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Sample records for magnetically confined tokamak

  1. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization.

  2. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM`y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nT{tau}`s {approximately} 2.5x greater than ELM`ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices.

  3. Magnetic confinement

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is a compact, high-magnetic-field tokamak capable of operating at density and magnetic field values similar to, or even encompassing, those of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore physics issues that are directly relevant to ITER. During 2004 the experimental activities were focussed on fully exploiting the lower hybrid system (for generating and controlling the plasma current) and the electron cyclotron heating system (joint experiment with the Institute of Plasma Physics of the National Research Council, Milan). With all four gyrotrons in operation, full electron cyclotron power was achieved up to a record level of 1.5 MW. By simultaneously injecting lower hybrid waves, to tailor the plasma current radial profile, and electron cyclotron waves, to heat the plasma centre, good confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma density values ever achieved for this operation regime (n {approx}1.5X10{sup 20}m{sup -3}). Specific studies were devoted to optimising the coupling of lower hybrid waves to the plasma (by real-time control of the plasma position) and to generating current by electron cyclotron current drive. The new scanning CO{sub 2} interferometer (developed by the Reversed Field Experiment Consortium) for high spatial and time resolution (1 cm/50 {mu}s) density profile measurements was extensively used. The Thomson scattering diagnostic was upgraded and enabled observation of scattered signals associated with the Confinement background plasma dynamics. As for theoretical studies on the dynamics of turbulence in plasmas, the transition from Bohm-like scaling to gyro-Bohm scaling of the local plasma diffusivity was demonstrated on the basis of a generalised four wave model (joint collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine). The transition from weak to strong

  4. The 2008 Public Release of the International Multi-tokamak Confinement Profile Database

    Roach, C. M.; Walters, M.; Budny, R. V.; Imbeaux, F.; Fredian, T. W.; Greenwald, M.; Stillerman, J. A.; Alexander, D. A.; Carlsson, J.; Cary, J. R.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.; Murakami, M.; Bracco, G.; Esposito, B.; Romanelli, M.; Parail, V.; Stubberfield, P.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Brickley, C.; Field, A. R.; Sakamoto, Y.; Fujita, T.; Fukuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Chudnovskiy, A.; Kinerva, N. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Aniel, T.; Hoang, G. T.; Ongena, J.; Doyle, E. J.; Houlberg, W. A.; Polevoi, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents the public release PR08 of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database, which should be of particular interest to the magnetic confinement fusion community. Data from a wide variety of interesting discharges from many of the world's leading tokamak ex

  5. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  6. Improvement of tokamak confinement by current profile control

    Itoh, Kimitaka (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)); Itoh, Sanae; Yagi, Masatoshi; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Azumi, Masafumi

    1993-12-01

    Impact of the current profile on the anomalous transport coefficients in tokamaks is discussed, based on the recent progress of the anomalous transport theory. When the central q-value is elevated above unity, the geometry turns to the magnetic well, and the anomalous transport is reduced. If the negative shear is realized, the anomalous transport is further reduced. The confinement improvement phenomena associated with the lower hybrid wave current drive and with high [beta][sub p] experiments are discussed as an application of this model. A motivation of the research on the steady state plasmas is also discussed. (author).

  7. Calculation about a modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part I; Calculo sobre una modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak Novillo. Parte I

    Chavez A, E.; Melendez L, L.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1991-07-15

    The charged particles that constitute the plasma in the tokamaks are located in magnetic fields that determine its behavior. The poloidal magnetic field of the plasma current and the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak possess relatively big gradients, which produce drifts on these particles. These drifts are largely the cause of the continuous lost of particles and of energy of the confinement region. In this work the results of numerical calculations of a modification to the 'traditional' toroidal magnetic field that one waits it diminishes the drifts by gradient and improve the confinement properties of the tokamaks. (Author)

  8. Scaling of energy confinement time in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    Kurskiev, G. S.; Gusev, V. K.; Sakharov, N. V.; Bakharev, N. N.; Iblyaminova, A. D.; Shchegolev, P. B.; Avdeeva, G. F.; Kiselev, E. O.; Minaev, V. B.; Mukhin, E. E.; Patrov, M. I.; Petrov, Yu V.; Telnova, A. Yu; Tolstyakov, S. Yu

    2017-04-01

    The paper is devoted to an energy confinement study at the Globus-M spherical tokamak (ST). Experiments were performed in single null divertor configuration with elongation as high as 1.8–1.9 for variable plasma current and fixed toroidal magnetic field. The confinement time (τ E) dependence on density for ohmic-heated (OH) deuterium plasma is presented. It was found that τ E rises linearly with plasma current in H-mode with pure ohmic heating. Pronounced electron and ion heating was achieved in discharges with neutral beam injection at a moderate density level. The dependence of τ E on absorbed power was weak.

  9. Issues in tokamak/stellarator transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms

    Perkins, F.W.

    1990-08-01

    At present, the mechanism for anomalous energy transport in low-{beta} toroidal plasmas -- tokamaks and stellarators -- remains unclear, although transport by turbulent E {times} B velocities associated with nonlinear, fine-scale microinstabilities is a leading candidate. This article discusses basic theoretical concepts of various transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms as well as experimental ramifications which would enable one to distinguish among them and hence identify a dominant transport mechanism. While many of the predictions of fine-scale turbulence are born out by experiment, notable contradictions exist. Projections of ignition margin rest both on the scaling properties of the confinement mechanism and on the criteria for entering enhanced confinement regimes. At present, the greatest uncertainties lie with the basis for scaling confinement enhancement criteria. A series of questions, to be answered by new experimental/theoretical work, is posed to resolve these outstanding contradictions (or refute the fine-scale turbulence model) and to establish confinement enhancement criteria. 73 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  11. Pellet injection and confinement in the tore supra tokamak; Injection de glacons et confinement dans le tokamak tore supra

    Maget, P

    1998-09-23

    Pellet injection in the centre of tokamak plasmas can lead to an improved confinement regime called PEP (Pellet Enhanced Performance). The present work is dedicated to the mechanisms involved in the PEP regimes obtained in the tokamak Tore Supra. A neoclassical approach of transport shows that it is the anomalous transport, due to plasma turbulence, that causes the enhanced confinement. A linear model describing electrostatic instabilities has been developed in order to study the roles of density profile and current profile during the PEP, in the limit of large growth rates. The effect ofradial shear in flows is taken into account by removing the ExB shear flow rate from the linear growth rate, as suggested by non-linear numerical simulations of turbulence. A local transport coefficient is estimated from the knowledge of the linear growth rate and the mode width. We find that the peaked density profile in PEP regime lowers the diffusion coefficient, and that the velocity shear amplifies this effect. The evolution of the current profile is also stabilizing, but this parameter is not known with sufficient accuracy, so that its role in Tore Supra PEP experiments remains uncertain. (author)

  12. High Confinement Mode and Edge Localized Mode Characteristics in a Near-Unity Aspect Ratio Tokamak.

    Thome, K E; Bongard, M W; Barr, J L; Bodner, G M; Burke, M G; Fonck, R J; Kriete, D M; Perry, J M; Schlossberg, D J

    2016-04-29

    Tokamak experiments at near-unity aspect ratio A≲1.2 offer new insights into the self-organized H-mode plasma confinement regime. In contrast to conventional A∼3 plasmas, the L-H power threshold P_{LH} is ∼15× higher than scaling predictions, and it is insensitive to magnetic topology, consistent with modeling. Edge localized mode (ELM) instabilities shift to lower toroidal mode numbers as A decreases. These ultralow-A operations enable heretofore inaccessible J_{edge}(R,t) measurements through an ELM that show a complex multimodal collapse and the ejection of a current-carrying filament.

  13. Particle Confinement Improvement with Current Ramp in the HL-IM Tokamak

    YAN Long-Wen; WANG En-Yao; QIAN Jun; CHEN Liao-Yuan; LIU Yong

    2003-01-01

    Particle confinement with current ramp is investigated in the HL-IM tokamak. The ratio of particle confinement time to energy confinement time is used to determine confinement improvement. It increases a factor of 3 after the current rises twofold. An optimization density range to improve particle confinement is (1.5-3.5) XlO19 m~3. Particle confinement improvement during current ramp-up is beneficial to the startup of fusion reactors.

  14. Enhanced confinement regimes and control technology in the DIII-D tokamak

    Lohr, J.; Burrell, K.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Coda, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1993-07-01

    Advanced tokamak performance has been demonstrated in the DIII-D tokamak in a series of experiments which brought together developments in technology and improved understanding of the physical principles underlying tokamak operation. The achievement of greatly improved confinement coupled with development of new systems for real time plasma control have permitted investigation of the heretofore hidden or poorly controlled variables which together determine global confinement. These experiments, which included work in transport and control of the plasma boundary, point toward development of operationally and economically attractive reactors based on the tokamak. Some of these experiments are described.

  15. Effect of density changes on tokamak plasma confinement

    Spineanu, F

    2015-01-01

    A change of the particle density (by gas puff, pellets or impurity seeding) during the plasma discharge in tokamak produces a radial current and implicitly a torque and rotation that can modify the state of confinement. After ionization the newly born ions will evolve toward the periodic neoclassical orbits (trapped or circulating) but the first part of their excursion, which precedes the periodicity, is an effective radial current. It is short, spatially finite and unique for each new ion, but multiplied by the rate of ionization and it can produce a substantial total radial current. The associated torque induces rotation which modify the transport processes. We derive the magnitude of the radial current induced by ionization by three methods: the analysis of a simple physical picture, a numerical model and the neoclassical drift-kinetic treatment. The results of the three approaches are in agreement and show that the current can indeed be substantial. Many well known experimental observations can be reconsi...

  16. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  17. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Tokamak Fusion Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB[sub 6] biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V[sub bias] [le] 50 V and I[sub inj] [ge] 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A.

  18. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Tokamak Fusion Lab.

    1992-10-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB{sub 6} biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V{sub bias} {le} 50 V and I{sub inj} {ge} 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A.

  19. A Key to Improved Ion Core Confinement in the JET Tokamak: Ion Stiffness Mitigation due to Combined Plasma Rotation and Low Magnetic Shear

    Mantica, P.; Challis, C.; Peeters, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    New transport experiments on JET indicate that ion stiffness mitigation in the core of a rotating plasma, as described by Mantica et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 175002 (2009)] results from the combined effect of high rotational shear and low magnetic shear. The observations have important implicatio...

  20. Distributed chaos and solitons at the edges of magnetically confined plasmas

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of measurements of ion saturation current in the plasma edges of different magnetic fusion confinement devices (tokamaks and stellarators), that the plasma dynamics in the edges is dominated by distributed chaos with spontaneously broken translational symmetry at low magnetic field, and with spontaneously broken reflexional symmetry (by helical solitons) at high magnetic field.

  1. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  2. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  3. Magnetic flux reconstruction methods for shaped tokamaks

    Tsui, Chi-Wa

    1993-12-01

    The use of a variational method permits the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to be solved by reducing the problem of solving the 2D non-linear partial differential equation to the problem of minimizing a function of several variables. This high speed algorithm approximately solves the GS equation given a parameterization of the plasma boundary and the current profile (p` and FF` functions). The author treats the current profile parameters as unknowns. The goal is to reconstruct the internal magnetic flux surfaces of a tokamak plasma and the toroidal current density profile from the external magnetic measurements. This is a classic problem of inverse equilibrium determination. The current profile parameters can be evaluated by several different matching procedures. Matching of magnetic flux and field at the probe locations using the Biot-Savart law and magnetic Green`s function provides a robust method of magnetic reconstruction. The matching of poloidal magnetic field on the plasma surface provides a unique method of identifying the plasma current profile. However, the power of this method is greatly compromised by the experimental errors of the magnetic signals. The Casing Principle provides a very fast way to evaluate the plasma contribution to the magnetic signals. It has the potential of being a fast matching method. The performance of this method is hindered by the accuracy of the poloidal magnetic field computed from the equilibrium solver. A flux reconstruction package has been implemented which integrates a vacuum field solver using a filament model for the plasma, a multi-layer perception neural network as an interface, and the volume integration of plasma current density using Green`s functions as a matching method for the current profile parameters. The flux reconstruction package is applied to compare with the ASEQ and EFIT data. The results are promising.

  4. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  5. Magnetic confinement fusion energy research

    Grad, H

    1977-03-01

    Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion offers probably the only relatively clean energy solution with completely inexhaustible fuel and unlimited power capacity. The scientific and technological problem consists in magnetically confining a hot, dense plasma (pressure several to hundreds of atmospheres, temperature 10/sup 8/ degrees or more) for an appreciable fraction of a second. The scientific and mathematical problem is to describe the behavior, such as confinement, stability, flow, compression, heating, energy transfer and diffusion of this medium in the presence of electromagnetic fields just as we now can for air or steam. Some of the extant theory consists of applications, routine or ingenious, of known mathematical structures in the theory of differential equations and in traditional analysis. Other applications of known mathematical structures offer surprises and new insights: the coordination between sub-supersonic and elliptic-hyperbolic is fractured; supersonic propagation goes upstream; etc. Other completely nonstandard mathematical structures with significant theory are being rapidly uncovered (and somewhat less rapidly understood) such as non-elliptic variational equations and new types of weak solutions. It is these new mathematical structures which one should expect to supply the foundation for the next generation's pure mathematics, if history is a guide. Despite the substantial effort over a period of some twenty years, there are still basic and important scintific and mathematical discoveries to be made, lying just beneath the surface.

  6. Numerical modeling of the transition from low to high confinement in magnetically confined plasma

    Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    The transition dynamics from low (L) to high (H) mode confinement in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a four-field drift fluid model—HESEL (Hot Edge-Sol-Electrostatic). The model includes profile evolution and is solved in a 2D domain at the out-board mid-plane of a tokamak......–I–H transition with an intermediate I-phase displaying limit-cycle oscillations (LCO). The model recovers the power threshold for the L–H transition, the scaling of the threshold with the density and with the loss-rate in the SOL, indicating a decrease in power threshold when switching from single to double null...

  7. Test particle transport in perturbed magnetic fields in tokamaks

    de Rover, M.; Schilham, A.M.R.; Montvai, A.; Cardozo, N. J. L.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical calculations of magnetic field line trajectories in a tokamak are used to investigate the common hypotheses that (i) field lines in a chaotic field make a Gaussian random walk and (ii) that the poloidal component of the magnetic field is uniform in regions with a chaotic magnetic field. Bo

  8. Experimental Phenomena of Improved Ohmic Confinement Induced by Modulated Toroidal Current on the HT-7 Tokamak

    毛剑珊; 罗家融; P.Phillips; 赵君煜; 揭银先; 吴振伟; 胡立群; 李建刚

    2002-01-01

    The phenomena of improved ohmic confinement have been observed during the modulation of the toroidal curranton the Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). In the experiment, the programming ohmic heating field wasmodulated. A toroidal frequency-modulated current induced by modulated loop voltage was added on the plasmaequilibrium current. The ratio of ac amplitude of the plasma current to the main plasma current is about 12-30%.These improved plasma confinement phenomena include the facts that the average electron density and the centralelectron temperature both increase, the Dα radiation from the edge is reduced, the magnetohydrodynamics isobviously suppressed by oscillating plasma current, eand the global energy confinement time increases by 27-45%o.It is found that the faster the modulation is, the more effective the improved ohmic confinement phase.

  9. Magnetic stochasticity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas chaos of field lines and charged particle dynamics

    Abdullaev, Sadrilla

    2014-01-01

    This is the first book to systematically consider the modern aspects of chaotic dynamics of magnetic field lines and charged particles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas.  The analytical models describing the generic features of equilibrium magnetic fields and  magnetic perturbations in modern fusion devices are presented. It describes mathematical and physical aspects of onset of chaos, generic properties of the structure of stochastic magnetic fields, transport of charged particles in tokamaks induced by magnetic perturbations, new aspects of particle turbulent transport, etc. The presentation is based on the classical and new unique mathematical tools of Hamiltonian dynamics, like the action--angle formalism, classical perturbation theory, canonical transformations of variables, symplectic mappings, the Poincaré-Melnikov integrals. They are extensively used for analytical studies as well as for numerical simulations of magnetic field lines, particle dynamics, their spatial structures and  statisti...

  10. Scale size of magnetic turbulence in tokamaks probed with 30-MeV electrons

    Entrop; Lopes Cardozo NJ; Jaspers; Finken

    2000-04-17

    Measurements of synchrotron radiation emitted by 30-MeV runaway electrons in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak show that the runaway population decays after switching on neutral beam injection (NBI). The decay starts only with a significant delay, which decreases with increasing NBI heating power. This delay provides direct evidence of the energy dependence of runaway confinement, which is expected if magnetic modes govern the loss of runaways. Application of the theory by Mynick and Strachan [Phys. Fluids 24, 695 (1981)] yields estimates for the "mode width" (delta) of magnetic perturbations: delta<0.5 cm in Ohmic discharges, increasing to delta = 4.4 cm for 0. 6 MW NBI.

  11. Analysis of tokamak plasma confinement modes using the fast Fourier transformation

    S R MIRMOEINI; A SALAR ELAHI; M GHORANNEVISS

    2016-11-01

    The Fourier analysis is a satisfactory technique for detecting plasma confinement modes in tokamaks. The confinement mode of tokamak plasma was analysed using the fast Fourier transformation (FFT). For this purpose, we used the data of Mirnov coils that is one of the identifying tools in the IR-T1 tokamak, with and without external field (electric biasing), and then compared it with each other. After the Fourier analysis of Mirnov coil data, the diagram of power spectrum density was depicted in different angles of Mirnov coils in the ‘presenceof external field’ as well as in the ‘absence of external field’. The power spectrum density (PSD) interprets the manner of power distribution of a signal with frequency. In this article, the number of plasma modes and the safety factor $q$ were obtained by using the mode number of $q = m/n$ ($m$ is the mode number). The maximum MHD activity was obtained in 30–35 kHz frequency, using the density of the energy spectrum. In addition, the number of different modes across 0–35 ms time was compared with each other in the presence and absence of theexternal field.

  12. Improved confinement with reversed magnetic shear in TFTR

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States); Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Highly peaked density and pressure profiles in a new operating regime have been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The q-profile has a region of reversed magnetic shear extending from the magnetic axis to r/a {approximately}0.3-0.4. The central electron density rises from 0.45 x 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} to nearly 1.2 x 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} during neutral beam injection. The electron particle diffusivity drops precipitously in the plasma core with the onset of the improved confinement mode and can be reduced by a factor of {approximately}50 to near the neoclassical particle diffusivity level.

  13. Robust analysis of trends in noisy tokamak confinement data using geodesic least squares regression

    Verdoolaege, G.; Shabbir, A.; Hornung, G.

    2016-11-01

    Regression analysis is a very common activity in fusion science for unveiling trends and parametric dependencies, but it can be a difficult matter. We have recently developed the method of geodesic least squares (GLS) regression that is able to handle errors in all variables, is robust against data outliers and uncertainty in the regression model, and can be used with arbitrary distribution models and regression functions. We here report on first results of application of GLS to estimation of the multi-machine scaling law for the energy confinement time in tokamaks, demonstrating improved consistency of the GLS results compared to standard least squares.

  14. Tokamak Plasmas : Internal magnetic field measurement in tokamak plasmas using a Zeeman polarimeter

    M Jagadeeshwari; J Govindarajan

    2000-11-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the poloidal magnetic field profile closely depends on the current density profile. We can deduce the internal magnetic field from the analysis of circular polarization of the spectral lines emitted by the plasma. The theory of the measurement and a detailed design of the Zeeman polarimeter constructed to measure the poloidal field profile in the ADITYA tokamak are presented. The Fabry-Perot which we have employed in our design, with photodiode arrays followed by lock-in detection of the polarization signal, allows the measurement of the fractional circular polarization. In this system He-II line with wavelength 4686 Å is adopted as the monitoring spectral line. The line emission used in the present measurement is not well localized in the plasma, necessiating the use of a spatial inversion procedure to obtain the local values of the field.

  15. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ b\\bot\\text{ext}≈ {{10}-4}\\to {{10}-3}~\\text{T} ). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes (ELMs). At the same time, theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design (Loarte et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 033007). This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  16. Structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamaks

    Long, C.J.

    1976-12-01

    The selection of structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamak-type fusion reactors is considered. The important criteria are working stress, radiation resistance, electromagnetic interaction, and general feasibility. The most advantageous materials appear to be face-centered-cubic alloys in the Fe-Ni-Cr system, but high-modulus composites may be necessary where severe pulsed magnetic fields are present. Special-purpose structural materials are considered briefly.

  17. Magnetic Diagnostics for Equilibrium Reconstructions in the Presence of Nonaxisymmetric Eddy Current Distributions in Tokamaks

    Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Logan, N.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Zakharov, L.

    2010-12-10

    The lithium tokamak experiment LTX is a modest-sized spherical tokamak R0=0.4 m and a =0.26 m designed to investigate the low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. LTX will reach this regime through a lithium-coated shell internal to the vacuum vessel, conformal to the plasma last-closed-flux surface, and heated to 300-400 oC. This structure is highly conductive and not axisymmetric. The three-dimensional nature of the shell causes the eddy currents and magnetic fields to be three-dimensional as well. In order to analyze the plasma equilibrium in the presence of three-dimensional eddy currents, an extensive array of unique magnetic diagnostics has been implemented. Sensors are designed to survive high temperatures and incidental contact with lithium and provide data on toroidal asymmetries as well as full coverage of the poloidal cross-section. The magnetic array has been utilized to determine the effects of nonaxisymmetric eddy currents and to model the start-up phase of LTX. Measurements from the magnetic array, coupled with two-dimensional field component modeling, have allowed a suitable field null and initial plasma current to be produced. For full magnetic reconstructions, a three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the vacuum vessel and shell is under development.

  18. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-01

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E ×B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs˜0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E ×B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E ×B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Moreover, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in advanced ST

  19. Disruption avoidance through active magnetic feedback in tokamak plasmas

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Zanca, Paolo; Yanovskiy, Vadim; Finotti, Claudio; Manduchi, Gabriele; Piron, Chiara; Carraro, Lorella; Franz, Paolo; RFX Team

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions avoidance and mitigation is a fundamental need for a fusion relevant tokamak. In this paper a new experimental approach for disruption avoidance using active magnetic feedback is presented. This scheme has been implemented and tested on the RFX-mod device operating as a circular tokamak. RFX-mod has a very complete system designed for active mode control that has been proved successful for the stabilization of the Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs). In particular the current driven 2/1 mode, unstable when the edge safety factor, qa, is around (or even less than) 2, has been shown to be fully and robustly stabilized. However, at values of qa (qa > 3), the control of the tearing 2/1 mode has been proved difficult. These results suggested the idea to prevent disruptions by suddenly lowering qa to values around 2 where the tearing 2/1 is converted to a RWM. Contrary to the universally accepted idea that the tokamaks should disrupt at low qa, we demonstrate that in presence of a well designed active control system, tokamak plasmas can be driven to low qa actively stabilized states avoiding plasma disruption with practically no loss of the plasma internal energy.

  20. Application of advanced composites in tokamak magnet systems

    Long, C. J.

    1977-11-01

    The use of advanced (high-modulus) composites in superconducting magnets for tokamak fusion reactors is discussed. The most prominent potential application is as the structure in the pulsed poloidal-field coil system, where a significant reduction in eddy currents could be achieved. Present low-temperature data on the advanced composites are reviewed briefly; they are too meager to do more than suggest a broad class of composites for a particular application.

  1. On Runaway Transport under Magnetic Turbulence in Tokamaks

    Castejon, F.; Equilior, S.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The influence of magnetic turbulence on runaway transport has been studied. The evolution of runaway distribution function has been calculated using Electra a 2D code in momentum space and 1D in radius coordinate. The code considers the effect of averaging the turbulence by runaway orbits. Then Hard X-Ray emission spectrum is estimated and compared with experimental results of TJ-1 tokamak, obtaining a remarkable agreement. (Author) 15 refs.

  2. Properties of plasma radiation during discharges with improved confinement on HL-2A Tokamak

    Gao Jin-Ming; Liu Yi; Li Wei; Cui Zheng-Ying; Zhou Yan; Huang Yuan; Ji Xiao-Quan

    2010-01-01

    In the recent experiment on the HL-2A tokamak,two types of improved confinement regimes have been achieved in different configurations.One is the improved confinement regime in Umiter configuration during electron cyclotron resonant heating(ECRH),characterized by a sharp decrease in Hσ emission accompanied by an increase in the total radiation of plasma,the line averaged electron density and the stored energy of plasma.The other is high confinement regime(H-mode)in divertor configuration during a combination of ECRH and Neutral beam injection(NBI)heating,characterized with edge localized modes(ELMs)besides the features mentioned above.The ELMs are found to be localized on the plasma edge(r/α≥0.8),causing average losses of particles and stored energy in the ranges of about1-3% and 3-5% respectively during a single ELM event.So far,the ELMs observed in the HL-2A are type Ⅲ ELMs with low amplitude and high repetition frequency in a range from 200 Hz to 350 Hz.An investigation of the radiated power density profiles shows that radiative cooling effect plays a significant role in the transition back to the L-mode and the triggering of ELM events.

  3. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-01

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. The physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  4. Magnetic Fluctuation Measurement in Sino United Spherical Tokamak Plasma

    LIU Fei; WANG Wen-Hao; HE Ye-Xi; LIU Jun; TAN Yi; XIE Li-Feng; ZENG Long

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the magnetic fluctuations and for further transport study, the poloidal and radial magnetic field measurement is conducted on the Sino United Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). Auto-power spectral density indicates that the magnetic fluctuation energy mainly concentrates in the frequency region lower than 10kHz. The magnetic field oscillations, which are characterized by harmonic frequencies of 40 kHz, are observed in the scrapeoff layer; by contrast, in the plasma core, the magnetic fluctuations are of Gaussian type. The time-frequency profiles show that the poloidal magnetic fluctuations are temporally intermittent. The autocorrelation calculation indicates that the fluctuations in decorrelation time vary between the core and the edge.

  5. Controlling tokamak geometry with three-dimensional magnetic perturbations

    Bird, T. M., E-mail: tbird@ipp.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    It is shown that small externally applied magnetic perturbations can significantly alter important geometric properties of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks. Through 3D shaping, experimentally relevant perturbation levels are large enough to influence turbulent transport and MHD stability in the pedestal region. It is shown that the dominant pitch-resonant flux surface deformations are primarily induced by non-resonant 3D fields, particularly in the presence of significant axisymmetric shaping. The spectral content of the applied 3D field can be used to control these effects.

  6. Tachocline Confinement by an Oscillatory Magnetic Field

    Forgács-Dajka, E

    2001-01-01

    Helioseismic measurements indicate that the solar tachocline is very thin, its full thickness not exceeding 4% of the solar radius. The mechanism that inhibits differential rotation to propagate from the convective zone to deeper into the radiative zone is not known, though several propositions have been made. In this paper we demonstrate by numerical models and analytic estimates that the tachocline can be confined to its observed thickness by a poloidal magnetic field B_p of about one kilogauss, penetrating below the convective zone and oscillating with a period of 22 years, if the tachocline region is turbulent with a diffusivity of eta~10^10 cm^2/s (for a turbulent magnetic Prandtl number of unity). We also show that a similar confinement may be produced for other pairs of the parameter values (B_p, eta). The assumption of the dynamo field penetrating into the tachocline is consistent whenever eta>10^9 cm^2/s.

  7. Improved Mirnov Magnetic Coils System for the TCABR Tokamak

    Vannucci, Alvaro; Olschewski, Erich; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Kucinski, Mutsuko; Tadeu Degasperi, Francisco; Araujo, Mauro Sergio; Galvao, Ricardo; Okano, Valdir; Nascimento, Ivan

    2000-10-01

    The Mirnov magnetic coils system for the TCABR was recently reconstructed. The most interesting aspect of this system is that the measured experimental signals already incorporate the influence of the toroidal geometry. This means that the usual fast Fourier transform analysis done on the magnetic experimental data is able to indicate, more precisely and in a straightforward way, the MHD mode contribution to the detected signals during a plasma discharge. The influence of the toroidal geometry on the Fourier analysis of the magnetic signals was investigated by carring a series of simulations, considering the Merezhkin correction expressed only as a function of the inverse of the tokamak aspect ratio (calculated at the position of interest). The results obtained clearly showed the existence of a phase modulation on the Mirnov signals which is not usually considered when the magnetic signals are Fourier analyzed in the frame of cylindrical approximation, that is, by neglecting the existing toroidal effect.

  8. Tokamak

    Meglicki, Z

    1995-09-19

    We describe in detail the implementation of a weighted differences code, which is used to simulate a tokamak using the Maschke-Perrin solution as an initial condition. The document covers the mainlines of the program and the most important problem-specific functions used in the initialization, static tests, and dynamic evolution of the system. The mathematics of the Maschke-Perrin solution is discussed in parallel with its realisation within the code. The results of static and dynamic tests are presented in sections discussing their implementation.The code can also be obtained by ftp -anonymous from cisr.anu.edu.au Directory /pub/papers/meglicki/src/tokamak. This code is copyrighted. (author). 13 refs.

  9. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    Burrell, K.H.

    1996-11-01

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization.

  10. Microwave Reflectometry for Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Mazzucato, E.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is about microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for plasma density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves by a plasma cutoff. Both the theoretical foundations of reflectometry and its practical application to the study of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the role of short-scale density fluctuations is discussed at length, both as a unique diagnostic tool for turbulence studies in thermonuclear plasmas and for the deleterious effects that fluctuations may have on the measurement of the average plasma density with microwave reflectometry.

  11. Stabilization of burn conditions in an ITER FEAT like tokamak with uncertainities in the helium ash confinement time

    Vitela, J E

    2004-01-01

    In this work we demostrate using a two-temperature volume average 0D model that robust stabilization, with regard the hellium ash confinement time, of the burn conditions of a tokamak reactor with the ITER FEAT design parameters can be achieved using Radial Basis Neural Networks (RBNN). Alpha particle thermalization time delay is taken into account in this model. The control actions implemented by means of a RBNN, include the modulation of the DT refueling rate, a neutral He-4 injection beam and auxiliary heating powers to ions and to electrons; all of them constrained to lie within allowable range values. Here we assume that the tokamak follows the IPB98(y,2) scaling for the energy confinement time, while the helium ash confinement time is assumed to be independently estimated on-line. The DT and helium ash confinement times are assumed to keep a constant relationship at all times. An on-line noisy estimation of the helium ash confinement time is simulated by corrupting it with pseudo Gaussian noise.

  12. Multiplication of shearless barriers for chaotic transport in order to improve confined plasmas in tokamaks

    Martins, Caroline G.L.; Roberto, M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, R. Egydio de [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), SP (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We present a study that deals with meandering curves which arise after the reconnection process (or overlap) of resonances (1), that occurs only in non-twist discrete maps (2). Meandering curves formed by this kind of process play the role of barriers for chaotic transport in phase space, because inside the meandering region there is a special torus, called shearless torus, known as the strongest torus in a dynamical system (1). We introduce an extra perturbation in the Standard Non-twist Map (3), and we call this new map Labyrinthic Standard Non-twist Map (4). The labyrinthic map proposed in this work shows multiple reconnection processes of resonances, presenting multiple barriers for chaotic transport. Having applications in important areas such as the physics of thermonuclear plasmas confined in tokamaks for the extraction of clean energy. (1) D. del-Castillo-Negrete, J. M. Greene, P. J. Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996) (2) A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics (Springer, New York, 1992) (3) D. Del-Castillo-Negrete and P. J. Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993) (4) Caroline G. L. Martins; R. Egydio de Carvalho; I. L. Caldas; M. Roberto. Labyrinthic standard non-twist map. Journal of Physics A, Mathematical and Theoretical, v. 44, p. 045102 (2011). (author)

  13. Magnetic Propulsion of Intense Lithium Streams in a Tokamak Magnetic Field

    Leonid E. Zakharov

    2002-03-13

    The paper gives the theory of magnetic propulsion of liquid lithium streams and their stability in tokamaks. In the approximation of a thin flowing layer the MHD equations are reduced to one integro-differential equation which takes into account the propulsion effect, viscosity and the drag force due to magnetic pumping and other interactions with the magnetic field. A criterion is obtained for the stabilization of the ''sausage'' instability of the streams by centrifugal force.

  14. Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures III

    Hillebrands, Burkard

    2006-01-01

    This third volume of Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures addresses central aspects of spin-dynamic phenomena, including recent new developments, on a tutorial level. Researchers will find a comprehensive compilation of the current work in the field. Introductory chapters help newcomers to understand the basic concepts. The more advanced chapters give the current state of the art of spin dynamic issues ranging from the femtosecond to the microsecond regime. This volume concentrates on new experimental techniques such as ferromagnetic-resonance-force microscopy and two-photon photoemission, as well as on aspects of precessional switching, spin-wave excitation, vortex dynamics, spin relaxation, domain-wall dynamics in nanowires and their applications to magnetic logic devices. An important chapter is devoted to the presently very hot subject of the spin-transfer torque, combining the physics of electronic transport and micromagnetics. The comprehensive presentation of these developments makes this volu...

  15. Escape patterns due to ergodic magnetic limiters in tokamaks with reversed magnetic shear

    Roberto, M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Dept. de Fisica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Da Silva, E.C.; Caldas, I.L. [Sao Paulo Univ., Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Parana Univ., Dept. de Fisica, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    In this work we study the ergodic magnetic limiters (EML) action on field lines from the point of view of a chaotic scattering process, considering the so-called exit basins, or sets of points in the chaotic region which originate field lines hitting the wall in some specified region. We divide the tokamak wall into three areas of equal poloidal angular length, corresponding to different exits for a chaotic field line. In order to obtain the exit basins we used a grid chosen inside a small rectangle which comprises a representative part of the chaotic region near the wall. Thus, exit basins were obtained for a tokamak wall with reversed magnetic shear. The no-twist mapping describes the perturbed magnetic field lines with two chains of magnetic islands and chaotic field lines in their vicinity. For a perturbing resonant magnetic field with a fixed helicity, the observed escape pattern changes with the perturbation intensity. (authors)

  16. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C. [and others

    2001-02-02

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  17. Measurement of local, internal magnetic fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Barada, K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present new measurements of internal magnetic fluctuations obtained with a novel eight channel cross polarization scattering (CPS) system installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Measurements of internal, localized magnetic fluctuations provide a window on an important physics quantity that we heretofore have had little information on. Importantly, these measurements provide a new ability to challenge and test linear and nonlinear simulations and basic theory. The CPS method, based upon the scattering of an incident microwave beam into the opposite polarization by magnetic fluctuations, has been significantly extended and improved over the method as originally developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. A new scattering geometry, provided by a unique probe beam, is utilized to improve the spatial localization and wavenumber range. Remotely controllable polarizer and mirror angles allow polarization matching and wavenumber selection for a range of plasma conditions. The quasi-optical system design, its advantages and challenges, as well as important physics validation tests are presented and discussed. Effect of plasma beta (ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure) on both density and magnetic fluctuations is studied and it is observed that internal magnetic fluctuations increase with beta. During certain quiescent high confinement operational regimes, coherent low frequency modes not detected by magnetic probes are detected locally by CPS diagnostics.

  18. Enhanced Plasma Confinement in a Magnetic Well by Whistler Waves

    Balmashnov, A. A.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of whistler waves in a magnetic field of mirror configuration is investigated experimentally. The strong interaction between waves and particles at the electron-cyclotron resonance leads to enhanced confinement in the magnetic well.......The propagation of whistler waves in a magnetic field of mirror configuration is investigated experimentally. The strong interaction between waves and particles at the electron-cyclotron resonance leads to enhanced confinement in the magnetic well....

  19. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Stutman, Dan [Johns Hopkins University

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  20. Considerations of the high magnetic field tokamak path on the approach to fusion energy

    Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    This tutorial will review the physics basis, and its applications, for high magnetic field, compact visions of steady-state pilot plants and fusion reactors. This includes: energy and particle confinement; transport barriers; heating and current drive; scrape-off layer and divertor physics including implications for power handling, and ash/impurity control. The development of new technologies, particularly high-temperature, high critical magnetic field superconducting materials opens a new opportunity to consider the leverage of on-axis magnetic fields of 10T or more, enabling the feasibility of smaller sized devices on the path to fusion energy, including a pilot plant which could produce hundreds of megawatts of net electricity in a 10T tokamak with major radius of order 3 meter. Incorporating jointed magnetic coils, also made feasible by the high temperature superconductors, can dramatically improve flexibility of experimental superconducting facilities, and ultimately maintainability for reactor systems. Steady-state requires high bootstrap fraction, combined with efficient off-axis current drive, and existing and new approaches for RF sustainment will be covered, including Lower Hybrid Current Drive (both from the low- and high-field side), ECCD, and fast-wave techniques. External torque drive from neutral beams, routinely used in most present-day experiments to enhance confinement and suppress instabilities, will be weak or absent in reactors. Alternative, RF-based flow drive, using mode-converted ICRF waves will be discussed. All reactor concepts have extraordinary power handling requirements, combined with stringent limits on PFC erosion and impurity sources; the current state of the art in divertor configurations will be compared with emerging and new concepts, including snowflake, x-point, x-divertor and liquid metals, to meet these challenges. Supported by USDOE.

  1. Upgrading of the Magnetic Confinement Plasma Device KT-5E

    何迎花; 余羿; 闻一之; 刘万东; 李定; 俞昌旋; 谢锦林; 李弘; 兰涛; 王昊宇

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present ideas of providing appropriate poloidal magnetic field for helimaks to help to generate toroidal magnetic plasma torus. Placing a conductive ring in the center of the cross-section to induce a suitable current, we change the helical magnetic field lines in the helimak discharge into magnetic surface. In this kind of discharge, the plasma density is greatly increased, and the corresponding density fluctuation is significantly decreased, showing a better confinement by magnetic shear. It allows more flexible and efficient experimental investigations on the toroidal magnetic confinement plasmas to be carried on in this kind of device.

  2. In situ ``artificial plasma'' calibration of tokamak magnetic sensors

    Shiraki, D.; Levesque, J. P.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; DeBono, B. A.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; Rath, N.

    2013-06-01

    A unique in situ calibration technique has been used to spatially calibrate and characterize the extensive new magnetic diagnostic set and close-fitting conducting wall of the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) experiment. A new set of 216 Mirnov coils has recently been installed inside the vacuum chamber of the device for high-resolution measurements of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena including the effects of eddy currents in the nearby conducting wall. The spatial positions of these sensors are calibrated by energizing several large in situ calibration coils in turn, and using measurements of the magnetic fields produced by the various coils to solve for each sensor's position. Since the calibration coils are built near the nominal location of the plasma current centroid, the technique is referred to as an "artificial plasma" calibration. The fitting procedure for the sensor positions is described, and results of the spatial calibration are compared with those based on metrology. The time response of the sensors is compared with the evolution of the artificial plasma current to deduce the eddy current contribution to each signal. This is compared with simulations using the VALEN electromagnetic code, and the modeled copper thickness profiles of the HBT-EP conducting wall are adjusted to better match experimental measurements of the eddy current decay. Finally, the multiple coils of the artificial plasma system are also used to directly calibrate a non-uniformly wound Fourier Rogowski coil on HBT-EP.

  3. Stability properties and fast ion confinement of hybrid tokamak plasma configurations

    Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferle, D.; Faustin, J. M. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Kleiner, A.; Lanthaler, S.; Patten, H. W.; Raghunathan, M.

    2015-11-01

    In hybrid scenarios with flat q just above unity, extremely fast growing tearing modes are born from toroidal sidebands of the near resonant ideal internal kink mode. New scalings of the growth rate with the magnetic Reynolds number arise from two fluid effects and sheared toroidal flow. Non-linear saturated 1/1 dominant modes obtained from initial value stability calculation agree with the amplitude of the 1/1 component of a 3D VMEC equilibrium calculation. Viable and realistic equilibrium representation of such internal kink modes allow fast ion studies to be accurately established. Calculations of MAST neutral beam ion distributions using the VENUS-LEVIS code show very good agreement of observed impaired core fast ion confinement when long lived modes occur. The 3D ICRH code SCENIC also enables the establishment of minority RF distributions in hybrid plasmas susceptible to saturated near resonant internal kink modes.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Instabilities in Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    Haverkort, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to achieve controlled nuclear fusion for the commercial production of energy is the tokamak design. In such a device, a hot plasma is confined in a toroidal geometry using magnetic fields. The present generation of tokamaks shows significant plasma rotation, primarily

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Stott, PE; Wootton, A.; Gorini, G.; Sindoni, E.; Batani, D.

    2003-02-01

    This book is a collection of papers, written by specialists in the field, on advanced topics of nuclear fusion diagnostics. The 78 contributions were originally presented at the International Conference on Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Fusion held at Villa Monastero, Italy in September 2001. Both magnetically confined and inertial fusion programmes are quite extensively covered, with more emphasis given to the former scheme. In the case of magnetic confinement, since the present international programme is strongly focused on next-step devices, particular attention is devoted to techniques and technologies viable in an environment with strong neutron fluxes. Indeed, in the first section, the various methods are considered in the perspective of performing the measurements of the relevant parameters in conditions approaching a burning plasma, mainly in the Tokamak configuration. The most demanding requirements, like the implications of the use of tritium and radiation resistance, are reviewed and the most challenging open issues, which require further research and development, are also clearly mentioned. The following three sections are devoted to some of the most recent developments in plasma diagnostics, which are grouped according to the following classification: `Neutron and particle diagnostics', `Optical and x-ray diagnostics' and `Interferometry, Polarimetry and Thomson Scattering'. In these chapters, several of the most recent results are given, covering measurements taken on the most advanced experiments around the world. Here the developments described deal more with the requirements imposed by the physical issues to be studied. They are therefore more focused on the approaches adopted to increase the spatial and time resolution of the diagnostics, on some methods to improve the characterisation of the turbulence and on fast particles. Good coverage is given to neutron diagnostics, which are assuming increasing relevance as the plasma

  6. Plasma Transport at Magnetic Axis in Toroidal Confinement System

    WANGZhongtian

    2001-01-01

    The particle orbits which intersect the magnetic axis behave differently from banana ones, referred to as potato orbits. The potential importance on tokamak transport is emphasized by Politzer, Lin, Tang, and Lee,and Shaing, Hazeltine, and Zarnstoff. However, there are many problems in the lasttwo papers. For example, the Eq. (48) in Ref. [5] should satisfy the orbit constraint which guarantees single value of the function go, that is, solubility condition, and Eq. (8) in Ref. [6] has the same problem.

  7. Application of symbolic regression to the derivation of scaling laws for tokamak energy confinement time in terms of dimensionless quantities

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Lungaroni, M.; Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.

    2016-02-01

    In many scientific applications, it is important to investigate how certain properties scale with the parameters of the systems. The experimental studies of scalings have traditionally been addressed with log regression, which limits the results to power laws and to theoretical and not data-driven dimensionless quantities. This has also been the case in nuclear fusion, in which the scaling of the energy confinement time is a crucial aspect in understanding the physics of transport and in the design of future devices. Traditionally two main assumptions are at the basis of the most widely accepted empirical scaling laws for the confinement time: (a) the dimensionless variables used are the ones derived from the symmetries of the Vlasov equation; (b) the final scalings have the mathematical form of power laws. In this paper, it is shown how symbolic regression (SR), implemented with genetic programming (GP) techniques, can be used to test these hypotheses. Neither assumption is confirmed by the available data of the multi-machine International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) of validated tokamak discharges. The statistically soundest expressions are not power laws and cannot be formulated in terms of the traditional dimensionless quantities. The consequences of the data-driven scaling laws obtained are both practical and theoretical: the confinement time for the ITER can be significantly shorter than foreseen by power laws and different dimensionless variables should be considered for theoretical investigations. On the other hand, higher quality databases should be built to reduce the uncertainties in the extrapolations. It is also worth emphasising that the proposed methodology is fully general and therefore can be applied to any field of science.

  8. Advancements of microwave diagnostics in magnetically confined plasmas

    Mase, A.; Kogi, Y.; Ito, N.; Yokota, Y.; Akaki, K.; Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Tokuzawa, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Hojo, H.; Oyama, N.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Park, H. K.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Microwave to millimeter-wave diagnostic techniques such as interferometry, reflectometry, scattering and radiometry have been powerful tools for diagnosing magnetically confined plasmas. Recent advances in electronic devices and components together with computer technology have enabled the developme

  9. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  10. Electron transport in the plasma edge with rotating resonant magnetic perturbations at the TEXTOR tokamak

    Stoschus, Henning

    2011-10-13

    Small three-dimensional (3D) magnetic perturbations can be used as a tool to control the edge plasma parameters in magnetically confined plasmas in high confinement mode (''H-mode'') to suppress edge instabilities inherent to this regime, the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs). In this work, the impact of rotating 3D resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields on the edge plasma structure characterized by electron density and temperature fields is investigated. We study a low confinement (L-mode) edge plasma (r/a>0.9) with high resistivity (edge electron collisionality {nu}{sup *}{sub e}>4) at the TEXTOR tokamak. The plasma structure in the plasma edge is measured by a set of high resolution diagnostics: a fast CCD camera ({delta}t=20 {mu}s) is set up in order to visualize the plasma structure in terms of electron density variations. A supersonic helium beam diagnostic is established as standard diagnostic at TEXTOR to measure electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} with high spatial ({delta}r=2 mm) and temporal resolution ({delta}t=20 {mu}s). The measured plasma structure is compared to modeling results from the fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE. A sequence of five new observations is discussed: (1) Imaging of electron density variations in the plasma edge shows that a fast rotating RMP field imposes an edge plasma structure, which rotates with the external RMP rotation frequency of vertical stroke {nu}{sub RMP} vertical stroke =1 kHz. (2) Measurements of the electron density and temperature provide strong experimental evidence that in the far edge a rotating 3D scrape-off layer (SOL) exists with helical exhaust channels to the plasma wall components. (3) Radially inward, the plasma structure at the next rational flux surface is found to depend on the relative rotation between external RMP field and intrinsic plasma rotation. For low relative rotation the plasma structure is dominated by a particle and energy loss

  11. Solar Multiple Eruptions from a Confined Magnetic Structure

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-09-01

    How eruption can recur from a confined magnetic structure is discussed based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the NOAA active region 11444, which produced three eruptions within 1.5 hr on 2012 March 27. The active region (AR) had the positive-polarity magnetic fields in the center surrounded by the negative-polarity fields around. Since such a distribution of magnetic polarity tends to form a dome-like magnetic fan structure confined over the AR, the multiple eruptions were puzzling. Our investigation reveals that this event exhibits several properties distinct from other eruptions associated with magnetic fan structures: (i) a long filament encircling the AR was present before the eruptions; (ii) expansion of the open-closed boundary (OCB) of the field lines after each eruption was suggestive of the growing fan-dome structure, and (iii) the ribbons inside the closed magnetic polarity inversion line evolved in response to the expanding OCB. It thus appears that in spite of multiple eruptions the fan-dome structure remained undamaged, and the closing back field lines after each eruption rather reinforced the fan-dome structure. We argue that the multiple eruptions could occur in this AR in spite of its confined magnetic structure because the filament encircling the AR was adequate for slipping through the magnetic separatrix to minimize the damage to its overlying fan-dome structure. The result of this study provides a new insight into the productivity of eruptions from a confined magnetic structure.

  12. Dynamics of the electron thermal diffusivity at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak

    Kouprienko, D. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Lashkul, S. I.; Esipov, L. A.

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of electron heat transport at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak was studied experimentally. Evolution of the profiles of the electron temperature and density was thoroughly investigated under conditions of fast variation in the plasma parameters. The energy balance in the electron channel is calculated with the help of the ASTRA code by using the measured plasma parameters. Correlation is revealed between the dynamics of electron heat transport and the behavior of small-scale drift turbulence measured using the enhanced scattering correlation diagnostics. The suppression of heat transfer and turbulence agrees well with the increase in the shear of poloidal plasma rotation calculated from experimental data in the neoclassical approximation.

  13. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2016-07-05

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  14. Thermonuclear reactions with magnetical confined plasmas

    Pinkau, K.; Schumacher, U.

    1982-09-01

    As the result of intensive research activities in the plasma physics one can expect that in future an independent burning plasma can be produced. The focal point of fusion research then will crescent shift on the answer of the question whether the technological development the design of a commercial working energy systems allows. The authors report on thermonuclear devices, plasma confinement, plasma heating, thermonuclear reactions and safety.

  15. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    Bécoulet, A.; Hoang, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The steady-state operation of magnetically confined fusion plasmas is considered as one of the 'grand challenges' of future decades, if not the ultimate goal of the research and development activities towards a new source of energy. Reaching such a goal requires the high-level integration of both science and technology aspects of magnetic fusion into self-consistent plasma regimes in fusion-grade devices. On the physics side, the first constraint addresses the magnetic confinement itself which must be made persistent. This means to either rely on intrinsically steady-state configurations, like the stellarator one, or turn the inductively driven tokamak configuration into a fully non-inductive one, through a mix of additional current sources. The low efficiency of the external current drive methods and the necessity to minimize the re-circulating power claim for a current mix strongly weighted by the internal 'pressure driven' bootstrap current, itself strongly sensitive to the heat and particle transport properties of the plasma. A virtuous circle may form as the heat and particle transport properties are themselves sensitive to the current profile conditions. Note that several other factors, e.g. plasma rotation profile, magneto-hydro-dynamics activity, also influence the equilibrium state. In the present tokamak devices, several examples of such 'advanced tokamak' physics research demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state regimes, though with a number of open questions still under investigation. The modelling activity also progresses quite fast in this domain and supports understanding and extrapolation. This high level of physics sophistication of the plasma scenario however needs to be combined with steady-state technological constraints. The technology constraints for steady-state operation are basically twofold: the specific technologies required to reach the steady-state plasma conditions and the generic technologies linked to the long pulse operation of a

  16. Progress in theory and simulation of ion cyclotron emission from magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    Dendy, Richard; Chapman, Ben; Chapman, Sandra; Cook, James; Reman, Bernard; McClements, Ken; Carbajal, Leopoldo

    2016-10-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is detected from all large tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Its frequency spectrum has narrow peaks at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population (fusion-born or neutral beam-injected) at the outer edge of the plasma. ICE was the first collective radiative instability driven by confined fusion-born ions observed in deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR, and the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability is the most likely emission mechanism. Contemporary ICE measurements are taken at very high sampling rates from the LHD stellarator and from the conventional aspect ratio KSTAR tokamak. A correspondingly advanced modelling capability for the ICE emission mechanism has been developed using 1D3V PIC and hybrid-PIC codes, supplemented by analytical theory. These kinetic codes simulate the self-consistent full orbit dynamics of energetic and thermal ions, together with the electric and magnetic fields and the electrons. We report recent progress in theory and simulation that addresses: the scaling of ICE intensity with energetic particle density; the transition between super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes for the collectively radiating particles; and the rapid time evolution that is seen for some ICE measurements. This work was supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/I501045] and by Euratom.

  17. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  18. The influence of toroidal Alfvén modes on the confinement of fast particles in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Bakharev, N. N.; Gusev, V. K.; Minaev, V. B.; Kornev, V. A.; Mel'nik, A. D.; Patrov, M. I.; Sakharov, N. V.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Shchegolev, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral beam injection into the Globus-M spherical tokamak at the early stage of discharge leads to the development of instabilities in a frequency range of 50-200 kHz, which have been identified as toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) [1]. The influence of these modes on the confinement of fast particles has been studied with the aid of a neutral particle analyzer (NPA) and a neutron detector. The isotope effect was studied using hydrogen and deuterium both in the injected beam and in the target plasma. A correlation analysis of signals from magnetic probes showed that the observed modes in most cases contain a single harmonic with toroidal number n = 1. Upon the injection of deuterium into deuterium plasma, the development of TAEs led to a decrease in the neutron flux by 25%, whereas the fluxes of high-energy recharge atoms decreased by 75%. After the injection of hydrogen, a decrease in the flux measured by NPA did not exceed 25%.

  19. Sensitivity of magnetic field-line pitch angle measurements to sawtooth events in tokamaks

    Ko, J.

    2016-11-01

    The sensitivity of the pitch angle profiles measured by the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic to the evolution of the safety factor, q, profiles during the tokamak sawtooth events has been investigated for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). An analytic relation between the tokamak pitch angle, γ, and q estimates that Δγ ˜ 0.1° is required for detecting Δq ˜ 0.05 near the magnetic axis (not at the magnetic axis, though). The pitch angle becomes less sensitive to the same Δq for the middle and outer regions of the plasma (Δγ ˜ 0.5°). At the magnetic axis, it is not straightforward to directly relate the γ sensitivity to Δq since the gradient of γ(R), where R is the major radius of the tokamak, is involved. Many of the MSE data obtained from the 2015 KSTAR campaign, when calibrated carefully, can meet these requirements with the time integration down to 10 ms. The analysis with the measured data shows that the pitch angle profiles and their gradients near the magnetic axis can resolve the change of the q profiles including the central safety factor, q0, during the sawtooth events.

  20. Langmuir-magnetic probe measurements of ELMs and dithering cycles in the EAST tokamak

    Yan, Ning; Naulin, Volker; Xu, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the dynamical behavior associated with edge localized modes (ELMs) have been carried out in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by direct probing near the separatrix and far scrape-off layer (SOL) using electrostatic as well as magnetic probes. Type-III ELMs...

  1. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    Tenfelde, Jan

    2012-12-11

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion

  2. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    Leitner, Peter; Heyn, Martin F.; Kernbichler, Winfried [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Ivanov, Ivan B. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); St. Petersburg State University, Institute of Physics, Ulyanovskaya 1, Petrodvoretz 198504 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast (Russian Federation); Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, TU Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology,” Ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results.

  3. Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks in X-rays - a Review

    ud-Doula, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A subset (~ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modelling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  4. High Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    Park, Jaeyoung; Sieck, Paul E; Offermann, Dustin T; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when beta (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is order of unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high beta a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. The current experiment validates this theoretical conjecture for the first time and represents critical progress toward the Polywell fusion concept which combines a high beta cusp configuration with an electrostatic fusion for a compact, economical, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  5. Status of tokamak research

    Rawls, J.M. (ed.)

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design. (MOW)

  6. Magnetic field considerations in fusion power plant environs

    Liemohn, H.B.; Lessor, D.L.; Duane, B.H.

    1976-09-01

    A summary of magnetic field production mechanisms and effects is given. Discussions are included on the following areas: (1) stray magnetic and electric fields from tokamaks, (2) methods for reducing magnetic fields, (3) economics of magnetic field reductions, (4) forces on magnetizable objects near magnetic confinement fusion reactors, (5) electric field transients in tokamaks, (6) attenuation and decay of electromagnetic fields, and (7) magnetic field transients from tokamak malfunctions.

  7. Improved energy confinement with nonlinear isotope effects in magnetically confined plasmas

    Garcia, J; Jenko, F

    2016-01-01

    The efficient production of electricity from nuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas relies on a good confinement of the thermal energy. For more than thirty years, the observation that such confinement depends on the mass of the plasma isotope and its interaction with apparently unrelated plasma conditions has remained largely unexplained and it has become one of the main unsolved issues. By means of numerical studies based on the gyrokinetic theory, we quantitatively show how the plasma microturbulence depends on the isotope mass through nonlinear multiscale microturbulence effects involving the interplay between zonal flows, electromagnetic effects and the torque applied. This finding has crucial consequences for the design of future reactors since, in spite of the fact that they will be composed by multiple ion species, their extrapolation from present day experiments heavily relies on the knowledge obtained from a long experimental tradition based in single isotope plasmas.

  8. 3D-MAPTOR Code for computation of magnetic fields in tokamaks

    ChÁVez-AlarcÓN, Esteban; Herrera-VelÁZquez, Julio

    2009-11-01

    A 3dimensional code has been developed in order to determine the magnetic field in tokamaks, starting from the assumption that the toroidal and vertical field coils are all circular, as well as the cross section of the plasma current distribution. It was earlier used to study the stochastization of the outer magnetic surfaces [1] and to reconstruct the evolution of the plasma column, using the experimental signals of tokamak discharges. These results were compared with tomographic reconsructions of the ISTTOK tokamak [2]. We present an upgrade of the code, in which rectangular toroidal field coils and D shaped plasma current cross sections can be included. The code is particularly useful to study the effect of the ripple along the toroidal coordinate.[4pt] [1] E. Ch'avez, et al., ``Stochastization of Magnetic Field Surfaces in Tokamaks by an Inner Coil'' in Plasma and Fusion Science, AIP Conference Proceedings Series 875 (2006) pp.347-349.[0pt] [2] B.B. Carvalho, et al., ``Real-time plasma control based on the ISTTOK tomography diagnostic'', Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 (2008)10F329.

  9. Neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) magnetic spectrum and magnetic coupling in JET tokamak

    Baruzzo, M; Bolzonella, T [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Alper, B; Brix, M; Challis, C D; De Vries, P C; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N C; Howell, D F; Mailloux, J [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Buratti, P; Crisanti, F; Tudisco, O [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, CP 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); De la Luna, E [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Imbeaux, F; Joffrin, E; Litaudon, X [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Koslowski, H R [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZ Juelich, Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Sips, A C C, E-mail: matteo.baruzzo@igi.cnr.i [European Commission, Brussels, B-1094 (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    An experimental study on the poloidal mode number (m) spectrum produced by a single toroidal mode number (n) neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) in the JET tokamak is presented. Clear evidence of the existence of more than one significant m component is given. The analysis is performed comparing several methods and diagnostics; among the latter we mention high frequency magnetic pick-up coils and an electron cyclotron emission radiometer, which measures detailed electron temperature radial profiles at high time resolution. The two diagnostics are also used together in a cross coherence calculation technique. The issue of the interaction of this multiple m structure with the plasma is addressed as well, with particular attention paid to plasma toroidal rotation and rotation shear, obtained from charge exchange spectroscopy data. This effect has been studied under two different operational plasma scenarios on JET in order to investigate both dependences on plasma parameters and consequences on the scenario itself.

  10. First Measurement of the Magnetic Turbulence Induced Reynolds Stress in a Tokamak

    徐国盛; 万宝年; 宋梅

    2003-01-01

    Reynolds stress component due to magnetic turbulence was first measured in the plasma edge region of the HT- 7 superconducting tokamak using an insertable magnetic probe. A radial gradient of magnetic Reynolds stress was observed to be dose to the velocity shear layer location; however, in this experiment its contribution to driving the poloidal flows is small compared to the electrostatic component. The electron heat transport driven by magnetic turbulence is quite small and cannot account for the total energy transport at the plasma edge.

  11. The field line map approach for simulations of magnetically confined plasmas

    Stegmeir, Andreas; Coster, David; Maj, Omar; Hallatschek, Klaus; Lackner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Predictions of plasma parameters in the edge and scrape-off layer of tokamaks is difficult since most modern tokamaks have a divertor and the associated separatrix causes the usually employed field/flux-aligned coordinates to become singular on the separatrix/X-point. The presented field line map approach avoids such problems as it is based on a cylindrical grid: standard finite-difference methods can be used for the discretisation of perpendicular (w.r.t. magnetic field) operators, and the characteristic flute mode property (k∥ ≪k⊥) of structures is exploited computationally via a field line following discretisation of parallel operators which leads to grid sparsification in the toroidal direction. This paper is devoted to the discretisation of the parallel diffusion operator (the approach taken is very similar to the flux-coordinate independent (FCI) approach which has already been adopted to a hyperbolic problem (Ottaviani, 2011; Hariri, 2013)). Based on the support operator method, schemes are derived which maintain the self-adjointness property of the parallel diffusion operator on the discrete level. These methods have very low numerical perpendicular diffusion compared to a naive discretisation which is a critical issue since magnetically confined plasmas exhibit a very strong anisotropy. Two different versions of the discrete parallel diffusion operator are derived: the first is based on interpolation where the order of interpolation and therefore the numerical diffusion is adjustable; the second is based on integration and is advantageous in cases where the field line map is strongly distorted. The schemes are implemented in the new code GRILLIX, and extensive benchmarks and numerous examples are presented which show the validity of the approach in general and GRILLIX in particular.

  12. Nonlinear Burn Control in Tokamaks using Heating, Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Fields, Isotopic fueling and Impurity injection

    Pajares, Andres; Schuster, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    Plasma density and temperature regulation in future tokamaks such as ITER is arising as one of the main problems in nuclear-fusion control research. The problem, known as burn control, is to regulate the amount of fusion power produced by the burning plasma while avoiding thermal instabilities. Prior work in the area of burn control considered different actuators, such as modulation of the auxiliary power, modulation of the fueling rate, and controlled impurity injection. More recently, the in-vessel coil system was suggested as a feasible actuator since it has the capability of modifying the plasma confinement by generating non-axisymmetric magnetic fields. In this work, a comprehensive, model-based, nonlinear burn control strategy is proposed to integrate all the previously mentioned actuators. A model to take into account the influence of the in-vessel coils on the plasma confinement is proposed based on the plasma collisionality and the density. A simulation study is carried out to show the capability of the controller to drive the system between different operating points while rejecting perturbations. Supported by the US DOE under DE-SC0010661.

  13. Magnetic ripple and the modeling of lower-hybrid current drive in tokamaks

    Peysson, Y.; Arslanbekov, R.; Basiuk, V.; Carrasco, J.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Bizarro, J.P. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica

    1996-01-01

    Using ray-tracing, a detailed investigation of the lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation in presence of toroidal magnetic field ripple is presented. By coupling ray tracing with a one-dimensional relativistic Fokker-Planck code, simulations of LH experiments have been performed for the Tore Supra tokamak. Taking into account magnetic ripple in LH simulations, a better agreement is found between numerical predictions and experimental observations, such as non-thermal Bremsstrahlung emission, current profile, ripple-induced power losses in local magnetic mirrors, when plasma conditions correspond to the ` `few passes` regime. (author). 47 refs.

  14. Magnetic reconnection triggering magnetohydrodynamic instabilities during a sawtooth crash in a Tokamak plasma.

    Chapman, I T; Scannell, R; Cooper, W A; Graves, J P; Hastie, R J; Naylor, G; Zocco, A

    2010-12-17

    Thomson scattering measurements with subcentimeter spatial resolution have been made during a sawtooth crash in a Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak fusion plasma. The unparalleled resolution of the temperature profile has shed new light on the mechanisms that underlie the sawtooth. As magnetic reconnection occurs, the temperature gradient at the island boundary increases. The increased local temperature gradient is sufficient to make the helical core unstable to ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, thought to be responsible for the rapidity of the collapse.

  15. The fast reciprocating magnetic probe system on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhuang, Ge; Liu, Hai; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The fast reciprocating magnetic probe (FRMP) system is newly developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) to measure the local magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge. The magnetic probe array in the FRMP consists of four 2-dimensional magnetic probes arranged at different radial locations to detect local poloidal and radial magnetic fields. These probes are protected by a graphite and boron nitride casing to improve the frequency response of each probe; they are mounted on the head of a movable rod, which is oriented along radial direction at the top of the torus. In the experiments, multiple core diagnostics show that the insertion of the FRMP has little impact on the equilibrium of the plasma. Local magnetic fluctuations inside the last closed flux surface are successfully measured by the FRMP.

  16. A MHD invariant with effects on the confinement regimes in Tokamak

    Spineanu, Florin

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental Lagrangian, frozen-in and topological invariants can be useful to explain systematic connections between plasma parameters. At high plasma temperature the dissipation is small and the robust invariances are manifested. We invoke a frozen-in invariant which is an extension of the Ertel's theorem and connects the vorticity of the large scale motions with the profile of the safety factor and of particle density. Assuming ergodicity of the small scale turbulence we consider the approximative preservation of the invariant for changes of the vorticity in an annular region of finite radial extension (i.e. poloidal rotation). We find that the ionization-induced rotation triggered by a pellet requires a reversed-$q$ profile. In the $H$-mode, the invariance requires a accumulation of the current density in the rotation layer. Then this becomes a vorticity-current sheet which may explain experimental observations related to the penetration of the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation and the filamentation during th...

  17. Relationship between Magnetic Helicity Injection and Magnetic Reconnection in Double-Null Startup of the UTST Spherical Tokamak

    Watanabe, Takenori; Kamio, Shuji; Cao, Qinghong; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Takemura, Koichiro; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ishiguchi, Koji; Yamada, Takuma; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic helicity injection is a useful idea for explaining plasma current drive and startup of various magnetized plasmas such as Spherical Tokamaks (STs). Magnetic reconnection is directly related with the magnetic helicity injection, because it is essential to reorganization of magnetic field lines injected externally. We address how and why helicity injection is related with magnetic reconnection. An ST plasma is produced by using two pairs of external poloidal field coils in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) device. In the late phase of the formation, a single ST is connected to the coil flux, which enables magnetic helicity injection from the helicity source (the coil flux) into the helicity sink (the ST plasma). We measured the Y-shaped reconnection region between the ST plasma and the poloidal coil using two dimensional pickup coil arrays in the r-z plane. magnetic reconnection of common flux into private flux causes concentration of current density along the current sheet, forming a high eigen-value area between the helicity source and the helicity sink. We made a parameter scan to study how crucial and effective the plasmoid ejection is for helicity injection and found that the plasmoid motion is a dynamic helicity injection process.

  18. The rectangular array of magnetic probes on J-TEXT tokamak

    Chen, Zhipeng; Li, Fuming; Zhuang, Ge; Jian, Xiang; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The rectangular array of magnetic probes system was newly designed and installed in the torus on J-TEXT tokamak to measure the local magnetic fields outside the last closed flux surface at a single toroidal angle. In the implementation, the experimental results agree well with the theoretical results based on the Spool model and three-dimensional numerical finite element model when the vertical field was applied. Furthermore, the measurements were successfully used as the input of EFIT code to conduct the plasma equilibrium reconstruction. The calculated Faraday rotation angle using the EFIT output is in agreement with the measured one from the three-wave polarimeter-interferometer system.

  19. Calculation of fractal dimension of magnetic footprint in double-null divertor tokamaks

    Crank, Willie; Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima

    2010-11-01

    The simplest symplectic map that represents the magnetic topology of double-null divertor tokamaks is the double-null map, given by the map equations: x1=x0-ky0(1-y0^2 ), y1=y0+kx1. k is the map parameter. The map parameter k represents the generic topological effects of toroidal asymmetries. The O-point is at (0,0). The X-points are at (0,±1). We set k=0.51763, and Np=12. Np is the number of iterations of map that are equivalent to a single toroidal circuit of the tokamak. The width of stochastic layer near the upper and the lower X-points is exactly the same and equals 1.69 mm. We start 100,000 filed lines in the stochastic layer near the X-points and advance them for at most 10,000 toroidal circuits. We use the continuous analog of the map to calculate the magnetic footprints in the double-null divertor tokamaks. We calculate the area of the footprints and their fractal dimension. The area is A=0.0024 m^2, and fractal dimension is dfrac=1.0266. This work is supported by US Department of Energy grants DE-FG02-07ER54937, DE-FG02-01ER54624 and DE-FG02-04ER54793.

  20. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  1. A magnetically driven reciprocating probe for tokamak scrape-off layer measurements.

    Gunn, J P; Pascal, J-Y

    2011-12-01

    A new in situ reciprocating probe system has been developed to provide scrape-off layer measurements in the Tore Supra tokamak. The probe motion is provided by the rotation of an energized coil in the tokamak magnetic field. Simple analytic approximations to the exact numerical model were used to identify the important parameters that govern the dynamics of the system, and optimize the coil geometry, the electrical circuit, and the stiffness of the retaining spring. The linear speed of the probe is directly proportional to the current induced by the coil's rotation; its integral gives the coil position, providing a means to implement real-time feedback control of the probe motion. Two probes were recently mounted on a movable outboard antenna protection limiter in Tore Supra and provided automatic measurements during the 2011 experimental campaign.

  2. Observation of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Improved Confinement with a Graphite Probe at the Last Closed Flux Surface of the HT-7 Tokamak

    徐国盛; 万宝年; 宋梅; 凌必利; 匡光力; 丁伯江

    2002-01-01

    High time resolution measurements of the electrostatic fluctuations, radial electric field Er and turbulence-induced electron flux Гe have been performed across the transition of lower hybrid current drive improved confinement with a graphite Langmuir probe array at the last closed flux surface of the HT-7 tokamak. The decrease of Гe is dominated by the suppression of fluctuation levels, which follows the change of Er. A reversal of the poloidal propagation direction of turbulence demonstrates that the poloidal propagation is dominated by Eт× Bφ drift. The enhancement of poloidal coherence accompanies the fluctuation suppression, which suggests the subtle variation of turbulence features.

  3. Orbital magnetism of graphene nanostructures: Bulk and confinement effects

    Heße, Lisa; Richter, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    We consider the orbital magnetic properties of noninteracting charge carriers in graphene-based nanostructures in the low-energy regime. The magnetic response of such systems results both from bulk contributions and from confinement effects that can be particularly strong in ballistic quantum dots. First we provide a comprehensive study of the magnetic susceptibility χ of bulk graphene in a magnetic field for the different regimes arising from the relative magnitudes of the energy scales involved, i.e., temperature, Landau-level spacing, and chemical potential. We show that for finite temperature or chemical potential, χ is not divergent although the diamagnetic contribution χ0 from the filled valance band exhibits the well-known -B-1 /2 dependence. We further derive oscillatory modulations of χ , corresponding to de Haas-van Alphen oscillations of conventional two-dimensional electron gases. These oscillations can be large in graphene, thereby compensating the diamagnetic contribution χ0 and yielding a net paramagnetic susceptibility for certain energy and magnetic field regimes. Second, we predict and analyze corresponding strong, confinement-induced susceptibility oscillations in graphene-based quantum dots with amplitudes distinctly exceeding the corresponding bulk susceptibility. Within a semiclassical approach we derive generic expressions for orbital magnetism of graphene quantum dots with regular classical dynamics. Graphene-specific features can be traced back to pseudospin interference along the underlying periodic orbits. We demonstrate the quality of the semiclassical approximation by comparison with quantum-mechanical results for two exemplary mesoscopic systems, a graphene disk with infinite mass-type edges, and a rectangular graphene structure with armchair and zigzag edges, using numerical tight-binding calculations in the latter case.

  4. World survey of magnetic mirror confinement research facilities

    Wood, J. T.; Price, R. E.

    1984-02-01

    A common format to present the information on each project was adopted. Projects were selected for inclusion based on knowledge of their direct relevance or contribution to the magnetic mirror confinement program. The information on each project was first compiled in draft form from published literature and reports available. The draft material was then sent to key individuals associated with each project, with the original source of information identified, to solicit their additions and corrections. The responses were then reviewed and discrepancies with previously published information clarified through further consultations. The information was then incorporated into the document with a revision date to reflect the state of currency of the information.

  5. Density Functional Theory Studies of Magnetically Confined Fermi Gas

    陈宇俊; 马红孺

    2001-01-01

    A theory is developed for magnetically confined Fermi gas at a low temperature based on the density functional theory. The theory is illustrated by the numerical calculation of the density distributions of Fermi atoms 40K with parameters according to DeMarco and Jin's experiment [Science, 285(1999)1703]. Our results are in close agreement with the experiment. To check the theory, we also performed calculations using our theory at a high temperature, which compared very well to the results of the classical limit.

  6. Progress toward the creation of magnetically confined pair plasmas

    Saitoh, Haruhiko [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); The University of Tokyo (Japan); Hergenhahn, Uwe; Paschkowski, Norbert; Stanja, Juliane; Stenson, Eve V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Niemann, Holger; Sunn Pedersen, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald (Germany); Stoneking, Matthew R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (Germany); Lawrence University (United States); Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Piochacz, Christian; Vohburger, Sebastian [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Schweikhard, Lutz [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald (Germany); Danielson, James R.; Surko, Clifford M. [University of California, San Diego (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The PAX (Positron Accumulation eXperiment) and APEX (A Positron Electron eXperiment) projects aim to experimentally study the unique wave propagation and stability properties of pair plasmas. We plan to accumulate a large number of positrons in a multicell-type trap system (PAX) and to confine them with electrons in APEX, a levitated dipole or stellarator configuration, operated at the NEPOMUC facility, the world's most intense positron source. In this contribution, we report on recent results from PAX and APEX. We have conducted electron experiments with a 2.3 T Penning-Malmberg trap; confinement for more than 1 hour and observation of a collective mode were demonstrated. At NEPOMUC, we have characterized the positron beam for a wide energy range. In a prototype permanent-magnet dipole trap, efficient (38%) injection of the remoderated 5 eV positron beam was realized using E x B drifts. Based on these results, design studies on the confinement of pair-plasmas in a levitated dipole trap are ongoing.

  7. Effect of the vacuum vessel on magnetic measurements in TCABR tokamak

    Kucinski, M. Y.; Kuznetsov, Yu. K.; Saettone, E. A. O.

    2004-11-01

    Magnetic diagnostics in fusion experiments can be strongly affected by eddy currents induced in the vacuum vessel and in-vessel conducting components. In the present work the effect of the eddy currents on magnetic measurements in the TCABR tokamak with nearly circular plasma shape and rectangular cross section of the vacuum vessel is discussed. A method to find the magnetic field generated by eddy currents, in reply to the magnetic field of plasma currents, is based on expansion of vacuum field in series of toroidal harmonics. The conclusion is that, if the sensors are placed near the vessel, the effect of the vessel is strong and it decreases substantially in the case of sensors located near the plasma boundary at the circular surface.

  8. Generation of a magnetic island by edge turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    Poyé, A.; Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Garbet, X.; Benkadda, S.; Sen, A.; Dubuit, N.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate, through extensive 3D magneto-hydro-dynamics numerical simulations, the nonlinear excitation of a large scale magnetic island and its dynamical properties due to the presence of small-scale turbulence. Turbulence is induced by a steep pressure gradient in the edge region [B. D. Scott, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, S25 (2007)], close to the separatrix in tokamaks where there is an X-point magnetic configuration. We find that quasi-resonant localized interchange modes at the plasma edge can beat together and produce extended modes that transfer energy to the lowest order resonant surface in an inner stable zone and induce a seed magnetic island. The island width displays high frequency fluctuations that are associated with the fluctuating nature of the energy transfer process from the turbulence, while its mean size is controlled by the magnetic energy content of the turbulence.

  9. Generation of a magnetic island by edge turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    Poyé, A. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Université de Bordeaux, CELIA Laboratory, Talence 33405 (France); Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S.; Dubuit, N. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2015-03-15

    We investigate, through extensive 3D magneto-hydro-dynamics numerical simulations, the nonlinear excitation of a large scale magnetic island and its dynamical properties due to the presence of small-scale turbulence. Turbulence is induced by a steep pressure gradient in the edge region [B. D. Scott, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, S25 (2007)], close to the separatrix in tokamaks where there is an X-point magnetic configuration. We find that quasi-resonant localized interchange modes at the plasma edge can beat together and produce extended modes that transfer energy to the lowest order resonant surface in an inner stable zone and induce a seed magnetic island. The island width displays high frequency fluctuations that are associated with the fluctuating nature of the energy transfer process from the turbulence, while its mean size is controlled by the magnetic energy content of the turbulence.

  10. Influence of external resonant magnetic perturbation field on edge plasma of small tokamak HYBTOK-II

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: hayashi-yuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Suzuki, Y.; Ohno, N. [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Okamoto, M. [Ishikawa National College of Technology, Kitachujo, Tsubata-cho, Kahoku-gun, Ishikawa 929-0392 (Japan); Kikuchi, Y. [University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakakibara, S.; Watanabe, K.; Takemura, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Radial profile of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field with mode numbers of m = 6 and n = 2 in a small tokamak device HYBTOK-II have been investigated using a magnetic probe array, which is able to measure the radial profile of magnetic field perturbation induced by applying RMP. Results of RMP penetration into the plasma show that the RMP decreased toward the plasma center, while they were amplified around the resonant surface with a safety factor q = 3 due to the formation of magnetic islands. This suggests that RMP fields for controlling edge plasmas may trigger some kind of MHD instabilities. In addition, simulation results, based on a linearized four-field model, which agrees with the experimental ones, indicates that the penetration and amplification process of RMP strongly depend on a Doppler-shifted frequency between the RMP and plasma rotation.

  11. Project and analysis of the toroidal magnetic field production circuits and the plasma formation of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) tokamak; Projeto e analise dos circuitos de producao de campo magnetico toroidal e de formacao do plasma do Tokamak ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe F.P.W.; Bosco, Edson del

    1994-12-31

    This report presents the project and analysis of the circuit for production of the toroidal magnetic field in the Tokamak ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The ETE is a Tokamak with a small-aspect-ratio parameter to be used for studying the plasma physics for the research on thermonuclear fusion. This machine is being constructed at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil. (author). 20 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC) for toroidal confinement systems

    Zakharov, Leonid; Kolemen, Egemen; Lazerson, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Because of intrinsic anisotropy of high temperature plasma with respect to magnetic field, use of proper coordinates is of high priority for both theory and numerical methods. While in axisymmetric case, the poloidal flux function Y(r,z)=const determines proper flux coordinates, in 3-D, such a function does not exist. The destruction of nested magnetic surfaces even by small 3-D perturbations leads to a sudden change of topology of magnetic field. As a result, the coordinate systems can no longer be based on tracing the magnetic field lines resulting in difficulties for theory and 3-D numerical simulations. The RMC coordinates a,θ,ζ presented here (introduced in 1998 but not really used) are nested toroidal coordinates, which are best aligned with an ergodic confinement fields. In particular, in RMC the vector potential of the magnetic field has an irreducible form A = φ00(a)∇θ +[Y00(a) +ψ^*(a,θ,ζ)]∇ζ , where 3-D function ψ^* contains only resonant Fourier harmonics of angle coordinates. RMC can be generated and advanced using a fast (Newton) algorithm not involving the field line tracing.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Impurity Transport along Magnetic Field Lines in Tokamak Scrape-Off Layer

    Chung, Tae Kyun; Hong, Sang Hee

    1996-11-01

    A flow of impurity ions along the magnetic field lines in tokamak SOL (scrape-off layer) is investigated by a one-dimensional numerical analysis. The background values of SOL plasma, fields such as density, velocity, temperature and electric field, are obtained from an edge plasma transport code EDGETRAN(A 2-D edge plasma transport code with limited and diverted tokamak configurations developed by Dr. Kihak Im at Seoul National University). Impurity ions are generated by ionizations of neutral atoms in tokamak. The density profile of neutral atoms is given at an initial state. Impurity ions in a single-charged state develop into multi-charged states by ionization and recombination reactions. Impurity productions at the divertor target plate by sputterings are also considered as main source terms. As a numerics, FDM(Finite Difference Method) is employed. The Neumann condition on impurity density and the Dirchlet condition on impurity velocity are provided for their boundary conditions at a symmetry plane of the layer. No strict boundary condition on the target plate is given except an external source prescribed by sputtering rates.

  14. Variation of magnetic braking by non-axisymmetric magnetic fields depending on the perturbed field structure in the KSTAR tokamak

    Kim, Kimin; Jeon, Y. M.; Park, J.-K.; Ko, W. H.; In, Y.; Choe, W.; Kim, J.; Lee, S. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2017-03-01

    The variation of a magnetic braking profile by non-axisymmetric magnetic fields has been experimentally demonstrated and numerically validated in the KSTAR tokamak. Two types of n  =  2 non-resonant magnetic fields were applied by changing the relative phase of non-axisymmetric field coils. One is even parity, of which non-resonant fields deeply penetrate into the plasma core, and the other is odd parity localized at the plasma edge. The even and odd parity produced significantly different perturbed magnetic field structures, and thereby drove global and edge-dominant toroidal rotation damping, respectively. These distinct braking profiles are consistently reproduced by drift-kinetic particle simulations, indicating the possibility of the predictive utilization of non-resonant magnetic fields for rotation profile control.

  15. Energy confinement and magnetic field generation in the SSPX spheromak

    Hudson, B; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Hooper, E B; Hill, D N; Jayakumar, J; Moller, J; Romero-Talamas, C; Casper, T A; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Johnson, III, J A; Mezonlin, E

    2008-02-11

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [E.B. Hooper, et. al., Nuclear Fusion, Vol. 39, No. 7] explores the physics of efficient magnetic field buildup and energy confinement, both essential parts of advancing the spheromak concept. Extending the spheromak formation phase increases the efficiency of magnetic field generation with the maximum edge magnetic field for a given injector current (B/I) from 0.65 T/MA previously to 0.9 T/MA. We have achieved the highest electron temperatures (T{sub e}) recorded for a spheromak with T{sub e} > 500 eV, toroidal magnetic field {approx}1 T and toroidal current ({approx}1 MA) [R.D. Wood, D.N. Hill, H.S. McLean, E.B. Hooper, B.F. Hudson, J.M. Moller, 'Improved magnetic field generation efficiency and higher temperature spheromak plasmas', submitted to Physical Review Letters]. Extending the sustainment phase to > 8 ms extends the period of low magnetic fluctuations (< 1 %) by 50%. The NIMROD 3-D resistive MHD code [C.R. Sovinec, T.A. Gianakon, E.D. Held, S.E. Kruger and D.D. Schnack, The NIMROD Team, Phys. Plasmas 10, 1727 (2003)] reproduces the observed flux amplification {Psi}{sub pol}/{Psi}{sub gun}. Successive gun pulses are demonstrated to maintain the magnetic field in a quasi-steady state against resistive decay. Initial measurements of neutral particle flux in multi-pulse operation show charge-exchange power loss < 1% of gun input power and dominantly collisional majority ion heating. The evolution of electron temperature shows a distinct and robust feature of spheromak formation: a hollow-to-peaked T{sub e}(r) associated with q {approx} 1/2.

  16. Studies of instability and transport in tokamak plasmas with very weak magnetic shear

    Dong, J.Q.; Zhang, Y.Z. [Southwestern Inst. of Physics, Chengdu (China)]|[International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1997-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG or {eta}{sub i}) driven microinstabilities are studied, using kinetic theory, for tokamak plasmas with very weak (positive or negative) magnetic shear (VWS). The gradient of magnetic shear as well as the effects of parallel and perpendicular velocity shear (v{prime}{sub {parallel}} and v{prime}{sub E}) are included in the defining equations. Two eigenmodes: the double (D) and the global (G) are found to coexist. Parametric dependence of these instabilities, and of the corresponding quasilinear transport is systematically analyzed. It is shown that, in VWS plasmas, a parallel velocity shear (PVS) may stabilize or destabilize the modes, depending on the individual as well as the relative signs of PVS and of the gradient of magnetic shear. The quasilinear transport induced by the instabilities may be significantly reduced with PVS in VWS plasmas. The v{prime}{sub E} values required to completely suppress the instabilities are much lower in VWS plasmas than they are in normal plasmas. Possible correlations with tokamak experiments are discussed.

  17. Enhanced Confinement Scenarios Without Large Edge Localized Modes in Tokamaks: Control, Performance, and Extrapolability Issues for ITER

    Maingi, R [PPPL

    2014-07-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) typically accompany good H-mode confinement in fusion devices, but can present problems for plasma facing components because of high transient heat loads. Here the range of techniques for ELM control deployed in fusion devices is reviewed. The two baseline strategies in the ITER baseline design are emphasized: rapid ELM triggering and peak heat flux control via pellet injection, and the use of magnetic perturbations to suppress or mitigate ELMs. While both of these techniques are moderately well developed, with reasonable physical bases for projecting to ITER, differing observations between multiple devices are also discussed to highlight the needed community R & D. In addition, recent progress in ELM-free regimes, namely Quiescent H-mode, I-mode, and Enhanced Pedestal H-mode is reviewed, and open questions for extrapolability are discussed. Finally progress and outstanding issues in alternate ELM control techniques are reviewed: supersonic molecular beam injection, edge electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating and/or current drive, controlled periodic jogs of the vertical centroid position, ELM pace-making via periodic magnetic perturbations, ELM elimination with lithium wall conditioning, and naturally occurring small ELM regimes.

  18. Enhanced confinement scenarios without large edge localized modes in tokamaks: control, performance, and extrapolability issues for ITER

    Maingi, R.

    2014-11-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) typically accompany good H-mode confinement in fusion devices, but can present problems for plasma facing components because of high transient heat loads. Here the range of techniques for ELM control deployed in fusion devices is reviewed. Two strategies in the ITER baseline design are emphasized: rapid ELM triggering and peak heat flux control via pellet injection, and the use of magnetic perturbations to suppress or mitigate ELMs. While both of these techniques are moderately well developed, with reasonable physical bases for projecting to ITER, differing observations between multiple devices are also discussed to highlight the needed community R&D. In addition, recent progress in ELM-free regimes, namely quiescent H-mode, I-mode, and enhanced pedestal H-mode is reviewed, and open questions for extrapolability are discussed. Finally progress and outstanding issues in alternate ELM control techniques are reviewed: supersonic molecular beam injection, edge electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating and/or current drive, controlled periodic jogs of the vertical centroid position, ELM pace-making via periodic magnetic perturbations, ELM elimination with lithium wall conditioning, and naturally occurring small ELM regimes.

  19. Conceptual architecture of the plant system controller for the magnetics diagnostic of the ITER tokamak

    Neto, A.C., E-mail: Andre.Neto@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Arshad, S.; Sartori, F. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Vayakis, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ambrosino, G. [Consorzio CREATE/Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e delle Tecnologie dell’Informazione, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Batista, A. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bas, I. [GTD Sistemas de Información, 08005 Barcelona (Spain); Campagnolo, R. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Carvalho, B.B. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); De Magneval, G. [GTD Sistemas de Información, 08005 Barcelona (Spain); De Tommasi, G. [Consorzio CREATE/Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e delle Tecnologie dell’Informazione, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Dominguez, O. [GTD Sistemas de Información, 08005 Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez-Hernando, J.L. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pironti, A. [Consorzio CREATE/Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica e delle Tecnologie dell’Informazione, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Simrock, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    In a tokamak the magnetic diagnostics are key to the exploitation of the machine. They play a central role in the real-time control of fundamental plasma properties, such as the plasma shape and position, while also contributing with important data to a better understanding of the plasma physics. One of the particular challenges of the ITER magnetics diagnostic is the need to balance high system reliability with sufficient freedom to tune and improve the quality of the diagnostic physics output. This requirement calls for a design pattern where the functions related to plasma control and protection are loosely coupled with the functions related to the plasma science. This work reports on the current status of the magnetics plant system controller design and discusses some possible design solutions that address the aforementioned issue.

  20. Development of a precise long-time digital integrator for magnetic measurements in a tokamak

    Kurihara, Kenichi; Kawamata, Youichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    Long-time D-T burning operation in a tokamak requires that a magnetic sensor must work in an environment of 14-MeV intense neutron field, and that the measurement system must output precise magnetic field values. A method of time-integration of voltage produced in a simple pick-up coil seems to have preferable features of good time response, easy maintenance, and resistance to neutron irradiation. However, an inevitably-produced signal drift makes it difficult to apply the method to the long-time integral operation. To solve this problem, we have developed a new digital integrator (a voltage-to-frequency converter and an up-down counter) with testing the trial boards in the JT-60 magnetic measurements. This reports all of the problems and their measures through the development steps in details, and shows how to apply this method to the ITER operation. (author)

  1. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  2. Prospects for a dominantly microwave-diagnosed magnetically confined fusion reactor

    Volpe, F. A.

    2017-01-01

    Compared to present experiments, tokamak and stellarator reactors will be subject to higher heat loads, sputtering, erosion and subsequent coating, tritium retention, higher neutron fluxes, and a number of radiation effects. Additionally, neutral beam penetration in tokamak reactors will only be limited to the plasma edge. As a result, several optical, beam-based and magnetic diagnostics of today's plasmas might not be applicable to tomorrow's reactors, but the present discussion suggests that reactors could largely rely on microwave diagnostics, including techniques based on mode conversions and Collective Thomson Scattering.

  3. Evaluation of magnetic field due to ferromagnetic vacuum vessel in Tokamak

    Nakayama, Takeshi; Abe, Mitsushi; Tadokoro, Takahiro [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan). Power and Industrial Systems R and D Div.; Miura, Yukitoshi; Suzuki, Norio; Sato, Masayasu; Sengoku, Seio

    1998-03-01

    We evaluated magnetic fields due to the ferromagnetic vacuum vessel (FVV) in the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 experimentally and computationally, the results were extrapolated to the JFT-2M and ITER. The maximum amount of local poloidal field on the magnetic axis induced by the FVV port was about 5 mT in the HT-2. This is the allowable amount of the field to discharge plasma in the HT-2. The proportion of external poloidal field shielded by FVV is in inverse proportion to external toroidal field. The stronger the field induced by FVV, the smaller the distance between plasma center and vacuum vessel wall. The delay time of poloidal field penetration due to the FVV is small, as long as the toroidal field is supplied. (author)

  4. Helical temperature perturbations associated with radially asymmetric magnetic island chains in tokamak plasmas

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2016-12-01

    The simple analysis of Rutherford [Phys. Fluids 16, 1903 (1973)] is generalized in order to incorporate radial magnetic island asymmetry into the nonlinear theory of tearing mode stability in a low-β, large aspect-ratio, quasi-cylindrical, tokamak plasma. The calculation is restricted to cases in which the radial shifts of the island X- and O-points are (almost) equal and opposite. For the sake of simplicity, the calculation concentrates on a particular (but fairly general) class of radially asymmetric island magnetic flux-surfaces that can all be mapped to the same symmetric flux-surfaces by means of a suitable coordinate transform. The combination of island asymmetry (in which the radial shifts of the X- and O-points are almost equal and opposite) and temperature-induced changes in the inductive current profile in the immediate vicinity of the island is found to have no effect on tearing mode stability.

  5. Two-fluid and magnetohydrodynamic modelling of magnetic reconnection in the MAST spherical tokamak and the solar corona

    Browning, P K; Evans, M; Lucini, F Arese; Lukin, V S; McClements, K G; Stanier, A

    2015-01-01

    Twisted magnetic flux ropes are ubiquitous in space and laboratory plasmas, and the merging of such flux ropes through magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism for restructuring magnetic fields and releasing free magnetic energy. The merging-compression scenario is one possible start up scheme for spherical tokamaks, which has been used on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak MAST. Two current-carrying plasma rings, or flux ropes, approach each other through the mutual attraction of their like currents, and merge, through magnetic reconnection, into a single plasma torus, with substantial plasma heating. 2D resistive MHD and Hall MHD simulations of this process are reported, and new results for the temperature distribution of ions and electrons are presented. A model of the based on relaxation theory is also described, which is now extended to tight aspect ratio geometry. This model allows prediction of the final merged state and the heating. The implications of the relaxation model for heating of the solar ...

  6. Measurements of magnetic field fluctuations using an array of Hall detectors on the TEXTOR tokamak

    Ďuran, I.; Stöckel, J.; Mank, G.; Finken, K. H.; Fuchs, G.; Oost, G. Van

    2002-10-01

    Hall detectors have been used to measure the magnetic field together with its' fluctuations in the boundary of a tokamak. The results show, that the measurements which have been performed so far, mainly by use of coils together with subsequent integration, either on-line or later by computer, can be substituted by Hall probe measurements giving the desired value of B directly. Because the integration of the coil signal becomes more and more difficult with long pulses, Hall detectors may give advantages in future fusion devices. We implemented a stack of nine Hall detectors mounted on three planes on a rod in such a way, that the three components of the magnetic field can be measured. To avoid capacitive and charge pickup from the plasma, the probes are electrically shielded. The damping due to skin effect within this shield has been taken into account. The probes have been calibrated using a known magnetic field of a straight wire driven with a LC bank. This field has been precisely measured with a Rogowski coil. The dependence of the Hall coefficient on the frequency has been measured and the pickup in the feeds due to Ḃ has been withdrawn from the results. We demonstrate the method with measurements on the TEXTOR tokamak, where we could clearly detect the small stray fields associated with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations. On TEXTOR we have been able to detect the MHD activity preceding discharge disruptions as well as the precursors of the so called sawteeth. The results are compared to those of other diagnostics on TEXTOR as, e.g., magnetic loops and electron cyclotron emission, and they do well compare.

  7. Magnetic compressibility and ion-temperature-gradient-driven microinstabilities in magnetically confined plasmas

    Zocco, A; Connor, J W

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic theory of the strongly driven ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas is developed. Stabilizing and destabilizing effects are identified, and a critical $\\beta_{e}$ (the ratio of the electron to magnetic pressure) for stabilization of the toroidal branch of the mode is calculated for magnetic equilibria independent of the coordinate along the magnetic field. Its scaling is $\\beta_{e}\\sim L_{Te}/R,$ where $L_{Te}$ is the characteristic electron temperature gradient length, and $R$ the major radius of the torus. We conjecture that a fast particle population can cause a similar stabilization due to its contribution to the equilibrium pressure gradient. For sheared equilibria, the boundary of marginal stability of the electromagnetic correction to the electrostatic mode is also given. For a general magnetic equilibrium, we find a critical length (for electromagnetic stabilization) of the extent of the unfavourable curvature along the magnetic field....

  8. Sawtooth mitigation in 3D MHD tokamak modelling with applied magnetic perturbations

    Bonfiglio, D.; Veranda, M.; Cappello, S.; Chacón, L.; Escande, D. F.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of magnetic perturbations (MPs) on the sawtoothing dynamics of the internal kink mode in the tokamak is discussed in the framework of nonlinear 3D MHD modelling. Numerical simulations are performed with the pixie3d code (Chacón 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 056103) based on a D-shaped configuration in toroidal geometry. MPs are applied as produced by two sets of coils distributed along the toroidal direction, one set located above and the other set below the outboard midplane, like in experimental devices such as DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade. The capability of n  =  1 MPs to affect quasi-periodic sawteeth is shown to depend on the toroidal phase difference Δ φ between the perturbations produced by the two sets of coils. In particular, sawtooth mitigation is obtained for the Δ φ =π phasing, whereas no significant effect is observed for Δ φ =0 . Numerical findings are explained by the interplay between different poloidal harmonics in the spectrum of applied MPs, and appear to be consistent with experiments performed in the DIII-D device. Sawtooth mitigation and stimulation of self-organized helical states by applied MPs have been previously demonstrated in both circular tokamak and reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments in the RFX-mod device, and in related 3D MHD modelling.

  9. A planar conducting microstructure to guide and confine magnetic beads to a sensing zone

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2011-08-01

    A novel planar conducting microstructure is proposed to transport and confine magnetic micro/nano beads to a sensing zone. Manipulation and concentration of magnetic beads are achieved by employing square-shaped conducting micro-loops, with a few hundred nano-meters in thickness, arranged in a unique fashion. These microstructures are designed to produce high magnetic field gradients which are directly proportional to the force applied to manipulate the magnetic beads. Furthermore, the size of the microstructures allows greater maneuverability and control of magnetic beads than what could be achieved by permanent magnets. The aim of the microstructures is to guide magnetic beads from a large area and confine them to a smaller area where for example quantification would take place. Experiments were performed with different concentrations of 2 μm diameter magnetic beads. Experimental results showed that magnetic beads could be successfully guided and confined to the sensing zone. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 15, System design description. Volume 1

    NONE

    1995-09-22

    This System Design Description, prepared in accordance with the TPX Project Management Plan provides a summary or TF Magnet System design features at the conclusion of Phase I, Preliminary Design and Manufacturing Research. The document includes the analytical and experimental bases for the design, and plans for implementation in final design, manufacturing, test, and magnet integration into the tokamak. Requirements for operation and maintenance are outlined, and references to sources of additional information are provided.

  11. A novel flexible field-aligned coordinate system for tokamak edge plasma simulation

    Leddy, Jarrod; Romanelli, Michele; Shanahan, Brendan; Walkden, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas are confined by a magnetic field that limits the particle and heat transport perpendicular to the field. Parallel to the field the ionised particles can move freely, so to obtain confinement the field lines are "closed" (ie. form closed surfaces of constant poloidal flux) in the core of a tokamak. Towards, the edge, however, the field lines begin to intersect physical surfaces, leading to interaction between neutral and ionised particles, and the potential melting of the material surface. Simulation of this interaction is important for predicting the performance and lifetime of future tokamak devices such as ITER. Field-aligned coordinates are commonly used in the simulation of tokamak plasmas due to the geometry and magnetic topology of the system. However, these coordinates are limited in the geometry they allow in the poloidal plane due to orthogonality requirements. A novel 3D coordinate system is proposed herein that relaxes this constraint so that any arbitrary, smoothly varying geometry...

  12. Magnetic Field Confinement in the Corona: The Role of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation

    Zhang, M; Zhang, Mei; Low, Natasha Flyer & Boon Chye

    2006-01-01

    A loss of magnetic field confinement is believed to be the cause of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a major form of solar activity in the corona. The mechanisms for magnetic energy storage are crucial in understanding how a field may possess enough free energy to overcome the Aly limit and open up. Previously, we have pointed out that the accumulation of magnetic helicity in the corona plays a significant role in storing magnetic energy. In this paper, we investigate another hydromagnetic consequence of magnetic-helicity accumulation. We propose a conjecture that there is an upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain. This is directly related to the hydromagnetic property that force-free fields in unbounded space have to be self-confining. Although a mathematical proof of this conjecture for any field configuration is formidable, its plausibility can be demonstrated with the properties of several families of power-law, axisymmetric force-free fields. We put forth mathematica...

  13. Improvement of neutral beam injection heating efficiency with magnetic field well structures in a tokamak with a low magnetic field

    Kim, S. K.; Na, D. H.; Lee, J. W.; Yoo, M. G.; Kim, H.-S.; Hwang, Y. S.; Hahm, T. S.; Na, Yong-Su

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic well structures are introduced as an effective means to reduce the prompt loss of fast ions, the so-called first orbit loss from neutral beam injection (NBI), which is beneficial to tokamaks with a low magnetic field strength such as small spherical torus devices. It is found by single-particle analysis that this additional field structure can modify the gradient of the magnetic field to reduce the shift of the guiding center trajectory of the fast ion. This result is verified by a numerical calculation of following the fast ion’s trajectory. We apply this concept to the Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus [1], where NBI is under design for the purpose of achieving high-performance plasma, to evaluate the effect of the magnetic well structure on NBI efficiency. A 1D NBI analysis code and the NUBEAM code are employed for detailed NBI calculations. The simulation results show that the orbit loss can be reduced by 70%-80%, thereby improving the beam efficiency twofold compared with the reference case without the well structure. The well-shaped magnetic field structure in the low-field side can significantly decrease orbit loss by broadening the non-orbit loss region and widening the range of the velocity direction, thus improving the heating efficiency. It is found that this magnetic well can also improve orbit loss during the slowing down process.

  14. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The DIII-D Team; The Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m  =  qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, ν \\text{ped}\\ast≤slant 0.4 : (a) a reduction of the global plasma density by up to 61 % and (b) a reduction of the energy loss associated with edge localised modes (ELMs) by a factor of up to 9. A comprehensive database of ELM mitigation pulses at low {ν\\ast} in ASDEX Upgrade shows that the degree of ELM mitigation correlates with the reduction of pedestal pressure which in turn is limited and defined by the onset of ELMs, i. e. a modification of the ELM stability limit by the magnetic perturbation.

  15. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov's results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov's result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  16. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov`s results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov`s result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  17. Application of reflectometry power flow for magnetic field pitch angle measurements in tokamak plasmas (invited).

    Gourdain, P-A; Peebles, W A

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has successfully demonstrated measurements of many important parameters in high temperature tokamak fusion plasmas. However, implementing such capabilities in a high-field, large plasma, such as ITER, will be a significant challenge. In ITER, the ratio of plasma size (meters) to the required reflectometry source wavelength (millimeters) is significantly larger than in existing fusion experiments. This suggests that the flow of the launched reflectometer millimeter-wave power can be realistically analyzed using three-dimensional ray tracing techniques. The analytical and numerical studies presented will highlight the fact that the group velocity (or power flow) of the launched microwaves is dependent on the direction of wave propagation relative to the internal magnetic field. It is shown that this dependence strongly modifies power flow near the cutoff layer in a manner that embeds the local magnetic field direction in the "footprint" of the power returned toward the launch antenna. It will be shown that this can potentially be utilized to locally determine the magnetic field pitch angle at the cutoff location. The resultant beam drift and distortion due to magnetic field and relativistic effects also have significant consequences on the design of reflectometry systems for large, high-field fusion experiments. These effects are discussed in the context of the upcoming ITER burning plasma experiment.

  18. Development of the Fast Ionization Gauge in the HL-2A Tokamak

    WANGMingxu; LIBo; YANGZhigang; LIAOZhiqing; YANLongwen; ZHANGNianman; YANDonghai

    2003-01-01

    The neutral gas pressure near plasma or divertor plates is very important for the plasma-wall interaction, which determine the operation mode of divertom and confinement performances of plasma in tokamaks. The commercial ionization gauge does not work in strong magnetic field and noisy enviroment encountered in tokamaks. The measuring errom of pressure commercial ionizationare very large by the gauge mounted on the pumping system or through a long pipe to the vacuum vessel. A new ionization gauge,

  19. An improved neoclassical drift-magnetohydrodynamical fluid model of helical magnetic island equilibria in tokamak plasmas

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the perturbed ion polarization current on the stability of neoclassical tearing modes in tokamak plasmas is calculated using an improved, neoclassical, four-field, drift-magnetohydrodynamical model. The calculation involves the self-consistent determination of the pressure and scalar electric potential profiles in the vicinity of the associated magnetic island chain, which allows the chain's propagation velocity to be fixed. Two regimes are considered. First, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is not strong enough to enhance the magnitude of the polarization current (relative to that found in slab geometry). Second, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is strong enough to significantly enhance the magnitude of the polarization current. In both regimes, two types of solution are considered. First, a freely rotating solution (i.e., an island chain that is not interacting with a static, resonant, magnetic perturbation). Second, a locked solution (i.e., an island chain that has been brought to rest in the laboratory frame via interaction with a static, resonant, magnetic perturbation). In all cases, the polarization current is found to be either always stabilizing or stabilizing provided that ηi≡d ln Ti/d ln ne does not exceed some threshold value. In certain ranges of ηi, the polarization current is found to have a stabilizing effect on a freely rotating island, but a destabilizing effect on a corresponding locked island.

  20. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing-Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing-Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  1. High Confinement and High Density with Stationary Plasma Energy and Strong Edge Radiation in the TEXTOR-94 Tokamak

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Durodie, F.; Jaspers, R.; Tokar, M.Z.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Winter, J.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Dumortier, P.; Euringer, H.; Finken, K.H.; Fuchs, G.; Giesen, B.; Koch, R.; Koenen, L.; Koenigs, C.; Koslowski, H.R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Schoon, N.; Telesca, G.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association ``EURATOM-Belgian State,`` Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1040 Brussels, Koninklijke Militaire School (Belgium)]|[Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, GmbH Association ``Euratom-KFA,`` D-52425 Juelich (Federal Republic of Germany)]|[FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Associatie ``FOM-EURATOM,`` Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    Stationary high energy confinement is observed on TEXTOR-94 for times limited only by the flux swing of the transformer using strong edge radiation cooling. Necessary tools are the feedback control of the radiated power and of the plasma energy content. At the highest densities obtained (up to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit), energy confinement exceeds the edge-localized-mode-free {ital H}-mode scaling ITERH93-P by more than 20{percent}. {beta} limits of TEXTOR-94 are reached with {ital f}{sub H89}/{ital q}{sub {ital a}}{approx_equal}0.6. No detrimental effect of the seeded impurity is seen. These high confinement discharges meet many conditions necessary for a fusion reactor regime. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  3. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  4. Tokamak DEMO-FNS: Concept of magnet system and vacuum chamber

    Azizov, E. A.; Ananyev, S. S.; Belyakov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, E. N.; Voronova, A. A.; Golikov, A. A.; Goncharov, P. R.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Zapretilina, E. R.; Ivanov, D. P.; Kavin, A. A.; Kedrov, I. V.; Klischenko, A. V.; Kolbasov, B. N.; Krasnov, S. V.; Krylov, A. I.; Krylov, V. A.; Kuzmin, E. G.; Kuteev, B. V.; Labusov, A. N.; Lukash, V. E.; Maximova, I. I.; Medvedev, S. Yu.; Mineev, A. B.; Muratov, V. P.; Petrov, V. S.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Tanchuk, V. N.; Trofimov, V. A.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Khokhlov, M. V.; Shpanskiy, Yu. S.

    2016-12-01

    The level of knowledge accumulated to date in the physics and technologies of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF) makes it possible to begin designing fusion—fission hybrid systems that would involve a fusion neutron source (FNS) and which would admit employment for the production of fissile materials and for the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel. Modern Russian strategies for CTF development plan the construction to 2023 of tokamak-based demonstration hybrid FNS for implementing steady-state plasma burning, testing hybrid blankets, and evolving nuclear technologies. Work on designing the DEMO-FNS facility is still in its infancy. The Efremov Institute began designing its magnet system and vacuum chamber, while the Kurchatov Institute developed plasma-physics design aspects and determined basic parameters of the facility. The major radius of the plasma in the DEMO-FNS facility is R = 2.75 m, while its minor radius is a = 1 m; the plasma elongation is k 95 = 2. The fusion power is P FUS = 40 MW. The toroidal magnetic field on the plasma-filament axis is B t0 = 5 T. The plasma current is I p = 5 MA. The application of superconductors in the magnet system permits drastically reducing the power consumed by its magnets but requires arranging a thick radiation shield between the plasma and magnet system. The central solenoid, toroidal-field coils, and poloidal-field coils are manufactured from, respectively, Nb3Sn, NbTi and Nb3Sn, and NbTi. The vacuum chamber is a double-wall vessel. The space between the walls manufactured from 316L austenitic steel is filled with an iron—water radiation shield (70% of stainless steel and 30% of water).

  5. Polar confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field by laminar magnetostrophic flow

    Wood, Toby S

    2010-01-01

    The global-scale interior magnetic field B_i needed to account for the Sun's observed differential rotation can be effective only if confined in the polar caps. Axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic solutions are obtained showing that such confinement can be brought about by a very weak downwelling flow U~10^{-5}cm/s over each pole. Such downwelling is consistent with the helioseismic evidence. All three components of the magnetic field decay exponentially with altitude across a thin, laminar "magnetic confinement layer" located at the bottom of the tachocline. With realistic parameter values, the thickness of the confinement layer ~10^{-3} of the Sun's radius. Alongside baroclinic effects and stable thermal stratification, the solutions take into account the stable compositional stratification of the helium settling layer, if present as in today's Sun, and the small diffusivity of helium through hydrogen, chi. The small value of chi relative to magnetic diffusivity produces a double boundary-layer structure in wh...

  6. Magnetic measurements using array of integrated Hall sensors on the CASTOR tokamak

    Ďuran, Ivan; Hronová, Olena; Stöckel, Jan; Sentkerestiová, Jana; Havlicek, Josef

    2008-10-01

    We have performed the first tests of ``integrated'' Hall sensors (IHSs) in a tokamak in-vessel environment. IHS combines the sensing element together with the complex electronic circuitry on a single small chip. The on-chip integrated circuits provide stabilization of the supply voltage, output amplification, noise suppression, and elimination of temperature dependencies. Eight IHSs of A1322LUA type produced by Allegro MicroSystems, Inc. were mounted on a stainless steel ring symmetrically encircling the CASTOR plasmas in poloidal direction 10 mm outside the limiter radius. IHSs were oriented such that they measure the horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. We found out that these sensors qualify for in-vessel use of small to middle sized fusion devices where the radiation is not an issue and the temperature below 150 °C can be guaranteed. The main advantages over the traditional pickup coils are the smaller size and more straightforward interpretation of output without the need of rather cumbersome integration and drift removal procedure associated with the use of inductive loops. We successfully exploited the sensors for determination of vertical plasma displacement on CASTOR. This new diagnostic helped us to shed more light into long term observed discrepancy on CASTOR between vertical plasma displacement as deduced by standard magnetic and by nonmagnetic diagnostics (Langmuir probes, bolometers).

  7. Confined excitons in a semiconductor quantum dot in a magnetic field

    Nomura, Shintaro; Segawa, Yusaburo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic field effects in a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) are studied theoretically. Magneto-optical effects originating from electron-hole pairs in the lowest and the higher excited states are discussed. The theory is based on the effective-mass approximation with the following effects taken into account: the direct Coulomb interaction, the electron-hole exchange interaction, and the valence-band mixing effect. A calculation is performed with a numerical diagonalization method. The transition from the quantum confined Zeeman effect for a weak magnetic field to the quantum confined Paschen-Back effect for a strong magnetic field is discussed. Special attention is paid to a magnetic field dependence of the optical transition probabilities which is found to be a pronounced effect for a CdSe QD, where the confinement by a potential and a magnetic field have competing contributions.

  8. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined α particles and tritons on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Medley, S. S.; Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Fisher, R. K.; Duong, H. H.; McChesney, J. M.; Parks, P. B.; Petrov, M. P.; Khudoleev, A. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    1996-09-01

    Radially resolved energy and density distributions of the confined α particles in D-T experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are being measured with the pellet charge exchange (PCX) diagnostic. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons produced in D-D plasmas and H, He3, or tritium rf-driven minority ion tails. The ablation cloud formed by injected low-Z impurity pellets provides the neutralization target for this active charge exchange technique. Because the cloud neutralization efficiency is uncertain, the PCX diagnostic is not absolutely calibrated so only relative density profiles are obtained. A mass and energy resolving E∥B neutral particle analyzer (NPA) is used which has eight energy channels covering the energy range of 0.3-3.7 MeV for α particles with energy resolution ranging from 5.8% to 11.3% and a spatial resolution of ˜5 cm. The PCX diagnostic views deeply trapped ions in a narrow pitch angle range around a mean value of v∥/v=-0.048±10-3. For D-T operation, the NPA was shielded by a polyethylene-lead enclosure providing 100× attenuation of ambient γ radiation and 14 MeV neutrons. The PCX diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail.

  9. 3D, LTCC-type, high-frequency magnetic sensors for the TCV Tokamak

    Testa, Duccio, E-mail: duccio.testa@epfl.ch [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Corne, Adrien; Farine, Gaël; Jacq, Caroline; Maeder, Thomas [Laboratoire de Production Microtechnique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Toussaint, Matthieu [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    High-frequency, 3D magnetic sensors have been designed and manufactured in-house for installation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV). To optimize the in-vessel volume occupation, the sensors are based on combining the Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) and the classical thick-film technologies. The target requirements for the three measurement axes are an effective area NA{sub EFF} = 100 cm{sup 2} and end-to-end resonant frequency ω{sub 0}/2π = 1 MHz. For the as-built sensors, an effective area NA{sub EFF} ∼ 220 cm{sup 2}, self-inductance L{sub SELF} ∼ 8 μH and self-resonant frequency ω{sub 0}/2π ∼ 16 MHz are obtained for the primary δB{sub NOR} measurement, while NA{sub EFF} ∼ 265 cm{sup 2}, NA{sub EFF} ∼ 300 cm{sup 2}, L{sub SELF} ∼ 150 μH and ω{sub 0}/2π ∼ 5.5 MHz are obtained for the secondary δB{sub TOR} and δB{sub POL} measurements. When including the cabling up to the front-end electronics, ω{sub 0}/2π > 2 MHz is expected for all three measurement axes. To optimize the measurement performance of this new magnetic diagnostic system while limiting the number of elements for the first phase of installation on TCV, five 3D sensors will be installed along the toroidal direction, allowing detection of magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode numbers |n| > 30, thus significantly improving on the previous detection capabilities, which were Nyquist-limited to |n| = 8.

  10. Simulation of transition dynamics to high confinement in fusion plasmas

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Xu, G. S.; Madsen, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST. Particula......The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST....... Particularly, the slow transition with an intermediate dithering phase is well reproduced at proper parameters. The model recovers the power threshold for the L-H transition as well as the decrease in power threshold switching from single to double null configuration observed experimentally. The results...

  11. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  12. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  13. Stabilizing effect of ion pressure gradient on magnetic curvature-driven drift modes located at rational surface of tokamak plasma

    Wang Ai-Ke

    2005-01-01

    In the fluid model, we derive a dispersion relation for the toroidal drift modes of tokamak plasmas, including the ion pressure gradient and the magnetic field gradient and curvature. It is shown that the magnetic field gradient and curvature (MFGC) can cause instabilities at the rational surface, which are of toroidicity-induced (TI) modes. On the other hand, it is discovered that the ion pressure gradient can stabilize the present MFGC instabilities. The critical threshold of ion pressure gradient, which makes the growth rate reduced to zero, is obtained both analytically and numerically.

  14. Ion and Electron Heating Characteristics of Magnetic Re- Connection in Mast Tokamak Merging Experiment

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Yamada, Takuma; Imazawa, Ryota; Cheng, Chio-Zong

    2016-07-01

    We present results of recent studies of high power heating of magnetic reconnection, the fundamental process of several astrophysical events such as solar flare, in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) - the world largest merging experiment. In addition to the previously reported significant reconnection heating up to ˜1keV [1], detailed local profiles of electron and ion temperature have been measured using a ultra-fine 300 channel Ruby- and a 130 channel YAG-Thomson scattering and a new 32 channel ion Doppler tomography diagnostics [2]. 2D profile measurement of electron temperature revealed highly localized heating structure at the X point with the characteristic scale length of 0.02-0.05m0.3T), a thick layer of closed flux surface surrounding the current sheet sustains the temperature profile for longer time than the electron and ion energy relaxation time ˜4-10ms, finally forming triple peak structures of ion and electron temperatures at the X point and in the downstream. While the peak electron temperature at the X point increases with toroidal field, the bulk electron temperature and the ion temperature in the downstream are unaffected. [1] Y. Ono et.al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54, 124039 (2012) [2] H. Tanabe et. al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093027 (2013). [3] H. Tanabe et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 215004 (2015)

  15. Effect of a static external magnetic perturbation on resistive mode stability in tokamaks

    Fitzpatrick, R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies; Hender, T.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1994-03-01

    The influence of a general static external magnetic perturbation on the stability of resistive modes in a tokamak plasma is examined. There are three main parts to this investigation. Firstly, the vacuum perturbation is expanded as a set of well-behaved toroidal ring functions and is, thereafter, specified by the coefficients of this expansion. Secondly, a dispersion relation is derived for resistive plasma instabilities in the presence of a general external perturbation and finally, this dispersion relation is solved for the amplitudes of the tearing and twisting modes driven in the plasma by a specific perturbation. It is found that the amplitudes of driven tearing and twisting modes are negligible until a certain critical perturbation strength is exceeded. Only tearing modes are driven in low-{beta} plasmas with {epsilon}{beta}{sub p} << 1. However, twisting modes may also be driven if {epsilon}{beta}{sub p}{approx}>1. For error-field perturbations made up of a large number of different poloidal and toroidal harmonics the critical strength to drive locked modes has a {open_quote}staircase{close_quote} variation with edge-q, characterized by strong discontinuities as coupled rational surfaces enter or leave the plasma. For single harmonic perturbations the variation with edge-q is far smoother. Both types of behaviour have been observed experimentally. The critical perturbation strength is found to decrease strongly close to an ideal external kink stability boundary. This is also in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    1976-11-01

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn/sub 3/ conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended.

  17. Effects of resistivity on linear plasma responses to resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamak plasmas

    Kim, Juhyung; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun

    2016-09-01

    Numerical studies are made of the effects of resistivity on linear plasma responses to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in tokamaks based on a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. From a local two-field model, it is suggested that the ratio of the poloidal electron advection to the resistivity diffusion rate α m can be a figure of merit parameter in linear RMP penetration physics. The shielding efficiency is governed by α m , and when α m ≳ 1 , RMPs are effectively shielded. Global simulations using a four-field model [Hazeltine and Meiss, Phys. Rep. 121, 1 (1985)] show that there exists an effective threshold of the perpendicular electron flow ( Ve , ⊥ c ) beyond which RMPs cannot penetrate. Resistivity is found to determine Ve , ⊥ c which increases as resistivity becomes higher, making RMP penetration easier. At low resistivity, small Ve , ⊥ c renders the RMP penetration sensitive to ion collisionality and the change in q95. The kink response is observed to be closely related to the residual level of RMPs at rational surfaces and can be also strongly affected by resistivity.

  18. A magnetic confinement versus rotation classification of massive-star magnetospheres

    Petit, V.; Owocki, S.P.; Wade, G.A.; Cohen, D.H.; Sundqvist, J.O.; Cagné, M.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Oksala, M.E.; Bohlender, D.A.; Rivinius, T.; Henrichs, H.F.; Alecian, E.; Townsend, R.H.D.; ud-Doula, A.

    2013-01-01

    Building on results from the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project, this paper shows how a two-parameter classification of massive-star magnetospheres in terms of the magnetic wind confinement (which sets the Alfvén radius RA) and stellar rotation (which sets the Kepler co-rotation radius RK) p

  19. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2008-10-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  20. Properties of highly electronegative plasmas produced in a multipolar magnetic-confined device with a transversal magnetic filter

    Draghici, Mihai; Stamate, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    Highly electronegative plasmas were produced in Ar/SF6 gas mixtures in a dc discharge with multipolar magnetic confinement and transversal magnetic filter. Langmuir probe and mass spectrometry were used for plasma diagnostics. Plasma potential drift, the influence of small or large area biased el...

  1. Locked mode unlocking by rotating resonant magnetic perturbations in J-TEXT tokamak

    Jin, Hai; Hu, Qiming; Wang, Nengchao; Rao, Bo; Ding, Yonghua; Li, Da; Li, Mao; Xie, Shujia

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to unlock the m/n = 2/1 locked mode (LM) performed in J-TEXT tokamak by using rotating resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively. In the experiments, to maintain the LM, mode locking occurs by using static RMPs generated by a set of saddle coils. After mode locking, another rotating RMP with frequency of several kilo-Hz is applied to drive the static LM to rotate. The unlocking of LM is realized by using rotating RMP with different frequency and amplitude. It is found that the unlocking process contains two stages, i.e. the oscillating stage and the unlocking stage. In the oscillating stage, the rotating RMP with amplitude that is not strong enough causes the LM to oscillate around its locked phase and produces magnetic fluctuation to behave as a standing wave-like structure in poloidal direction. When the amplitude of the rotating RMP is strong enough, it first causes the LM to oscillate and then transforms to mode unlocking quickly in less than 1 ms, namely the unlocking stage. Further analysis shows that the unlocking of LM is determined by the torque balance between the viscous torque and the electromagnetic torques exerted by both the static and the rotating RMP. In addition, the unlocking process is sensitive to both the amplitude and the frequency of the rotating RMP as well as the amplitude of static RMP. Nonlinear numerical modeling based on reduced MHD equations is also performed to understand the unlocking process, and numerical results qualitatively agree with the experimental ones.

  2. Existence Conditions of Collision Sheath in the Tokamak Scrape-off Layer

    GAOQingdi; CHENXiaoping

    2002-01-01

    In controlled nuclear fusion devices like tokamaks, plasma particles are confined by closed magnetic flux surfaces. Outside the last closed flux surface (LCFS), plasma is in direct contact with a solid wall in the scrape-off layer (SOL). Due to the different

  3. Fast-ion dynamics in the TEXTOR tokamak measured by collective Thomson scattering

    Bindslev, H.; Nielsen, S.K.; Porte, L.;

    2006-01-01

    Here we present the first measurements by collective Thomson scattering of the evolution of fast-ion populations in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. 150 kW and 110 Ghz radiation from a gyrotron were scattered in the TEXTOR tokamak plasma with energetic ions generated by neutral beam injecti...

  4. Magnetic phase transition in confined MnO nanoparticles studied by polarized neutron scattering

    Feygenson, M.; Schweika, W.; Ioffe, A.; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Brückel, T.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic ordering and the phase transition in MnO nanoparticles confined in a porous glass using polarized neutron scattering. These MnO nanoparticles are best described as extended wormlike structures with a mean diameter of 70 angstrom. We observe an apparent continuous magnetic phase transition in MnO nanoparticles, in contrast to the well-known discontinuous phase transition in bulk MnO. By polarization analysis, separating the magnetic scattering, it is found tha...

  5. Self-organized criticality and the dynamics of near-marginal turbulent transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The high plasma temperatures expected at reactor conditions in magnetic confinement fusion toroidal devices suggest that near-marginal operation could be a reality in future devices and reactors. By near-marginal it is meant that the plasma profiles might wander around the local critical thresholds for the onset of instabilities. Self-organized criticality (SOC) was suggested in the mid 1990s as a more proper paradigm to describe the dynamics of tokamak plasma transport in near-marginal conditions. It advocated that, near marginality, the evolution of mean profiles and fluctuations should be considered simultaneously, in contrast to the more common view of a large separation of scales existing between them. Otherwise, intrinsic features of near-marginal transport would be missed, that are of importance to understand the properties of energy confinement. In the intervening 20 years, the relevance of the idea of SOC for near-marginal transport in fusion plasmas has transitioned from an initial excessive hype to the much more realistic standing of today, which we will attempt to examine critically in this review paper. First, the main theoretical ideas behind SOC will be described. Secondly, how they might relate to the dynamics of near-marginal transport in real magnetically confined plasmas will be discussed. Next, we will review what has been learnt about SOC from various numerical studies and what it has meant for the way in which we do numerical simulation of fusion plasmas today. Then, we will discuss the experimental evidence available from the several experiments that have looked for SOC dynamics in fusion plasmas. Finally, we will conclude by identifying the various problems that still remain open to investigation in this area. Special attention will be given to the discussion of frequent misconceptions and ongoing controversies. The review also contains a description of ongoing efforts that seek effective transport models better suited than traditional

  6. Distribution of magnetically confined circumstellar matter in oblique rotators

    Preuss, O; Holzwarth, V R; Solanki, S K

    2004-01-01

    We consider the mechanical equilibrium and stability of matter trapped in the magnetosphere of a rapidly rotating star. Assuming a dipolar magnetic field and arbitrary inclination of the magnetic axis with respect to the axis of rotation we find stable equilibrium positions a) in a (warped) disk roughly aligned with the magnetic equatorial plane and b) at two locations above and below the disk, whose distance from the star increases with decreasing inclination angle between dipole and rotation axis. The distribution of matter is not strongly affected by allowing for a spatial offset of the magnetic dipole. These results provide a possible explanation for some observations of corotating localized mass concentrations in hot magnetic stars.

  7. Cu Films Deposited by Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering Enhanced by ICP and External Magnetic Field Confinement

    QI Xuelian; REN Chunsheng; MA Tengcai; WANG Younian

    2008-01-01

    Metallic copper(Cu) films were deposited on a Si (100) substrate by unbalanced magnetron sputtering enhanced by radio-frequency plasma and external magnetic field confine-ment. The morphology and structure of the films were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface average rough-ness of the deposited Cu films was characterized by AFM data and resistivity was measured by a four-point probe. The results show that the Cu films deposited with radio-frequency discharge enhanced ionization and external magnetic field confinement have a smooth surface, low surface roughness and low resistivity. The reasons may be that the radio-frequency discharge and external magnetic field enhance the plasma density, which further improves the ion bombardment effect under the same bias voltage conditions. Ion bombardment can obviously influence the growth features and characteristics of the deposited Cu films.

  8. 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    Berk, Herbert L.; Breizman, Boris N.

    2014-02-21

    The 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems took place in Austin, Texas (7–11 September 2011). This meeting was organized jointly with the 5th IAEA Technical Meeting on Theory of Plasma Instabilities (5–7 September 2011). The two meetings shared one day (7 September 2011) with presentations relevant to both groups. Some of the work reported at these meetings was then published in a special issue of Nuclear Fusion [Nucl. Fusion 52 (2012)]. Summaries of the Energetic Particle Conference presentations were given by Kazuo Toi and Boris Breizman. They respectively discussed the experimental and theoretical progress presented at the meeting. Highlights of this meeting include the tremendous progress that has been achieved in the development of diagnostics that enables the ‘viewing’ of internal fluctuations and allows comparison with theoretical predictions, as demonstrated, for example, in the talks of P. Lauber and M. Osakabe. The need and development of hardened diagnostics in the severe radiation environment, such as those that will exist in ITER, was discussed in the talks of V. Kiptily and V.A. Kazakhov. In theoretical studies, much of the effort is focused on nonlinear phenomena. For example, detailed comparison of theory and experiment on D-III-D on the n = 0 geodesic mode was reported in separate papers by R. Nazikian and G. Fu. A large number of theoretical papers were presented on wave chirping including a paper by B.N. Breizman, which notes that wave chirping from a single frequency may emanate continuously once marginal stability conditions have been established. Another area of wide interest was the detailed study of alpha orbits in a burning plasma, where losses can come from symmetry breaking due to finite coil number or magnetic field imperfections introduced by diagnostic or test modules. An important area of development, covered by M.A. Hole and D.A. Spong, is concerned with the self

  9. Holographic equilibration in confining gauge theories under external magnetic fields

    Demircik, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of external magnetic fields on equilibration in the improved holographic QCD theory in the deconfined phase using the AdS/CFT correspondence. In particular we calculate the quasinormal mode spectra in the corresponding black brane solutions and study their dependence on temperature, momentum and magnetic field, both in the scalar and the shear channels. We find complex patterns in the motion of quasinormal modes on the complex plane, including certain cross overs between the lowest lying modes under varying momentum. We also find a curious dynamical instability that arise at a certain value of momentum.

  10. GPUbased, Microsecond Latency, HectoChannel MIMO Feedback Control of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Rath, Nikolaus

    Feedback control has become a crucial tool in the research on magnetic confinement of plasmas for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. This thesis presents a novel plasma feedback control system that, for the first time, employs a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for microsecond-latency, real-time control computations. This novel application area for GPU computing is opened up by a new system architecture that is optimized for low-latency computations on less than kilobyte sized data samples as they occur in typical plasma control algorithms. In contrast to traditional GPU computing approaches that target complex, high-throughput computations with massive amounts of data, the architecture presented in this thesis uses the GPU as the primary processing unit rather than as an auxiliary of the CPU, and data is transferred from A-D/D-A converters directly into GPU memory using peer-to-peer PCI Express transfers. The described design has been implemented in a new, GPU-based control system for the High-Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The system is built from commodity hardware and uses an NVIDIA GeForce GPU and D-TACQ A-D/D-A converters providing a total of 96 input and 64 output channels. The system is able to run with sampling periods down to 4 μs and latencies down to 8 μs. The GPU provides a total processing power of 1.5 x 1012 floating point operations per second. To illustrate the performance and versatility of both the general architecture and concrete implementation, a new control algorithm has been developed. The algorithm is designed for the control of multiple rotating magnetic perturbations in situations where the plasma equilibrium is not known exactly and features an adaptive system model: instead of requiring the rotation frequencies and growth rates embedded in the system model to be set a priori, the adaptive algorithm derives these parameters from the evolution of the perturbation amplitudes themselves. This results in non-linear control

  11. The field line map approach for simulations of magnetically confined plasmas

    Stegmeir, Andreas; Maj, Omar; Hallatschek, Klaus; Lackner, Karl

    2015-01-01

    In the presented field line map approach the simulation domain of a tokamak is covered with a cylindrical grid, which is Cartesian within poloidal planes. Standard finite-difference methods can be used for the discretisation of perpendicular (w.r.t.~magnetic field lines) operators. The characteristic flute mode property $\\left(k_{\\parallel}\\ll k_{\\perp}\\right)$ of structures is exploited computationally by a grid sparsification in the toroidal direction. A field line following discretisation of parallel operators is then required, which is achieved via a finite difference along magnetic field lines. This includes field line tracing and interpolation or integration. The main emphasis of this paper is on the discretisation of the parallel diffusion operator. Based on the support operator method a scheme is constructed which exhibits only very low numerical perpendicular diffusion. The schemes are implemented in the new code GRILLIX, and extensive benchmarks are presented which show the validity of the approach ...

  12. Plasma transport in the Scrape-off-Layer of magnetically confined plasma and the plasma exhaust

    Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    An overview of the plasma dynamics in the Scrape-off-Layer (SOL) of magnetically confined plasma is presented. The SOL is the exhaust channel of the warm plasma from the core, and the understanding of the SOL plasma dynamics is one of the key issues in contemporary fusion research. It is essential...

  13. Scale size of magnetic turbulence in tokamaks probed with 30-MeV electrons

    Entrop, I.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; R. Jaspers,; Finken, K.H.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of synchrotron radiation emitted by 30-MeV runaway electrons in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak show that the runaway population decays after switching on neutral beam injection (NBI). The decay starts only with a significant delay, which decreases with increasing NBI heating power. This delay pr

  14. Localization of the magnetic reconnection zone during sawtooth crashes in tokamak plasmas

    Munsat, T.; Park, H. K.; Classen, I.G.J.; Domier, C.W.; Donne, A. J. H.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Mazzucato, E.; van de Pol, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent 2D spatially and temporally resolved measurements of electron temperature fluctuations in the tokamak core have revealed new information on the dynamics of the sawtooth crash. Measures of poloidal localization of the reconnection zone are achieved through direct analysis of the 2D data and th

  15. Diffusion of magnetic field lines in a confined RFP plasma

    Bazzani, A. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica; INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy); Lab. di Tecnologia dei Materiali, Bologna (Italy); Di Sebastiano, A. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica; Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Matematica; Turchetti, G. [Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica

    1998-12-01

    A volume-preserving symplectic map is proposed to describe the magnetic field lines when the Taylor equilibrium is perturbed in a generic way. The standard scenario is observed by varying the perturbation strength, but the statistical properties in the chaotic regions are not simple due to the presence of boundaries and remnants of invariant structures. Simpler models of volume-preserving maps are proposed. The slowly modulated standard map captures the basic topological and statistical features. The diffusion is analytically described for large perturbations in terms of correlation functions and for small perturbations using the adiabatic theory, provided that the modulation is sufficiently slow.

  16. Computational challenges in magnetic-confinement fusion physics

    Fasoli, A.; Brunner, S.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Ricci, P.; Sauter, O.; Villard, L.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic-fusion plasmas are complex self-organized systems with an extremely wide range of spatial and temporal scales, from the electron-orbit scales (~10-11 s, ~ 10-5 m) to the diffusion time of electrical current through the plasma (~102 s) and the distance along the magnetic field between two solid surfaces in the region that determines the plasma-wall interactions (~100 m). The description of the individual phenomena and of the nonlinear coupling between them involves a hierarchy of models, which, when applied to realistic configurations, require the most advanced numerical techniques and algorithms and the use of state-of-the-art high-performance computers. The common thread of such models resides in the fact that the plasma components are at the same time sources of electromagnetic fields, via the charge and current densities that they generate, and subject to the action of electromagnetic fields. This leads to a wide variety of plasma modes of oscillations that resonate with the particle or fluid motion and makes the plasma dynamics much richer than that of conventional, neutral fluids.

  17. A midsize tokamak as a fast track to burning plasmas

    E. Mazzucato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the conceptual design of a midsize tokamak as a fast track to the investigation of burning plasmas. It is shown that it could reach large values of energy gain (≥ 10 with only a modest improvement in confinement over the scaling that was used for designing the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER. This can be achieved by operating in a low plasma recycling regime that experiments indicate can lead to improved plasma confinement. The possibility of reaching the necessary conditions of low recycling using a different magnetic divertor from those currently employed in present experiments is discussed.

  18. Equilibrium reconstruction based on core magnetic measurement and its applications on equilibrium transition in Joint-TEXT tokamak

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Jian, X.; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-10-01

    Evaluation and reconstruction of plasma equilibrium, especially to resolve the safety factor profile, is imperative for advanced tokamak operation and physics study. Based on core magnetic measurement by the high resolution laser polarimeter-interferometer system (POLARIS), the equilibrium of Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) plasma is reconstructed and profiles of safety factor, current density, and electron density are, therefore, obtained with high accuracy and temporal resolution. The equilibrium reconstruction procedure determines the equilibrium flux surfaces essentially from the data of POLARIS. Refraction of laser probe beam, a major error source of the reconstruction, has been considered and corrected, which leads to improvement of accuracy more than 10%. The error of reconstruction has been systematically assessed with consideration of realistic diagnostic performance and scrape-off layer region of plasma, and its accuracy has been verified. Fast equilibrium transitions both within a single sawtooth cycle and during the penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation have been investigated.

  19. New printed circuit boards magnetic coils in the vacuum vessel of J-TEXT tokamak for position measurement

    Qiu, S. S.; Zhuang, G.; Zhang, M.; Xia, D. H.; Rao, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Pan, Y. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gentle, K. [Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Four sets of magnetic diagnostic coils, which are printed on machinable ceramic printed circuit boards (PCB), are designed, fabricated, installed, and tested in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) vacuum vessel for detecting the plasma radial and vertical displacements relative to the geometric center of the vacuum vessel in Ohmic discharges. Each coordinate is determined by a pair of variable cross-section Rogowski and saddle coils, which measure the tangential and normal magnetic fields (relative to the coil surface). These coils are suitable for mass production and offer advantages in vacuum compatibility and temperature tolerance that are important for J-TEXT. Position measurements using PCB coils are compared with those from soft x-ray image system and match the position well.

  20. New printed circuit boards magnetic coils in the vacuum vessel of J-TEXT tokamak for position measurementa)

    Qiu, S. S.; Zhuang, G.; Zhang, M.; Xia, D. H.; Rao, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Pan, Y.; Gentle, K.

    2010-10-01

    Four sets of magnetic diagnostic coils, which are printed on machinable ceramic printed circuit boards (PCB), are designed, fabricated, installed, and tested in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) vacuum vessel for detecting the plasma radial and vertical displacements relative to the geometric center of the vacuum vessel in Ohmic discharges. Each coordinate is determined by a pair of variable cross-section Rogowski and saddle coils, which measure the tangential and normal magnetic fields (relative to the coil surface). These coils are suitable for mass production and offer advantages in vacuum compatibility and temperature tolerance that are important for J-TEXT. Position measurements using PCB coils are compared with those from soft x-ray image system and match the position well.

  1. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    Albert, Christopher G; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant NTV regimes including superbanana plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shea...

  2. Nonlinear Transition from Mitigation to Suppression of the Edge Localized Mode with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in the EAST Tokamak.

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Liu, Y Q; Gu, S; Yang, X; Guo, W; Shi, T; Jia, M; Wang, L; Lyu, B; Zhou, C; Liu, A; Zang, Q; Liu, H; Chu, N; Wang, H H; Zhang, T; Qian, J; Xu, L; He, K; Chen, D; Shen, B; Gong, X; Ji, X; Wang, S; Qi, M; Song, Y; Yuan, Q; Sheng, Z; Gao, G; Fu, P; Wan, B

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of a nonlinear transition from mitigation to suppression of the edge localized mode (ELM) by using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in the EAST tokamak is presented. This is the first demonstration of ELM suppression with RMPs in slowly rotating plasmas with dominant radio-frequency wave heating. Changes of edge magnetic topology after the transition are indicated by a gradual phase shift in the plasma response field from a linear magneto hydro dynamics modeling result to a vacuum one and a sudden increase of three-dimensional particle flux to the divertor. The transition threshold depends on the spectrum of RMPs and plasma rotation as well as perturbation amplitude. This means that edge topological changes resulting from nonlinear plasma response plays a key role in the suppression of ELM with RMPs.

  3. Anomalous behavior of a confined two-dimensional electron within an external magnetic field

    Rosas, R; Riera R; Marin, J. L. [Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Leon, H. [Instituto Superior Jose Antonio Echeverria, La Habana (Cuba)

    2001-10-01

    An anomalous diamagnetic behavior of a confined two-dimensional electron within an external magnetic field (perpendicular to the confining plane) is discussed in this letter. Although this finding is consistent with the pioneering work of Robnik, it has not been previously reported. When this effect occurs, the ratio between the typical length of spatial and magnetic confinement is an integer number. This property leads also to a quantization of the magnetic flux across the confining circle. The possible consequences of the peculiar behavior of the electron within such a structure are discussed. [Spanish] Se estudia una posible anomalia en las propiedades diamagneticas de un electron bidimensional confinado en presencia de un campo magnetico externo perpendicular al plano de confinamiento. Aunque los resultados obtenidos son consistentes con el trabajo pionero de Robnik, no han sido reportados anteriormente, a pesar de sus posibles aplicaciones, ya que cuando ocurre, el cociente entre la longitud magnetica y el tamano de la region de confinamiento es un numero entero, propiedad que establece una cuantizacion del flujo magnetico que atraviesa el circulo confinante. Se discuten las posibles consecuencias del comportamiento peculiar del electron en este tipo de estructura.

  4. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    Hedditch, John, E-mail: john.hedditch@sydney.edu.au; Bowden-Reid, Richard, E-mail: rbow3948@physics.usyd.edu.au; Khachan, Joe, E-mail: joe.khachan@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Whales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  5. Fusion in a magnetically-shielded-grid inertial electrostatic confinement device

    Hedditch, John; Khachan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented that shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively-biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  6. Confinement of ultra-cold neutron in a multiple cusp magnetic field

    Akiyama, Nobumichi; Inoue, Nobuyuki; Nihei, Hitoshi; Kinosita, Ken-ichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-08-01

    A new confinement system of ultra-cold neutrons is proposed. The neutron bottle is made of a rectangular vacuum chamber with the size of 40 cm x 40 cm x 30 cm covered with arrays of bar type permanent magnets. The operation of bottle requires neither cooling system nor high electric power supply, and thereby the bottle is appropriate to use in the room which is located in controlled area. The maximum kinetic energy of neutrons confined is 20 neV. Experimental scheme to test the performance of the bottle is described. (author)

  7. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments [Simulating the MagLIF plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrmann, M. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sinars, D. B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-06-20

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. Furthermore, this observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  8. Plasma column displacement measurements by modified Rogowski sine-coil and Biot-Savart/magnetic flux equation solution on IR-T1 tokamak

    Razavi, M.; Mollai, M.; Khorshid, P. [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad Branch, Mashhad 91735-413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nedzelskiy, I. [Instituto de Plasma e Fusao Nuclear, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Islamic Azad University, Tehran 14665-678 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The modified Rogowski sine-coil (MRSC) has been designed and implemented for the plasma column horizontal displacement measurements on small IR-T1 tokamak. MRSC operation has been examined on test assembly and tokamak. Obtained results show high sensitivity to the plasma column horizontal displacement and negligible sensitivity to the vertical displacement; linearity in wide, {+-}0.1 m, range of the displacements; and excellent, 1.5%, agreement with the results of numerical solution of Biot-Savart and magnetic flux equations.

  9. Seiberg-Witten and 'Polyakov-like' Magnetic Bion Confinements are Continuously Connected

    Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-06-01

    We study four-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric pure-gauge (Seiberg-Witten) theory and its N = 1 mass perturbation by using compactification on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}. It is well known that on R{sup 4} (or at large S{sup 1} size L) the perturbed theory realizes confinement through monopole or dyon condensation. At small S{sup 1}, we demonstrate that confinement is induced by a generalization of Polyakov's three-dimensional instanton mechanism to a locally four-dimensional theory - the magnetic bion mechanism - which also applies to a large class of nonsupersymmetric theories. Using a large- vs. small-L Poisson duality, we show that the two mechanisms of confinement, previously thought to be distinct, are in fact continuously connected.

  10. Inverse Magnetic Catalysis within a Confining Contact Interaction Model for Quarks

    Ahmad, Aftab

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of an external magnetic field on the chiral symmetry and confinement-deconfinement transition temperatures by using a vector-vector contact interaction model for quarks regularized so as to include an explicit confining scale in the corresponding gap equation. Exploring the evolution of the chiral condensate and the confining scale with temperature $T$ and magnetic field strength $eB$ ($e$ represents the fundamental electric charge), we determine the pseudo-critical temperatures for the chiral ($T_c^\\chi$) and deconfinement ($T_c^c$) transitions from their inflection points, respectively. By construction, $T_c^\\chi= T_c^c$ in the chiral limit. Within a mean field approximation, we observe the magnetic catalysis phenomenon, characterized by a rising behavior of $T_c^\\chi$ and $T_c^c$ with growing $eB$. Considering a lattice inspired running coupling which monotonically decreases with $eB$, inverse magnetic catalysis takes place in our model. Our findings are also in agreement with predic...

  11. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak; Reconstrucao do equilibrio no tokamak TCA/BR

    Sa, Wanderley Pires de

    1996-12-31

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author) 68 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  12. Assessment of liquid hydrogen cooled MgB2 conductors for magnetically confined fusion

    Glowacki, B. A.; Nuttall, W. J.

    2008-02-01

    Importantly environmental factors are not the only policy-driver for the hydrogen economy. Over the timescale of the development of fusion energy systems, energy security issues are likely to motivate a shift towards both hydrogen production and fusion as an energy source. These technologies combine local control of the system with the collaborative research interests of the major energy users in the global economy. A concept Fusion Island Reactor that might be used to generate H2 (rather than electricity) is presented. Exploitation of produced hydrogen as a coolant and as a fuel is proposed in conjunction with MgB2 conductors for the tokomak magnets windings, and electrotechnical devices for Fusion Island's infrastructure. The benefits of using MgB2 over the Nb-based conductors during construction, operation and decommissioning of the Fusion Island Reactor are presented. The comparison of Nb3Sn strands for ITER fusion magnet with newly developed high field composite MgB2 PIT conductors has shown that at 14 Tesla MgB2 possesses better properties than any of the Nb3Sn conductors produced. In this paper the potential of MgB2 conductors is examined for tokamaks of both the conventional ITER type and a Spherical Tokamak geometry. In each case MgB2 is considered as a conductor for a range of field coil applications and the potential for operation at both liquid helium and liquid hydrogen temperatures is considered. Further research plans concerning the application of MgB2 conductors for Fusion Island are also considered.

  13. Confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field, with implications for lithium burning

    Wood, Toby S

    2010-01-01

    The simplest interior magnetic field B_i that can explain the observed uniform rotation of the Sun's radiative envelope is an axial dipole stabilized by a deep toroidal field. It can explain the uniform rotation only if confined in the polar caps. The field must be prevented from diffusing up into the high-latitude convection zone, whose slower rotation must remain decoupled from the radiative interior. This paper describes new analytical and numerical solutions of the relevant magnetohydrodynamic equations showing that such confinement and decoupling is dynamically possible by means of a laminar "magnetic confinement layer" at the bottom of the tachocline. With realistic values of the microscopic diffusivities, a weak laminar downwelling flow U~10^{-5}cm/s over the poles is enough to enforce exponential decay of B_i with altitude, in a confinement layer only a fraction of a megameter thick. Downwelling in the polar tachocline is implied both by helioseismic observations, combined with elementary dynamics, an...

  14. Development of 2D/3D equilibrium codes for magnetically confined fusion experiments

    2013-01-01

    The present work is the result of a three-year Ph.D. research project carried out at Consorzio RFX on magnetically confined plasmas. Research on controlled thermonuclear fusion is currently being pursued by many countries throughout the world, thanks to its promise of a relatively clean and abundant energy source. The next steps for the international community are the construction and operation of a large device, ITER, considered as the last fusion physics experiment with respect to the tokam...

  15. An Observational Evaluation of Magnetic Confinement in the Winds of BA Supergiants

    Shultz, M; Petit, V; Grunhut, J; Neiner, C; Hanes, D

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic wind confinement has been proposed as one explanation for the complex wind structures of supergiant stars of spectral types B and A. Observational investigation of this hypothesis was undertaken using high-resolution ({\\lambda}/{\\Delta}{\\lambda} {\\sim} 65,000) circular polarization (Stokes V ) spectra of six late B and early A type supergiants ({\\beta} Ori, B8Iae; 4 Lac, B9Iab; {\\eta} Leo, A0Ib; HR1040, A0Ib; {\\alpha} Cyg, A2Iae; {\

  16. Magnetic Bion Condensation: A New Mechanism ofConfinement and Mass Gap in Four Dimensions

    Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-09-25

    In recent work, we derived the long distance confining dynamics of certain QCD-like gauge theories formulated on small S{sup 1} x R{sup 3} based on symmetries, an index theorem and abelian duality. Here, we give the microscopic derivation. The solution reveals a new mechanism of confinement in QCD(adj) in the regime where we have control over both perturbative and nonperturbative aspects. In particular, consider SU(2) QCD(adj) theory with 1 {le} n{sub f} {le} 4 Majorana fermions, a theory which undergoes gauge symmetry breaking at small S{sup 1}. If the magnetic charge of the BPS monopole is normalized to unity, we show that confinement occurs due to condensation of objects with magnetic charge 2, not 1. Due to index theorems, we know that such an object cannot be a two identical monopole configuration. Its net topological charge must vanish, and hence it must be topologically indistinguishable from the perturbative vacuum. We construct such objects, the magnetically charged, topologically null molecules of a BPS monopole and {bar K}{bar K} antimonopole, which we refer as magnetic bions. An immediate puzzle with this proposal is the apparent Coulomb repulsion between BPS-{bar K}{bar K} pair. An attraction which overcomes the Coulomb repulsion between the two is induced by 2n{sub f} -fermion exchange. Bion condensation is also the mechanism of confinement in N = 1 SYM on the same four-manifold. The SU(N) generalization hints a possible hidden integrability behind nonsupersymmetric QCD of affine Toda type, and allows us to analytically compute the string tensions and thicknesses. We currently do not know the extension to R{sup 4}.

  17. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L., E-mail: laura.savoldi@polito.it; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-15

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study

  18. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-01

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study has been

  19. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  20. Magnetic bion condensation: A new mechanism of confinement and mass gap in four dimensions

    Unsal, Mithat

    2007-01-01

    In recent work, we derived the long distance confining dynamics of certain QCD-like gauge theories formulated on small $S^1 \\times \\R^3$ based on symmetries, an index theorem and abelian duality. Here, we give the microscopic derivation. The solution reveals a new mechanism of confinement in QCD(adj) in the regime where we have control over both perturbative and nonperturbative aspects. In particular, consider $SU(2) QCD(adj)$ theory with $1 \\leq n_f \\leq 4$ Majorana fermions, a theory which undergoes gauge symmetry breaking at small $S^1$. If the magnetic charge of the BPS monopole is normalized to unity, we show that confinement occurs due to condensation of objects with magnetic charge 2, not 1. Due to index theorems, we know that such an object cannot be a two identical monopole configuration. Its net topological charge must vanish, and hence it must be topologically indistinguishable from the perturbative vacuum. We construct such objects, the magnetically charged, topologically null molecules of a BPS m...

  1. A Magnetic Confinement vs. Rotation Classification of Massive-Star Magnetospheres

    Petit, V; Wade, G A; Cohen, D H; Sundqvist, J O; Gagné, M; Apellániz, J Maíz; Oksala, M E; Bohlender, D A; Rivinius, Th; Henrichs, H F; Alecian, E; Townsend, R H D; ud-Doula, A

    2012-01-01

    Building on results from the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project, this paper shows how a two-parameter classification of massive-star magnetospheres in terms of the magnetic wind confinement (which sets the Alfv\\'en radius RA) and stellar rotation (which sets the Kepler co-rotation radius RK) provides a useful organisation of both observational signatures and theoretical predictions. We compile the first comprehensive study of inferred and observed values for relevant stellar and magnetic parameters of 64 confirmed magnetic OB stars with Teff > 16 kK. Using these parameters, we locate the stars in the magnetic confinement-rotation diagram, a log-log plot of RK vs. RA. This diagram can be subdivided into regimes of centrifugal magnetospheres (CM), with RA > RK, vs. dynamical magnetospheres (DM), with RK > RA. We show how key observational diagnostics, like the presence and characteristics of Halpha emission, depend on a star's position within the diagram, as well as other parameters, especially the expe...

  2. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 2{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T., E-mail: shikama@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Zushi, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 2{sup 3}S–2{sup 3}P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  3. Poloidal beta and internal inductance measurement on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

    Shen, B; Sun, Y W; Wan, B N; Qian, J P

    2007-09-01

    Poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) measurements are very important for tokamak operation. Much more plasma parameters can be inferred from the two parameters, such as the plasma energy confinement time, the plasma toroidal current profile, and magnetohydrodynamics instability. Using diamagnetic and compensation loop, combining with poloidal magnetic probe array signals, poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) are measured. In this article, the measurement system and arithmetic are introduced. Different experimental results are given in different plasma discharges on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

  4. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-10-26

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended.

  5. Measurement of magnetic field fluctuations within last closed flux surface with movable magnetic probe array in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    Kitachi, K.; Oike, T. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. Sci.; Ohdachi, S.; Toi, K.; Akiyama, R.; Ejiri, A.; Hamada, Y.; Narihara, K.; Seki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Kuramoto, H. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka 820 (Japan); 2; JIPP T-IIU Group

    1997-03-01

    Poloidal and radial magnetic field fluctuations less than 100 kHz are measured with a newly developed movable magnetic probe array in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. The probe array protected by a carbon-carbon composite with 20% boron is inserted beyond the last closed flux surface (LFCS) up to r/a{approx}0.77 without deleterious effect on ohmically and neutral beam heated plasmas. From the radial variation in the fluctuation amplitude just outside the LCFS the poloidal mode number m is estimated to be 4 or less for the low frequency coherent part (f<30 kHz) and about 10 for the relatively high frequency incoherent part (f>50 kHz). (orig.) 8 refs.

  6. Multi-field/-scale interactions of turbulence with neoclassical tearing modes and impact on plasma confinement in the DIII-D tokamak

    Bardoczi, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the first localized measurements of ITG scale temperature and density fluctuations and TEM scale density fluctuations modified by an m=2, n=1 magnetic island. These islands are formed by a Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) deep in the core plasma at the q=2 surface. NTMs are important as they often degrade confinement and lead to disruption. This is the first experimental confirmation of a long-standing theory prediction of decreased local small-scale turbulence levels across large-scale magnetic islands. Our measurements capture a mean reduction of turbulence inside (and enhancement just outside) the island region during island evolution. Additionally, in the island saturated state, the fluctuations at the O-point are observed to be reduced compared to the X-point. These measurements allow the determination of the turbulence length scale at the island separatrix that is predicted to affect NTM stability. A novel, non-perturbative measurement technique finds reduced cross-field electron thermal diffusivity (by 1-2 orders of magnitude) at the O-point, consistent with the local turbulence reduction. Initial comparisons to the GENE non-linear gyrokinetic code are promising with GENE predicting the observed turbulence reduction inside the island and increase just outside the island and replicating the observed scaling with island size. These results allow the validation of gyrokinetic simulations modeling the interaction of multi-scale phenomena as well as have potential implications for improved NTM control. Supported by USDOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984, DE-FG02-08ER54999 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  7. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported.

  8. Kazakhstan tokamak for material testing conceptual design and basic parameters

    Korotkov, V.A. E-mail: korotkov@sintez.niiefa.spb.su; Azizov, E.A.; Cherepnin, Yu.S.; Dokouka, V.N.; Ya.Dvorkin, N.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Krylov, V.A.; Kuzmin, E.G.; Leykin, I.N.; Mineev, A.B.; Shkolnik, V.S.; Shestakov, V.P.; Shapovalov, G.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Yagnov, V.A

    2001-10-01

    The construction of a special machine for plasma facing material testing under powerful and particle and heat flux deposition is necessary for progress of researches in the field of controlled fusion to industrial application. Kazakhstan tokamak for material testing (KTM) is planned as spherical tokamak with moderate-to-low aspect ratio (A=2) and high plasma and vacuum vessel elongation, that allows to reach high plasma parameters, large power-intensity at a compact arrangement of design elements and low requirements to a toroidal magnetic field. KTM tokamak is planned in order to investigate the following issues: (1) Plasma confinement in tokamak with A=2, plasma parameters and configurations working window; (2) Differed kinds of divertor plates under power flux of plasma to divertor volume; (3) Plasma-wall interaction (different materials and coating) and plasma-limiter configurations. In the paper the basic parameters of the machine are given. The design of magnet system with poloidal field coils, vacuum vessel and divertor are submitted.

  9. Population Inversion and Gain Measurements for Soft X-Ray Laser Development in a Magnetically Confined Plasma Column.

    1985-09-01

    INVERSION AND GAIN MEASUREMENTS FOR ’I SOFT X-RAY LASER DEVELOPMENT IN A MAGNET ICALLY CONFINED PLASMA COLUMN" For the Period: Nov. 1, 1983 t hr u Sept...proposal to AFOSR entitled "Population Inversion and Gain Measurements for X-Ray Laser Development in Magnetically Confined Plasma Column," Princeton, March...I* INTRODUCTION Extensive research on x-ray laser development has provided a number of interesting results for different schemes, e.g. recombination

  10. Confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field: some exact boundary-layer solutions

    Wood, T S

    2007-01-01

    High-latitude laminar confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field is shown to be possible, as originally proposed by Gough and McIntyre (1998) but contrary to a recent claim by Brun and Zahn (A&A 2006). Mean downwelling as weak as 2x10^-6cm/s -- gyroscopically pumped by turbulent stresses in the overlying convection zone and/or tachocline -- can hold the field in advective-diffusive balance within a confinement layer of thickness scale ~ 1.5Mm ~ 0.002 x (solar radius) while transmitting a retrograde torque to the Ferraro-constrained interior. The confinement layer sits at the base of the high-latitude tachocline, near the top of the radiative envelope and just above the `tachopause' marking the top of the helium settling layer. A family of exact, laminar, frictionless, axisymmetric confinement-layer solutions is obtained for uniform downwelling in the limit of strong rotation and stratification. A scale analysis shows that the flow is dynamically stable and the assumption of laminar flow realistic. T...

  11. Analysis of neutral hydrogenic emission spectra in a tokamak

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Balmer-α radiation by the excitation of thermal and fast neutral hydrogenic particles has been investigated in a magnetically confined fusion device, or tokamak, from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). From the diagnostic point of view, the emission from thermal neutrals is associated with passive spectroscopy and that from energetic neutrals that are usually injected from the outside of the tokamak to the active spectroscopy. The passive spectroscopic measurement for the thermal Balmer-α emission from deuterium and hydrogen estimates the relative concentration of hydrogen in a deuterium-fueled plasma and therefore, makes a useful tool to monitor the vacuum wall condition. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium obtained from this measurement qualitatively correlates with the energy confinement of the plasma. The Doppler-shifted Balmer-α components from the fast neutrals features the spectrum of the motional Stark effect (MSE) which is an essential principle for the measurement of the magnetic pitch angle profile. Characterization of this active MSE spectra, especially with multiple neutral beam lines crossing along the observation line of sight, has been done for the guideline of the multi-ion-source heating beam operation and for the optimization of the narrow bandpass filters that are required for the polarimeter-based MSE diagnostic system under construction at KSTAR.

  12. Magnetic self organization, MHD active control and confinement in RFX-mod

    Marrelli, L; Zanca, P; Valisa, M; Marchiori, G; Alfier, A; Bonomo, F; Gobbin, M; Piovesan, P; Terranova, D; Agostini, M; Alessi, C; Antoni, V; Apolloni, L; Auriemma, F; Barana, O; Bettini, P; Bolzonella, T; Bonfiglio, D; Brombin, M; Buffa, A; Canton, A; Cappello, S; Carraro, L; Cavazzana, R; Cavinato, M; Chitarin, G; Bello, S Dal; Lorenzi, A De; Escande, D F; Fassina, A; Franz, P; Gadani, G; Gaio, E; Gazza, E; Giudicotti, L; Gnesotto, F; Grando, L; Guo, S C; Innocente, P; Lorenzini, R; Luchetta, A; Malesani, G; Manduchi, G; Marcuzzi, D; Martin, P; Martini, S; Martines, E; Masiello, A; Milani, F; Moresco, M; Murari, A; Novello, L; Ortolani, S; Paccagnella, R; Pasqualotto, R; Peruzzo, S; Piovan, R; Pizzimenti, A; Pomaro, N; Predebon, I; Puiatti, M E; Rostagni, G; Sattin, F; Scarin, P; Serianni, G; Sonato, P; Spada, E; Soppelsa, A; Spizzo, G; Spolaore, M; Taccon, C; Taliercio, C; Toigo, V; Vianello, N; Zaccaria, P; Zaniol, B; Zanotto, L; Zilli, E; Zollino, G; Zuin, M [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35127-Padova (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    RFX-mod is a reversed field pinch (RFP) experiment equipped with a system that actively controls the magnetic boundary. In this paper we describe the results of a new control algorithm, the clean mode control (CMC), in which the aliasing of the sideband harmonics generated by the discrete saddle coils is corrected in real time. CMC operation leads to a smoother (i.e. more axisymmetric) boundary. Tearing modes rotate (up to 100 Hz) and partially unlock. Plasma-wall interaction diminishes due to a decrease of the non-axisymmetric shift of the plasma column. With the ameliorated boundary control, plasma current has been successfully increased to 1.5 MA, the highest for an RFP. In such regimes, the magnetic dynamics is dominated by the innermost resonant mode, the internal magnetic field gets close to a pure helix and confinement improves.

  13. Magnetic self organization, MHD active control and confinement in RFX-mod

    Marrelli, L.; Zanca, P.; Valisa, M.; Marchiori, G.; Alfier, A.; Bonomo, F.; Gobbin, M.; Piovesan, P.; Terranova, D.; Agostini, M.; Alessi, C.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Bettini, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Brombin, M.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; DeLorenzi, A.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gadani, G.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Malesani, G.; Manduchi, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martin, P.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; Masiello, A.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Murari, A.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Puiatti, M. E.; Rostagni, G.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spizzo, G.; Spolaore, M.; Taccon, C.; Taliercio, C.; Toigo, V.; Vianello, N.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zollino, G.; Zuin, M.

    2007-12-01

    RFX-mod is a reversed field pinch (RFP) experiment equipped with a system that actively controls the magnetic boundary. In this paper we describe the results of a new control algorithm, the clean mode control (CMC), in which the aliasing of the sideband harmonics generated by the discrete saddle coils is corrected in real time. CMC operation leads to a smoother (i.e. more axisymmetric) boundary. Tearing modes rotate (up to 100 Hz) and partially unlock. Plasma-wall interaction diminishes due to a decrease of the non-axisymmetric shift of the plasma column. With the ameliorated boundary control, plasma current has been successfully increased to 1.5 MA, the highest for an RFP. In such regimes, the magnetic dynamics is dominated by the innermost resonant mode, the internal magnetic field gets close to a pure helix and confinement improves.

  14. Magnetic phase transition in confined MnO nanoparticles studied by polarized neutron scattering

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Schweika, Werner; Ioffe, Alexander; Vakhrushev, Sergey B.; Brückel, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    We have investigated the magnetic ordering and the phase transition in MnO nanoparticles confined in a porous glass using polarized neutron scattering. These MnO nanoparticles are best described as extended wormlike structures with a mean diameter of 70Å . We observe an apparent continuous magnetic phase transition in MnO nanoparticles, in contrast to the well-known discontinuous phase transition in bulk MnO. By polarization analysis, separating the magnetic scattering, it is found that within the individual MnO nanoparticles about 60% of atoms remain disordered in the low-temperature limit, presumably due to interactions between nanoparticles and glass walls. The continuous character of the phase transition and the unusual temperature dependence suggests a surface-induced disorder phenomenon.

  15. Confined dissipative droplet solitons in spin-valve nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Iacocca, Ezio; Dumas, Randy K; Bookman, Lake; Mohseni, Majid; Chung, Sunjae; Hoefer, Mark A; Akerman, Johan

    2014-01-31

    Magnetic dissipative droplets are localized, strongly nonlinear dynamical modes excited in nanocontact spin valves with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These modes find potential application in nanoscale structures for magnetic storage and computation, but dissipative droplet studies have so far been limited to extended thin films. Here, numerical and asymptotic analyses are used to demonstrate the existence and properties of novel solitons in confined structures. As a nanowire's width is decreased with a nanocontact of fixed size at its center, the observed modes undergo transitions from a fully localized two-dimensional droplet into a two-dimensional droplet edge mode and then a pulsating one-dimensional droplet. These solitons are interpreted as dissipative versions of classical, conservative solitons, allowing for an analytical description of the modes and the mechanisms of bifurcation. The presented results open up new possibilities for the study of low-dimensional solitons and droplet applications in nanostructures.

  16. Efficiency of passive magnetic-confinement methods for rapidly rotating rings

    Hull, John R.

    1985-11-01

    Rapidly rotating, large-diameter rings have potential for use as low-cost electrical-energy storage devices. The efficiency of passive electromagnetic and electrodynamic methods to confine the rotating rings is investigated. Confinement methods examined include repulsive image force, repulsive null flux, attractive image force, and radially stable attractive. For each method the decay time is given in terms of the ring material properties and design parameters. The repulsive techniques are shown to have decay times of less than a day when optimized within a set of practical design constraints. The two attractive levitation methods result in the largest decay times, but are inherently unstable. When null-flux stabilizers are used with attractive levitation, the decay time is shown to depend on magnetic field inhomogeneity. Finally, an inherently stable and very efficient attractive levitation method is proposed. The new method is based on an analogy with alternating-gradient synchrotrons and should have application in high-speed ground transportation.

  17. Geodesic least squares regression for scaling studies in magnetic confinement fusion

    Verdoolaege, Geert [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium and Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Royal Military Academy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-01-13

    In regression analyses for deriving scaling laws that occur in various scientific disciplines, usually standard regression methods have been applied, of which ordinary least squares (OLS) is the most popular. However, concerns have been raised with respect to several assumptions underlying OLS in its application to scaling laws. We here discuss a new regression method that is robust in the presence of significant uncertainty on both the data and the regression model. The method, which we call geodesic least squares regression (GLS), is based on minimization of the Rao geodesic distance on a probabilistic manifold. We demonstrate the superiority of the method using synthetic data and we present an application to the scaling law for the power threshold for the transition to the high confinement regime in magnetic confinement fusion devices.

  18. Tokamak magnetic field lines described by simple maps. Dedicated to Professor Celso Grebogi on the occasion of his 60th birthday

    Portela, J. S. E.; Caldas, I. L.; Viana, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    The magnetic field line structure in a tokamak can be obtained by direct numerical integration of the field line equations. However, this is a lengthy procedure and the analysis of the solution may be very time-consuming. Otherwise we can use simple two-dimensional, area-preserving maps, obtained either by approximations of the magnetic field line equations, or from dynamical considerations. These maps can be quickly iterated, furnishing solutions that mirror the ones obtained from direct numerical integration, and which are useful when long-term studies of field line behavior are necessary (e.g. in diffusion calculations). In this work we focus on a set of simple tokamak maps for which these advantages are specially pronounced.

  19. A CONCEPT FOR NEXT STEP ADVANCED TOKAMAK FUSION DEVICE

    2002-01-01

    A concept is introduced for initiating the design study of a special class of tokamak,which has a magnetic confinement configuration intermediate between contemporary advanced tokamak and the recently established spherical torus (ST,also well known by the name "spherical tokamak").The leading design parameter in the present proposal is a dimensionless geometrical parameter, the machine aspect ratio A=R0/a0=2.0,where the parameters a0 and R0 denote,respectively,the plasma (equatorial) minor radius and the plasma major radius.The aim of this choice is to technologically and experimentally go beyond the aspect ratio frontier (R0/a0≈2.5) of present day tokamaks and enter a broad unexplored domain existing on the (a0,R0) parameter space in current international tokamak database,between the data region already moderately well covered by the advanced conventional tokamaks and the data region planned to be covered by STs.Plasma minor radius a0 has been chosen to be the second basic design parameter, and consequently,the plasma major radius R0 is regarded as a dependent design parameter.In the present concept,a nominal plasma minor radius a0=1.2m is adopted to be the principal design value,and smaller values of a0 can be used for auxiliary design purposes,to establish extensive database linkage with existing tokamaks.Plasma minor radius can also be adjusted by mechanical and/or electromagnetic means to smaller values during experiments,for making suitable data linkages to existing machines with higher aspect ratios and smaller plasma minor radii.The basic design parameters proposed enable the adaptation of several confinement techniques recently developed by STs,and thereby a specially arranged central-bore region inside the envisioned tokamak torus,with retrieved space in the direction of plasma minor radius,will be available for technological adjustments and maneuverings to facilitate implementation of engineering instrumentation and real time high

  20. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  1. Remediation of hydrophobic, persistent pollutants using a magnetic permanently confined micelle array (Mag-PCMA)

    Clark, K. K.; Keller, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    Natural and anthropogenic factors have resulted in the deposition of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) like PAHs and PCBs in elevated levels in soils and sediments. Currently there are 150 Superfund sites in the United States with contaminated sediments. Dredging is the most common practice for restoring Superfund sites to their preexisting conditions; this requires the transport of large volumes of material off-site for additional storage or processing. Our lab has designed a nano-hybrid material that can be used on-site; it combines a magnetic nanoscale iron oxide core coated with a cationic surfactant and is encased in a mesoporous silica matrix, called magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays, (Mag-PCMAs). This sorbent has been designed to remove HOCs from such scenarios. Surfactants are important in the enhancement of transport from binding sites in nature, such as organic matter, onto sorbents and other recoverable materials. The sorbent’s magnetic core allows for rapid separation by applying a magnetic field. It has also been shown to be reusable and maintain a removal efficiency of 95% over five cycles of reuse. Preliminary sorption studies show that the sorbent is capable of removing up to 98% of hydrophobic compounds from aqueous media. Current sorption studies are being done to test the efficiency of removing PAHs and PCBs from sediments, soils, and suspended sediments. Physicochemical properties that will influence the desorption/sorption hysteresis are being characterized to determine which properties enhance desorption from the contaminated media onto the Mag-PCMAs. Relevant applications are diverse as this material has the potential to recover a variety of HOCs in both ex situ and in situ remediation scenarios. Magnetic Permanently Confined Micelle Arrays

  2. RCD Large Aspect-Ratio Tokamak Equilibrium with Magnetic Islands: a Perturbed Approach

    F.L.Braga

    2013-01-01

    Solutions of Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation with Reversed Current Density (RCD) profiles present magnetic islands when the magnetic flux is explicitly dependent on the poloidal angle.In this work it is shown that a typical cylindrical (large aspect-ratio) RCD equilibrium configuration perturbed by the magnetic tield of a circular loop (simulating a divertor) is capable of generate magnetic islands,due to the poloidal symmetry break of the GS equilibrium solution.

  3. Direct measurement of the confinement time in a magnetically driven liner stagnation

    Martin, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    We report on direct, radiographic measurement of the stagnation phase of a magnetically driven liner implosion. In experiments on the Z machine, a beryllium liner is filled with liquid deuterium and imploded to a minimum radius of 440 microns (radial convergence ratio of 7.7) over 300ns, achieving a density at stagnation of approximately 10 g/cc. The measured confinement time is 12.2 ns, compared to 14 ns from 1D simulations. Comparison of the evolution of the density profiles from the radiographs with the simulation shows a deviation in the reflected shock trajectory and the stagnation of the trailing mass. Additionally, the magneto-Raleigh-Taylor instability modifies the axial liner mass distribution, leading to enhanced compression with shorter confinement in the bubble region compared to the spikes, reducing the overall pressure-confinement time product by 29 percent as compared to the 1D simulation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. In collaboration with: Patrick Knapp & Daniel Dolan, Sandia National Labs.

  4. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  5. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.

    2010-08-01

    The history of fusion research resembles the way in which one builds skyscrapers: laying the first foundation stone, one thinks about the top of the skyscraper. At the early stages of fusion, when it became clear that the thermonuclear reactor would operate with DT plasma confined by the magnetic field, the study of the `top item'—the physics of 3.5 MeV alpha particles produced by the DT fusion reaction—was initiated. The first publications on this topic appeared as long ago as the 1960s. At that time, because the physics of alpha particles was far from the experimental demand, investigations were carried out by small groups of theoreticians who hoped to discover important and interesting phenomena in this new research area. Soon after the beginning of the work, theoreticians discovered that alpha particles could excite various instabilities in fusion plasmas. In particular, at the end of the 1960s an Alfvén instability driven by alpha particles was predicted. Later it turned out that a variety of Alfvén instabilities with very different features does exist. Instabilities with perturbations of the Alfvénic type play an important role in current experiments; it is likely that they will affect plasma performance in ITER and future reactors. The first experimental manifestation of instabilities excited by superthermal particles in fusion devices was observed in the PDX tokamak in 1983. In this device a large-scale instability—the so called `fishbone instability'—associated with ions produced by the neutral beam injection resulted in a loss of a large fraction of the injected energy. Since then, the study of energetic-ion-driven instabilities and the effects produced by energetic ions in fusion plasmas has attracted the growing attention of both experimentalists and theorists. Recognizing the importance of this topic, the first conference on fusion alpha particles was held in 1989 in Kyiv under the auspices of the IAEA. The meeting in Kyiv and several

  6. Nanosurface-confined anisotropic growth and magnetism of ellipsoidal alpha-Fe nanogranules.

    Huh, Seung Hun; Kim, Chang Yeoul; Riu, Doh Hyung; Taguchi, Yosuke; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2008-04-01

    We have investigated the nanosurface-confined anisotropic growth of ordered-ellipsoidal Fe nanogranules when an Fe plume was deposited at a slanting angle onto an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) film. Layer-by-layer growth was also investigated. This growth is driven by two critical factors: (1) a new rhombic AAO cell and (2) the slanting deposition of the Fe plume. During slanting deposition, the rhombic AAO cell induces strong restrictions in the nucleation site, growth direction, and granular size; therefore, the degree of freedom during growth is restricted. The magnetic dipoles of the ordered Fe nanogranules are placed along the long axis of the ellipsoid at an angle of 180 degrees (antiparallel) due to the demagnetizing field, shape anisotropy, and magnetic dipole-to-dipole interactions.

  7. Confined partial filament eruption and its reformation within a stable magnetic flux rope

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Kayshap, Pradeep; Uddin, Wahab [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Filippov, Boris [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chandra, Ramesh [Department of Physics, D.S.B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Choudhary, Debi Prasad, E-mail: navin@aries.res.in, E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com [California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present observations of a confined partial eruption of a filament on 2012 August 4, which restores its initial shape within ≈2 hr after eruption. From the Global Oscillation Network Group Hα observations, we find that the filament plasma turns into dynamic motion at around 11:20 UT from the middle part of the filament toward the northwest direction with an average speed of ≈105 km s{sup –1}. A little brightening underneath the filament possibly shows the signature of low-altitude reconnection below the filament eruptive part. In Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å images, we observe an activation of right-handed helically twisted magnetic flux rope that contains the filament material and confines it during its dynamical motion. The motion of cool filament plasma stops after traveling a distance of ≈215 Mm toward the northwest from the point of eruption. The plasma moves partly toward the right foot point of the flux rope, while most of the plasma returns after 12:20 UT toward the left foot point with an average speed of ≈60 km s{sup –1} to reform the filament within the same stable magnetic structure. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, we find filament chirality to be sinistral, while the activated enveloping flux rope shows a clear right-handed twist. Thus, this dynamic event is an apparent example of one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). From the coronal magnetic field decay index, n, calculation near the flux rope axis, it is evident that the whole filament axis lies within the domain of stability (i.e., n < 1), which provides the filament stability despite strong disturbances at its eastern foot point.

  8. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  9. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  10. Effect of spatial confinement on magnetic hyperthermia via dipolar interactions in Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Sadat, M E; Patel, Ronak; Sookoor, Jason; Bud'ko, Sergey L; Ewing, Rodney C; Zhang, Jiaming; Xu, Hong; Wang, Yilong; Pauletti, Giovanni M; Mast, David B; Shi, Donglu

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the effect of nanoparticle confinement on the magnetic relaxation of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated by measuring the hyperthermia heating behavior in high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three different Fe3O4 nanoparticle systems having distinct nanoparticle configurations were studied in terms of magnetic hyperthermia heating rate and DC magnetization. All magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems were constructed using equivalent ~10nm diameter NP that were structured differently in terms of configuration, physical confinement, and interparticle spacing. The spatial confinement was achieved by embedding the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the matrices of the polystyrene spheres of 100 nm, while the unconfined was the free Fe3O4 nanoparticles well-dispersed in the liquid via PAA surface coating. Assuming the identical core MNPs in each system, the heating behavior was analyzed in terms of particle freedom (or confinement), interparticle spacing, and magnetic coupling (or dipole-dipole interaction). DC magnetization data were correlated to the heating behavior with different material properties. Analysis of DC magnetization measurements showed deviation from classical Langevin behavior near saturation due to dipole interaction modification of the MNPs resulting in a high magnetic anisotropy. It was found that the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of the unconfined nanoparticle systems were significantly higher than those of confined (the MNPs embedded in the polystyrene matrix). This increase of SAR was found to be attributable to high Néel relaxation rate and hysteresis loss of the unconfined MNPs. It was also found that the dipole-dipole interactions can significantly reduce the global magnetic response of the MNPs and thereby decrease the SAR of the nanoparticle systems.

  11. Effect of spatial confinement on magnetic hyperthermia via dipolar interactions in Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Sadat, M E [University of Cincinnati; Patel, Ronak [University of Cincinnati; Sookoor, Jason [University of Cincinnati; Bud' ko, Sergey L [Ames Laboratory; Ewing, Rodney C [Stanford University; Zhang, Jiaming [Stanford University; Xu, Hong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Wang, Yilong [Tongji University School of Medicine; Pauletti, Giovanni M [University of Cincinnati; Mast, David B [University of Cincinnati; Shi, Donglu [University of Cincinnati

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the effect of nanoparticle confinement on the magnetic relaxation of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated by measuring the hyperthermia heating behavior in high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three different Fe3O4 nanoparticle systems having distinct nanoparticle configurations were studied in terms of magnetic hyperthermia heating rate and DC magnetization. All magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems were constructed using equivalent ~10nm diameter NP that were structured differently in terms of configuration, physical confinement, and interparticle spacing. The spatial confinement was achieved by embedding the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the matrices of the polystyrene spheres of 100 nm, while the unconfined was the free Fe3O4 nanoparticles well-dispersed in the liquid via PAA surface coating. Assuming the identical core MNPs in each system, the heating behavior was analyzed in terms of particle freedom (or confinement), interparticle spacing, and magnetic coupling (or dipole-dipole interaction). DC magnetization data were correlated to the heating behavior with different material properties. Analysis of DC magnetization measurements showed deviation from classical Langevin behavior near saturation due to dipole interaction modification of the MNPs resulting in a high magnetic anisotropy. It was found that the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of the unconfined nanoparticle systems were significantly higher than those of confined (the MNPs embedded in the polystyrene matrix). This increase of SAR was found to be attributable to high Néel relaxation rate and hysteresis loss of the unconfined MNPs. It was also found that the dipole-dipole interactions can significantly reduce the global magnetic response of the MNPs and thereby decrease the SAR of the nanoparticle systems.

  12. Observational evidence for local particle acceleration associated with magnetically confined magnetic islands in the heliosphere - a review

    Khabarova, O. V.; Zank, G. P.; Malandraki, O. E.; Li, G.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of unusual energetic particle enhancements up to several MeV/nuc at leading edges of corotating interaction regions (CIRs), near the heliospheric current sheet and downstream of interplanetary shocks at 1AU has puzzled observers for a long time. Commonly accepted mechanisms of particle energization, such as a classical diffusive shock acceleration mechanism or magnetic reconnection at current sheets, are unable to explain these phenomena. We present a review of recently obtained observational results that attribute these atypical energetic particle events to local acceleration of particles in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands confined by currents sheets of various origins. The observations are in very good accordance with the theory of stochastic particle energization in the supersonic solar wind via a sea of small-scale flux-ropes interacting dynamically (Zank et al., 2014, 2015; le Roux et al., 2015, 2016).

  13. Active Control of 2/1 Magnetic Islands in the HBT-EP Tokamak

    Navratil, G.A.; Cates, C.; Mauel, M.E.; Maurer, D.; Nadle, D.; Taylor, E.; Xiao, Q.; Wurden, G.A.; Reass, W.A.

    1997-11-18

    Closed and open loop control techniques were applied to growing m/n=2/1 rotating islands in wall stabilized plasmas in the HBT-EP tokamak. The approach taken by HBT-EP combines an adjustable segmented conducting wall (which slows the growth or stabilizes ideal external kinks) with a number of small (6{degree} wide) saddle coils located between the gaps of the conducting wall. In this paper we report demonstration of 2-phase island rotation control from 5 kHz to 15 kHz and observation of the phase instability which are well modeled by the single-helicity, predictions of nonlinear Rutherford island dynamics for 2/1 tearing modes including important effects of ion inertia and FLR which appears as a damping term in the model equations. The closed loop response of active feedback control of the 2/1 mode at moderate gain was observed to be in good agreement with the theory. We have also demonstrated suppression of the 2/1 island growth using an asynchronous frequency modulation drive which maintains the flow damping of the island by application of rotating control fields with frequencies alternating above and below the natural mode frequency. This frequency modulation control technique was also able to prevent disruptions normally observed to follow giant sawtooth crashes in the plasma core.

  14. Electron and Ion Heating Characteristics during Magnetic Reconnection in the MAST Spherical Tokamak.

    Tanabe, H; Yamada, T; Watanabe, T; Gi, K; Kadowaki, K; Inomoto, M; Imazawa, R; Gryaznevich, M; Michael, C; Crowley, B; Conway, N J; Scannell, R; Harrison, J; Fitzgerald, I; Meakins, A; Hawkes, N; McClements, K G; O'Gorman, T; Cheng, C Z; Ono, Y

    2015-11-20

    Electron and ion heating characteristics during merging reconnection start-up on the MAST spherical tokamak have been revealed in detail using a 130 channel yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and a 300 channel Ruby-Thomson scattering system and a new 32 chord ion Doppler tomography diagnostic. Detailed 2D profile measurements of electron and ion temperature together with electron density have been achieved for the first time and it is found that electron temperature forms a highly localized hot spot at the X point and ion temperature globally increases downstream. For the push merging experiment when the guide field is more than 3 times the reconnecting field, a thick layer of a closed flux surface form by the reconnected field sustains the temperature profile for longer than the electron and ion energy relaxation time ~4-10 ms, both characteristic profiles finally forming a triple peak structure at the X point and downstream. An increase in the toroidal guide field results in a more peaked electron temperature profile at the X point, and also produces higher ion temperatures at this point, but the ion temperature profile in the downstream region is unaffected.

  15. Simulation of transition dynamics to high confinement in fusion plasmas

    Nielsen, A H; Madsen, J; Naulin, V; Rasmussen, J Juul; Wan, B N

    2014-01-01

    The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in close agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST. Particularly, the slow transition with an intermediate dithering phase is well reproduced by the numerical solutions. Additionally, the model reproduces the experimentally determined L-H transition power threshold scaling that the ion power threshold increases with increasing particle density. The results hold promise for developing predictive models of the transition, essential for understanding and optimizing future fusion power reactors.

  16. Importance of the fine structure in a tokamak for the abnormal transport and the internal disruptions; Importance de la structure magnetique fine dans un Tokamak pour le transport anormal et les disruptions internes

    Sabot, R.

    1996-02-28

    The problem of energy transport in a Tokamak, in presence of magnetic islets, has been treated by decomposing this problem in different bricks. To assembly the different bricks the model of dynamic percolation, which couples by the intermediate of scattering coefficient, the activity of transport sites (islets size) to the profile of transported quantity (temperature profile) has been chosen. The results, got with this model, results connected to the hypothesis of a limited number of islets, agree with the different observations. A possible application of this model could be the exploration of different operating conditions of Tokamak and a research of improved confinement running. (N.C.). 149 refs., 85 figs.

  17. Plasma response to m/n  =  3/1 resonant magnetic perturbation at J-TEXT Tokamak

    Hu, Qiming; Li, Jianchao; Wang, Nengchao; Yu, Q.; Chen, Jie; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Zhipeng; Ding, Yonghua; Jin, Hai; Li, Da; Li, Mao; Liu, Yang; Rao, Bo; Zhu, Lizhi; Zhuang, Ge; the J-TEXT Team

    2016-09-01

    The influence of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with a large m/n  =  3/1 component on electron density has been studied at J-TEXT tokamak by using externally applied static and rotating RMPs, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode number, respectively. The detailed time evolution of electron density profile, measured by the polarimeter-interferometer, shows that the electron density n e first increases (decreases) inside (around/outside) of the 3/1 rational surface (RS), and it is increased globally later together with enhanced edge recycling. Associated with field penetration, the toroidal rotation around the 3/1 RS is accelerated in the co-I p direction and the poloidal rotation is changed from the electron to ion diamagnetic drift direction. Spontaneous unlocking-penetration circles occur after field penetration if the RMPs amplitude is not strong enough. For sufficiently strong RMPs, the 2/1 locked mode is also triggered due to mode coupling, and the global density is increased. The field penetration threshold is found to be linearly proportional to n eL (line-integrated density) at the 3/1 RS but to (n eL)0.73 for n e at the plasma core. In addition, for rotating RMPs with a large 3/1 component, field penetration causes a global increase in electron density.

  18. A novel flexible field-aligned coordinate system for tokamak edge plasma simulation

    Leddy, J.; Dudson, B.; Romanelli, M.; Shanahan, B.; Walkden, N.

    2017-03-01

    Tokamak plasmas are confined by a magnetic field that limits the particle and heat transport perpendicular to the field. Parallel to the field the ionised particles can move freely, so to obtain confinement the field lines are ;closed; (i.e. form closed surfaces of constant poloidal flux) in the core of a tokamak. Towards, the edge, however, the field lines intersect physical surfaces, leading to interaction between neutral and ionised particles, and the potential melting of the material surface. Simulation of this interaction is important for predicting the performance and lifetime of future tokamak devices such as ITER. Field-aligned coordinates are commonly used in the simulation of tokamak plasmas due to the geometry and magnetic topology of the system. However, these coordinates are limited in the geometry they allow in the poloidal plane due to orthogonality requirements. A novel 3D coordinate system is proposed herein that relaxes this constraint so that any arbitrary, smoothly varying geometry can be matched in the poloidal plane while maintaining a field-aligned coordinate. This system is implemented in BOUT++ and tested for accuracy using the method of manufactured solutions. A MAST edge cross-section is simulated using a fluid plasma model and the results show expected behaviour for density, temperature, and velocity. Finally, simulations of an isolated divertor leg are conducted with and without neutrals to demonstrate the ion-neutral interaction near the divertor plate and the corresponding beneficial decrease in plasma temperature.

  19. Magnetic Reconnection Rates and Energy Release in a Confined X-class Flare

    Veronig, A M

    2015-01-01

    We study the energy-release process in the confined X1.6 flare that occurred on 22 October 2014 in AR 12171. Magnetic-reconnection rates and reconnection fluxes are derived from three different data sets: space-based data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 1600 {\\AA} filter onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and ground-based H$\\alpha$ and Ca II K filtergrams from Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory. The magnetic-reconnection rates determined from the three data sets all closely resemble the temporal profile of the hard X-rays measured by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), which are a proxy for the flare energy released into high-energy electrons. The total magnetic-reconnection flux derived lies between $4.1 \\times 10^{21}$ Mx (AIA 1600 {\\AA}) and $7.9 \\times 10^{21}$ Mx (H$\\alpha$), which corresponds to about 2 to 4% of the total unsigned flux of the strong source AR. Comparison of the magnetic-reconnection flux dependence on the GOES class for 27 eruptive events collected fr...

  20. Heat Diffusion across a Strong Stochastic Magnetic Field in Tokamak Plasmas

    GAO Hong; YU Qing-Quan

    2009-01-01

    We investigate heat diffusion across a local strong stochastic magnetic field by using eleven low-m perturbed magnetic islands.A maximum stochasticity of 38.82 between two neighboring rationed surfaces is attained.The correlation between the effective radied heat conductivity Xr and the ratio of the paredlel heat diffusion coefficient to the perpendicular coefficient,X||/X,is numericeally studied and compared with earlier work.

  1. Hα/ DαMeasurements Based on Photo Diode Array in the HT-7 Tokamak

    刘建坤; 吴振伟; 万宝年; 张先梅; 周倩

    2001-01-01

    Photo Diode Array (PDA) has been successfully applied in HT-7 tokamak experiments. The PDA system is almost free of electromagnetic interference from the machine. The system is compact and inexpensive, and it is convenient to be arranged in experiment. With the PDA system, the particle confinement time (Tp) has been systematically investigated. The relations such as Tp on the center-line-averaged electron density (ne), Tp on plasma current (Ip),and Tp on the toroidal magnetic field (Bt) have been obtained. The particle confinement under the Ion Berstain Wave (IBW) Heating has also been measured and analyzed.

  2. X-rays from Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks: Effect of Cooling-Regulated Shock Retreat

    ud-Doula, Asif; Townsend, Richard; Petit, Veronique; Cohen, David

    2014-01-01

    We use 2D MHD simulations to examine the effects of radiative cooling and inverse Compton (IC) cooling on X-ray emission from magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS) in magnetic massive stars with radiatively driven stellar winds. For the standard dependence of mass loss rate on luminosity $\\Mdot \\sim L^{1.7} $, the scaling of IC cooling with $L$ and radiative cooling with $\\Mdot$ means that IC cooling become formally more important for lower luminosity stars. However, because the sense of the trends is similar, we find the overall effect of including IC cooling is quite modest. More significantly, for stars with high enough mass loss to keep the shocks radiative, the MHD simulations indicate a linear scaling of X-ray luminosity with mass loss rate; but for lower luminosity stars with weak winds, X-ray emission is reduced and softened by a {\\em shock retreat} resulting from the larger post-shock cooling length, which within the fixed length of a closed magnetic loop forces the shock back to lower pre-shock w...

  3. Properties of the interface in the confined Ising magnet with competing surface fields

    Albano, Ezequiel V. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, INIFTA: Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas, UNLP, CONICET, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: ealbano@inifta.unlp.edu.ar; Virgiliis, Andres de [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, INIFTA: Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas, UNLP, CONICET, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina) and Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, WA331, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Mueller, Marcus [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, WA331, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Georg-August Universitaet, Friedrich Hund Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Binder, Kurt [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, WA331, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2007-02-01

    A two-dimensional magnetic Ising system confined in an LxD geometry (L-bar D) in the presence of competing magnetic fields (h) acting at opposite walls along the D-direction, exhibits an interface between domains of different orientation that run parallel to the walls. In the limit L->{approx}, this interface undergoes a wetting transition that occurs at the critical curve T{sub w}(h), so that for Tmagnetic fields acting at the walls, we study the divergence of the (equilibrated) average position of the interface when approaching the wetting critical point. Furthermore, starting from a monodomain structure with the interface bound to one wall, we also study the dynamics of the interface unbinding.

  4. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results.

    Mallamace, F; Broccio, M; Corsaro, C; Faraone, A; Wanderlingh, U; Liu, L; Mou, C-Y; Chen, S H

    2006-04-28

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature T(L)=223+/-2 K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280 K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time tau(T), as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  5. Multistage depressed collector conceptual design for thin magnetically confined electron beams

    Pagonakis, Ioannis Gr.; Wu, Chuanren; Illy, Stefan; Jelonnek, John

    2016-04-01

    The requirement of higher efficiency in high power microwave devices, such as traveling wave tubes and gyrotrons, guides scientific research to more advanced types of collector systems. First, a conceptual design approach of a multistage depressed collector for a sheet electron beam confined by a magnetic field is presented. The sorting of the electron trajectories, according to their initial kinetic energy, is based on the E × B drift concept. The optimization of the geometrical parameters is based on the analytical equations under several general assumptions. The analysis predicts very high levels of efficiency. Then, a design approach for the application of this type of collector to a gyrotron cylindrical hollow electron beam is also presented with very high levels of efficiency more than 80%.

  6. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results

    Mallamace, F.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Faraone, A.; Wanderlingh, U.; Liu, L.; Mou, C.-Y.; Chen, S. H.

    2006-04-01

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature TL=223±2K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1/D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time ⟨τT⟩, as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  7. Trapping, anomalous transport and quasi-coherent structures in magnetically confined plasmas

    Vlad, Madalina

    2009-01-01

    Strong electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by trapping or eddying of particle trajectories produced by the $E\\times B$ stochastic drift. Trapping is shown to produce strong effects on test particles and on test modes. It determines non-standard statistics of trajectories: non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects and coherence. Trapped trajectories form quasi-coherent structure. Trajectory trapping has strong nonlinear effects on the test modes on turbulent plasmas. We determine the growth rate of drift modes as function of the statistical characteristics of the background turbulence. We show that trapping provides the physical mechanism for the inverse cascade observed in drift turbulence and for the zonal flow generation.

  8. Control of magnetohydrodynamic stability by phase space engineering of energetic ions in tokamak plasmas.

    Graves, J P; Chapman, I T; Coda, S; Lennholm, M; Albergante, M; Jucker, M

    2012-01-10

    Virtually collisionless magnetic mirror-trapped energetic ion populations often partially stabilize internally driven magnetohydrodynamic disturbances in the magnetosphere and in toroidal laboratory plasma devices such as the tokamak. This results in less frequent but dangerously enlarged plasma reorganization. Unique to the toroidal magnetic configuration are confined 'circulating' energetic particles that are not mirror trapped. Here we show that a newly discovered effect from hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic theory has been exploited in sophisticated phase space engineering techniques for controlling stability in the tokamak. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed, and the technique successfully applied in the Joint European Torus. Manipulation of auxiliary ion heating systems can create an asymmetry in the distribution of energetic circulating ions in the velocity orientated along magnetic field lines. We show the first experiments in which large sawtooth collapses have been controlled by this technique, and neoclassical tearing modes avoided, in high-performance reactor-relevant plasmas.

  9. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their rôle in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath (`scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital rôle in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei

  10. Stochastic Ripple Diffusion of Energetic Particles in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak

    GAO Qing-Di; LONG Yong-Xing

    2004-01-01

    @@ The stochastic ripple diffusion is investigated in a realistic reversed magnetic shear discharge. Rippled field produces variations in the velocity of trapped particles leading to excursion of the tip position for successive banana bounces. When the excursion is large enough, the trapped energetic particles are lost rapidly via stochastic banana diffusion.

  11. An Improved Neoclassical Drift-Magnetohydrodynamical Fluid Model of Helical Magnetic Island Equilibria in Tokamak Plasmas

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the perturbed ion polarization current on the stability of neoclassical tearing modes is calculated using an improved, neoclassical, four-field, drift-MHD model. The calculation involves the self-consistent determination of the pressure and scalar electric potential profiles in the vicinity of the associated magnetic island chain, which allows the chain's propagation velocity to be fixed. Two regimes are considered. First, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is not strong enough to enhance the magnitude of the polarization current (relative to that found in slab geometry). Second, a regime in which neoclassical ion poloidal flow damping is strong enough to significantly enhance the magnitude of the polarization current. In both regimes, two types of solution are considered. First, a freely rotating solution (i.e., an island chain that is not interacting with a static, resonant, magnetic perturbation). Second, a locked solution (i.e., an island chain that has been brought to ...

  12. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings.

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-Ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 10(11) cm(-3) could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  13. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 1011 cm-3 could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  14. Curling probe measurement of a large-volume pulsed plasma with surface magnetic confinement

    Pandey, A.; Tashiro, H.; Sakakibara, W.; Nakamura, K.; Sugai, H.

    2016-12-01

    A curling probe (CP) based on microwave resonance is applied to the measurement of electron density in a pulsed DC glow discharge under surface magnetic confinement (SMC) provided by a number of permanent magnets on a chamber wall. Owing to the SMC effects, a 1 m scale large-volume plasma is generated by a relatively low voltage (~1 kV) at low pressure (~1 Pa) in various gases (Ar, CH4, and C2H2). Temporal variation of the electron density is measured for pulse frequency f  =  0.5-25 kHz for various discharge-on times (T ON) with a high resolution time (~0.2 µs), using the on-point mode. In general, the electron density starts to increase at time t  =  0 after turn-on of the discharge voltage, reaches peak density at t  =  T ON, and then decreases after turn-off. The peak electron density is observed to increase with the pulse frequency f for constant T ON owing to the residual plasma. This dependence is successfully formulated using a semi-empirical model. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cathode sheath in the pulsed discharge is revealed by a 1 m long movable CP. The measured thickness of the high-voltage cathode fall in a steady state coincides with the value of the so-called Child-Langmuir sheath.

  15. Chandra View of Magnetically Confined Wind in HD191612: Theory versus Observations

    Naze, Yael; Zhekov, Svetozar A

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of the magnetic star HD191612 were acquired using the Chandra X-ray observatory at both maximum and minimum emission phases. We confirm the flux and hardness variations previously reported with XMM-Newton, demonstrating the great repeatability of the behavior of HD191612 over a decade. The line profiles appear typical for magnetic massive stars: no significant line shift, relatively narrow lines for high-Z elements, and formation radius at about 2R*. Line ratios confirm the softening of the X-ray spectrum at the minimum emission phase. Shift or width variations appear of limited amplitude at most (slightly lower velocity and slightly increased broadening at minimum emission phase, but within 1--2 sigma of values at maximum). In addition, a fully self-consistent 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the confined wind in HD191612 was performed. The simulation results were directly fitted to the data leading to a remarkable agreement overall between them.

  16. Distance dependence of magnetic field effect inside confined environment of reverse micelles

    Sarangi, Manas Kumar; Basu, Samita

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we emphasize on the distance dependence of the magnetic field effect (MFE) on the donoracceptor (D-A) pair inside the confined environment of AOT/H2O/n-heptane reverse micellar (RMs) system. For this study N, N-dimethyl aniline (DMA) is used as an electron donor while the protonated form of Acr is treated as an electron acceptor. We report of the occurrence of an associated excited state proton transfer with the photoinduced electron transfer between Acr and DMA forming corresponding radical pair (RP) and radical ion pairs (RIP). The fate of these reaction products has been tested in the presence of an external magnetic field (˜0.08T) by varying the size of the RMs. The MFE between Acr and DMA has been compared to the results with the earlier reported interactions between Acr and TEA (Chemical Physics Letters, 2011, 506, 205-210). We accentuate the importance of the localization of the D and A inside the RMs, and the intervening distance between the pair to be the critical component for observing substantial MFE.

  17. Modeling of Resistive Wall Modes in Tokamak and Reversed Field Pinch Configurations of KTX

    Han, Rui; Zhu, Ping; Bai, Wei; Lan, Tao; Liu, Wandong

    2016-10-01

    Resistive wall mode is believed to be one of the leading causes for macroscopic degradation of plasma confinement in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFP). In this study, we evaluate the linear RWM instability of Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) in both tokamak and RFP configurations. For the tokamak configuration, the extended MHD code NIMROD is employed for calculating the dependence of the RWM growth rate on the position and conductivity of the vacuum wall for a model tokamak equilibrium of KTX in the large aspect-ratio approximation. For the RFP configuration, the standard formulation of dispersion relation for RWM based on the MHD energy principle has been evaluated for a cylindrical α- Θ model of KTX plasma equilibrium, in an effort to investigate the effects of thin wall on the RWM in KTX. Full MHD calculations of RWM in the RFP configuration of KTX using the NIMROD code are also being developed. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grant Nos. 2014GB124002, 2015GB101004, 2011GB106000, and 2011GB106003.

  18. Simulating W Impurity Transport in Tokamaks

    Younkin, Timothy R.; Green, David L.; Lasa, Ane; Canik, John M.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-10-01

    The extreme heat and charged particle flux to plasma facing materials in magnetically confined fusion devices has motivated Tungsten experiments such as the ``W-Ring'' experiment on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate W divertor viability. In this domain, the transport of W impurities from their tile locations to other first-wall tiles is highly relevant to material lifetimes and tokamak operation. Here we present initial results from a simulation of this W transport. Given that sputtered impurities may experience prompt redeposition near the divertor strikepoint, or migrate far from its origin to the midplane, there is a need to track the global, 3-D, impurity redistribution. This is done by directly integrating the 6-D Lorentz equation of motion (plus thermal gradient terms and relevant Monte-Carlo operators) for the impurity ions and neutrals under background plasma parameters determined by the SOLPS edge plasma code. The geometric details of the plasma facing components are represented to a fidelity sufficient to examine the global impurity migration trends with initial work also presented on advanced surface meshing capabilities targeting high fidelity simulation. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Office of Science SciDAC project on plasma-surface interactions under US DOE contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    Marcus, F A; Fuhr, G; Monnier, A; Benkadda, S

    2014-01-01

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code (EMEDGE3D) with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindr...

  20. Special section containing papers presented at the 13th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems (Beijing, China, 17-20 September 2013) Special section containing papers presented at the 13th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems (Beijing, China, 17-20 September 2013)

    Lin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    In magnetic fusion plasmas, a significant fraction of the kinetic pressure is contributed by superthermal charged particles produced by auxiliary heating (fast ions and electrons) and fusion reactions (a-particles). Since these energetic particles are often far away from thermal equilibrium due to their non-Maxwellian distribution and steep pressure gradients, the free energy can excite electromagnetic instabilities to intensity levels well above the thermal fluctuations. The resultant electromagnetic turbulence could induce large transport of energetic particles, which could reduce heating efficiency, degrade overall plasma confinement, and damage fusion devices. Therefore, understanding and predicting energetic particle confinement properties are critical to the success of burning plasma experiments such as ITER since the ignition relies on plasma self-heating by a-particles. To promote international exchanges and collaborations on energetic particle physics, the biannual conference series under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were help in Kyiv (1989), Aspenas (1991), Trieste (1993), Princeton (1995), JET/Abingdon (1997), Naka (1999), Gothenburg (2001), San Diego (2003), Takayama (2005), Kloster Seeon (2007), Kyiv (2009), and Austin (2011). The papers in this special section were presented at the most recent meeting, the 13th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems, which was hosted by the Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing, China (17-20 September 2013). The program of the meeting consisted of 71 presentations, including 13 invited talks, 26 oral contributed talks, 30 posters, and 2 summary talks, which were selected by the International Advisory Committee (IAC). The IAC members include H. Berk, L.G. Eriksson, A. Fasoli, W. Heidbrink, Ya. Kolesnichenko, Ph. Lauber, Z. Lin, R. Nazikian, S. Pinches, S. Sharapov, K. Shinohara, K. Toi, G. Vlad, and X.T. Ding. The conference program

  1. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L., E-mail: jeg@uga.edu, E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  2. REQUIREMENTS FOR COLLISION DATA ON THE SPECIES HELIUM, BERYLLIUM AND BORON IN MAGNETIC CONFINEMENT FUSION

    SUMMERS, HP; VONHELLERMANN, M; DEHEER, FJ; HOEKSTRA, R

    1992-01-01

    Requirements for collision data on helium, beryllium and boron are reviewed in the light of the directions of present and planned tokamak fusion experiments. The occurrence of the atoms and ions of these species and their roles in plasma behaviour and diagnostic measurements are described. Special e

  3. Plasma confinement

    Hazeltine, R D

    2003-01-01

    Detailed and authoritative, this volume examines the essential physics underlying international research in magnetic confinement fusion. It offers readable, thorough accounts of the fundamental concepts behind methods of confining plasma at or near thermonuclear conditions. Designed for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course in plasma physics, it also represents a valuable reference for professional physicists in controlled fusion and related disciplines.

  4. Drift Mode Growth Rate and Associated Ion Thermal Transport in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasma

    WANG Ai-Ke; QIU Xiao-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Drift mode linear growth rate and quasi-linear ion thermal transport in the reversed magnetic shear plasma are investigated by using the two-fluid theory, previously developed by Weiland and the Chalmers group [J. Nucl.Fusion, 29 (1989) 1810; ibid. 30 (1990) 983]. The theory is here extended to include both the radial electrical field shear (dEr/dr) and the electron fluid velocity (Ve) in the sheared coordinate system. Here, Ve describes the coupling between the safety factor q and the Er × B velocity V E. Their influences on the growth rate and associated ion thermal transport are obtained numerically. In addition, the ion heat pinch in the reversed shear plasma is observed. Qualitatively, the present conclusions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Comparison of confinement in resistive-shell reversed-field pinch devices with two different magnetic shell penetration times

    Gravestijn, R. M.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew, E.

    2004-01-01

    A loop voltage is required to sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibrium. The configuration is characterized by redistribution of magnetic helicity but with the condition that the total helicity is maintained constant. The magnetic field shell penetration time, tgrs, has a critical role in the stability and performance of the RFP. Confinement in the EXTRAP device has been studied with two values of tgrs, first (EXTRAP-T2) with tgrs of the order of the typical relaxation cycle timescale and then (EXTRAP-T2R) with tgrs much longer than the relaxation cycle timescale, but still much shorter than the pulse length. Plasma parameters show significant improvements in confinement in EXTRAP-T2R. The typical loop voltage required to sustain comparable electron poloidal beta values is a factor of 3 lower in the EXTRAP-T2R device. The improvement is attributed to reduced magnetic turbulence.

  6. Banana orbits in elliptic tokamaks with hole currents

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2015-03-01

    Ware Pinch is a consequence of breaking of up-down symmetry due to the inductive electric field. This symmetry breaking happens, though up-down symmetry for magnetic surface is assumed. In previous work Ware Pinch and banana orbits were studied for tokamak magnetic surface with ellipticity and triangularity, but up-down symmetry. Hole currents appear in large tokamaks and their influence in Ware Pinch and banana orbits are now considered here for tokamaks magnetic surfaces with ellipticity and triangularity.

  7. UCLA Tokamak Program Close Out Report.

    Taylor, Robert John [UCLA/retired

    2014-02-04

    The results of UCLA experimental fusion program are summarized. Starting with smaller devices like Microtor, Macrotor, CCT and ending the research on the large (5 m) Electric Tokamak. CCT was the most diagnosed device for H-mode like physics and the effects of rotation induced radial fields. ICRF heating was also studied but plasma heating of University Type Tokamaks did not produce useful results due to plasma edge disturbances of the antennae. The Electric Tokamak produced better confinement in the seconds range. However, it presented very good particle confinement due to an "electric particle pinch". This effect prevented us from reaching a quasi steady state. This particle accumulation effect was numerically explained by Shaing's enhanced neoclassical theory. The PI believes that ITER will have a good energy confinement time but deleteriously large particle confinement time and it will disrupt on particle pinching at nominal average densities. The US fusion research program did not study particle transport effects due to its undue focus on the physics of energy confinement time. Energy confinement time is not an issue for energy producing tokamaks. Controlling the ash flow will be very expensive.

  8. Use of soft x-ray diagnostic on the COMPASS tokamak for investigations of sawteeth crash neighborhood and of plasma position using fast inversion methods

    Imrisek, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Weinzettl, V.; Mlynar, J.; Panek, R.; Hron, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Odstrcil, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Odstrcil, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Optical Research Center, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Ficker, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Pinzon, J. R. [Institue Jean Lamour, Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Ehrlacher, C. [ENS Cachan, Paris (France)

    2014-11-15

    The soft x-ray diagnostic is suitable for monitoring plasma activity in the tokamak core, e.g., sawtooth instability. Moreover, spatially resolved measurements can provide information about plasma position and shape, which can supplement magnetic measurements. In this contribution, fast algorithms with the potential for a real-time use are tested on the data from the COMPASS tokamak. In addition, the soft x-ray data are compared with data from other diagnostics in order to discuss possible connection between sawtooth instability on one side and the transition to higher confinement mode, edge localized modes and productions of runaway electrons on the other side.

  9. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can limit the performance and degrade the confinement of tokamak plasmas. The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV), unique for its capability to produce a variety of poloidal plasma shapes, has been used to analyse various instabilities and compare their behaviour with theoretical predictions. These instabilities are perturbations of the magnetic field, which usually extend to the plasma edge where they can be detected with magnetic pick-up coils as magnetic fluctuations. A spatially dense set of magnetic probes, installed inside the TCV vacuum vessel, allows for a fast observation of these fluctuations. The structure and temporal evolution of coherent modes is extracted using several numerical methods. In addition to the setup of the magnetic diagnostic and the implementation of analysis methods, the subject matter of this thesis focuses on four instabilities, which impose local and global stability limits. All of these instabilities are relevant for the operation of a fusion reactor and a profound understanding of their behaviour is required in order to optimise the performance of such a reactor. Sawteeth, which are central relaxation oscillations common to most standard tokamak scenarios, have a significant effect on central plasma parameters. In TCV, systematic scans of the plasma shape have revealed a strong dependence of their behaviour on elongation {kappa} and triangularity {delta}, with high {kappa}, and low {delta} leading to shorter sawteeth with smaller crashes. This shape dependence is increased by applying central electron cyclotron heating. The response to additional heating power is determined by the role of ideal or resistive MHD in triggering the sawtooth crash. For plasma shapes where additional heating and consequently, a faster increase of the central pressure shortens the sawteeth, the low experimental limit of the pressure gradient within the q = 1 surface is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The

  10. Peeling-off of the external kink modes at tokamak plasma edge

    Zheng, L J

    2014-01-01

    It is pointed that there is a current jump between the edge plasma inside the last closed magnetic surface and the scrape-off layer and the current jump can lead the external kink modes to convert to the tearing modes, due to the current interchange effects [L. J. Zheng and M. Furukawa, Phys. Plasmas 17, 052508 (2010)]. The magnetic reconnection in the presence of tearing modes subsequently causes the tokamak edge plasma to be peeled off to link to the diverters. In particular, the peeling or peeling-ballooning modes can become the "peeling-off" modes in this sense. This phenomenon indicates that the tokamak edge confinement can be worse than the expectation based on the conventional kink mode picture.

  11. Pellet Enhanced Performance on the HL-2A Tokamak

    DING Xuan-Tong; LIU Yi; ZHOU Yan; PAN Yu-Dong; CUI Zheng-Ying; HUANG Yuan; LIU Ze-Tian; SHI Zhong-Bing; JI Xiao-Quan; XIAO Wei-Wen; LIU Yong; YANG Qing-Wei; YAN Long-Wen; ZHU Gen-Liang; XIAO Zheng-Gui; LIU De-Quan; CAO Zeng; GAO Qing-Di; LONG Yong-Xing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Enhanced confinement has been achieved by the centre fuelling of pellet injection on the HL-2A tokamak. The energy confinement time increases from 50ms to 140ms after the pellet injection. Experimental results show that the improvement of the confinement is related to the decrease of the electron heat transport.

  12. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  13. Introduction to Gyrokinetic Theory with Applications in Magnetic Confinement Research in Plasma Physics

    W.M. Tang

    2005-01-03

    The present lecture provides an introduction to the subject of gyrokinetic theory with applications in the area of magnetic confinement research in plasma physics--the research arena from which this formalism was originally developed. It was presented as a component of the ''Short Course in Kinetic Theory within the Thematic Program in Partial Differential Equations'' held at the Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Science (24 March 2004). This lecture also discusses the connection between the gyrokinetic formalism and powerful modern numerical simulations. Indeed, simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential modern tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was enabled by two key factors: (i) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (ii) access to powerful new computational resources.

  14. A Moving Coordinate Numerical Method for Analyses of Electromagneto-Mechanical Coupled Behavior of Structures in a Strong Magnetic Field Aiming at Application to Tokamak Structures

    Li, Weixin; Yuan, Zhensheng; Chen, Zhenmao

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of the electromagneto-mechanical coupling effect contributes greatly to the high accuracy estimation of the EM load of many EM devices, such as a tokamak structure during plasma disruption. This paper presents a method for the numerical analysis of the electromagneto-mechanical coupling effect on the basis of Maxwell's equations in the Lagrangian description and staggered load transfer scheme, which can treat the coupled behaviors of magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness effects at the same time. Codes were developed based on the ANSYS development platform and were applied to solve two typical numerical examples: the TEAM Problem 16 and dynamic behavior analysis of a shallow arch under electromagnetic force. The good consistency of numerical results and experimental data demonstrates the validity and accuracy of the proposed method and the related numerical codes.

  15. Scoping study for compact high-field superconducting net energy tokamaks

    Mumgaard, R. T.; Greenwald, M.; Freidberg, J. P.; Wolfe, S. M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Brunner, D.; Sorbom, B. N.; Whyte, D. G.

    2016-10-01

    The continued development and commercialization of high temperature superconductors (HTS) may enable the construction of compact, net-energy tokamaks. HTS, in contrast to present generation low temperature superconductors, offers improved performance in high magnetic fields, higher current density, stronger materials, higher temperature operation, and simplified assembly. Using HTS along with community-consensus confinement physics (H98 =1) may make it possible to achieve net-energy (Q>1) or burning plasma conditions (Q>5) in DIII-D or ASDEX-U sized, conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. It is shown that, by operating at high plasma current and density enabled by the high magnetic field (B>10T), the required triple products may be achieved at plasma volumes under 20m3, major radii under 2m, with external heating powers under 40MW. This is at the scale of existing devices operated by laboratories, universities and companies. The trade-offs in the core heating, divertor heat exhaust, sustainment, stability, and proximity to known plasma physics limits are discussed in the context of the present tokamak experience base and the requirements for future devices. The resulting HTS-based design space is compared and contrasted to previous studies on high-field copper experiments with similar missions. The physics exploration conducted with such HTS devices could decrease the real and perceived risks of ITER exploitation, and aid in quickly developing commercially-applicable tokamak pilot plants and reactors.

  16. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    Teofilo, V.L.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Aase, D.T.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant has been performed. The tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb/sub 3/Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs have been made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis has been made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered.

  17. Numerical Tokamak Turbulence Calculations on the CRAY T3E

    Lynch, V.E., Leboeuf, J.N., Carreras, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)], Alvarez, J.D., Garcia, L. [Universidad `Carlos III` de Madrid (Spain)

    1997-12-31

    Full cross section calculations of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence with Landau closure are being carried out as part of the Numerical Tokamak Turbulence Project, one of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Phase II Grand Challenges. To include the full cross section of a magnetic fusion device like the tokamak requires more memory and CPU time than is available on the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center`s (NERSC`s) shared-memory vector machines such as the CRAY C90 and J90. Calculations of cylindrical multi-helicity ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence were completed on NERSC`s 160-processor distributed-memory CRAY T3E parallel computer with 256 Mbytes of memory per processor. This augurs well for yet more memory and CPU intensive calculations on the next-generation T3E at NERSC. This paper presents results on benchmarks with the current T3E at NERSC. Physics results pertaining to plasma confinement at the core of tokamaks subject to ion-temperature-gradient-driven-turbulence are also highlighted. Results at this resolution covering this extent of physical time were previously unattainable. Work is in progress to increase the resolution, improve the performance of the parallel code, and include toroidal geometry in these calculations in anticipation of the imminent arrival of a fully configured,512-processor, T3E-900 model.

  18. Magnetic spires for the detection of the position of the plasma column in a Tokamak (linear approximation); Espiras magneticas para la deteccion de la posicion de la columna de plasma en un Tokamak (aproximacion lineal)

    Colunga S, S

    1990-07-15

    In this report the simplified analysis of a method to detect the movement of the plasma column of a tokamak in the vertical direction and of the biggest radius is given. The peculiar case of the Tokamak Novillo of the Plasma Physics Laboratory of the ININ is studied. (Author)

  19. Study of the confined Ising magnet with long-range competing boundary fields

    Virgiliis, Andres de [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), UNLP, CONICET, Casilla de Correo 16, Sucursal 4 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Albano, Ezequiel V [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), UNLP, CONICET, Casilla de Correo 16, Sucursal 4 (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Mueller, Marcus [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706-1390 (United States); Binder, Kurt [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Staudingerweg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2005-07-27

    We present extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the Ising film confined in an L ? M geometry (L << M) in the presence of long-range competing magnetic fields h(n) = h{sub 1}/n{sup 3}(n = 1,2,...,L) which are applied at opposite walls along the M-direction. Due to the fields, an interface between domains of different orientations that runs parallel to the walls forms and can be located close to one of the two surfaces or fluctuate in the centre of the film (localization-delocalization transition). This transition is the precursor of the wetting phase transition that occurs in the limit of infinite film thickness (L {yields} {infinity}) at the critical curve T{sub w}(h{sub 1}). For T=}T{sub w}(h{sub 1})) such an interface is bound to (unbound from) the walls. We study this transition by measuring the magnetization profiles across the sample and the distribution function of both the magnetization of the whole sample and that of the centre of the film as a function of temperature, T, or strength of the wall field, h{sub 1}. We obtain estimates of the size-dependent wetting 'critical' points that allow us to extrapolate to the thermodynamic limit. Using the results of these extrapolations, confirmed by independent measurements of the cumulant, we draw the phase diagram of the wetting transition with long-range surface fields. We show that, starting from a localized interface well inside the non-wet phase, the position of the interface diverges exponentially when approaching the transition point, in contrast to the power-law divergence observed in the case of short-range fields. The properties of the delocalized interface are also studied. Within the wet phase the width of the capillary waves broadens the observed interface profiles. The spectrum of capillary waves is cut off at large wavelengths by the correlation length, {xi}{sub parallel}, which scales like {xi}{sub parallel} {proportional_to} L{sup 2}, similar to the short-range case

  20. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    Kushwaha, Manvir S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level

  1. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra

  2. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    Kozlovskij, K. I.; Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Shatokhin, V. L.; Isaev, A. A.; Martynenko, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10-3-10-1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed.

  3. Computer Simulation of Transport Driven Current in Tokamaks

    Nunan, William Joseph, III

    1995-01-01

    Plasma transport phenomena can drive large currents parallel to an externally applied magnetic field. The Bootstrap Current Theory accounts for the effect of Banana Diffusion on toroidal current, but the effect is not confined to that transport regime, or even to toroidal geometry. Our electromagnetic particle simulations have demonstrated that Maxwellian plasmas in static toroidal and vertical fields spontaneously develop significant toroidal current, even in the absence of the "seed current" which the Bootstrap Theory requires. Other simulations, in both cylindrical and toroidal geometries, and without any externally imposed electric field, show that if the plasma column is centrally fueled, then an initial toroidal current grows steadily, apparently due to a dynamo effect. The straight cylinder does not exhibit kink instabilities because k_ {z} = 0 in this 2 + 1/2 dimensional model. When the plasma is fueled at the edge rather than the center, the effect is diminished. Fueling at an intermediate radius should produce a level of current drive in between these two limits, because the key to the current drive seems to be the amount of total poloidal flux which the plasma crosses in the process of escaping. In a reactor, injected (cold) fuel ions must reach the center, and be heated up in order to burn; therefore, central fueling is needed anyway, and the resulting influx of cold plasma and outflux of hot plasma drives the toroidal current. Our simulations indicate that central fueling, coupled with the central heating due to fusion reactions may provide all of the required toroidal current. The Neoclassical Theory predicts that the Bootstrap Current approaches zero as the aspect ratio approaches infinity; however, in straight cylindrical plasma simulations, axial current increases over time at nearly the same rate as in the toroidal case. These results indicate that a centrally fueled and heated tokamak may sustain its own toroidal current, even in the absence of

  4. Atoms confined in a penetrable potential: effect of the atom position on the electric and magnetic responses

    Acosta Coden, Diego S; Gomez, Sergio S; Romero, Rodolfo H, E-mail: rhromero@exa.unne.edu.ar [Instituto de Modelado e Innovacion Tecnologica, CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400) Corrientes (Argentina)

    2011-02-14

    We report results of the calculation of polarizability and the nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of two-electron atoms confined within an attractive Gaussian potential well. The electric and magnetic responses are obtained within the random phase approximation (RPA) of the polarization propagator. The influence of the depth and range of the potential on the electronic structure is also studied. The dependence of the parallel (along the displacement) and perpendicular components of the polarizability and shielding tensors on the distance of the atom to the centre of the well is calculated and rationalized as a dissociation-type process of the artificial diatomic molecule formed between the Coulomb and the well potentials.

  5. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  6. Simulations of the operational control of a cryogenic plant for a superconducting burning-plasma tokamak

    Mitchell, N

    2001-01-01

    In recent proposals for next generation superconducting tokamaks, such as the ITER project, the nuclear burning plasma is confined by magnetic fields generated from a large set (up to 100 GJ stored energy) of superconducting magnets. These magnets suffer heat loads in operation from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as eddy currents and AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and resistive heat generated at the current lead transitions to room temperature. The initial cryoplant for such a tokamak is expected to have a steady state capacity of up to about 85 kW at 4.5 K, comparable to the system installed for LHC at CERN. Experimental tokamaks are expected to operate at least initially in a pulsed mode with 20-30 short plasma pulses and plasma burn periods each day. A conventional cryoplant, consisting of a cold box and a set of primary heat exchangers, is ill-suited to such a mode of operation as the instantaneou...

  7. Analysis of fast ion induced instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    Horváth, László

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices like tokamaks, it is crucial to confine the high energy fusion-born helium nuclei ($\\alpha$-particles) to maintain the energy equilibrium of the plasma. However, energetic ions can excite various instabilities which can lead to their enhanced radial transport. Consequently, these instabilities may degrade the heating efficiency and they can also cause harmful power loads on the plasma-facing components of the device. Therefore, the understanding of these modes is a key issue regarding future burning plasma experiments. One of the main open questions concerning energetic particle (EP) driven instabilities is the non-linear evolution of the mode structure. In this thesis, I present my results on the investigation of $\\beta$-induced Alfv\\'{e}n eigenmodes (BAEs) and EP-driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) observed in the ramp-up phase of off-axis NBI heated plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. These modes were well visible on several line-of-sights (LOSs) of the soft X-ra...

  8. A divertor plasma configuration design method for tokamaks

    Guo, Yong; Xiao, Bing-Jia; Liu, Lei; Yang, Fei; Wang, Yuehang; Qiu, Qinglai

    2016-11-01

    The efficient and safe operation of large fusion devices strongly relies on the plasma configuration inside the vacuum chamber. It is important to construct the proper plasma equilibrium with a desired plasma configuration. In order to construct the target configuration, a shape constraint module has been developed in the tokamak simulation code (TSC), which controls the poloidal flux and the magnetic field at several defined control points. It is used to construct the double null, lower single null, and quasi-snowflake configurations for the required target shape and calculate the required PF coils current. The flexibility and practicability of this method have been verified by the simulated results. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB103000 and 2014GB110003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305216, 11305209, and 11375191), and External Cooperation Program of BIC, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. GJHZ201303).

  9. Effect of a stochastic electric field on plasma confinement in FTU

    Martorelli, Roberto; Carlevaro, Nakia

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a stochastic model for the behavior of electrons in a magnetically confined plasma having axial symmetry. The aim of the work is to provide an explanation for the density limit observed in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade machine. The dynamical framework deals with an electron embedded in a stationary and uniform magnetic field and affected by an orthogonal random electric field. The behavior of the average plasma profile is determined by the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation associated to the considered model and the disruptive effects of the stochastic electric field is shown. The comparison between the addressed model and the experimental data allows to fix the relevant spatial scale of such a stochastic field. It is found to be of the order of the Tokamak micro-physics scale, i.e. few millimeters. Moreover, it is clarified how the diffusion process outlines a dependence on the magnetic field as $\\sim B^{-3/2}$.

  10. Cryogenic needs for future tokamaks

    Katheder, H.

    The ITER tokamak is a machine using superconducting magnets. The windings of these magnets will be subjected to high heat loads resulting from a combination of nuclear energy absorption and AC-losses. It is estimated that about 100 kW at 4.5 K are needed. The total cooling mass flow rate will be around 10 - 15 kg/s. In addition to the large cryogenic power required for the superconducting magnets cryogenic power is also needed for refrigerated radiation shield, various cryopumps, fuel processing and test beds. A general description of the overall layout and the envisaged refrigerator cycle, necessary cold pumps and ancillary equipment is given. The basic cryogenic layout for the ITER tokakmak design, as developed during the conceptual design phase and a short overview about existing tokamak designs using superconducting magnets is given.

  11. Interaction of external n  =  1 magnetic fields with the sawtooth instability in low-q RFX-mod and DIII-D tokamaks

    Piron, C.; Martin, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Hanson, J.; Logan, N. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piovesan, P.; Turco, F.; Bialek, J.; Franz, P.; Jackson, G.; Lanctot, M. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E.; Terranova, D.; Turnbull, A.

    2016-10-01

    External n  =  1 magnetic fields are applied in RFX-mod and DIII-D low safety factor Tokamak plasmas to investigate their interaction with the internal MHD dynamics and in particular with the sawtooth instability. In these experiments the applied magnetic fields cause a reduction of both the sawtooth amplitude and period, leading to an overall stabilizing effect on the oscillations. In RFX-mod sawteeth eventually disappear and are replaced by a stationary m  =  1, n  =  1 helical equilibrium without an increase in disruptivity. However toroidal rotation is significantly reduced in these plasmas, thus it is likely that the sawtooth mitigation in these experiments is due to the combination of the helically deformed core and the reduced rotation. The former effect is qualitatively well reproduced by nonlinear MHD simulations performed with the PIXIE3D code. The results obtained in these RFX-mod experiments motivated similar ones in DIII-D L-mode diverted Tokamak plasmas at low q 95. These experiments succeeded in reproducing the sawtooth mitigation with the approach developed in RFX-mod. In DIII-D this effect is correlated with a clear increase of the n  =  1 plasma response, that indicates an enhancement of the coupling to the marginally stable n  =  1 external kink, as simulations with the linear MHD code IPEC suggest. A significant rotation braking in the plasma core is also observed in DIII-D. Numerical calculations of the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) carried out with PENT identify this torque as a possible contributor for this effect.

  12. Characterization of magnetically confined low-pressure plasmas produced by an electromagnetic field in argon-acetylene mixtures

    Makdessi, G. Al; Margot, J.; Clergereaux, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles formation was investigated in magnetically confined low-pressure plasma produced in argon-acetylene mixtures. The plasma characteristics were measured in order to identify the species involved in the dust particles formation. Their dependence on the operating conditions including magnetic field intensity, acetylene fraction in the gas mixture and operating pressure was examined. In contrast with noble gases, in the presence of acetylene, the electron temperature increases with the magnetic field intensity, indicating additional charged particles losses in the plasma. Indeed, in these conditions, larger hydrocarbon ions are produced leading to the formation of dust particles in the plasma volume. The observed dependence of positive ion mass distribution and density and relative negative ion density on the operating parameters suggests that the dust particles are formed through different pathways, where negative and positive ions are both involved in the nucleation.

  13. Simulations of Enhanced Confinement

    Dorland, W.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Liu, Q. P.; Jones, C. S.; Beer, M. A.; Hammett, G. W.

    1996-11-01

    Most existing tokamaks routinely achieve enhanced confinement regimes. Designs for new, larger tokamaks therefore are typically predicated upon reliable enhanced confinement performance. However, most enhanced confinement regimes rely (to some degree) upon sheared E×B flows to stabilize the turbulence that otherwise limits the confinement. For example, the pedestal H-mode transport barrier is typically attributed to shear stabilization [Biglari, Diamond and Terry, Phys. Fl. B, 2 1 (1990)]. Unfortunately, it is easily shown that sheared E×B stabilization of microinstabilities such as the ITG mode does not scale favorably with machine size. Here, using nonlinear gyrofluid simulations in general geometry, we attempt to quantify the confinement enhancement that can be expected from velocity shear stabilization for conventional reactor plasmas. We also consider other microinstability stabilization mechanisms(See related presentations by Beer, Kotschenreuther, Manickam, and Ramos, this conference.) (strong density peaking, Shafranov shift stabilization, dots) and unconventional reactor configurations.^2 Experimental datasets from JET, DIII-D, C-Mod and TFTR are analyzed, and ITER operation is considered.

  14. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  15. Effect of magnetic field on quantum state energies of an electron confined in the core of a double walled carbon nanotube

    Shah, Khurshed A.; Bhat, Bashir Mohi Ud Din

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we report the effect of external magnetic field and core radius on the excited quantum state energies of an electron confined in the core of a double walled carbon nanotube. The goal is accomplished by using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillioun (WKB) approximation method within the effective mass approximation and confinement potential. All numerical analysis were carried out in a strong confinement regime. The results show that the electron energy increases with the increase in external magnetic field at a given core radii. The electron energy is also found to increase as the core radius of the CNT decreases and for core radius a > 5 nm the energy becomes almost zero. The effect of magnetic field on the excited state energies of the confined electron is more evident for smaller core radius acarbon nanotube quantum dot devices [1].

  16. Application of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance in determination of input power time of Damavand tokamak

    Noori, Ehsanallah; Sadeghi, Yahya; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    In this study, magnetic measurement of poloidal fields were used to determine poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance of Damavand tokamak combination of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance (β _p+{l_i}/{2} ), known as Shafranov parameter, was obtained experimentally in terms of normal and tangential components of the magnetic field. Plasma internal inductance and poloidal beta were obtained using parametrization method based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE) and compared with parabolic-like profile of toroidal current density approach for determination of the plasma internal inductance. Finding evolution of β _p+{l_i}/{2} and plasma internal inductance. Finding poloidal beta (Shafranov parameter and internal inductance) and using energy balance equation, thermal energy and energy confinement were determined qualitatively in terms of poloidal beta during a regular discharge of Damavand tokamak.

  17. Deuterium--tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Bell, M.G.; Batha, S.; Beer, M.; Bell, R.E.; Belov, A.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Callen, J.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, C.S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Dendy, R.O.; Dorland, W.; Duong, H.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.J.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Goloborodko, V.Y.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.W.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Hill, K.W.; Hogan, J.; Hooper, B.; Hosea, J.C.; Houlberg, W.A.; Hughes, M.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kesner, J.; Kim, J.S.; Kissick, M.; Krasilnikov, A.V.; Kugel, H.; Kumar, A.; Lam, N.T.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F.M.; Ludescher, C.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.P.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McChesney, J.; McCune, D.C.; McKee, G.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.K.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Petrov, M.P.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Phillips, P.; Ramsey, A.T.; Rice, B.; Redi, M.H.; Rewoldt, G.; Reznik, S.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rogers, J.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Skinner, C.H.; Stevenson, T.; Strait, E.J.; Stratton, B.C.; Strachan, J.D.; Stodiek, W.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Thompson, M.E.; von Goeler, S.; Von Halle, A.; Walters, R.T.; Wang, S.; White, R.; Wieland, R.M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Wong, K.L.; Wurden, G.A.; Yamada, M.; Yavorski, V.; Young, K.M.; Zakharov, L.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 2176 (1995)] have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium{endash}tritium (D--T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through {ital in situ} deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a}{approx}4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D--T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D--T plasmas with q{sub 0}{gt}1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfvn eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  19. Nonlocally of plasma fluctuations and transport in magnetically confined plasmas theoretical background of nonlocality in fluctuations

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2002-09-01

    Nonlocal properties of fluctuations in confined plasmas are briefly surveyed. Contributions to understanding the bifurcation phenomena, improved confinement, and transient transport problem are explained. The theoretical progress in this aspect is addressed: Namely, the fluctuations are not excited by linear instabilities but are dressed with other turbulent fluctuations or fluctuations of meso-scale. Nonlinear interactions of fluctuations with different scale lengths are essential in dictating the dynamics of turbulence and turbulent transport. There are activators and suppressers in global inhomogeneities for evolution of turbulence. Turbulent fluctuations, on the other hand, induce or destroy these global inhomogeneities. Finally, statistical nature of turbulence is addressed. (author)

  20. Fusion an introduction to the physics and technology of magnetic confinement fusion

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    This second edition of a popular textbook is thoroughly revised with around 25% new and updated content.It provides an introduction to both plasma physics and fusion technology at a level that can be understood by advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the physical sciences and related engineering disciplines.As such, the contents cover various plasma confinement concepts, the support technologies needed to confine the plasma, and the designs of ITER as well as future fusion reactors.With end of chapter problems for use in courses.

  1. Two dimensional electron gas confined over a spherical surface: Magnetic moment

    Hernando, A; Crespo, P [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-CSIC-ADIF, Las Rozas. P. O. Box 155, Madrid 28230 (Spain) and Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense (Spain); Garcia, M A, E-mail: antonio.hernando@adif.es [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC c/Kelsen, 5 Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    Magnetism of capped nanoparticles, NPs, of non-magnetic substances as Au and ZnO is briefly reviewed. The source of the magnetization is discussed on the light of recent X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments. As magnetic dichroism analysis has pointed out impurity atoms bonded to the surface act as donor or acceptor of electrons that occupy the surface states. It is proposed that mesoscopic collective orbital magnetic moments induced at the surface states can account for the experimental magnetism characteristic of these nanoparticles. The total magnetic moment of the surface originated at the unfilled Fermi level can reach values as large as 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3} Bohr magnetons.

  2. Coil-type Fano Resonances: a Plasmonic Approach to Magnetic Sub-diffraction Confinement

    Panaro, Simone

    2015-05-10

    Matrices of nanodisk trimers are introduced as plasmonic platforms for the generation of localized magnetic hot-spots. In Fano resonance condition, the optical magnetic fields can be squeezed in sub-wavelength regions, opening promising scenarios for spintronics.

  3. D-D tokamak reactor studies

    Evans, K.E. Jr.; Baker, C.C.; Brooks, J.N.; Ehst, D.A.; Finn, P.A.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Misra, B.; Smith, D.L.; Stevens, H.C.

    1980-11-01

    A tokamak D-D reactor design, utilizing the advantages of a deuterium-fueled reactor but with parameters not unnecessarily extended from existing D-T designs, is presented. Studies leading to the choice of a design and initial studies of the design are described. The studies are in the areas of plasma engineering, first-wall/blanket/shield design, magnet design, and tritium/fuel/vacuum requirements. Conclusions concerning D-D tokamak reactors are stated.

  4. Development with MESSENGER Data of a Model of Mercury's Magnetospheric Magnetic Field Confined within the Average Observed Magnetopause

    Korth, H.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Al Asad, M.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field that is confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. The model consists of individual modules for magnetic fields of internal origin, approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis, and of external origin resulting from currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is prescribed having a disk shape near the planet and extending into a Harris sheet at larger distances. The magnitude of the tail current is fit to minimize the root mean square residual between the magnetic field within the magnetosphere observed by MESSENGER and the model field. The magnetic field contribution from each module is shielded individually by a scalar potential function consisting of Cartesian harmonic expansions with linear and non-linear coefficients, which are fit to minimize the root-mean-square normal magnetic field component at the magnetopause. The resulting model resembles the observed magnetic field better than the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause, i.e., at northern high latitudes and on the dayside. It will allow more accurate characterization of crustal magnetization, which may be observed during low-altitude orbits in the final months of the MESSENGER mission.

  5. Time and space correlated investigations of confinement effects due to static axial magnetic fields acting on laser produced carbon plasmas

    Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund; Veloso, Felipe; Bhuyan, Heman; Reyes, Sebastian; Ruiz, Hugo Marcelo; Caballero-Bendixsen, Luis Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    We present further detailed studies of the dynamics and plasma properties of a laser produced Carbon plasma expanding in a static axial magnetic field. The laser plasmas are produced in vacuum, 1 .10-6 Torr, using a graphite target, with a Nd:YAG laser, 3.5 ns, 340 mJ at 1.06 μm, focused at 2 .109 W/cm2, and propagate in static magnetic fields of maximum value 0.2 T. 15 ns time and spaced resolved OES is used to investigate plasma composition. 50 ns time resolved plasma imaging is used to visualize the plasma dynamics. A mm size B-dot probe is used, in combination with a Faraday cup, to characterize the interaction between the expanding plasma and the magnetic field. As a result of time and space correlated measurements, unique features of the laser plasma dynamics in the presence of the magnetic field are identified, which highlight the confinement effects of the static magnetic field Funded by project FONDECYT 1141119.

  6. The magnetic vortex gyration mediated by spin-polarized current in a confined off-centered nanocontact structure

    Li, Huanan; Li, Dongfei; Wang, Yaxin; Hua, Zhong

    2017-02-01

    We study the magnetic vortex dynamical behaviors in a confined off-centered nanocontact system through micromagnetic simulations. It is found that the vortex core could be pinned when the nanocontact is shifted to large enough distance from the center of the nanodisk. We also find that the position of nanocontact exerts great influence on the vortex core gyration, including trajectory, eigenfrequency, excitation time, and instantaneous velocity. The simulations show that it is possible to utilize the nanocontact position to change the total effective potential energy of the system so as to realize both the pinning of the vortex core and the controllability of vortex core gyration. The characteristic gyration in this system is advantageous to control the polarity switching and other dynamical behaviors of magnetic vortex.

  7. Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems (7-11 September 2011) Special issue containing papers presented at the 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems (7-11 September 2011)

    Berk, H. L.

    2012-09-01

    addition, a significant number of studies focused on understanding nonlinear behaviour by means of computer simulation of energetic particle driven instability. An under-represented area of investigation was the study of electron runaway formation during major tokamak disruptions. It was noted in an overview by S. Putvinski that electron energies in the 10-20 MeV range is to be expected during projected major disruptions in ITER and that reliable methods for mitigation of the runaway process needs to be developed. Significant recent work in the field of the disruption induced electron runaway, which was reported by J. Riemann, does not appear in this special issue of Nuclear Fusion as the work had been previously submitted to Physics of Plasmas [3]. Overall it is clear that reliable mitigation of electron runaway is an extremely important topic that is in need of better understanding and solutions. It has been my pleasure to serve as the organizer of the 12th meeting and to serve as a Guest Editor of this issue of Nuclear Fusion. I am sure that the contents of this issue will serve as a valuable research guide to the field of energetic particle behaviour in a burning plasma for many years to come. The site of the next meeting will by Beijing, China in the fall of 2013, which will be organized by Zinghong Lin. References [1] Program 2011 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems (Austin, Texas, USA, 7-11 September 2011) http://w3fusion.ph.utexas.edu/ifs/iaeaep/program.html [2] Program 2011 5th IAEA Technical Meeting on Theory of Plasma Wave Instabilities (Austin, Texas, USA, 5-7 September 2011) http://w3fusion.ph.utexas.edu/ifs/iaeapi/program.html [3] Riemann J., Smith H.M. and Helander P. 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 012507

  8. Theory of self-sustained turbulence in confined plasmas

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1996-02-01

    This article overviews some aspect of the recent theoretical activities in Japan on the problem of turbulent transport in confined plasmas. The method of self-sustained turbulence is discussed. The process of the renormalization is shown and the turbulent Prandtl number is introduced. Nonlinear destabilization by the electron momentum diffusion is explained. The nonlinear eigenmode equation is derived for the dressed-test-mode for the inhomogeneous plasma in the shear magnetic field. The eigenvalue equation is solved, and the least stable mode determines the anomalous transport coefficient. Formula of thermal conductivity is presented for the system of bad average magnetic curvature (current diffusive interchange mode (CDIM) turbulence) and that for the average good magnetic curvature (current diffusive ballooning mode (CDBM) turbulence). The transport coefficient, scale length of fluctuations and fluctuation level are shown to be the increasing function of the pressure gradient. Verification by use of the nonlinear simulation is shown. The bifurcation of the electric field and improved confinement is addressed, in order to explain the H-mode physics. Improved confinement and the dynamics such as ELMs are explained. Application to the transport analysis of tokamaks is also presented, including the explanations of the L-mode confinement, internal transport barrier as well as the role of current profile control. (author). 102 refs.

  9. Co-current toroidal rotation-driven and turbulent stresses with resonant magnetic perturbations in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak

    Zhao, K. J.; Shi, Yuejiang; Liu, H.; Diamond, P. H.; Li, F. M.; Cheng, J.; Chen, Z. P.; Nie, L.; Ding, Y. H.; Wu, Y. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Rao, B.; Cheng, Z. F.; Gao, L.; Zhang, X. Q.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, N. C.; Wang, L.; Jin, W.; Xu, J. Q.; Yan, L. W.; Dong, J. Q.; Zhuang, G.; J-TEXT Team

    2016-07-01

    The acceleration of the co-current toroidal rotations around resonant surfaces by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) through turbulence is presented. These experiments were performed using a Langmuir probe array in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak. This study aims at understanding the RMP effects on edge toroidal rotations and exploring its control method. With RMPs, the flat electron temperature T e profile, due to magnetic islands, appears around resonant surfaces (Zhao et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 073022). When the resonant surface is closer to the last closed flux surface, the flat T e profile vanishes with RMPs. In both cases, the toroidal rotations significantly increase in the direction of the plasma current around the resonant surfaces with RMPs. The characteristics of turbulence are significantly affected by RMPs around the resonant surfaces. The turbulence intensity profile changes and the poloidal wave vector k θ increases with RMPs. The power fraction of the turbulence components in the ion diamagnetic drift direction increases with RMPs. The measurements of turbulent Reynolds stresses are consistent with the toroidal flows that can be driven by turbulence. The estimations of the energy transfer between the turbulence and toroidal flows suggest that turbulence energy transfers into toroidal flows. The result has the implication of the intrinsic rotation being driven by RMPs via turbulence.

  10. A spectral line survey from 17.5-250 nm of plasmas created in a magnetic confinement device

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Hollmann, E. M.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; TJ-II Team1, the

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emission lines continue to be a powerful tool for studying astrophysical, process, laser-produced, and magnetically confined plasmas, among others. Hence, numerous spectroscopy-based plasma diagnostics, from the x-ray to the infrared, make use of the relative intensity, width, displacement in wavelength, or temporal evolution of such emission lines emitted by the atoms and ions present in such plasmas. In this work, a spectral line survey, from 17.5-250 nm, is presented for electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas created and maintained in the TJ-II stellarator, a medium-sized magnetically confined plasma device. In these plasmas, for which hydrogen, deuterium or helium have been used as the working gas, central electron temperatures and densities up to 1 keV and 5 × 1019 m-3, respectively, are achieved. This work is a compilation of the identified spectral emission lines emitted by the working gas as well by the intrinsic and injected impurity ions in the above wavelength range. For this, spectra were recorded, over the past fifteen years of TJ-II operation, using a 1 m focal length normal incidence spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled detector at its output focal plane. In total, almost 400 spectral emission lines from eighteen different elements have been identified using a number of atomic line emission databases.

  11. Feedback control of current drive by using hybrid wave in tokamaks; Asservissement de la generation de courant par l`onde hybride dans un plasma de tokamak

    Wijnands, T.J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Sciences de la Matiere

    1997-03-01

    This work is focussed on an important and recent development in present day Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research and Tokamaks. The aim is to optimise the energy confinement for a certain magnetic configuration by adapting the radial distribution of the current. Of particular interest are feedback control scenarios with stationary modifications of the current profile using current, driven by Lower Hybrid waves. A new feedback control system has been developed for Tore Supra and has made a large number of new operation scenarios possible. In one of the experiments described here, there is no energy exchange between the poloidal field system and the plasma, the current is controlled by the power of the Lower Hybrid waves while the launched wave spectrum is used to optimise the current profile shape and the energy confinement. (author) 151 refs.

  12. Diffusive, convective and Nernst-effect losses of magnetic flux and heat from a wall-confined magnetized plasma

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2013-10-01

    The recently proposed MAGLIF approach to inertial fusion ignition involves compression and heating of plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. To reach fusion conditions, the compressed plasma should retain a large fraction of the magnetic flux and thermal energy enclosed by the liner. Magnetic flux and heat losses from strongly magnetized plasma to a cold liner wall are significantly influenced by the Nernst and Ettingshausen thermomagnetic effects. We present exact analytical solutions of 1D MHD equations with Ohmic heating, heat conductivity and thermomagnetic terms included and discuss relative roles of diffusive, conductive and Nernst-effect-related losses of magnetic flux and heat from the magnetized plasma to the wall. These solutions are compared to our 1D simulation results. They can serve for verification of plasma transport modeling by MHD codes. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  13. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    Roy, Amitava, E-mail: roy@fzu.cz, E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment(CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Murtaza Hassan, Syed; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed [School of Nuclear Engineering and Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment(CMUXE), Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas [HiLASE Project, Department of Diode-pumped Lasers, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the role of a guiding magnetic field on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma for various laser pulse duration and intensity. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm, Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–15 ns) and intensity. A magnetic trap was fabricated with the use of two neodymium permanent magnets which provided a magnetic field strength ∼0.5 T along the plume expansion direction. Our results indicate that the EUV conversion efficiency do not depend significantly on applied axial magnetic field. Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma show that the ion flux reduces by a factor of ∼5 with the application of an axial magnetic field. It was found that the plasma plume expand in the lateral direction with peak velocity measured to be ∼1.2 cm/μs and reduced to ∼0.75 cm/μs with the application of an axial magnetic field. The plume expansion features recorded using fast photography in the presence and absence of 0.5 T axial magnetic field are simulated using particle-in-cell code. Our simulation results qualitatively predict the plasma behavior.

  14. X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures

    Fischer, P; Im, M -Y; Kasai, S; Yamada, K; Ono, T; Thiaville, A

    2011-02-11

    Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analyzed by high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex-core radius was observed from approximately 38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full three-dimensional micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement, taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

  15. The influence of the dynamic ergodic divertor on the radial electric field at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    Coenen, Jan Willem

    2009-11-06

    In this work the influence of external Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on the radial electric field Er in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) at the Tokamak TEXTOR. Here, the RMPs are produced with the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED), a set of 16 helical perturbation coils located at the high field side of TEXTOR. Within this work, the base mode number of perturbations has been m/n=6/2. We have first investigated the influence of external torque from neutral heating beams on plasma rotation and E{sub r}. The ergodic zone causes an electron loss, and subsequently a (vector)j x (vector)B force driven by the compensating ion return current. In addition, the DED changes the global confinement properties. Depending on the edge safety factor (''field line twist'') q{sub a}, either increased or decreased particle confinement is observed. In case of the increased particle confinement (IPC) the increase in density (40%) and particle confinement time {tau}{sub p} (30%) is correlated to the connection of field lines at the q=5/2 surface to the DED target, locally changing the transport properties and the E{sub r}. Transport is reduced and the E{sub r} shear is increased locally at q=5/2 up to 1.5 . 10{sup 5}s{sup -1}, while the E{sub r} becomes more positive. (orig.)

  16. A low cost and high throughput magnetic bead-based immuno-agglutination assay in confined droplets.

    Teste, Bruno; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Viovy, Jean Louis; Malaquin, Laurent

    2013-06-21

    Although passive immuno-agglutination assays consist of one step and simple procedures, they are usually not adapted for high throughput analyses and they require expensive and bulky equipment for quantitation steps. Here we demonstrate a low cost, multimodal and high throughput immuno-agglutination assay that relies on a combination of magnetic beads (MBs), droplets microfluidics and magnetic tweezers. Antibody coated MBs were used as a capture support in the homogeneous phase. Following the immune interaction, water in oil droplets containing MBs and analytes were generated and transported in Teflon tubing. When passing in between magnetic tweezers, the MBs contained in the droplets were magnetically confined in order to enhance the agglutination rate and kinetics. When releasing the magnetic field, the internal recirculation flows in the droplet induce shear forces that favor MBs redispersion. In the presence of the analyte, the system preserves specific interactions and MBs stay in the aggregated state while in the case of a non-specific analyte, redispersion of particles occurs. The analyte quantitation procedure relies on the MBs redispersion rate within the droplet. The influence of different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, flow rate and MBs concentration on the agglutination performances have been investigated and optimized. Although the immuno-agglutination assay described in this work may not compete with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in terms of sensitivity, it offers major advantages regarding the reagents consumption (analysis is performed in sub microliter droplet) and the platform cost that yields to very cheap analyses. Moreover the fully automated analysis procedure provides reproducible analyses with throughput well above those of existing technologies. We demonstrated the detection of biotinylated phosphatase alkaline in 100 nL sample volumes with an analysis rate of 300 assays per hour and a limit of detection of 100 pM.

  17. In-situ analysis of the first wall by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the TEXTOR tokamak: Dependence on the magnetic field strength

    Xiao, Q., E-mail: qingmeierin@126.com [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hai, R. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Ding, H., E-mail: hding@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Huber, A.; Philipps, V.; Gierse, N.; Sergienko, G. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is considered as a promising method for in-situ diagnostic of the co-deposition and fuel retention during and in between plasma discharges in fusion devices. LIBS has been investigated intensively under laboratory conditions, while the application of LIBS in fusion devices is still in early stages. Moreover, the LIB processes are influenced by additional conditions in fusion devices, particularly the magnetic field. The experiments in TEXTOR show a significant enhancement in the spectral line emission and a deeper penetration of the laser-produced plasma into the edge plasma in the presence of magnetic field. These effects can be attributed to an increased confinement of the plasma by the magnetic field. The interference of magnetic field may compromise the quantitative interpretation of LIB spectra. Therefore, quantitative analysis of ITER-like co-deposits was done in laboratory without magnetic field as well as in TEXTOR with a magnetic field of Bt ∼ 2.25 T.

  18. Reference distribution functions for magnetically confined plasmas from the minimum entropy production theorem and the MaxEnt principle, subject to the scale-invariant restrictions

    Sonnino, Giorgio, E-mail: gsonnino@ulb.ac.be [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Cardinali, Alessandro [EURATOM-ENEA Fusion Association, Via E. Fermi 45, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Steinbrecher, Gyorgy [EURATOM-MEdC Fusion Association, Physics Faculty, University of Craiova, Str. A.I. Cuza 13, 200585 Craiova (Romania); Peeters, Philippe [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Sonnino, Alberto [Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Ecole Polytechnique de Louvain (EPL), Rue Archimède, 1 bte L6.11.01, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nardone, Pasquale [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-12-09

    We derive the expression of the reference distribution function for magnetically confined plasmas far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. The local equilibrium state is fixed by imposing the minimum entropy production theorem and the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, subject to scale invariance restrictions. After a short time, the plasma reaches a state close to the local equilibrium. This state is referred to as the reference state. The aim of this Letter is to determine the reference distribution function (RDF) when the local equilibrium state is defined by the above mentioned principles. We prove that the RDF is the stationary solution of a generic family of stochastic processes corresponding to an universal Landau-type equation with white parametric noise. As an example of application, we consider a simple, fully ionized, magnetically confined plasmas, with auxiliary Ohmic heating. The free parameters are linked to the transport coefficients of the magnetically confined plasmas, by the kinetic theory.

  19. Magnetic confinement and coupling in narrow-diameter Au–Ni nanowires

    Schelhas, Laura T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States); Banholzer, Matthew J. [Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry and International Institute for Nanotechnology, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, CA, 60208-3113 (United States); Mirkin, Chad A., E-mail: chadnano@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry and International Institute for Nanotechnology, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, CA, 60208-3113 (United States); Tolbert, Sarah H., E-mail: tolbert@chem.ucla.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Here we examine magnetic coupling in layered magnetic/nonmagnetic nanowires created using electrochemical deposition into nanoporous templates. By utilizing reproducible and tunable deposition methods, various aspect ratios and spacing between magnetic domains were created. Low aspect ratio disks were then coupled to high aspect ratio rods to control the mechanism for spin flip in the disk component of the system. The orthogonal relationship between the magnetic easy axis of the disk and rod geometries creates a multistate system with both in-plane and out-of-plane easy axes by balancing magnetic shape anisotropy with dipole coupling between the two layers. - Highlights: • Layered Ni–Au rods with precise dimensions were synthesized via electrochemical deposition into AAO templates. • Coupling between rod and disk shaped Ni segments was explored by varying the thickness of the Au spacers. • Magnetic hysteresis studies indicate that coupling between disk and rod magnetic easy axis can be used to control the mechanism for spin flips.

  20. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can limit the performance and degrade the confinement of tokamak plasmas. The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV), unique for its capability to produce a variety of poloidal plasma shapes, has been used to analyse various instabilities and compare their behaviour with theoretical predictions. These instabilities are perturbations of the magnetic field, which usually extend to the plasma edge where they can be detected with magnetic pick-up coils as magnetic fluctuations. A spatially dense set of magnetic probes, installed inside the TCV vacuum vessel, allows for a fast observation of these fluctuations. The structure and temporal evolution of coherent modes is extracted using several numerical methods. In addition to the setup of the magnetic diagnostic and the implementation of analysis methods, the subject matter of this thesis focuses on four instabilities, which impose local and global stability limits. All of these instabilities are relevant for the operation of a fusion reactor and a profound understanding of their behaviour is required in order to optimise the performance of such a reactor. Sawteeth, which are central relaxation oscillations common to most standard tokamak scenarios, have a significant effect on central plasma parameters. In TCV, systematic scans of the plasma shape have revealed a strong dependence of their behaviour on elongation {kappa} and triangularity {delta}, with high {kappa}, and low {delta} leading to shorter sawteeth with smaller crashes. This shape dependence is increased by applying central electron cyclotron heating. The response to additional heating power is determined by the role of ideal or resistive MHD in triggering the sawtooth crash. For plasma shapes where additional heating and consequently, a faster increase of the central pressure shortens the sawteeth, the low experimental limit of the pressure gradient within the q = 1 surface is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The

  1. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 46, CPDR review package. Volume 6

    Weber, C.M. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This preliminary design reviews the overall design package for the magnet system. It is mostly presented in viewgraphs. The lengthy presentation took up two full days. Sections are given on TF SDD, TF magnet specifications, TF interface definition, drawing tree and design control, winding pack design, manufacturing, coil setup for VPI, TPX TF magnet assembly, TF materials and processes, quality assurance and test requirements, coil verification testing, TPX acceptance tools, and planning tools.

  2. Evolution of views on the structure of the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Kovrizhnykh, L. M., E-mail: lmkov@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Various methods of determining the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic systems (predominantly, in stellarators) and the evolution of views on this problem are discussed. Paradoxes encountered in solving this problem are analyzed, and ways of resolving them are proposed.

  3. Spin wave confinement

    2008-01-01

    This book presents recent scientific achievements in the investigation of magnetization dynamics in confined magnetic systems. Introduced by Bloch as plane waves of magnetization in unconfined ferromagnets, spin waves currently play an important role in the description of very small magnetic systems ranging from microelements, which form the basis of magnetic sensors, to magnetic nano-contacts. The spin wave confinement effect was experimentally discovered in the 1990s in permalloy microstripes. The diversity of systems where this effect is observed has been steadily growing since then, and

  4. Zeeman Spectroscopy of Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    Hey, J. D.; Chu, C. C.; Mertens, Ph.

    2002-12-01

    Zeeman spectroscopy is a valuable tool both for diagnostic purposes, and for more fundamental studies of atomic and molecular processes in the boundary region of magnetically confined fusion plasmas (B ≃ 1 to 10 T). The method works well when the Zeeman (Paschen-Back) effect plays an important, or dominant, rôle in relation to other broadening mechanisms (Doppler, Stark, resonant excitation transfer) in determining the spectral line shape. For impurity species identification and temperature determination, Zeeman spectroscopy has advantages over charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy from highly excited radiator states, since spectral features practically unique to the species under investigation are analysed. It also provides useful information on probable mechanisms of line production (e.g. sputtering mechanisms, electron impact-induced dissociative excitation from molecules in the edge plasma), and on the temperature evolution of lower charge states in the process of convection inwards or diffusion outwards from the hotter plasma interior. Where different physical processes are responsible for different sections of the line profile — especially in the case of hydrogen isotopes — Zeeman spectroscopy can provide a set of characteristic temperatures for each section. The method is introduced in both passive and active spectroscopy, and general principles of the Zeeman effect are discussed with special reference to régimes of interest for the tokamak. Relevant physical processes (sputtering mechanisms, electron impact-induced dissociative excitation from molecules in the edge plasma, and ion-atom collisional heating mechanisms) are illustrated by sample spectra.

  5. Magnetic γ-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe nanoparticles confined within ordered mesoporous carbons as efficient microwave absorbers.

    Wang, Jiacheng; Zhou, Hu; Zhuang, Jiandong; Liu, Qian

    2015-02-07

    A series of magnetic γ-Fe2O3, Fe3O4, and Fe nanoparticles have been successfully introduced into the mesochannels of ordered mesoporous carbons by the combination of the impregnation of iron salt precursors and then in situ hydrolysis, pyrolysis and reduction processes. The magnetic nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed and confined within the mesopores of mesoporous carbons. Although the as-prepared magnetic mesoporous carbon composites have high contents of magnetic components, they still possess very high specific surface areas and pore volumes. The magnetic hysteresis loops measurements indicate that the magnetic constituents are poorly-crystalline nanoparticles and their saturation magnetization is evidently smaller than bulky magnetic materials. The confinement of magnetic nanoparticles within the mesopores of mesoporous carbons results in the decrease of the complex permittivity and the increase of the complex permeability of the magnetic nanocomposites. The maximum reflection loss (RL) values of -32 dB at 11.3 GHz and a broad absorption band (over 2 GHz) with RL values magnetic mesoporous carbon composites as high-performance microwave absorbing materials.

  6. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF.

  7. Magnetic confinement effects on the particle escape from the loop top in stochastic acceleration models for solar flares.

    Effenberger, F.; Petrosian, V.

    2015-12-01

    Stochastic acceleration scenarios are among the most promising candidates to explain the high energies attained by particles in solar flares. Recent progress in the determination of fundamental acceleration parameters using novel techniques for the inversion of high resolution RHESSI hard X-ray spectra allows to determine non-thermal electron spectra at the loop top and foot points of a flare loop (Chen & Petrosian 2014). One outcome of this work is that the trapping and escape of the electrons is governed by wave particle scatterings and convergence of magnetic lines of force. Here, we present a computational study of the transport and escape processes of particles in the acceleration region. We employ a Fokker-Planck model, which includes pitch-angle scattering and magnetic mirroring in a non-uniform magnetic field. This allows to test analytical approximations for the particle escape times in the loop top region, which are helpful to constrain the key particle acceleration parameters. New perspectives will be given on how the insights gained from the analysis of the particle confinement will enable subsequent studies of a broader class of solar flares.

  8. Separation of species of a binary fluid mixture confined in a channel in presence of a strong transverse magnetic field

    Sharma Bishwaram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of a transverse magnetic field on separation of a binary mixture of incompressible viscous thermally and electrically conducting fluids confined between two stationary parallel plates are examined. Both the plates are maintained at constant temperatures. It is assumed that one of the components, which is rarer and lighter, is present in the mixture in a very small quantity. The equations governing the motion, temperature and concentration in Cartesian coordinate are solved analytically. The solution obtained for concentration distribution is plotted against the width of the channel for various values of non-dimensional parameters. It is found that the effect of transverse magnetic field is to separate the species of rarer and lighter component by contributing its effect directly to the temperature gradient and the pressure gradient. The effects of increase in the values of Hartmann number, magnetic Reynolds number, barodiffusion number, thermal diffusion number, electric field parameter and the product of Prandtl number and Eckert number are to collect the rarer and lighter component near the upper plate and throw away the heavier component towards the lower plate. The problem discussed here derives its application in the basic fluid dynamics separation processes to separate the rare component of the different isotopes of heavier molecules where electromagnetic method of separation does not work.

  9. Density matrix for an electron confined in quantum dots under uniform magnetic field and static electrical field

    Pang Qian-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Using unitary transformations, this paper obtains the eigenvalues and the common eigenvector of Hamiltonian and a new-defined generalized angular momentum (Lz) for an electron confined in quantum dots under a uniform magnetic field (UMF) and a static electric field (SEF). It finds that the eigenvalue of Lz just stands for the expectation value of a usual angular momentum lz in the eigen-state. It first obtains the matrix density for this system via directly calculating a transfer matrix element of operator exp(-βH) in some representations with the technique of integral within an ordered products (IWOP) of operators, rather than via solving a Bloch equation. Because the quadratic homogeneity of potential energy is broken due to the existence of SEF, the virial theorem in statistical physics is not satisfactory for this system, which is confirmed through the calculation of thermal averages of physical quantities.

  10. Ion cyclotron emission in tokamak plasmas; Emission cyclotronique ionique dans les plasmas de tokamak

    Fraboulet, D.

    1996-09-17

    Detection of {alpha}(3.5 MeV) fusion products will be of major importance for the achievement of self sustained discharges in fusion thermonuclear reactors. Due to their cyclotronic gyration in the confining magnetic field of a tokamak, {alpha} particles are suspected to radiate in the radio-frequency band [RF: 10-500 MHz]. Our aim is to determine whether detection of RF emission radiated from a reactor plasma can provide information concerning those fusion products. We observed experimentally that the RF emission radiated from fast ions situated in the core of the discharge is detectable with a probe located at the plasma edge. For that purpose, fast temporal acquisition of spectral power was achieved in a narrow frequency band. We also propose two complementary models for this emission. In the first one, we describe locally the energy transfer between the photon population and the plasma and we compute the radiation equilibrium taking place in the tokamak. {alpha} particles are not the unique species involved in the equilibrium and it is necessary to take into account all other species present in the plasma (Deuterium, Tritium, electrons,...). Our second model consists in the numerical resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov with the use of a variational formulation, in which all polarizations are considered and the 4 first cyclotronic harmonics are included in a 1-D slab geometry. The development of this second model leads to the proposal for an experimental set up aiming to the feasibility demonstration of a routine diagnostic providing the central {alpha} density in a reactor. (author). 166 refs.

  11. Extended gyrokinetic field theory for time-dependent magnetic confinement fields

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    A gyrokinetic system of equations for turbulent toroidal plasmas in time-dependent axisymmetric background magnetic fields is derived from the variational principle. Besides governing equations for gyrocenter distribution functions and turbulent electromagnetic fields, the conditions which self-consistently determine the background magnetic fields varying on a transport time scale are obtained by using the Lagrangian, which includes the constraint on the background fields. Conservation laws for energy and toroidal angular momentum of the whole system in the time-dependent background magnetic fields are naturally derived by applying Noether's theorem. It is shown that the ensemble-averaged transport equations of particles, energy, and toroidal momentum given in the present work agree with the results from the conventional recursive formulation with the WKB representation except that collisional effects are disregarded here.

  12. EBT: an alternate concept to tokamaks and mirrors

    Glowienka, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is a hybrid magnetic trap formed by a series of toroidally connected simple mirrors. It differs from a tokamak, the present main-line approach, in that plasma stability and heating are obtained in a current-free geometry by the application of steady-state, high power, electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) producing a steady-state plasma. The primary motivation for EBT confinement research is the potential for a steady-state, highly accessible reactor with high ..beta... In the present EBT-I/S device, electron confinement has been observed to agree with the predictions of theory. The major emphasis of the experimental program is on the further scaling of plasma parameters in the EBT-I/S machine with ECH frequency (10.6, 18, and 28 GHz), resonant magnetic field (0.3, 0.6, and 1 T), and heating power (30, 60, and 200 kW). In addition, substantial efforts are under way or planned in the areas of ion cyclotron heating, neutral beam heating, plasma-wall interactions, impurity control, synchrotron radiation, and divertors. Recently, EBT has been selected as the first alternative concept to be advanced to the proof-of-principle stage; this entails a major device scale-up to allow a reasonable extrapolation to a DT-burning facility. The status and future plans of the EBT program, in particular the proof-of-principle experiment (EBT-P), are discussed.

  13. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    HUMPHREYS,D.A; FERRON,J.R; JOHNSON,R.D; LEUER,J.A; PENAFLOR,B.G; WALKER,M.L; WELANDER,A.S; KHAYRUTDINOV,R.R; DOKOUKA,V; EDGELL,D.H; FRANSSON,C.M

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance.

  14. Construction and operation of parallel electric and magnetic field spectrometers for mass/energy resolved multi-ion charge exchange diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Medley, S. S.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1998-07-01

    A novel charge exchange spectrometer using a dee-shaped region of parallel electric and magnetic fields was developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for neutral particle diagnostics on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The E∥B spectrometer has an energy range of 0.5⩽A (amu)E (keV)⩽600 and provides mass-resolved energy spectra of H+, D+, and T+ (or 3He+) ion species simultaneously during a single discharge. The detector plane exhibits parallel rows of analyzed ions, each row containing the energy dispersed ions of a given mass-to-charge ratio. The detector consists of a large area microchannel plate (MCP) which is provided with three rectangular, semicontinuous active area strips, one coinciding with each of the mass rows for detection of H+, D+, and T+ (or 3He+) and each mass row has 75 energy channels. To suppress spurious signals attending operation of the plate in the magnetic fringe field of the spectrometer, the MCP was housed in a double-walled iron shield with a wire mesh ion entrance window. Using an accelerator neutron generator, the MCP neutron detection efficiency was measured to be 1.7×10-3 and 6.4×10-3 counts/neutron/cm2 for 2.5 MeV-DD and 14 MeV-DT neutrons, respectively. The design and calibration of the spectrometer are described in detail, including the effect of MCP exposure to tritium, and results obtained during high performance D-D operation on TFTR are presented to illustrate the performance of the E∥B spectrometer. The spectrometers were not used during D-T plasma operation due to the cost of providing the required radiation shielding.

  15. The magnetic field and confined wind of the O star $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C

    Wade, G A; Donati, J F; Landstreet, J D; Petit, P; Strasser, S

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we confirm the presence of a globally-ordered, kG-strength magnetic field in the photosphere of the young O star $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C, and examine the properties of its optical line profile variations. A new series of high-resolution MuSiCoS Stokes $V$ and $I$ spectra has been acquired which samples approximately uniformly the rotational cycle of $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C. Using the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) multiline technique, we have succeeded in detecting variable Stokes $V$ Zeeman signatures associated with the LSD mean line profile. These signatures have been modeled to determine the magnetic field geometry. We have furthermore examined the profi le variations of lines formed in both the wind and photosphere using dynamic spectra. Based on spectrum synthesis fitting of the LSD profiles, we determine that the polar strength of the magnetic dipole component is $1150 \\la B_{\\rm d}\\la 1800$~G and that the magnetic obliquity is $27\\degr \\la \\beta \\la 68\\degr$, assuming $i=45\\pm 20\\degr$. The...

  16. Pellet refuelling of particle loss due to ELM mitigation with RMPs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak at low collisionality

    Valovič, M; Kirk, A; Suttrop, W; Cavedon, M; Fischer, L R; Garzotti, L; Guimarais, L; Kocsis, G; Cseh, G; Plőckl, B; Szepesi, T; Thornton, A; Mlynek, A; Tardini, G; Viezzer, E; Scannell, R; Wolfrum, E

    2015-01-01

    The complete refuelling of the plasma density loss (pump-out) caused by mitigation of Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) is demonstrated on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma is refuelled by injection of frozen deuterium pellets and ELMs are mitigated by external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). In this experiment relevant dimensionless parameters, such as relative pellet size, relative RMP amplitude and pedestal collisionality are kept at the ITER like values. Refuelling of density pump out requires a factor of two increase of nominal fuelling rate. Energy confinement and pedestal temperatures are not restored to pre-RMP values by pellet refuelling.

  17. Researches on the Neutral Gas Pressure in the Divertor Chamber of the HL-2A Tokamak

    WANGMingxu; LIBo; YANGZhigang; YANLongwen; HONGWenyu; YUANBaoshan; LIULi; CAOZeng; CUIChenghe; LIUYong; WANGEnyao; ZHANGNianman

    2003-01-01

    The neutral gas pressure in divertor chamber is a very basic and important physics parameter because it determines the temperature of charged particles, the thermal flux density onto divertor plates, the erosion of divertor plates, impurity retaining and exhausting, particle transportation and confinement performance of plasma in tokamaks. Therefore, the pressure measurement in divertor chamber is taken into account in many large tokamaks.

  18. Confinement of an electron in a non-homogeneous magnetic field: Integrable vs superintegrable quantum systems

    Contreras-Astorga, A., E-mail: alonso.contreras.astorga@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary, IN 46408 (United States); Departamento de Física, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico); Negro, J., E-mail: jnegro@fta.uva.es [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica and IMUVA, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Tristao, S., E-mail: hetsudoyaguiu@gmail.com [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica and IMUVA, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2016-01-08

    This paper deals with the problem of an electron in a non-homogeneous magnetic field perpendicular to a plane. From the classical point of view this is an integrable, but not superintegrable, solvable system. In the quantum framework of the Dirac equation this integrable system is solvable too; the energy levels and wavefunctions of bound states, for its reduction to the plane, are computed. The effective one-dimensional matrix Hamiltonian is shown to belong to a shape-invariant hierarchy. Through this example we will shed some light on the specific properties of a quantum integrable system with respect to those characteristic of superintegrable systems. - Highlights: • The system: an electron in a non-homogeneous magnetic field. • This is a solvable integrable but not superintegrable system. • Solutions to the discrete Dirac spectrum are found. • The shape-invariance of Dirac matrix Hamiltonians is characterized. • Specific properties of integrable, not superintegrable, systems are analyzed.

  19. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time. PMID:27796370

  20. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-10-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time.

  1. PIC numerical study of ECR plasmas confinement in a minimum-B and zero-B magnetic traps with GPU

    Murillo Acevedo, M. T.; Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.

    2016-02-01

    This work analyzes through computational methods the phenomenon of confinement and heating of plasmas, in open magnetic traps, Minimum-B, and zero-B under conditions of resonance electron cyclotron (ECR). This simulation is made using electrostatic particle in cell method. First, it simulates the minimum-B trap, which has been studied both numerically and experimentally, by which is accomplished the confrontation of 6 different types of results that help us to validate our code. In the same way the zero-B trap is analysed. Proposed by Dr. Dugar-Zhabon, the main characteristic of the trap is the nullity of the magnetic field in the centre of the trap. The results show the detailed behaviour of the electronic component in the initial stage of the formation of plasma. Given the computational cost of the used model that allowed us to simulates fine details of the dynamics of plasma. Results were only reached in the time of half-life of the electrons. During this period the minimum-B trap proved to be better for the production of ions than the zero-B trap. Due to the huge amount of equations needed to solve the motion equations and the charge density, they are calculated in a Parallel way by GPU clustering.

  2. Improved estimate of the detectability of gravitational radiation from a magnetically confined mountain on an accreting neutron star

    Vigelius, M

    2009-01-01

    We give an improved estimate of the detectability of gravitational waves from magnetically confined mountains on accreting neutron stars. The improved estimate includes the following effects for the first time: three-dimensional hydromagnetic ("fast") relaxation, three-dimensional resistive ("slow") relaxation, realistic accreted masses $M_a \\la 2 \\times 10^{-3} M_\\odot$, (where the mountain is grown ab initio by injection), and verification of the curvature rescaling transformation employed in previous work. Typically, a mountain does not relax appreciably over the lifetime of a low-mass X-ray binary. The ellipticity reaches $\\epsilon \\approx 2 \\times 10^{-5}$ for $M_a=2\\times 10^{-3} M_\\odot$. The gravitational wave spectrum for triaxial equilibria contains an additional line, which, although weak, provides valuable information about the mountain shape. We evaluate the detectability of magnetic mountains with Initial and Advanced LIGO. For a standard, coherent matched filter search, we find a signal-to-nois...

  3. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    Rogers, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented.

  4. The Thomson Scattering System on the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    T. Strickler, R. Majeski, R. Kaita, B. LeBlanc

    2008-07-31

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R0 = 0.4m, a = 0.26m, BTF ~ 3.4kG, IP ~ 400kA, and pulse length ~ 0.25s. The goal of LTX is to investigate tokamak plasmas that are almost entirely surrounded by a lithium-coated plasma-facing shell conformal to the last closed magnetic flux surface. Based on previous experimental results and simulation, it is expected that the low-recycling liquid lithium surfaces will result in higher temperatures at the plasma edge, flatter overall temperature profiles, centrally-peaked density profiles, and an increased confinement time. To test these predictions, the electron temperature and density profiles in LTX will be measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering system (TVTS). Initially, TS measurements will be made at up to 12 simultaneous points between the plasma center and plasma edge. Later, high resolution edge measurements will be deployed to study the lithium edge physics in greater detail. Technical challenges to implementing the TS system included limited "line of sight" access to the plasma due to the plasma-facing shell and problems associated with the presence of liquid lithium.

  5. LDRD final report on confinement of cluster fusion plasmas with magnetic fields.

    Argo, Jeffrey W.; Kellogg, Jeffrey W.; Headley, Daniel Ignacio; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Waugh, Caleb J.; Lewis, Sean M.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Wisher, Matthew; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Bengtson, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Two versions of a current driver for single-turn, single-use 1-cm diameter magnetic field coils have been built and tested at the Sandia National Laboratories for use with cluster fusion experiments at the University of Texas in Austin. These coils are used to provide axial magnetic fields to slow radial loss of electrons from laser-produced deuterium plasmas. Typical peak field strength achievable for the two-capacitor system is 50 T, and 200 T for the ten-capacitor system. Current rise time for both systems is about 1.7 {mu}s, with peak current of 500 kA and 2 MA, respectively. Because the coil must be brought to the laser, the driver needs to be portable and drive currents in vacuum. The drivers are complete but laser-plasma experiments are still in progress. Therefore, in this report, we focus on system design, initial tests, and performance characteristics of the two-capacitor and ten-capacitors systems. The questions of whether a 200 T magnetic field can retard the breakup of a cluster-fusion plasma, and whether this field can enhance neutron production have not yet been answered. However, tools have been developed that will enable producing the magnetic fields needed to answer these questions. These are a two-capacitor, 400-kA system that was delivered to the University of Texas in 2010, and a 2-MA ten-capacitor system delivered this year. The first system allowed initial testing, and the second system will be able to produce the 200 T magnetic fields needed for cluster fusion experiments with a petawatt laser. The prototype 400-kA magnetic field driver system was designed and built to test the design concept for the system, and to verify that a portable driver system could be built that delivers current to a magnetic field coil in vacuum. This system was built copying a design from a fixed-facility, high-field machine at LANL, but made to be portable and to use a Z-machine-like vacuum insulator and vacuum transmission line. This system was sent to the

  6. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_sglobal tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  7. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  8. Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: status of FEDC studies

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Compact Ignition Tokamak Program comprise the report. The technical areas discussed are the mechanical configuration status, magnet analysis, stress analysis, cooling between burns, TF coil joint, and facility/device layout options. (WRF)

  9. Inertial confinement fusion with direct electric generation by magnetic flux comparession

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    A high-power-density laser-fusion-reactor concept in investigated in which directed kinetic enery imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium--in which the fusion target is centrally located--is maximized. In turn, this kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with, potentially, very high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the concept maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall can be many orders of magnitude less than is typical of D-T fusion reactor concepts.

  10. Review of heat transfer problems associated with magnetically-confined fusion reactor concepts

    Hoffman, M.A.; Werner, R.W.; Carlson, G.A.; Cornish, D.N.

    1976-04-01

    Conceptual design studies of possible fusion reactor configurations have revealed a host of interesting and sometimes extremely difficult heat transfer problems. The general requirements imposed on the coolant system for heat removal of the thermonuclear power from the reactor are discussed. In particular, the constraints imposed by the fusion plasma, neutronics, structure and magnetic field environment are described with emphasis on those aspects which are unusual or unique to fusion reactors. Then the particular heat transfer characteristics of various possible coolants including lithium, flibe, boiling alkali metals, and helium are discussed in the context of these general fusion reactor requirements. Some specific areas where further experimental and/or theoretical work is necessary are listed for each coolant along with references to the pertinent research already accomplished. Specialized heat transfer problems of the plasma injection and removal systems are also described. Finally, the challenging heat transfer problems associated with the superconducting magnets are reviewed, and once again some of the key unsolved heat transfer problems are enumerated.

  11. Impact of physics and technology innovations on compact tokamak fusion pilot plants

    Menard, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    For magnetic fusion to be economically attractive and have near-term impact on the world energy scene it is important to focus on key physics and technology innovations that could enable net electricity production at reduced size and cost. The tokamak is presently closest to achieving the fusion conditions necessary for net electricity at acceptable device size, although sustaining high-performance scenarios free of disruptions remains a significant challenge for the tokamak approach. Previous pilot plant studies have shown that electricity gain is proportional to the product of the fusion gain, blanket thermal conversion efficiency, and auxiliary heating wall-plug efficiency. In this work, the impact of several innovations is assessed with respect to maximizing fusion gain. At fixed bootstrap current fraction, fusion gain varies approximately as the square of the confinement multiplier, normalized beta, and major radius, and varies as the toroidal field and elongation both to the third power. For example, REBCO high-temperature superconductors (HTS) offer the potential to operate at much higher toroidal field than present fusion magnets, but HTS cables are also beginning to access winding pack current densities up to an order of magnitude higher than present technology, and smaller HTS TF magnet sizes make low-aspect-ratio HTS tokamaks potentially attractive by leveraging naturally higher normalized beta and elongation. Further, advances in kinetic stabilization and feedback control of resistive wall modes could also enable significant increases in normalized beta and fusion gain. Significant reductions in pilot plant size will also likely require increased plasma energy confinement, and control of turbulence and/or low edge recycling (for example using lithium walls) would have major impact on fusion gain. Reduced device size could also exacerbate divertor heat loads, and the impact of novel divertor solutions on pilot plant configurations is addressed. For

  12. On the non-stiffness of edge transport in L-mode tokamak plasmas

    Sauter, O.; Brunner, S.; Kim, D.; Merlo, G.; Behn, R.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Federspiel, L.; Goodman, T. P.; Karpushov, A.; Merle, A.; Team, TCV, E-mail: olivier.sauter@epfl.ch [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confédération Suisse, EPFL, PPB-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Camenen, Y. [CNRS, UMR 7345, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France)

    2014-05-15

    Transport analyses using first-principle turbulence codes and 11/2 -D transport codes usually study radial transport properties between the tokamak plasma magnetic axis and a normalized minor radius around 0.8. In this region, heat transport shows significantly stiff properties resulting in temperature scalelength values (R∕L{sub T}) that are relatively independent of the level of the radial heat flux. We have studied experimentally in the tokamak à configuration variable [F. Hofmann et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 36, B277 (1994)] the radial electron transport properties of the edge region, close to the last closed flux surface, namely, between ρ{sub V}=√(V/V{sub edge})=0.8 to 1. It is shown that electron transport is not stiff in this region and high R∕L{sub Te} values (∼20–40) can be attained even for L-mode confinement. We can define a “pedestal” location, already in L-mode regimes, where the transport characteristics change from constant logarithmic gradient, inside ρ{sub V} = 0.8, to constant gradient between 0.8 and 1.0. In particular, we demonstrate, with well resolved T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles, that the confinement improvement with plasma current I{sub p}, with or without auxiliary heating, is due to this non-stiff edge region. This new result is used to explain the significant confinement improvement observed with negative triangularity, which could not be explained by theory to date. Preliminary local gyrokinetic simulations are now consistent with an edge, less stiff, region that is more sensitive to triangularity than further inside. We also show that increasing the electron cyclotron heating power increases the edge temperature inverse scalelength, in contrast to the value in the main plasma region. The dependence of confinement on density in ohmic plasmas is also studied and brings new insight in the understanding of the transition between linear and saturated confinement regimes, as well as of the density limit and

  13. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  14. Comment on "Extension of neoclassical rotation theory for tokamaks to realistically account for the geometry of magnetic flux surfaces"

    Johnson, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The derivation presented in the paper (C. Bae et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 043011) relies heavily on the approximate solution of the electron momentum balance equation for the poloidal component of the electric field. One can show that, within the assumptions specified by the model, the exact solution of the resulting equation leads to an unphysical expression for the electrostatic potential relative to the magnetic axis. Remarks on its treatment of the radial and toroidal components of the electric field also appear.

  15. Spin flip loss in magnetic confinement of ultracold neutrons for neutron lifetime experiments

    Steyerl, A; Kaufman, C; Müller, G; Malik, S S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the spin flip loss for ultracold neutrons in magnetic bottles of the type used in experiments aiming at a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, extending the one-dimensional field model used previously by Steyerl $\\textit{et al.}$ [Phys.Rev.C $\\mathbf{86}$, 065501 (2012)] to two dimensions for cylindrical multipole fields. We also develop a general analysis applicable to three dimensions. Here we apply it to multipole fields and to the bowl-type field configuration used for the Los Alamos UCN$\\tau$ experiment. In all cases considered the spin flip loss calculated exceeds the Majorana estimate by many orders of magnitude but can be suppressed sufficiently by applying a holding field of appropriate magnitude to allow high-precision neutron lifetime measurements, provided other possible sources of systematic error are under control.

  16. A rare-earth-magnet ion trap for confining low-Z, bare nuclei

    Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    2009-05-01

    Simplifications in the theory for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions allow a substantial improvement in the accuracy of predicted levels, which can yield information on the values of fundamental constants and test theory if they can be compared with precision frequency measurements.[1] We consider the trapping of bare nuclei (fully-stripped) to be used in making Rydberg states of one-electron ions with atomic number 1earth permanent magnets, and to model the capture of charge-state-selected ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). An experimental apparatus adapted to the NIST EBIT will also be discussed. Reference: [1] U.D. Jentschura, P.J. Mohr, J.N. Tan, and B.J. Wundt, ``Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 160404 (2008).

  17. Magnetic quadrupoles lens for hot spot proton imaging in inertial confinement fusion

    Teng, J. [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Gu, Y.Q., E-mail: yqgu@caep.cn [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Chen, J.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, T.K.; Tan, F.; Hong, W.; Zhang, B.H. [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, X.Q. [Academy of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of DD-produced protons from an implosion hot spot region by miniature permanent magnetic quadrupole (PMQ) lens is proposed. Corresponding object-image relation is deduced and an adjust method for this imaging system is discussed. Ideal point-to-point imaging demands a monoenergetic proton source; nevertheless, we proved that the blur of image induced by proton energy spread is a second order effect therefore controllable. A proton imaging system based on miniature PMQ lens is designed for 2.8 MeV DD-protons and the adjust method in case of proton energy shift is proposed. The spatial resolution of this system is better than 10 μm when proton yield is above 10{sup 9} and the spectra width is within 10%.

  18. Study on VPI Process of Epoxy Impregnating Resin for Cryogenic Superconducting Magnets in TOKAMAK%TOKAMAK超导磁体用VPI浸渍树脂应用性能研究

    崔益民; 潘皖江; 武松涛; 王珏; 王先锋; 白小庆

    2001-01-01

    This article investigated a epoxy impregnating resin for cryogenic superconducting magnet coils in TOKAMAK.The viscosities at processing temperatures and the volatilities in high vacuums were measured to select the optimum VPI process.The dielectric and mechanical properties of the solified impregnating resin was tested at low and high temperatures.%本文测试了一种低温超导磁体绝缘胶在常温下的性能,研究了该低温胶进行VPI工艺的可行性,为低温超导磁体的VPI工艺提供参数和依据。

  19. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  20. Edge localized mode control using n  =  1 resonant magnetic perturbation in the EAST tokamak

    Sun, Y.; Jia, M.; Zang, Q.; Wang, L.; Liang, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Yang, X.; Guo, W.; Gu, S.; Li, Y.; Lyu, B.; Zhao, H.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Li, G.; Qian, J.; Xu, L.; Chu, N.; Wang, H. H.; Shi, T.; He, K.; Chen, D.; Shen, B.; Gong, X.; Ji, X.; Wang, S.; Qi, M.; Yuan, Q.; Sheng, Z.; Gao, G.; Song, Y.; Fu, P.; Wan, B.; Contributors, EAST

    2017-03-01

    A set of in-vessel resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coil has been recently installed in EAST. It can generate a range of spectrum, and there is a relatively large window for edge localized mode (ELM) control according to the vacuum field modeling of the edge magnetic island overlapping area. Observation of mitigation and suppression of ELM in slow rotating plasmas during the application of an n  =  1 RMP is presented in this paper. Strong ELM mitigation effect is observed in neutral beam injection heating plasmas. The ELM frequency increases by a factor of 5, and the crash amplitude and the particle flux are effectively reduced by a similar factor. Clear density pump-out and magnetic braking effects are observed during the application of RMP. Footprint splitting is observed during ELM mitigation and agrees well with vacuum field modelling. Strong ELM mitigation happens after a second sudden drop of plasma density, which indicates the possible effect due to field penetration of the resonant harmonics near the pedestal top, where the electron perpendicular rotation becomes flat and close to zero after the application of RMP. ELM suppression is achieved in a resonant window during the scan of the n  =  1 RMP spectrum in radio-frequency (RF) dominant heating plasmas. The best spectrum for ELM suppression is consistent with the resonant peak of RMP by taking into account of linear magnetohydrodynamics plasma response. There is no mode locking during the application of n  =  1 RMP in ELMy H-mode plasmas, although the maximal coil current is applied.

  1. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2009-03-31

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  2. Adiabatic Quasi-Spherical Compressions Driven by Magnetic Pressure for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASH,THOMAS J.

    2000-11-01

    The magnetic implosion of a high-Z quasi-spherical shell filled with DT fuel by the 20-MA Z accelerator can heat the fuel to near-ignition temperature. The attainable implosion velocity on Z, 13-cm/{micro}s, is fast enough that thermal losses from the fuel to the shell are small. The high-Z shell traps radiation losses from the fuel, and the fuel reaches a high enough density to reabsorb the trapped radiation. The implosion is then nearly adiabatic. In this case the temperature of the fuel increases as the square of the convergence. The initial temperature of the fuel is set by the heating of an ion acoustic wave to be about 200-eV after a convergence of 4. To reach the ignition temperature of 5-keV an additional convergence of 5 is required. The implosion dynamics of the quasi-spherical implosion is modeled with the 2-D radiation hydrodynamic code LASNEX. LASNEX shows an 8-mm diameter quasi-spherical tungsten shell on Z driving 6-atmospheres of DT fuel nearly to ignition at 3.5-keV with a convergence of 20. The convergence is limited by mass flow along the surface of the quasi-spherical shell. With a convergence of 20 the final spot size is 400-{micro}m in diameter.

  3. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    Kaita, Robert; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor

    2010-02-16

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions. __________________________________________________

  4. Experiments with liquid metal walls: Status of the lithium tokamak experiment

    Kaita, Robert, E-mail: kaita@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Berzak, Laura; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M.; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlake, John [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Abstarct: Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the current drive experiment-upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS). Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions.

  5. Measurements of plasma composition in the TEXTOR tokamak by collective Thomson scattering

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh;

    2012-01-01

    with wave vector components nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. Under such conditions the sensitivity of the CTS spectrum to plasma composition is enhanced by the spectral signatures of the ion cyclotron motion and of weakly damped ion Bernstein waves. Recent experiments on TEXTOR demonstrated......We demonstrate the use of collective Thomson scattering (CTS) for spatially localized measurements of the isotopic composition of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The experiments were conducted in the TEXTOR tokamak by scattering millimeter-wave probe radiation off plasma fluctuations...... the ability to resolve these signatures in the CTS spectrum as well as their sensitivity to the ion species mix in the plasma. This paper shows that the plasma composition can be inferred from the measurements through forward modeling of the CTS spectrum. We demonstrate that spectra measured in plasmas...

  6. Control of neo-classical double tearing modes by differential poloidal rotation in reversed magnetic shear tokamak plasmas

    Wang, Jialei; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Wei, Lai; Liu, Yue

    2017-04-01

    The control of neo-classical tearing modes (NTMs) by the differential rotation in the reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configuration with different separations Δ {{r}\\text{s}} between two rational surfaces is numerically studied by means of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. It is found that the differential rotation with a strong shear at the outer resonant surface can effectively suppress the explosive burst of double tearing modes (DTMs)/NTMs. Critical values of the strength of rotation to suppress the burst are also presented for different bootstrap current fractions {{f}\\text{b}} . Furthermore, a couple of measurable parameters ≤ft(δ, κ \\right) , corresponding respectively to the triangularity and elongation of the magnetic islands at the outer resonant surface, are introduced to characterize the deformation of islands in the nonlinear phase. It is found that the triangularity δ is more likely to precisely predict the onset of burst than the island width w and elongation κ . For a given Δ {{r}\\text{s}} , the critical value of triangularity {δ\\text{crit}} is obtained by scanning different plasma parameters. Establishing such a database of ≤ft(δ,κ \\right) is helpful to effectively control the development of NTMs in the RMS experimental discharges.

  7. Enhanced Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments on HT-7 Tokamak

    2003-01-01

    Effective Lower Hybrid Current Driving (LHCD) and improved confinement exper-iments in higher plasma parameters (Ip > 200 kA, ne> 2×1013 cm-3, Te ≥ 1 keⅤ) havebeen curried out in optimized LH wave spectrum and plasma parameters in HT-7 supercon-ducting tokamak. The dependence of current driving efficiency on LH power spectrum, plasmadensity ne and toroidal magnetic field BT has been obtained under optimal conditions. A goodCD efficiency was obtained at higher plasma current and higher electron density. The improve-ment of the energy confinement time is accompanied with the increase in line averaged electrondensity, and in ion and electron temperatures. The highest current driving efficiency reachedηCD = IpneR/PRF ≈ 1.05 × 1019 Am-2/W. Wave-plasma coupling was sustained in a good stateand the reflective coefficient was less than 5%. The experiments have also demonstrated the abilityof LH wave in the start-up and ramp-up of the plasma current. The measurement of the temporaldistribution of plasma parameter shows that lower hybrid leads to a broader profile in plasmaparameter. The LH power deposition profile and the plasma current density profile were modeledwith a 2D Fokker-Planck code corresponding to the evolution process of the hard x-ray detectorarray.

  8. Resistive interchange instability in reversed shear tokamaks

    Furukawa, Masaru; Nakamura, Yuji; Wakatani, Masahiro [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Resistive interchange modes become unstable due to the magnetic shear reversal in tokamaks. In the present paper, the parameter dependences, such as q (safety factor) profile and the magnetic surface shape are clarified for improving the stability, using the local stability criterion. It is shown that a significant reduction of the beta limit is obtained for the JT-60U reversed shear configuration with internal transport barrier, since the local pressure gradient increases. (author)

  9. Digital controlled pulsed electric system of the ETE tokamak. First report; Sistema eletrico pulsado com controle digital do Tokamak ETE (experimento Tokamak esferico). Primeiro relatorio

    Barbosa, Luis Felipe de F.P.W.; Del Bosco, Edson

    1997-12-31

    This reports presents a summary on the thermonuclear fusion and application for energy supply purposes. The tokamak device operation and the magnetic field production systems are described. The ETE tokamak is a small aspect ratio device designed for plasma physics and thermonuclear fusion studies, which presently is under construction at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) - S.J. dos Campos - S. Paulo. (author) 55 refs., 40 figs.

  10. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Konings, J.A.

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  11. Universal main magnetic focus ion source: A new tool for laboratory research of astrophysics and Tokamak microplasma

    Ovsyannikov, V P; Levin, A A

    2016-01-01

    A novel room-temperature ion source for the production of atomic ions in electron beam within wide ranges of electron energy and current density is developed. The device can operate both as conventional Electron Beam Ion Source/Trap (EBIS/T) and novel Main Magnetic Focus Ion Source. The ion source is suitable for generation of the low-, medium- and high-density microplasma in steady state, which can be employed for investigation of a wide range of physical problems in ordinary university laboratory, in particular, for microplasma simulations relevant to astrophysics and ITER reactor. For the electron beam characterized by the incident energy $E_e = 10$ keV, the current density $j_e \\sim 20$ kA/cm$^2$ and the number density $n_e \\sim 2 \\times 10^{13}$ cm$^{-3}$ were achieved experimentally. For $E_e \\sim 60$ keV, the value of electron number density $n_e \\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$ is feasible. The efficiency of the novel ion source for laboratory astrophysics significantly exceeds that of other existing warm and ...

  12. Self-consistent kinetic simulations of lower hybrid drift instability resulting in electron current driven by fusion products in tokamak plasmas

    Cook, J W S; Dendy, R O

    2010-01-01

    We present particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of minority energetic protons in deuterium plasmas, which demonstrate a collective instability responsible for emission near the lower hybrid frequency and its harmonics. The simulations capture the lower hybrid drift instability in a regime relevant to tokamak fusion plasmas, and show further that the excited electromagnetic fields collectively and collisionlessly couple free energy from the protons to directed electron motion. This results in an asymmetric tail antiparallel to the magnetic field. We focus on obliquely propagating modes under conditions approximating the outer mid-plane edge in a large tokamak, through which there pass confined centrally born fusion products on banana orbits that have large radial excursions. A fully self-consistent electromagnetic relativistic PIC code representing all vector field quantities and particle velocities in three dimensions as functions of a single spatial dimension is used to model this situation, by evolving the in...

  13. Burn Control of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasma 2. Burn Control in Tokamak Fusion Reactors 2.3 Burn Control in ITER

    Fujisawa, Noboru

    The issue of burn control in FDR-ITER, the design of which was completed in 1998, is introduced, Controllability was studied based on the ID transport code, PRETOR, during the burn phase with self-ignition, as well as during start-up and shut-down. The results of the present study have helped us to identify the importance of controlling the fuel supply, impurity injection, and heating power to maintain fusion power and power to the divertor.

  14. Magnetic moments of confined quarks and baryons in an independent-quark model based on Dirac equation with power-law potential

    Barik, N.; Das, M.

    1983-12-01

    The effect of confinement on the magnetic moment of a quark has been studied in a simple independent-quark model based on the Dirac equation with a power-law potential. The magnetic moments so obtained for the constituent quarks, which are found to be significantly different from their corresponding Dirac moments, are used in predicting the magnetic moments of baryons in the nucleon octet as well as those in the charmed and b-flavored sectors. We not only get an improved result for the proton magnetic moment, but the calculation for the rest of the nucleon octet also turns out to be in reasonable agreement with experiment. The overall predictions for the charmed and b-flavored baryons are also comparable with other model predictions.

  15. M.H.D. activity associated with the q=1 surface in the Tore-Supra tokamak; Activite M.H.D. associee a la surface q=1 dans le tokamak Tore-Supra

    Cristofani, P.

    1996-02-12

    In order to increase the temperature, density and confinement time of the plasma energy inside tokamak devices, several heating and fuel injection techniques have been used. However, the increase of the energy content of the central part of the plasma leads to instabilities in the confinement magnetic structure which can degrade the confinement properties and the temperature performances. Inside the plasma, the ``q=1`` surface plays an important role in the confinement process. The aim of this thesis is to study the experimental physics related to this surface with the analysis of the ``saw-tooth`` periodical internal relaxations and of the ``snake`` structure. The first chapter gives a general introduction about thermonuclear fusion and a description of the plasma and of its equilibrium. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the soft X-ray tomography, the diagnostic technique used in this work. In chapter 3, a theoretical presentation of plasma stability and a comparison with experimental results obtained in the Tore-Supra tokamak are given. The observations of saw-tooth instabilities are presented with the principal theoretical models which are used to explain this phenomenon. The snake density instability localized in the central part of the plasma is described in chapter 4 with an attempt of interpretation. The equation of the size evolution of a magnetic island was modified to test different models which can explain the snake stability. One model is based on the modification of the bootstrap current induced by the presence of the snake, and on the local modification of the current induced by the accumulation of impurities inside the snake. (J.S.). 107 refs.

  16. Power Deposition on Tokamak Plasma-Facing Components

    Arter, Wayne; Fishpool, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The SMARDDA software library is used to model plasma interaction with complex engineered surfaces. A simple flux-tube model of power deposition necessitates the following of magnetic fieldlines until they meet geometry taken from a CAD (Computer Aided Design) database. Application is made to 1) models of ITER tokamak limiter geometry and 2) MASTU tokamak divertor designs, illustrating the accuracy and effectiveness of SMARDDA, even in the presence of significant nonaxisymmetric ripple field. SMARDDA's ability to exchange data with CAD databases and its speed of execution also give it the potential for use directly in the design of tokamak plasma facing components.

  17. Lithium pellet injection experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Garnier, D.T.

    1996-06-01

    A pellet enhanced performance mode, showing significantly reduced core transport, is regularly obtained after the injection of deeply penetrating lithium pellets into Alcator C-Mod discharges. These transient modes, which typically persist about two energy confinement times, are characterized by a steep pressure gradient ({ell}{sub p} {le} a/5) in the inner third of the plasma, indicating the presence of an internal transport barrier. Inside this barrier, particle and energy diffusivities are greatly reduced, with ion thermal diffusivity dropping to near neoclassical values. Meanwhile, the global energy confinement time shows a 30% improvement over ITER89-P L-mode scaling. The addition of ICRF auxiliary heating shortly after the pellet injection leads to high fusion reactivity with neutron rates enhanced by an order of magnitude over L-mode discharges with similar input powers. A diagnostic system for measuring equilibrium current density profiles of tokamak plasmas, employing high speed lithium pellets, is also presented. Because ions are confined to move along field lines, imaging the Li{sup +} emission from the toroidally extended pellet ablation cloud gives the direction of the magnetic field. To convert from temporal to radial measurements, the 3-D trajectory of the pellet is determined using a stereoscopic tracking system. These measurements, along with external magnetic measurements, are used to solve the Grad-Shafranov equation for the magnetic equilibrium of the plasma. This diagnostic is used to determine the current density profile of PEP modes by injection of a second pellet during the period of good confinement. This measurement indicates that a region of reversed magnetic shear exists at the plasma core. This current density profile is consistent with TRANSP calculations for the bootstrap current created by the pressure gradient. MHD stability analysis indicates that these plasmas are near the n = {infinity} and the n = 1 marginal stability limits.

  18. Minimum dimension of an ITER like Tokamak with a given Q

    Johner, J

    2004-07-01

    The minimum dimension of an ITER like tokamak with a given amplification factor Q is calculated for two values of the maximum magnetic field in the superconducting toroidal field coils. For ITERH-98P(y,2) scaling of the energy confinement time, it is shown that for a sufficiently large tokamak, the maximum Q is obtained for the operating point situated both at the maximum density and at the minimum margin with respect to the H-L transition. We have shown that increasing the maximum magnetic field in the toroidal field coils from the present 11.8 T to 16 T would result in a strong reduction of the machine size but has practically no effect on the fusion power. Values obtained for {beta}{sub N} are found to be below 2. Peak fluxes on the divertor plates with an ITER like divertor and a multi-machine expression for the power radiated in the plasma mantle, are below 10 MW/m{sup 2}.

  19. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and

  20. Tokamak Plasmas : Observation of floating potential asymmetry in the edge plasma of the SINP tokamak

    Krishnendu Bhattacharyya; N R Ray

    2000-11-01

    Edge plasma properties in a tokamak is an interesting subject of study from the view point of confinement and stability of tokamak plasma. The edge plasma of SINP-tokamak has been investigated using specially designed Langmuir probes. We have observed a poloidal asymmetry of floating potentials, particularly the top-bottom floating potential differences are quite noticeable, which in turn produces a vertical electric field (v). This v remains throughout the discharge but changes its direction at certain point of time which seems to depend on applied vertical magnetic field v).

  1. Experimental study of the MHD activity associated to the mode m=2, n=1 in the Tore Supra tokamak; Etude experimentale de l`activite MHD associee au mode m=2, n=1 dans le tokamak Tore Supra

    Turlur, S.

    1996-09-20

    In tokamaks such as Tore Supra, the plasma confinement magnetic structure can be severely affected when Magnetohydrodynamic (M.H.D.) instabilities are destabilized. Experimentally, these instabilities are detected as magnetic fluctuations with captors located against the inner wall of the vacuum vessel. Fourier analysis provides amplitude, frequency and wave numbers of magnetic modes. In case of fast or transient phenomena, the analysis of magnetic fluctuations is completed using the singular value decomposition. In this dissertation, these analysis techniques are used to study two specific examples of M.H.D. activity related to the m = 2, n = 1 mode. On Tore Supra, the onset of this mode have strong consequences on the stability of partially or fully non inductive discharges. A regular and persistent sawtooth-like regime is observed on the electronic temperature leading to a significant degradation of the central confinement. Heat exhaust and particle balance are also essential parameters to achieve stationary discharges. On Tore Supra, these are studied with the ergodic divertor which produces stochastic magnetic field lines at the plasma edge. For optimal operating conditions of the ergodic divertor, the growth of the m = 2, N = 1 mode can lead to sudden destruction of magnetic equilibrium. For both cases, understanding and characterization of mechanisms leading to the observed m = 2, n = 1 M.H.D. activity are fundamental to obtain stationary discharges. (author). 115 refs.

  2. Recent results from the DIII-D tokamak

    Petersen, P.I.

    1998-02-01

    The DIII-D national fusion research program focuses on establishing the scientific basis for optimization of the tokamak approach to fusion energy production. The symbiotic development of research, theory, and hardware continues to fuel the success of the DIII-D program. During the last year, a radiative divertor and a second cryopump were installed in the DIII-D vacuum vessel, an array of central and boundary diagnostics were added, and more sophisticated computer models were developed. These new tools have led to substantial progress in the understanding of the plasma. The authors now have a better understanding of the divertor as a means to manage the heat, particle, and impurity transport pumping of the plasma edge using the in situ divertor cryopumps effectively controls the plasma density. The evolution of diagnostics that probe the interior of the plasma, particularly the motional Stark effect diagnostic, has led to a better understanding of the core of the plasma. This understanding, together with tools to control the profiles, including electron cyclotron waves, pellet injection, and neutral beam injection, has allowed them to progress in making plasma configurations that give rise to both low energy transport and improved stability. Most significant here is the use of transport barriers to improve ion confinement to neoclassical values. Commissioning of the first high power (890 kW) 110 GHz gyrotron validates an important tool for managing the plasma current profile, key to maintaining the transport barriers. An upgraded plasma control system, ``isoflux control,`` which exploits real time MHD equilibrium calculations to determine magnetic flux at specified locations within the tokamak vessel and provides the means for precisely controlling the plasma shape and, in conjunction with other heating and fueling systems, internal profiles.

  3. The ion velocity distribution of tokamak plasmas: Rutherford scattering at TEXTOR

    Tammen, H.F.

    1995-01-10

    One of the most promising ways to gererate electricity in the next century on a large scale is nuclear fusion. In this process two light nuclei fuse and create a new nucleus with a smaller mass than the total mass of the original nuclei, the mass deficit is released in the form of kinetic energy. Research into this field has already been carried out for some decades now, and will have to continue for several more decades before a commercially viable fusion reactor can be build. In order to obtain fusion, fuels of extremely high temperatures are needed to overcome the repulsive force of the nuclei involved. Under these circumstances the fuel is fully ionized: it consists of ions and electrons and is in the plasma state. The problem of confining such a hot substance is solved by using strong magnetic fields. One specific magnetic configuration, in common use, is called the tokamak. The plasma in this machine has a toroidal, i.e. doughnut shaped, configuration. For understanding the physical processes which take place in the plasma, a good temporally and spatially resolved knowledge of both the ion and electron velocity distribution is required. The situation concerning the electrons is favourable, but this is not the case for the ions. To improve the existing knowledge of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak plasmas, a Rutherford scattering diagnostic (RUSC), designed and built by the FOM-Institute for Plasmaphysics `Rijnhuizen`, was installed at the TEXTOR tokamak in Juelich (D). The principle of the diagnostic is as follows. A beam of monoenergetic particles (30 keV, He) is injected vertically into the plasma. A small part of these particles collides elastically with the moving plasma ions. By determining the energy of a scattered beam particle under a certain angle (7 ), the initial velocity of the plasma ion in one direction can be computed. (orig./WL).

  4. The Enhanced Effect of Optical Emission from Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of an Al-Li Alloy in the Presence of Magnetic Field Confinement

    Liu, Ping; Hai, Ran; Wu, Ding; Xiao, Qingmei; Sun, Liying; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the influence of magnetic field strength on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated for various pressures. The plasma plume was produced by employing Q-switch Nd:YAG laser ablation of an Al-Li alloy operating at a 1064 nm wavelength. The results indicated that the LIBS intensity of the Al and Li emission lines is boosted with an increase of magnetic strength. Typically, the intensity of the Al I and Li I spectral emissions can be magnified by 1.5-3 times in a steady magnetic field of 1.1 T compared with the field-free case. Also, in this investigation we recorded time-resolved images of the laser-produced plume by employing a fast ICCD camera. The results show that the luminance of the plasma is enhanced and the time of persistence is increased significantly, and the plasma plume splits into two lobes in the presence of a magnetic field. The probable reason for the enhancement is the magnetic confinement effect which increases the number density of excited atoms and the population of species in a high energy state. In addition, the electron temperature and density are also augmented by the magnetic field compared to the field-free case. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB109005) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175035), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ768), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Nos. DUT12ZD(G)01, (DUT14ZD(G)04), MMLab Research Project (DP1051208)

  5. Measurement of Absolute Atomic Collision Cross Section with Helium Using 87Rb Atoms Confined in Magneto-Optic and Magnetic Traps

    WANG Ji-Cheng; ZHOU Ke-Ya; WANG Yue-Yuan; LIAO Qing-Hong; LIU Shu-Tian

    2011-01-01

    We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87 Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap. The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences. The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained. These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.%@@ We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap.The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences.The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained.These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.

  6. Mechanical design of the coils encapsulated of toroidal field of Tokamak TPM1; Diseno mecanico del encapsulado de las bobinas de campo toroidal del Tokamak TPM1

    Caldino H, U.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: ucaldino@outlook.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The TPM1 is a small Tokamak that belongs to the Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias Aplicadas y Tecnologia Avanzada of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CICATA-IPN); the project is under construction. Currently it has the vacuum chamber, and is intended that the machine can operate with electric pulses of 10 ms to study the behavior of plasmas in order to provide knowledge in the field of nuclear fusion by magnetic confinement. To achieve this goal is necessary to design the toroidal field coils which operate the Tokamak. This paper presents an analysis which was performed to obtain the correct configuration of coils depending on design parameters for operation of the machine. Once determined this configuration, an analysis of electromagnetic forces present in normal machine operation on one coil was conducted, this to know the stresses in the encapsulation of the same. Considering the pulsed operation, a thickness of 5 mm is determined in the encapsulated, considering fatigue failure based on studies of fatigue failures in epoxy resins. (Author)

  7. Performance Projections For The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    Majeski, R.; Berzak, L.; Gray, T.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Levinton, F.; Lundberg, D. P.; Manickam, J.; Pereverzev, G. V.; Snieckus, K.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stotler, D.; Strickler, T.; Timberlake, J.; Yoo, J.; Zakharov, L.

    2009-06-17

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium limiter in the CDX-U tokamak produced the largest relative increase (an enhancement factor of 5-10) in Ohmic tokamak confinement ever observed. The confinement results from CDX-U do not agree with existing scaling laws, and cannot easily be projected to the new lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). Numerical simulations of CDX-U low recycling discharges have now been performed with the ASTRA-ESC code with a special reference transport model suitable for a diffusion-based confinement regime, incorporating boundary conditions for nonrecycling walls, with fuelling via edge gas puffing. This model has been successful at reproducing the experimental values of the energy confinement (4-6 ms), loop voltage (<0.5 V), and density for a typical CDX-U lithium discharge. The same transport model has also been used to project the performance of the LTX, in Ohmic operation, or with modest neutral beam injection (NBI). NBI in LTX, with a low recycling wall of liquid lithium, is predicted to result in core electron and ion temperatures of 1-2 keV, and energy confinement times in excess of 50 ms. Finally, the unique design features of LTX are summarized.

  8. Evidence and relevance of spatially chaotic magnetic field lines in MCF devices

    Firpo, M.-C.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Ettoumi, W.; Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; García-Martínez, P. L.

    2017-03-01

    Numerical evidence for the existence of spatially chaotic magnetic field lines about the collapse phase of tokamak sawteeth with incomplete reconnection is presented. This uses the results of extensive test particle simulations in different sets of electromagnetic perturbations tested against experimental JET measurements. In tokamak sawteeth, that form a laboratory prototype of magnetic reconnection, the relative magnetic perturbation δ B/B may reach a few percents. This does not apply to tokamak operating regimes dominated by turbulence where δ B/B is usually not larger than {10}-4. However, this small magnetic perturbation being sustained by a large spectrum of modes is shown to be sufficient to ensure the existence of stochastic magnetic field lines. This has important consequences for magnetic confinement fusion where electrons are dominantly governed by the magnetic force. Indeed some overlap between magnetic resonances can locally induce chaotic magnetic field lines enabling the spatial redistribution of the electron population and of its thermal content. As they are the swiftest plasma particles, electrons feed back the most rapid perturbations of the magnetic field.

  9. Plasma discharge in ferritic first wall vacuum vessel of the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2

    Abe, Mitsushi; Nakayama, Takeshi; Asano, Katsuhiko; Otsuka, Michio [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    A tokamak discharge with ferritic material first wall was tried successfully. The Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 had a stainless steel SUS304 vacuum vessel and modified to have a ferritic plate first wall for experiments to investigate the possibility of ferritic material usage in magnetic fusion devices. The achieved vacuum pressure and times used for discharge cleaning was roughly identical with the stainless steel first wall or the original HT-2. We concluded that ferritic material vacuum vessel is possible for tokamaks. (author)

  10. Thermo-statistical study of evaporation effects in a non neutral plasma under an imperfect magnetic confinement

    Ordenes-Huanca, C.; Velazquez, L.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies of non-neutral plasmas in magnetic traps undergo, in some degree of affectation, the incidence of evaporation. For example, the existence of a finite threshold energy {{\\varepsilon}c} for the escaping of plasma constituents can be favored by the external electrostatic forces near the grounded conducting walls of a cylindrical Penning trap. In contrast, the conventional statistical mechanics description of these situations is performed assuming the existence of a rigorous thermodynamic equilibrium (Dubin and O’Neil 1999 Rev. Mod. Phys. 71 87), dismissing thus the existence of evaporation effects. We propose in this work a two-dimensional toy model that describes the incidence of evaporation on thermo-statistics of a pure non-neutral plasma (a system composed of a single charge species like an infinitely long electron column). Considering the existing connections between the macroscopic descriptions of pure non-neutral plasmas and astrophysical systems, the treatment of evaporation along a quasi-stationary regime is developed here in analogy to some astrophysical models proposed in the literature. We start from a regularized microcanonical description that only considers those microscopic configurations where particles are trapped inside a confinement region of radius R c , which is implemented introducing a truncation of their velocity spectrum. These arguments lead us to a statistical procedure to predict the quasi-stationary particles distribution n≤ft(\\mathbf{r}\\right) similar to the maximum entropy approach. According to our analysis, the influence of evaporation for a non-zero temperature T crucially depends on the saturation parameter δ ={{r}\\text{B}}/{{R}c} , whose admissible values are located in the interval 0<δ <1 , with r B being the radius of Billouin steady state that appears in the limit T\\to 0 . The theoretical profiles predicted from this model are then compared to the metastable radial density distribution reported by

  11. High Bootstrap Current Fraction during the Synergy of LHCD and IBW on the HT-7 Tokamak

    ZHANG Xian-Mei; WAN Bao-Nian; WU Zhen-Wei; HT-7 Team

    2005-01-01

    @@ More than 70% of the total plasma current is sustained by the bootstrap current and current drive during the synergy of lower hybrid current driving (LHCD) and ion Berstein wave (IBW) heating on the HT-7 tokamak.The lower hybrid non-inductive current source is off-axis and well localized, and more than 35% bootstrap current plasma has been obtained. The IBW in controlling electron pressure profile can be integrated into the LHCD target plasma. The largest steep gradient of the electron pressure profile in the region ρ~ 0.5-0.7 mostly comes from the electron temperature profile, which may induce the large fraction bootstrap current. The large off-axis bootstrap current can help to create negative magnetic shear, and the good plasma confinement is achieved.

  12. Application of radial correlation doppler reflectometry on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Pinzon, J.R.; Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, TUM, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Happel, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hennequin, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique (France); Collaboration: The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    Doppler Reflectometry (DR) is a diagnostic used for the characterization of plasma density turbulence in magnetic confinement devices. It allows to measure the perpendicular propagation velocity of density fluctuations and their perpendicular wavenumber spectrum with good spatial resolution. By studying the correlation between signals of two reflectometers probing at different radial positions (Radial Correlation DR), it is possible to evaluate the radial correlation length L{sub r} of the plasma turbulence by scanning the radial separation Δr. However, results from analytical calculations and two-dimensional full-wave simulations indicate that the L{sub r} measurement by RCDR is not straightforward and might depend on factors such as plasma velocity, fluctuation amplitudes and probing beam angle. Experimental data from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak are studied. An assessment of the viability of the use of different signals and analysis methods, including an evaluation of potential caveats, is given.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of noninductive helicity injection in the reversed-field pinch and tokamak

    Sovinec, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical computation is used to investigate resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and in tokamak-like configurations driven solely by direct current (DC) helicity injection. A Lundquist number (S) scan of RFP turbulence without plasma pressure produces the weak scaling of S{sup -0.18} for the root-mean-square magnetic fluctuation level for 2.5x10{sup 3}{le}S{le}4x10{sup 4}. The temporal behavior of fluctuations and the reversal parameter becomes more regular as S is increased, acquiring a {open_quotes}sawtooth{close_quotes} shape at the largest value of S. Simulations with plasma pressure and anisotropic thermal conduction demonstrate energy transport resulting from parallel heat fluctuations. To investigate means of improving RFP energy confinement, three forms of current profile modification are tested. Radio frequency (RF) current drive is modeled with an auxiliary electron force, and linear stability calculations are used.

  14. The Construction of Plasma Density Feedback Control System on J-TEXT Tokamak

    Ke, Xin; Chen, Zhipeng; Ba, Weigang; Shu, Shuangbao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-02-01

    The plasma density feedback control system (PDFCS) has been established on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) for meeting the need for an accurate plasma density in physical experiments. It consists of a density measurement subsystem, a feedback control subsystem and a gas puffing subsystem. According to the characteristic of the gas puffing system, a voltage amplitude control mode has been applied in the feedback control strategy, which is accomplished by the proportion, integral and differential (PID) controller. In this system, the quantity calibration of gas injection, adjusted responding to the change of the density signal, has been carried out. Some experimental results are shown and discussed. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program (Nos. 2014GB103001 and 2013GB106001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11305070 and 11105028)

  15. On circulating power of steady state tokamaks

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1996-03-01

    Circulating power for the sustenance and profile control of the steady state tokamak plasmas is discussed. The simultaneous fulfillment of the MHD stability at high beta value, the improved confinement and the stationary equilibrium requires the rotation drive as well as the current drive. In addition to the current drive efficiency, the efficiency for the rotation drive is investigated. The direct rotation drive by the external torque, such as the case of beam injection, is not efficient enough. The mechanism and the magnitude of the spontaneous plasma rotation are studied. (author)

  16. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-04-24

    The high confinement regime (H-mode) in a tokamak plasma displays a remarkable edge region. On a small spatial scale of 1-2 cm the properties of the plasma change significantly. Certain parameters vary 1-2 orders of magnitude in this region, called the pedestal. Currently, there is no complete understanding of how the pedestal forms or how it is sustained. The goal of this thesis is to contribute to the theoretical understanding of the pedestal and provide scalings towards larger machines, like ITER and DEMO. A pedestal database was built with data from different tokamaks: ASDEX Upgrade, DIIID and JET. The pedestal was characterized with the same method for all three machines. This gives the maximum value, gradient and width of the pedestal in n{sub e}, T{sub e} and T{sub i}. These quantities were analysed along with quantities derived from them, such as the pressure or the confinement time. For this purpose two parameter sets were used: normalized parameters (pressure {beta}, time {nu}{sub *}, length {rho}{sub *}, shape f{sub q}) and machine parameters (size a, magnetic field B{sub t}, plasma current I{sub p}, heating P). All results are dependent on the choice of the coordinate system: normalized poloidal flux {Psi}{sub N} and real space r/a. The most significant result, which was obtained with both parameter sets, shows a different scaling of the pedestal width for the electron temperature and the electron density. The presented scalings predict that in ITER and DEMO the temperature pedestal will be appreciably wider than the density pedestal. The pedestal top scaling for the pressure reveals differences between the electron and the ion pressure. In extrapolations this results in values for T{sub e,ped} of 4 keV (ITER) and 10 keV (DEMO), but significantly lower values for the ion temperature. A two-term method was applied to use the pedestal pressure to determine the pedestal contribution to the global confinement time {tau}{sub E}. The dependencies in the

  17. Anomalous particle pinch in Tokamaks

    Miskane, F.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, DRFC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dezairi, A.; Saifaoui, D. [Faculte des Sciences Ain Chok, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2000-06-01

    The diffusion coefficient in phase space usually varies with the particle energy. A consequence is the dependence of the fluid particle flux on the temperature gradient. If the diffusion coefficient in phase space decreases with the energy in the bulk of the thermal distribution function, the particle thermodiffusion coefficient which links the particle flux to the temperature gradient is negative. This is a possible explanation for the inward particle pinch that is observed in tokamaks. A quasilinear theory shows that such a thermodiffusion is generic for a tokamak electrostatic turbulence at low frequency. This effect adds to the particle flux associated with the radial gradient of magnetic field. This behavior is illustrated with a perturbed electric potential, for which the trajectories of charged particle guiding centers are calculated. The diffusion coefficient of particles is computed and compared to the quasilinear theory, which predicts a divergence at low velocity. It is shown that at low velocity, the actual diffusion coefficient increases, but remains lower than the quasilinear value. Nevertheless, this differential diffusion between cold and fast particles leads to an inward flux of particles. (author)

  18. Energy confinement scaling from the international stellarator database

    Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Murakami, M.; Dory, R.A.; Yamada, H.; Okamura, S.; Sano, F.; Obiki, T.

    1995-09-01

    An international stellarator database on global energy confinement is presented comprising data from the ATF, CHS and Heliotron E heliotron/torsatrons and the W7-A and W7-AS shearless stellarators. Regression expressions for the energy confinement time are given for the individual devices and the combined dataset. A comparison with tokamak L mode confinement is discussed on the basis of various scaling expressions. In order to make this database available to interested colleagues, the structure of the database and the parameter list are explained in detail. More recent confinement results incorporating data from enhanced confinement regimes such as H mode are reported elsewhere. (author).

  19. Study of the 3D Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 Around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE--MHD Model

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S T; Hu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    We apply a data-driven MHD model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare occurred on 2010 October 25. The MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element (CESE) scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic-field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma $\\beta$. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photoshpere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria basing on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the {\\it Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)} around the time of flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and t...

  20. Tokamak Plasmas : Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    D Raju; R Jha; P K Kaw; S K Mattoo; Y C Saxena; Aditya Team

    2000-11-01

    The spatial and temporal structures of magnetic signal in the tokamak ADITYA is analysed using recently developed singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. The analysis technique is first tested with simulated data and then applied to the ADITYA Mirnov coil data to determine the structure of current peturbation as the discharge progresses. It is observed that during the current rise phase, current perturbation undergoes transition from = 5 poloidal structure to = 4 and then to = 3. At the time of current termination, = 2 perturbation is observed. It is observed that the mode frequency remains nearly constant (≈10 kHz) when poloidal mode structure changes from = 4 to = 2. This may be either an indication of mode coupling or a consequences of changes in the plasma electron temperature and density scale length.

  1. Relativistic runaway electrons in tokamak plasmas

    Jaspers, R.E.

    1995-02-03

    Runaway electrons are inherently present in a tokamak, in which an electric field is applied to drive a toroidal current. The experimental work is performed in the tokamak TEXTOR. Here runaway electrons can acquire energies of up to 30 MeV. The runaway electrons are studied by measuring their synchrotron radiation, which is emitted in the infrared wavelength range. The studies presented are unique in the sense that they are the first ones in tokamak research to employ this radiation. Hitherto, studies of runaway electrons revealed information about their loss in the edge of the discharge. The behaviour of confined runaways was still a terra incognita. The measurement of the synchrotron radiation allows a direct observation of the behaviour of runaway electrons in the hot core of the plasma. Information on the energy, the number and the momentum distribution of the runaway electrons is obtained. The production rate of the runaway electrons, their transport and the runaway interaction with plasma waves are studied. (orig./HP).

  2. Operation of a tokamak reactor in the radiative improved mode

    Morozov, D. Kh.; Mavrin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The operation of a nuclear fusion reactor has been simulated within a model based on experimental results obtained at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak and other facilities in which quasistationary regimes were achieved with long confinement times, high densities, and absence of the edge-localized mode. The radiative improved mode of confinement studied in detail at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak is the most interesting such regime. One of the most important problems of modern tokamaks is the problem of a very high thermal load on a divertor (or a limiter). This problem is quite easily solved in the radiative improved mode. Since a significant fraction of the thermal energy is reemitted by an impurity, the thermal loading is significantly reduced. As the energy confinement time τ E at high densities in the indicated mode is significantly larger than the time predicted by the scaling of ITERH-98P(y, 2), ignition can be achieved in a facility much smaller than the ITER facility at plasma temperatures below 20 keV. The revealed decrease in the degradation of the confinement time τ E with an increase in the introduced power has been analyzed.

  3. Kinetic transport in a magnetically confined and flux-constrained fusion plasma; Transport cinetique dans un plasma de fusion magnetique a flux force

    Darmet, G

    2007-11-15

    This work deals with the kinetic transport in a fusion plasma magnetically confined and flux-constrained. The author proposes a new interpretation of the dynamics of zonal flows. The model that has been studied is a gyrokinetic model reduced to the transport of trapped ions. The inter-change stability that is generated allows the study of the kinetic transport of trapped ions. This model has a threshold instability and can be simulated over a few tens confining time for either thermal bath constraint or flux constraint. For thermal baths constraint, the simulation shows a metastable state where zonal flows are prevailing while turbulence is non-existent. In the case of a flux-constraint, zonal flows appear and relax by exchanging energy with system's kinetic energy and turbulence energy. The competition between zonal flows and turbulence can be then simulated by a predator-prey model. 2 regimes can be featured out: an improved confining regime where zonal flows dominate transport and a turbulent regime where zonal flows and turbulent transport are of the same magnitude order. We show that flux as well as the Reynolds tensor play an important role in the dynamics of the zonal flows and that the gyrokinetic description is relevant for all plasma regions. (A.C.)

  4. Influence of nonuniform surface magnetic fields in wetting transitions in a confined two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet

    Trobo, Marta L.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-11-01

    Wetting transitions are studied in the two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet confined between walls where competitive surface fields act. In our finite samples of size L×M, the walls are separated by a distance L, M being the length of the sample. The surface fields are taken to be short-range and nonuniform, i.e., of the form H1,δH1,H1,δH1,..., where the parameter -1≤δ≤1 allows us to control the nonuniformity of the fields. By performing Monte Carlo simulations we found that those competitive surface fields lead to the occurrence of an interface between magnetic domains of different orientation that runs parallel to the walls. In finite samples, such an interface undergoes a localization-delocalization transition, which is the precursor of a true wetting transition that takes place in the thermodynamic limit. By exactly working out the ground state (T=0), we found that besides the standard nonwet and wet phases, a surface antiferromagnetic-like state emerges for δ3), H1tr/J=3, δtr=-1/3,T=0, being a triple point where three phases coexist. By means of Monte Carlo simulations it is shown that these features of the phase diagram remain at higher temperatures; e.g., we examined in detail the case T=0.7×Tcb. Furthermore, we also recorded phase diagrams for fixed values of δ, i.e., plots of the critical field at the wetting transition (H1w) versus T showing, on the one hand, that the exact results of Abraham [Abraham, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.44.1165 44, 1165 (1980)] for δ=1 are recovered, and on the other hand, that extrapolations to T→0 are consistent with our exact results. Based on our numerical results we conjectured that the exact result for the phase diagram worked out by Abraham can be extended for the case of nonuniform fields. In fact, by considering a nonuniform surface field of some period λ, with λ≪M, e.g., [H1(x,λ)>0], one can obtain the effective field Heff at a λ coarse-grained level given by Heff=(1)/(λ)∑x=1

  5. D-T burning plasma characteristics in an A=2 tokamak reactor

    石秉仁

    2005-01-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning plasma characteristic in an aspect ratio A=2 tokamak reactor is studied based on a simple equilibrium configuration, the Soloviev-type configuration. Operation limits for the Troyon beta value and for the Greenwald density value as well as for the ITER H-mode confinement scaling are used as the benchmark.It is found that in addition to suitable elongation, large triangularity has advantage for arriving at high beta value and obtaining high fusion power output. Compared to the present ITER design, the A=2 system can have very good merit for the avoidance of disruptions by setting rather high edge q value while keeping relatively large total toroidal current.The main disadvantage of decreasing the aspect ratio is due to the loss of more useful space in the inward region that leads to the decrease of toroidal magnetic field in the plasma region, then worsening the fusion merit. Our analysis and calculation also present a trade-off in this respect. Due to simple equilibrium configuration assumed, some other important issues such as the bootstrap current alignment cannot be optimized. However, the present analysis can offer an insight into the advantages of the medium aspect ratio reactor system that is a blank in present-day tokamak study.

  6. The Calibration of High-Speed Camera Imaging System for ELMs Observation on EAST Tokamak

    Fu, Chao; Zhong, Fangchuan; Hu, Liqun; Yang, Jianhua; Yang, Zhendong; Gan, Kaifu; Zhang, Bin; East Team

    2016-09-01

    A tangential fast visible camera has been set up in EAST tokamak for the study of edge MHD instabilities such as ELM. To determine the 3-D information from CCD images, Tsai's two-stage technique was utilized to calibrate the high-speed camera imaging system for ELM study. By applying tiles of the passive stabilizers in the tokamak device as the calibration pattern, transformation parameters for transforming from a 3-D world coordinate system to a 2-D image coordinate system were obtained, including the rotation matrix, the translation vector, the focal length and the lens distortion. The calibration errors were estimated and the results indicate the reliability of the method used for the camera imaging system. Through the calibration, some information about ELM filaments, such as positions and velocities were obtained from images of H-mode CCD videos. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275047), the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB102000)

  7. Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Rice, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. For momentum sources, there is direct drive from neutral beam injection, lower hybrid and ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves (including mode conversion flow drive), as well as indirect \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} forces from fast ion and electron orbit shifts, and toroidal magnetic field ripple loss. Counteracting rotation drive are sinks, such as from neutral drag and toroidal viscosity. Many of these observations are in agreement with the predictions of neo-classical theory while others are not, and some cases of intrinsic rotation remain puzzling. In contrast to particle and heat fluxes which depend on the relevant diffusivity and convection, there is an additional term in the momentum flux, the residual stress, which can act as the momentum source for intrinsic rotation. This term is independent of the velocity or its gradient, and its divergence constitutes an intrinsic torque. The residual stress, which ultimately responds to the underlying turbulence, depends on the confinement regime and is a complicated function of collisionality, plasma shape, and profiles of density, temperature, pressure and current density. This leads to the rich intrinsic rotation phenomenology. Future areas of study include integration of these many effects, advancement of quantitative explanations for intrinsic rotation and development of strategies for velocity profile control.

  8. Control of bootstrap current in the pedestal region of tokamaks

    Shaing, K. C. [Institute for Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53796 (United States); Lai, A. L. [Institute for Space and Plasma Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    The high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in the pedestal region of tokamaks are characterized by steep gradient of the radial electric field, and sonic poloidal U{sub p,m} flow that consists of poloidal components of the E×B flow and the plasma flow velocity that is parallel to the magnetic field B. Here, E is the electric field. The bootstrap current that is important for the equilibrium, and stability of the pedestal of H-mode plasmas is shown to have an expression different from that in the conventional theory. In the limit where ‖U{sub p,m}‖≫ 1, the bootstrap current is driven by the electron temperature gradient and inductive electric field fundamentally different from that in the conventional theory. The bootstrap current in the pedestal region can be controlled through manipulating U{sub p,m} and the gradient of the radial electric. This, in turn, can control plasma stability such as edge-localized modes. Quantitative evaluations of various coefficients are shown to illustrate that the bootstrap current remains finite when ‖U{sub p,m}‖ approaches infinite and to provide indications how to control the bootstrap current. Approximate analytic expressions for viscous coefficients that join results in the banana and plateau-Pfirsch-Schluter regimes are presented to facilitate bootstrap and neoclassical transport simulations in the pedestal region.

  9. Sawtooth Activity in Ohmically Heated Plasma on HT-7 Tokamak

    2001-01-01

    Sawtooth activity on HT-7 tokamak has been investigated experimentally mainly by using soft x-ray diode array and magnetic probes. Their behaviors and occurrences are correlatedclosely to the discharge conditions: the electron density Ne, the electron temperature Te, the safetyfactor qa on plasma boundary and wall condition etc. When central line-averaged electron densityNe(0) is over 2.0×1013cm-3, major sawtooth activity emerges with a period of up to 6.5 ms and afluctuation amplitude of up to 2~30 % of SXR radiation signal. In some cases such as the safetyfactor between 4.2~4.7 and Zeff=3.0~6.0, a monster sawtooth activity often emerges withoutapparent deterioration of plasma confinement and without major disruption. During these events,abundant MHD phenomena are observed including partial sawtooth oscillations. In this paper, theobserved sawtooth behaviors and their dependence on the and their dependence density Ne andwall condition in ohmically heated plasma are introduced, the results are discussed and presented.

  10. Discharge cleaning and wall conditioning in a Novillo Tokamak

    Valencia, R; Camps, E; Contreras, G; Muhl, S

    2002-01-01

    Our Novillo Tokamak is a small toroidal device magnetically confined defined by the main design parameters: R sub o =0.23 m, a sub v =0.08 m, a sub p =0.06 m, B sub T =0.05-0.47 T, I sub p =1-12 kA, n sub e =1-2x10 sup 1 sup 3 cm sup - sup 3 , T sub e =150 eV, T sub i =50 eV. For the initial discharge chamber cleaning we have often used vacuum baking up to 100 deg. C and then conditioning using Taylor discharge cleaning (TDC) in H sub 2 and He. In this work we report that vacuum baking is effective for obtaining a final total pressure of the order of 1.6x10 sup - sup 7 Torr. We have found that a single parameter, the performance parameter (PP), can be used to optimize the TDC method. This parameter represents the quantity of electron and ion energy incident on the chamber wall during the Taylor discharge, it is equal to (I sub p tau), where I sub p is the peak-to-peak plasma current and tau is the plasma current duration. In graphs of PP versus the gas pressure for different oscillator powers, the maximum val...

  11. Fractional statistics and confinement

    Gaete, P; Gaete, Patricio; Wotzasek, Clovis

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that a pointlike composite having charge and magnetic moment displays a confining potential for the static interaction while simultaneously obeying fractional statistics in a pure gauge theory in three dimensions, without a Chern-Simons term. This result is distinct from the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory that shows a screening nature for the potential.

  12. Design and Analysis of the Thermal Shield of EAST Tokamak

    XIE Han; LIAO Ziying

    2008-01-01

    EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is a tokamak with superconducting toroidal and poloidal magnets operated at 4.5 K. In order to reduce the thermal load applied on the surfaces of all cryogenically cooled components and keep the heat load of the cryogenic system at a minimum, a continuous radiation shield system located between the magnet system and warm components is adopted. The main loads to which the thermal shield system is subjected are gravity, seismic, electromagnetic and thermal gradients. This study employed NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to analyze the stress under a spectrum of loading conditions and combinations, providing a theoretical basis for an optimization design of the structure.

  13. Advanced tokamak concepts

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described and the main e

  14. Advanced tokamak concepts

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    1996-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described and the main e

  15. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  16. Transport in gyrokinetic tokamaks

    Mynick, H.E.; Parker, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive study of transport in full-volume gyrokinetic (gk) simulations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in core tokamak plasmas is presented. Though this ``gyrokinetic tokamak`` is much simpler than experimental tokamaks, such simplicity is an asset, because a dependable nonlinear transport theory for such systems should be more attainable. Toward this end, we pursue two related lines of inquiry. (1) We study the scalings of gk tokamaks with respect to important system parameters. In contrast to real machines, the scalings of larger gk systems (a/{rho}{sub s} {approx_gt} 64) with minor radius, with current, and with a/{rho}{sub s} are roughly consistent with the approximate theoretical expectations for electrostatic turbulent transport which exist as yet. Smaller systems manifest quite different scalings, which aids in interpreting differing mass-scaling results in other work. (2) With the goal of developing a first-principles theory of gk transport, we use the gk data to infer the underlying transport physics. The data indicate that, of the many modes k present in the simulation, only a modest number (N{sub k} {approximately} 10) of k dominate the transport, and for each, only a handful (N{sub p} {approximately} 5) of couplings to other modes p appear to be significant, implying that the essential transport physics may be described by a far simpler system than would have been expected on the basis of earlier nonlinear theory alone. Part of this analysis is the inference of the coupling coefficients M{sub kpq} governing the nonlinear mode interactions, whose measurement from tokamak simulation data is presented here for the first time.

  17. Confinement studies in TFTR

    Murakami, M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.; Boyd, D.; Bretz, N.; Bush, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The paper describes the present (end of February 1985) status of the plasma confinement studies in the TFTR tokamak with emphasis on those with neutral beam injection (NBI). Recent improvements in the device capabilities have substantially extended operating parameters: B/sub T/ increased to 4.0 T, I/sub p/ to 2.0 MA, injection power (P/sub b/) to 5 MW with H/sup 0/ or D/sup 0/ beams anti n/sub e/ to 5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/, and Z/sub eff/ reduced to 1.4. With ohmic heating (OH) alone, the previously established scaling for gross energy confinement time (tau/sub E/ = anti n/sub e/q) has been confirmed at higher I/sub p/ and B/sub T/, and the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.4 sec has been achieved. With NBI at P/sub b/ substantially (by factor >2) higher than P/sub OH/, excellent power and particle accountability have been established. This suggests that the less-than-expected increase in stored energy with NBI is not due to problems of power delivery, but due to problems of confinement deterioration. tau/sub E/ is observed to scale approximately as I/sub p/ P/sub b//sup -0.5/ (independent of anti n/sub e/), consistent with previous L-mode scalings. With NBI we have achieved the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.2 sec and the maximum T/sub i/(o) of 4.4 keV in the normal operating regime, and even higher T/sub i/(o) in the energetic-ion regime with low-n/sub e/ and low-I/sub p/ operation.

  18. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  19. Microtearing modes in tokamak discharges

    Rafiq, T.; Weiland, J.; Kritz, A. H.; Luo, L.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Microtearing modes (MTMs) have been identified as a source of significant electron thermal transport in tokamak discharges. In order to describe the evolution of these discharges, it is necessary to improve the prediction of electron thermal transport. This can be accomplished by utilizing a model for transport driven by MTMs in whole device predictive modeling codes. The objective of this paper is to develop the dispersion relation that governs the MTM driven transport. A unified fluid/kinetic approach is used in the development of a nonlinear dispersion relation for MTMs. The derivation includes the effects of electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations, arbitrary electron-ion collisionality, electron temperature and density gradients, magnetic curvature, and the effects associated with the parallel propagation vector. An iterative nonlinear approach is used to calculate the distribution function employed in obtaining the nonlinear parallel current and the nonlinear dispersion relation. The third order nonlinear effects in magnetic fluctuations are included, and the influence of third order effects on a multi-wave system is considered. An envelope equation for the nonlinear microtearing modes in the collision dominant limit is introduced in order to obtain the saturation level. In the limit that the mode amplitude does not vary along the field line, slab geometry, and strong collisionality, the fluid dispersion relation for nonlinear microtearing modes is found to agree with the kinetic dispersion relation.

  20. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  1. Texas Experimental Tokamak. Technical progress report, April 1990--April 1993

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported.

  2. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law

    Joglekar, A S; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields.We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfv\\`enic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high $\\beta$ plasma. However, the Hall parameter $\\omega_c \\tau_{ei}$ can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  3. Quantum Hall effect in a bulk antiferromagnet EuMnBi2 with magnetically confined two-dimensional Dirac fermions.

    Masuda, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Hideaki; Tokunaga, Masashi; Yamasaki, Yuichi; Miyake, Atsushi; Shiogai, Junichi; Nakamura, Shintaro; Awaji, Satoshi; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Arima, Taka-hisa; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ishiwata, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    For the innovation of spintronic technologies, Dirac materials, in which low-energy excitation is described as relativistic Dirac fermions, are one of the most promising systems because of the fascinating magnetotransport associated with extremely high mobility. To incorporate Dirac fermions into spintronic applications, their quantum transport phenomena are desired to be manipulated to a large extent by magnetic order in a solid. We report a bulk half-integer quantum Hall effect in a layered antiferromagnet EuMnBi2, in which field-controllable Eu magnetic order significantly suppresses the interlayer coupling between the Bi layers with Dirac fermions. In addition to the high mobility of more than 10,000 cm(2)/V s, Landau level splittings presumably due to the lifting of spin and valley degeneracy are noticeable even in a bulk magnet. These results will pave a route to the engineering of magnetically functionalized Dirac materials.

  4. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  5. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  6. Formation of Magnetic Flux Ropes during Confined Flaring Well Before the Onset of a Pair of Major Coronal Mass Ejections

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    NOAA Active Region (AR) 11429 was the source of twin super-fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The CMEs took place within a hour from each other, with the onset of the first taking place in the beginning of March 7, 2012. This AR fulfills all the requirements for a "super active region"; namely, Hale's law incompatibility and a $\\delta$-spot magnetic configuration. One of the biggest storms of Solar Cycle 24 to date ($D_{st}=-143$ nT) was associated with one of these events. Magnetic Flux Ropes (MFRs) are twisted magnetic structures in the corona, best seen in $\\sim$10 MK hot plasma emission and are often considered the core of erupting structures. However, their "dormant" existence in the solar atmosphere (i.e. prior to eruptions), is an open question. Aided by multi-wavelength observations (SDO/HMI/AIA and STEREO EUVI B) and a Non-Linear Force-Free (NLFFF) model for the coronal magnetic field, our work uncovers two separate, weakly-twisted magnetic flux systems which suggest the existence of pre-eruption MF...

  7. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  8. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    Box, F. M. A.; Howard, J.; VandeKolk, E.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines. S

  9. ADX - Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment

    Greenwald, Martin; Labombard, Brian; Bonoli, Paul; Irby, Jim; Terry, Jim; Wallace, Greg; Vieira, Rui; Whyte, Dennis; Wolfe, Steve; Wukitch, Steve; Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Divertor and RF Tokamak Experiment (ADX) is a design concept for a compact high-field tokamak that would address boundary plasma and plasma-material interaction physics challenges whose solution is critical for the viability of magnetic fusion energy. This device would have two crucial missions. First, it would serve as a Divertor Test Tokamak, developing divertor geometries, materials and operational scenarios that could meet the stringent requirements imposed in a fusion power plant. By operating at high field, ADX would address this problem at a level of power loading and other plasma conditions that are essentially identical to those expected in a future reactor. Secondly, ADX would investigate the physics and engineering of high-field-side launch of RF waves for current drive and heating. Efficient current drive is an essential element for achieving steady-state in a practical, power producing fusion device and high-field launch offers the prospect of higher efficiency, better control of the current profile and survivability of the launching structures. ADX would carry out this research in integrated scenarios that simultaneously demonstrate the required boundary regimes consistent with efficient current drive and core performance.

  10. Initial DEMO tokamak design configuration studies

    Bachmann, Christian, E-mail: christian.bachmann@efda.org [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aiello, G. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Arbeiter, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Aubert, J. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Boccaccini, L.; Carloni, D. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Federici, G. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Kovari, M. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Li Puma, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Loving, A. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maione, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Mattei, M. [ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mazzone, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Meszaros, B. [EFDA, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Riccardo, V. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A definition of main DEMO requirements. • A description of the DEMO tokamak design configuration. • A description of issues yet to be solved. - Abstract: To prepare the DEMO conceptual design phase a number of physics and engineering assessments were carried out in recent years in the frame of EFDA concluding in an initial design configuration of a DEMO tokamak. This paper gives an insight into the identified engineering requirements and constraints and describes their impact on the selection of the technologies and design principles of the main tokamak components. The EU DEMO program aims at making best use of the technologies developed for ITER (e.g., magnets, vessel, cryostat, and to some degree also the divertor). However, other systems in particular the breeding blanket require design solutions and advanced technologies that will only partially be tested in ITER. The main differences from ITER include the requirement to breed, to extract, to process and to recycle the tritium needed for plasma operation, the two orders of magnitude larger lifetime neutron fluence, the consequent radiation dose levels, which limit remote maintenance options, and the requirement to use low-activation steel for in-vessel components that also must operate at high temperature for efficient energy conversion.

  11. General Description of Ideal Tokamak MHD Instability Ⅱ

    石秉仁

    2002-01-01

    In this subsequent study on general description of ideal tokamak MHD instability,the part Ⅱ, by using a coordinate with rectified magnetic field lines, the eigenmode equationsdescribing the low-mode-number toroidal Alfven modes (TAE and EAE) are derived through afurther expansion of the shear Alfven equation of motion.

  12. Fokker-Planck Study of Tokamak Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating

    SHIBingren; LONGYongxing; DONGJiaqi; LIWenzhong; JIAOYiming; WANGAike

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we add a subroutine for describing the electron cyclotron resonant heating calculation to the Fokker-Planck code. By analyzing the wave-particle resonance condition in tokamak plasma and the fast motion of electrons along magnetic field lines, suitable quasi-linear diffusion coefficients are given.

  13. Magnetic Reconnection

    Schep, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    This lecture deals with the concept of magnetic field lines and with the conservation of magnetic flux. In high temperature fusion devices like tokamaks flux conservation can be violated and reconnection can occur at closed magnetic field lines. Reconnection processes lead to changes in the global t

  14. Properties of the static NMR response of a confined thin nematic film of 5CB-d2 under crossed electric and magnetic fields: theory and experiments.

    Véron, A; Sugimura, A; Luckhurst, G R; Martins, A F

    2012-11-01

    This work describes an investigation of the static (or quasistatic) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response in a nematic liquid crystal confined between two planar conducting plates and subject to a magnetic field and an electric field produced by a difference of voltage applied on the plates. Deuterium NMR spectroscopy of 4-pentyl-d(2)-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB-d(2)) under these conditions has revealed a voltage dependent inhomogeneous director distribution for a particular narrow range of voltages and for a fixed magnetic field (that of the spectrometer). In the ideal setup the two plates are assumed to be rigorously parallel, so that a difference of voltage applied on the plates leads to a constant electric field normal to them. When the magnetic field is parallel to the plates (orthogonal geometry) there exists a threshold value of the electric field for which the effect of both fields exactly compensate; moreover, for stronger electric field the director aligns with the electric field while for weaker electric field the director aligns with the magnetic field. If there is a lack of parallelism between the two plates, the electric field becomes inhomogeneous so that it may be larger than the threshold value in some region of the sample and smaller in the remaining part of the sample. In that case the director will adopt essentially two orientations within the sample, namely, parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the position of the frontier between the two domains depends on the voltage. This feature is clearly shown by deuterium NMR spectra that exhibit a transfer of intensity between two quadrupolar doublets with increase in the applied voltage. The coexistence of two director populations occurs for a range of voltages that depends on the degree of nonparallelism; accordingly, an estimation of this range by NMR yields an experimental estimation of the lack of parallelism. A tiny tilt of the magnetic field (nonorthogonal geometry) entrains a

  15. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  16. Measurement of Current Profile in a Tokamak Through AC Modulation

    2005-01-01

    The plasma current is modulated with an alternating current (ac) component in a frequency range of 90 Hz~900 Hz in the plateau discharge phase in the CT-6B tokamak. A plasma electric conductivity profile in a form of (1 - r2/a2)α with a parameter α, which is fitted with the experimental data, can be determined. The effects of magnetic shear in a tokamak field configuration on the current penetration are taken into account in the numerical simulation. The measurement method and obtained results are discussed.

  17. TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L.; Bulmer, R.H.; Doggett, J.N.; Johnson, B.M.; Lee, J.D.; Hoard, R.W.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs. (WRF)

  18. Simulation of EAST vertical displacement events by tokamak simulation code

    Qiu, Qinglai; Xiao, Bingjia; Guo, Yong; Liu, Lei; Xing, Zhe; Humphreys, D. A.

    2016-10-01

    Vertical instability is a potentially serious hazard for elongated plasma. In this paper, the tokamak simulation code (TSC) is used to simulate vertical displacement events (VDE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Key parameters from simulations, including plasma current, plasma shape and position, flux contours and magnetic measurements match experimental data well. The growth rates simulated by TSC are in good agreement with TokSys results. In addition to modeling the free drift, an EAST fast vertical control model enables TSC to simulate the course of VDE recovery. The trajectories of the plasma current center and control currents on internal coils (IC) fit experimental data well.

  19. Electron heat transport in current carrying and currentless thermonuclear plasmas. Tokamaks and stellarators compared

    Peters, M.

    1996-01-16

    In the first experiment the plasma current in the RTP tokamak is varied. Here the underlying idea was to check whether at a low plasma current, transport in the tokamak resembles transport in stellarators more than at higher currents. Secondly, experiments have been done to study the relation of the diffusivity {chi} to the temperature and its gradient in both W7-AS and RTP. In this case the underlying idea was to find the explanation for the phenomenon observed in both tokamaks and stellarators that the quality of the confinement degrades when more heating is applied. A possible explanation is that the diffusivity increases with the temperature or its gradient. Whereas in standard tokamak and stellarator experiments the temperature and its gradient are strongly correlated, a special capability of the plasma heating system of W7-AS and RTP can force them to decouple. (orig.).

  20. Differential and Integral Models of TOKAMAK

    Ivo Dolezel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of 3D electromagnetic phenomena in TOKAMAK with typically distributed main and additional coils is not an easy business. Evaluated must be not only distribution of the magnetic field, but also forces acting in particular coils. Use of differential methods (such as FDM or FEM for this purpose may be complicated because of geometrical incommensurability of particular subregions in the investigated area or problems with the boundary conditions. That is why integral formulation of the problem may sometimes be an advantages. The theoretical analysis is illustrated on an example processed by both methods, whose results are compared and discussed.

  1. Development of hybrid frequency couplers for non-inductive current drive in a tokamak; Developpement de coupleurs a la frequence hybride pour la generation non inductive du courant dans un tokamak

    Berio, St.

    1996-11-04

    Used at its first time as an heating method in order to reach the temperature requisite for the fusion of a thermonuclear plasma, the hybrid waves has shown that they were the more efficient method for non-inductive current drive in a tokamak. The size and the objectives of a next machine such as ITER lead of the design of new antennae (in process of realisation on Tore Supra) made of oversized waveguides. This new concept of antenna will be more simple, more robust and will be able to transmit the same if not much power than the present antennae. This thesis contribute to the development of a new code called ALOHA (for `Advanced LOwer Hybrid Antenna`) which, at the end, will be able to give the characteristics and the behaviours of this new oversized antennae in front of a tokamak plasma. This thesis is also a first step in the interpretation of some experimental data concerning the measurement of coupling, absorption and current drive of the actual hybrid wave launched by a grill with rectangular waveguides. Moreover, this thesis lay some foundations of the study of these new antennae in front of a non-parallel confinement magnetic field and/or in front of poloidal inhomogeneities of plasma. (author). 53 refs.

  2. Separation of species of a binary fluid mixture confined between two concentric rotating circular cylinders in presence of a strong radial magnetic field

    Sharma, B.R. [Dibrugarh University, Department of Mathematics, Dibrugarh, Assam (India); Singh, R.N. [Marwari Hindi High School, Dibrugarh (India)

    2010-08-15

    The effect of a radial magnetic field on separation of a binary mixture of incompressible viscous thermally and electrically conducting fluids confined between two concentric rotating circular cylinders with different angular velocity is examined. The equations governing the motion, temperature and concentration in cylindrical polar coordinate are solved analytically. The solution obtained in closed form for concentration distribution is plotted against the radial distances from the surface of the inner circular cylinder for various values of non-dimensional parameters. It is found that the non-dimensional parameters viz. the Hartmann number, thermal diffusion number, baro diffusion number, rotational Reynolds number, the product of Prandtl number and Eckert number, magnetic Prandtl number and the ratio of the angular velocities of inner and outer cylinders affects the species separation of rarer and lighter component significantly. The problem discussed here derives its application in the basic fluid dynamics separation processes to separate the rarer component of the different isotopes of heavier molecules where electromagnetic method of separation does not work. (orig.)

  3. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Magnetic islands and spontaneous generation of zonal flows

    Grasso, D.; Margheriti, L.; Porcelli, F.; Tebaldi, C.

    2006-09-01

    A study of saturated magnetic island equilibria on the basis of the resistive magneto-hydro-dynamic model is presented. A bifurcation in the sequence of equilibria is found as the ratio of the width of the current layer in the initial (non-reconnected) configuration over the island periodicity length reaches a critical threshold. Below this threshold, spontaneous generation of zonal flows occurs. This result is suggestive of a possible evolution of current sheets in magnetically confined plasmas and may be relevant to the understanding of the suppression of drift-wave turbulence and the formation of internal transport barriers in tokamak experiments.

  4. Development of a free boundary Tokamak Equilibrium Solver (TES) for Advanced Study of Tokamak Equilibria

    Jeon, Y M

    2015-01-01

    A free-boundary Tokamak Equilibrium Solver (TES), developed for advanced study of tokamak equilibra, is described with two distinctive features. One is a generalized method to resolve the intrinsic axisymmetric instability, which is encountered after all in equilibrium calculation with a free-boundary condition. The other is an extension to deal with a new divertor geometry such as snowflake or X divertors. For validations, the uniqueness of a solution is confirmed by the independence on variations of computational domain, the mathematical correctness and accuracy of equilibrium profiles are checked by a direct comparison with an analytic equilibrium known as a generalized Solovev equilibrium, and the governing force balance relation is tested by examining the intrinsic axisymmetric instabilities. As a valuable application, a snowflake equilibrium that requires a second order zero of the poloidal magnetic field is discussed in the circumstance of KSTAR coil system.

  5. High performance discharges in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment with liquid lithium wallsa)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Bell, R. E.; Boyle, D. P.; Esposti, B.; Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lucia, M.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Merino, E.; Punjabi-Vinoth, S.; Tchilingurian, G.; Capece, A.; Koel, B.; Roszell, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Gray, T. K.; Kubota, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.; Tritz, K.

    2015-05-01

    The first-ever successful operation of a tokamak with a large area (40% of the total plasma surface area) liquid lithium wall has been achieved in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). These results were obtained with a new, electron beam-based lithium evaporation system, which can deposit a lithium coating on the limiting wall of LTX in a five-minute period. Preliminary analyses of diamagnetic and other data for discharges operated with a liquid lithium wall indicate that confinement times increased by 10× compared to discharges with helium-dispersed solid lithium coatings. Ohmic energy confinement times with fresh lithium walls, solid and liquid, exceed several relevant empirical scaling expressions. Spectroscopic analysis of the discharges indicates that oxygen levels in the discharges limited on liquid lithium walls were significantly reduced compared to discharges limited on solid lithium walls. Tokamak operations with a full liquid lithium wall (85% of the total plasma surface area) have recently started.

  6. Solenoid-free plasma start-up in spherical tokamaks

    Raman, R.; Shevchenko, V. F.

    2014-10-01

    The central solenoid is an intrinsic part of all present-day tokamaks and most spherical tokamaks. The spherical torus (ST) confinement concept is projected to operate at high toroidal beta and at a high fraction of the non-inductive bootstrap current as required for an efficient reactor system. The use of a conventional solenoid in a ST-based fusion nuclear facility is generally believed to not be a possibility. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is therefore an area of extensive worldwide research activity. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is also relevant to steady-state tokamak operation, as the central transformer coil of a conventional aspect ratio tokamak reactor would be located in a high radiation environment but would be needed only during the initial discharge initiation and current ramp-up phases. Solenoid-free operation also provides greater flexibility in the selection of the aspect ratio and simplifies the reactor design. Plasma start-up methods based on induction from external poloidal field coils, helicity injection and radio frequency current drive have all made substantial progress towards meeting this important need for the ST. Some of these systems will now undergo the final stages of test in a new generation of large STs, which are scheduled to begin operations during the next two years. This paper reviews research to date on methods for inducing the initial start-up current in STs without reliance on the conventional central solenoid.

  7. Dissipative nonlinear structures in tokamak plasmas

    K. A. Razumova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of different kinds of instabilities may be developed in high temperature plasma located in a strong toroidal magnetic field (tokamak plasma. Nonlinear effects in the instability development result in plasma self-organization. Such plasma has a geometrically complicated configuration, consisting of the magnetic surfaces imbedded into each other and split into islands with various characteristic numbers of helical twisting. The self-consistency of the processes means that the transport coefficients in plasma do not depend just on the local parameters, being a function of the whole plasma configuration and of the forces affecting it. By disrupting the bonds between separate magnetic surfaces filled with islands, one can produce zones of reduced transport in the plasma, i.e. “internal thermal barriers”, allowing one essentially to increase the plasma temperature and density.

  8. Advanced Tokamak current density profiles for non-inductive Tore Supra operation

    Kazarian-Vibert, F.; Litaudon, X.; Arslanbekov, R.; Bibet, P.; Froissard, P.; Goniche, M.; Hoang, G.T.; Joffrin, E.; Moreau, D.; Peysson, Y.; Rey, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1995-12-31

    This document deals with the advanced Tokamak concept concerning self consistent hollow current density profiles. Several Lower Hybrid experiments performed on Tore Supra are presented: the feasibility of the constant-flux operation mode is demonstrated and a new improved confinement regime with a reversed shear has been obtained. (TEC). 12 refs., 5 figs.

  9. L-H transition in the mega-Amp spherical tokamak

    Akers, R.J.; Counsell, G.F.; Sykes, A.

    2002-01-01

    H-mode plasmas have been achieved on the MAST spherical tokamak at input power considerably higher than predicted by conventional threshold scalings. Following L-H transition, a clear improvement in energy confinement is obtained, exceeding recent international scalings even at densities approach...

  10. Up-down asymmetric tokamaks

    Ball, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Bulk toroidal rotation has proven capable of stabilising both dangerous MHD modes and turbulence. In this thesis, we explore a method to drive rotation in large tokamaks: up-down asymmetry in the magnetic equilibrium. We seek to maximise this rotation by finding optimal up-down asymmetric flux surface shapes. First, we use the ideal MHD model to show that low order external shaping (e.g. elongation) is best for creating up-down asymmetric flux surfaces throughout the device. Then, we calculate realistic up-down asymmetric equilibria for input into nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence analysis. Analytic gyrokinetics shows that, in the limit of fast shaping effects, a poloidal tilt of the flux surface shaping has little effect on turbulent transport. Since up-down symmetric surfaces do not transport momentum, this invariance to tilt implies that devices with mirror symmetry about any line in the poloidal plane will drive minimal rotation. Accordingly, further analytic investigation suggests that non-mirror symmetri...

  11. ICPP: Scale size of of magnetic turbulence as probed with 30 MeV runaway electrons

    Jaspers, Roger

    2000-10-01

    This paper reviews results concerning generation, confinement and transport of runaway electrons in the energy range 20-30 MeV in the TEXTOR tokamak. For future fusion reactors, it is of major importance to know the processes of runaway generation and runaway loss after disruptions, because of the potential damage to first wall components. Second, since the runaway electrons are effectively collisionless, their confinement is determined by the magnetic field turbulence. In this way the runaway transport provides a unique opportunity to probe turbulence in the core of a thermonuclear plasma. Runaway electrons above 20 MeV emit synchrotron radiation in the (near) infrared, which can easily be detected by thermographic cameras. This technique is developed and exploited at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak and has resulted in some spectacular results. These include: the experimental evidence of the secondary (`knock-on') runaway generation; the discovery of the runaway snake; the observation of disruption generated runaways; the probing of magnetic turbulence in the core of the plasma in Ohmic and additionally heated plasmas. The paper reviews these results with special emphasis on the subject of probing magnetic turbulence in the core of the plasma. Measurements in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak show that after switching on Neutral Beam Injection, the runaway population decays. The decay only starts with a significant delay, which decreases with increasing NBI heating power. This delay provides direct evidence of the energy dependence of runaway confinement, which is expected if magnetic modes govern the loss of runaway electrons. These observations allow to estimate the mode width δ of the magnetic perturbations:δ smaller than 0.5 cm in Ohmic discharges, increasing to δ=3D 4.4 cm for 0.6 MW NBI power.

  12. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  13. Vacuum system of SST-1 Tokamak

    Khan, Ziauddin, E-mail: ziauddin@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India); Pathan, Firozkhan; George, Siju; Semwal, Pratibha; Dhanani, Kalpesh; Paravastu, Yuvakiran; Thankey, Prashant; Ramesh, Gattu; Himabindu, Manthena; Pradhan, Subrata [Institute for Plasma Research, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Air leaks developed during ongoing SST-1 cooldown campaign were detected online using RGA. ► The presence of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} gases with the ratio of their partial pressures with ∼3.81:1 confirmed the air leaks. ► Baking of SST-1 was done efficiently by flowing hot N{sub 2} gas in C-channels welded on inner surfaces without any problem. ► In-house fabricated demountable bull nose couplers were demonstrated for high temperature and pressure applications. ► Cryopumping effect was observed when liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets reached below 63 K. -- Abstract: Vacuum chambers of Steady State Superconducting (SST-1) Tokamak comprises of the vacuum vessel and the cryostat. The plasma will be confined inside the vacuum vessel while the cryostat houses the superconducting magnet systems (TF and PF coils), LN{sub 2} cooled thermal shields and hydraulics for these circuits. The vacuum vessel is an ultra-high (UHV) vacuum chamber while the cryostat is a high-vacuum (HV) chamber. In order to achieve UHV inside the vacuum vessel, it would be baked at 150 °C for longer duration. For this purpose, U-shaped baking channels are welded inside the vacuum vessel. The baking will be carried out by flowing hot nitrogen gas through these channels at 250 °C at 4.5 bar gauge pressure. During plasma operation, the pressure inside the vacuum vessel will be raised between 1.0 × 10{sup −4} mbar and 1.0 × 10{sup −5} mbar using piezoelectric valves and control system. An ultimate pressure of 4.78 × 10{sup −6} mbar is achieved inside the vacuum vessel after 100 h of pumping. The limitation is due to the development of few leaks of the order of 10{sup −5} mbar l/s at the critical locations of the vacuum vessel during baking which was confirmed with the presence of nitrogen gas and oxygen gas with the ratio of ∼3.81:1 indicating air leak. Similarly an ultimate vacuum of 2.24 × 10{sup −5} mbar is achieved inside the cryostat. Baking of the

  14. No confinement without Coulomb confinement

    Zwanziger, D

    2003-01-01

    We compare the physical potential $V_D(R)$ of an external quark-antiquark pair in the representation $D$ of SU(N), to the color-Coulomb potential $V_{\\rm coul}(R)$ which is the instantaneous part of the 44-component of the gluon propagator in Coulomb gauge, $D_{44}(\\vx,t) = V_{\\rm coul}(|\\vx|) \\delta(t)$ + (non-instantaneous). We show that if $V_D(R)$ is confining, $\\lim_{R \\to \\infty}V_D(R) = + \\infty$, then the inequality $V_D(R) \\leq - C_D V_{\\rm coul}(R)$ holds asymptotically at large $R$, where $C_D > 0$ is the Casimir in the representation $D$. This implies that $ - V_{\\rm coul}(R)$ is also confining.

  15. Tokamak power reactor ignition and time dependent fractional power operation

    Vold, E.L.; Mau, T.K.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-06-01

    A flexible time-dependent and zero-dimensional plasma burn code with radial profiles was developed and employed to study the fractional power operation and the thermal burn control options for an INTOR-sized tokamak reactor. The code includes alpha thermalization and a time-dependent transport loss which can be represented by any one of several currently popular scaling laws for energy confinement time. Ignition parameters were found to vary widely in density-temperature (n-T) space for the range of scaling laws examined. Critical ignition issues were found to include the extent of confinement time degradation by alpha heating, the ratio of ion to electron transport power loss, and effect of auxiliary heating on confinement. Feedback control of the auxiliary power and ion fuel sources are shown to provide thermal stability near the ignition curve.

  16. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to

  17. Simultaneous measurement of magnetic and density fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering and Doppler backscattering on the DIII-D tokamak

    Rhodes, T. L.; Barada, K.; Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    An upgraded cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the simultaneous measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations B ˜ and density fluctuations ñ is presented. The system has eight radial quadrature channels acquired simultaneously with an eight-channel Doppler backscattering system (measures density fluctuations ñ and flows). 3-D ray tracing calculations based on the GENRAY ray tracing code are used to illustrate the scattering and geometric considerations involved in the CPS implementation on DIII-D. A unique quasi-optical design and IF electronics system allow direct comparison of B ˜ and ñ during dynamic or transient plasma events (e.g., Edge Localized Modes or ELMs, L to H-mode transitions, etc.). The system design allows the interesting possibility of both magnetic-density ( B ˜ -ñ) fluctuation and magnetic-temperature ( B ˜ - T ˜ ) fluctuation cross-phase measurements suitable for detailed tests of turbulence simulations.

  18. Tokamak resistive magnetohydrodynamic ballooning instability in the negative shear regime

    Shi Bing-Ren; Lin Jian-Long; Li Ji-Quan

    2007-01-01

    Improved confinement of tokamak plasma with central negative shear is checked against the resistive ballooning mode. In the negative shear regime, the plasma is always unstable for purely growing resistive ballooning mode. For a simplest tokamak equilibrium model, the s-α model, characteristics of this kind of instability are fully clarified by numerically solving the high n resistive magnetohydrodynamic ballooning eigen-equation. Dependences of the growth rate on the resistivity, the absolute shear value, the pressure gradient are scanned in detail. It is found that the growth rate is a monotonically increasing function of a while it is not sensitive to the changes of the shear s, the initial phase θ0 and the resistivity parameter εR.

  19. Stability and heating of a poloidal divertor tokamak

    Biddle, A. P.; Dexter, R. N.; Holly, D. T.; Lipschultz, B.; Osborne, T. H.; Prager, S. C.; Shepard, D.A., Sprott, J.C.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    1980-06-01

    Five experimental studies - two stability and three heating investigations - have been carried out on Tokapole II, a Tokamak with a four node poloidal divertor. First, discharges have been attained with safety factor q as low as 0.6 over most of the column without degradation of confinement, and correlation of helical instability onset with current profile shape is being studied. Second, the axisymmetric instability has been investigated in detail for various noncircular cross-sectional shapes, and results have been compared with a numerical stability code adapted to the Tokapole machine. Third, application of high power fast wave ion cyclotron resonance heating doubles the ion temperature and permits observation of heating as a function of harmonic number and spatial location of the resonance. Fourth, low power shear Alfven wave propagation is underway to test the applicability of this heating method to tokamaks. Fifth, preionization by electron cyclotron heating has been employed to reduce the startup loop voltage by approx. 60%.

  20. The first results of electrode biasing experiments in the IR-T1 tokamak

    Ghoranneviss, M; Salar Elahi, A; Mohammadi, S; Arvin, R, E-mail: salari_phy@yahoo.co [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    We report here the first results of our movable electrode biasing experiments performed in the IR-T1 tokamak. For this study, a movable electrode biasing system was designed, constructed and installed on the IR-T1 tokamak. A positive voltage was applied to an electrode inserted in the tokamak limiter. The plasma current, poloidal and radial components of the magnetic fields, loop voltage and diamagnetic flux in the absence and presence of the biased electrode were measured. Results of the improvement done to plasma equilibrium behaviour are compared and discussed in this paper.

  1. The I-mode confinement regime at ASDEX Upgrade: global properties and characterization of strongly intermittent density fluctuations

    Happel, T.; Manz, P.; Ryter, F.; Bernert, M.; Dunne, M.; Hennequin, P.; Hetzenecker, A.; Stroth, U.; Conway, G. D.; Guimarais, L.; Honoré, C.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-01-01

    Properties of the I-mode confinement regime on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak are summarized. A weak dependence of the power threshold for the L-I transition on the toroidal magnetic field strength is found. During improved confinement, the edge radial electric field well deepens. Stability calculations show that the I-mode pedestal is peeling-ballooning stable. Turbulence investigations reveal strongly intermittent density fluctuations linked to the weakly coherent mode in the confined plasma, which become stronger as the confinement quality increases. Across all investigated structure sizes ({{k}\\bot}≈ 5 -12 cm-1, with {{k}\\bot} the perpendicular wavenumber of turbulent density fluctuations), the intermittent turbulence bursts are observed. Comparison with bolometry data shows that they move poloidally toward the X-point and finally end up in the divertor. This might be indicative that they play a role in inhibiting the density profile growth, such that no pedestal is formed in the edge density profile.

  2. Metamaterial lens of specifiable frequency-dependent focus and adjustable aperture for electron cyclotron emission in the DIII-D tokamak

    Hammond, K C; Massidda, S D; Volpe, F A

    2014-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) of different frequencies originates at different locations in non-uniformly magnetized plasmas. For simultaneous observation of multiple ECE frequencies from the outside edge of a toroidal plasma confinement device (e.g. a tokamak), the focal length of the collecting optics should increase with the frequency to maximize the resolution on a line of sight along the magnetic field gradient. Here we present the design and numerical study of a zoned metamaterial lens with such characteristics, for possible deployment with the 83-130 GHz ECE radiometer in the DIII-D tokamak. The lens consists of a concentric array of miniaturized element phase-shifters. These were reverse-engineered starting from the desired Gaussian beam waist locations and further optimized to account for diffraction and finite-aperture effects that tend to displace the waist. At the same time we imposed high and uniform transmittance, averaged over all phase-shifters. The focal length is shown to increase from 1...

  3. Dynamic diagnostics of the error fields in tokamaks

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2007-07-01

    The error field diagnostics based on magnetic measurements outside the plasma is discussed. The analysed methods rely on measuring the plasma dynamic response to the finite-amplitude external magnetic perturbations, which are the error fields and the pre-programmed probing pulses. Such pulses can be created by the coils designed for static error field correction and for stabilization of the resistive wall modes, the technique developed and applied in several tokamaks, including DIII-D and JET. Here analysis is based on the theory predictions for the resonant field amplification (RFA). To achieve the desired level of the error field correction in tokamaks, the diagnostics must be sensitive to signals of several Gauss. Therefore, part of the measurements should be performed near the plasma stability boundary, where the RFA effect is stronger. While the proximity to the marginal stability is important, the absolute values of plasma parameters are not. This means that the necessary measurements can be done in the diagnostic discharges with parameters below the nominal operating regimes, with the stability boundary intentionally lowered. The estimates for ITER are presented. The discussed diagnostics can be tested in dedicated experiments in existing tokamaks. The diagnostics can be considered as an extension of the 'active MHD spectroscopy' used recently in the DIII-D tokamak and the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch.

  4. Magnetic microsphere-confined graphene for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental water samples coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence analysis.

    Wang, Weina; Ma, Ruiyang; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2013-06-07

    In this paper, a magnetic microsphere-confined graphene adsorbent (Fe3O4@SiO2-G) was fabricated and used for the extraction of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (fluorene, anthracene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene) from environmental water samples prior to high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The Fe3O4@SiO2-G was characterized by various instrumental methods. Various experimental parameters that could affect the extraction efficiencies, such as the amount of Fe3O4@SiO2-G, the pH and ionic strength of sample solution, the extraction time and the desorption conditions, were investigated. Due to the high surface area and excellent adsorption capacity of the Fe3O4@SiO2-G, satisfactory extraction can be achieved with only 15mg of the adsorbent per 250mL solution and 5min extraction. Under the optimum conditions, a linear response was observed in the concentration range of 5-1500ngL(-1) for fluorene, 2.5-1500ngL(-1) for anthracene and 15-1500ngL(-1) for phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene, with the correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.9897 to 0.9961. The limits of detection (S/N=3) of the method were between 0.5 and 5.0ngL(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 5.6%. The recoveries of the method were in the range between 83.2% and 108.2%. The results indicated that this graphene-based magnetic nanocomposite had a great adsorptive ability toward the five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental water samples.

  5. Edge Transport Modeling using the 3D EMC3-Eirene code on Tokamaks and Stellarators

    Lore, J. D.; Ahn, J. W.; Briesemeister, A.; Ferraro, N.; Labombard, B.; McLean, A.; Reinke, M.; Shafer, M.; Terry, J.

    2015-11-01

    The fluid plasma edge transport code EMC3-Eirene has been applied to aid data interpretation and understanding the results of experiments with 3D effects on several tokamaks. These include applied and intrinsic 3D magnetic fields, 3D plasma facing components, and toroidally and poloidally localized heat and particle sources. On Alcator C-Mod, a series of experiments explored the impact of toroidally and poloidally localized impurity gas injection on core confinement and asymmetries in the divertor fluxes, with the differences between the asymmetry in L-mode and H-mode qualitatively reproduced in the simulations due to changes in the impurity ionization in the private flux region. Modeling of NSTX experiments on the effect of 3D fields on detachment matched the trend of a higher density at which the detachment occurs when 3D fields are applied. On DIII-D, different magnetic field models were used in the simulation and compared against the 2D Thomson scattering diagnostic. In simulating each device different aspects of the code model are tested pointing to areas where the model must be further developed. The application to stellarator experiments will also be discussed. Work supported by U.S. DOE: DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-99ER54512, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  6. Preliminary conceptual design of a Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR). Status report, January 1978--March 1978

    Kelly, J.L. (ed.)

    1978-03-01

    The DTHR preliminary conceptual design consists of a magnetically confined fusion reactor fitted with a fertile thorium blanket. The fusion driver concept is based on a beam driven plasma, but at sufficiently high plasma densities that neutrons originating from the interactions of bulk plasma ions contribute significantly to the wall loading. The tokamak has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.2 m, and the elongation is 1.6. All of the magnetic coil systems are superconducting Nb/sub 3/Sn based on the Large Coil Project (LCP) technology. The toroidal field (TF) coils employ an innovative concept, the ''compact D'' configuration. An engineered bundle divertor concept has been developed based on the bundle divertor design techniques developed for TNS and ISX-B. A thermal power of 150MW of 200 keV deuterium is injected into the plasma through six ducts of a positive ion, neutral beam injection system (NBIS). A water cooled, 316 stainless steel vacuum vessel concept was developed and initial scoping analyses look encouraging. The fusile fuel handling system was evaluated and defined. Details of the tritium injection system remain to be developed. Tritium breeding will be assessed in subsequent phases of the DTHR operation. The fusion driver provides a neutron first wall loading of 2MW/m/sup 2/ for fissile production in the blanket.

  7. Impulsive energy release and non-thermal emission in a confined M4.0 flare triggered by rapidly evolving magnetic structures

    Kushwaha, Upendra; cho, Kyung-suk; Veronig, Astrid; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Mathew, S K

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of a confined M4.0 flare from NOAA 11302 on 2011 September 26. Observations at high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and Nobeyama Radioheliograph enabled us to explore the possible triggering and energy release processes of this flare despite its very impulsive behavior and compact morphology. The flare light curves exhibit an abrupt rise of non-thermal emission with co-temporal hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) bursts that peaked instantly without any precursor emission. This stage was associated with HXR emission up to 200 keV that followed a power law with photon spectral index ($\\delta$) $\\sim$3. Another non-thermal peak, observed 32 s later, was more pronounced in the MW flux than the HXR profiles. Dual peaked structure in the MW and HXR light curves suggest a two-step magnetic reconnection process. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images exhibit a sequential evolution of the inner and oute...

  8. First-principles-driven model-based current profile control for the DIII-D tokamak via LQI optimal control

    Boyer, Mark D.; Barton, Justin; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2013-10-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, control of the spatial distribution profile of the toroidal plasma current plays an important role in realizing certain advanced operating scenarios. These scenarios, characterized by improved confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and a high fraction of non-inductively driven plasma current, could enable steady-state reactor operation with high fusion gain. Current profile control experiments at the DIII-D tokamak focus on using a combination of feedforward and feedback control to achieve a targeted current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the shot and then to actively maintain this profile during the rest of the discharge. The dynamic evolution of the current profile is nonlinearly coupled with several plasma parameters, motivating the design of model-based control algorithms that can exploit knowledge of the system to achieve desired performance. In this work, we use a first-principles-driven, control-oriented model of the current profile evolution in low confinement mode (L-mode) discharges in DIII-D to design a feedback control law for regulating the profile around a desired trajectory. The model combines the magnetic diffusion equations with empirical correlations for the electron temperature, resistivity, and non-inductive current drive. To improve tracking performance of the system, a nonlinear input transformation is combined with a linear-quadratic-integral (LQI) optimal controller designed to minimize a weighted combination of the tracking error and controller effort. The resulting control law utilizes the total plasma current, total external heating power, and line averaged plasma density as actuators. A simulation study was used to test the controller's performance and ensure correct implementation in the DIII-D plasma control system prior to experimental testing. Experimental results are presented that show the first-principles-driven model-based control scheme's successful rejection of input

  9. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma; Barbosa, L.F.W. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  10. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  11. The ETE spherical Tokamak project

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Andrade, Maria Celia Ramos de; Barbosa, Luis Filipe Wiltgen [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] [and others]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, with a brief overview of work in the area of spherical torus already performed or in progress at several institutions. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and status of construction in September, 1998 at the Associated plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  12. Potential Safe Termination by Laser Ablation of High Z Impurity in the HL-1M Tokamak

    ZHENGYongzhen; FENGXingya; ZHENGYinjja; GUOGancheng; XUDeming; DENGZhongchao

    2003-01-01

    In the contemporary large tokamak, the disruptive termination of a discharge will reduce the lifetime of the first wall materials with the intense heat flux at the energy quench and the intense runaway electrons duringthe current quench, and generate high electron magnetic forces on vacuum vessel components with intense eddy current at the current quench. Thus, avoidance and softening of the energy quench and the current quench and controlling an expected disruption or emergency shutdown must be established in the present tokamak machines.

  13. Unusual Low-frequency Magnetic Perturbations in TFTR

    H. Takahashi; E.D. Fredrickson; M.S. Chance

    2001-02-12

    Low-frequency magnetic perturbations (less than or equal to 30 kHz) observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tokamak do not always conform to expectations from Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) modes. The discrepancy between observations and expectations arises from the existence of three classes of magnetic perturbations in TFTR: (1) 'Edge Originated Magnetic Perturbations' (EOMP's), (2) 'Kink-like Modes' (KLM's), and (3) Tearing Modes (TM's). The EOMP class has unusual magnetic phenomenon including up/down asymmetry in poloidal intensity variation that MHD modes alone cannot generate. The contributions of MHD modes in plasma edge regions are too small to explain the magnitude of observed EOMP perturbations. At least two-thirds, possibly nearly all, of magnetic perturbations in a typical EOMP originate from sources other than MHD modes. An EOMP has a unity toroidal harmonic number and a poloidal harmonic number close to a discharge's edge q-value. It produces little temperature fluctuations, except possibly in edge regions. The KLM class produces temperature fluctuations, mostly confined within the q=1 surface with an ideal-mode-like structure, but generates little external magnetic perturbations. The TM class conforms generally to expectations from MHD modes. We propose that current flowing in the Scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma is a possible origin of EOMP's.

  14. Safety factor profile control in a tokamak

    Bribiesca Argomedo, Federico; Prieur, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Control of the Safety Factor Profile in a Tokamak uses Lyapunov techniques to address a challenging problem for which even the simplest physically relevant models are represented by nonlinear, time-dependent, partial differential equations (PDEs). This is because of the  spatiotemporal dynamics of transport phenomena (magnetic flux, heat, densities, etc.) in the anisotropic plasma medium. Robustness considerations are ubiquitous in the analysis and control design since direct measurements on the magnetic flux are impossible (its estimation relies on virtual sensors) and large uncertainties remain in the coupling between the plasma particles and the radio-frequency waves (distributed inputs). The Brief begins with a presentation of the reference dynamical model and continues by developing a Lyapunov function for the discretized system (in a polytopic linear-parameter-varying formulation). The limitations of this finite-dimensional approach motivate new developments in the infinite-dimensional framework. The t...

  15. Heat flux mitigation by impurity seeding in high-field tokamaks

    Reinke, M. L.

    2017-03-01

    The ability for tokamaks to exhaust power in the boundary via impurity radiation is explored using empirical scalings and a simple 0D exhaust model, focusing on the scaling with toroidal field and major radius. By combining a scaling for the heat flux width and the L-H threshold power, the parallel heat flux in the SOL is shown to scale strongly with magnetic field, {{q}\\parallel}∼ B\\text{T}2.52 while having little to no scaling with machine size, {{q}\\parallel}∼ {{R}0.16} . Despite the increased heat flux at high field, it is shown that target temperatures relevant to detachment can be reached with finite main-ion dilution for a variety of impurity seeding gases, although non-equilibrium ionization balance is required in most cases. The necessary impurity fractions are estimated to scale like {{f}Z}∼ B\\text{T}0.88{{R}1.33} , a result that is facilitated by an increase in upstream temperature at high {{q}\\parallel} relative to peaks in the impurity cooling-curves. This scaling indicates that for optimizing reactors, minimizing device size while maximizing toroidal field, an approach shown to be consistent with energy confinement scaling, will also maximize the feasibility of reaching detachment at the lowest dilution. Despite this, analysis suggests an increase in the impurity fractions relative to existing devices will be required to exhaust power in a reactor-scale tokamak, with validation of impurity radiation physics required before both simple and detailed models can make reliable predictions of absolute f Z .

  16. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

  17. Confinement and stability of plasmas with externally driven steady-state elevated q-profiles

    Bock, Alexander; Stober, Joerg; Fischer, Rainer; Fable, Emiliano; Reich, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-05-01

    The helicity profile of the magnetic field lines is an important quantity for the operation of Tokamak fusion devices and can be expressed as the so-called safety factor q. It has profound influence on both the stability of the fusion plasma, as well as its confinement properties. Operation scenarios with centrally elevated and flat, or even reversed q-profiles promise fewer central instabilities and better core confinement and are thus considered potentially attractive for future fusion power plants. To verify these predictions, centrally elevated q-profiles are created using external counter current drive, with additional heating power added afterwards to explore the stability limits and transport properties of the resulting plasmas. The tailored q-profiles are calculated using magnetic equilibrium reconstruction constrained by internal motional Stark effect data to confirm to the presence of the desired helicities. They are then used as a basis for simulations of the transport properties with the gyro-Landau-fluid code TGLF. The simulation results are then compared to the experimentally measured kinetic profiles.

  18. Analysis of the plasma turbulence through radar reflectometry in the Tore-Supra tokamak; Analyse de la turbulence de plasma par reflectometrie radar sur le tokamak Tore Supra

    Gerbaud, T

    2005-07-01

    The turbulence developing in a tokamak's plasma is liable for a large transport of energy and particles, what slims the plasma magnetic confinement. This turbulence induces electromagnetic fluctuations inside the plasma, which imply local electronic density fluctuations. Using microwave reflectometers 50 - 110 GHz, operating like radars, one can probe the plasma at different depths, and then analyse the wave reflected by the plasma. Probe waves can be polarized ordinarily or extraordinarily, the difference lying in the dispersion relation of the plasma reflection index. The goal of this work is to compare density fluctuations spectrums, obtained in both polarization. Wave numbers spectrums and radials profiles of corresponding RMS values (equivalent to mean quadratic values) allow to conclude on a good agreement between the fluctuations density levels generated by measurement done in ordinary or extraordinary polarization. The comparison of wave numbers spectrums of density fluctuations underlines the growth of turbulence activity in the gradients zone. These results represent the first steps of a advanced analysis of fluctuations profiles and spectrums generated in ordinary polarization. (author)

  19. Tangential and Vertical Compact Torus Injection Experiments on the STOR-M Tokamak

    Xiao Chijin; Liu D.; S. Livingstone; A. K. Singh; E. Zhang; A. Hirose

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the setup and results of compact torus (CT) injection experiments on the STOR-M tokamak. Tangential CT injection into STOR-M induced H-mode-like phenomena including doubling the electron density, reduction in the Ha radiation level, suppression of the floating potential fluctuations, suppression of the m = 2 Mirnov oscillations, and increase in the global energy confinement time. Experimental setup, bench-test results, and some preliminary injection data for vertical CT injection experiments on STOR-M will be shown. In addition, numerical simulations of the CT trajectories in tokamak discharges for both tangential and vertical injection geometries will be discussed.

  20. Stabilizing Alginate Confinement and Polymer Coating of CO-Releasing Molecules Supported on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles To Trigger the CO Release by Magnetic Heating.

    Meyer, Hajo; Winkler, Felix; Kunz, Peter; Schmidt, Annette M; Hamacher, Alexandra; Kassack, Matthias U; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-12-07

    Maghemite (Fe2O3) iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized, modified with covalent surface-bound CO-releasing molecules of a tri(carbonyl)-chlorido-phenylalaninato-ruthenium(II) complex (CORM), and coated with a dextran polymer. The time- and temperature-dependent CO release from this CORM-3 analogue was followed by a myoglobin assay. A new measurement method for the myoglobin assay was developed, based on confining "water-soluble" polymer-coated Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles in hollow spheres of nontoxic and easily prepared calcium alginate. Dropping a mixture of Dextran500k@CORM@IONP and sodium alginate into a CaCl2 solution leads to stable hollow spheres of Ca(2+) cross-linked alginate which contain the Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles. This "alginate-method" (i) protects CORM-3 analogues from rapid CO-displacement reactions with a protein, (ii) enables a spatial separation of the CORM from its surrounding myoglobin assay with the alginate acting as a CO-permeable membrane, and (iii) allows the use of substances with high absorptivity (such as iron oxide nanoparticles) in the myoglobin assay without interference in the optical path of the UV cell. Embedding the CORM@IONP nanoparticles in the alginate vessel represents a compartmentation of the reactive component and allows for close contact with, yet facile separation from, the surrounding myoglobin assay. The half-life of the CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles surrounded by alginate was determined to be 890 ± 70 min at 20 °C. An acceleration of the CO release occurs at higher temperature with a half-life of 172 ± 27 min at 37 °C and 45 ± 7 min at 50 °C. The CO release can be triggered in an alternating current magnetic field (31.7 kA m(-1), 247 kHz, 39.9 mT) through local magnetic heating of the susceptible iron oxide nanoparticles. With magnetic heating at 20 °C in the bulk solution, the half-life of CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles decreased to 155 ± 18 min

  1. Plasma shaping effects on tokamak scrape-off layer turbulence

    Riva, Fabio; Lanti, Emmanuel; Jolliet, Sébastien; Ricci, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    The impact of plasma shaping on tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) turbulence is investigated. The drift-reduced Braginskii equations are written for arbitrary magnetic geometries, and an analytical equilibrium model is used to introduce the dependence of turbulence equations on tokamak inverse aspect ratio (ε ), Shafranov’s shift (Δ), elongation (κ), and triangularity (δ). A linear study of plasma shaping effects on the growth rate of resistive ballooning modes (RBMs) and resistive drift waves (RDWs) reveals that RBMs are strongly stabilized by elongation and negative triangularity, while RDWs are only slightly stabilized in non-circular magnetic geometries. Assuming that the linear instabilities saturate due to nonlinear local flattening of the plasma gradient, the equilibrium gradient pressure length {L}p=-{p}e/{{\

  2. Development of atomic beam probe for tokamaks

    Berta, M., E-mail: bertam@sze.hu [Széchenyi István University, EURATOM Association, Győr (Hungary); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic); Anda, G.; Aradi, M.; Bencze, A.; Buday, Cs.; Kiss, I.G.; Tulipán, Sz.; Veres, G.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner – RCP, HAS, EURATOM Association, Budapest (Hungary); Havlícek, J.; Háček, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • ABP is newly developed diagnostic. • Unique measurement method for the determination of plasma edge current variations caused by different transient events such as ELMs. • The design process has been fruitfully supported by the physically motivated computer simulations. • Li-BES system has been modified accordingly to the needs of the ABP. -- Abstract: The concept and development of a new detection method for light alkali ions stemming from diagnostic beams installed on medium size tokamak is described. The method allows us the simultaneous measurement of plasma density fluctuations and fast variations in poloidal magnetic field, therefore one can infer the fast changes in edge plasma current. The concept has been worked out and the whole design process has been done at Wigner RCP. The test detector with appropriate mechanics and electronics is already installed on COMPASS tokamak. General ion trajectory calculation code (ABPIons) has also been developed. Detailed calculations show the possibility of reconstruction of edge plasma current density profile changes with high temporal resolution, and the possibility of density profile reconstruction with better spatial resolution compared to standard Li-BES measurement, this is important for pedestal studies.

  3. Moving Divertor Plates in a Tokamak

    S.J. Zweben, H. Zhang

    2009-02-12

    Moving divertor plates could help solve some of the problems of the tokamak divertor through mechanical ingenuity rather than plasma physics. These plates would be passively heated on each pass through the tokamak and cooled and reprocessed outside the tokamak. There are many design options using varying plate shapes, orientations, motions, coatings, and compositions.

  4. Synchronization of Geodesic Acoustic Modes and Magnetic Fluctuations in Toroidal Plasmas

    Zhao, K. J.; Nagashima, Y.; Diamond, P. H.; Dong, J. Q.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yan, L. W.; Cheng, J.; Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Kosuga, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, L.; Huang, Z. H.; Yu, D. L.; Hong, W. Y.; Li, Q.; Ji, X. Q.; Song, X. M.; Huang, Y.; Liu, Yi.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Duan, X. R.

    2016-09-01

    The synchronization of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) and magnetic fluctuations is identified in the edge plasmas of the HL-2A tokamak. Mesoscale electric fluctuations (MSEFs) having components of a dominant GAM, and m /n =6 /2 potential fluctuations are found at the same frequency as that of the magnetic fluctuations of m /n =6 /2 (m and n are poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). The temporal evolutions of the MSEFs and the magnetic fluctuations clearly show the frequency entrainment and the phase lock between the GAM and the m /n =6 /2 magnetic fluctuations. The results indicate that GAMs and magnetic fluctuations can transfer energy through nonlinear synchronization. Such nonlinear synchronization may also contribute to low-frequency zonal flow formation, reduction of turbulence level, and thus confinement regime transitions.

  5. Experimental investigation of the confinement of d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products in JET

    Bonheure, Georges; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.

    2012-01-01

    In ITER, magnetic fusion will explore the burning plasma regime. Because such burning plasma is sustained by its own fusion reactions, alpha particles need to be confined (Hazeltine 2010 Fusion Eng. Des. 7–9 85). New experiments using d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products were performed...... in JET. Fusion product loss was measured from MHD-quiescent plasmas with a charged particle activation probe installed at a position opposite to the magnetic field ion gradient drift (see figure 1)—1.77 m above mid-plane—in the ceiling of JET tokamak. This new kind of escaping ion detector (Bonheure et...... al 2008 Fusion Sci. Technol. 53 806) provides for absolutely calibrated measurements. Both the mechanism and the magnitude of the loss are dealt with by this research. Careful analysis shows measured loss is in quantitative agreement with predictions from the classical orbit loss model. However...

  6. Surface thermocouples for measurement of pulsed heat flux in the divertor of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    Brunner, D; LaBombard, B

    2012-03-01

    A novel set of thermocouple sensors has been developed to measure heat fluxes arriving at divertor surfaces in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a magnetic confinement fusion experiment. These sensors operate in direct contact with the divertor plasma, which deposits heat fluxes in excess of ~10 MW/m(2) over an ~1 s pulse. Thermoelectric EMF signals are produced across a non-standard bimetallic junction: a 50 μm thick 74% tungsten-26% rhenium ribbon embedded in a 6.35 mm diameter molybdenum cylinder. The unique coaxial geometry of the sensor combined with its single-point electrical ground contact minimizes interference from the plasma/magnetic environment. Incident heat fluxes are inferred from surface temperature evolution via a 1D thermal heat transport model. For an incident heat flux of 10 MW/m(2), surface temperatures rise ~1000 °C/s, corresponding to a heat flux flowing along the local magnetic field of ~200 MW/m(2). Separate calorimeter sensors are used to independently confirm the derived heat fluxes by comparing total energies deposited during a plasma pulse. Langmuir probes in close proximity to the surface thermocouples are used to test plasma-sheath heat transmission theory and to identify potential sources of discrepancies among physical models.

  7. Locating cantori for symmetric tokamap and symmetric ergodic magnetic limiter map using mean-energy error criterion

    Jazayeri, S.M. [Physics Department, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sohrabi, A.R., E-mail: arsohrabi@iust.ac.ir [Faculty of Computer and information technology Engineering, Qazvin Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    We use a method based on the conservation of energy, the mean-energy error criterion, to approximately locate the place of a cantorus by locating the series of its convergent. The mean-energy error curve has nearly stationary parts in the vicinity of elliptic (minimax) orbits, the so-called magnetic islands. Stable minimax orbits converge to orbits homoclinic to a cantorus. By tracing the island series, we limit the cantorus to a narrow region. A near-critical perturbation parameter is used so that, while the cantorus may be destabilized, its high order minimax orbits remain intact. As illustrations, we consider two symplectic maps, systematically derived from the Hamilton– Jacobi equation and Jacobi’s theorem, in the context of the magnetically confined plasmas in a tokamak: a symmetric tokamap realistically reproduces the main features of a tokamak, and a symmetric ergodic magnetic limiter (EML) map is defined to describe the action of EML rings on the magnetic field lines in the tokamak. (author)

  8. Overview of the ITER Tokamak complex building and integration of plant systems toward construction

    Cordier, Jean-Jacques, E-mail: jean-jacques.cordier@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Bak, Joo-Shik [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Baudry, Alain [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Benchikhoune, Magali [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Carafa, Leontin; Chiocchio, Stefano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Darbour, Romaric [Fusion For Energy (F4E), c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Elbez, Joelle; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Jeannoutot, Thomas; Kotamaki, Miikka; Kuehn, Ingo; Lee, Andreas; Levesy, Bruno; Orlandi, Sergio [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Packer, Rachel [Engage Consortium, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Patisson, Laurent; Reich, Jens; Rigoni, Giuliano [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); and others

    2015-10-15

    The ITER Tokamak complex consists of Tokamak, diagnostic and tritium buildings. The Tokamak machine is located in the bioshield pit of the Tokamak building. Plant systems are implemented in the three buildings and are strongly interfacing with the Tokamak. The reference baseline (3D) configuration is a set of over 1000 models that today defines in an exhaustive way the overall layout of Tokamak and plant systems, needed for fixing the interfaces and to complete the construction design of the buildings. During the last two years, one of the main ITER challenges was to improve the maturity of the plant systems layout in order to confirm their integration in the building final design and freeze the interface definitions in-between the systems and to the buildings. The propagation of safety requirements in the design of the nuclear building like confinement, fire zoning and radiation shielding is of first priority. A major effort was placed by ITER Organization together with the European Domestic Agency (F4E) and the Architect Engineer as a joint team to fix the interfaces and the loading conditions to buildings. The most demanding systems in terms of interface definition are water cooling, cryogenic, detritiation, vacuum, cable trays and building services. All penetrations through the walls for piping, cables and other equipment have been defined, as well as all temporary openings needed for the installation phase. Project change requests (PCR) impacting the Tokamak complex buildings have been implemented in a tight allocated time schedule. The most demanding change was to implement a new design of the Tokamak basic machine supporting system. The 18 supporting columns of the cryostat (2001 baseline) were replaced at the end of 2012 by a concrete crown and radial concrete ribs linked to the basemat and to the bioshield surrounding the Tokamak. The change was implemented successfully in the building construction design to allow basemat construction phase being performed

  9. A note on the application of the Prigogine theorem to rotation of tokamak-plasmas in absence of external torques

    Sonnino, Giorgio, E-mail: gsonnino@ulb.ac.be [Department of Physics, Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Campus de la Plaine C.P. 231-Bvd du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Royal Military Academy (RMA), Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Cardinali, Alessandro; Zonca, Fulvio [EURATOM-ENEA Fusion Association, Via E.Fermi 45, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Sonnino, Alberto [Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Ecole Polytechnique de Louvain (EPL), Rue Archimède, 1 bte L6.11.01, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nardone, Pasquale [Department of Physics, Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Campus de la Plaine C.P. 231-Bvd du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Steinbrecher, György [EURATOM-MEdC Fusion Association, University of Craiova, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Str.A.I.Cuza Street 13, 200585 Craiova (Romania)

    2014-03-15

    Rotation of tokamak-plasmas, not at the mechanical equilibrium, is investigated using the Prigogine thermodynamic theorem. This theorem establishes that, for systems confined in rectangular boxes, the global motion of the system with barycentric velocity does not contribute to dissipation. This result, suitably applied to toroidally confined plasmas, suggests that the global barycentric rotations of the plasma, in the toroidal and poloidal directions, are pure reversible processes. In case of negligible viscosity and by supposing the validity of the balance equation for the internal forces, we show that the plasma, even not in the mechanical equilibrium, may freely rotate in the toroidal direction with an angular frequency, which may be higher than the neoclassical estimation. In addition, its toroidal rotation may cause the plasma to rotate globally in the poloidal direction at a speed faster than the expression found by the neoclassical theory. The eventual configuration is attained when the toroidal and poloidal angular frequencies reaches the values that minimize dissipation. The physical interpretation able to explain the reason why some layers of plasma may freely rotate in one direction while, at the same time, others may freely rotate in the opposite direction, is also provided. Invariance properties, herein studied, suggest that the dynamic phase equation might be of the second order in time. We then conclude that a deep and exhaustive study of the invariance properties of the dynamical and thermodynamic equations is the most correct and appropriate way for understanding the triggering mechanism leading to intrinsic plasma-rotation in toroidal magnetic configurations.

  10. Shape reconstruction of merging spherical tokamak plasma in UTST device

    Ushiki, Tomohiko; Itagaki, Masafumi; Inomoto, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    Spherical tokamak (ST) merging method is one of the ST start-up methods which heats the plasma through magnetic reconnection. In the present study reconstruction of eddy current profile and plasma shape was performed during spherical tokamak merging only using external sensor signals by the Cauchy condition surface (CCS) method. CCS method have been implemented for JT-60 (QST), QUEST (Kyushu University), KSTAR (NFRI), RELAX (KIT), and LHD (Nifs). In this method, CCS was assumed inside each plasmas, where both flux function and its normal derivative are unknown. Effect of plasma current was replaced by the boundary condition of CCS, assuming vacuum field everywhere. Also, the nodal points for the boundary integrals of eddy current density were set using quadratic elements in order to express the complicated vacuum vessel shape. Reconstructed profiles of the eddy current and the magnetic flux were well coincided with the reference in each phase of merging process. Magnetic sensor installation plan for UTST was determined from these calculation results. This work was supported by the JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus''.

  11. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas

    Green, David L [ORNL; Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL; Canik, John [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Observations of improved radio frequency (RF) heating efficiency in high-confinement (H-) mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. We present the first full-wave simulation to couple kinetic physics of the well confined core plasma to the poorly confined scrape-off plasma. The new simulation is used to scan the launched fast-wave spectrum and examine the steady-state electric wave field structure for experimental scenarios corresponding to both reduced, and improved RF heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave-numbers that required for fast-wave propagation excites large amplitude (kVm 1 ) coaxial standing modes in the wave electric field between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggest these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency. Also, the H-mode density pedestal and fast-wave cutoff within the confined plasma allow for the excitation of whispering gallery type eigenmodes localised to the plasma edge.

  12. Litization of FTU tokamak vacuum vessel by using a Li limiter

    Mazzitelli, Giuseppe; Apicella, Maria Laura; Lazarev, Vladimir; Azizov, E. A.; Mirnov, S. V.; Petrov, Vladimir; Vertkov, Alexei; Evtikhin, V. A.; Lyublinski, I. E.

    2003-10-01

    The idea to use lithium, a low Z metallic material, for the first wall protection of the tokamak-reactor was known for a rather long time. However practical application of lithium on experimental installations began rather recently. Litization - the coating of tokamak vacuum vessel walls by a thin lithium film is one of methods for protection of plasma from high Z impurities fluxes. A possible method for litization of the vacuum walls is by sputtering and evaporation of a Li limiter . This method utilizes a new concept of limiter on the basis of capillary-porous structure (CPS), having a sufficient mechanical stability (Li confinement). Furthermore the proposed experiment aims to study the liquid Li erosion, Li accumulation and distribution in plasma, thermal load reduction on the limiter due to Li radiation losses in a medium size tokamak as FTU.

  13. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  14. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fusion product activation probe experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Äkäslompolo, S.; Bonheure, G.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-10-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material making it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitates, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within a factor of about two, which can be considered a quite good result considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations.Also an alternative to the present probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized orientation could measure the flux from a significantly larger part of the plasma. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  15. Experimental characteristics of a lower hybrid wave multi-junction coupler in the HT-7 tokamak

    Ding Bo-Jiang; Jiang Min; Zhang Gong-Rang; Huang Feng; Zhao Yan-Ping; Kuang Guang-Li; HT-7 team; Shan Jia-Fang; Liu Fu-Kun; Fang Yu-De; Wei Wei; Wu Zhen-Wei; Chen Zhong-Yong; Xu Han-Dong; Wang Mao

    2006-01-01

    A phase-controlled lower hybrid wave (LHW) multi-junction (M J) coupler (3(rows)×4(columns)×4 (subwaveguides)) has been developed in the HT-7 tokamak. Simulations show that it is more effective for driving plasma current than an ordinary phase-controlled LHW antenna (3(rows)× 12(columns)) (traditional coupler). The plasma-wave coupling experiments show that the reflection coefficient (RC) is below 10%, implying that the MJ grill can launch the wave into the plasma effectively. The effect of power spectrum launched by the MJ coupler on RC indicates that an optimal condition is requisite for a better coupling in the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments. Studies indicate that the drive efficiency of the MJ antenna is higher than that of the traditional one, which is mainly ascribed to the discrepancy in impurity concentration, plasma temperature, and spectrum directivity. An improved confinement with an electron internal transport barrier is obtained by LHCD. The analysis shows that the modified negative (low)magnetic shear and the change of radial electric field profile due to LHCD are possible factors responsible for the eITB formation.

  16. Soft X-ray tomography in support of impurity control in tokamaks

    Mlynar, J.; Mazon, D.; Imrisek, M.; Loffelmann, V.; Malard, P.; Odstrcil, T.; Tomes, M.; Vezinet, D.; Weinzettl, V.

    2016-10-01

    This contribution reviews an important example of current developments in diagnostic systems and data analysis tools aimed at improved understanding and control of transport processes in magnetically confined high temperature plasmas. The choice of tungsten for the plasma facing components of ITER and probably also DEMO means that impurity control in fusion plasmas is now a crucial challenge. Soft X-ray (SXR) diagnostic systems serve as a key sensor for experimental studies of plasma impurity transport with a clear prospective of its control via actuators based mainly on plasma heating systems. The SXR diagnostic systems typically feature high temporal resolution but limited spatial resolution due to access restrictions. In order to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the SXR radiation from line integrated measurements, appropriate tomographic methods have been developed and validated, while novel numerical methods relevant for real-time control have been proposed. Furthermore, in order to identify the main contributors to the SXR plasma radiation, at least partial control over the spectral sensitivity range of the detectors would be beneficial, which motivates for developments of novel SXR diagnostic methods. Last, but not least, semiconductor photosensitive elements cannot survive in harsh conditions of future fusion reactors due to radiation damage, which calls for development of radiation hard SXR detectors. Present research in this field is exemplified on recent results from tokamaks COMPASS, TORE SUPRA and the Joint European Torus JET. Further planning is outlined.

  17. Plasma current start-up using the lower hybrid wave on the TST-2 spherical tokamak

    Takase, Y.; Ejiri, A.; Inada, T.; Moeller, C. P.; Shinya, T.; Tsujii, N.; Yajima, S.; Furui, H.; Homma, H.; Imamura, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K.; Sonehara, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Togashi, H.; Tsuda, S.; Yoshida, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Non-inductive plasma current start-up, ramp-up and sustainment by waves in the lower hybrid wave (LHW) frequency range at 200 MHz were investigated on the TST-2 spherical tokamak (R0 ≤ 0.38 m, a ≤ 0.25 m, Bt0 ≤ 0.3T, Ip ≤ 0.14 MA). Experimental results obtained using three types of antenna were compared. Both the highest plasma current (Ip = 18 kA) and the highest current drive figure of merit ηCD≡n¯eIpR0/PRF=1.4 ×1017 A/W/m2 were achieved using the capacitively-coupled combline (CCC) antenna, designed to excite the LHW with a sharp and highly directional wavenumber spectrum. For Ip greater than about 5 kA, high energy electrons accelerated by the LHW become the dominant carrier of plasma current. The low value of ηCD observed so far are believed to be caused by a rapid loss of energetic electrons and parasitic losses of the LHW energy in the plasma periphery. ηCD is expected to improve by an order of magnitude by increasing the plasma current to improve energetic electron confinement. In addition, edge power losses are expected to be reduced by increasing the toroidal magnetic field to improve wave accessibility to the plasma core, and by launching the LHW from the inboard upper region of the torus to achieve better single-pass absorption.

  18. Adjoint Monte Carlo Simulation of Fusion Product Activation Probe Experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Tardini, Giovanni; Kurki-Suonio, Taina

    2015-01-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material makig it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte-Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitated, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within 40%, which can be considered remarkable considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations. Also an alternative probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized...

  19. Interaction between fast ions and ion cyclotron heating in a tokamak plasma; Interaction des ions rapides avec les ondes a la frequence cyclotronique ionique dans un plasma de tokamak

    Bergeaud, V

    2001-11-01

    In an ignited fusion reactor, the plasma temperature is sustained by the fusion reactions. However, before this regime is reached, it is necessary to bring an additional power to the plasma. One of the methods that enables the coupling of power is the use of an electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). This thesis deals with the interaction between ICRF heating and the fast ions. The thesis contains a theoretical study of the influence of ICRF heating on the ion distribution function. A particular emphasis is put on the importance of the toroidal spectrum of the modes of propagation of the wave in the tokamak. It is necessary to take into account all these modes in order to correctly assess the strength of the wave particle interaction, especially for high energy particles (of the order of hundreds of keV). The classical treatment of the wave particle interaction is based on the hypothesis that the cyclotron phase of the particle and the wave phase are de-correlated between successive resonant interactions. One is therefore led to consider ICRF heating as a diffusive process. This hypothesis is reconsidered in this thesis and it is shown that strong correlations exist in a large part of the velocity space. For this study, a numerical code that computes the full trajectory of particles interacting with a complete electromagnetic field has been developed. The thesis also deals with the problem of fast ion losses due to the breaking of the toroidal symmetry of the confinement magnetic field (called the ripple modulation). Between two toroidal coils, local magnetic wells exist, and particles can be trapped there. When trapped they undergo a vertical drift that makes them quit the plasma rapidly. The ripple modulation also causes an enhancement of the radial diffusion, thereby increasing the losses. A Monte Carlo model describing these mechanisms is presented. This model is validated thanks to a comparison with an experimental database from

  20. Interaction of fast ions with ion cyclotron electromagnetic waves in tokamak plasma; Interaction des ions rapides avec les ondes a la frequence cyclotronique ionique dans un plasma de tokamak

    Bergeaud, V

    2000-12-01

    In an ignited fusion reactor, the plasma temperature is sustained by the fusion reactions. However, before this regime is reached, it is necessary to bring an additional power to the plasma. One of the methods that enables the coupling of power is the use of an electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). This thesis deals with the interaction between ICRF heating and the fast ions. The thesis contains a theoretical study of the influence of ICRF heating on the ion distribution function. A particular emphasis is put on the importance of the toroidal spectrum of the modes of propagation of the wave in the tokamak. It is necessary to take into account all these modes in order to correctly assess the strength of the wave particle interaction, especially for high energy particles (of the order of hundreds of keV). The classical treatment of the wave particle interaction is based on the hypothesis that the cyclotron phase of the particle and the wave phase are de-correlated between successive resonant interactions. One is therefore led to consider ICRF heating as a diffusive process. This hypothesis is reconsidered in this thesis and it is shown that strong correlations exist in a large part of the velocity space. For this study, a numerical code that computes the full trajectory of particles interacting with a complete electromagnetic field has been developed. The thesis also deals with the problem of fast ion losses due to the breaking of the toroidal symmetry of the confinement magnetic field (called the ripple modulation). Between two toroidal coils, local magnetic wells exist, and particles can be trapped there. When trapped they undergo a vertical drift that makes them quit the plasma rapidly. The ripple modulation also causes an enhancement of the radial diffusion, thereby increasing the losses. A Monte Carlo model describing these mechanisms is presented. This model is validated thanks to a comparison with an experimental database from