theory shows alignment of clusters in field direction. • Cluster radius increases and then decreases with increasing volume fractions. • Optical images show that fluctuating chains and lateral alignment of chains at higher fields.

  8. Magnetically induced rotor vibration in dual-stator permanent magnet motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bang; Wang, Shiyu; Wang, Yaoyao; Zhao, Zhifu; Xiu, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Magnetically induced vibration is a major concern in permanent magnet (PM) motors, which is especially true for dual-stator motors. This work develops a two-dimensional model of the rotor by using energy method, and employs this model to examine the rigid- and elastic-body vibrations induced by the inner stator tooth passage force and that by the outer. The analytical results imply that there exist three typical vibration modes. Their presence or absence depends on the combination of magnet/slot, force's frequency and amplitude, the relative position between two stators, and other structural parameters. The combination and relative position affect these modes via altering the force phase. The predicted results are verified by magnetic force wave analysis by finite element method (FEM) and comparison with the existing results. Potential directions are also given with the anticipation of bringing forth more interesting and useful findings. As an engineering application, the magnetically induced vibration can be first reduced via the combination and then a suitable relative position.

  9. Current-induced magnetic switching of a single molecule magnet on a spin valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zheng-Chuan; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Su, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The current-induced magnetic switching of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) attached on the central region of a spin valve is explored, and the condition for the switching current is derived. Electrons flowing through the spin valve will interact with the SMM via the s–d exchange interaction, producing the spin accumulation that satisfies the spin diffusion equation. We further describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. Based on the linear stability analysis, we obtain the critical current from two coupled equations. The results of the critical current versus the external magnetic field indicate that one can manipulate the magnetic state of the SMM by an external magnetic field. - Highlights: • We theoretically study the current-induced magnetic switching of the SMM. • We describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. • We describe the spin accumulation by the spin diffusion equation. • We obtain the critical current by the linear stability analysis. • Our approach can be easily extended to other SMMs

  10. Current-induced magnetic switching of a single molecule magnet on a spin valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Zheng-Chuan, E-mail: wangzc@ucas.ac.cn [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zheng, Qing-Rong [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Zheng-Gang [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Electronics, Electric and Communication Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Su, Gang, E-mail: gsu@ucas.ac.cn [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics and Computational Materials Physics Laboratory, School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-04-17

    The current-induced magnetic switching of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) attached on the central region of a spin valve is explored, and the condition for the switching current is derived. Electrons flowing through the spin valve will interact with the SMM via the s–d exchange interaction, producing the spin accumulation that satisfies the spin diffusion equation. We further describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. Based on the linear stability analysis, we obtain the critical current from two coupled equations. The results of the critical current versus the external magnetic field indicate that one can manipulate the magnetic state of the SMM by an external magnetic field. - Highlights: • We theoretically study the current-induced magnetic switching of the SMM. • We describe the spin motion of the SMM by a Heisenberg-like equation. • We describe the spin accumulation by the spin diffusion equation. • We obtain the critical current by the linear stability analysis. • Our approach can be easily extended to other SMMs.

  11. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  12. Radiofrequency heating and magnetically induced displacement of dental magnetic attachments during 3.0 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, K; Hasegawa, M; Abe, Y; Tabuchi, T; Namiki, T; Ishigami, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of injury from dental magnetic attachments due to their radiofrequency (RF) heating and magnetically induced displacement during 3.0 T MRI. Methods To examine the magnetic attachments, we adopted the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-02a and F2052-06 standards in two MRI systems (Achieva 3.0 T Nova Dual; Philips, Tokyo, Japan, and Signa HDxt 3.0 T; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). The temperature change was measured in a cylindrical keeper (GIGAUSS D600; GC, Tokyo, Japan) with coping of the casting alloy and a keeper with a dental implant at the maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) for 20 min. To measure the magnetically induced displacement force, three sizes of keepers (GIGAUSS D400, D600 and D1000) were used in deflection angle tests conducted at the point of the maximum magnetic field strength. Results Temperature elevations of both coping and implant were higher in the Signa system than in the Achieva system. The highest temperature changes in the keeper with implant and keeper with coping were 0.6 °C and 0.8 °C in the Signa system, respectively. The temperature increase did not exceed 1.0 °C at any location. The deflection angle (α) was not measurable because it exceeded 90°. GIGAUSS D400 required an extra 3.0 g load to constrain the deflection angle to less than 45°; GIGAUSS D600 and D1000 required 5.0 and 9.0 g loads, respectively. Conclusions Dental magnetic attachments pose no risk due to RF heating and magnetically induced displacement at 3.0 T MRI. However, it is necessary to confirm that these keepers are securely attached to the prosthesis before imaging. PMID:22499128

  13. Stress induced magnetic-domain evolution in magnetoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Harsh; Shvartsman, Vladimir V.; Lupascu, Doru C.; Medeiros, Marco S. A.; Pullar, Robert C.

    2018-06-01

    Local observation of the stress mediated magnetoelectric (ME) effect in composites has gained a great deal of interest over the last decades. However, there is an apparent lack of rigorous methods for a quantitative characterization of the ME effect at the local scale, especially in polycrystalline microstructures. In the present work, we address this issue by locally probing the surface magnetic state of barium titante–hexagonal barium ferrite (BaTiO3–BaFe12O19) ceramic composites using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The effect of the piezoelectrically induced local stress on the magnetostrictive component (BaFe12O19, BaM) was observed in the form of the evolution of the magnetic domains. The local piezoelectric stress was induced by applying a voltage to the neighboring BaTiO3 grains, using a conductive atomic force microscopy tip. The resulting stochastic evolution of magnetic domains was studied in the context of the induced magnetoelastic anisotropy. In order to overcome the ambiguity in the domain changes observed by MFM, certain generalizations about the observed MFM contrast are put forward, followed by application of an algorithm for extracting the average micromagnetic changes. An average change in domain wall thickness of 50 nm was extracted, giving a lower limit on the corresponding induced magnetoelastic anisotropy energy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this induced magnetomechanical energy is approximately equal to the K1 magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant of BaM, and compare it with a modeled value of applied elastic energy density. The comparison allowed us to judge the quality of the interfaces in the composite system, by roughly gauging the energy conversion ratio.

  14. Thermometry of hot spot using NMR for hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Yoshifumi; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu

    1983-01-01

    Lately noticed hyperthermia in cancer therapy requires non-invasive measurement of the temperature at the warmed site in the deep portion of human body. Nuclear magnetic relaxation time of NMR is also usable for cancer diagnosis. For coordination of these two techniques, it was judged suitable to measure temperature by NMR so that cancer diagnosis and treatment and evaluation of therapeutic effect might be incorporated into one system. This report dealt with concrete procedures of measuring the temperature of deep portions by NMR. Computations revealed that the coefficient of temperature of the thermal equilibrium magnetization was useful, that magnetic field focusing was the most effective imaging technique and that temperature rise in areas about 2 cm in radius could be measured without large errors. (Chiba, N.)

  15. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references

  16. Spin-orbit torque induced switching in a magnetic insulator thin film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. X.; Yu, G. Q.; Tang, C.; Wang, K. L.; Shi, J.

    Spin-orbit torque (SOT) has been demonstrated to be efficient to manipulate the magnetization in heavy-metal/ferromagnetic metal (HM/FMM) heterostructures. In HM/magnetic insulator (MI) heterostructures, charge currents do not flow in MI, but pure spin currents generated by the spin Hall effect in HM can enter the MI layer to cause magnetization dynamics. Here we report SOT-induced magnetization switching in Tm3Fe5O12/Pt heterostructures, where Tm3Fe5O12 (TmIG) is a MI grown by pulsed laser deposition with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The anomalous Hall signal in Pt is used as a probe to detect the magnetization switching. Effective magnetic fields due to the damping-like and field-like torques are extracted using a harmonic Hall detection method. The experiments are carried out in heterostructures with different TmIG film thicknesses. Both the switching and harmonic measurements indicate a more efficient SOT generation in HM/MI than in HM/FMM heterostructures. Our comprehensive experimental study and detailed analysis will be presented. This work was supported as part of the SHINES, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award No. SC0012670.

  17. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Grey, Michael James

    2010-01-01

    Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement...... and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over...... premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement....

  18. Magnetization dynamics induced by Rashba effect in a Permalloy nanodisk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanan; Hua, Zhong, E-mail: jiyonghnli@126.com; Li, Dongfei

    2017-02-15

    Magnetic vortex dynamics mediated by spin-polarized ac current of different amplitudes and frequencies are investigated by micromagnetic simulations in a system lacking structure inversion symmetry. Micromagnetic calculations reveal that the critical current density required to induce vortex core reversal may be decreased to below 10{sup 10} A m{sup −2} due to strong transverse magnetic field by Rashba effect. We also find the spin torque of ac current plays a trivial role in magnetic vortex dynamics in a broken inversion symmetry system when the current density is on the order of 10{sup 10} A m{sup −2} and the current with frequency close to the vortex eigenfrequency is the most efficient for reversal.

  19. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  20. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  1. Zinc substituted ferrite nanoparticles with Zn{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 2.1}O{sub 4} formula used as heating agents for in vitro hyperthermia assay on glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanini, Amel [Interface Traitement Organisation et Dynamique des Systèmes (TODYS), Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75013, Paris (France); Institut Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-8104, INSERM U1016, 75005 Paris (France); Laboratoire de Physiologie Intégrée (LPI), Université de Carthage, 7021, Jarzouna (Tunisia); Lartigue, Lenaic [Matière et Systèmes Complexes (MSC), Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7057, 75013, Paris (France); Gavard, Julie [Institut Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-8104, INSERM U1016, 75005 Paris (France); Kacem, Kamel [Laboratoire de Physiologie Intégrée (LPI), Université de Carthage, 7021, Jarzouna (Tunisia); Wilhelm, Claire; Gazeau, Florence [Matière et Systèmes Complexes (MSC), Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7057, 75013, Paris (France); Chau, François [Interface Traitement Organisation et Dynamique des Systèmes (TODYS), Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, CNRS UMR-7086, 75013, Paris (France); and others

    2016-10-15

    In this paper we investigate the ability of zinc rich ferrite nanoparticles to induce hyperthermia on cancer cells using an alternating magnetic field (AMF). First, we synthesized ferrites and then we analyzed their physico-chemical properties by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and magnetic and magnetocalorimetric measurements. We found that the polyol-made magnetically diluted particles are of 11 nm in size. They are superparamagnetic at body temperature (310 K) with a low but non-negligible magnetization. Interestingly, as nano-ferrimagnets they exhibit a Curie temperature of 366 K, close to the therapeutic temperature range. Their effect on human healthy endothelial (HUVEC) and malignant glioma (U87-MG) cells was also evaluated using MTT viability assays. Incubated with the two cell lines, at doses ≤100 µg mL{sup −1} and contact times ≤4 h, they exhibit a mild in vitro toxicity. In these same operating biological conditions and coupled to AMF (700 kHz and 34.4 Oe) for 1 h, they rapidly induce a net temperature increase. In the case of tumor cells it reaches 4 K, making the produced particles particularly promising for self-regulated magnetically-induced heating in local glioma therapy. - Highlights: • Highly crystallized monodisperse 11 nm sized Zn{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 2.1}O{sub 4} particles were produced in polyol. • They exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior at 37 °C with a magnetization of 12 emu g{sup −1} at 50 kOe. • Their Curie temperature reaches 88 °C, close to the therapeutic hyperthermia temperatures. • Incubated with glioma cells and exposed to ac-magnetic field they induce a 4 °C temperature increase. • They can be considered as potential self-regulated heating probes for glioma therapy.

  2. Strain-induced chiral magnetic effect in Weyl semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortijo, Alberto; Kharzeev, Dmitri; Vozmediano, Maria A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we argue that strain applied to a time-reversal and inversion breaking Weyl semimetal in a magnetic field can induce an electric current via the chiral magnetic effect. A tight-binding model is used to show that strain generically changes the locations in the Brillouin zone but also the energies of the band touching points (tips of the Weyl cones). Since axial charge in a Weyl semimetal can relax via intervalley scattering processes, the induced current will decay with a time scale given by the lifetime of a chiral quasiparticle. Lastly, we estimate the strength and lifetime of the current for typical material parameters and find that it should be experimentally observable.

  3. Patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Xianjun; Gong Changde; Zhou Yuan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the modulated patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping based on the t-t ' -U-V model. Modulated checkerboard patterns with periodicity of eight or four lattice constants (8a or 4a) in the spin-, charge- and DSC orders are observed. Moreover, the checkerboard modulation in the spin order appear to be robust against parameter changes, which is consistent with neutron-scattering experiments. For the two-impurity case, a modulated stripe-like spin order with periodicity 8a is induced, which coexists with the DSC order. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  4. Patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xian-Jun; Gong, Chang-De; Zhou, Yuan

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the modulated patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping based on the t-t-U-V model. Modulated checkerboard patterns with periodicity of eight or four lattice constants (8 a or 4 a) in the spin-, charge- and DSC orders are observed. Moreover, the checkerboard modulation in the spin order appear to be robust against parameter changes, which is consistent with neutron-scattering experiments. For the two-impurity case, a modulated stripe-like spin order with periodicity 8 a is induced, which coexists with the DSC order. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  5. Mechanism of carrier-induced ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Furukawa, N.; Kubo, K.

    2004-01-01

    Using the spin-polarized band obtained by applying the dynamical coherent potential approximation to a simple model, we have calculated the magnetization of Ga x Mn 1-x As as a function of the temperature for various values of carrier density. The result is consistent with the experimental observation, supporting the view previously proposed by us that the ferromagnetism is induced by the carriers in the bandtail through double-exchange-like mechanism

  6. MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/ZrO{sub 2} composite nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Amin ur [Magnetism Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Applied Physical and Material Sciences, University of Swat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Humayun, Asif [Magnetism Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Manzoor, Sadia, E-mail: sadia_manzoor@comsats.edu.pk [Magnetism Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2017-04-15

    MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/ZrO{sub 2} composites containing ZrO{sub 2} in different weight percentages from 0% to 80% were prepared via the citrate gel technique as potential candidate materials for magnetic hyperthermia. The biocompatible ceramic ZrO{sub 2} was introduced to prevent MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles from aggregation and to reduce their dipolar interactions in order to enhance the specific absorption rate (SAR). Structural and magnetic properties of the samples were studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Magnetically induced heating in radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields was observed in all samples. Most significantly, the sample with only 20 wt% MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} has been found to have a SAR that is larger than that of pure MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. This is an important finding from the point of view of biomedical applications, because ZrO{sub 2} in known to have low toxicity and a higher biocompatibility as compared to ferrites. - Highlights: • MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZrO{sub 2} composite nanoparticles with different weight percentages of ZrO{sub 2} were prepared via the citrate gel technique. • Significant variation in magnetic properties was observed with increasing the weight % of ZrO{sub 2}. • Magnetically induced heating was observed when the composites were subjected to RF magnetic field. • Most significantly, the sample 80 wt% ZrO{sub 2} has been found to have SAR that is larger than that of pure MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. • The SAR was found to have a strong dependence on magnetic dipolar interactions.

  7. Effect of hyperthermia on replicating chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The extent of heat-induced structural alterations in chromatin containing nascent (pulse-labeled) DNA was assayed using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. The basic nucleosome structure in nascent and mature chromatin of S-phase cells appeared unaltered for up to 16 hr after exposure to hyperthermic temperatures as high as 48 0 C for 15 min. However, the rate of nuclease digestion of DNA in both nascent and mature chromatin is inhibited following exposure to hyperthermic temperatures. In unheated cells, pulse-labeled nascent DNA matured into mature chromatin structure with a half-time of 2.5 min. The half-time for the maturation of pulse-labeled DNA from nascent into mature chromatin increased in a linear manner as a function of increasing temperature of exposure with constant heating time at temperatures above 43 0 C. Both the reduced nuclease digestibility of nascent DNA and the increased time for chromatin structural changes could be due to the increased protein mass of chromatin following hyperthermia

  8. Dose concept of oncological hyperthermia: Heat-equation considering the cell destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szasz A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We shall assume, of course, that the objective of hyperthermia is to destroy the malignant cells. Destruction definitely needs energy. Description and quality assurance of hyperthermia use the Pennes heat equation to describe the processes. However the energy balance of the Pennes-equation does not contain the hyperthermic cell-destruction energy, which is a mandatory factor of the process. We propose a generalization of the Pennes-equation, inducing the entire energy balance. The new paradigm could be a theoretical basis of the till now empirical dose-construction for oncological hyperthermia. The cell destruction is a non-equilibrium thermodynamical process, described by the equations of chemical reactions. The dynamic behavior (time dependence has to be considered in this approach. We are going to define also a dose concept that can be objectively compared with other oncological methods. We show how such empirical dose as CEM43oC could be based theoretically as well.

  9. Induced magnetism at the interfaces of a Fe/V superlattice investigated by resonant magnetic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Magnuson@ifm.liu.se

    2017-01-15

    The induced magnetic moments in the V 3d electronic states of interface atomic layers in a Fe(6ML)/V(7ML) superlattice was investigated by x-ray resonant magnetic scattering. The first V atomic layer next to Fe was found to be strongly antiferromagnetically polarized relatively to Fe and the magnetic moments of the next few atomic layers in the interior V region decay exponentially with increasing distance from the interface, while the magnetic moments of the Fe atomic layers largely remain bulk-like. The induced V moments decay more rapidly as observed by x-ray magnetic scattering than in standard x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The theoretical description of the induced magnetic atomic layer profile in V was found to strongly rely on the interface roughness within the superlattice period. These results provide new insight into interface magnetism by taking advantage of the enhanced depth sensitivity to the magnetic profile over a certain resonant energy bandwidth in the vicinity of the Bragg angles. - Highlights: • Magnetic moments of buried layers are probed by XRMS in a Fe/V superlattice. • The induced V magnetic moments in XRMS are more rapidly decaying than previously observed by XMCD. • The magnetic depth profile sensitivity is enhanced at an energy bandwidth in the vicinity of the Bragg angles.

  10. Novel magnetic wire fabrication process by way of nanoimprint lithography for current induced magnetization switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Asari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoimprint lithography (NIL is an effective method to fabricate nanowire because it does not need expensive systems and this process is easier than conventional processes. In this letter, we report the Current Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS in perpendicularly magnetized Tb-Co alloy nanowire fabricated by NIL. The CIMS in Tb-Co alloy wire was observed by using current pulse under in-plane external magnetic field (HL. We successfully observed the CIMS in Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL. Additionally, we found that the critical current density (Jc for the CIMS in the Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL is 4 times smaller than that fabricated by conventional lift-off process under HL = 200Oe. These results indicate that the NIL is effective method for the CIMS.

  11. Novel magnetic wire fabrication process by way of nanoimprint lithography for current induced magnetization switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asari, Tsukasa; Shibata, Ryosuke; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an effective method to fabricate nanowire because it does not need expensive systems and this process is easier than conventional processes. In this letter, we report the Current Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS) in perpendicularly magnetized Tb-Co alloy nanowire fabricated by NIL. The CIMS in Tb-Co alloy wire was observed by using current pulse under in-plane external magnetic field (HL). We successfully observed the CIMS in Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL. Additionally, we found that the critical current density (Jc) for the CIMS in the Tb-Co wire fabricated by NIL is 4 times smaller than that fabricated by conventional lift-off process under HL = 200Oe. These results indicate that the NIL is effective method for the CIMS.

  12. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Auchmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the years 2009–2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012 instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  13. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchmann, B.; Baer, T.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P. P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E. B.; Lechner, A.; Nebot Del Busto, E.; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-01

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam-induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy deposition in the coils is compared to the quench levels predicted by electrothermal models, thus allowing one to validate and improve the models which are used to set beam-dump thresholds on beam-loss monitors for run 2.

  14. Testing beam-induced quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B.; Bednarek, M.; Bellodi, G.; Bracco, C.; Bruce, R.; Cerutti, F.; Chetvertkova, V.; Dehning, B.; Granieri, P.P.; Hofle, W.; Holzer, E.B.; Lechner, A.; Del Busto, E. Nebot; Priebe, A.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua, B.; Sapinski, M.; Schmidt, R.; Shetty, N.; Skordis, E.; Solfaroli, M.; Steckert, J.; Valuch, D.; Verweij, A.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    2015-06-25

    In the years 2009-2013 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been operated with the top beam energies of 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV per proton (from 2012) instead of the nominal 7 TeV. The currents in the superconducting magnets were reduced accordingly. To date only seventeen beam-induced quenches have occurred; eight of them during specially designed quench tests, the others during injection. There has not been a single beam- induced quench during normal collider operation with stored beam. The conditions, however, are expected to become much more challenging after the long LHC shutdown. The magnets will be operating at near nominal currents, and in the presence of high energy and high intensity beams with a stored energy of up to 362 MJ per beam. In this paper we summarize our efforts to understand the quench levels of LHC superconducting magnets. We describe beam-loss events and dedicated experiments with beam, as well as the simulation methods used to reproduce the observable signals. The simulated energy depositio...

  15. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday's law. We previously determined that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here we calculate the electron density including both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. We calculate the potential required to establish a constant electron density, and compare with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest

  16. Effects of hyperthermia and X-irradiation on mouse stromal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of normal stroma to heat, irradiation and heat combined with irradiation, was studied using the tumour bed effect (TBE) assay. Irradiation before implantation led to a TBE, dose dependent below 15 Gy, but remaining relatively constant above. The interval (0-90 days) between irradiation and tumour implantation did not influence the magnitude of the TBE. Hyperthermia with large heat doses (45-60 min at 44 0 C) before implantation may lead to a TBE. The interval between hyperthermia and tumour implantation was very important. Results showed that the recovery from heat-induced stromal damage is very rapid. When the interval between hyperthermia and tumour implantation was 10 days or longer, no TBE could be observed. Irradiation combined with large heat doses (30-60 min at 44 0 C) decreased the radiation-induced TBE. The combination of irradiation with mild heat treatments (15 min at 44 0 C) could lead to a larger TBE then after irradiation alone. When hyperthermia was given prior to irradiation, the interval between heat and irradiation proved to be very important. With large intervals (21 days or longer), TBE values were about the same as with irradiation alone. When heat was given after irradiation, irradiation-induced TBE was always reduced. (UK)

  17. Effects of hyperthermia on the normal liver using scintigraphic methods. Functional changes of the rabbit whole-liver by local hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kiyotaka; Shinotsuka, Akira; Takenaka, Hiroki; Hirono, Yoshisada

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate effect of hyperthermia to the liver in rabbits. The whole liver was heated at 43degC for 30 min by a RF capacitive heating device, and subsequent changes were observed by scintigraphy using 99m Tc-EHIDA and 99m Tc-Sn-colloid. The excretory ratio (Ke value) of 99m Tc-EHIDA and the uptake ratio (K value) of 99m Tc-Sn-colloid were measured to estimate hyperthermia induced hepatic injury for a month. Blood chemistry analysis was also conducted during this period. Also, the uptake of 3 H-methyl-thymidine into the DNA of hepatocyted was assayed 2 and 5 days after heating. Concurrently, histopathological changes were observed. The Ke value showed a transient increase and returned to the level prior to heating after approximately one week. A distinct increase in GPT was observed. The uptake of 3 H-methyl-thymidine showed a marked rise 2 days after hyperthermia, which demonstrated regeneration of the previously damaged hepatocytes. Pathologically, overall liver congestion and hepatocytes necrosis were noted. Also, both enlargement of the nuclei and binuclear hepatocytes were present, pathologically proving hepatocytes regeneration. The K value showed a transient decrease, showing that the reticuloendothelial function and blood flow of the liver were temporarily reduced. These results indicate the whole liver function damaged by hyperthermia is reversible. (author)

  18. Chemically induced magnetism in atomically precise gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2014-03-12

    Comparative theoretical and experimental investigations are reported into chemically induced magnetism in atomically-precise, ligand-stabilized gold clusters Au25 , Au38 and Au55 . The results indicate that [Au25 (PPh3 )10 (SC12 H25 )5 Cl2 ](2+) and Au38 (SC12 H25 )24 are diamagnetic, Au25 (SC2 H4 Ph)18 is paramagnetic, and Au55 (PPh3 )12 Cl6 , is ferromagnetic at room temperature. Understanding the magnetic properties resulting from quantum size effects in such atomically precise gold clusters could lead to new fundamental discoveries and applications. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Compensation of the magnetization current induced sextupole error at LHC injection field by short lumped permanent sextupole magnets, incorporated into the end configuration of superconducting dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Asner, A

    1985-01-01

    Compensation of the magnetization current induced sextupole error at LHC injection field by short lumped permanent sextupole magnets, incorporated into the end configuration of superconducting dipoles

  20. Micromagnetic Simulation of Strain-Assisted Current-Induced Magnetization Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of substrate misfit strain on the current-induced magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions by combining micromagnetic simulation with phase-field microelasticity theory. Our results indicate that the positive substrate misfit strain can decrease the critical current density of magnetization switching by pushing the magnetization from out-of-plane to in-plane directions, while the negative strain pushes the magnetization back to the out-of-plane directions. The magnetic domain evolution is obtained to demonstrate the strain-assisted current-induced magnetization switching.

  1. HF-induced airglow at magnetic zenith: theoretical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Mishin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of airglow at 630nm (red line and 557.7nm (green line during HF modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP heating facility are analyzed. We propose a theoretical framework for understanding the generation of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves during magnetic zenith injections. We show that observations of HF-induced airglow in an underdense ionosphere as well as a decrease in the height of the emitting volume are consistent with this scenario.

  2. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Kristina [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Slater, Lee [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  3. Electric susceptibility of a magnetized plasma under electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamori, E

    2011-01-01

    This study derives the electric susceptibility tensor of a cold magnetized plasma under electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) regime (Litvak and Tokman 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 095003, Shvets and Wurtele 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 115003) in which an intense right-hand circularly polarized pump wave is injected parallel to the background magnetic field. A dispersion relation of the wave in the electron cyclotron frequency range for an arbitrary propagation angle is obtained from this susceptibility tensor. In the case of purely parallel propagation of the probe wave, the dispersion relation obtained by Litvak, Shvets and others is recaptured. A new finding is that a stop band emerges between left-hand cutoff and upper hybrid frequencies, in which originally an extraordinary-mode (X) branch exists, in the case of perpendicular propagation to the background magnetic field under the EIT. The bandwidth of the stop band expands as the pump wave is intensified. For the situation of launching the probe wave from the high-field side in a tokamak, the accessibility of the probe wave to the region where the EIT effect appears is investigated. The EIT region which is a resonance layer created by the EIT is accessible to the probe wave, indicating the possibility of the application of EIT to control the spatial position of wave power deposition.

  4. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H. B.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, T. N.; Chen, L. Q.; Ma, X. Q.

    2014-01-01

    Effect of substrate misfit strain on current-induced in-plane magnetization reversal in CoFeB-MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase-field microelasticity theory. It is found that the critical current density for in-plane magnetization reversal decreases dramatically with an increasing substrate strain, since the effective elastic field can drag the magnetization to one of the four in-plane diagonal directions. A potential strain-assisted multilevel bit spin transfer magnetization switching device using substrate misfit strain is also proposed.

  5. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-04-11

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an "all-or-none" manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish.

  6. Magnetic reconnection processes induced by a CME expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bemporad

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available On 10–11 December 2005 a slow CME occurred in the Western Hemisphere in between two coronal streamers. SOHO/MDI magnetograms show a multipolar magnetic configuration at the photosphere: a complex of active regions located at the CME source and two bipoles at the base of the lateral coronal streamers. White light observations reveal that the CME expansion affects both of them and induces the release of plasma within or close to the nearby streamers. These transient phenomena are possibly due to magnetic reconnections induced by the CME expansion and occurring inside the streamer current sheet or between the CME flanks and the streamer. These events have been observed by the SOHO/UVCS with the spectrometer slit centered at 1.8 R⊙ over about a full day. In this work we focus on the interaction between the CME and the streamer: the UVCS spectral interval included UV lines from ions at different temperatures of maximum formation such as O VI, Si XIII and Al Xi. These data gave us the opportunity to infer the evolution of plasma temperature and density at the reconnection site and adjacent regions. These are relevant to characterize secondary reconnection processes occurring during a CME development.

  7. Polymer coated fiber Bragg grating thermometry for microwave hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Indu Fiesler; Hui, Kaleo; Astrahan, Melvin

    2010-09-01

    Measuring tissue temperature distribution during electromagnetically induced hyperthermia (HT) is challenging. High resistance thermistors with nonmetallic leads have been used successfully in commercial HT systems for about three decades. The single 1 mm thick temperature sensing element is mechanically moved to measure tissue temperature distributions. By employing a single thermometry probe containing a fixed linear sensor array temperature, distributions during therapy can be measured with greater ease. While the first attempts to use fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology to obtain multiple temperature points along a single fiber have been reported, improvement in the detection system's stability were needed for clinical applications. The FBG temperature sensing system described here has a very high temporal stability detection system and an order of magnitude faster readout than commercial systems. It is shown to be suitable for multiple point fiber thermometry during microwave hyperthermia when compared to conventional mechanically scanning probe HT thermometry. A polymer coated fiber Bragg grating (PFBG) technology is described that provides a number of FBG thermometry locations along the length of a single optical fiber. The PFBG probe developed is tested under simulated microwave hyperthermia treatment to a tissue equivalent phantom. Two temperature probes, the multiple PFBG sensor and the Bowman probe, placed symmetrically with respect to a microwave antenna in a tissue phantom are subjected to microwave hyperthermia. Measurements are made at start of HT and 85 min later, when a 6 degrees C increase in temperature is registered by both probes, as is typical in clinical HT therapy. The optical fiber multipoint thermometry probe performs highly stable, real-time thermometry updating each multipoint thermometry scan over a 5 cm length every 2 s. Bowman probe measurements are acquired simultaneously for comparison. In addition, the PFBG sensor's detection

  8. Investigation of particle accumulation, chemosensitivity and thermosensitivity for effective solid tumor therapy using thermosensitive liposomes and hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.M. Lokerse (Wouter); M. Bolkestein (Michiel); T.L.M. ten Hagen (Timo); M. de Jong (Marcel); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); Grüll, H. (Holger); G.A. Koning (Gerben)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDoxorubicin (Dox) loaded thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs) have shown promising results for hyperthermia-induced local drug delivery to solid tumors. Typically, the tumor is heated to hyperthermic temperatures (41-42 °C), which induced intravascular drug release from TSLs within the tumor

  9. Fe3O4@Au composite magnetic nanoparticles modified with cetuximab for targeted magneto-photothermal therapy of glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qianling; Dai, Xinyu; Zhang, Peng; Tan, Xiao; Zhong, Yuejiao; Yao, Cheng; Song, Mei; Song, Guili; Zhang, Zhenghai; Peng, Gang; Guo, Zhirui; Ge, Yaoqi; Zhang, Kangzhen; Li, Yuntao

    2018-01-01

    Thermoresponsive nanoparticles have become an attractive candidate for designing combined multimodal therapy strategies because of the onset of hyperthermia and their advantages in synergistic cancer treatment. In this paper, novel cetuximab (C225)-encapsulated core-shell Fe 3 O 4 @Au magnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 @Au-C225 composite-targeted MNPs) were created and applied as a therapeutic nanocarrier to conduct targeted magneto-photothermal therapy against glioma cells. The core-shell Fe 3 O 4 @Au magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared, and then C225 was further absorbed to synthesize Fe 3 O 4 @Au-C225 composite-targeted MNPs. Their morphology, mean particle size, zeta potential, optical property, magnetic property and thermal dynamic profiles were characterized. After that, the glioma-destructive effect of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) combined with near-infrared (NIR) hyperthermia mediated by Fe 3 O 4 @Au-C225 composite-targeted MNPs was evaluated through in vitro and in vivo experiments. The inhibitory and apoptotic rates of Fe 3 O 4 @Au-C225 composite-targeted MNPs-mediated combined hyperthermia (MFH+NIR) group were significantly higher than other groups in vitro and the marked upregulation of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 expression indicated excellent antitumor effect by inducing intrinsic apoptosis. Furthermore, Fe 3 O 4 @Au-C225 composite-targeted MNPs-mediated combined hyperthermia (MFH+NIR) group exhibited significant tumor growth suppression compared with other groups in vivo. Our studies illustrated that Fe 3 O 4 @Au-C225 composite-targeted MNPs have great potential as a promising nanoplatform for human glioma therapy and could be of great value in medical use in the future.

  10. Evidence for a New Magnetoelectric Effect of Current-Induced Magnetization in a Toroidal Magnetic Ordered State of UNi$_4$B

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Hiraku; Uenishi, Kenta; Miura, Naoyuki; Tabata, Chihiro; Hidaka, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Tatsuya; Amitsuka, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Magnetization measurements under direct electric currents were performed for toroidal magnetic ordered state of UNi$_4$B to test a recent theoretical prediction of current-induced magnetization in a metallic system lacking local inversion symmetry.We found that each of the electric currents parallel to [$2\\bar{1}\\bar{1}0$] and [$0001$] in the hexagonal 4-index notation induces uniform magnetization in the direction of [$01\\bar{1}0$].The observed behavior of the induced magnetization is essent...

  11. Magneto-optical effects induced in a magnetic-fluid layer by thermally released supermassive magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofonea, V.; Vekas, L.; Hegedues, E.

    1993-01-01

    The number of photons in the optical pulse induced via magneto-optical effects by a thermally released (e.g., from old iron ores) supermassive magnetic monopole traversing a thin magnetic-fluid layer is evaluated on the basis of phenomenological models. In certain monopole search experiments, these effects could give a detectable signal of the order of tens of photons and thus it may serve as a basis for a new magnetic-monopole detection method. (orig.)

  12. Light-induced changes of cubic and uniaxial magnetic aniosotropy in a magnet doped by strongly anisotropic ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zaytseva, I.; Stupakiewicz, A.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.

    254-255, - (2003), s. 118-120 ISSN 0304-8853. [Soft Magnetic Material Conference ( SMM 15). Bilbao, 05.09.2001-07.09.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : photomagnetic effects * light-induced anisotropy * garnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.910, year: 2003

  13. Intestinal cell proliferation following hyperthermia-radiation combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burholt, D.R.; Wilkinson, D.A.; Shrivastava, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The present work is an investigation of the extent to which hyperthermia enhances x-ray induced inhibition of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation in mice. Hyperthermia was achieved by whole body immersion of anesthetized ice in a temperature controlled water bath (+-0.1 0 C). Post-treatment proliferative activity was monitored by determining the incorporation of /sup 3/H-TdR into intestinal crypt cells and by the counting of epithelial cell mitotic figures. Initial levels of cell kill were assessed by the microcolony crypt survival technique. All heat treatments were 41.5 0 C for 0.5h. Heat alone reduced the /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation to 50% of the control value by 2h post-treatment. This was followed by a return to control value by 10h and a slight hyperplasia at 24h. Heat either immediately before or after 2Gy abdominal field x-irradiation produced a prolonged period of depressed cell proliferation: /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation remained below control value for the first 24h. As the heat and radiation were separated in time from each other (up to 4h) the interaction between the two decreased. The development of thermotolerance was observed following the second and third treatment during either a heat-only or a heat-radiation multifraction treatments schedule with the treatment spaced 24h apart

  14. Immunogenicity of ascites tumor cells following in vitro hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, J.A.; Jasiewicz, M.L.; Simpson, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The concept that host immunization may be achieved by heat-induced antigenic modifications of cancer cells and/or the release of immunogenic products by dead or dying tumor cells following in vitro heating was examined. Ehrlich ascites cells were used, inasmuch as it was claimed that in vitro hyperthermia increased the immunogenicity of these cells. Tumor cell populations of different viability were obtained by heating Ehrlich cells at 42.5 degrees, 45 degrees, or 60 degrees C. Viable and nonviable cells were separated by Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation; viable nonreplicating cells were obtained by treatment with mitomycin C. Cell populations of different viability after heating were left to die slowly over 3 days at 37 degrees C. Swiss TO mice were then given injections of the treated cells and/or medium. No survival benefit occurred in mice inoculated with any of these different components and then challenged with viable tumor cells. Injection of irradiated cells, however, did produce host immunity. Similarly, D23 rat hepatoma ascites cells produced host immunity after 15,000 rad but not after heating. The claim that in vitro hyperthermia increases the immunogenicity of tumor cells was not confirmed

  15. [Anesthesia unrelated triggering of a fatal malignant hyperthermia crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthoff, D; Vonderlind, C

    1997-12-01

    For incidents of malignant hyperthermia (MH) outside the hospital, a high number of unrecorded cases must be reckoned with because of an insufficient knowledge of emergency services and poor identification and documentation that make it impossible to classify acute situations under the diagnosis of malignant hyperthermia crisis. As a result, there are no statistical data in this field, and only case reports with a broad spectrum of suspected trigger mechanisms have been published. The case described in this report is a proved example of a non-anesthesia-related triggering of MH in a 21-year-old man who had had an anesthetic-induced MH manifestation in childhood, which was confirmed with an in vitro contracture test. After visiting a restaurant, he became unconscious and convulsive after consuming a high level of alcohol (2.9/1000). The first cardiocirculatory arrest occurred directly before hospitalization. After admission, the patient showed a full-blown MH episode whose subsequent fatality was unavoidable in spite of adapted and optimal therapy. Suspected trigger mechanisms seem to be multifactoral (excessive alcohol consumption, over-heating, mental stress) as a forensic investigation did not point to any particular signs of typical trigger substances. The case demonstrates again that an MH attack might be triggered under certain non-anaesthesia-related situations. For patients with an MH disposition, additional information on their behavior outside the hospital is required.

  16. Production of lesions in rabbit spinal cord with microwave hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.H.; Popovic, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a variety of injury models in different species to produce spinal cord lesions by trauma or ischemia has often given rise to conflicting or inconclusive data. A new model has been developed in rabbits. Spinal cord lesions were produced in selected spinal cord segments of male New Zealand white rabbits by non-invasive irradiation with microwaves in the near field at 915 MHz. Graded injuries of predictable severity can be produced by the non-invasive induction of moderate hyperthermia in the thoracic spinal cord at precise dosage levels of temperature elevation and duration. Histological changes in microwave-induced hyperthermia closely parallel those seen in traumatic lesions of the human spinal cord, as well as those produced in animals with the classical weight-drop method of Allen. In addition to grading the spinal cord lesions with respect to residual neurological function, dose-response observations made with somatosensory evoked responses, blood-spinal cord barrier tracers, and neurohistological and enzyme histochemical preparations, suggest that it will be possible to use this approach to develop a standardized, calibrated model in rabbits to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of spinal cord injury

  17. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J.

    1991-01-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain

  18. A Parallel 2D Numerical Simulation of Tumor Cells Necrosis by Local Hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, R F; Loureiro, F S; Lobosco, M

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been widely used in cancer treatment to destroy tumors. The main idea of the hyperthermia is to heat a specific region like a tumor so that above a threshold temperature the tumor cells are destroyed. This can be accomplished by many heat supply techniques and the use of magnetic nanoparticles that generate heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied has emerged as a promise technique. In the present paper, the Pennes bioheat transfer equation is adopted to model the thermal tumor ablation in the context of magnetic nanoparticles. Numerical simulations are carried out considering different injection sites for the nanoparticles in an attempt to achieve better hyperthermia conditions. Explicit finite difference method is employed to solve the equations. However, a large amount of computation is required for this purpose. Therefore, this work also presents an initial attempt to improve performance using OpenMP, a parallel programming API. Experimental results were quite encouraging: speedups around 35 were obtained on a 64-core machine

  19. Radiofrequency hyperthermia for advanced malignant liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Y.; Okuno, Y.; Mitsumori, M.; Akuta, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Masunaga, S.; Kanamori, S.; Fujishiro, M.; Hiraoka, M.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate thermometry and the clinical results of radiofrequency (RF) thermotherapy for advanced malignant liver tumors. Materials and Methods One-hundred and seventy-three patients with malignant liver tumors treated between 1983 and 1995 underwent hyperthermia. Surgery were contraindicated in all patients. The 173 tumors consisted of 114 hepatocellular carcinomas(HCCs), and 59 non-HCCs(45 metastatic liver tumors and 12 cholangiocarcinomas). Eight MHz RF capacitive heating equipment was used for hyperthermia. Two opposing 25-cm or 30-cm electrodes were generally used for heating liver tumors. Our standard protocol was to administer hyperthermia 40-50 minutes twice a week to a total of 8 sessions. Temperature of the liver tumor was measured by microthermocouples. In each patient, a single catheter was inserted into the liver tumor through the normal liver. Transcatheter arterial embolization, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and chemotherapy were combined with hyperthermia depending on the patient's liver function and tumor location. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by the change in tumor size assessed by computed tomography (CT) three or four months after the completion of treatment. Results One-hundred and forty (81%) of 173 patients underwent hyperthermia more than 4 times. Thermometry could be performed in 77(55%) of these 140 patients. Neither systolic nor diastolic blood pressure changed significantly after hyperthermia. However, pulse rate significantly increased from 82.8 ± 1.1 to 96.5 ± 1.3 beats/min. Only 21 patients (11%) showed a decrease in pulse rate after hyperthermia. Body temperature increased from 36.3 ±0.1 to 37.4±0.2 after hyperthermia. Sequelae of hyperthermia included focal fat burning in 20 (12%), gastric ulceration in 4 (2%), and liver necrosis in 1(1%). Sequelae of thermometry were severe peritoneal pain in 7 (11%), intraperitoneal hematoma in 1(1%), and pneumothorax in one (1%) patient. The maximal tumor temperature

  20. Enhancement of crystallinity and magnetization in Fe3O4 nanoferrites induced by a high synthesized magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinxiu; Zhang, Zhanxian; Chen, Shijie; Lei, Wei; Xu, Yan; Lin, Jia; Luo, Xiaojing; Liu, Yongsheng

    2018-05-01

    A one-step hydrothermal method in different dc magnetic fields was used to prepare the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Under the magnetic field, the average particle size decreased from 72.9 to 41.6 nm, meanwhile, the particle crystallinity is greatly improved. The magnetic field enhances its saturation magnetization and coercivity. The high magnetic field induce another magnetic structure. At room temperature, these nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetism whose critical size (D sp) is about 26 nm. The Verwey transition is observed in the vicinity of 120 K of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The effective magnetic anisotropy decreases with the increase of the test temperature because of the H c decreased.

  1. Polyamines and polyamine biosynthesis in cells exposed to hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerner, E.W.; Stickney, D.G.; Herman, T.S.; Fuller, D.J.

    1983-02-01

    The issue of how polyamines act to sensitize cultured cells to the lethal effects of hyperthermia was investigated using Chinese hamster cells which were induced to express thermotolerance. Intracellular levels of these naturally occurring polycations were manipulated in certain situations by treating whole cells with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone), an inhibitor of the S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylases. Exogenous spermine as low as 100 ..mu..M in the culture media dramatically sensitized cells expressing thermotolerance to the lethal effects of subsequent 42/sup 0/C exposures. When thermotolerance was differentially induced in cultures exposed to 42.4/sup 0/C by varying the rate of heating from 37 to 42.4/sup 0/C, the most resistant cells and the highest levels of intracellular spermidine and spermine. This finding was explainable in part by the observation that the putrescine-dependent S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity was minimally affected in cells expressng the greatest degree of thermotolerance. When this enzyme activity was inhibited by drug, lowered intracellular polyamine levels did not correspond with subsequent survival responses to heat. Interestingly, cultures treated with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) 24 hr previous to heat exposure showed a reduced capacity to express rate of heating-induced thermotolerance. Together, these results demonstrate that the polyamines, especially spermidine and spermine, enhance hyperthermia-induced cell killing by some mechanism involving the plasma membrane. Further, our data suggest that methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) can act to affect thermal responses by a mechanism(s) other than modification of intracellular polyamine levels.

  2. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D., E-mail: davsark@yahoo.com, E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am [National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Institute for Physical Research (Armenia); Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C. [Université de Bourgogne-Dijon, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS (France); Cartaleva, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Electronics (Bulgaria); Wilson-Gordon, A. D. [Bar-Ilan University Ramat Gan, Department of Chemistry (Israel); Auzinsh, M. [University of Latvia, Department of Physics (Latvia)

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  3. Proposal for a magnetic field induced graphene dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksym, P A; Roy, M; Craciun, M F; Russo, S; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S; Aoki, H

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots induced by a strong magnetic field applied to a single layer of graphene in the perpendicular direction are investigated. The dot is defined by a model potential which consists of a well of depth ΔV relative to a flat asymptotic part and quantum states formed from the zeroth Landau level are considered. The energy of the dot states cannot be lower than -ΔV relative to the asymptotic potential. Consequently, when ΔV is chosen to be about half of the gap between the zeroth and first Landau levels, the dot states are isolated energetically in the gap between Landau level 0 and Landau level -1. This is confirmed with numerical calculations of the magnetic field dependent energy spectrum and the quantum states. Remarkably, an antidot formed by reversing the sign of ΔV also confines electrons but in the energy region between Landau level 0 and Landau level +1. This unusual behaviour gives an unambiguous signal of the novel physics of graphene quantum dots.

  4. Preparation and characterization of composite microspheres for brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Di; Huang Wenhai; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Wang Deping; Gu Yifei

    2012-01-01

    Composite microspheres were prepared by coating yttrium–aluminum–silicate (YAS) glass microspheres (20–30 μm) with a layer of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and evaluated for potential use in brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. After neutron activation to form the β-emitting 90 Y radionuclide, the composite microspheres can be injected into a patient to destroy cancerous tumors; at the same time, the composite microspheres can generate heat upon application of a magnetic field to also destroy the tumors. The results showed that the composite microspheres were chemically durable when immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF), with ∼ 0.25% weight loss and ∼ 3.2% yttrium dissolved into the SBF after 30 days at 37 °C. The composite microspheres also showed ferromagnetic properties as a result of the Fe 3 O 4 coating; when immersed in water at 20 °C (20 mg in 1 mL of water), the application of an alternating magnetic field produced a temperature increase from 20 °C to 38−46 °C depending on the thickness of the Fe 3 O 4 coating. The results indicate that these composite microspheres have promising potential in combined brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancerous tumors. - Highlights: ► Composite microspheres for brachytherapy and hyperthermia treatment of cancer. ► Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles coated on the yttrium–aluminum–silicate glass microspheres. ► Microspheres are chemically stable in SBF. ► Microspheres can generate heat for hyperthermia under an alternating magnetic field. ► Microspheres can emit β-rays for brachytherapy after neutron activation.

  5. Measurement of 3-Axis Magnetic Fields Induced by Current Wires Using a Smartphone in Magnetostatics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, B.; Septianto, R. D.; Suhendra, D.; Iskandar, F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an inexpensive smartphone's magnetic sensor to measure magnetic field components (B[subscript x], B[subscript y] and B[subscript z]) induced by current wires in magnetostatic experiments. The variable parameters used to measure the magnetic sensor's capabilities were: the geometrical shapes of the wire, current…

  6. New, coupling loss induced, quench protection system for superconducting accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravaioli, Emanuele; Datskov, V.I.; Giloux, C.; Kirby, G.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.; Verweij, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    A new and promising method for the protection of superconducting high-field magnets is developed and tested on the so-called MQXC quadrupole magnet in the CERN magnet test facility. The method relies on a capacitive discharge system inducing during a few periods an oscillation of the transport

  7. Controlling laser-induced magnetization reversal dynamics in a rare-earth iron garnet across the magnetization compensation point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Marwan; Molho, Pierre; Barbara, Bernard; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2018-04-01

    In this work we explore the ultrafast magnetization dynamics induced by femtosecond laser pulses in a doped film of gadolinium iron garnet over a broad temperature range including the magnetization compensation point TM. By exciting the phonon-assisted 6S→4G and 6S→4P electronic d -d transitions simultaneously by one- and two-photon absorption processes, we find out that the transfer of heat energy from the lattice to the spin has, at a temperature slightly below TM, a large influence on the magnetization dynamics. In particular, we show that the speed and the amplitude of the magnetization dynamics can be strongly increased when increasing either the external magnetic field or the laser energy density. The obtained results are explained by a magnetization reversal process across TM. Furthermore, we find that the dynamics has unusual characteristics which can be understood by considering the weak spin-phonon coupling in magnetic garnets. These results open new perspectives for controlling the magnetic state of magnetic dielectrics using an ultrashort optically induced heat pulse.

  8. Experimental study of induced staggered magnetic fields in dysprosium gallium garnet (DGG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Corliss, L.M.; Hastings, J.M.; Blume, M.; Giordano, N.; Wolf, W.P.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron diffraction techniques have been used to study induced staggered magnetic field effects in DGG. The application of a uniform magnetic field at temperatures much greater than the Neel temperature induces a significant amount of antiferromagnetic order. The temperature and field dependences of this effect are in good agreement with recent theoretical predicions

  9. Remanent and induced magnetization in the volcanites of Lipari and Vulcano (Aeolian Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lanza

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of remanent and induced magnetization as sources of magnetic anomalies in the Lipari and Vulcano islands has been studied by systematic sampling. Remanent magnetization is higher than induced magnetization in almost all lithotypes. Its polarity is normal, and the mean directions are close to the present magnetic field. A slight thermal enhancement of the magnetic susceptibility occurs up to 450-500 °C, followed by a fall up to the Curie point, which is comprised in the range 550 ± 30 °C. This points to titanomagnetite as the main carrier of magnetization. The blocking temperature spectrum of the remanence ranges between the Curie point and 400 °C in most lithotypes, and falIs to 150-200 °C in the pyroclastic deposits. The results as a whole yield an outline of the areal distribution of the total magnetization intensity within the two islands.

  10. Effects of Transverse Magnetic Anisotropy on Current-Induced Spin Switching

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnaś, Józef

    2013-01-01

    Spin-polarized transport through bistable magnetic adatoms or single-molecule magnets (SMMs), which exhibit both uniaxial and transverse magnetic anisotropy, is considered theoretically. The main focus is on the impact of transverse anisotropy on transport characteristics and the adatom's/SMM's spin. In particular, we analyze the role of quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) in the mechanism of the current-induced spin switching, and show that the QTM phenomenon becomes revealed as resonan...

  11. Ferrimagnetic resonance study on photo-induced magnetism in hybrid magnetic semiconductor V(TCNE)x, x ˜2 film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jung-Woo; Shima Edelstein, R.; Lincoln, D. M.; Epstein, A. J.

    2007-03-01

    The V(TCNE)x, x˜2 is a fully spin-polarized magnetic semiconductor, whose magnetic order exceeds room temperature (Tc > 350 K), and electronic transport follows hopping mechanism through the Coulomb energy split &*circ; subband. In addition, it was determined that this material has thermally reversible persistent change in both magnetism and conductivity driven by the optical excitation [1]. Here, we report detailed investigation on photo-induced magnetism in V(TCNE)x by employing ferrimagnetic resonance (PIFMR) study with an in-situ light illumination. Upon optical excitation (λ˜ 457.9 nm), the FMR spectra display substantial change in their linewidth and resonance field. Angular dependence analyses of line shift indicate the increase of unixial anisotropy field in the film caused by the light irradiation. The results demonstrated that the change in overall magnetic anisotropy by the illumination plays an important role in inducing photo- induced magnetism in (TCNE) class magnet. [1] J.-W. Yoo, et al. to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett.

  12. Simple and Rapid Synthesis of Magnetite/Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hyperthermia Treatments via a Mechanochemical Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Ryo; Murase, Kenya; Takata, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for the rapid synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite particles. In this method, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are first synthesized by coprecipitation using ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. Immediately following the synthesis, carbonate-substituted (B-type) hydroxyapatite particles are mechanochemically synthesized by wet milling dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium carbonate in a dispersed suspension of magnetite nanoparticles, during which the magnetite nanoparticles are incorporated into the hydroxyapatite matrix. We observed that the resultant magnetite/hydroxyapatite composites possessed a homogeneous dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles, characterized by an absence of large aggregates. When this material was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, the heat generated increased with increasing magnetite concentration. For a magnetite concentration of 30 mass%, a temperature increase greater than 20 K was achieved in less than 50 s. These results suggest that our composites exhibit good hyperthermia properties and are promising candidates for hyperthermia treatments. PMID:23629669

  13. Simple and Rapid Synthesis of Magnetite/Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hyperthermia Treatments via a Mechanochemical Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Iwasaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple method for the rapid synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite particles. In this method, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are first synthesized by coprecipitation using ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. Immediately following the synthesis, carbonate-substituted (B-type hydroxyapatite particles are mechanochemically synthesized by wet milling dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium carbonate in a dispersed suspension of magnetite nanoparticles, during which the magnetite nanoparticles are incorporated into the hydroxyapatite matrix. We observed that the resultant magnetite/hydroxyapatite composites possessed a homogeneous dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles, characterized by an absence of large aggregates. When this material was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, the heat generated increased with increasing magnetite concentration. For a magnetite concentration of 30 mass%, a temperature increase greater than 20 K was achieved in less than 50 s. These results suggest that our composites exhibit good hyperthermia properties and are promising candidates for hyperthermia treatments.

  14. A multipoint feedback control system for scanned focussed ultrasound hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.; Kress, R.; Roemer, R.; Hynynen, K.

    1987-01-01

    A multipoint feedback control system has been developed and tested for use with a scanned focussed ultrasound hyperthermia system. Extensive in-vivo tests (using a perfused organ model) have been made to evaluate the basic performance characteristics of the feedback control scheme for control of temperature in perfused media. The results of these tests are presented and compared with the predictions of a simulation routine. The control scheme was also tested in vivo using dogs' thighs and kidneys. Thigh experiments show the control scheme responds well to the affects of vasodilation and is able to maintain the targeted temperatures. In kidney experiments, where the rate of perfusion was controllable, the power adjusting algorithm successfully maintained uniform temperature distributions across regions of varying rates of perfusion. As a conclusion, the results show that this multipoint feedback controller scheme induces uniform temperature distributions when used with scanned focussed ultrasound systems

  15. Hyperthermia, a modality in the wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szasz A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is a heat-treatment. It is widely used in various medical fields and has a well-recognized effect in oncology. Its effect is achieved by overheating of the targeted tissues. It is an ancient treatment and a promising physical approach with lack of acceptance by the serious medical use. To accept the method we need strong proofs and stable, reproducible treatment quality, but we are limited by biological, physical/technical and physiological problems. However, the main point - I believe - is the incorrect characterization and unrealistic expectations from this capable method. The temperature concept of the quality assurance guidelines has to be replaced by the heat-dose sensitive characterization, pointing the essence of the hyperthermia method.

  16. THE FIRST EXPERIENCE OF USING LOCAL HYPERTHERMIA IN COMBINED MODALITY TREATMENT OF OPERABLE NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Dobrodeev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the first experience in treating 5 patients with stage II–III non-small cell lung cancer using combined modality treatment including 40 Gy preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent 2 cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin chemotherapy and local hyperthermia (10 sessions followed by radical surgery. The overal response rate to preoperative treatment was 80 %. Chemotherapy was well tolerated and hyperthermia resulted no in adverse effects. All patients underwent surgery (4 lobectomies and 1 pneumonectomy. No complications were observed in the postoperative period. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 20 months. No evidence of disease progression and radiation-induced damages were observed.

  17. Interaction of hyperthermia and radiation: radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loshek, D.D.; Orr, J.S.; Solomonidis, E.

    1981-01-01

    Cell-survival data were collected to determine the survival response of asynchronous CHO cells subject to radiation and hyperthermia. The irradiation was at room temperature 100 minutes before exposure to hyperthermia at 42 0 C. The survival response to the combination of these two agents is expressed by means of a survival surface, a three-dimensional concept relating cell survival to heat dose and radiation dose. The survival surface could be approximately described by a survival model comprising three components of cell killing: the unperturbed radiation component, the unperturbed hyperthermia component and the interaction component. The dependence of the radiation component and the interaction component on radiation quality were investigated by irradiating with either 60 Co γ rays, 250 kV X rays or 14.7 MeV neutrons. An analysis suggests that the interaction component and the radiation component exhibit similar dependencies on radiation quality both for the deposition of damage and the repair or accumulation of that damage. (U.K.)

  18. A study of effects of hyperthermia on large, short-haired male dogs : a simulated air transport environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    When dogs are shipped by air transport, they can encounter environmental temperatures as high as 130.0 F during the summer months. Heat- induced hyperthermia can be a major problem in dogs. : To assess some aspects of the heat stress problem, 20 dogs...

  19. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  20. Effect of the induced magnetic field on peristaltic flow of a couple stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekheimer, Kh.S.

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed the MHD flow of a conducting couple stress fluid in a slit channel with rhythmically contracting walls. In this analysis we are taking into account the induced magnetic field. Analytical expressions for the stream function, the magnetic force function, the axial pressure gradient, the axial induced magnetic field and the distribution of the current density across the channel are obtained using long wavelength approximation. The results for the pressure rise, the frictional force per wave length, the axial induced magnetic field and distribution of the current density across the channel have been computed numerically and the results were studied for various values of the physical parameters of interest, such as the couple stress parameter γ, the Hartmann number M, the magnetic Reynolds number R m and the time averaged mean flow rate θ. Contour plots for the stream and magnetic force functions are obtained and the trapping phenomena for the flow field is discussed

  1. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Sun, Nian, E-mail: n.sun@neu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Peng, Bin; Liu, Ming, E-mail: mingliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Budil, David [Department of Chemistry, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  2. Fabrication, characterization and in-vitro cytotoxicity of magnetic nanocomposite polymeric film for multi-functional medical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingyun; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Gao, Fuping; Tang, Jintian

    2009-07-01

    Cancer comprehensive treatment has been fully acknowledged as it can provide an effective multimodality approach for fighting cancers. In this study, various innovative technologies for cancer treatment including cancer nanotechnology, chemotherapy by sustainable release, as well as magnetic induction hyperthermia (MIH) have been integrated for the purpose of cancer comprehensive treatment. Briefly, such kind of treatment can be realized by applying of the tailored magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) composite polymeric film. Fe3O4 MNPs acting as the agent for MIH, and anti-cancer drug docetaxel as chemotherapeutic agent were incorporated within the biodegradable polymeric film. Physiochemical characterizations on MNPs and the film have been systematically carried out by various instrumental analyses. Our results demonstrated that the film has been successfully fabricated by the solvent cast method. Hyperthermia could be induced by stimulating the nanocomposite film under an alternative magnetic field (AMF). The incorporation of MNPs, as well as hyperthermia would facilitate the drug release from the polymeric film. The in-vitro cytotoxicity results indicated the bi-modal cancer treatment approach for combined MIH and chemotherapy is more effective than the mono-modal treatment by docetaxel treatment. The magnetic nanocomposite film can realize cancer comprehensive treatment thus has great potential in clinical application.

  3. Universal Effectiveness of Inducing Magnetic Moments in Graphene by Amino-Type sp3-Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Tang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Inducing magnetic moments in graphene is very important for its potential application in spintronics. Introducing sp3-defects on the graphene basal plane is deemed as the most promising approach to produce magnetic graphene. However, its universal validity has not been very well verified experimentally. By functionalization of approximately pure amino groups on graphene basal plane, a spin-generalization efficiency of ~1 μB/100 NH2 was obtained for the first time, thus providing substantial evidence for the validity of inducing magnetic moments by sp3-defects. As well, amino groups provide another potential sp3-type candidate to prepare magnetic graphene.

  4. A characterisation of the magnetically induced movement of NdFeB-particles in magnetorheological elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, M.; Borin, D. Y.; Huang, S.; Auernhammer, G. K.; Müller, R.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers are a type of smart hybrid material where elastic properties of a soft elastomer matrix are combined with magnetic properties of magnetic micro particles. This combination leads to a complex interplay of magnetic and elastic phenomena, of which the magnetorheological effect is the best described. In this paper, magnetically hard NdFeB-particles were used to obtain remanent magnetic properties. X-ray microtomography has been utilised to analyse the particle movement induced by magnetic fields. A particle tracking was performed; thus, it was possible to characterise the movement of individual particles. Beyond that, a comprehensive analysis of the orientation of all particles was performed at different states of magnetisation and global particle arrangements. For the first time, this method was successfully applied to a magnetorheological material with a technically relevant amount of magnetic NdFeB-particles. A significant impact of the magnetic field on the rotation and translation of the particles was shown.

  5. Field Induced Magnetic Moments in a Metastable Iron-Mercury Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.S.; Mørup, Steen; Linderoth, Søren

    1996-01-01

    The magnetic properties of a metastable iron-mercury alloy have been investigated in the temperature range from 5 to 200 K by Mossbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements. At low temperature the magnetic moment per iron atom is larger than af alpha-Fe. The effective spontaneous magnetic ....... It was found that the field-induced increase of the magnetic moment in the metastable iron-mecury alloy was about 0.06 Bohr magnetons per iron atom in the temperature range from 5 to 200 K for a field change from 6 to 12 T....

  6. Studies of Current Induced Magnetization reversal and generation of GHz radiation in magnetic nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajdarwish, Mustafa Yousef

    This thesis describes studies of two phenomena: Current-Induced Magnetization Switching (CIMS), and Current-Induced Generation of GHz Radiation. The CIMS part contains results of measurements of current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) magnetoresistance (MR) and CIMS behavior on Ferromagnetic/Nonmetal/Ferromagnetic (F1/N/F2) nanopillars. Judicious combinations of F1 and F2 metals with different bulk scattering asymmetries, and with F1/N and N/F2 interfaces having different interfacial scattering asymmetries, are shown to be able to controllably, and independently, 'invert' both the CPP-MR and the CIMS. In 'normal' CPP-MR, R(AP) > R(P), where R(AP) and R(P) are the nanopillar resistances for the anti-parallel (AP) and parallel (P) orientations of the Fi and F2 magnetic moments. In 'inverse' CPP-MR, R(P) > R(AP). In 'normal' CIMS, positive current switches the nanopillar from the P to the AP state. In 'inverse' CIMS, positive current switches the nanopillar from AP to P. All four possible combinations of CPP-MR and CIMS---(a) 'normal'-'normal', (b) 'normal'- 'inverse', 'inverse'-'normal', and (d) 'inverse'-'inverse' are shown and explained. These results rule out the self-Oersted field as the switching source, since the direction of that field is independent of the bulk or interfacial scattering asymmetries. Successful use of impurities to reverse the bulk scattering asymmetry shows the importance of scattering off of impurities within the bulk F1 and F2 metals---i.e. that the transport must be treated as 'diffusive' rather than 'ballistic'. The GHz studies consist of five parts: (1) designing a sample geometry that allows reliable measurements; (2) making nanopillar samples with this geometry; (3) constructing a system for measuring frequencies up to 12 GHz and measuring current-driven GHz radiation data with it; (4) showing 'scaling' behavior of GHz data with the critical fields and currents for nominally identical (but actually slightly different) samples, and

  7. Gradient-induced longitudinal relaxation of hyperpolarized noble gases in the fringe fields of superconducting magnets used for magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wangzhi; Cleveland, Zackary I; Möller, Harald E; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2011-02-01

    When hyperpolarized noble gases are brought into the bore of a superconducting magnet for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or spectroscopy studies, the gases must pass through substantial field gradients, which can cause rapid longitudinal relaxation. In this communication, we present a means of calculating this spatially dependent relaxation rate in the fringe field of typical magnets. We then compare these predictions to experimental measurements of (3)He relaxation at various positions near a medium-bore 2-T small animal MRI system. The calculated and measured relaxation rates on the central axis of the magnet agree well and show a maximum (3)He relaxation rate of 3.83×10(-3) s(-1) (T(1)=4.4 min) at a distance of 47 cm from the magnet isocenter. We also show that if this magnet were self-shielded, its minimum T(1) would drop to 1.2 min. In contrast, a typical self-shielded 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner will induce a minimum on-axis T(1) of 12 min. Additionally, we show that the cylindrically symmetric fields of these magnets enable gradient-induced relaxation to be calculated using only knowledge of the on-axis longitudinal field, which can either be measured directly or calculated from a simple field model. Thus, while most MRI magnets employ complex and proprietary current configurations, we show that their fringe fields and the resulting gradient-induced relaxation are well approximated by simple solenoid models. Finally, our modeling also demonstrates that relaxation rates can increase by nearly an order of magnitude at radial distances equivalent to the solenoid radius. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Altered lipid homeostasis in Sertoli cells stressed by mild hyperthermia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana S Vallés

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is known to be vulnerable to temperature. Exposures of rat testis to moderate hyperthermia result in loss of germ cells with survival of Sertoli cells (SC. Because SC provide structural and metabolic support to germ cells, our aim was to test the hypothesis that these exposures affect SC functions, thus contributing to germ cell damage. In vivo, regularly repeated exposures (one of 15 min per day, once a day during 5 days of rat testes to 43 °C led to accumulation of neutral lipids. This SC-specific lipid function took 1-2 weeks after the last of these exposures to be maximal. In cultured SC, similar daily exposures for 15 min to 43 °C resulted in significant increase in triacylglycerol levels and accumulation of lipid droplets. After incubations with [3H]arachidonate, the labeling of cardiolipin decreased more than that of other lipid classes. Another specifically mitochondrial lipid metabolic function, fatty acid oxidation, also declined. These lipid changes suggested that temperature affects SC mitochondrial physiology, which was confirmed by significantly increased degrees of membrane depolarization and ROS production. This concurred with reduced expression of two SC-specific proteins, transferrin, and Wilms' Tumor 1 protein, markers of SC secretion and differentiation functions, respectively, and with an intense SC cytoskeletal perturbation, evident by loss of microtubule network (α-tubulin and microfilament (f-actin organization. Albeit temporary and potentially reversible, hyperthermia-induced SC structural and metabolic alterations may be long-lasting and/or extensive enough to respond for the decreased survival of the germ cells they normally foster.

  9. Size dependence of spin-torque induced magnetic switching in CoFeB-based perpendicular magnetization tunnel junctions (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. Z.; Trouilloud, P. L.; Gajek, M. J.; Nowak, J.; Robertazzi, R. P.; Hu, G.; Abraham, D. W.; Gaidis, M. C.; Brown, S. L.; O'Sullivan, E. J.; Gallagher, W. J.; Worledge, D. C.

    2012-04-01

    CoFeB-based magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are used as a model system for studies of size dependence in spin-torque-induced magnetic switching. For integrated solid-state memory applications, it is important to understand the magnetic and electrical characteristics of these magnetic tunnel junctions as they scale with tunnel junction size. Size-dependent magnetic anisotropy energy, switching voltage, apparent damping, and anisotropy field are systematically compared for devices with different materials and fabrication treatments. Results reveal the presence of sub-volume thermal fluctuation and reversal, with a characteristic length-scale of the order of approximately 40 nm, depending on the strength of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and exchange stiffness. To have the best spin-torque switching efficiency and best stability against thermal activation, it is desirable to optimize the perpendicular anisotropy strength with the junction size for intended use. It also is important to ensure strong exchange-stiffness across the magnetic thin film. These combine to give an exchange length that is comparable or larger than the lateral device size for efficient spin-torque switching.

  10. Hyperthermia for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervix Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Franckena (Martine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstract(English): There is a strong biological rationale for the use of hyperthermia as an oncological treatment modality. Fifteen randomized trials have shown significant improvement in clinical outcome when hyperthermia was added to radiotherapy, chemotherapy or both. At temperatures ≥ 40

  11. Development of a tensile-stress-induced anisotropy in amorphous magnetic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, K.; Vazquez, M.; Garcia, D.; Castano, F.J.; Prados, C.; Hernando, A.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic anisotropy was induced in positive magnetostrictive Fe 80 B 20 and negative magnetostrictive Co 75 Si 15 B 10 thin films by developing a tensile stress within the samples. The films were grown on the concave surfaces of mechanically bowed glass substrates. On releasing the substrates from the substrate holders, a tensile stress was developed within the samples that modified the domain structure. As a result of it, a magnetic easy axis parallel to the direction of the stress was induced in FeB sample whereas in CoSiB sample the induced easy axis was perpendicular to the direction of the developed stress. To produce magnetic multilayers with crossed anisotropy, FeB/CoSiB bilayers and FeB/Cu/CoSiB trilayers were grown on bowed substrates. The study of magnetic properties of the multilayers indicates the development of crossed anisotropy within them, particularly when the magnetic layers are separated by a nonmagnetic Cu layer

  12. Switching the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy by ion irradiation induced compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Amarouche, Teyri; Xu, Chi; Rushforth, Andrew; Böttger, Roman; Edmonds, Kevin; Campion, Richard; Gallagher, Bryan; Helm, Manfred; Jürgen von Bardeleben, Hans; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAsP is modified by helium ion irradiation. According to the micro-magnetic parameters, e.g. resonance fields and anisotropy constants deduced from ferromagnetic resonance measurements, a rotation of the magnetic easy axis from out-of-plane [0 0 1] to in-plane [1 0 0] direction is achieved. From the application point of view, our work presents a novel avenue in modifying the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in GaMnAsP with the possibility of lateral patterning by using lithography or focused ion beam.

  13. Roles of effective helical ripple rates in nonlinear stability of externally induced magnetic islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Seiya, E-mail: n-seiya@kobe-kosen.ac.jp [Kobe City College of Technology, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2194 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic islands are externally produced by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in toroidal plasmas. Spontaneous annihilation of RMP-induced magnetic islands called self-healing has been observed in helical systems. A possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by helical ripple-induced neoclassical flows, which give rise to neoclassical viscous torques. In this study, effective helical ripple rates in multi-helicity helical systems are revisited, and a multi-helicity effect on the self-healing is investigated, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands. It is confirmed that effective helical ripple rates are sensitive to magnetic axis positions. It is newly found that self-healing thresholds also strongly depend on magnetic axis positions, which is due to dependence of neoclassical viscous torques on effective helical ripple rates.

  14. Influence of an ac magnetic field and induced magnetic anisotropy on the surface magnetoimpedance tensor in an amorphous wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A P; Zhukova, V; Zhukov, A; Dominguez, L; Chizhik, A; Blanco, J M; Gonzalez, J

    2004-01-01

    The influence of an ac magnetic field and the induced magnetic anisotropy (by field annealing and torsion annealing) on the magnetoimpedance (MI) tensor in an amorphous wire has been analysed. The experimental measurements were carried out in an amorphous wire of composition (Co 0.94 Fe 0.06 ) 72.5 Si 12.5 B 15 , with a negative, nearly zero magnetostriction constant, excited either by an ac circular, h φ , or an axial, h z , magnetic field created by an ac electric current passing along the wire or through an exciting coil mounted on the wire, respectively. The ac current amplitude was changed from 7.5 to 40 mA and the current frequency f was varied from 1.5 to 20 MHz. The induced magnetic anisotropies modify the MI response drastically. The field annealed sample shows a unique peak of the MI effect, while the torsion annealed sample presents an asymmetric giant magnetoimpedance ratio associated with the induced magnetic anisotropy which provokes such thermal treatments

  15. Part-body hyperthermia with a radiofrequency multiantenna applicator under online control in 1,5 T MR-tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, P.; Gellermann, J.; Faehling, H.; Wlodarczyk, W.; Felix, R.; Seebass, M.; Turner, P.; Nadobny, J.; Rau, B.; Hildebrandt, B.; Schlag, P.M.; Oppelt, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective of this study is the integration of a multiantenna applicator for part-body hyperthermia (BSD 2000/3D) in a 1.5 T MR-tomograph (Siemens Magnetom Symphony) in order to perform noninvasive MR monitoring in real time to increase safety and effectiveness of heat treatments. The positioning unit is mechanically coupled to the MR gantry from the back side and the body coil is utilised for imaging. For that purpose, the hyperthermia antenna system (100 MHz, 1.500 W) and the MR receiver(63.9 MHs) have to be decoupled in terms of high frequency (filter) and electromagnetically (emc). The processing of MR data sets is performed in a hyperthermia planning system. A simultaneous operation of radiofrequency hyperthermia and MR system is possible at clinically relevant power levels. MR imaging is used for tumor diagnostics (standard spin echo sequences), for hyperthermia planning (T1-weighted gradient echo sequences in equal- and opposed-phase techniques), and for temperature measurements according to the proton resonance frequency method (PRF method, phase evaluation registration using a gradient echo sequence with long echo time). In 33 patients with advanced pelvic and abdominal tumors we performed 150 heat sessions under MR monitoring. For 70% of these patients a visualisation of temperature sensitive data during treatment was possible. The evaluated difference images represent a superposition of real temperature increase and a (temperature-induced) perfusion elevation. The hybrid approach renders development of part body hyperthermia possible as an MR-controlled intervention in radiology. (orig.) [de

  16. Low-magnetization magnetic microcapsules: A synergistic theranostic platform for remote cancer cells therapy and imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei; Deng, Lin; Wang, Guangchao; Guo, Xianrong; Li, Qiujin; Zhang, Jianfei; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2014-01-01

    Multifunctional magnetic microcapsules (MMCs) for the combined cancer cells hyperthermia and chemotherapy in addition to MR imaging are successfully developed. A classical layer-by-layer technique of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes (poly

  17. Magnetic-field induced phase transitions in intermetallic rare-earth ferrimagnets with a compensation point

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sabdenov, Ch.K.; Davydova, M.D.; Zvezdin, K.A.; Gorbunov, Denis; Tereshina, I. S.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2017), s. 551-558 ISSN 1063-777X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03593S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : rare-earth intermetallics * phase diagram * field-induced transition * magnetic anisotropy * high magnetic fields Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.804, year: 2016

  18. Computer circuit analysis of induced currents in the MFTF-B magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnuson, G.D.; Woods, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was made of the induced current behavior of the MFTF-B magnet system. Although the magnet system consists of 22 coils, because of its symmetry we considered only 11 coils in the analysis. Various combinations of the coils were dumped either singly or in groups, with the current behavior in all magnets calculated as a function of time after initiation of the dump

  19. Calculation of induced modes of magnetic field in the geodynamo problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Yukiko; Yukutake, Takesi

    1989-01-01

    In the dynamo problem, the calculation of induced modes is of vital importance, because the interaction of fluid motions with the magnetic field induces specific types of fields which are, in many cases, different either from the type of velocity field or from the original magnetic field. This special induction relationship, known as 'selection rules', has so far been derived by calculating Adams-Gaunt integrals and Elsasser integrals. In this paper, we calculate the induced modes in a more direct way, expressing the magnetic fields and the velocity in a spherical harmonic series. By linearizing the product terms of spherical harmonic functions, which appear in interaction terms between the velocity and the magnetic field, into a simple spherical harmonic series, we have derived the induced magnetic modes in a simple general form. When the magnetic field and the velocity are expressed by toroidal and poloidal modes, four kinds of interaction are conceivable between the velocity and the magnetic field. By each interaction, two modes, the poloidal and toroidal, are induced, except in the interaction of the toroidal velocity with the toroidal magnetic field, which induces only the toroidal mode. In spite of the diversity of interaction processes, the induced modes have been found to be expressed simply by two types. For a velocity of degree l and order k interacting with a magnetic field of degree n and order m, one type is the mode with degree and order of n+l-2t, |m±k| for an integer t, and the other with n+l-2t-1, |m±k|. (author)

  20. Controlling the induced anisotropy in soft magnetic films for high-frequency applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chezan, A.R.; Craus, C.B.; Chechenin, N.G.; Vystavel, T.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Niesen, L.; Boerma, D.O.

    Nanocrystalline soft magnetic Fe–Zr–N films were successfully deposited by dc magnetron reactive sputtering. The nitrogen content was controlled by varying the Ar/N2 ratio and/or the substrate temperature. The films have saturation magnetization and induced uniaxial anisotropy values in the range

  1. Quenched-disorder-induced magnetization jumps in (Sm,Sr)MnO3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fisher, LM; Kalinov, AV; Voloshin, IF; Babushkina, NA; Khomskii, DI; Zhang, Y; Palstra, TTM

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic field induced steplike changes in magnetization and resistivity of Sm1-xSrxMnO3 manganites were studied. A strong dependence of these features on the cooling rate was observed. Magnetostriction, however, does not show the presence of large strain in our samples. From all these features we

  2. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of biocompatible cinnamaldehyde functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (CPGF Nps for hyperthermia and drug delivery applications in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtee D Wani

    Full Text Available Cinnamaldehyde, the bioactive component of the spice cinnamon, and its derivatives have been shown to possess anti-cancer activity against various cancer cell lines. However, its hydrophobic nature invites attention for efficient drug delivery systems that would enhance the bioavailability of cinnamaldehyde without affecting its bioactivity. Here, we report the synthesis of stable aqueous suspension of cinnamaldehyde tagged Fe3O4 nanoparticles capped with glycine and pluronic polymer (CPGF NPs for their potential application in drug delivery and hyperthermia in breast cancer. The monodispersed superparamagnetic NPs had an average particulate size of ∼ 20 nm. TGA data revealed the drug payload of ∼ 18%. Compared to the free cinnamaldehyde, CPGF NPs reduced the viability of breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDAMB231, at lower doses of cinnamaldehyde suggesting its increased bioavailability and in turn its therapeutic efficacy in the cells. Interestingly, the NPs were non-toxic to the non-cancerous HEK293 and MCF10A cell lines compared to the free cinnamaldehyde. The novelty of CPGF nanoparticulate system was that it could induce cytotoxicity in both ER/PR positive/Her2 negative (MCF7 and ER/PR negative/Her2 negative (MDAMB231 breast cancer cells, the latter being insensitive to most of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The NPs decreased the growth of the breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and altered their migration through reduction in MMP-2 expression. CPGF NPs also decreased the expression of VEGF, an important oncomarker of tumor angiogenesis. They induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, upon exposure to the radiofrequency waves, the NPs heated up to 41.6 °C within 1 min, suggesting their promise as a magnetic hyperthermia agent. All these findings indicate that CPGF NPs prove to be potential nano-chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer.

  3. Chiral spiral induced by a strong magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuki Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modification of the chiral phase structure of QCD due to an external magnetic field. We first demonstrate how the effect of magnetic field can systematically be incorporated into a generalized Ginzburg-Landau framework. We then analyze the phase structure in the vicinity of the chiral critical point. In the chiral limit, the effect is found to be so drastic that it brings a “continent” of chiral spiral in the phase diagram, by which the chiral tricritical point is totally washed out. This is the case no matter how small the intensity of magnetic field is. On the other hand, the current quark mass protects the chiral critical point from a weak magnetic field. However, the critical point will eventually be covered by the chiral spiral phase as the magnetic field grows.

  4. An FDTD code for hyperthermia treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocco, G.; Bardati, F. [Rome Univ. Tor Vergata (Italy). Dipt. di Informatica, sistemi e produzione; Tognolatti, P. [L' Aquila Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica

    1999-08-01

    Radio-frequency hyperthermia is an anticancer modality based on the heating of tumours by radiating sources. A set of antennas is frequently used to enhance power depositions in tissues. Treatments planning needs electromagnetic field computation within realistic body models. Since several simulation may be required the optimize the antenna-body configuration, the electromagnetic solver should be designed in such a way that new configuration of the antenna set-up can be solved without heavy changes of the basic numerical code. In this paper a numerical investigation on the effects of a segmentation technique will be presented, with reference to an FDTD computation and the heating of a paediatric tumour.

  5. Trial of radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegawa, Y; Fujiwara, K; Oe, J; Nagase, M; Akiyama, H [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-08-01

    Nine patients were treated by the combination therapy of external irradiation and hyperthermia, 5 patients with metastatic lesions; two breast cancer, one lung cancer, one malignant melanoma, one vulva cancer, 1 patient with recurrent lesion of skin cancer and 3 patients with bladder cancer. All patients were treated by heating locally (42/sup 0/C, 30 min) followed by external irradiation with 4,000 - 5,000 rad over 4 to 5 weeks. No local recurrence was found in 4 of 9 patients.

  6. First-principles study of adsorption-induced magnetic properties of InSe monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhaoming; Yang, Bowen; Zhang, Na; Ma, Dongwei; Yang, Zongxian

    2018-04-01

    In this work we studied the adsorption-induced magnetic behaviors on the two-dimensional InSe monolayer. Six kinds of adatoms (H, B, C, N, O and F) are taken into account. It is found that the InSe with adsorbing C and F have nonzero magnetic moments and good stability. Importantly, the magnetism of C and F modified InSe monolayers completely comes from p electrons of adatoms and substrates. The strength of magnetic exchange interaction can be controlled by changing the coverage of adsorbates. This p-electron magnetic material is thought to have obvious advantages compared to conventional d- or f-electron magnets. Our research is meaningful for practical applications in spintronic electronics and two dimensional magnetic semiconductors.

  7. Strain and thermally induced magnetic dynamics and spin current in magnetic insulators subject to transient optical grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-Guang; Chotorlishvili, Levan; Berakdar, Jamal

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the magnetic dynamics and particularlythe spin current in an open-circuit ferromagnetic insulator irradiated by two intense, phase-locked laser pulses. The interference of the laser beams generates a transient optical grating and a transient spatio-temporal temperature distribution. Both effects lead to elastic and heat waves at the surface and into the bulk of the sample. The strain induced spin current as well as the thermally induced magnonic spin current are evaluated numerically on the basis of micromagnetic simulations using solutions of the heat equation. We observe that the thermo-elastically induced magnonic spin current propagates on a distance larger than the characteristic size of thermal profile, an effect useful for applications in remote detection of spin caloritronics phenomena. Our findings point out that exploiting strain adds a new twist to heat-assisted magnetic switching and spin-current generation for spintronic applications.

  8. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  9. Hyperthermia studies using inductive and ultrasound methods on E. coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral–Prieto, A., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.mx; López-Callejas, R., E-mail: regulo.lopez@inin.gob.mx; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G., E-mail: benjamin.rodriguez@inin.gob.mx; Santos-Cuevas, C. L., E-mail: clara.cuevas@inin.gob.mx [Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Celis-Almazán, J., E-mail: jony-jac-5@hotmail.com; Olea-Mejía, O., E-mail: oleaoscar@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable (Mexico); Gómez-Morales, J. L. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Campus El Cerrillo, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico); Peña-Eguiluz, R., E-mail: rosendo.eguiluz@inin.gob.mx; Valencia-Alvarado, R., E-mail: raul.valencia@inin.gob.mx; Mercado-Cabrera, A., E-mail: antonio.mercado@inin.gob.mx; Muñoz-Castro, A. E., E-mail: arturo.munoz@inin.gob.mx [Carretera México-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); García-Santibañez, F., E-mail: fegasa2@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Campus El Cerrillo, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico)

    2017-11-15

    The survival of Escherichia coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells were studied under different temperatures using direct heating in water, ultrasound, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. The survival of these microorganisms depended on whether the heating mode was continuous or discontinuous, surviving more in the former than in the discontinuous heating mode. Whereas Escherichia coli bacteria did not survive at temperatures ≥50{sup ∘}C, the mouse glioma cells did not survive at temperatures ≥48{sup ∘}C. The survival of both these microorganisms was independent of the presence or absence of the magnetic nanoparticles of magnetite, suggesting that these, having mean particle sizes of 9.5, 8.5 and 5, did not show any apparent cytotoxicity effect. Present results also showed that the inductive heating system which used a radiofrequency of 13.56 MHz, providing a maximum magnetic field strength of 160 A/m, the electric rather than magnetic heating predominated.

  10. Hyperthermia studies using inductive and ultrasound methods on E. coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral–Prieto, A.; López-Callejas, R.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; Santos-Cuevas, C. L.; Celis-Almazán, J.; Olea-Mejía, O.; Gómez-Morales, J. L.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; García-Santibañez, F.

    2017-01-01

    The survival of Escherichia coli bacteria and mouse glioma cells were studied under different temperatures using direct heating in water, ultrasound, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. The survival of these microorganisms depended on whether the heating mode was continuous or discontinuous, surviving more in the former than in the discontinuous heating mode. Whereas Escherichia coli bacteria did not survive at temperatures ≥50"∘C, the mouse glioma cells did not survive at temperatures ≥48"∘C. The survival of both these microorganisms was independent of the presence or absence of the magnetic nanoparticles of magnetite, suggesting that these, having mean particle sizes of 9.5, 8.5 and 5, did not show any apparent cytotoxicity effect. Present results also showed that the inductive heating system which used a radiofrequency of 13.56 MHz, providing a maximum magnetic field strength of 160 A/m, the electric rather than magnetic heating predominated.

  11. Magnetization reversal of Co-based amorphous wires induced by longitudinal AC magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perov, N.S.; Antonov, A.S.; Buznikov, N.A.; Granovsky, A.B. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Iakubov, I.T.; Kartashov, M.A.; Rakhmanov, A.A

    2004-05-01

    The remagnetization process in CoFeSiB amorphous wires under influence of a high-amplitude AC longitudinal magnetic field is studied. The frequency spectra of the voltage at the wire ends are measured as a function of a longitudinal DC magnetic field and the AC field amplitude. A high sensitivity of the voltage harmonics to the DC magnetic field is demonstrated. The experimental results are interpreted within a simple rotational model.

  12. Magnetization reversal of Co-based amorphous wires induced by longitudinal AC magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perov, N.S.; Antonov, A.S.; Buznikov, N.A.; Granovsky, A.B.; Iakubov, I.T.; Kartashov, M.A.; Rakhmanov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The remagnetization process in CoFeSiB amorphous wires under influence of a high-amplitude AC longitudinal magnetic field is studied. The frequency spectra of the voltage at the wire ends are measured as a function of a longitudinal DC magnetic field and the AC field amplitude. A high sensitivity of the voltage harmonics to the DC magnetic field is demonstrated. The experimental results are interpreted within a simple rotational model

  13. Magnetic domain structure and magnetically-induced reorientation in Ni–Mn–Ga magnetic shape memory alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Bradshaw, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 4 (2017), s. 1063-1065 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00262S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic shape memory effect * magnetic domain structure * 3D visualization * domain mirroring Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.469, year: 2016

  14. Field-induced magnetic instability within a superconducting condensate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzone, Daniel Gabriel; Raymond, Stephane; Gavilano, Jorge Luis

    2017-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields, chemical substitution, or hydrostatic pressure to strongly correlated electron materials can stabilize electronic phases with different organizational principles. We present evidence for a fieldinduced quantum phase transition, in superconducting Nd0.05Ce0.95Co...... that the magnetic instability is not magnetically driven, and we propose that it is driven by a modification of superconducting condensate at H*.......In5, that separates two antiferromagnetic phases with identical magnetic symmetry. At zero field, we find a spin-density wave that is suppressed at the critical field mu H-0* = 8 T. For H > H*, a spin-density phase emerges and shares many properties with the Q phase in CeCoIn5. These results suggest...

  15. Backwards time travel induced by combined magnetic and gravitational fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novello, M.; Svaiter, N.F.; Guimaraes, M.E.X.

    1990-01-01

    We analyse the behaviour of an elementary microscopic particle submitted to combined Magnetic and Gravitational Fields on Goedel's Universe. The exam is made in a local Gaussian system of coordinates. (author)

  16. Shear-induced inflation of coronal magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimchuk, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Using numerical models of force-free magnetic fields, the shearing of footprints in arcade geometries leading to an inflation of the coronal magnetic field was examined. For each of the shear profiles considered, all of the field lines become elevated compared with the potential field. This includes cases where the shear is concentrated well away from the arcade axis, such that B(sub z), the component of field parallel to the axis, increases outward to produce an inward B(sub z) squared/8 pi magnetic pressure gradient force. These results contrast with an earlier claim, shown to be incorrect, that field lines can sometimes become depressed as a result of shear. It is conjectured that an inflation of the entire field will always result from the shearing of simple arcade configurations. These results have implications for prominence formation, the interplanetary magnetic flux, and possibly also coronal holes. 38 refs

  17. Membrane defect in procine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) has been proposed to result from abnormal calcium-homeostasis in skeletal muscle. This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-sequestration or calcium-release by sarcoplasmic reticulum was abnormal in MH-susceptible swine. A heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction (HSR), enriched in terminal cisternae, was isolated from MH and control muscle using differential and density-gradient centrifugation. Calcium transport was studied using 45 Ca radioisotope and Millipore filtration. Enzymatic activities, cholesterol, phospholipid, and protein composition were determined using spectrophotometric techniques and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Properties of calcium-sequestration by MH and control HSR were indistinguishable, although Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin content were 100% increased in MH HSR. However when muscle homogenate pH was decreased due to MH, calcium-uptake activity was depressed to <5% of control values. Results of this study indicate a model for the etiopathogenesis of MH, and for the inheritance and diagnosis of susceptibility to MH. Malignant hyperthermia is initiated due to a hypersensitive HSR calcium-release mechanism and propagated by a loss of calcium-sequestering function as acidosis develops. Susceptibility is inherited in an autosomal, codominant pattern and may be diagnosed most definitively and sensitively on the basis of calcium-release sensitivity-tests, performed on isolated HSR

  18. Enhancement of immunological activity after mild hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Tohru

    2002-01-01

    At present, hyperthermia is clinically very important as interdisciplinary therapeutic method, and studies are being performed on combined effects with surgical treatment, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and gene therapy for the treatment of malignant tumors. We evaluated the effects of hyperthermia under temperature of 42.5C and demonstrated that the activation of immunological response is increased and anti-tumor effect cabn be obtained in this studies. We used animals were C3H mice (male,7W) bearing SCC-VII tumor on femur skin. Then, the mice were divided to 10 mice in each group, and only femur region was immersed in warm water for thermal treatment. Also we measured the tumor growth, changes of blood cell fraction and NK cell activity. The results of the present study confirmed: (1) Anti-tumor effect can be given by thermal treatment at relatively mild temperature (mild temperature at 39C-42C); (2) The increase of neutrophils is dependent on the quantity of heat added; (3) Immunological response of monocytes and lymphocytes is associated with it; (4) Activity of the immunological potency as a whole such as activation of NK cells was also confirmed

  19. A thermocouple thermometry system for ultrasound hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozarka, M.; Gharakhani, A.; Magin, R.; Cain, C.

    1984-01-01

    A thermometry system designed to be used in the treatment of cancer by ultrasound hyperthermia is described. The system monitors tumor temperatures using 16 type T (copper-constantan) thermocouples and is controlled by a 12 MHz Intel 8031 microcomputer. An analog circuit board contains the thermocouple amplifiers, an analog multiplexer, scaling circuitry, and an analog to digital converter. A digital board contains the Intel 8031, program memory, data memory, as well as circuitry for control and data communications. Communication with the hyperthermia system control computer is serially by RS-232 with selectable baud rate. Since the thermocouple amplifiers may have slight differences in gain and offset, a calibrated offset is added to a lookup table value to obtain the proper display temperature to within +- 0.1 0 C. The calibration routine, implemented in software, loads a nonvolatile random access memory chip with the proper offset values based on the outputs of each thermocouple channel at known temperatures which bracket a range of interest

  20. Long duration mild temperature hyperthermia and brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, E P; Raaphorst, G P

    2004-03-01

    Combining long duration mild temperature hyperthermia (LDMH) and low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to enhance therapeutic killing of cancer cells was proposed many years ago. The cellular and tumour research that supports this hypothesis is presented in this review. Research describing LDMH interaction with pulsed brachytherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy using clinically relevant parameters are compared with LDMH/LDR brachytherapy. The mechanism by which LDMH sensitizes LDR has been established as the inhibition of sublethal damage repair. The molecular mechanisms have been shown to involve DNA repair enzymes, but the exact nature of these processes is still under investigation. The relative differences between LDMH interactions with human and rodent cells are presented to help in the understanding of possible roles of LDMH in clinical application. The role of LDMH in modifying tumour blood flow and its possible role in LDR sensitization of tumours is also presented. The positive aspects of LDMH-brachytherapy for clinical application are sixfold; (1) the thermal goals (temperature, time and volume) are achievable with currently available technology, (2) the hyperthermia by itself has no detectable toxic effects, (3) thermotolerance appears to play a minor if any role in radiation sensitization, (4) TER of around 2 can be expected, (5) hypoxic fraction may be decreased due to blood flow modification and (6) simultaneous chemotherapy may also be sensitized. Combined LDMH and brachytherapy is a cancer therapy that has established biological rationale and sufficient technical and clinical advancements to be appropriately applied. This modality is ripe for clinical testing.

  1. Defect-induced magnetic structure of CuMnSb

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máca, František; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Turek, I.; Stelmakhovych, O.; Beran, Přemysl; Llobet, A.; Martí, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 9 (2016), 1-9, č. článku 094407. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : CuMnSb * electronic structure * defects * magnetic order * ab initio calculations * neutron diffraction analysis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  2. Investigation of strain-induced magnetization change in ferromagnetic microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuklanov, A P; Nurgazizov, N I; Bizyaev, D A; Khanipov, T F; Bukharaev, A A; Yu Petukhov, V; Chirkov, V V; Gumarov, G G

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigation of magnetoelastic strain effect on the ferromagnetic microparticles of permalloy. An original method of sample fabrication with compressed microparticles is proposed. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr experiments were carried out with unstrained and compressed microparticles. The domain walls transformation in compressed microparticles is in good agreement with numerical calculations. Hard axis of magnetization was observed on the compressed sample. (paper)

  3. Electric-field-induced magnetic domain writing in a Co wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuki; Hirai, Takamasa; Koyama, Tomohiro; Chiba, Daichi

    2018-05-01

    We have demonstrated that the local magnetization in a Co microwire can be switched by an application of a gate voltage without using any external magnetic fields. The electric-field-induced reversible ferromagnetic phase transition was used to realize this. An internal stray field from a ferromagnetic gate electrode assisted the local domain reversal in the Co wire. This new concept of electrical domain switching may be useful for dramatically reducing the power consumption of writing information in a magnetic racetrack memory, in which a shift of a magnetic domain by electric current is utilized.

  4. Current-Induced Switching of a Single-Molecule Magnet with Arbitrary Oriented Easy Axis

    OpenAIRE

    Misiorny, Maciej; Barnas, Józef

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate theoretically how tilting of an easy axis of a single-molecule magnet (SMM) from the orientation collinear with magnetic moments of the leads affects the switching process induced by current flowing through the system. To do this we consider a model system that consists of a SMM embedded in the nonmagnetic barrier of a magnetic tunnel junction. The anisotropy axis of the SMM forms an arbitrary angle with magnetic moments of the leads (the latt...

  5. Inducing and manipulating magnetization in 2D zinc–oxide by strain and external voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taivansaikhan, P.; Tsevelmaa, T.; Rhim, S. H.; Hong, S. C.; Odkhuu, D.

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) structures that exhibit intriguing magnetic phenomena such as perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and its switchable feature are of great interests in spintronics research. Herein, the density functional theory studies reveal the critical impacts of strain and external gating on vacancy-induced magnetism and its spin direction in a graphene-like single layer of zinc oxide (ZnO). In contrast to the pristine and defective ZnO with an O-vacancy, the presence of a Zn-vacancy induces significant magnetic moments to its first neighboring O and Zn atoms due to the charge deficit. We further predict that the direction of magnetization easy axis reverses from an in-plane to perpendicular orientation under a practically achievable biaxial compressive strain of only ~1–2% or applying an electric field by means of the charge density modulation. This magnetization reversal is mainly driven by the strain- and electric-field-induced changes in the spin–orbit coupled d states of the first-neighbor Zn atom to a Zn-vacancy. These findings open interesting prospects for exploiting strain and electric field engineering to manipulate magnetism and magnetization orientation of 2D materials.

  6. Photoacoustic-Based-Close-Loop Temperature Control for Nanoparticle Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaohua, Feng; Fei, Gao; Yuanjin, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia therapy requires tight temperature control to achieve selective killing of cancerous tissue with minimal damage on surrounding healthy tissues. To this end, accurate temperature monitoring and subsequent heating control are critical. However, an economic, portable, and real-time temperature control solution is currently lacking. To bridge this gap, we present a novel portable close-loop system for hyperthermia temperature control, in which photoacoustic technique is proposed for noninvasive real-time temperature measurement. Exploiting the high sensitivity of photoacoustics, the temperature is monitored with an accuracy of around 0.18 °C and then fed back to a controller implemented on field programmable gate array (FPGA) for temperature control. Dubbed as portable hyperthermia feedback controller (pHFC), it stabilizes the temperature at preset values by regulating the hyperthermia power with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm; and to facilitate digital implementation, the pHFC further converts the PID output into switching values (0 and 1) with the pulse width modulation (PWM) algorithm. Proof-of-concept hyperthermia experiments demonstrate that the pHFC system is able to bring the temperature from baseline to predetermined value with an accuracy of 0.3° and a negligible temperature overshoot. The pHFC can potentially be translated to clinical applications with customized hyperthermia system design. This paper can facilitate future efforts in seamless integration of close-loop temperature control solution and various clinical hyperthermia systems.

  7. Feasibility study of local ultrasound hyperthermia in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.G.; Straube, W.; Emami, B.; Perez, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a retrospective analysis of patients treated at Washington University for recurrent or persistent cancer with Ultrasound Hyperthermia between October 1984 and June 1986. Fifteen of 102 lesions were treated during this time period with Ultrasound Hyperthermia instead of microwave hyperthermia due to the size of the lesion needing heat at depths greater than 4 cm. Also, the patients' lesion could not be implanted for interstitial microwave hyperthermia. Fourteen of the treated patients received concomitant radiotherapy, while one received concomitant Bleomycin. There were 79 total hyperthermia treatments delivered, of which 67 achieved a therapeutic temperature of 43 0 C for 60 minutes. During 15/79 treatments, patients experienced pain; of which 11/15 lead to poor heating. Only one treatment of the twelve poor treatments was secondary to technical difficulties. Complete local control was accomplished in seven patients, a partial response in four patients. The results of therapeutic heating and its relationship to the site of treatment and local control are presented, along with phantom studies of Ultrasound microwave hyperthermia reemphasizing the feasibility of using Ultrasound Hyperthermia

  8. Effect of prior hyperthermia on subsequent thermal enhancement of radiation damage in mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marigold, J.C.L.; Hume, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Hyperthermia given in conjunction with X-rays results in a greater level of radiation injury than following X-rays alone, giving a thermal enhancement ratio (TER). The effect of prior hyperthermia ('priming') on TER was studied in the small intestine of mouse by giving 42.0 deg C for 1 hour at various times before the combined heat and X-ray treatments. Radiation damage was assessed by measuring crypt survival 4 days after radiation. TER was reduced when 'priming' hyperthermia was given 24-48 hours before the combined treatments. The reduction in effectiveness of the second heat treatment corresponded to a reduction in hyperthermal temperature of approximately 0.5 deg C, a value similar to that previously reported for induced resistance to heat given alone ('thermotolerance') (Hume and Marigold 1980). However, the time courses for development and decay of the TER response were much longer than those for 'thermotolerance', suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in thermal damage following heat alone and thermal enhancement of radiation damage

  9. Laser-induced spin protection and switching in a specially designed magnetic dot: A theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. P.; Si, M. S.; George, T. F.

    2011-04-01

    Most laser-induced femtosecond magnetism investigations are done in magnetic thin films. Nanostructured magnetic dots, with their reduced dimensionality, present new opportunities for spin manipulation. Here we predict that if a magnetic dot has a dipole-forbidden transition between the lowest occupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and the highest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO), but a dipole-allowed transition between LUMO+1 and HOMO, electromagnetically induced transparency can be used to prevent ultrafast laser-induced spin momentum reduction, or spin protection. This is realized through a strong dump pulse to funnel the population into LUMO+1. If the time delay between the pump and dump pulses is longer than 60 fs, a population inversion starts and spin switching is achieved. These predictions are detectable experimentally.

  10. Hyperthermia effects in the presence of gold nanoparticles together with chemotherapy on Saos-2 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazgarnia, A.; Bahreyni Toosi, M. H.; Haji Ghahremani, F.; Rajabi, O.; Aledavood, A.; Esmaily, H.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperthermia created by microwave, infrared, ultrasound and other methods, is often utilized as an adjuvant to sensitize cancer cells to