WorldWideScience

Sample records for magnetically confined tokamak

  1. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  2. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization.

  3. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM'y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nTτ's ∼ 2.5x greater than ELM'ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices

  4. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM`y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nT{tau}`s {approximately} 2.5x greater than ELM`ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices.

  5. Turbulence, transport and confinement: from tokamaks to star magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is part of the general study of self-organization in hot and magnetized plasmas. We focus our work on two specific objects: stars and tokamaks. We use first principle numerical simulations to study turbulence, transport and confinement in these plasmas. The first part of this thesis introduces the main characteristics of stellar and tokamak plasmas. The reasons for studying them together are properly detailed. The second part is focused on stellar aspects. We study the interactions between the 3D turbulent motions in the solar convection zone with an internal magnetic field in the tachocline (the transition region between the instable and stable zones in the Sun). The tachocline is a very thin layer (less than five percent of the solar radius) that acts as a transport barrier of angular momentum. We show that such an internal magnetic field is not likely to explain the observed thickness of the tachocline and we give some insights on how to find alternative mechanisms to constrain it. We also explore the effect of the environment of star on its structure. We develop a methodology to study the influence of stellar wind and of the magnetic coupling of a star with its orbiting planets. We use the same methodology to analyse the magnetic interaction between a stellar wind and a planetary magnetosphere that acts as a transport barrier of matter. Then, the third part is dedicated to fusion oriented research. We present a numerical investigation on the experimental mechanisms that lead to the development of transport barriers in the plasma. These barriers are particularly important for the design of high performance fusion devices. The creation of transport barriers is obtained in turbulent first principle simulations for the very first time. The collaboration between the two scientific teams lead to the results presented in the fourth part of this thesis. An original spectral method is developed to analyse the saturation of stellar convective dynamos and of

  6. Confinement of a self-stabilized tokamak under average magnetic well conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that the average favorable magnetic curvature of a tokamak is stabilizing with respect to pressure-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities at low beta and that self-stabilization occurs at finite beta in the so-called second stability regime. Here we self-consistently investigate how these two effects, viz., the mean magnetic well and the self-stabilization, influence the energy confinement time in a tokamak, using the ballooning mode transport model

  7. Correlation among plasma rotation, magnetic configurations and improved confinement regimes on the DIII-D Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alladio, F.; Micozzi, P. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1995-12-01

    A correlation has been established between the improvement of the energy confinement time observed in some plasma regimes on the DIII-D tokamak (VH modes and shear reversed discharges) and a geometrical characteristic of the plasma column: the Pfirsch-Schluter-like factor, which multiplies the moment of inertia of the magnetic configuration. Such a quantity is generated by the compression that the flux tubes suffer going from the external to the internal part of the torus. Therefore the configurations in which the module of the total magnetic field is more constant upon the magnetic surfaces (near omnigeneous configurations) show a lower value of the moment of inertia. The geometric parameter of Pfirsch-Schluter determines the transient and steady state behaviour of the plasma rotation under the assumption that the anomalous parallel viscosity is greater that the neoclassical one. In this way, also the profile of the part of the radial electric field (and his absolute value) is influenced by the magnetic configuration. The radial electric field, or, at least, his radial derivative, is invoked by many authors as a principal factor in reducing the turbulence (and so the anomalous transport) in magnetically confined plasmas. In particular, DIII-D machine, the highly elongated and triangular plasma discharges that evolve toward the VH-mode show a lower value of the Pfirsch-Schluter quantity and a higher level of the radial electric field; also the shear reversed profiles tend to lower 1+2q{sup 2} in the central region of the plasma column, driving towards very high values of the electric field within the reversal region.

  8. Confinement and diffusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of electric field fluctuations on confinement and diffusion in tokamak is discussed. Based on the experimentally determined cross-field turbolent diffusion coefficient, D∼3.7*cTe/eB(δni/ni)rms which is also derived by a simple theory, the cross-field diffusion time, tp=a2/D, is calculated and compared to experimental results from 51 tokamak for standard Ohmic operation

  9. Magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is a compact, high-magnetic-field tokamak capable of operating at density and magnetic field values similar to, or even encompassing, those of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore physics issues that are directly relevant to ITER. During 2004 the experimental activities were focussed on fully exploiting the lower hybrid system (for generating and controlling the plasma current) and the electron cyclotron heating system (joint experiment with the Institute of Plasma Physics of the National Research Council, Milan). With all four gyrotrons in operation, full electron cyclotron power was achieved up to a record level of 1.5 MW. By simultaneously injecting lower hybrid waves, to tailor the plasma current radial profile, and electron cyclotron waves, to heat the plasma centre, good confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma density values ever achieved for this operation regime (n {approx}1.5X10{sup 20}m{sup -3}). Specific studies were devoted to optimising the coupling of lower hybrid waves to the plasma (by real-time control of the plasma position) and to generating current by electron cyclotron current drive. The new scanning CO{sub 2} interferometer (developed by the Reversed Field Experiment Consortium) for high spatial and time resolution (1 cm/50 {mu}s) density profile measurements was extensively used. The Thomson scattering diagnostic was upgraded and enabled observation of scattered signals associated with the Confinement background plasma dynamics. As for theoretical studies on the dynamics of turbulence in plasmas, the transition from Bohm-like scaling to gyro-Bohm scaling of the local plasma diffusivity was demonstrated on the basis of a generalised four wave model (joint collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine). The transition from weak to strong

  10. The 2008 Public Release of the International Multi-tokamak Confinement Profile Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roach, C. M.; Walters, M.; Budny, R. V.; Imbeaux, F.; Fredian, T. W.; Greenwald, M.; Stillerman, J. A.; Alexander, D. A.; Carlsson, J.; Cary, J. R.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.; Murakami, M.; Bracco, G.; Esposito, B.; Romanelli, M.; Parail, V.; Stubberfield, P.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Brickley, C.; Field, A. R.; Sakamoto, Y.; Fujita, T.; Fukuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Chudnovskiy, A.; Kinerva, N. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Aniel, T.; Hoang, G. T.; Ongena, J.; Doyle, E. J.; Houlberg, W. A.; Polevoi, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper documents the public release PR08 of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database, which should be of particular interest to the magnetic confinement fusion community. Data from a wide variety of interesting discharges from many of the world's leading tokamak ex

  11. Tokamak plasma self-organization-synergetics of magnetic trap plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razumova, K. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Eliseev, L. G.; Kislov, A. Y.; La Haye, R. J.; Lysenko, S. E.; Melnikov, A. V.; Notkin, G. E.; Pavlov, Y. D.; Kantor, M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of a wide range of experimental results in plasma magnetic confinement investigations shows that in most cases, plasmas are self-organized. In the tokamak case, it is realized in the self-consistent pressure profile, which permits the tokamak plasma to be macroscopically MHD stable. Existin

  12. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — tokamaks and stellarators — will be introduced and described. The first fusion reactor, ITER, and the most modern stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X, are under construction. Their basic features and objectives will be presented.

  13. Enhanced Energy Confinement and Performance in a Low-Recycling Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive lithium wall coatings and liquid lithium plasma-limiting surfaces reduce recycling, with dramatic improvements in Ohmic plasma discharges in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade. Global energy confinement times increase by up to 6 times. These results exceed confinement scalings such as ITER98P(y,1) by 2-3 times, and represent the largest increase in energy confinement ever observed for an Ohmic tokamak plasma. Measurements of Dα emission indicate that global recycling coefficients decrease to approximately 0.3, the lowest documented for a magnetically confined hydrogen plasma

  14. Magnetic confinement fusion plasma theory, Task 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on a few key tokamak plasma confinement and heating theory issues: extensive development of a new Chapman-Enskog-like fluid/kinetic hybrid approach to deriving rigorously valid fluid moment equations; applications (neoclassical viscous force, instabilities in the banana-plateau collisionality regime, nonlinear gyroviscous force, unified plasma microinstability equations and their implications, semi-collisional presheath modeling, etc.) of this new formalism; interactions of fluctuating bootstrap-current-driven magnetic islands; determination of net transport processes and equations for a tokamak; and some other topics (extracting more information from heat-pulse-propagation data, modeling of BES fluctuation data, exploring sawtooth effects on energy confinement in DIII-D, divertor X-point modeling). Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the local NERSC node and fusion theory DECstation 5000 at UW-Madison are summarized briefly in this report

  15. Magnetic turbulence in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a discussion of the disruption process, it is concluded that this process plausibly consists of the onset of a fine grain turbulence. This turbulence must be able to produce the large values of the inductive electric field which are associated with the reorganization of the poloidal flux and the current density on the magnetic surfaces. It is then plausible that the turbulence belongs to a class of 'rippling' modes, that may explain the experimental values for the magnetic perturbations corresponding to a substantial radial ergodicity of the flux lines. The stability of the modes in the presence of such an ergodicity is accordingly considered. It is found that the modes may be unstable even in collisionless regime, the ergodicity playing a role similar to the resistivity to partially remove the M.H.D. constraint

  16. Magnetic diagnostics for the lithium tokamak experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzak, L; Kaita, R; Kozub, T; Majeski, R; Zakharov, L

    2008-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak with R(0)=0.4 m, a=0.26 m, B(TF) approximately 3.4 kG, I(P) approximately 400 kA, and pulse length approximately 0.25 s. The focus of LTX is to investigate the novel low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. This regime is reached by placing an in-vessel shell conformal to the plasma last closed flux surface. The shell is heated and then coated with liquid lithium. An extensive array of magnetic diagnostics is available to characterize the experiment, including 80 Mirnov coils (single and double axis, internal and external to the shell), 34 flux loops, 3 Rogowskii coils, and a diamagnetic loop. Diagnostics are specifically located to account for the presence of a secondary conducting surface and engineered to withstand both high temperatures and incidental contact with liquid lithium. The diagnostic set is therefore fabricated from robust materials with heat and lithium resistance and is designed for electrical isolation from the shell and to provide the data required for highly constrained equilibrium reconstructions. PMID:19044600

  17. Energy Confinement of High-Density Pellet-Fueled Plasmas in the Alcator C Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, M.; Gwinn, D.; Milora, S.; Parker, J.; Parker, R.; Wolfe, S.; Besen, M.; Camacho, F.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Foord, M.; Gandy, R.; Gomez, C.; Granetz, R.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Lloyd, B.; Marmar, E.; McCool, S.; Pappas, D.; Petrasso, R.; Pribyl, P.; Rice, J.; Schuresko, D.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Watterson, R.

    1984-07-01

    A series of pellet-fueling experiments has been carried out on the Alcator C tokamak. High-speed hydrogen pellets penetrate to within a few centimeters of the magnetic axis, raise the plasma density, and produce peaked density profiles. Energy confinement is observed to increase over similar discharges fueled only by gas puffing. In this manner record values of electron density, plasma pressure, and Lawson number (n τ) have been achieved.

  18. Calculation about a modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part I; Calculo sobre una modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak Novillo. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez A, E.; Melendez L, L.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1991-07-15

    The charged particles that constitute the plasma in the tokamaks are located in magnetic fields that determine its behavior. The poloidal magnetic field of the plasma current and the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak possess relatively big gradients, which produce drifts on these particles. These drifts are largely the cause of the continuous lost of particles and of energy of the confinement region. In this work the results of numerical calculations of a modification to the 'traditional' toroidal magnetic field that one waits it diminishes the drifts by gradient and improve the confinement properties of the tokamaks. (Author)

  19. Improvement of confinement characteristics of tokamak plasma by controlling plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relation between plasma-wall interactions and confinement characteristics of a tokamak plasma with respect to both impurity and fuel particle controls is discussed. Following results are obtained from impurity control studies: (1) Ion sputtering is the dominant mechanism of impurity release in a steady state tokamak discharge. (2) By applying carbon coating on entire first wall of DIVA tokamak, dominant radiative region is concentrated more in boundary plasma resulting a hot peripheral plasma with cold boundary plasma. (3) A physical model of divertor functions about impurity control is empilically obtained. By a computer simulation based on above model with respect to divertor functions for JT-60 tokamak, it is found that the allowable electron temperature of the divertor plasma is not restricted by a condition that the impurity release due to ion sputtering does not increase continuously. (4) Dense and cold divertor plasma accompanied with strong remote radiative cooling was diagnosed along the magnetic field line in the simple poloidal divertor of DOUBLET III tokamak. Strong particle recycling region is found to be localized near the divertor plate. by and from particle control studies: (1) The INTOR scaling on energy confinement time is applicable to high density region when a core plasma is fueled directly by solid deuterium pellet injection in DOUBLET III tokamak. (2) As remarkably demonstrated by direct fueling with pellet injection, energy confinement characteristics can be improved at high density range by decreasing particle deposition at peripheral plasma in order to reduce plasma-wall interaction. (3) If the particle deposition at boundary layer is necessarily reduced, the electron temperature at the boundary or divertor region increases due to decrease of the particle recycling and the electron density there. (J.P.N.)

  20. Magnetic surfaces of toroidal helical fields in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to analyse theoretically the disruptive instability that occurs in confined plasmas in tokamaks, through investigation of the influence of resonant helical fields on their equilibrium; With this aim, a superposition of the magnetic field of the plasma in static MHD equilibrium with the field associated with the resonances is considered, taking into account the toroidal geometry of the tokamak. Due to the lack of symmetry, the lines of the total magnetic field resulting from this superposition must form magnetic surfaces only around some regions of the plasma. using the averaging method, functions of approximate magnetic surfaces are obtained (analytically) around the regions of resonances of the plasma (they contain the lines of this total magnetic field). It was verified that these approximate surfaces have structures of magnetic islands. (author)

  1. West European magnetic confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a technical assessment and review of the West European program in magnetic confinement fusion by a panel of US scientists and engineers active in fusion research. Findings are based on the scientific and technical literature, on laboratory reports and preprints, and on the personal experiences and collaborations of the panel members. Concerned primarily with developments during the past 10 years, from 1979 to 1989, the report assesses West European fusion research in seven technical areas: tokamak experiments; magnetic confinement technology and engineering; fusion nuclear technology; alternate concepts; theory; fusion computations; and program organization. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis is that West European fusion research has attained a position of leadership in the international fusion program. This distinction reflects in large measure the remarkable achievements of the Joint European Torus (JET). However, West European fusion prominence extends beyond tokamak experimental physics: the program has demonstrated a breadth of skill in fusion science and technology that is not excelled in the international effort. It is expected that the West European primacy in central areas of confinement physics will be maintained or even increased during the early 1990s. The program's maturity and commitment kindle expectations of dramatic West European advances toward the fusion energy goal. For example, achievement of fusion breakeven is expected first in JET, before 1995

  2. Magnetic mirror confinement concepts system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics: world survey of mirror confinement research facilities; data base on mirror confinement program budget milestone; Fokker-Planck modeling of tandem mirror confinement; review of diagnostic capabilities for tandem mirror research; tandem mirror reactor concept development; tandem mirror data base; and primer on tokamak confinement

  3. Issues in tokamak/stellarator transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the mechanism for anomalous energy transport in low-β toroidal plasmas -- tokamaks and stellarators -- remains unclear, although transport by turbulent E x B velocities associated with nonlinear, fine-scale microinstabilities is a leading candidate. This article discusses basic theoretical concepts of various transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms as well as experimental ramifications which would enable one to distinguish among them and hence identify a dominant transport mechanism. While many of the predictions of fine-scale turbulence are born out by experiment, notable contradictions exist. Projections of ignition margin rest both on the scaling properties of the confinement mechanism and on the criteria for entering enhanced confinement regimes. At present, the greatest uncertainties lie with the basis for scaling confinement enhancement criteria. A series of questions, to be answered by new experimental/theoretical work, is posed to resolve these outstanding contradictions (or refute the fine-scale turbulence model) and to establish confinement enhancement criteria. 73 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  5. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved

  6. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  7. High Confinement Mode and Edge Localized Mode Characteristics in a Near-Unity Aspect Ratio Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, K E; Bongard, M W; Barr, J L; Bodner, G M; Burke, M G; Fonck, R J; Kriete, D M; Perry, J M; Schlossberg, D J

    2016-04-29

    Tokamak experiments at near-unity aspect ratio A≲1.2 offer new insights into the self-organized H-mode plasma confinement regime. In contrast to conventional A∼3 plasmas, the L-H power threshold P_{LH} is ∼15× higher than scaling predictions, and it is insensitive to magnetic topology, consistent with modeling. Edge localized mode (ELM) instabilities shift to lower toroidal mode numbers as A decreases. These ultralow-A operations enable heretofore inaccessible J_{edge}(R,t) measurements through an ELM that show a complex multimodal collapse and the ejection of a current-carrying filament.

  8. Effect of density changes on tokamak plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2015-01-01

    A change of the particle density (by gas puff, pellets or impurity seeding) during the plasma discharge in tokamak produces a radial current and implicitly a torque and rotation that can modify the state of confinement. After ionization the newly born ions will evolve toward the periodic neoclassical orbits (trapped or circulating) but the first part of their excursion, which precedes the periodicity, is an effective radial current. It is short, spatially finite and unique for each new ion, but multiplied by the rate of ionization and it can produce a substantial total radial current. The associated torque induces rotation which modify the transport processes. We derive the magnitude of the radial current induced by ionization by three methods: the analysis of a simple physical picture, a numerical model and the neoclassical drift-kinetic treatment. The results of the three approaches are in agreement and show that the current can indeed be substantial. Many well known experimental observations can be reconsi...

  9. Magnetic well for plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multipole magnetic well for plasma confinement includes a plurality of current-carrying coils placed on planes corresponding to the facets of a regular polyhedron that can be symmetrically circumscribed about a sphere. The direction of current in the coils is such as to minimize the flux density at the center of the polyhedron, thereby providing a confinement well with three-dimensional symmetry having an increasing flux density in all directions from the center. 16 claims, 18 figures

  10. Fusion plasma theory grant: Task 1, Magnetic confinement fusion plasma theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on key tokamak plasma confinement and heating theory issues: further development of neoclassical MHD; development of a new fluid/kinetic hybrid model; energy confinement degradation due to macroscopic phenomena in tokamaks; and some other topics (magnetics analysis, coherent structures, presheath structure). Progress and publications in these areas are briefly summarized in this report. 20 refs

  11. Magnetic sensor for steady state tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyatani, Yuzuru; Mori, Katsuharu; Oguri, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    A new type of magnetic sensor has been developed for the measurement of steady state magnetic fields without DC-drift such as integration circuit. The electromagnetic force induced to the current which leads to the sensor was used for the measurement. For the high frequency component which exceeds higher than the vibration frequency of sensor, pick-up coil was used through the high pass filter. From the results using tokamak discharges, this sensor can measure the magnetic field in the tokamak discharge. During {approx}2 hours measurement, no DC drift was observed. The sensor can respond {approx}10ms of fast change of magnetic field during disruptions. We confirm the extension of measured range to control the current which leads to the sensor. (author).

  12. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Tokamak Fusion Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB[sub 6] biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V[sub bias] [le] 50 V and I[sub inj] [ge] 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A.

  13. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Tokamak Fusion Lab.

    1992-10-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB{sub 6} biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V{sub bias} {le} 50 V and I{sub inj} {ge} 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A.

  14. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  15. Distributed chaos and solitons at the edges of magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown, using results of measurements of ion saturation current in the plasma edges of different magnetic fusion confinement devices (tokamaks and stellarators), that the plasma dynamics in the edges is dominated by distributed chaos with spontaneously broken translational symmetry at low magnetic field, and with spontaneously broken reflexional symmetry (by helical solitons) at high magnetic field.

  16. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner F

    2013-01-01

    Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — t...

  17. Magnetic confinement of cosmic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Michel; Thompson, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the magnetic field in the confinement or compression of interstellar gas clouds is reconsidered. The virial theorem for an isolated magnetized cloud in the presence of distant magnetic sources is reformulated in terms of moments of the internal and external currents, and an equilibrium condition is derived. This condition is applied to the interaction between isolated clouds for the simple- and artificial-case in which the field of each cloud is a dipole. With the simplest of statistical assumptions, the probability of any given cloud being compressed is calculated as about 10 percent, the magnetic field acting as a medium which transmits the kinetic pressure between clouds. Even when compression occurs the magnetic pressure 1/2 B-squared may decrease on leaving the cloud surface.

  18. Density Limits in Toroidal Magnetic Confinement Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2001-10-01

    The density limit represents one of the fundamental operating boundaries for magnetic confinement devices - one with practical importance to the goal of fusion power. With fusion reactivity maximized at a plasma temperature on the order of 10 keV and a reaction rate scaling as n^2, an optimum density can be calculated which is not guaranteed to be achievable in any given device. Unlike operational limits for plasma current or pressure, the density limit cannot be explained by magneto-hydrodynamics alone. There is general agreement that the proximate cause for the disruptive limit in the tokamak is cooling of the plasma edge and subsequent current profile shrinkage. The edge cooling may be dominated by atomic physics processes or as suggested in recent experiments, by anomalous transport. A similar picture is emerging for the reversed field pinch (RFP), while the limit in stellarators is apparently due to loss of thermal equilibrium from radiation. Empirical scaling laws in which the maximum plasma density is proportional to the average current density have been fairly successful in predicting the limit for subsequent experiments. Surprisingly, the density limits found in tokamaks and RFPs are virtually identical. Currentless stellarators reach similar density limits, though the expression needs to be recast in terms of the rotational transform. While scaling laws have done a reasonable job in describing data from many recent experiments, they can only give hints at the underlying physics. Understanding the mechanism for the density limit is crucial for extrapolating machine performance into untested regimes and so far, a completely satisfactory theory has not emerged. It seems likely that robust, reliable predictions will only come from the development of a first-principles theory backed up by detailed experimental observations. The extensive work already accomplished and reviewed here should provide a solid basis for such development.

  19. Review of compact, alternate concepts for magnetic confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a study of compact alternate magnetic confinement fusion experiments and conceptual reactor designs. The purpose of this study is to identify those devices with a potential to burn tritium in the near future. The bulk of the report is made up of a review of the following compact alternates: compact toroids, high power density tokamaks, linear magnetic systems, compact mirrors, reversed field pinches and some miscellaneous concepts. Bumpy toruses and stellarators were initially reviewed but were not pursued since no compact variations were found. Several of the concepts show promise of either burning tritium or evolving into tritium burning devices by the early 1990's: RIGGATRON, Ignitor, OHTE, Frascati Tokamak upgrade, several driven (low or negative net power) mirror experiments and several Reversed Field Pinch experiments that may begin operation around 1990. Of the above only the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade has had funds allocated. Also identified in this report are groups who may have tritium burning experiments in the mid to late 1990's. There is a discussion of the differences between the reviewed devices and the mainline tokamak experiments. This discussion forms the basis of recommendations for R and D aimed at the compact alternates and the applicability of the present CFFTP program to the needs of the compact alternates. These recommendations will be presented in a subsequent report

  20. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  1. Magnetic confinement fusion energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grad, H

    1977-03-01

    Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion offers probably the only relatively clean energy solution with completely inexhaustible fuel and unlimited power capacity. The scientific and technological problem consists in magnetically confining a hot, dense plasma (pressure several to hundreds of atmospheres, temperature 10/sup 8/ degrees or more) for an appreciable fraction of a second. The scientific and mathematical problem is to describe the behavior, such as confinement, stability, flow, compression, heating, energy transfer and diffusion of this medium in the presence of electromagnetic fields just as we now can for air or steam. Some of the extant theory consists of applications, routine or ingenious, of known mathematical structures in the theory of differential equations and in traditional analysis. Other applications of known mathematical structures offer surprises and new insights: the coordination between sub-supersonic and elliptic-hyperbolic is fractured; supersonic propagation goes upstream; etc. Other completely nonstandard mathematical structures with significant theory are being rapidly uncovered (and somewhat less rapidly understood) such as non-elliptic variational equations and new types of weak solutions. It is these new mathematical structures which one should expect to supply the foundation for the next generation's pure mathematics, if history is a guide. Despite the substantial effort over a period of some twenty years, there are still basic and important scintific and mathematical discoveries to be made, lying just beneath the surface.

  2. Confinement analysis in low-confinement mode of hydrogen isotope experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of isotope on confinement in high-recycling, L-mode plasmas is studied on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [see D. M. Meade, J. Fusion Energy 7, 107 (1988)] by comparing hydrogen and deuterium plasmas with the same magnetic field and similar electron densities and heating power, with both Ohmic and deuterium-neutral-beam heating. Following a long operational period in deuterium, nominally hydrogen plasmas were created through hydrogen glow discharge and hydrogen gas puffing in Ohmic plasmas, which saturated the exposed limiter surface with hydrogen and raised the H/(H+D) ratio from 10±3% to 65±5%. Ohmic deuterium discharges obtained higher stored energy and lower loop voltage than hydrogen discharges with similar limiter conditions. Neutral-beam power scans were conducted in L-mode plasmas at minor radii of 50 and 80 cm, with plasma currents of 0.7 and 1.4 MA. To minimize transport differences from the beam deposition profile and beam heating, deuterium neutral beams were used to heat the plasmas of both isotopes. Total stored energy increased approximately 20% from nominally hydrogen plasmas to deuterium plasmas during auxiliary heating. Of this increase about half can be attributed to purely classical differences in the energy content of unthermalized beam ions. Kinetic measurements indicate a consistent but small increase in central electron temperature and total stored electron energy in deuterium relative to hydrogen plasmas, but no change in total ion stored energy. No significant differences in particle transport, momentum transport, and sawtooth behavior are observed. Overall, only a small improvement (∼10%) in global energy confinement time of the thermal plasma is seen between operation in hydrogen and deuterium. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The ofly potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting torgidal magnets. It is found that the two general classificatigls of protectign methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which aldow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed

  4. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  5. Numerical modeling of the transition from low to high confinement in magnetically confined plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    The transition dynamics from low (L) to high (H) mode confinement in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a four-field drift fluid model—HESEL (Hot Edge-Sol-Electrostatic). The model includes profile evolution and is solved in a 2D domain at the out-board mid-plane of a tokamak......–I–H transition with an intermediate I-phase displaying limit-cycle oscillations (LCO). The model recovers the power threshold for the L–H transition, the scaling of the threshold with the density and with the loss-rate in the SOL, indicating a decrease in power threshold when switching from single to double null...

  6. Visualization of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid developments in experimental and theoretical fusion energy research towards more geometric details, visualization plays an increasingly important role. In this paper we will give an overview of how visualization can be used to compare and contrast some different configurations for future fusion reactors. Specifically we will focus on the stellarator and tokamak concepts. In order to gain understanding of the underlying fundamental differences and similarities these two competing concepts are compared and contrasted by visualizing some key attributes

  7. Statistical analysis of the global energy confinement time in ohmic discharges in the ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ohmic discharges in all tokamaks at low plasma densities the global energy confinement time, τE, increases almost linearly with the density (LOC, linear ohmic confinement). In tokamaks with sufficiently large dimensions, τE saturates at a critical density (ASDEX bar ne- ≅ 3 x 1019 m-3) and is nearly constant at higher densities (SOC, saturated ohmic confinement). In the same density region some experiments report a further confinement regime for deuterium discharges in which τE exceeds the saturated value and is further increased (IOC, improved ohmic confinement). There the global energy confinement time roughly behaves as in the LOC regime. For both the LOC and the SOC regimes an isotope effect, i.e. the dependence of τ on the ion mass, is reported as an additional aspect of the ohmic energy confinement. A statistical analysis is performed to identify the parameters which are responsible for the properties of the energy confinement in these discharges in ASDEX. In contrast to earlier reports on confinement time scalings in ASDEX OH, only discharges with a full experimental description of kinetic electron and ion parameters, i.e. profiles of densities, temperatures and Zeff, are used to evaluate the energy contents of both species. By means of statistics it is shown that the characteristics of τE are mainly caused by the behaviour of the electron energy flux and the ohmic input power. The ion energy flux, does not play a significant role. Furthermore, the IOC regime is explained as a continuation of the low-density LOC regime. Both the isotope effect and the density dependence of τE are caused by features of the electron energy transport. (Author)

  8. Experimental Phenomena of Improved Ohmic Confinement Induced by Modulated Toroidal Current on the HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛剑珊; 罗家融; P.Phillips; 赵君煜; 揭银先; 吴振伟; 胡立群; 李建刚

    2002-01-01

    The phenomena of improved ohmic confinement have been observed during the modulation of the toroidal curranton the Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). In the experiment, the programming ohmic heating field wasmodulated. A toroidal frequency-modulated current induced by modulated loop voltage was added on the plasmaequilibrium current. The ratio of ac amplitude of the plasma current to the main plasma current is about 12-30%.These improved plasma confinement phenomena include the facts that the average electron density and the centralelectron temperature both increase, the Dα radiation from the edge is reduced, the magnetohydrodynamics isobviously suppressed by oscillating plasma current, eand the global energy confinement time increases by 27-45%o.It is found that the faster the modulation is, the more effective the improved ohmic confinement phase.

  9. Scale size of magnetic turbulence in tokamaks probed with 30-MeV electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entrop; Lopes Cardozo NJ; Jaspers; Finken

    2000-04-17

    Measurements of synchrotron radiation emitted by 30-MeV runaway electrons in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak show that the runaway population decays after switching on neutral beam injection (NBI). The decay starts only with a significant delay, which decreases with increasing NBI heating power. This delay provides direct evidence of the energy dependence of runaway confinement, which is expected if magnetic modes govern the loss of runaways. Application of the theory by Mynick and Strachan [Phys. Fluids 24, 695 (1981)] yields estimates for the "mode width" (delta) of magnetic perturbations: delta<0.5 cm in Ohmic discharges, increasing to delta = 4.4 cm for 0. 6 MW NBI.

  10. Economic evaluation of fissile fuel production using resistive magnet tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of resistive magnet tokamaks to fissile fuel production has been studied. Resistive magnets offer potential advantages over superconducting magnets in terms of robustness, less technology development required and possibility of demountable joints. Optimization studies within conservatively specified constraints for a compact machine result in a major radius of 3.81 m and 618 MW fusion power and a blanket space envelope of 0.35 m inboard and 0.75 m outboard. This machine is called the Resistive magnet Tokamak Fusion Breeder (RTFB). A computer code was developed to estimate the cost of the resistive magnet tokamak breeder. This code scales from STARFIRE values where appropriate and calculates costs of other systems directly. The estimated cost of the RTFB is $3.01 B in 1984 dollars. The cost of electricity on the same basis as STARFIRE is 42.4 mills/kWhre vs 44.9 mills/kWhre for STARFIRE (this does not include the fuel value or fuel cycle costs for the RTFB). The breakeven cost of U3O8 is $150/lb when compared to a PWR on the once through uranium fuel cycle with no inflation and escalation. On the same basis, the breakeven cost for superconducting tokamak and tandem mirror fusion breeders is $160/lb and $175/lb. Thus, the RTFB appears to be competitive in breakeven U3O8 cost with superconducting magnet fusion breeders and offers the potential advantages of resistive magnet technology

  11. Investigation of high energy runaway electron confinement in the Oak Ridge tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S. J.

    1977-11-01

    High energy runaway electrons in the Oak Ridge tokamak ORMAK have been investigated through measurement of the bremsstrahlung produced when these electrons leave the discharge and strike the limiting aperture of the torus. The experimental results have been interpreted in terms of a classical single-particle model appropriate for collisionless particles in a tokamak, and it has been found that most of the confinement properties of high energy runaways in ORMAK can be understood on this basis. An experiment designed to directly test this model has disclosed an anomalous transport which has been described by a runaway diffusion coefficient D approximately 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 4/ cm/sup 2//sec appropriate for runaways near the outside of the plasma. A discussion of the possible mechanisms for this anomalous transport is given.

  12. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ b\\bot\\text{ext}≈ {{10}-4}\\to {{10}-3}~\\text{T} ). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes (ELMs). At the same time, theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design (Loarte et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 033007). This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  13. Magnetic properties of confined electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of confinement by a two or three-dimensional harmonic potential on the magnetic properties of a free electron gas are investigated using the grand-canonical ensemble framework. At high temperatures an extension of Darwin's, Felderhof and Raval's works is made taking into account spin effects at low temperature. A comprehensive description of the magnetic properties of a free electron gas is given. The system is regarded as finite, but the boundary condition psi=0 is not introduced. The limits of weak and strong confinement are also analysed

  14. A Steady State Tokamak Operation by Use of Magnetic Monopoles

    OpenAIRE

    Narihara, K.

    1991-01-01

    A steady state tokamak operation based on a magnetic monopole circuit is considered. Circulation of a chain of iron cubes which trap magnetic monopoles generates the needed loop voltage. The monopole circuit is enclosed by a series of solenoid coils in which the magnetic field is feedback controlled so that the force on the circuit balance against the mechanical friction. The driving power is supplied through the current sources of poloidal, ohmic and solenoid coils. The current drive efficie...

  15. Design of Magnetic Measurement System on SUNIST Spherical Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Long; LIU Jun; WANG Ping; ZHANG Lu; HE Yexi; GAO Zhe; WANG Wenhao; XIE Lifeng; TAN Yi; ZHANG Liang; XIE Huiqiao; PENG Lili

    2008-01-01

    A magnetic measurement system consisting of magnetic probes and flux loops for spherical tokamak SUNIST,is uniquely designed due to the strongly shaped plasma cross section and the narrow space near the central solenoid.Plasma equilibrium reconstruction with the current filament method is performed to determine the number and positions of the magnetic probes and flux loops,as well as their design precision required.

  16. Role of runaway electrons in LHCD regimes with improved confinement on the CASTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitsekhovich, I. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stoeckel, J.; Zacek, F. [Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky, Prague (Czech Republic). Ustav Fyziky Plazmatu

    1993-12-31

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments in low density plasmas on ASDEX, CASTOR, WT-3, VERSATOR and HT-6B tokamaks demonstrated an improvement of the particle confinement at moderate lower hybrid powers (P{sub LH}). Moreover, the experiments have shown that a reduction of edge electrostatic fluctuations is probably responsible for this effect. However, the mechanism behind the reduction of fluctuations has remained unclear. Here we try to explain the reduction of fluctuations by enhanced population and non-ambipolar losses of runaway electrons with LHCD. (author) 8 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Robust analysis of trends in noisy tokamak confinement data using geodesic least squares regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoolaege, G.; Shabbir, A.; Hornung, G.

    2016-11-01

    Regression analysis is a very common activity in fusion science for unveiling trends and parametric dependencies, but it can be a difficult matter. We have recently developed the method of geodesic least squares (GLS) regression that is able to handle errors in all variables, is robust against data outliers and uncertainty in the regression model, and can be used with arbitrary distribution models and regression functions. We here report on first results of application of GLS to estimation of the multi-machine scaling law for the energy confinement time in tokamaks, demonstrating improved consistency of the GLS results compared to standard least squares.

  18. Distinct turbulence sources and confinement features in the spherical tokamak plasma regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. X. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ethier, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ren, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kaye, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Chen, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Startsev, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lu, Z. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). La Jolla, CA

    2015-10-30

    New turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in the spherical tokamak (ST) regime are identified through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) mode characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is shown to drive significant ion thermal transport in strongly rotating national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) L-modes. The long wavelength, quasi-coherent dissipative trapped electron mode (TEM) is destabilized in NSTX H-modes despite the presence of strong ExB shear, providing a robust turbulence source dominant over collisionless TEM. Dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM)-driven transport in the NSTX parametric regime is shown to increase with electron collision frequency, offering one possible source for the confinement scaling observed in experiments. There exists a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced collisionless trapped electron mode to DTEM transition for ST plasmas. This predicts a natural access to a minimum transport state in the low collisionality regime that future advanced STs may cover.

  19. Avoiding Tokamak disruptions by applying static magnetic fields that align locked modes with stabilizing wave-driven currents

    CERN Document Server

    Volpe, F A; La Haye, R J; Lanctot, M J; Lohr, J; Prater, R; Strait, E J; Welander, A

    2015-01-01

    Non-rotating (`locked') magnetic islands often lead to complete losses of confinement in tokamak plasmas, called major disruptions. Here locked islands were suppressed for the first time, by a combination of applied three-dimensional magnetic fields and injected millimetre waves. The applied fields were used to control the phase of locking and so align the island O-point with the region where the injected waves generated non-inductive currents. This resulted in stabilization of the locked island, disruption avoidance, recovery of high confinement and high pressure, in accordance with the expected dependencies upon wave power and relative phase between O-point and driven current.

  20. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-01

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. The physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  1. Tokamak Plasmas : Internal magnetic field measurement in tokamak plasmas using a Zeeman polarimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Jagadeeshwari; J Govindarajan

    2000-11-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the poloidal magnetic field profile closely depends on the current density profile. We can deduce the internal magnetic field from the analysis of circular polarization of the spectral lines emitted by the plasma. The theory of the measurement and a detailed design of the Zeeman polarimeter constructed to measure the poloidal field profile in the ADITYA tokamak are presented. The Fabry-Perot which we have employed in our design, with photodiode arrays followed by lock-in detection of the polarization signal, allows the measurement of the fractional circular polarization. In this system He-II line with wavelength 4686 Å is adopted as the monitoring spectral line. The line emission used in the present measurement is not well localized in the plasma, necessiating the use of a spatial inversion procedure to obtain the local values of the field.

  2. Energy confinement and transport of H-mode plasmas in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A characteristic feature of the high-confinement (H-mode) regime is the formation of a transport barrier near the plasma edge, where steepening of the density and temperature gradients is observed. The H-mode is expected to be a standard operation mode in a next-step fusion experimental reactor, called ITER-the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. However, energy confinement in the H-mode has been observed to degrade with increasing density. This is a critical constraint for the operation domain in the ITER. Investigation of the main cause of confinement degradation is an urgent issue in the ITER Physics Research and Development Activity. A key element for solving this problem is investigation of the energy confinement and transport properties of H-mode plasmas. However, the influence of the plasma boundary characterized by the transport barrier in H-modes on the energy transport of the plasma core has not been examined sufficiently in tokamak research. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the energy confinement properties of H-modes in a variety of density, plasma shape, seed impurity concentration, and conductive heat flux in the plasma core using the experimental results obtained in the JT-60U tokamak of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Comparison of the H-mode confinement properties with those of other tokamaks using an international multi-machine database for extrapolation to the next step device was also one of the main subjects in this study. Density dependence of the energy confinement properties has been examined systematically by separating the thermal stored energy into the H-mode pedestal component determined by MHD stability called the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and the core component governed by gyro-Bohm-like transport. It has been found that the pedestal pressure imposed by the destabilization of ELM activities led to a reduction in the pedestal temperature with increasing density. The core temperature for each

  3. Structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, C.J.

    1976-12-01

    The selection of structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamak-type fusion reactors is considered. The important criteria are working stress, radiation resistance, electromagnetic interaction, and general feasibility. The most advantageous materials appear to be face-centered-cubic alloys in the Fe-Ni-Cr system, but high-modulus composites may be necessary where severe pulsed magnetic fields are present. Special-purpose structural materials are considered briefly.

  4. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics for the steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SST-1 is a steady state superconducting tokamak for studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and to learn technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. SST-1 will have superconducting magnets made from NbTi based conductors operating at 4.5 K temperature. The design of the superconducting magnets and the cryogenic system of SST-1 tokamak are described. (author)

  5. Magnetic Diagnostics for Equilibrium Reconstructions in the Presence of Nonaxisymmetric Eddy Current Distributions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a modest-sized spherical tokamak (R0 = 0.4 m and a = 0.26 m) designed to investigate the low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. LTX will reach this regime through a lithium-coated shell internal to the vacuum vessel, conformal to the plasma last-closed-flux surface, and heated to 300-400 C. This structure is highly conductive and not axisymmetric. The three-dimensional nature of the shell causes the eddy currents and magnetic fields to be three-dimensional as well. In order to analyze the plasma equilibrium in the presence of three-dimensional eddy currents, an extensive array of unique magnetic diagnostics has been implemented. Sensors are designed to survive high temperatures and incidental contact with lithium and provide data on toroidal asymmetries as well as full coverage of the poloidal cross-section. The magnetic array has been utilized to determine the effects of nonaxisymmetric eddy currents and to model the start-up phase of LTX. Measurements from the magnetic array, coupled with two-dimensional field component modeling, have allowed a suitable field null and initial plasma current to be produced. For full magnetic reconstructions, a three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the vacuum vessel and shell is under development.

  6. Magnetic Diagnostics for Equilibrium Reconstructions in the Presence of Nonaxisymmetric Eddy Current Distributions in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R.; Kozub, T.; Logan, N.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Zakharov, L.

    2010-12-10

    The lithium tokamak experiment LTX is a modest-sized spherical tokamak R0=0.4 m and a =0.26 m designed to investigate the low-recycling lithium wall operating regime for magnetically confined plasmas. LTX will reach this regime through a lithium-coated shell internal to the vacuum vessel, conformal to the plasma last-closed-flux surface, and heated to 300-400 oC. This structure is highly conductive and not axisymmetric. The three-dimensional nature of the shell causes the eddy currents and magnetic fields to be three-dimensional as well. In order to analyze the plasma equilibrium in the presence of three-dimensional eddy currents, an extensive array of unique magnetic diagnostics has been implemented. Sensors are designed to survive high temperatures and incidental contact with lithium and provide data on toroidal asymmetries as well as full coverage of the poloidal cross-section. The magnetic array has been utilized to determine the effects of nonaxisymmetric eddy currents and to model the start-up phase of LTX. Measurements from the magnetic array, coupled with two-dimensional field component modeling, have allowed a suitable field null and initial plasma current to be produced. For full magnetic reconstructions, a three-dimensional electromagnetic model of the vacuum vessel and shell is under development.

  7. Magnetic confinement and the Linde problem

    CERN Document Server

    Simonov, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    Perturbation theory of thermodynamic potentials in QCD at $T>T_c$ is considered with the nonperturbative background vacuum taken into account. It is shown that the magnetic confinement in the QCD vacuum prevents the infrared catastrophe of the perturbation theory present in the case of the free vacuum (the "Linde problem"). A short discussion is given of the applicability of the nonperturbative formalism at large $T$ and of the relation with the HTL theory.

  8. Tokamak D-T neutron source models for different plasma physics confinement modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fausser, Clement, E-mail: clement.fausser@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DANS/DM2S/SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Puma, Antonella Li; Gabriel, Franck [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DANS/DM2S/SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Villari, Rosaria [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCLL DEMO neutronics is based on plasma physics L-mode, but may use H or A mode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Based on Plasma Physics 0D code, H and A-mode D-T neutron sources formulae are proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRANSGEN code is built to create 2D source maps as input for Monte-Carlo codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A-mode neutronic impact is compared to L-mode at same power on a HCLL DEMO design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results show TBR and Me slight changes, contrary to NWL profile: from -22% to +11%. - Abstract: Neutronic studies of European demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) have been so far based on plasma physics low confinement mode (L-mode). Future tokamaks, nevertheless, may likely use alternative confinement modes such as high or advanced confinement modes (H and A-mode). Based on analytical formulae used in plasma physics, H and A-modes D-T neutron sources formulae are proposed in this paper. For that purpose, a tokamak random neutron source generator, TRANSGEN, has been built generating bidimensional (radial and poloidal) neutron source maps to be used as input for neutronics Monte-Carlo codes (TRIPOLI-4 and MCNP5). The impact of such a source on the neutronic behavior of the European DEMO-2007 Helium-cooled lithium-lead reactor concept has been assessed and compared with previous results obtained using a L-mode neutron source. An A-mode neutron source map from TRANSGEN has been used with the code TRIPOLI-4. Assuming the same fusion power, results show that main reactor global neutronic parameters, e.g. tritium breeding ratio and neutron multiplication factor, evolved slightly when compared to present uncertainties margin. However, local parameters, such as the neutron wall loading (NWL), change significantly compared to L-mode shape: from -22% to +11% for NWL.

  9. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. X. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Ethier, S. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Ren, Y. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Kaye, S. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Chen, J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Startsev, E. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Lu, Z. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA; Li, Z. Q. [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People' s Republic of China

    2015-10-01

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E x B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around k(theta)rho(s) similar to 0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E x B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E x B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Moreover, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport

  10. Measurement of the internal magnetic field structure of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this article deals with the physical fundaments and technical aspects of this polarimetric measuring method, with its diagnostic capability, but also with its limitations. The second part summarizes the essential experimental results and their feedback on the theoretical description of Tokamak plasmas, which caused a revision of the accepted ideas of the magnetic field structure and its magnetohydrodynamic stability, in particular in the area of the hot plasma core. (orig.)

  11. Equilibrium and stability MHD in the magnetic confinement for thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of the mayor systems for magnetic confinement of plasmas is made. The basic concepts are reviewed briefly. The equilibrium and stability conditions for open systems (mirrors, magnetic wells, Z and Theta-pinches), for toroidal axisymmetric (Z-Pinch, Screw-Pinch, Belt-Pinch and Tokamak) and toroidal non-axisymmetric systems (High-β Stellarator and low-β Theta-Pinch) are discussed. A comparative analysis between the diferent systems is made. In the conclusions, the author's opinions about future developments in the field are included. (author)

  12. Improved Edge Confinement due to Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency boronization in the HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国盛; 万宝年; 宋梅; 凌必利

    2003-01-01

    The phenomena of improved edge confinement due to ion cyclotron radio frequency boronization were observed with a fast reciprocating Langmuir probe in the HT-7 tokamak. A strong shear layer of radial electric field was produced in the plasma edge region, which resulted in the formation of an edge transport barrier. Consequently,the edge profiles of electron density were steepened, and both the absolute and relative fluctuation levels were suppressed by the shearing E × B flows. Concomitant reduction of the coherence between electron density and poloidal electric field fluctuations and the change of their cross-phase resulted in turbulent particle flux dropping by more than a half at the plasma edge. This demonstrates the de-correlation effect of turbulence and its contribution to edge transport. The results presented here suggest a link between wall conditions and boundary plasma physics, especially an interaction between atomic processes and turbulence through the formation of radial electric field shear at the plasma edge.

  13. Disruption avoidance through active magnetic feedback in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Zanca, Paolo; Yanovskiy, Vadim; Finotti, Claudio; Manduchi, Gabriele; Piron, Chiara; Carraro, Lorella; Franz, Paolo; RFX Team

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions avoidance and mitigation is a fundamental need for a fusion relevant tokamak. In this paper a new experimental approach for disruption avoidance using active magnetic feedback is presented. This scheme has been implemented and tested on the RFX-mod device operating as a circular tokamak. RFX-mod has a very complete system designed for active mode control that has been proved successful for the stabilization of the Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs). In particular the current driven 2/1 mode, unstable when the edge safety factor, qa, is around (or even less than) 2, has been shown to be fully and robustly stabilized. However, at values of qa (qa > 3), the control of the tearing 2/1 mode has been proved difficult. These results suggested the idea to prevent disruptions by suddenly lowering qa to values around 2 where the tearing 2/1 is converted to a RWM. Contrary to the universally accepted idea that the tokamaks should disrupt at low qa, we demonstrate that in presence of a well designed active control system, tokamak plasmas can be driven to low qa actively stabilized states avoiding plasma disruption with practically no loss of the plasma internal energy.

  14. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings of the IAEA-sponsored meeting held in Nice, France 10-11 October, 1988, contain the manuscripts of the 21 reports dealing with research using small tokamaks. The purpose of this meeting was to highlight some of the achievements of small tokamaks and alternative magnetic confinement concepts and assess the suitability of starting new programs, particularly in developing countries. Papers presented were either review papers, or were detailed descriptions of particular experiments or concepts. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Microwave Reflectometry for Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzucato, E.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is about microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for plasma density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves by a plasma cutoff. Both the theoretical foundations of reflectometry and its practical application to the study of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the role of short-scale density fluctuations is discussed at length, both as a unique diagnostic tool for turbulence studies in thermonuclear plasmas and for the deleterious effects that fluctuations may have on the measurement of the average plasma density with microwave reflectometry.

  16. Controlling tokamak geometry with three-dimensional magnetic perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that small externally applied magnetic perturbations can significantly alter important geometric properties of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks. Through 3D shaping, experimentally relevant perturbation levels are large enough to influence turbulent transport and MHD stability in the pedestal region. It is shown that the dominant pitch-resonant flux surface deformations are primarily induced by non-resonant 3D fields, particularly in the presence of significant axisymmetric shaping. The spectral content of the applied 3D field can be used to control these effects

  17. Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures III

    CERN Document Server

    Hillebrands, Burkard

    2006-01-01

    This third volume of Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures addresses central aspects of spin-dynamic phenomena, including recent new developments, on a tutorial level. Researchers will find a comprehensive compilation of the current work in the field. Introductory chapters help newcomers to understand the basic concepts. The more advanced chapters give the current state of the art of spin dynamic issues ranging from the femtosecond to the microsecond regime. This volume concentrates on new experimental techniques such as ferromagnetic-resonance-force microscopy and two-photon photoemission, as well as on aspects of precessional switching, spin-wave excitation, vortex dynamics, spin relaxation, domain-wall dynamics in nanowires and their applications to magnetic logic devices. An important chapter is devoted to the presently very hot subject of the spin-transfer torque, combining the physics of electronic transport and micromagnetics. The comprehensive presentation of these developments makes this volu...

  18. Helium transport in enhanced confinement regimes on the TEXTOR and DIII-D tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparisons of helium (He) transport and exhaust in L-mode and in an enhanced confinement regime (H-mode), which is induced by a polarizing electrode, have been made for the TEXTOR tokamak. The results show an increased tendency for He accumulation when bulk plasma energy and particle confinement are improved during the polarization induced H-mode. Since these results imply that a high He pumping efficiency may be necessary for H-mode burning plasmas, we have begun exploring He transport in a divertor H-mode, similar to that proposed for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A collaborative program has been initiated to measure He transport and scaling on DIII-D during L-mode, H-mode, and ELMing H-mode plasma conditions. To simulate the presence of He ash in DIII-D, a 25 ms He puff is injected into a DIII-D plasma resulting in a He concentration of ∼5%. The time dependence of the He2+ density profiles in the plasma core is measured by charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy at 11 radial locations

  19. Magnet systems for ''Bean-Shaped'' tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean-shaping of tokamak plasmas offers a method of reaching stable operation at (beta) > 10%. In order to establish the indentation of the ''bean'', a set of high- current ''pushing coils'' (> 5 MA in a reactor) must be located at the midplane as close as possible to the inboard edge of the plasma. If located in the bore of the TF coils, then maintenance of the pushing coils may be impossible, and the interlocking coils may prevent reactor modularity. If located outside, the required pushing-coil current may be unacceptably large. This dilemma is overcome with a unique TF coil design in which the inboard leg is bent outward in the form of an arc. The pushing coils are housed in the midplane indentation of this arc, just outside the TF coils but adequately close to the plasma. The arched coil transfers forces to the top and bottom legs, where it can be reacted by a clamp structure if necessary. This technique would allow demountable joints to be placed near the inoard leg (for copper TF coils). Another design approach to the pushing coils is to use liquid Li or Na as the conductor and coolant. The liquid metal ''coils'' can be placed immediately adjacent to the plasma, giving optimal control of the plasma shape with minimal coil current, although modularity of the reactor may have to be surrendered. Conceptual designs are presented of PF and TF coil systems for an ignition test reactor with about 14% and for a full-scale demonstration reactor with about 20%, both using copper TF coils

  20. Radiation control in fusion plasmas by magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work addresses two important issues for the industrial use of fusion: plasma radiation control, as a part of the more general power handling issue, and high density tokamak operation. These two issues will be most critical in the demonstration reactor, called DEMO, intermediate step between ITER and a future commercial reactor. For DEMO, the need to radiate a large fraction of the power so as to limit the peak power load on the divertor will be a key constraint. High confinement will have to be combined with high radiated power fraction, and the required level of plasma purity. The main achievement of this thesis is to have shown experimental evidence of the existence of a stable plasma regime meeting the most critical requirements of a DEMO scenario: an electron density up to 40% above the Greenwald value, together with a fraction of radiated power close to 80%, with a good energy confinement and limited dilution. The plasma is additionally heated with ion cyclotron waves in a central electron heating scenario, featuring alpha particle heating. The original observations reported in this work bring highly valuable new pieces of information both to the physics of the tokamak edge layer and to the construction of an 'integrated operational scenario' required to successfully operate fusion devices. In the way for getting high density plasmas, the new observations involve the following topics. First, the formation of a poloidal asymmetry in the edge electron density profile, with a maximum density located close to toroidal pumped limiter. This asymmetry occurs inside the separatrix, with a constant plasma pressure on magnetic surfaces. Secondly, a correlative decrease of the electron temperature in the same edge region. Thirdly, the excellent coupling capabilities of the ICRH waves, up to a central line averaged electron density of 1.4 times the Greenwald density. Fourthly, a poloidally asymmetric edge radiation region, providing the dissipation of 80% of

  1. Effects of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear on turbulence and transport in magnetic confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the scientific success stories of fusion research over the past decade is the development of the ExB shear stabilization model to explain the formation of transport barriers in magnetic confinement devices. This model was originally developed to explain the transport barrier formed at the plasma edge in tokamaks after the L (low) to H (high) transition. This concept has the universality needed to explain the edge transport barriers seen in limiter and divertor tokamaks, stellarators, and mirror machines. More recently, this model has been applied to explain the further confinement improvement from H (high)-mode to VH (very high)-mode seen in some tokamaks, where the edge transport barrier becomes wider. Most recently, this paradigm has been applied to the core transport barriers formed in plasmas with negative or low magnetic shear in the plasma core. These examples of confinement improvement are of considerable physical interest; it is not often that a system self-organizes to a higher energy state with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. The transport decrease that is associated with ExB velocity shear effects also has significant practical consequences for fusion research. The fundamental physics involved in transport reduction is the effect of ExB shear on the growth, radial extent and phase correlation of turbulent eddies in the plasma. The same fundamental transport reduction process can be operational in various portions of the plasma because there are a number ways to change the radial electric field Er. An important theme in this area is the synergistic effect of ExB velocity shear and magnetic shear. Although the ExB velocity shear appears to have an effect on broader classes of microturbulence, magnetic shear can mitigate some potentially harmful effects of ExB velocity shear and facilitate turbulence stabilization

  2. Magnetic confinement of the solar tachocline: The oblique dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Antoine, Strugarek; Jean-Paul, Zahn

    2011-01-01

    3D MHD global solar simulations coupling the turbulent convective zone and the radiative zone have been carried out. Essential features of the Sun such as differential rotation, meridional circulation and internal waves excitation are recovered. These realistic models are used to test the possibility of having the solar tachocline confined by a primordial inner magnetic field. We find that the initially confined magnetic fields we consider open into the convective envelope. Angular momentum is transported across the two zones by magnetic torques and stresses, establishing the so-called Ferarro's law of isorotation. In the parameter space studied, the confinement of the magnetic field by meridional circulation penetration fails, also implying the failure of the tachocline confinement by the magnetic field. Three-dimensional convective motions are proven responsible for the lack of magnetic field confinement. Those results are robust for the different magnetic field topologies considered, i.e. aligned or obliqu...

  3. Ambipolarity in a tokamak with magnetic field ripple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recognized importance of electrostatic fields regarding turbulent transport, the radial electric field in a tokamak with magnetic field ripple is reconsidered. Terms in the ambipolarity condition involving the radial derivative of the field are derived from an extended drift-kinetic equation, including effects of second order in the gyroradius. Such terms are of interest in part because of their known importance in rotational relaxation equations for the axisymmetric case. The electric field is found to satisfy a nonlinear differential equation that is universal in a certain sense, and that implies spatial relaxation of the potential to its conventionally predicted value.

  4. Stabilization of burn conditions in an ITER FEAT like tokamak with uncertainities in the helium ash confinement time

    CERN Document Server

    Vitela, J E

    2004-01-01

    In this work we demostrate using a two-temperature volume average 0D model that robust stabilization, with regard the hellium ash confinement time, of the burn conditions of a tokamak reactor with the ITER FEAT design parameters can be achieved using Radial Basis Neural Networks (RBNN). Alpha particle thermalization time delay is taken into account in this model. The control actions implemented by means of a RBNN, include the modulation of the DT refueling rate, a neutral He-4 injection beam and auxiliary heating powers to ions and to electrons; all of them constrained to lie within allowable range values. Here we assume that the tokamak follows the IPB98(y,2) scaling for the energy confinement time, while the helium ash confinement time is assumed to be independently estimated on-line. The DT and helium ash confinement times are assumed to keep a constant relationship at all times. An on-line noisy estimation of the helium ash confinement time is simulated by corrupting it with pseudo Gaussian noise.

  5. Enhanced Plasma Confinement in a Magnetic Well by Whistler Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balmashnov, A. A.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of whistler waves in a magnetic field of mirror configuration is investigated experimentally. The strong interaction between waves and particles at the electron-cyclotron resonance leads to enhanced confinement in the magnetic well.......The propagation of whistler waves in a magnetic field of mirror configuration is investigated experimentally. The strong interaction between waves and particles at the electron-cyclotron resonance leads to enhanced confinement in the magnetic well....

  6. Multiplication of shearless barriers for chaotic transport in order to improve confined plasmas in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G.L.; Roberto, M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, R. Egydio de [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), SP (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We present a study that deals with meandering curves which arise after the reconnection process (or overlap) of resonances (1), that occurs only in non-twist discrete maps (2). Meandering curves formed by this kind of process play the role of barriers for chaotic transport in phase space, because inside the meandering region there is a special torus, called shearless torus, known as the strongest torus in a dynamical system (1). We introduce an extra perturbation in the Standard Non-twist Map (3), and we call this new map Labyrinthic Standard Non-twist Map (4). The labyrinthic map proposed in this work shows multiple reconnection processes of resonances, presenting multiple barriers for chaotic transport. Having applications in important areas such as the physics of thermonuclear plasmas confined in tokamaks for the extraction of clean energy. (1) D. del-Castillo-Negrete, J. M. Greene, P. J. Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996) (2) A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics (Springer, New York, 1992) (3) D. Del-Castillo-Negrete and P. J. Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993) (4) Caroline G. L. Martins; R. Egydio de Carvalho; I. L. Caldas; M. Roberto. Labyrinthic standard non-twist map. Journal of Physics A, Mathematical and Theoretical, v. 44, p. 045102 (2011). (author)

  7. Multiplication of shearless barriers for chaotic transport in order to improve confined plasmas in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We present a study that deals with meandering curves which arise after the reconnection process (or overlap) of resonances (1), that occurs only in non-twist discrete maps (2). Meandering curves formed by this kind of process play the role of barriers for chaotic transport in phase space, because inside the meandering region there is a special torus, called shearless torus, known as the strongest torus in a dynamical system (1). We introduce an extra perturbation in the Standard Non-twist Map (3), and we call this new map Labyrinthic Standard Non-twist Map (4). The labyrinthic map proposed in this work shows multiple reconnection processes of resonances, presenting multiple barriers for chaotic transport. Having applications in important areas such as the physics of thermonuclear plasmas confined in tokamaks for the extraction of clean energy. (1) D. del-Castillo-Negrete, J. M. Greene, P. J. Morrison, Physica D 91, 1 (1996) (2) A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics (Springer, New York, 1992) (3) D. Del-Castillo-Negrete and P. J. Morrison, Phys. Fluids A 5, 948 (1993) (4) Caroline G. L. Martins; R. Egydio de Carvalho; I. L. Caldas; M. Roberto. Labyrinthic standard non-twist map. Journal of Physics A, Mathematical and Theoretical, v. 44, p. 045102 (2011). (author)

  8. Conceptual design of a commercial tokamak reactor using resistive magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of resistive magnet tokamaks as commercial electricity producing power plants is investigated. Parametric studies indicate that attractive design space exists for these reactors at relatively low field (2.5 to 4.5 T), moderate wall loading (3 to 4 MW/m2) and medium to large net electric outputs (>600 MW/sub e/). High toroidal beta (20 to 25%) possible in the second regime of plasma stability may provide advantages of reduced recirculating power and plasma current but moderate beta reactors (6 to 10%) remain attractive. A conceptual design for the Resistive magnet Commercial Tokamak Reactor (RCTR) is presented. The layout of the nuclear island is driven by compatibility requirements of the demounting capability with structural and blanket design considerations. The nuclear island is fully demountable with access to all components within the toroidal field coils possible via simple vertical lifts. The blanket system, segmented for vertical removal, uses a self-cooled liquid lithium breeder/coolant with vanadium structure and an HT-9 reflector. The first wall is also lithium cooled with a vanadium structure but is constructed in a single, pre-tested unit for assembly and periodic replacement. Ohmic and equilibrium field-coils are located within the bore of the toroidal field coil for improved performance

  9. Toroidal magnet for a tokamak with a strong magnetic field and combined adiabatic compression of the pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the concept and the main characteristics of the torroidal magnet in a tokamak with a strong magnetic field and combined adiabatic compression of the plasma pinch for an experiment to achieve the parameter Q = 1

  10. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  11. Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meglicki, Z

    1995-09-19

    We describe in detail the implementation of a weighted differences code, which is used to simulate a tokamak using the Maschke-Perrin solution as an initial condition. The document covers the mainlines of the program and the most important problem-specific functions used in the initialization, static tests, and dynamic evolution of the system. The mathematics of the Maschke-Perrin solution is discussed in parallel with its realisation within the code. The results of static and dynamic tests are presented in sections discussing their implementation.The code can also be obtained by ftp -anonymous from cisr.anu.edu.au Directory /pub/papers/meglicki/src/tokamak. This code is copyrighted. (author). 13 refs.

  12. Upgrading of the Magnetic Confinement Plasma Device KT-5E

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何迎花; 余羿; 闻一之; 刘万东; 李定; 俞昌旋; 谢锦林; 李弘; 兰涛; 王昊宇

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present ideas of providing appropriate poloidal magnetic field for helimaks to help to generate toroidal magnetic plasma torus. Placing a conductive ring in the center of the cross-section to induce a suitable current, we change the helical magnetic field lines in the helimak discharge into magnetic surface. In this kind of discharge, the plasma density is greatly increased, and the corresponding density fluctuation is significantly decreased, showing a better confinement by magnetic shear. It allows more flexible and efficient experimental investigations on the toroidal magnetic confinement plasmas to be carried on in this kind of device.

  13. High Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when beta (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is order of unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configur...

  14. Measurement of local, internal magnetic fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present new measurements of internal magnetic fluctuations obtained with a novel eight channel cross polarization scattering (CPS) system installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Measurements of internal, localized magnetic fluctuations provide a window on an important physics quantity that we heretofore have had little information on. Importantly, these measurements provide a new ability to challenge and test linear and nonlinear simulations and basic theory. The CPS method, based upon the scattering of an incident microwave beam into the opposite polarization by magnetic fluctuations, has been significantly extended and improved over the method as originally developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. A new scattering geometry, provided by a unique probe beam, is utilized to improve the spatial localization and wavenumber range. Remotely controllable polarizer and mirror angles allow polarization matching and wavenumber selection for a range of plasma conditions. The quasi-optical system design, its advantages and challenges, as well as important physics validation tests are presented and discussed. Effect of plasma beta (ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure) on both density and magnetic fluctuations is studied and it is observed that internal magnetic fluctuations increase with beta. During certain quiescent high confinement operational regimes, coherent low frequency modes not detected by magnetic probes are detected locally by CPS diagnostics.

  15. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Dan [Johns Hopkins University

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  16. Investigation of magnetic modes in the ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of MHD-modes in the ASDEX Tokamak have been investigated by application and further development of the MIRNOV-diagnostics, i.e. measurement of magnetic field fluctuations. In addition to evaluation methods supported by models, also a model-independent statistical data analysis makes sense. The very important physics of mode locking, i.e. the slowing-down of rotating modes is examined. An elaborated theoretical model allows an interpretation of experimental results. Especially interesting is the loss of the angular momentum of rotating plasmas by mode locking. Experiments for mode stabilisation and prevention of electric current breakdown are discussed. Additional MHD-processes under different plasma conditions are treated on the fundament of the devloped model ideas. The author shows that the main tokamak plasma is described very well by one-dimensional models with cylindrical geometry, while the boundary zone of the plasma demands a more complex analysis. In the appendix a concept for the investigation of the MHD-activity in ASDEX-Upgrade is discussed. (AH)

  17. Transport and confinement in the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, R. J.; Ahn, J. W.; Antar, G. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C. D.; Conway, N. J.; Counsell, G. F.; Dendy, R. O.; Dudson, B.; Field, A. R.; Kirk, A.; Lloyd, B.; Meyer, H. F.; Morris, A. W.; Patel, A.; Roach, C. M.; Rohzansky, V.; Sykes, A.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Valovi, M.; Wilson, H. R.; Axon, K. B.; Buttery, R. J.; Ciric, D.; Cunningham, G.; Dowling, J.; Dunstan, M. R.; Gee, S. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Keeling, D. L.; Knight, P. J.; Lott, F.; Loughlin, M. J.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; Price, M. N.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Walsh, M. J.; MAST, the; NBI Team

    2003-12-01

    A combination of recently installed state-of-the-art imaging and profile diagnostics, together with established plasma simulation codes, are providing for the first time on Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) the tools required for studying confinement and transport, from the core through to the plasma edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL). The H-mode edge transport barrier is now routinely turned on and off using a combination of poloidally localized fuelling and fine balancing of the X-points. Theory, supported by experiment, indicates that the edge radial electric field and toroidal flow velocity (thought to play an important role in H-mode access) are largest if gas fuelling is concentrated at the inboard side. H-mode plasmas show predominantly type III ELM characteristics, with confinement HH factor (w.r.t. scaling law IPB98[y, 2]) around ~1.0. Combining MAST H-mode data with the International Tokamak Physics Activities (ITPA) analyses, results in an L H power threshold scaling proportional to plasma surface area (rather than PLH ~ R2). In addition, MAST favours an inverse aspect ratio scaling PLH ~ egr0.5. Similarly, the introduction of type III ELMing H-mode data to the pedestal energy regression analysis introduces a scaling Wped ~ egr-2.13 and modifies the exponents on R, BT and kgr. Preliminary TRANSP simulations indicate that ion and electron thermal diffusivities in ELMing H-mode approach the ion-neoclassical level in the half-radius region of the plasma with momentum diffusivity a few times lower. Linear flux-tube ITG and ETG microstability calculations using GS2 offer explanations for the near-neoclassical ion diffusivity and significantly anomalous electron diffusivity seen on MAST. To complement the baseline quasi-steady-state H-mode, newly developed advanced regimes are being explored. In particular, 'broad' internal transport barriers (ITBs) have been formed using techniques developed at conventional aspect ratio. Electron and ion energy diffusivities

  18. Transport and confinement in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of recently installed state-of-the-art imaging and profile diagnostics, together with established plasma simulation codes, are providing for the first time on Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) the tools required for studying confinement and transport, from the core through to the plasma edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL). The H-mode edge transport barrier is now routinely turned on and off using a combination of poloidally localized fuelling and fine balancing of the X-points. Theory, supported by experiment, indicates that the edge radial electric field and toroidal flow velocity (thought to play an important role in H-mode access) are largest if gas fuelling is concentrated at the inboard side. H-mode plasmas show predominantly type III ELM characteristics, with confinement HH factor (w.r.t. scaling law IPB98[y, 2]) around approx. 1.0. Combining MAST H-mode data with the International Tokamak Physics Activities (ITPA) analyses, results in an L-H power threshold scaling proportional to plasma surface area (rather than PLH approx. R2). In addition, MAST favours an inverse aspect ratio scaling PLH approx. epsilon 0.5. Similarly, the introduction of type III ELMing H-mode data to the pedestal energy regression analysis introduces a scaling Wped approx. epsilon -2.13 and modifies the exponents on R, BT and Kappa. Preliminary TRANSP simulations indicate that ion and electron thermal diffusivities in ELMing H-mode approach the ion-neoclassical level in the half-radius region of the plasma with momentum diffusivity a few times lower. Linear flux-tube ITG and ETG microstability calculations using GS2 offer explanations for the near-neoclassical ion diffusivity and significantly anomalous electron diffusivity seen on MAST. To complement the baseline quasi-steady-state H-mode, newly developed advanced regimes are being explored. In particular, 'broad' internal transport barriers (ITBs) have been formed using techniques developed at conventional aspect ratio

  19. Transport and confinement in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R J; Ahn, J W; Appel, L C; Brickley, C; Bunting, C; Carolan, P G; Challis, C D; Conway, N J; Counsell, G F; Dendy, R O; Dudson, B; Field, A R; Kirk, A; Lloyd, B; Meyer, H F; Morris, A W; Patel, A; Roach, C M; Sykes, A; Taylor, D; Tournianski, M R; Valovic, M; Wilson, H R; Axon, K B; Buttery, R J; Ciric, D; Cunningham, G; Dowling J; Dunstan, M R; Gee, S J; Gryaznevich, M P; Helander, P; Keeling, D L; Knight, P J; Lott, F; Loughlin, M J; Manhood, S J; Martin, R; McArdle, G J; Price, M N; Stammers, K; Storrs, J [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Antar, G Y [Fusion Energy Research Program, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Applegate, D [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Rohzansky, V [St. Petersburg State Politechnical University, Polytechnicheskaya 29, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Walsh, M J [Walsh Scientific Ltd., Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3EB (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-01

    A combination of recently installed state-of-the-art imaging and profile diagnostics, together with established plasma simulation codes, are providing for the first time on Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) the tools required for studying confinement and transport, from the core through to the plasma edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL). The H-mode edge transport barrier is now routinely turned on and off using a combination of poloidally localized fuelling and fine balancing of the X-points. Theory, supported by experiment, indicates that the edge radial electric field and toroidal flow velocity (thought to play an important role in H-mode access) are largest if gas fuelling is concentrated at the inboard side. H-mode plasmas show predominantly type III ELM characteristics, with confinement H{sub H} factor (w.r.t. scaling law IPB98[y, 2]) around approx. 1.0. Combining MAST H-mode data with the International Tokamak Physics Activities (ITPA) analyses, results in an L-H power threshold scaling proportional to plasma surface area (rather than P{sub LH} approx. R{sup 2}). In addition, MAST favours an inverse aspect ratio scaling P{sub LH} approx. epsilon 0.5. Similarly, the introduction of type III ELMing H-mode data to the pedestal energy regression analysis introduces a scaling W{sub ped} approx. epsilon -2.13 and modifies the exponents on R, B{sub T} and Kappa. Preliminary TRANSP simulations indicate that ion and electron thermal diffusivities in ELMing H-mode approach the ion-neoclassical level in the half-radius region of the plasma with momentum diffusivity a few times lower. Linear flux-tube ITG and ETG microstability calculations using GS2 offer explanations for the near-neoclassical ion diffusivity and significantly anomalous electron diffusivity seen on MAST. To complement the baseline quasi-steady-state H-mode, newly developed advanced regimes are being explored. In particular, 'broad' internal transport barriers (ITBs) have been formed using

  20. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intensified studies of plasma transport in toroidal plasmas over the past three to five years have progressed through increased understanding in some areas and changed perceptions about the most important issues in other areas. Recent developments are reviewed for six selected topics: edge fluctuations and transport; L-H mode transition; core fluctuations; modern plasma turbulence theory; transient transport; and global scaling. Some of the developments that are highlighted include: the role of a strongly sheared poloidal flow in edge plasma turbulence, transport and the L-H transition; change of focus from κ perpendicular ρs ∼ 1 to κ perpendicular ρs much-lt 1 fluctuations in tokamak plasmas; modern Direct-Interaction-Approximation plasma turbulence and hybrid fluid/kinetic theoretical models; and transient transport experiments that are raising fundamental questions about our conceptions of local transport processes in tokamaks. 104 refs., 6 figs

  1. Energy confinement studies of lower hybrid current driven discharges in the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy confinement properties of purely RF-driven plasmas on Alcator C are being investigated by experimental measurements of the bulk electron and ion temperature profiles, and by numerical modelling of the lower hybrid wave propagation and thermal energy transport. Power balance studies are performed on plasmas with parameters n-bar/sub e/ = 3-7 x 1013 cm-3, B = 7-11 T, I/sub p/ = 100-200 kA, and q(a)> or =8, and with RF powers up to 1 MW at 4.6 GHz. The temperature mesurements from RF-driven discharges are compared with those from similar ohmic discharges (identical current and density). The gross energy confinement time, defined by tau/sub E/03/2 (Σ∫n/sub j/T/sub j/ dV)/P/sub i//sub n/, is lower in the RF-driven discharges than in the ohmic ones by a factor of 1.5 to 4, depending on the plasma conditions and RF power. While tau/sub E/ in ohmic discharges increases with density and is independent of the toroidal field, the confinement time in the RF-driven discharges decreases with RF power, is independent of density in the range n-bar/sub e/ = 3-7 x 1013cm-3, and increases with the toroidal magnetic field. The confinement degrades slightly with increasing current in both RF-driven and ohmic discharges. The code used to simulate these results employs a lower hybrid ray tracing package, a Fokker-Planck code for the evolution of the fast electron tail, and enhanced thermal transport models for auxiliary-heated plasmas. In the code simulations, more than 80% of the injected RF power is absorbed by electron Landau damping in the inner half of the plasma column, the remainder being dissipated by collisions near the plasma edge

  2. Plasma confinement in a magnetic dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dipole fusion confinement device is stable to MHD interchange and ballooning modes when the pressure profile is sufficiently gentle. The plasma can be confined at high beta, is steady state and disruption free. Theory indicates that when the pressure gradient is sufficiently gentle to satisfy MHD requirements drift waves will also be stable. The dipole approach is particularly applicable for advanced fuels. A new experimental facility is presently being built to test the stability and transport properties of a dipole-confined plasma. (author)

  3. Advancements of microwave diagnostics in magnetically confined plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mase, A.; Kogi, Y.; Ito, N.; Yokota, Y.; Akaki, K.; Kawahata, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Tokuzawa, T.; Yamaguchi, S.; Hojo, H.; Oyama, N.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Park, H. K.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Microwave to millimeter-wave diagnostic techniques such as interferometry, reflectometry, scattering and radiometry have been powerful tools for diagnosing magnetically confined plasmas. Recent advances in electronic devices and components together with computer technology have enabled the developme

  4. Plasma Transport at Magnetic Axis in Toroidal Confinement System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZhongtian

    2001-01-01

    The particle orbits which intersect the magnetic axis behave differently from banana ones, referred to as potato orbits. The potential importance on tokamak transport is emphasized by Politzer, Lin, Tang, and Lee,and Shaing, Hazeltine, and Zarnstoff. However, there are many problems in the lasttwo papers. For example, the Eq. (48) in Ref. [5] should satisfy the orbit constraint which guarantees single value of the function go, that is, solubility condition, and Eq. (8) in Ref. [6] has the same problem.

  5. Considerations of the high magnetic field tokamak path on the approach to fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmar, Earl

    2015-11-01

    This tutorial will review the physics basis, and its applications, for high magnetic field, compact visions of steady-state pilot plants and fusion reactors. This includes: energy and particle confinement; transport barriers; heating and current drive; scrape-off layer and divertor physics including implications for power handling, and ash/impurity control. The development of new technologies, particularly high-temperature, high critical magnetic field superconducting materials opens a new opportunity to consider the leverage of on-axis magnetic fields of 10T or more, enabling the feasibility of smaller sized devices on the path to fusion energy, including a pilot plant which could produce hundreds of megawatts of net electricity in a 10T tokamak with major radius of order 3 meter. Incorporating jointed magnetic coils, also made feasible by the high temperature superconductors, can dramatically improve flexibility of experimental superconducting facilities, and ultimately maintainability for reactor systems. Steady-state requires high bootstrap fraction, combined with efficient off-axis current drive, and existing and new approaches for RF sustainment will be covered, including Lower Hybrid Current Drive (both from the low- and high-field side), ECCD, and fast-wave techniques. External torque drive from neutral beams, routinely used in most present-day experiments to enhance confinement and suppress instabilities, will be weak or absent in reactors. Alternative, RF-based flow drive, using mode-converted ICRF waves will be discussed. All reactor concepts have extraordinary power handling requirements, combined with stringent limits on PFC erosion and impurity sources; the current state of the art in divertor configurations will be compared with emerging and new concepts, including snowflake, x-point, x-divertor and liquid metals, to meet these challenges. Supported by USDOE.

  6. Diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and stochastic layers in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat transport in tokamak plasmas with magnetic islands and ergodic field lines was simulated at realistic plasma parameters in realistic tokamak geometries. This requires the treatment of anisotropic heat diffusion, which is more efficient along magnetic field lines by up to ten orders of magnitude than perpendicular to them. Comparisons with analytical predictions and experimental measurements allow to determine the stability properties of neoclassical tearing modes as well as the experimental heat diffusion anisotropy.

  7. Modified magnetic quantum dot with electric confining potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic properties of a modified magnetic quantum dot are studied. The modified magnetic quantum dot is a quantum structure that is formed by spatially inhomogeneous distributions of magnetic fields. Electrons are magnetically confined to the plane where the magnetic fields inside and outside the dot are different from each other. The energy spectrum exhibits quite different features depending on the directions of the magnetic fields inside and outside the dot. In particular, the case of opposite directions of the fields is more interesting than that of the same direction. An electrostatic potential is introduced to the system to study the effects of an electric confining potential on the eigenenergy of a single electron in the modified magnetic quantum dot. The additional potential raises the whole energy spectrum and changes its shape. The ground-state angular momentum transitions occurring in a bare modified magnetic quantum dot disappear on introduction of the additional parabolic potential

  8. Poloidal magnetic field profile measurements on the microwave tokamak experiment using far-infrared polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of plasma poloidal magnetic field (B) profiles in tokamaks with good temporal and spatial resolution has proven to be a difficult but important measurement. A large range of toroidal confinement phenomena is expected to depend sensitively on the radial variation of B including the tearing instability, sawtooth oscillations, disruptions, and transport. Experimental confirmation of theoretical models describing these phenomena has been hampered by the lack of detailed B measurements. A fifteen chord far-infrared (FIR) polarimeter has been developed to measure B in the Microwave Tokamak, Experiment (MTX). Polarimetry utilizes the well known Faraday rotation effect, which causes a rotation of the polarization of an FIR beam propagating in the poloidal plane. The rotation angle is proportional to the component of B parallel to the beam. A new technique for determining the Faraday rotation angle is introduced, based on phase measurements of a rotating polarization ellipse. This instrument has been used successfully to measure B profiles for a wide range of experiments on MTX. For ohmic discharges, measurements of the safety factor on axis give q0 ∼ 0.75 during sawteeth and q0 > 1 without sawteeth. Large perturbations to the polarimeter signals correlated with the sawtooth crash are observed during some discharges. Measurements in discharges with electron cyclotron heating (ECH) show a transition from a hollow to peaked J profile that is triggered by the ECH pulse. Current-ramp experiments were done to perturb the J profile from the nominal Spitzer conductivity profile. Profiles for initial current ramps and ramps starting from a stable equilibrium have been measured and are compared with a cylindrical diffusion model. Finally, the tearing mode stability equation is solved using measured J profiles. Stability predictions are in good agreement with the existence of oscillations observed on the magnetic loops

  9. Stability properties and fast ion confinement of hybrid tokamak plasma configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferle, D.; Faustin, J. M. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Kleiner, A.; Lanthaler, S.; Patten, H. W.; Raghunathan, M.

    2015-11-01

    In hybrid scenarios with flat q just above unity, extremely fast growing tearing modes are born from toroidal sidebands of the near resonant ideal internal kink mode. New scalings of the growth rate with the magnetic Reynolds number arise from two fluid effects and sheared toroidal flow. Non-linear saturated 1/1 dominant modes obtained from initial value stability calculation agree with the amplitude of the 1/1 component of a 3D VMEC equilibrium calculation. Viable and realistic equilibrium representation of such internal kink modes allow fast ion studies to be accurately established. Calculations of MAST neutral beam ion distributions using the VENUS-LEVIS code show very good agreement of observed impaired core fast ion confinement when long lived modes occur. The 3D ICRH code SCENIC also enables the establishment of minority RF distributions in hybrid plasmas susceptible to saturated near resonant internal kink modes.

  10. Solar Multiple Eruptions from a Confined Magnetic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; Liu, Chang; Jing, Ju; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-09-01

    How eruption can recur from a confined magnetic structure is discussed based on the Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of the NOAA active region 11444, which produced three eruptions within 1.5 hr on 2012 March 27. The active region (AR) had the positive-polarity magnetic fields in the center surrounded by the negative-polarity fields around. Since such a distribution of magnetic polarity tends to form a dome-like magnetic fan structure confined over the AR, the multiple eruptions were puzzling. Our investigation reveals that this event exhibits several properties distinct from other eruptions associated with magnetic fan structures: (i) a long filament encircling the AR was present before the eruptions; (ii) expansion of the open-closed boundary (OCB) of the field lines after each eruption was suggestive of the growing fan-dome structure, and (iii) the ribbons inside the closed magnetic polarity inversion line evolved in response to the expanding OCB. It thus appears that in spite of multiple eruptions the fan-dome structure remained undamaged, and the closing back field lines after each eruption rather reinforced the fan-dome structure. We argue that the multiple eruptions could occur in this AR in spite of its confined magnetic structure because the filament encircling the AR was adequate for slipping through the magnetic separatrix to minimize the damage to its overlying fan-dome structure. The result of this study provides a new insight into the productivity of eruptions from a confined magnetic structure.

  11. In situ ``artificial plasma'' calibration of tokamak magnetic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, D.; Levesque, J. P.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; DeBono, B. A.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; Rath, N.

    2013-06-01

    A unique in situ calibration technique has been used to spatially calibrate and characterize the extensive new magnetic diagnostic set and close-fitting conducting wall of the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) experiment. A new set of 216 Mirnov coils has recently been installed inside the vacuum chamber of the device for high-resolution measurements of magnetohydrodynamic phenomena including the effects of eddy currents in the nearby conducting wall. The spatial positions of these sensors are calibrated by energizing several large in situ calibration coils in turn, and using measurements of the magnetic fields produced by the various coils to solve for each sensor's position. Since the calibration coils are built near the nominal location of the plasma current centroid, the technique is referred to as an "artificial plasma" calibration. The fitting procedure for the sensor positions is described, and results of the spatial calibration are compared with those based on metrology. The time response of the sensors is compared with the evolution of the artificial plasma current to deduce the eddy current contribution to each signal. This is compared with simulations using the VALEN electromagnetic code, and the modeled copper thickness profiles of the HBT-EP conducting wall are adjusted to better match experimental measurements of the eddy current decay. Finally, the multiple coils of the artificial plasma system are also used to directly calibrate a non-uniformly wound Fourier Rogowski coil on HBT-EP.

  12. Magnetic Domain Confinement by Anisotropy Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. P.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C. A.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a ``natural'' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic wall-the ``anisotropy constrained'' magnetic wall.

  13. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2016-07-05

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Instabilities in Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most promising ways to achieve controlled nuclear fusion for the commercial production of energy is the tokamak design. In such a device, a hot plasma is confined in a toroidal geometry using magnetic fields. The present generation of tokamaks shows significant plasma rotation, primarily

  15. Ideal plasma response to vacuum magnetic fields with resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kimin [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701, Korea; Ahn, J-W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, J-K [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-09-03

    Ideal plasma shielding and amplification of resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamak is presented by field line tracing simulation with full ideal plasma response, compared to measurements of divertor lobe structures. Magnetic field line tracing simulations in NSTX with toroidal non-axisymmetry indicate the ideal plasma response can significantly shield/amplify and phase shift the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations. Ideal plasma shielding for n = 3 mode is found to prevent magnetic islands from opening as consistently shown in the field line connection length profile and magnetic footprints on the divertor target. It is also found that the ideal plasma shielding modifies the degree of stochasticity but does not change the overall helical lobe structures of the vacuum field for n = 3. Amplification of vacuum fields by the ideal plasma response is predicted for low toroidal mode n = 1, better reproducing measurements of strong striation of the field lines on the divertor plate in NSTX.

  16. Application of symbolic regression to the derivation of scaling laws for tokamak energy confinement time in terms of dimensionless quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Lungaroni, M.; Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.

    2016-02-01

    In many scientific applications, it is important to investigate how certain properties scale with the parameters of the systems. The experimental studies of scalings have traditionally been addressed with log regression, which limits the results to power laws and to theoretical and not data-driven dimensionless quantities. This has also been the case in nuclear fusion, in which the scaling of the energy confinement time is a crucial aspect in understanding the physics of transport and in the design of future devices. Traditionally two main assumptions are at the basis of the most widely accepted empirical scaling laws for the confinement time: (a) the dimensionless variables used are the ones derived from the symmetries of the Vlasov equation; (b) the final scalings have the mathematical form of power laws. In this paper, it is shown how symbolic regression (SR), implemented with genetic programming (GP) techniques, can be used to test these hypotheses. Neither assumption is confirmed by the available data of the multi-machine International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) of validated tokamak discharges. The statistically soundest expressions are not power laws and cannot be formulated in terms of the traditional dimensionless quantities. The consequences of the data-driven scaling laws obtained are both practical and theoretical: the confinement time for the ITER can be significantly shorter than foreseen by power laws and different dimensionless variables should be considered for theoretical investigations. On the other hand, higher quality databases should be built to reduce the uncertainties in the extrapolations. It is also worth emphasising that the proposed methodology is fully general and therefore can be applied to any field of science.

  17. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  18. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  19. Magnetized plasma flow injection into tokamak and high-beta compact torus plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Komoriya, Yuuki; Tazawa, Hiroyasu; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Steinhauer, Loren; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Onchi, Takumi; Hirose, Akira

    2010-11-01

    As an application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), magnetic helicity injection via injection of a highly elongated compact torus (magnetized plasma flow: MPF) has been conducted on both tokamak and field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. The injected plasmoid has significant amounts of helicity and particle contents and has been proposed as a fueling and a current drive method for various torus systems. In the FRC, MPF is expected to generate partially spherical tokamak like FRC equilibrium by injecting a significant amount of magnetic helicity. As a circumstantial evidence of the modified equilibrium, suppressed rotational instability with toroidal mode number n = 2. MPF injection experiments have also been applied to the STOR-M tokamak as a start-up and current drive method. Differences in the responses of targets especially relation with beta value and the self-organization feature will be studied.

  20. The technology and science of steady-state operation in magnetically confined plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécoulet, A.; Hoang, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    The steady-state operation of magnetically confined fusion plasmas is considered as one of the 'grand challenges' of future decades, if not the ultimate goal of the research and development activities towards a new source of energy. Reaching such a goal requires the high-level integration of both science and technology aspects of magnetic fusion into self-consistent plasma regimes in fusion-grade devices. On the physics side, the first constraint addresses the magnetic confinement itself which must be made persistent. This means to either rely on intrinsically steady-state configurations, like the stellarator one, or turn the inductively driven tokamak configuration into a fully non-inductive one, through a mix of additional current sources. The low efficiency of the external current drive methods and the necessity to minimize the re-circulating power claim for a current mix strongly weighted by the internal 'pressure driven' bootstrap current, itself strongly sensitive to the heat and particle transport properties of the plasma. A virtuous circle may form as the heat and particle transport properties are themselves sensitive to the current profile conditions. Note that several other factors, e.g. plasma rotation profile, magneto-hydro-dynamics activity, also influence the equilibrium state. In the present tokamak devices, several examples of such 'advanced tokamak' physics research demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state regimes, though with a number of open questions still under investigation. The modelling activity also progresses quite fast in this domain and supports understanding and extrapolation. This high level of physics sophistication of the plasma scenario however needs to be combined with steady-state technological constraints. The technology constraints for steady-state operation are basically twofold: the specific technologies required to reach the steady-state plasma conditions and the generic technologies linked to the long pulse operation of a

  1. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  2. Electron transport in the plasma edge with rotating resonant magnetic perturbations at the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small three-dimensional (3D) magnetic perturbations can be used as a tool to control the edge plasma parameters in magnetically confined plasmas in high confinement mode (''H-mode'') to suppress edge instabilities inherent to this regime, the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs). In this work, the impact of rotating 3D resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields on the edge plasma structure characterized by electron density and temperature fields is investigated. We study a low confinement (L-mode) edge plasma (r/a>0.9) with high resistivity (edge electron collisionality ν*e>4) at the TEXTOR tokamak. The plasma structure in the plasma edge is measured by a set of high resolution diagnostics: a fast CCD camera (Δt=20 μs) is set up in order to visualize the plasma structure in terms of electron density variations. A supersonic helium beam diagnostic is established as standard diagnostic at TEXTOR to measure electron density ne and temperature Te with high spatial (Δr=2 mm) and temporal resolution (Δt=20 μs). The measured plasma structure is compared to modeling results from the fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE. A sequence of five new observations is discussed: (1) Imaging of electron density variations in the plasma edge shows that a fast rotating RMP field imposes an edge plasma structure, which rotates with the external RMP rotation frequency of vertical stroke νRMP vertical stroke =1 kHz. (2) Measurements of the electron density and temperature provide strong experimental evidence that in the far edge a rotating 3D scrape-off layer (SOL) exists with helical exhaust channels to the plasma wall components. (3) Radially inward, the plasma structure at the next rational flux surface is found to depend on the relative rotation between external RMP field and intrinsic plasma rotation. For low relative rotation the plasma structure is dominated by a particle and energy loss along open magnetic field lines to the wall components. For high relative

  3. Electron transport in the plasma edge with rotating resonant magnetic perturbations at the TEXTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoschus, Henning

    2011-10-13

    Small three-dimensional (3D) magnetic perturbations can be used as a tool to control the edge plasma parameters in magnetically confined plasmas in high confinement mode (''H-mode'') to suppress edge instabilities inherent to this regime, the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs). In this work, the impact of rotating 3D resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields on the edge plasma structure characterized by electron density and temperature fields is investigated. We study a low confinement (L-mode) edge plasma (r/a>0.9) with high resistivity (edge electron collisionality {nu}{sup *}{sub e}>4) at the TEXTOR tokamak. The plasma structure in the plasma edge is measured by a set of high resolution diagnostics: a fast CCD camera ({delta}t=20 {mu}s) is set up in order to visualize the plasma structure in terms of electron density variations. A supersonic helium beam diagnostic is established as standard diagnostic at TEXTOR to measure electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} with high spatial ({delta}r=2 mm) and temporal resolution ({delta}t=20 {mu}s). The measured plasma structure is compared to modeling results from the fluid plasma and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE. A sequence of five new observations is discussed: (1) Imaging of electron density variations in the plasma edge shows that a fast rotating RMP field imposes an edge plasma structure, which rotates with the external RMP rotation frequency of vertical stroke {nu}{sub RMP} vertical stroke =1 kHz. (2) Measurements of the electron density and temperature provide strong experimental evidence that in the far edge a rotating 3D scrape-off layer (SOL) exists with helical exhaust channels to the plasma wall components. (3) Radially inward, the plasma structure at the next rational flux surface is found to depend on the relative rotation between external RMP field and intrinsic plasma rotation. For low relative rotation the plasma structure is dominated by a particle and energy loss

  4. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion

  5. Experimental investigation of magnetically confined plasma loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenfelde, Jan

    2012-12-11

    Arch-shaped magnetic flux tubes generated in a pulsed-power plasma experiment were investigated with a variety of diagnostics concerning their expansion properties. Specifically, the expansion velocity was of interest, which is observed as constant for a wide range of experimental parameters. An MHD transport mechanism is investigated as possible cause of a uniform arch cross section: Axial transport of poloidal magnetic flux along the plasma may cause a pinch force leading to a uniform diameter along the arch. Despite numerous experimental findings at a very similar experimental setup, no indication for the relevance of this process could be found. Instead, magnetic probe data showed that the plasma current in the apex region is constant. A constant expansion velocity was observed for considerably different experimental conditions. This included different plasma source designs with fundamentally different toroidal magnetic field topology and variation of the working gas, which lead to plasma densities lower by an order of magnitude. Inside the current channel of the arch, Alfven velocities were estimated. To this end, plasma density profiles obtained from interferometry were inverted to obtain local densities, which were in turn verified by means of Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. Furthermore, measurements of multiple components of the magnetic field of the plasma arch were performed. An estimate for the conductivity was obtained from Spitzer's formula for fully ionized plasma using electron temperatures obtained from elementary optical emission spectroscopy. From the presented data of ccd imaging, magnetic field probes, and to lesser extent, interferometry, the underlying assumption of residual plasma (and considerable plasma currents through it) below the actual arch structure is very plausible. Rough estimates of the electric field strength along the arch and results of the magnetic field measurements showed, that the detected expansion

  6. A new method of asymmetric Abel inversion for magnetic equilibrium configuration state in tokamaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Chong-Li; Zhou Yan; Shi Zhong-Bing; Li Ying-Liang

    2007-01-01

    It is difficult to obtain the asymmetrical factor along the observation direction parallel to the plasma mid-plane when the detected radiation is also in the mid-plane. This paper considers the magnetic surfaces and Grad-Shafranov shift, and develops a new method for inverse asymmetric electron density information, during magnetic equilibrium configuration in a tokamak.

  7. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion

  8. Magnetically confined wind shocks in X-rays - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ud-Doula, Asif; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-09-01

    A subset (∼ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modeling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  9. Magnetically Confined Wind Shocks in X-rays - a Review

    CERN Document Server

    ud-Doula, Asif

    2015-01-01

    A subset (~ 10%) of massive stars present strong, globally ordered (mostly dipolar) magnetic fields. The trapping and channeling of their stellar winds in closed magnetic loops leads to magnetically confined wind shocks (MCWS), with pre-shock flow speeds that are some fraction of the wind terminal speed. These shocks generate hot plasma, a source of X-rays. In the last decade, several developments took place, notably the determination of the hot plasma properties for a large sample of objects using XMM-Newton and Chandra, as well as fully self-consistent MHD modelling and the identification of shock retreat effects in weak winds. Despite a few exceptions, the combination of magnetic confinement, shock retreat and rotation effects seems to be able to account for X-ray emission in massive OB stars. Here we review these new observational and theoretical aspects of this X-ray emission and envisage some perspectives for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  10. High Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jaeyoung; Sieck, Paul E; Offermann, Dustin T; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when beta (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is order of unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high beta a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. The current experiment validates this theoretical conjecture for the first time and represents critical progress toward the Polywell fusion concept which combines a high beta cusp configuration with an electrostatic fusion for a compact, economical, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  11. Magnetic trap Tornado-X for plasma confinement and heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of the magnetic trap Tornado-X for plasma confinement and heating is presented. Results of the first studies on decaying plasma, which make it possible to conclude that plasma losses are determined by classic diffusion, are given. The plasma heating through charged particles drive in the crossed magnetic and electrical fields is accomplished. The rotating plasma parameters, obtained on the Tornado-650 facility, are reproduced at the initial stage

  12. Introduction to magnetic confinement fusion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These notes present a brief survey of some of the current diagnostic techniques used in magnetic fusion plasma devices. To give an idea of the range of parameters and geometries encountered the parameters of four representative experiments - PLT, TMX, ZT-40 and EBT-I(S) - are given. The central issue of all experiments is to understand the flow of power which can be summarized by two volume integrated equations for the ions and electrons

  13. Improved energy confinement with nonlinear isotope effects in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, J; Jenko, F

    2016-01-01

    The efficient production of electricity from nuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas relies on a good confinement of the thermal energy. For more than thirty years, the observation that such confinement depends on the mass of the plasma isotope and its interaction with apparently unrelated plasma conditions has remained largely unexplained and it has become one of the main unsolved issues. By means of numerical studies based on the gyrokinetic theory, we quantitatively show how the plasma microturbulence depends on the isotope mass through nonlinear multiscale microturbulence effects involving the interplay between zonal flows, electromagnetic effects and the torque applied. This finding has crucial consequences for the design of future reactors since, in spite of the fact that they will be composed by multiple ion species, their extrapolation from present day experiments heavily relies on the knowledge obtained from a long experimental tradition based in single isotope plasmas.

  14. Classification and dimensionality reduction of international tokamak confinement data on a probabilistic manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdoolaege, Geert, E-mail: geert.verdoolaege@ugent.be [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Karagounis, Giorgos; Oost, Guido Van [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2013-08-21

    Pattern recognition for fusion data greatly contributes to a better understanding of the measurements and the physics of fusion plasmas. Through a geometric description of probability it is shown that consideration of the inherent uncertain nature of the data significantly improves the visualization of global confinement data and the identification of confinement regimes. The framework can be extended to the development of scaling laws for ITER.

  15. Magnetically confined plasma solar collector. [satellite based system in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, C. T.; Wolken, G., Jr.; Purvis, G. D., III

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of using a plasma medium for collecting solar energy in space is examined on the basis of a concept involving an orbiting magnetic bottle in which a solar-energy-absorbing plasma is confined. A basic system uses monatomic cesium as working fluid. Cesium evaporates from a source and flows into the useful volume of a magnetic bottle where it is photoionized by solar radiation. Ions and electrons lost through the loss cones are processed by a recovery system, which might be a combination of electromagnetic devices and heat engines. This study concentrates on the plasma production processes and size requirements, estimates of the magnetic field required to confine the plasma, and an estimate of the system parameters for a 10 GW solar collector using cesium.

  16. Confinement and αs in a strong magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.A. Simonov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hadron decay widths are shown to increase in strong magnetic fields as Γ(eB∼eBκΓ(0. The same mechanism is shown to be present in the production of the sea quark pair inside the confining string, which decreases the string tension with the growing eB parallel to the string. On the other hand, the average energy of the qq¯ holes in the string world sheet increases, when the direction of B is perpendicular to the sheet. These two effects stipulate the spectacular picture of the B dependent confinement and αs, discovered on the lattice.

  17. Effect of magnetic perturbations on the 3D MHD self-organization of shaped tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bonfiglio, D; Veranda, M; Chacón, L; Escande, D F

    2016-01-01

    The effect of magnetic perturbations (MPs) on the helical self-organization of shaped tokamak plasmas is discussed in the framework of the nonlinear 3D MHD model. Numerical simulations performed in toroidal geometry with the \\textsc{pixie3d} code [L. Chac\\'on, Phys. Plasmas {\\bf 15}, 056103 (2008)] show that $n=1$ MPs significantly affect the spontaneous quasi-periodic sawtoothing activity of such plasmas. In particular, the mitigation of sawtooth oscillations is induced by $m/n=1/1$ and $2/1$ MPs. These numerical findings provide a confirmation of previous circular tokamak simulations, and are in agreement with tokamak experiments in the RFX-mod and DIII-D devices. Sawtooth mitigation via MPs has also been observed in reversed-field pinch simulations and experiments. The effect of MPs on the stochastization of the edge magnetic field is also discussed.

  18. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in high-energy pulsed power capabilities, plasma formation techniques, plasma diagnostics, and multidimensional plasma computer codes make possible the evaluation of an unexplored approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales. Existing capabilities appear adequate to explore the major physics issues in this area, perhaps up to and including fusion ignition, with relatively low operating costs and essentially no major capital investment. (author). 25 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  19. The influence of toroidal Alfvén modes on the confinement of fast particles in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Bakharev, N. N.; Gusev, V. K.; Minaev, V. B.; Kornev, V. A.; Mel'nik, A. D.; Patrov, M. I.; Sakharov, N. V.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Shchegolev, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral beam injection into the Globus-M spherical tokamak at the early stage of discharge leads to the development of instabilities in a frequency range of 50-200 kHz, which have been identified as toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) [1]. The influence of these modes on the confinement of fast particles has been studied with the aid of a neutral particle analyzer (NPA) and a neutron detector. The isotope effect was studied using hydrogen and deuterium both in the injected beam and in the target plasma. A correlation analysis of signals from magnetic probes showed that the observed modes in most cases contain a single harmonic with toroidal number n = 1. Upon the injection of deuterium into deuterium plasma, the development of TAEs led to a decrease in the neutron flux by 25%, whereas the fluxes of high-energy recharge atoms decreased by 75%. After the injection of hydrogen, a decrease in the flux measured by NPA did not exceed 25%.

  20. Three-dimensional plasma transport in open chaotic magnetic fields. A computational assessment for tokamak edge layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nuclear fusion as an alternative energy source requires the research on magnetically confined, high temperature plasmas. In particular, the quantification of plasma flows in the domain near exposed material surfaces of the plasma container by computer simulations is of key importance, both for guiding interpretation of present fusion experiments and for aiding the ongoing design activities for large future devices such as ITER, W7-X or the DEMO reactor. There is a large number of computational issues related to the physics of hot, fully ionized and magnetized plasmas near surfaces of the vacuum chamber. This thesis is dedicated to one particular such challenge, namely the numerical quantification of self-consistent kinetic neutral gas and plasma fluid flows in very complex 3D (partially chaotic) magnetic fields, in the absence of any common symmetries for plasma and neutral gas dynamics. Such magnetic field configurations are e.g. generated by externally applied magnetic perturbations at the plasma edge, and are of great interest for the control of particle and energy exhausts. In the present thesis the 3D edge plasma and neutral particle transport code EMC3-EIRENE is applied to two distinct configurations of open chaotic magnetic system: at the TEXTOR and DIII-D tokamaks. Improvements of the edge transport model and extensions of the transport code are presented, which have allowed such simulations for the first time for 3D scenarios at DIII-D with ITER similar plasmas. A strong 3D effect of the chaotic magnetic field on the DIII-D edge plasma is found and analyzed in detail. It is found that a pronounced striation pattern of target particle and heat fluxes at DIII-D can only be obtained up to a certain upper limiting level of anomalous cross-field transport. Hence, in comparison to experimental data, these findings allow to narrow down the range of this model parameter. One particular interest at TEXTOR is the achievement of a regime with

  1. Magnetic field considerations in fusion power plant environs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liemohn, H.B.; Lessor, D.L.; Duane, B.H.

    1976-09-01

    A summary of magnetic field production mechanisms and effects is given. Discussions are included on the following areas: (1) stray magnetic and electric fields from tokamaks, (2) methods for reducing magnetic fields, (3) economics of magnetic field reductions, (4) forces on magnetizable objects near magnetic confinement fusion reactors, (5) electric field transients in tokamaks, (6) attenuation and decay of electromagnetic fields, and (7) magnetic field transients from tokamak malfunctions.

  2. Centrifugal Breakout of Magnetically Confined Line-Driven Stellar Winds

    CERN Document Server

    ud-Doula, A; Owocki, S P

    2006-01-01

    We present 2D MHD simulations of the radiatively driven outflow from a rotating hot star with a dipole magnetic field aligned with the star's rotation axis. We focus primarily on a model with moderately rapid rotation (half the critical value), and also a large magnetic confinement parameter, $\\eta_{\\ast} \\equiv B_{\\ast}^2 R_{\\ast}^{2} / \\dot{M} V_{\\infty} = 600$. The magnetic field channels and torques the wind outflow into an equatorial, rigidly rotating disk extending from near the Kepler corotation radius outwards. Even with fine-tuning at lower magnetic confinement, none of the MHD models produce a stable Keplerian disk. Instead, material below the Kepler radius falls back on to the stellar surface, while the strong centrifugal force on material beyond the corotation escape radius stretches the magnetic loops outwards, leading to episodic breakout of mass when the field reconnects. The associated dissipation of magnetic energy heats material to temperatures of nearly $10^{8}$K, high enough to emit hard (...

  3. Langmuir-magnetic probe measurements of ELMs and dithering cycles in the EAST tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Naulin, Volker; Xu, G. S.;

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the dynamical behavior associated with edge localized modes (ELMs) have been carried out in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by direct probing near the separatrix and far scrape-off layer (SOL) using electrostatic as well as magnetic probes. Type-III ELMs a...

  4. Plasma vortexes induced by an external rotating helical magnetic perturbation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankratov, I.M. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' , Akademicheskaya str., 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)]. E-mail: pankratov@kipt.kharkov.ua; Omelchenko, A.Ya. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' , Akademicheskaya str., 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Olshansky, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' , Akademicheskaya str., 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2005-08-01

    The occurrence of two or four vortexes per one poloidal perturbation period has been found near the resonant surface as a plasma motion response on the penetration of an external low frequency helical magnetic perturbation in tokamaks. The investigation is carried out on the basis of the two-fluid MHD equations in the linear approximation for the cylindrical model.

  5. Sensitivity of magnetic field-line pitch angle measurements to sawtooth events in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.

    2016-11-01

    The sensitivity of the pitch angle profiles measured by the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic to the evolution of the safety factor, q, profiles during the tokamak sawtooth events has been investigated for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). An analytic relation between the tokamak pitch angle, γ, and q estimates that Δγ ˜ 0.1° is required for detecting Δq ˜ 0.05 near the magnetic axis (not at the magnetic axis, though). The pitch angle becomes less sensitive to the same Δq for the middle and outer regions of the plasma (Δγ ˜ 0.5°). At the magnetic axis, it is not straightforward to directly relate the γ sensitivity to Δq since the gradient of γ(R), where R is the major radius of the tokamak, is involved. Many of the MSE data obtained from the 2015 KSTAR campaign, when calibrated carefully, can meet these requirements with the time integration down to 10 ms. The analysis with the measured data shows that the pitch angle profiles and their gradients near the magnetic axis can resolve the change of the q profiles including the central safety factor, q0, during the sawtooth events.

  6. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed

  7. The development of RF heating of magnetically confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q=0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed

  8. Stability of Tokamak and RFP Plasmas with an Extended Region of Low Magnetic Shear

    OpenAIRE

    Brunetti, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed experimentally that magnetically confined plasmas, characterised by the safety factor q with a small or slightly inverted magnetic shear, have good confinement properties. Such plasmas typically have no internal transport barrier, operate with q95 around 4 and are good candidates for long pulse operation at high fusion yield in the reactor ITER. These hybrid scenarios are an intermediate step between the reference standard H-mode (high confinement) scenario with monotonic...

  9. The field line map approach for simulations of magnetically confined plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmeir, Andreas; Coster, David; Maj, Omar; Hallatschek, Klaus; Lackner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Predictions of plasma parameters in the edge and scrape-off layer of tokamaks is difficult since most modern tokamaks have a divertor and the associated separatrix causes the usually employed field/flux-aligned coordinates to become singular on the separatrix/X-point. The presented field line map approach avoids such problems as it is based on a cylindrical grid: standard finite-difference methods can be used for the discretisation of perpendicular (w.r.t. magnetic field) operators, and the characteristic flute mode property (k∥ ≪k⊥) of structures is exploited computationally via a field line following discretisation of parallel operators which leads to grid sparsification in the toroidal direction. This paper is devoted to the discretisation of the parallel diffusion operator (the approach taken is very similar to the flux-coordinate independent (FCI) approach which has already been adopted to a hyperbolic problem (Ottaviani, 2011; Hariri, 2013)). Based on the support operator method, schemes are derived which maintain the self-adjointness property of the parallel diffusion operator on the discrete level. These methods have very low numerical perpendicular diffusion compared to a naive discretisation which is a critical issue since magnetically confined plasmas exhibit a very strong anisotropy. Two different versions of the discrete parallel diffusion operator are derived: the first is based on interpolation where the order of interpolation and therefore the numerical diffusion is adjustable; the second is based on integration and is advantageous in cases where the field line map is strongly distorted. The schemes are implemented in the new code GRILLIX, and extensive benchmarks and numerous examples are presented which show the validity of the approach in general and GRILLIX in particular.

  10. Radiofrequency-heated enhanced confinement modes in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, Y.; Boivin, R.L.; Bombarda, F.; Bonoli, P.T.; Christensen, C.; Fiore, C.; Garnier, D.; Goetz, J.A.; Golovato, S.N.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Horne, S.F.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.H.; Irby, J.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E.; May, M.; Mazurenko, A.; McCracken, G.; OShea, P.; Porkolab, M.; Reardon, J.; Rice, J.; Rost, C.; Schachter, J.; Snipes, J.A.; Stek, P.; Terry, J.; Watterson, R.; Welch, B.; Wolfe, S. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Enhanced confinement modes up to a toroidal field of B{sub T}=8T have been studied with up to 3.5 MW of radiofrequency (rf) heating power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) at 80 MHz. H-mode is observed when the edge temperature exceeds a threshold value. The high confinement mode (H-mode) with higher confinement enhancement factors (H) and longer duration became possible after boronization by reducing the radiated power from the main plasma. A quasi-steady state with high confinement (H=2.0), high normalized beta ({beta}{sub N}=1.5), low radiated power fraction (P{sub rad}{sup main}/P{sub loss}=0.3), and low effective charge (Z{sub eff}=1.5) has been obtained in Enhanced D{sub {alpha}} H-mode. This type of H-mode has enhanced levels of continuous D{sub {alpha}} emission and very little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity, and reduced core particle confinement time relative to ELM-free H-mode. The pellet enhanced performance (PEP) mode is obtained by combining core fueling with pellet injection and core heating. A highly peaked pressure profile with a central value of 8 atmospheres was observed. The steep pressure gradient drives off-axis bootstrap current, resulting in a shear reversed safety factor (q) profile. Suppression of sawteeth appears to be important in maintaining the highly peaked pressure profile. Lithium pellets were found to be more effective than deuterium pellets in raising q{sub 0}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Path Integral Confined Dirac Fermions in a Constant Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Merdaci, Abdeldjalil; Jellal, Ahmed; CHETOUANI, Lyazid

    2014-01-01

    We consider Dirac fermion confined in harmonic potential and submitted to a constant magnetic field. The corresponding solutions of the energy spectrum are obtained by using the path integral techniques. For this, we begin by establishing a symmetric global projection, which provides a symmetric form for the Green function. Based on this, we show that it is possible to end up with the propagator of the harmonic oscillator for one charged particle. After some transformations, we derive the nor...

  12. Effect of energy and momentum conservation on fluid resonances for resonant magnetic perturbations in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the impact of momentum and energy conservation of the collision operator in the kinetic description for Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in a tokamak is studied. The particle conserving differential collision operator of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type is supplemented with integral parts such that energy and momentum are conserved. The application to RMP penetration in a tokamak shows that energy conservation in the electron collision operator is important for the quantitative description of plasma shielding effects at the resonant surface. On the other hand, momentum conservation in the ion collision operator does not significantly change the results

  13. Total magnetic reconnection during a tokamak major disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety factor within a tokamak plasma has been measured during a major disruption. During the disruption, the central safety factor jumps from below one to above one, while the total current is unchanged. This implies that total reconnection has occurred. This observation is in contract to the absence of total reconnection observed during a sawtooth oscillation in the same device. 11 refs., 6 figs

  14. Observation of a high-confinement regime in a tokamak plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wagner, F.; Wesner, F.; Bäumler, J.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fritsch, R.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; v. Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hofmann, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; van Mark, E.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Puri, S.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K.-H.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Zasche, D.

    1987-01-01

    The H mode in ion cyclotron-resonance-heated plasmas has been investigated with and without additional neutral beam injection. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating can cause the transition into a high-confinement regime (H mode) in combination with beam heating. The H mode, however, has also been realized-for the first time-with ion cyclotron-resonance heating alone in the D (H)-hydrogen minority scheme at an absorbed rf power of 1.1 MW.

  15. Neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) magnetic spectrum and magnetic coupling in JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruzzo, M; Bolzonella, T [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Alper, B; Brix, M; Challis, C D; De Vries, P C; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N C; Howell, D F; Mailloux, J [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Buratti, P; Crisanti, F; Tudisco, O [Associazione Euratom/ENEA sulla Fusione, CP 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); De la Luna, E [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Imbeaux, F; Joffrin, E; Litaudon, X [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Koslowski, H R [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZ Juelich, Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Sips, A C C, E-mail: matteo.baruzzo@igi.cnr.i [European Commission, Brussels, B-1094 (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    An experimental study on the poloidal mode number (m) spectrum produced by a single toroidal mode number (n) neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) in the JET tokamak is presented. Clear evidence of the existence of more than one significant m component is given. The analysis is performed comparing several methods and diagnostics; among the latter we mention high frequency magnetic pick-up coils and an electron cyclotron emission radiometer, which measures detailed electron temperature radial profiles at high time resolution. The two diagnostics are also used together in a cross coherence calculation technique. The issue of the interaction of this multiple m structure with the plasma is addressed as well, with particular attention paid to plasma toroidal rotation and rotation shear, obtained from charge exchange spectroscopy data. This effect has been studied under two different operational plasma scenarios on JET in order to investigate both dependences on plasma parameters and consequences on the scenario itself.

  16. Particle confinement control with resonant magnetic perturbations at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two very contrary particle confinement stages were obtained at TEXTOR-DED by application of resonant magnetic perturbations. On the one hand a spontaneous build up of the total number of particles Ntot with correlated increase in the particle confinement time τp was observed and on the other hand a controlled decrease of Ntot and τp - the so called stochastic particle pump out is seen. Numerical analysis of the perturbed magnetic field topology shows that both domains can be distinguished by the ratio of short connection length field lines touching a specific resonant flux surface (here the q=5/2 surface) to the complete perturbed layer width. During improved particle confinement, the hyperbolic fixed points (X-points) of the pitch resonant islands are directly connected to the DED target followed by an ≤40% increase in τp. The subsequent increase in the ExB shear rate ΩExB at the q=5/2 surface and a steepening of ∇ne(r) suggests a reduction of the radial particle transport. On the opposite, complete stochastisation of this island chain, i.e. a predominant diffusive field line characteristics, causes a ≤30% decrease of τp with a reduction in ΩExB at the q=5/2 surface and ∇ne(r) indicating enhanced effective outward particle transport.

  17. Attainment of high confinement in neutral beam heated divertor discharges in the PDX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PDX divertor configuration has recently been converted from an open to a closed geometry to inhibit the return of neutral gas from the divertor region to the main chamber. Since then, operation in a regime with high energy confinement in neutral beam heated discharges (ASDEX H-mode) has been routine over a wide range of operating conditions. These H-mode discharges are characterized by a sudden drop in divertor density and H/sub α/ emission and a spontaneous rise in main chamber plasma density during neutral beam injection. The confinement time is found to scale nearly linearly with plasma current, but it can be degraded due to either the presence of edge instabilities or heavy gas puffing. Detailed Thomson scattering temperature profiles show high values of Te near the plasma edge (approx. 450 eV) with sharp radial gradients (approx. 400 eV/cm) near the separatrix. Density profiles are broad and also exhibit steep gradients close to the separatrix

  18. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  19. Stationary shapes of confined rotating magnetic liquid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Sérgio A; Miranda, José A; Oliveira, Rafael M

    2010-09-01

    We study the family of steady shapes which arise when a magnetic liquid droplet is confined in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell and subjected to an azimuthal magnetic field. Two different scenarios are considered: first, the magnetic fluid is assumed to be a Newtonian ferrofluid, and then it is taken as a viscoelastic magnetorheological fluid. The influence of the distinct material properties of the fluids on the ultimate morphology of the emerging stationary patterns is investigated by using a vortex-sheet formalism. Some of these exact steady structures are similar to the advanced time patterns obtained by existing time-evolving numerical simulations of the problem. A weakly nonlinear approach is employed to examine this fact and to gain analytical insight about relevant aspects related to the stability of such exact stationary solutions. PMID:21230182

  20. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today's magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today's computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  1. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  2. Orbital magnetism of graphene nanostructures: Bulk and confinement effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heße, Lisa; Richter, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    We consider the orbital magnetic properties of noninteracting charge carriers in graphene-based nanostructures in the low-energy regime. The magnetic response of such systems results both from bulk contributions and from confinement effects that can be particularly strong in ballistic quantum dots. First we provide a comprehensive study of the magnetic susceptibility χ of bulk graphene in a magnetic field for the different regimes arising from the relative magnitudes of the energy scales involved, i.e., temperature, Landau-level spacing, and chemical potential. We show that for finite temperature or chemical potential, χ is not divergent although the diamagnetic contribution χ0 from the filled valance band exhibits the well-known -B-1 /2 dependence. We further derive oscillatory modulations of χ , corresponding to de Haas-van Alphen oscillations of conventional two-dimensional electron gases. These oscillations can be large in graphene, thereby compensating the diamagnetic contribution χ0 and yielding a net paramagnetic susceptibility for certain energy and magnetic field regimes. Second, we predict and analyze corresponding strong, confinement-induced susceptibility oscillations in graphene-based quantum dots with amplitudes distinctly exceeding the corresponding bulk susceptibility. Within a semiclassical approach we derive generic expressions for orbital magnetism of graphene quantum dots with regular classical dynamics. Graphene-specific features can be traced back to pseudospin interference along the underlying periodic orbits. We demonstrate the quality of the semiclassical approximation by comparison with quantum-mechanical results for two exemplary mesoscopic systems, a graphene disk with infinite mass-type edges, and a rectangular graphene structure with armchair and zigzag edges, using numerical tight-binding calculations in the latter case.

  3. Turbulence and transport in enhanced confinement regimes of tokamaks: Simulation and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, T.S.; Artun, M.; Beer, M.A. [and others

    1996-12-31

    An integrated program of theory and computation has been developed to understand the physics responsible for the favorable confinement trends exhibited by, for example, enhanced reversed shear (ERS) plasmas in TFTR and DIII-D. This paper reports on (1) the quantitative assessment of ExB shear suppression of turbulence by comparison of the linear growth rate calculated from the gyrofluid/comprehensive kinetic codes and the experimentally measured shearing rate in TFTR ERS plasmas; (2) the first self-consistent nonlinear demonstration of ion temperature gradient turbulence reduction due to {angle}P{sub i} driven ExB shear by the global gyrokinetic simulation; (3) a revised neoclassical analysis and gyrokinetic particle simulation results in agreement with trends in ERS plasmas; (4) Shafranov shift induced stabilization of trapped electron mode in ERS plasmas calculated by the gyrofluid code; and (5) new nonlinear gyrokinetic equations for turbulence in core transport barriers.

  4. Study and optimization of magnetized ICRF discharges for tokamak wall conditioning and assessment of the applicability to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is devoted to the study and optimization of the Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) technique. ICWC, operated in presence of the toroidal magnetic field, makes use of four main tokamak systems: the ICRF antennas to initiate and sustain the conditioning discharge, the gas injection valves to provide the discharge gas, the machine pumps to remove the wall desorbed particles, and the poloidal magnetic field system to optimize the discharge homogeneity. Additionally neutral gas and plasma diagnostics are required to monitor the discharge and the conditioning efficiency. In chapter 2 a general overview on ICWC is given. Chapter 3 treats the ICRF discharge homogeneity and the confinement properties of the employed magnetic field. In the first part we will discuss experimental facts on plasma homogeneity, and how experimental optimization led to its improvement. In the second part of the chapter the confinement properties of a partially ionized plasma in a toroidal magnetic field configuration with additional small vertical component are discussed. Chapter 4 gives an overview of experimental results on the efficiency of ICWC, obtained on TORE SUPRA, TEXTOR, JET and ASDEX Upgrade. In chapter 5 a 0D kinetic description of hydrogen-helium RF plasmas is outlined. The model, describing the evolution of ICRF plasmas from discharge initiation to the (quasi) steady state plasma stage, is developed to obtain insight on ICRF plasma parameters, particle fluxes to the walls and the main collisional processes. Chapter 6 presents a minimum structure for a 0D reservoir model of the wall to investigate in deeper detail the ICWC plasma wall interaction during isotopic exchange experiments. The hypothesis used to build up the wall model is that the same model structure should be able to describe the wall behavior during normal plasmas and conditioning procedures. Chapter 7 extrapolates the results to the envisaged application of ICWC on ITER

  5. Injection, compression and confinement of electrons in a magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Helmholtz coil configuration has been constructed where the magnetic field can be increased to about 10 kGauss in 20 μsec. Electrons are injected from a hot tantalum filament between two plates across which a potential of about 5 keV is applied. The electric field E is perpendicular to the magnetic field B so that the direction of the E x B drift is radial--into the magnetic mirror. About 1014 electrons were injected and about 1013 electrons were trapped. The initial electron energy was about 5 keV and after compression 500 keV x-rays were observed. The confinement time is very sensitive to vacuum. Confinement times of milliseconds and good compression were observed at vacuum of 5.10-5 torr or less. Above 5.10-5 torr there was no trapping or compression. After a compressed ring of electrons was formed, it was released by a pulse applied to one of the Helmholtz coils that reduced the field. Ejection of the electron ring was observed by x-ray measurements

  6. World survey of magnetic mirror confinement research facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. T.; Price, R. E.

    1984-02-01

    A common format to present the information on each project was adopted. Projects were selected for inclusion based on knowledge of their direct relevance or contribution to the magnetic mirror confinement program. The information on each project was first compiled in draft form from published literature and reports available. The draft material was then sent to key individuals associated with each project, with the original source of information identified, to solicit their additions and corrections. The responses were then reviewed and discrepancies with previously published information clarified through further consultations. The information was then incorporated into the document with a revision date to reflect the state of currency of the information.

  7. Anomalous transport effects in magnetically-confined plasma columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of density structure in a magnetized plasma column is analyzed accounting for anomalous diffusion due to the lower hybrid drift instability. The plasma column is found to be divided into regions of classical, anomalous, and intermediate diffusivity. The bulk behavior, described in terms of radial confinement time, depends most sensitively upon the particle line density (ion/cm). For broad plasmas (large line density), the transport is characteristic of classical diffusion, and for slender plasmas (small line density) the transport is characteristic of anomalous diffusion. For intermediate line densities, the transport undertakes a rapid transition from classical to anomalous. Correlations between the theoretical results and past experiments are described

  8. Density Functional Theory Studies of Magnetically Confined Fermi Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇俊; 马红孺

    2001-01-01

    A theory is developed for magnetically confined Fermi gas at a low temperature based on the density functional theory. The theory is illustrated by the numerical calculation of the density distributions of Fermi atoms 40K with parameters according to DeMarco and Jin's experiment [Science, 285(1999)1703]. Our results are in close agreement with the experiment. To check the theory, we also performed calculations using our theory at a high temperature, which compared very well to the results of the classical limit.

  9. Magnetic ripple and the modeling of lower-hybrid current drive in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y.; Arslanbekov, R.; Basiuk, V.; Carrasco, J.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Bizarro, J.P. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica

    1996-01-01

    Using ray-tracing, a detailed investigation of the lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation in presence of toroidal magnetic field ripple is presented. By coupling ray tracing with a one-dimensional relativistic Fokker-Planck code, simulations of LH experiments have been performed for the Tore Supra tokamak. Taking into account magnetic ripple in LH simulations, a better agreement is found between numerical predictions and experimental observations, such as non-thermal Bremsstrahlung emission, current profile, ripple-induced power losses in local magnetic mirrors, when plasma conditions correspond to the ` `few passes` regime. (author). 47 refs.

  10. Effects of the magnetic equilibrium on gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak microinstabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general geometry of the experimental tokamak magnetic equilibrium is implemented in the global gyrokinetic simulation code GEM. Compared to the general geometry, the well used Miller parameterization of the magnetic equilibrium is a good approximation in the core region and up to the top of the pedestal. Linear simulations indicate that results with the two geometries agree for r/a ≤ 0.9. However, in the edge region, the instabilities are sensitive to the magnetic equilibrium in both the L-mode and the H-mode plasmas. A small variation of the plasma shaping parameters leads to large changes to the edge instability

  11. Magnetic ripple and the modeling of lower-hybrid current drive in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ray-tracing, a detailed investigation of the lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation in presence of toroidal magnetic field ripple is presented. By coupling ray tracing with a one-dimensional relativistic Fokker-Planck code, simulations of LH experiments have been performed for the Tore Supra tokamak. Taking into account magnetic ripple in LH simulations, a better agreement is found between numerical predictions and experimental observations, such as non-thermal Bremsstrahlung emission, current profile, ripple-induced power losses in local magnetic mirrors, when plasma conditions correspond to the ' 'few passes' regime. (author)

  12. Determination of the plasma column shape in the Tokamak Novillo cross section by magnetic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of plasma cross section shape in Tokamaks is an important diagnostic method for equilibrium conditions analysis. In this work, it is obtained a time dependent variation of the plasma column cross section in Novillo Tokamak. The experimental method is based on using one magnetic probe, which is installed inside of the vacuum vessel in a 1 mm. wall thickness stainless steel tube, in the protected region of the limiter shadow. The plasma column cross section is determined measuring the poloidal magnetic field produced by the plasma current. This method, now running for determining the plasma column shape, requires the measurement of magnetic present field outside plasma column. The measurements are carried out from a set of small coils, which are located inside the vacuum chamber in the radial and poloidal direction, so we can measure magnetic field with no current attenuations produced by the penetration time of the stainless steel vacuum chamber. The magnetic probe detect a real time variation of magnetic flux passing through them. In order to obtain the magnetic field values, it is required that the electric signals coming from the magnetic probe be integrated, this operation is carried out by active circuits located between the probe signal and one oscilloscope. The integrated signals can be exhibited photographed on the oscilloscope display. (Author)

  13. Nonneutralized charge effects on tokamak edge magnetohydrodynamic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin; Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Shi, T. H.; Wang, H. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the large ion orbits, excessive electrons can accumulate at tokamak edge. We find that the nonneutralized electrons at tokamak edge can contribute an electric compressive stress in the direction parallel to magnetic field by their mutual repulsive force. By extending the Chew-Goldburger-Low theory (Chew et al., 1956 [13]), it is shown that this newly recognized compressive stress can significantly change the plasma average magnetic well, so that a stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes in the pedestal can result. This linear stability regime helps to explain why in certain parameter regimes the tokamak high confinement can be rather quiet as observed experimentally.

  14. Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC) for toroidal confinement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Kolemen, Egemen; Lazerson, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Because of intrinsic anisotropy of high temperature plasma with respect to magnetic field, use of proper coordinates is of high priority for both theory and numerical methods. While in axisymmetric case, the poloidal flux function Y(r,z)=const determines proper flux coordinates, in 3-D, such a function does not exist. The destruction of nested magnetic surfaces even by small 3-D perturbations leads to a sudden change of topology of magnetic field. As a result, the coordinate systems can no longer be based on tracing the magnetic field lines resulting in difficulties for theory and 3-D numerical simulations. The RMC coordinates a,θ,ζ presented here (introduced in 1998 but not really used) are nested toroidal coordinates, which are best aligned with an ergodic confinement fields. In particular, in RMC the vector potential of the magnetic field has an irreducible form A = φ00(a)∇θ +[Y00(a) +ψ^*(a,θ,ζ)]∇ζ , where 3-D function ψ^* contains only resonant Fourier harmonics of angle coordinates. RMC can be generated and advanced using a fast (Newton) algorithm not involving the field line tracing.

  15. Magnetic reconnection triggering magnetohydrodynamic instabilities during a sawtooth crash in a Tokamak plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I T; Scannell, R; Cooper, W A; Graves, J P; Hastie, R J; Naylor, G; Zocco, A

    2010-12-17

    Thomson scattering measurements with subcentimeter spatial resolution have been made during a sawtooth crash in a Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak fusion plasma. The unparalleled resolution of the temperature profile has shed new light on the mechanisms that underlie the sawtooth. As magnetic reconnection occurs, the temperature gradient at the island boundary increases. The increased local temperature gradient is sufficient to make the helical core unstable to ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, thought to be responsible for the rapidity of the collapse.

  16. Benchmarking atomic physics models for magnetically confined fusion plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In present magnetically confined fusion devices, high and intermediate Z impurities are either puffed into the plasma for divertor radiative cooling experiments or are sputtered from the high Z plasma facing armor. The beneficial cooling of the edge as well as the detrimental radiative losses from the core of these impurities can be properly understood only if the atomic physics used in the modeling of the cooling curves is very accurate. To this end, a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of some relevant impurities is undertaken. Gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are puffed and nongases are introduced through laser ablation into the FTU tokamak plasma. The charge state distributions and total density of these impurities are determined from spatial scans of several photometrically calibrated vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrographs (3 - 1600 Angstrom), the multiple ionization state transport code transport code (MIST) and a collisional radiative model. The radiative power losses are measured with bolometery, and the emissivity profiles were measured by a visible bremsstrahlung array. The ionization balance, excitation physics, and the radiative cooling curves are computed from the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore atomic code (HULLAC) and are benchmarked by these experiments. (Supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53214 at JHU and Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at LLNL.) copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. Benchmarking atomic physics models for magnetically confined fusion plasma physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Finkenthal, M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Moos, H. W.; Pacella, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Fournier, K.; Goldstein, W.; Gregory, B.

    1999-01-01

    In present magnetically confined fusion devices, high and intermediate Z impurities are either puffed into the plasma for divertor radiative cooling experiments or are sputtered from the high Z plasma facing armor. The beneficial cooling of the edge as well as the detrimental radiative losses from the core of these impurities can be properly understood only if the atomic physics used in the modeling of the cooling curves is very accurate. To this end, a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of some relevant impurities is undertaken. Gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are puffed and nongases are introduced through laser ablation into the FTU tokamak plasma. The charge state distributions and total density of these impurities are determined from spatial scans of several photometrically calibrated vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrographs (3-1600 Å), the multiple ionization state transport code transport code (MIST) and a collisional radiative model. The radiative power losses are measured with bolometery, and the emissivity profiles were measured by a visible bremsstrahlung array. The ionization balance, excitation physics, and the radiative cooling curves are computed from the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore atomic code (HULLAC) and are benchmarked by these experiments. (Supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53214 at JHU and Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at LLNL.)

  18. The fast reciprocating magnetic probe system on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhuang, Ge; Liu, Hai; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The fast reciprocating magnetic probe (FRMP) system is newly developed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) to measure the local magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge. The magnetic probe array in the FRMP consists of four 2-dimensional magnetic probes arranged at different radial locations to detect local poloidal and radial magnetic fields. These probes are protected by a graphite and boron nitride casing to improve the frequency response of each probe; they are mounted on the head of a movable rod, which is oriented along radial direction at the top of the torus. In the experiments, multiple core diagnostics show that the insertion of the FRMP has little impact on the equilibrium of the plasma. Local magnetic fluctuations inside the last closed flux surface are successfully measured by the FRMP.

  19. A MHD invariant with effects on the confinement regimes in Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, Florin

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental Lagrangian, frozen-in and topological invariants can be useful to explain systematic connections between plasma parameters. At high plasma temperature the dissipation is small and the robust invariances are manifested. We invoke a frozen-in invariant which is an extension of the Ertel's theorem and connects the vorticity of the large scale motions with the profile of the safety factor and of particle density. Assuming ergodicity of the small scale turbulence we consider the approximative preservation of the invariant for changes of the vorticity in an annular region of finite radial extension (i.e. poloidal rotation). We find that the ionization-induced rotation triggered by a pellet requires a reversed-$q$ profile. In the $H$-mode, the invariance requires a accumulation of the current density in the rotation layer. Then this becomes a vorticity-current sheet which may explain experimental observations related to the penetration of the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation and the filamentation during th...

  20. Forced magnetic reconnection and field penetration of an externally applied rotating helical magnetic field in the TEXTOR tokamak

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, Y; de Bock, M. F. M.; Reiser, D.; Wolf, R C; Finken, K. H.; Jakubowski, M W.; R. Jaspers; Koslowski, H. R.; Krämer-Flecken, A; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Matsunaga, G.

    2006-01-01

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fl...

  1. An Overview of Plasma Confinement in Toroidal Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dini, Fatemeh; Baghdadi, Reza; Amrollahi, Reza; Khorasani, Sina

    2009-01-01

    This overview presents a tutorial introduction to the theory of magnetic plasma confinement in toroidal confinement systems with particular emphasis on axisymmetric equilibrium geometries, and tokamaks. The discussion covers three important aspects of plasma physics: Equilibrium, Stability, and Transport. The section on equilibrium will go through an introduction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, curvilinear system of coordinates, flux coordinates, extensions to axisymmetric equilibrium, Grad-Sh...

  2. Simulation of transition dynamics to high confinement in fusion plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Xu, G. S.; Madsen, Jens;

    2015-01-01

    The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST. Particula...... highly relevant for developing predictive models of the transition, essential for understanding and optimizing future fusion power reactors....

  3. The rectangular array of magnetic probes on J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhipeng; Li, Fuming; Zhuang, Ge; Jian, Xiang; Zhu, Lizhi

    2016-11-01

    The rectangular array of magnetic probes system was newly designed and installed in the torus on J-TEXT tokamak to measure the local magnetic fields outside the last closed flux surface at a single toroidal angle. In the implementation, the experimental results agree well with the theoretical results based on the Spool model and three-dimensional numerical finite element model when the vertical field was applied. Furthermore, the measurements were successfully used as the input of EFIT code to conduct the plasma equilibrium reconstruction. The calculated Faraday rotation angle using the EFIT output is in agreement with the measured one from the three-wave polarimeter-interferometer system.

  4. Pioneering superconducting magnets in large tokamaks: evaluation after 16 years of operating experience in tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal field (TF) system of Tore Supra (TS) is superconducting. After 16 years of operation it is possible to give an overview of the experience gained on a large superconducting system integrated in a large Tokamak. Quantitative data will be given, about the TF system for the cryogenic system and for the magnet system as well, concerning the number of plasmas shots and the availability of the machine. The origin and the number of breakdowns or incidents will be described, with emphasis on cryogenics, to document repairs and changes on the system components. Concerning the behaviour during operation, the Fast Safety Discharges (FSD) in operation are of particular interest for the Tokamak operation, as they interrupt it on a significant time of the order of one hour. This aspect is particularly documented. The approach followed to decrease the number of these FSD will be reported and explained. The Tore Supra Tokamak was the first important meeting between Superconductivity and Plasma Physics on a large scale. Overall, despite the differences in design and size, the accumulated experience over 16 years of operation is a useful tool to prepare the manufacturing and the operation of the ITER magnets. (authors)

  5. Design of magnetic probes for MHD measurements in ASDEX tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of magnetic probes (Mirnov coils) is described in this report. These probes are used in ASDEX to investigate MHD modes and measure the plasma displacement together with magnetic flux loops. Concerning the high temperature rise during a plasma shot proper material for the coil form of the magnetic probes and the suitable wire and cable in the high vacuum chamber in conjunction with special geometrical construction have been selected. The electrical circuit updated to operate in a high noise environment is shown and first MHD mode signals demonstrate the effeciency of the system. (orig.)

  6. A magnetically driven reciprocating probe for tokamak scrape-off layer measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, J P; Pascal, J-Y

    2011-12-01

    A new in situ reciprocating probe system has been developed to provide scrape-off layer measurements in the Tore Supra tokamak. The probe motion is provided by the rotation of an energized coil in the tokamak magnetic field. Simple analytic approximations to the exact numerical model were used to identify the important parameters that govern the dynamics of the system, and optimize the coil geometry, the electrical circuit, and the stiffness of the retaining spring. The linear speed of the probe is directly proportional to the current induced by the coil's rotation; its integral gives the coil position, providing a means to implement real-time feedback control of the probe motion. Two probes were recently mounted on a movable outboard antenna protection limiter in Tore Supra and provided automatic measurements during the 2011 experimental campaign.

  7. Conceptual integrated approach for the magnet system of a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We give a conceptual approach of a fusion reactor magnet system based on analytical formula. • We give design criteria for the CS and TF cable in conduit conductors and for the magnet system structural description. • We apply this conceptual approach to ITER and we crosscheck with actual characteristics. • We apply this conceptual approach to a possible version of DEMO. - Abstract: In the framework of the reflexion about DEMO, a conceptual integrated approach for the magnet system of a tokamak reactor is presented. This objective is reached using analytical formulas which are presented in this paper, coupled to a Fortran code ESCORT (Electromagnetic Superconducting System for the Computation of Research Tokamaks), to be integrated into SYCOMORE, a code for reactor modelling presently in development at CEA/IRFM in Cadarache, using the tools of the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modelling task force. The analytical formulas deal with all aspects of the magnet system, starting from the derivation of the TF system general geometry, from the plasma main characteristics. The design criteria for the cable current density and the structural design of the toroidal field and central solenoid systems are presented, enabling to deliver the radial thicknesses of the magnets and enabling also to estimate the plasma duration of the plateau. As a matter of fact, a pulsed version DEMO is presently actively considered in the European programmes. Considerations regarding the cryogenics and the protection are given, affecting the general design. An application of the conceptual approach is presented, allowing a comparison between ESCORT output data and actual ITER parameters and giving the main characteristics of a possible version for DEMO

  8. Conceptual integrated approach for the magnet system of a tokamak reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchateau, J.-L., E-mail: Jean-luc.duchateau@cea.fr; Hertout, P.; Saoutic, B.; Artaud, J.-F.; Zani, L.; Reux, C.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We give a conceptual approach of a fusion reactor magnet system based on analytical formula. • We give design criteria for the CS and TF cable in conduit conductors and for the magnet system structural description. • We apply this conceptual approach to ITER and we crosscheck with actual characteristics. • We apply this conceptual approach to a possible version of DEMO. - Abstract: In the framework of the reflexion about DEMO, a conceptual integrated approach for the magnet system of a tokamak reactor is presented. This objective is reached using analytical formulas which are presented in this paper, coupled to a Fortran code ESCORT (Electromagnetic Superconducting System for the Computation of Research Tokamaks), to be integrated into SYCOMORE, a code for reactor modelling presently in development at CEA/IRFM in Cadarache, using the tools of the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modelling task force. The analytical formulas deal with all aspects of the magnet system, starting from the derivation of the TF system general geometry, from the plasma main characteristics. The design criteria for the cable current density and the structural design of the toroidal field and central solenoid systems are presented, enabling to deliver the radial thicknesses of the magnets and enabling also to estimate the plasma duration of the plateau. As a matter of fact, a pulsed version DEMO is presently actively considered in the European programmes. Considerations regarding the cryogenics and the protection are given, affecting the general design. An application of the conceptual approach is presented, allowing a comparison between ESCORT output data and actual ITER parameters and giving the main characteristics of a possible version for DEMO.

  9. World survey of magnetic mirror confinement research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common format to present the information on each project has been adopted. Projects are selected for inclusion in this document based on knowledge of their direct relevance or contribution to the magnetic mirror confinement program. The information on each project was first compiled in draft form from published literature and reports available. The draft material was then sent to key individuals associated with each project, with the original source of information identified, to solicit their additions and corrections. The responses were then reviewed and discrepencies with previously published information clarified through further consultations. The information was then incorporated into this document with a revision date to reflect the state of currency of the information

  10. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  11. Path Integral Confined Dirac Fermions in a Constant Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Merdaci, Abdeldjalil; Chetouani, Lyazid

    2014-01-01

    We consider Dirac fermion confined in harmonic potential and submitted to a constant magnetic field. The corresponding solutions of the energy spectrum are obtained by using the path integral techniques. For this, we begin by establishing a symmetric global projection, which provides a symmetric form for the Green function. Based on this, we show that it is possible to end up with the propagator of the harmonic oscillator for one charged particle. After some transformations, we derive the normalized wave functions and the eigenvalues in terms of different physical parameters and quantum numbers. By interchanging quantum numbers, we show that our solutions possed interesting properties. The density of current and the non-relativistic limit are analyzed where different conclusions are obtained.

  12. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  13. Open and Closed Magnetic Confinement Systems: Is There a Fundamental Difference in Their Transport Properties?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R F

    2001-02-27

    The results of five decades of experimental investigations of open-ended and closed magnetic confinement geometries are examined to see if intrinsic topology-dependent differences in their cross-field transport can be discerned. The evidence strongly supports a picture in which closed systems (stellarators, tokamaks, reversed-field pinches, etc.) are in all cases studied to date characterized by some level of plasma turbulence, leading to substantial deviations from purely classical cross-field transport. This transport is often describable as a Bohm-like scaling with plasma temperature and magnetic field intensity. By contrast, open systems have in many significant examples been able to approach closely to classically predicted cross-field transport, including cases where the transport appeared to be more than five orders of magnitude slower than the Bohm-diffusion rate. To explain these differences the following tentative hypothesis is put forward: The differences arise from two sources: (1) differences in the instability driving terms arising from free-energy sources, such as current flow along the field lines, etc. and, (2) differences in the nature of the boundary conditions for the various unstable waves that may be stimulated by these free energy sources within the plasma. By analogy with a laser, closed systems, with their flux tubes returning on themselves, resemble a ring resonator, while open systems either have or can be arranged to have absorptive (or low reflectivity) end boundary conditions for unstable waves. It is suggested that if the hypothesis is a valid one it further enhances the desirability of devoting more effort to the investigation of open-ended systems than is now being allotted.

  14. Effect of the vacuum vessel on magnetic measurements in TCABR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinski, M. Y.; Kuznetsov, Yu. K.; Saettone, E. A. O.

    2004-11-01

    Magnetic diagnostics in fusion experiments can be strongly affected by eddy currents induced in the vacuum vessel and in-vessel conducting components. In the present work the effect of the eddy currents on magnetic measurements in the TCABR tokamak with nearly circular plasma shape and rectangular cross section of the vacuum vessel is discussed. A method to find the magnetic field generated by eddy currents, in reply to the magnetic field of plasma currents, is based on expansion of vacuum field in series of toroidal harmonics. The conclusion is that, if the sensors are placed near the vessel, the effect of the vessel is strong and it decreases substantially in the case of sensors located near the plasma boundary at the circular surface.

  15. Generation of a magnetic island by edge turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyé, A.; Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Garbet, X.; Benkadda, S.; Sen, A.; Dubuit, N.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate, through extensive 3D magneto-hydro-dynamics numerical simulations, the nonlinear excitation of a large scale magnetic island and its dynamical properties due to the presence of small-scale turbulence. Turbulence is induced by a steep pressure gradient in the edge region [B. D. Scott, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, S25 (2007)], close to the separatrix in tokamaks where there is an X-point magnetic configuration. We find that quasi-resonant localized interchange modes at the plasma edge can beat together and produce extended modes that transfer energy to the lowest order resonant surface in an inner stable zone and induce a seed magnetic island. The island width displays high frequency fluctuations that are associated with the fluctuating nature of the energy transfer process from the turbulence, while its mean size is controlled by the magnetic energy content of the turbulence.

  16. Generation of a magnetic island by edge turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyé, A. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Université de Bordeaux, CELIA Laboratory, Talence 33405 (France); Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S.; Dubuit, N. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2015-03-15

    We investigate, through extensive 3D magneto-hydro-dynamics numerical simulations, the nonlinear excitation of a large scale magnetic island and its dynamical properties due to the presence of small-scale turbulence. Turbulence is induced by a steep pressure gradient in the edge region [B. D. Scott, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, S25 (2007)], close to the separatrix in tokamaks where there is an X-point magnetic configuration. We find that quasi-resonant localized interchange modes at the plasma edge can beat together and produce extended modes that transfer energy to the lowest order resonant surface in an inner stable zone and induce a seed magnetic island. The island width displays high frequency fluctuations that are associated with the fluctuating nature of the energy transfer process from the turbulence, while its mean size is controlled by the magnetic energy content of the turbulence.

  17. Influence of external resonant magnetic perturbation field on edge plasma of small tokamak HYBTOK-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: hayashi-yuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Suzuki, Y.; Ohno, N. [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Okamoto, M. [Ishikawa National College of Technology, Kitachujo, Tsubata-cho, Kahoku-gun, Ishikawa 929-0392 (Japan); Kikuchi, Y. [University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakakibara, S.; Watanabe, K.; Takemura, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Radial profile of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field with mode numbers of m = 6 and n = 2 in a small tokamak device HYBTOK-II have been investigated using a magnetic probe array, which is able to measure the radial profile of magnetic field perturbation induced by applying RMP. Results of RMP penetration into the plasma show that the RMP decreased toward the plasma center, while they were amplified around the resonant surface with a safety factor q = 3 due to the formation of magnetic islands. This suggests that RMP fields for controlling edge plasmas may trigger some kind of MHD instabilities. In addition, simulation results, based on a linearized four-field model, which agrees with the experimental ones, indicates that the penetration and amplification process of RMP strongly depend on a Doppler-shifted frequency between the RMP and plasma rotation.

  18. Magnetic compressibility and ion-temperature-gradient-driven microinstabilities in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zocco, A; Connor, J W

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic theory of the strongly driven ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas is developed. Stabilizing and destabilizing effects are identified, and a critical $\\beta_{e}$ (the ratio of the electron to magnetic pressure) for stabilization of the toroidal branch of the mode is calculated for magnetic equilibria independent of the coordinate along the magnetic field. Its scaling is $\\beta_{e}\\sim L_{Te}/R,$ where $L_{Te}$ is the characteristic electron temperature gradient length, and $R$ the major radius of the torus. We conjecture that a fast particle population can cause a similar stabilization due to its contribution to the equilibrium pressure gradient. For sheared equilibria, the boundary of marginal stability of the electromagnetic correction to the electrostatic mode is also given. For a general magnetic equilibrium, we find a critical length (for electromagnetic stabilization) of the extent of the unfavourable curvature along the magnetic field....

  19. Enhanced Confinement Scenarios Without Large Edge Localized Modes in Tokamaks: Control, Performance, and Extrapolability Issues for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, R [PPPL

    2014-07-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) typically accompany good H-mode confinement in fusion devices, but can present problems for plasma facing components because of high transient heat loads. Here the range of techniques for ELM control deployed in fusion devices is reviewed. The two baseline strategies in the ITER baseline design are emphasized: rapid ELM triggering and peak heat flux control via pellet injection, and the use of magnetic perturbations to suppress or mitigate ELMs. While both of these techniques are moderately well developed, with reasonable physical bases for projecting to ITER, differing observations between multiple devices are also discussed to highlight the needed community R & D. In addition, recent progress in ELM-free regimes, namely Quiescent H-mode, I-mode, and Enhanced Pedestal H-mode is reviewed, and open questions for extrapolability are discussed. Finally progress and outstanding issues in alternate ELM control techniques are reviewed: supersonic molecular beam injection, edge electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating and/or current drive, controlled periodic jogs of the vertical centroid position, ELM pace-making via periodic magnetic perturbations, ELM elimination with lithium wall conditioning, and naturally occurring small ELM regimes.

  20. Enhanced confinement scenarios without large edge localized modes in tokamaks: control, performance, and extrapolability issues for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingi, R.

    2014-11-01

    Large edge localized modes (ELMs) typically accompany good H-mode confinement in fusion devices, but can present problems for plasma facing components because of high transient heat loads. Here the range of techniques for ELM control deployed in fusion devices is reviewed. Two strategies in the ITER baseline design are emphasized: rapid ELM triggering and peak heat flux control via pellet injection, and the use of magnetic perturbations to suppress or mitigate ELMs. While both of these techniques are moderately well developed, with reasonable physical bases for projecting to ITER, differing observations between multiple devices are also discussed to highlight the needed community R&D. In addition, recent progress in ELM-free regimes, namely quiescent H-mode, I-mode, and enhanced pedestal H-mode is reviewed, and open questions for extrapolability are discussed. Finally progress and outstanding issues in alternate ELM control techniques are reviewed: supersonic molecular beam injection, edge electron cyclotron heating, lower hybrid heating and/or current drive, controlled periodic jogs of the vertical centroid position, ELM pace-making via periodic magnetic perturbations, ELM elimination with lithium wall conditioning, and naturally occurring small ELM regimes.

  1. Project and analysis of the toroidal magnetic field production circuits and the plasma formation of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) tokamak; Projeto e analise dos circuitos de producao de campo magnetico toroidal e de formacao do plasma do Tokamak ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe F.P.W.; Bosco, Edson del

    1994-12-31

    This report presents the project and analysis of the circuit for production of the toroidal magnetic field in the Tokamak ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment). The ETE is a Tokamak with a small-aspect-ratio parameter to be used for studying the plasma physics for the research on thermonuclear fusion. This machine is being constructed at the Laboratorio Associado de Plasma (LAP) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, Brazil. (author). 20 refs., 39 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Magnetic signature of current carrying edge localized modes filaments on the Joint European Torus tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliucci, P.; Naulin, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Fast magnetic pickup coils are used in forward modeling to match parameters in a simple edge localized mode (ELM) filament model. This novel method allows us to determine key parameters for the evolution of the ELM filaments, as effective mode number, radial and toroidal velocities, and average...... tokamaks, obtained by a range of different diagnostics. It is found that the forward modeling produces key parameters such as the number of filaments and their toroidal velocity in agreement with other observations and in addition allows an estimate of the filament current....

  3. Forces on liquid lithium modules in a tokamak blanket due to the pulsed poloidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper treats cylindrical modules filled with liquid lithium in the presence of a steady toroidal magnetic field and a time-dependent poloidal field. Solutions for liquid lithium flows and formulas for the forces on the modules are presented for both axial and transverse poloidal fields. Numerical examples are presented for the design in the ORNL/Westinghouse Tokamak Blanket Study. The initial analysis ignores the ends of the modules and treats infinitely long pipes, but the effects of the ends are also treated. Calculations and conclusions based on the solutions for infinitely long pipes are not significantly altered by end effects

  4. Studies of instability and transport in tokamak plasmas with very weak magnetic shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.Q.; Zhang, Y.Z. [Southwestern Inst. of Physics, Chengdu (China)]|[International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1997-04-01

    Ion temperature gradient (ITG or {eta}{sub i}) driven microinstabilities are studied, using kinetic theory, for tokamak plasmas with very weak (positive or negative) magnetic shear (VWS). The gradient of magnetic shear as well as the effects of parallel and perpendicular velocity shear (v{prime}{sub {parallel}} and v{prime}{sub E}) are included in the defining equations. Two eigenmodes: the double (D) and the global (G) are found to coexist. Parametric dependence of these instabilities, and of the corresponding quasilinear transport is systematically analyzed. It is shown that, in VWS plasmas, a parallel velocity shear (PVS) may stabilize or destabilize the modes, depending on the individual as well as the relative signs of PVS and of the gradient of magnetic shear. The quasilinear transport induced by the instabilities may be significantly reduced with PVS in VWS plasmas. The v{prime}{sub E} values required to completely suppress the instabilities are much lower in VWS plasmas than they are in normal plasmas. Possible correlations with tokamak experiments are discussed.

  5. Optimisation of out-vessel magnetic diagnostics for plasma boundary reconstruction in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, J A

    2013-01-01

    To improve the low frequency spectrum of magnetic field measurements of future tokamak reactors such as ITER, several steady state magnetic sensor technologies have been considered. For all the studied technologies it is always advantageous to place the sensors outside the vacuum vessel and as far away from the reactor core to minimize radiation damage and temperature effects, but not so far as to compromise the accuracy of the equilibrium reconstruction. We have studied to what extent increasing the distance between out-vessel sensors and plasma can be compensated for sensor accuracy and/or density before the limit imposed by the degeneracy of the problem is reached. The study is particularized for the Swiss TCV tokamak, due to the quality of its magnetic data and its ability to operate with a wide range of plasma shapes and divertor configurations. We have scanned the plasma boundary reconstruction error as function of out-vessel sensor density, accuracy and distance to the plasma. The study is performed fo...

  6. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  7. A planar conducting microstructure to guide and confine magnetic beads to a sensing zone

    KAUST Repository

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka Pasan

    2011-08-01

    A novel planar conducting microstructure is proposed to transport and confine magnetic micro/nano beads to a sensing zone. Manipulation and concentration of magnetic beads are achieved by employing square-shaped conducting micro-loops, with a few hundred nano-meters in thickness, arranged in a unique fashion. These microstructures are designed to produce high magnetic field gradients which are directly proportional to the force applied to manipulate the magnetic beads. Furthermore, the size of the microstructures allows greater maneuverability and control of magnetic beads than what could be achieved by permanent magnets. The aim of the microstructures is to guide magnetic beads from a large area and confine them to a smaller area where for example quantification would take place. Experiments were performed with different concentrations of 2 μm diameter magnetic beads. Experimental results showed that magnetic beads could be successfully guided and confined to the sensing zone. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic field analysis during breakdown phase in the low loop resistance tokamak HT-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Mitsushi; Doi, Akira; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Otsuka, Michio (Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Energy Research Lab.); Nishio, Satoshi; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Yoshino, Ryuji; Okazaki, Takashi

    1994-06-01

    The magnetic analysis code SHP was improved in order to understand the poloidal magnetic field during the breakdown phase of the Hitachi tokamak HT-2, which had its loop resistance modified to a very low value. The SHP code uses a model with filamental loop currents in the plasma area. Its improvements are the following. (1) The eddy currents on the vacuum vessel, which are assumed to be uniform in the toroidal direction, are expanded by distribution functions obtained by a singular value decomposition of a projection matrix from the eddy currents to the flux distribution on the plasma surface area. (2) The magnetic field due to the iron core biasing current and the stray horizontal field of the toroidal field coils are compensated. After improvements, it was confirmed that the poloidal field null point was generated before breakdown and the SHP results were consistent with discharge photographs taken by a high speed camera. (author).

  9. Design study of superconducting toroidal field magnet for tokamak fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design study of the superconducting toroidal field magnet for a 2000 MW sub(t) tokamak fusion power reactor has been carried out. Performed here were conductor design, magnetic field calculation, design of coil support, stress analysis and design of refrigeration system. The maximum toroidal field at the coil is 12T, providing 6T at the plasma center. Nb3Sn superconductors are employed in the higher field zone. The operation current is 34.72 kA, and the conductors are fully stabilized. The heat load in the magnet is 21.1 kW, and the required liquefaction rate is 36,000 l/h. Many technological problems were revealed by the design study. (auth.)

  10. Shearless bifurcation on symplectic maps of magnetic field lines in tokamaks with reversed current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoloni, B.; Schelin, A. B.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce two-dimensional symplectic maps to describe the Poincaré maps of magnetic field lines in large aspect ratio tokamak equilibria with reversed non-monotonic plasma current density profiles. For these maps, we investigate the effect of the symmetry breaking due to the toroidal correction with a peculiar invariant, namely, a magnetic surface with a null rotation number, enclosing a vanishing current. We find that this rotationless invariant surface is surrounded by many small island chains. Furthermore, near such invariant, the symmetry breaking gives rise to two magnetic shearless invariants surrounded by twin island chains. We also find chaotic lines adjacent to all the observed islands created by the considered structurally unstable equilibria.

  11. Magnetic Field Confinement in the Corona: The Role of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, M; Zhang, Mei; Low, Natasha Flyer & Boon Chye

    2006-01-01

    A loss of magnetic field confinement is believed to be the cause of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), a major form of solar activity in the corona. The mechanisms for magnetic energy storage are crucial in understanding how a field may possess enough free energy to overcome the Aly limit and open up. Previously, we have pointed out that the accumulation of magnetic helicity in the corona plays a significant role in storing magnetic energy. In this paper, we investigate another hydromagnetic consequence of magnetic-helicity accumulation. We propose a conjecture that there is an upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain. This is directly related to the hydromagnetic property that force-free fields in unbounded space have to be self-confining. Although a mathematical proof of this conjecture for any field configuration is formidable, its plausibility can be demonstrated with the properties of several families of power-law, axisymmetric force-free fields. We put forth mathematica...

  12. Stress analysis studies in optimised 'D' shaped TOKAMAK magnet designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A suite of computer programs TOK was developed which enabled simple data input to be used for computation of magnetic fields and forces in a toroidal system of coils with either D-shaped or circular cross section. An additional requirement was that input data to the Swansea stress analysis program FINESSE could be output from the TOK fields and forces program, and that graphical output from either program should be available. A further program was required to optimise the coil shape. This used the field calculating routines from the TOK program. The starting point for these studies was the proposed 40 coil Princeton design. The stresses resulting from three different shapes of D-coil were compared. (author)

  13. Reconstruction of the electron distribution function during ECRH/ECCD and magnetic reconnection events in a tokamak plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Klimanov, Igor; Fasoli, Ambrogio

    2007-01-01

    The performance of tokamaks is usually described in terms of plasma temperature, density and confinement time. The term temperature implies that the plasma is in thermal equilibrium and its particles have maxwellian (normal) velocity distribution. However, in several conditions, the plasma contains a significant number of suprathermal or 'fast' particles, whose energy is several times higher than thermal energy. The number of such particles can be significantly higher than that corresponding ...

  14. Forced magnetic reconnection and field penetration of an externally applied rotating helical magnetic field in the TEXTOR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y; de Bock, M F M; Finken, K H; Jakubowski, M; Jaspers, R; Koslowski, H R; Kraemer-Flecken, A; Lehnen, M; Liang, Y; Matsunaga, G; Reiser, D; Wolf, R C; Zimmermann, O

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization. PMID:17026312

  15. Tokamak magneto-hydrodynamics and reference magnetic coordinates for simulations of plasma disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, Leonid E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Li, Xujing [Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2719, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-06-15

    This paper formulates the Tokamak Magneto-Hydrodynamics (TMHD), initially outlined by X. Li and L. E. Zakharov [Plasma Science and Technology 17(2), 97–104 (2015)] for proper simulations of macroscopic plasma dynamics. The simplest set of magneto-hydrodynamics equations, sufficient for disruption modeling and extendable to more refined physics, is explained in detail. First, the TMHD introduces to 3-D simulations the Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC), which are aligned with the magnetic field in the best possible way. The numerical implementation of RMC is adaptive grids. Being consistent with the high anisotropy of the tokamak plasma, RMC allow simulations at realistic, very high plasma electric conductivity. Second, the TMHD splits the equation of motion into an equilibrium equation and the plasma advancing equation. This resolves the 4 decade old problem of Courant limitations of the time step in existing, plasma inertia driven numerical codes. The splitting allows disruption simulations on a relatively slow time scale in comparison with the fast time of ideal MHD instabilities. A new, efficient numerical scheme is proposed for TMHD.

  16. Two-fluid and magnetohydrodynamic modelling of magnetic reconnection in the MAST spherical tokamak and the solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Browning, P K; Evans, M; Lucini, F Arese; Lukin, V S; McClements, K G; Stanier, A

    2015-01-01

    Twisted magnetic flux ropes are ubiquitous in space and laboratory plasmas, and the merging of such flux ropes through magnetic reconnection is an important mechanism for restructuring magnetic fields and releasing free magnetic energy. The merging-compression scenario is one possible start up scheme for spherical tokamaks, which has been used on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak MAST. Two current-carrying plasma rings, or flux ropes, approach each other through the mutual attraction of their like currents, and merge, through magnetic reconnection, into a single plasma torus, with substantial plasma heating. 2D resistive MHD and Hall MHD simulations of this process are reported, and new results for the temperature distribution of ions and electrons are presented. A model of the based on relaxation theory is also described, which is now extended to tight aspect ratio geometry. This model allows prediction of the final merged state and the heating. The implications of the relaxation model for heating of the solar ...

  17. Evaluation of magnetic field due to ferromagnetic vacuum vessel in Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Takeshi; Abe, Mitsushi; Tadokoro, Takahiro [Hitachi Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan). Power and Industrial Systems R and D Div.; Miura, Yukitoshi; Suzuki, Norio; Sato, Masayasu; Sengoku, Seio

    1998-03-01

    We evaluated magnetic fields due to the ferromagnetic vacuum vessel (FVV) in the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 experimentally and computationally, the results were extrapolated to the JFT-2M and ITER. The maximum amount of local poloidal field on the magnetic axis induced by the FVV port was about 5 mT in the HT-2. This is the allowable amount of the field to discharge plasma in the HT-2. The proportion of external poloidal field shielded by FVV is in inverse proportion to external toroidal field. The stronger the field induced by FVV, the smaller the distance between plasma center and vacuum vessel wall. The delay time of poloidal field penetration due to the FVV is small, as long as the toroidal field is supplied. (author)

  18. Shielding of External Magnetic Perturbations By Torque In Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Sabbagh, Steve A.

    2009-08-24

    The imposition of a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation on a rotating tokamak plasma requires energy and toroidal torque. Fundamental electrodynamics implies that the torque is essentially limited and must be consistent with the external response of a plasma equilibrium ƒ = j x B. Here magnetic measurements on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) device are used to derive the energy and the torque, and these empirical evaluations are compared with theoretical calculations based on perturbed scalar pressure equilibria ƒ = ∇p coupled with the theory of nonambipolar transport. The measurement and the theory are consistent within acceptable uncertainties, but can be largely inconsistent when the torque is comparable to the energy. This is expected since the currents associated with the torque are ignored in scalar pressure equilibria, but these currents tend to shield the perturbation.

  19. Evidence for reduction of the toroidal ITG instability in the transition from saturated to improved Ohmic confinement in the tokamak TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In high density Ohmically heated discharges in the tokamak TEXTOR a transition from the saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) to the improved Ohmic confinement (IOC) was observed triggered by a sudden reduction of the external gas flow. The SOC-IOC transition was investigated regarding the influence of the toroidal ITG instability driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG). The ion temperature profiles were measured with high radial resolution by means of charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) with a high-energetic diagnostic hydrogen beam recently installed at TEXTOR. On the basis of the measured ion temperature distributions the ηi parameter (ratio of the density and ion temperature decay lengths) and the growth rate of the toroidal ITG instability were calculated. After the SOC-IOC transition ηi drops and lies in a noticeably smaller radial region over the threshold for the toroidal ITG. In consequence of it, the IOC regime is characterized by a clear reduction of the ITG growth rate γITG which was calculated including finite Larmor radius effects. The steepening of the plasma density profile after the decrease of the external gas flow is the main reason for the reduction of the ITG growth rate and the subsequent confinement transition to the IOC regime

  20. Measurements of magnetic field fluctuations using an array of Hall detectors on the TEXTOR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuran, I.; Stöckel, J.; Mank, G.; Finken, K. H.; Fuchs, G.; Oost, G. Van

    2002-10-01

    Hall detectors have been used to measure the magnetic field together with its' fluctuations in the boundary of a tokamak. The results show, that the measurements which have been performed so far, mainly by use of coils together with subsequent integration, either on-line or later by computer, can be substituted by Hall probe measurements giving the desired value of B directly. Because the integration of the coil signal becomes more and more difficult with long pulses, Hall detectors may give advantages in future fusion devices. We implemented a stack of nine Hall detectors mounted on three planes on a rod in such a way, that the three components of the magnetic field can be measured. To avoid capacitive and charge pickup from the plasma, the probes are electrically shielded. The damping due to skin effect within this shield has been taken into account. The probes have been calibrated using a known magnetic field of a straight wire driven with a LC bank. This field has been precisely measured with a Rogowski coil. The dependence of the Hall coefficient on the frequency has been measured and the pickup in the feeds due to Ḃ has been withdrawn from the results. We demonstrate the method with measurements on the TEXTOR tokamak, where we could clearly detect the small stray fields associated with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations. On TEXTOR we have been able to detect the MHD activity preceding discharge disruptions as well as the precursors of the so called sawteeth. The results are compared to those of other diagnostics on TEXTOR as, e.g., magnetic loops and electron cyclotron emission, and they do well compare.

  1. Current fusion plasma theory grant: Task I, Magnetic confinement fusion plasma theory: Final report, December 1, 1987--November 14, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research performed under this grant over the current 11-1/2 month period has concentrated on key tokamak plasma confinement and heating theory issues: extensions of neoclassical MHD; viscosity coefficients and transport; nonlinear resistive MHD simulations of Tokapole II plasmas; ICRF and edge plasma interactions; energy confinement degradation due to macroscopic phenomena; and coordination of a new transport initiative. Progress and publications in these areas are briefly summarized in this report. 21 refs

  2. Losses of heat and particles in the presence of strong magnetic field perturbations

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Abhinav

    2009-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion has potential to offer an economically, environmentally and socially acceptable supply of energy. A promising reactor design to execute thermonuclear fusion is the toroidal magnetic confinement device, tokamak. The tokamak still faces challenges in the major areas which can be categorised into confinement, heating and fusion technology. This thesis addresses the problem of confinement, in particular the role of transport along magnetic field lines perturbed by diverse MHD...

  3. Improvement of neutral beam injection heating efficiency with magnetic field well structures in a tokamak with a low magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. K.; Na, D. H.; Lee, J. W.; Yoo, M. G.; Kim, H.-S.; Hwang, Y. S.; Hahm, T. S.; Na, Yong-Su

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic well structures are introduced as an effective means to reduce the prompt loss of fast ions, the so-called first orbit loss from neutral beam injection (NBI), which is beneficial to tokamaks with a low magnetic field strength such as small spherical torus devices. It is found by single-particle analysis that this additional field structure can modify the gradient of the magnetic field to reduce the shift of the guiding center trajectory of the fast ion. This result is verified by a numerical calculation of following the fast ion’s trajectory. We apply this concept to the Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus [1], where NBI is under design for the purpose of achieving high-performance plasma, to evaluate the effect of the magnetic well structure on NBI efficiency. A 1D NBI analysis code and the NUBEAM code are employed for detailed NBI calculations. The simulation results show that the orbit loss can be reduced by 70%-80%, thereby improving the beam efficiency twofold compared with the reference case without the well structure. The well-shaped magnetic field structure in the low-field side can significantly decrease orbit loss by broadening the non-orbit loss region and widening the range of the velocity direction, thus improving the heating efficiency. It is found that this magnetic well can also improve orbit loss during the slowing down process.

  4. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 15, System design description. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-22

    This System Design Description, prepared in accordance with the TPX Project Management Plan provides a summary or TF Magnet System design features at the conclusion of Phase I, Preliminary Design and Manufacturing Research. The document includes the analytical and experimental bases for the design, and plans for implementation in final design, manufacturing, test, and magnet integration into the tokamak. Requirements for operation and maintenance are outlined, and references to sources of additional information are provided.

  5. Diamagnetic measurements on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure for determining the total thermal energy content of a magnetically confined plasma from a measurement of the plasma magnetization has been successfully implemented on the Alcator C tokamak. When a plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the kinetic pressure of the plasma is supported by an interaction between the confining magnetic field and drift currents which flow in the plasma. These drift currents induce an additional magnetic field which can be measured by means of appropriately positioned pickup coils. From a measurement of this magnetic field and of the confining magnetic field, one can calculate the spatially averaged plasma pressure, which is related to the thermal energy content of the plasma by the equation of state of the plasma. The theory on which this measurement is based is described in detail. The fields and currents which flow in the plasma are related to the confining magnetic field and the plasma pressure by requiring that the plasma be in equilibrium, i.e., by balancing the forces due to pressure gradients against those due to magnetic interactions. The apparatus used to make this measurement is described and some example data analyses are carried out

  6. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov's results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov's result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits

  7. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov's results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov's result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  8. An analytic determination of beta poloidal and internal inductance in an elongated tokamak from magnetic probe measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorci, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Analytic calculations of the magnetic fields available to magnetic diagnostics are performed for tokamaks with circular and elliptical cross sections. The explicit dependence of the magnetic fields on the poloidal beta and internal inductances is sought. For tokamaks with circular cross sections, Shafranov`s results are reproduced and extended. To first order in the inverse aspect ratio expansion of the magnetic fields, only a specific combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is found to be measurable. To second order in the expansion, the measurements of beta poloidal and the internal inductance are demonstrated to be separable but excessively sensitive to experimental error. For tokamaks with elliptical cross sections, magnetic measurements are found to determine beta poloidal and the internal inductance separately. A second harmonic component of the zeroth order field in combination with the dc harmonic of the zeroth order field specifies the internal inductance. The internal inductance in hand, measurement of the first order, first harmonic component of the magnetic field then determined beta poloidal. The degeneracy implicit in Shafranov`s result (i.e. that only a combination of beta poloidal and internal inductance is measurable for a circular plasma cross section) reasserts itself as the elliptic results are collapsed to their circular limits.

  9. A novel flexible field-aligned coordinate system for tokamak edge plasma simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Leddy, Jarrod; Romanelli, Michele; Shanahan, Brendan; Walkden, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas are confined by a magnetic field that limits the particle and heat transport perpendicular to the field. Parallel to the field the ionised particles can move freely, so to obtain confinement the field lines are "closed" (ie. form closed surfaces of constant poloidal flux) in the core of a tokamak. Towards, the edge, however, the field lines begin to intersect physical surfaces, leading to interaction between neutral and ionised particles, and the potential melting of the material surface. Simulation of this interaction is important for predicting the performance and lifetime of future tokamak devices such as ITER. Field-aligned coordinates are commonly used in the simulation of tokamak plasmas due to the geometry and magnetic topology of the system. However, these coordinates are limited in the geometry they allow in the poloidal plane due to orthogonality requirements. A novel 3D coordinate system is proposed herein that relaxes this constraint so that any arbitrary, smoothly varying geometry...

  10. Outgassing tests on materials used in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve high performance plasma discharges in the DIII-D magnetic fusion tokamak, impurity levels must be carefully controlled. Since first wall materials can desorb volatile impurities during these discharges, it is important to characterize and control the outgassing of these materials. An outgassing chamber was built to measure the outgassing properties of various materials used in the DIII-D vessel. The results of pump-down tests performed on ATJ graphite, thin Grafoil reg-sign gaskets, and MgO coaxial cables will be presented. In addition to pumpdown tests it was desired to study the behavior of the materials at temperatures up to 400 C, which is the maximum temperature to which the DIII-D vessel is baked. The station was modified to include independent heating control of the sample and a simple load-lock chamber

  11. Evaluation of Possible Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Diagnostic Techniques for Tokamak Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diagnostic techniques to tokamak experiments are evaluated. NMR frequencies for hydrogen isotopes and low-Z nuclei in such experiments are in the frequency range approximately equal to 20-200 MHz, so existing RF [radio-frequency] antennas could be used to rotate the spin polarization and to make the NMR measurements. Our tentative conclusion is that such measurements are possible if highly spin polarized H or (superscript)3He gas sources (which exist) are used to fuel these plasmas. In addition, NMR measurements of the surface layers of the first wall (without plasma) may also be possible, e.g., to evaluate the inventory of tritium inside the vessel

  12. Plasma Theory: Toroidal Field Ripple Induced Excursion of Banana Orbit in Tokamak Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOQingdi

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic confinement of thermonuclear plasma ions within a tokamak must be achieved with a finite number of toroidal field(TF) coils. This results in a rippled toroidal field structure, and consequent distortions in fast ion orbits with potentially rapid loss of the affected ions. The ripple loss is an important issue for the design of future tokamak reactors such as ITER because it results in reduced alpha heating as well as potentially severe localized wallreactors.

  13. Development of the Fast Ionization Gauge in the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMingxu; LIBo; YANGZhigang; LIAOZhiqing; YANLongwen; ZHANGNianman; YANDonghai

    2003-01-01

    The neutral gas pressure near plasma or divertor plates is very important for the plasma-wall interaction, which determine the operation mode of divertom and confinement performances of plasma in tokamaks. The commercial ionization gauge does not work in strong magnetic field and noisy enviroment encountered in tokamaks. The measuring errom of pressure commercial ionizationare very large by the gauge mounted on the pumping system or through a long pipe to the vacuum vessel. A new ionization gauge,

  14. Experimental plasma equilibrium reconstruction from kinetic and magnetic measurements in the FTU Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of the FTU tokamak plasma has been analyzed by using two reconstructive MHD equilibrium codes: the first code works by using the magnetic data alone and the second one by including as well the shape of the kinetic pressure profile, as obtained from the measured profiles of electron temperature Te and density ne. The code that analyzes the magnetic data alone provides a good evaluation of the macroscopic quantities such as the poloidal beta Bp and the internal inductance li, if the plasma elongation is greater than 1. 04. No detailed information about the toroidal current density profile Jφ and the safety factor profile q can be obtained from the magnetic data alone. On the other hand, the coupling of magnetic and kinetic data is able to provide a reasonable estimate of the toroidal current density profile and of its behaviour during the plasma discharge. The reliability of the Jφ and q profiles reconstruction has been explored and validated by a detailed comparison with the observed MHD behaviour of the FTU plasma discharges. A good agreement between the appearance of the sawtooth activity and the drop of the safety factor on the magnetic axis qo to unity is observed. Also, at least for edge safety factors qψ less than four, the sawtooth inversion radius is found to be very close to the q=1 surface. A remarkable correspondence between Jφ and Te3/2 is found in sawtoothing discharges. The structure of the snake oscillation in pellet injected discharges is found to be strictly correlated to the position of the q=1 surface. A cylindrical linear tearing mode stability calculation applied to the reconstructed Jφ profile has shown qualitative agreement with the appearance of the Mirnov oscillations. Finally the magnetic reconnections between double resonant surfaces during the rise of the plasma current or after the pellet injection have provided an interesting validation of the Jφ profile reconstruction. 56 tabs

  15. Fusion plasma theory. Task I. Magnetic confinement fusion plasma theory. Final report, October 1, 1984-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research performed under this contract over the current 15 month period has concentrated on some key Phaedrus tandem mirror plasma confinement and heating issues (ambipolar potential formation due to ICRF, second harmonic ECH, ponderomotive force effects, drift-pumping calculations, moment approach to transport), on development of tokamak neoclassical MHD theory (equations, instabilities, transport), and on some tokamak-specific topics (ballooning modes on a divertor separatrix, equilibrium and resistive evolution codes for Tokapole II). Progress in these and some other miscellaneous areas are briefly summarized in this final progress report for this contract, which is to evolve into a special research grant in the future

  16. High Confinement and High Density with Stationary Plasma Energy and Strong Edge Radiation in the TEXTOR-94 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Durodie, F.; Jaspers, R.; Tokar, M.Z.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Winter, J.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Dumortier, P.; Euringer, H.; Finken, K.H.; Fuchs, G.; Giesen, B.; Koch, R.; Koenen, L.; Koenigs, C.; Koslowski, H.R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Schoon, N.; Telesca, G.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association ``EURATOM-Belgian State,`` Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1040 Brussels, Koninklijke Militaire School (Belgium)]|[Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, GmbH Association ``Euratom-KFA,`` D-52425 Juelich (Federal Republic of Germany)]|[FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Associatie ``FOM-EURATOM,`` Nieuwegein (The Netherlands)

    1996-09-01

    Stationary high energy confinement is observed on TEXTOR-94 for times limited only by the flux swing of the transformer using strong edge radiation cooling. Necessary tools are the feedback control of the radiated power and of the plasma energy content. At the highest densities obtained (up to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit), energy confinement exceeds the edge-localized-mode-free {ital H}-mode scaling ITERH93-P by more than 20{percent}. {beta} limits of TEXTOR-94 are reached with {ital f}{sub H89}/{ital q}{sub {ital a}}{approx_equal}0.6. No detrimental effect of the seeded impurity is seen. These high confinement discharges meet many conditions necessary for a fusion reactor regime. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing–Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing–Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  18. A magnetic confinement versus rotation classification of massive-star magnetospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Petit; S.P. Owocki; G.A. Wade; D.H. Cohen; J.O. Sundqvist; M. Cagné; J. Maiz Apellaniz; M.E. Oksala; D.A. Bohlender; T. Rivinius; H.F. Henrichs; E. Alecian; R.H.D. Townsend; A. ud-Doula

    2013-01-01

    Building on results from the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project, this paper shows how a two-parameter classification of massive-star magnetospheres in terms of the magnetic wind confinement (which sets the Alfvén radius RA) and stellar rotation (which sets the Kepler co-rotation radius RK) p

  19. Sensing magnetic nanoparticles using nano-confined ferromagnetic resonances in a magnonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Sushruth, M.; Begley, R. A.; Ding, J.; Woodward, R. C.; Maksymov, I. S.; Albert, M.; Wang, W.; Fangohr, H.; Adeyeye, A. O.; Kostylev, M.

    2015-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the use of the magnetic-field-dependence of highly spatially confined, GHz-frequency ferromagnetic resonances for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles using an anti-dot-based magnonic crystal. The stray magnetic fields of nanoparticles within the anti-dots modify nano-confined ferromagnetic resonances in the surrounding periodically nanopatterned magnonic crystal, generating easily measurable resonance peak shifts. The shifts are comparable to the resonance linewidths for high anti-dot filling fractions with their signs and magnitudes dependent upon the mode localization, consistent with micromagnetic simulation results. This is an encouraging result for the development of frequency-based nanoparticle detectors for nano-scale biosensing.

  20. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  1. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2008-10-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  2. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  3. The Power Supply System for HL-2A Tokamak's Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUAN Weimin; YAO Lieying; CHEN Yuhong; SHAO Kui; WANG Yingqiao

    2007-01-01

    The highpower pulsed power supply system for the magnetic field of the HL-2A Tokamak is described in this paper.The total output power of its eight magnetic field power supply units of nearly 250 MW.Their highest DC output voltage and current are 3510 V and 45 kA,respectively. All the units are operated in a pulsed mode.The pulse duration is 5 s,and the cyclic period is 15 min.The power supply system consists mainly of pulsed flywheel motor generators,rectifying transformers,thyristor converters,diode rectifiers and switches.The system incorporates many key technologies-supply equalization with two generators and four diode bridges,constant-angle phase triggers with a wide frequency range,current equalization,a status detector for the high current 6-phase converter,and advanced monitoring based on a programmable logic computer and engineering parameter measurement.The experimental results show that the performance of the power supply system satisfies the requirements of HL-2A experiments very well.

  4. Magnetic measurements using array of integrated Hall sensors on the CASTOR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuran, Ivan; Hronová, Olena; Stöckel, Jan; Sentkerestiová, Jana; Havlicek, Josef

    2008-10-01

    We have performed the first tests of ``integrated'' Hall sensors (IHSs) in a tokamak in-vessel environment. IHS combines the sensing element together with the complex electronic circuitry on a single small chip. The on-chip integrated circuits provide stabilization of the supply voltage, output amplification, noise suppression, and elimination of temperature dependencies. Eight IHSs of A1322LUA type produced by Allegro MicroSystems, Inc. were mounted on a stainless steel ring symmetrically encircling the CASTOR plasmas in poloidal direction 10 mm outside the limiter radius. IHSs were oriented such that they measure the horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. We found out that these sensors qualify for in-vessel use of small to middle sized fusion devices where the radiation is not an issue and the temperature below 150 °C can be guaranteed. The main advantages over the traditional pickup coils are the smaller size and more straightforward interpretation of output without the need of rather cumbersome integration and drift removal procedure associated with the use of inductive loops. We successfully exploited the sensors for determination of vertical plasma displacement on CASTOR. This new diagnostic helped us to shed more light into long term observed discrepancy on CASTOR between vertical plasma displacement as deduced by standard magnetic and by nonmagnetic diagnostics (Langmuir probes, bolometers).

  5. Magnetic monopole and confinement/deconfinement phase transition in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, Akihiro; Kato, Seikou; Shinohara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed the non-Abelian dual superconductivity in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory for the mechanism of quark confinement,and we presented the numerical evidences in preceding lattice conferences by using the proposed gauge link decomposition to extract magnetic monopole in the gauge invariant way. In this talk, we focus on the dual Meissner effects in view of the magnetic monopole in SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. We measure the chromoelectric and chromomagnetic flux due to a pair of quark and antiquark source at finite temperature. Then, we measure the correlation function of Polyakov loops and Polyakov loop average at various temperatures, and investigate chromomagnetic monopole current induced by chromo-magnetic flux in both confinement and deconfinement phase. We will discuss the role of the chromoelectric monopole in confinement/deconfinement phase transition.

  6. Development of a monoenergetic 1-10 keV neutral lithium beam for the diagnostic of edge plasmas in magnetic confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic of plasmas confined by magnetic fields for fusion research based on neutral lithium beam (NLB) is presently considered to be one of the most appropriate methods to carry out the important measurements of edge density and its fluctuation profiles without plasma perturbation. In this CRP project we proposed the development of an NLB source with 1-10 KeV based on a traditional β-eucryptite surface emission source coupled to a Pierce gun geometry accelerator and subsequent neutralization of the Li+ beam by a Li-oven neutralizer. Possible application of such an NLB probe in a medium term (2-3 years) in our country would be in a small RFP in operation and in a low-aspect-ratio tokamak in construction both at LAP/INPE and in other hot plasma devices operating at brazilian universities of Sao Paulo (USP) and Campinas (UNICAMP) with whom we maintain strong collaboration efforts in plasma research. (author). 8 refs

  7. Self-organized criticality and the dynamics of near-marginal turbulent transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The high plasma temperatures expected at reactor conditions in magnetic confinement fusion toroidal devices suggest that near-marginal operation could be a reality in future devices and reactors. By near-marginal it is meant that the plasma profiles might wander around the local critical thresholds for the onset of instabilities. Self-organized criticality (SOC) was suggested in the mid 1990s as a more proper paradigm to describe the dynamics of tokamak plasma transport in near-marginal conditions. It advocated that, near marginality, the evolution of mean profiles and fluctuations should be considered simultaneously, in contrast to the more common view of a large separation of scales existing between them. Otherwise, intrinsic features of near-marginal transport would be missed, that are of importance to understand the properties of energy confinement. In the intervening 20 years, the relevance of the idea of SOC for near-marginal transport in fusion plasmas has transitioned from an initial excessive hype to the much more realistic standing of today, which we will attempt to examine critically in this review paper. First, the main theoretical ideas behind SOC will be described. Secondly, how they might relate to the dynamics of near-marginal transport in real magnetically confined plasmas will be discussed. Next, we will review what has been learnt about SOC from various numerical studies and what it has meant for the way in which we do numerical simulation of fusion plasmas today. Then, we will discuss the experimental evidence available from the several experiments that have looked for SOC dynamics in fusion plasmas. Finally, we will conclude by identifying the various problems that still remain open to investigation in this area. Special attention will be given to the discussion of frequent misconceptions and ongoing controversies. The review also contains a description of ongoing efforts that seek effective transport models better suited than traditional

  8. Regime of Improved Confinement and High Beta in Neutral-Beam-Heated Divertor Discharges of the ASDEX Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F.; Becker, G.; Behringer, K.; Campbell, D.; Eberhagen, A.; Engelhardt, W.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. V.; Haas, G.; Huang, M.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; Lister, G. G.; Mayer, H. M.; Meisel, D.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K. H.; Venus, G.; Vollmer, O.; Yü, Z.

    1982-11-01

    A new operational regime has been observed in neutral-injection-heated ASDEX divertor discharges. This regime is characterized by high βp values comparable to the aspect ratio A (βp=1.9 MW, a mean density n¯e>=3×1013 cm-3, and a q(a) value >=2.6. Beyond these limits or in discharges with material limiter, low βp values and reduced particle and energy confinement times are obtained compared to the Ohmic heating phase.

  9. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  10. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  11. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  12. Holographic equilibration in confining gauge theories under external magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Demircik, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of external magnetic fields on equilibration in the improved holographic QCD theory in the deconfined phase using the AdS/CFT correspondence. In particular we calculate the quasinormal mode spectra in the corresponding black brane solutions and study their dependence on temperature, momentum and magnetic field, both in the scalar and the shear channels. We find complex patterns in the motion of quasinormal modes on the complex plane, including certain cross overs between the lowest lying modes under varying momentum. We also find a curious dynamical instability that arise at a certain value of momentum.

  13. Stabilizing effect of ion pressure gradient on magnetic curvature-driven drift modes located at rational surface of tokamak plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ai-Ke

    2005-01-01

    In the fluid model, we derive a dispersion relation for the toroidal drift modes of tokamak plasmas, including the ion pressure gradient and the magnetic field gradient and curvature. It is shown that the magnetic field gradient and curvature (MFGC) can cause instabilities at the rational surface, which are of toroidicity-induced (TI) modes. On the other hand, it is discovered that the ion pressure gradient can stabilize the present MFGC instabilities. The critical threshold of ion pressure gradient, which makes the growth rate reduced to zero, is obtained both analytically and numerically.

  14. 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Herbert L.; Breizman, Boris N.

    2014-02-21

    The 12th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems took place in Austin, Texas (7–11 September 2011). This meeting was organized jointly with the 5th IAEA Technical Meeting on Theory of Plasma Instabilities (5–7 September 2011). The two meetings shared one day (7 September 2011) with presentations relevant to both groups. Some of the work reported at these meetings was then published in a special issue of Nuclear Fusion [Nucl. Fusion 52 (2012)]. Summaries of the Energetic Particle Conference presentations were given by Kazuo Toi and Boris Breizman. They respectively discussed the experimental and theoretical progress presented at the meeting. Highlights of this meeting include the tremendous progress that has been achieved in the development of diagnostics that enables the ‘viewing’ of internal fluctuations and allows comparison with theoretical predictions, as demonstrated, for example, in the talks of P. Lauber and M. Osakabe. The need and development of hardened diagnostics in the severe radiation environment, such as those that will exist in ITER, was discussed in the talks of V. Kiptily and V.A. Kazakhov. In theoretical studies, much of the effort is focused on nonlinear phenomena. For example, detailed comparison of theory and experiment on D-III-D on the n = 0 geodesic mode was reported in separate papers by R. Nazikian and G. Fu. A large number of theoretical papers were presented on wave chirping including a paper by B.N. Breizman, which notes that wave chirping from a single frequency may emanate continuously once marginal stability conditions have been established. Another area of wide interest was the detailed study of alpha orbits in a burning plasma, where losses can come from symmetry breaking due to finite coil number or magnetic field imperfections introduced by diagnostic or test modules. An important area of development, covered by M.A. Hole and D.A. Spong, is concerned with the self

  15. Effect of a static external magnetic perturbation on resistive mode stability in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies; Hender, T.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1994-03-01

    The influence of a general static external magnetic perturbation on the stability of resistive modes in a tokamak plasma is examined. There are three main parts to this investigation. Firstly, the vacuum perturbation is expanded as a set of well-behaved toroidal ring functions and is, thereafter, specified by the coefficients of this expansion. Secondly, a dispersion relation is derived for resistive plasma instabilities in the presence of a general external perturbation and finally, this dispersion relation is solved for the amplitudes of the tearing and twisting modes driven in the plasma by a specific perturbation. It is found that the amplitudes of driven tearing and twisting modes are negligible until a certain critical perturbation strength is exceeded. Only tearing modes are driven in low-{beta} plasmas with {epsilon}{beta}{sub p} << 1. However, twisting modes may also be driven if {epsilon}{beta}{sub p}{approx}>1. For error-field perturbations made up of a large number of different poloidal and toroidal harmonics the critical strength to drive locked modes has a {open_quote}staircase{close_quote} variation with edge-q, characterized by strong discontinuities as coupled rational surfaces enter or leave the plasma. For single harmonic perturbations the variation with edge-q is far smoother. Both types of behaviour have been observed experimentally. The critical perturbation strength is found to decrease strongly close to an ideal external kink stability boundary. This is also in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Effects of resistivity on linear plasma responses to resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyung; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun

    2016-09-01

    Numerical studies are made of the effects of resistivity on linear plasma responses to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in tokamaks based on a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. From a local two-field model, it is suggested that the ratio of the poloidal electron advection to the resistivity diffusion rate α m can be a figure of merit parameter in linear RMP penetration physics. The shielding efficiency is governed by α m , and when α m ≳ 1 , RMPs are effectively shielded. Global simulations using a four-field model [Hazeltine and Meiss, Phys. Rep. 121, 1 (1985)] show that there exists an effective threshold of the perpendicular electron flow ( Ve , ⊥ c ) beyond which RMPs cannot penetrate. Resistivity is found to determine Ve , ⊥ c which increases as resistivity becomes higher, making RMP penetration easier. At low resistivity, small Ve , ⊥ c renders the RMP penetration sensitive to ion collisionality and the change in q95. The kink response is observed to be closely related to the residual level of RMPs at rational surfaces and can be also strongly affected by resistivity.

  17. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn3 conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended

  18. Ion and Electron Heating Characteristics of Magnetic Re- Connection in Mast Tokamak Merging Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hiroshi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Yamada, Takuma; Imazawa, Ryota; Cheng, Chio-Zong

    2016-07-01

    We present results of recent studies of high power heating of magnetic reconnection, the fundamental process of several astrophysical events such as solar flare, in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) - the world largest merging experiment. In addition to the previously reported significant reconnection heating up to ˜1keV [1], detailed local profiles of electron and ion temperature have been measured using a ultra-fine 300 channel Ruby- and a 130 channel YAG-Thomson scattering and a new 32 channel ion Doppler tomography diagnostics [2]. 2D profile measurement of electron temperature revealed highly localized heating structure at the X point with the characteristic scale length of 0.02-0.05m0.3T), a thick layer of closed flux surface surrounding the current sheet sustains the temperature profile for longer time than the electron and ion energy relaxation time ˜4-10ms, finally forming triple peak structures of ion and electron temperatures at the X point and in the downstream. While the peak electron temperature at the X point increases with toroidal field, the bulk electron temperature and the ion temperature in the downstream are unaffected. [1] Y. Ono et.al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54, 124039 (2012) [2] H. Tanabe et. al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093027 (2013). [3] H. Tanabe et.al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 215004 (2015)

  19. Magnetic mirror confinement of high-energy, high-density plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coensgen, F.H.; Simonen, T.C.

    1979-08-21

    This paper summarizes results obtained from and work in progress on those experiments which have contributed significantly toward the confinement in single-cell magnetic mirror systems of plasmas close to thermonuclear conditions. Because the mirror confinement of such high-energy, high-density plasmas has been studied most extensively in the 2XIIB experiment, discussion of 2XIIB results forms a major portion of this paper. In these experiments, injection of low-energy plasma has been shown to suppress microinstabilities to sufficiently low levels that high-beta (..beta.. approx. = 1) plasmas could be achieved and sustained by cross-field injection of beams of neutral particles. Plasma confinement was found to improve with ion energy, electron temperature, and plasma size. Based on these results, a larger Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) was designed to pursue confinement scaling to higher energies and larger plasma dimensions. MFTF design parameters and construction status are briefly reviewed.

  20. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  1. Locked mode unlocking by rotating resonant magnetic perturbations in J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hai; Hu, Qiming; Wang, Nengchao; Rao, Bo; Ding, Yonghua; Li, Da; Li, Mao; Xie, Shujia

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to unlock the m/n = 2/1 locked mode (LM) performed in J-TEXT tokamak by using rotating resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively. In the experiments, to maintain the LM, mode locking occurs by using static RMPs generated by a set of saddle coils. After mode locking, another rotating RMP with frequency of several kilo-Hz is applied to drive the static LM to rotate. The unlocking of LM is realized by using rotating RMP with different frequency and amplitude. It is found that the unlocking process contains two stages, i.e. the oscillating stage and the unlocking stage. In the oscillating stage, the rotating RMP with amplitude that is not strong enough causes the LM to oscillate around its locked phase and produces magnetic fluctuation to behave as a standing wave-like structure in poloidal direction. When the amplitude of the rotating RMP is strong enough, it first causes the LM to oscillate and then transforms to mode unlocking quickly in less than 1 ms, namely the unlocking stage. Further analysis shows that the unlocking of LM is determined by the torque balance between the viscous torque and the electromagnetic torques exerted by both the static and the rotating RMP. In addition, the unlocking process is sensitive to both the amplitude and the frequency of the rotating RMP as well as the amplitude of static RMP. Nonlinear numerical modeling based on reduced MHD equations is also performed to understand the unlocking process, and numerical results qualitatively agree with the experimental ones.

  2. Scalings of energy confinement and density limit in stellarator/heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empirical scaling of energy confinement observed experimentally in stellarator/heliotron (Heliotron E, Wendelstein 7A, L2, Heliotron DR) under the condition that plasmas are heated by ECH and/or NbI is proposed. Empirical scaling of density limit obtainable under the optimum condition is proposed. These scalings are compared with those of tokamaks. The energy confinement scaling has similar power dependence as 'L mode scaling' of tokamaks. The density limit scaling seems also to indicate the upper limit of achievable density in many tokamaks. Combining the energy confinement time and the density limit scaling a transport-limited beta value is also deduced. Thus, from the viewpoint of designing a machine, there should be some compromise in determing magnetic field strength on plasma axis, average minor radius and major radius, because their dependence on confinement time and transport-limited beta value is contradicting. (J.P.N.)

  3. GPUbased, Microsecond Latency, HectoChannel MIMO Feedback Control of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Nikolaus

    Feedback control has become a crucial tool in the research on magnetic confinement of plasmas for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. This thesis presents a novel plasma feedback control system that, for the first time, employs a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for microsecond-latency, real-time control computations. This novel application area for GPU computing is opened up by a new system architecture that is optimized for low-latency computations on less than kilobyte sized data samples as they occur in typical plasma control algorithms. In contrast to traditional GPU computing approaches that target complex, high-throughput computations with massive amounts of data, the architecture presented in this thesis uses the GPU as the primary processing unit rather than as an auxiliary of the CPU, and data is transferred from A-D/D-A converters directly into GPU memory using peer-to-peer PCI Express transfers. The described design has been implemented in a new, GPU-based control system for the High-Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The system is built from commodity hardware and uses an NVIDIA GeForce GPU and D-TACQ A-D/D-A converters providing a total of 96 input and 64 output channels. The system is able to run with sampling periods down to 4 μs and latencies down to 8 μs. The GPU provides a total processing power of 1.5 x 1012 floating point operations per second. To illustrate the performance and versatility of both the general architecture and concrete implementation, a new control algorithm has been developed. The algorithm is designed for the control of multiple rotating magnetic perturbations in situations where the plasma equilibrium is not known exactly and features an adaptive system model: instead of requiring the rotation frequencies and growth rates embedded in the system model to be set a priori, the adaptive algorithm derives these parameters from the evolution of the perturbation amplitudes themselves. This results in non-linear control

  4. Measurements of plasma composition in the TEXTOR tokamak by collective Thomson scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stejner, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Nielsen, S.K.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Brezinsek, S.; Furtula, V.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Meo, F.; Moseev, D.; Burger, A.; Kantor, M.; M.R. de Baar,

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of collective Thomson scattering (CTS) for spatially localized measurements of the isotopic composition of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The experiments were conducted in the TEXTOR tokamak by scattering millimeter-wave probe radiation off plasma fluctuations with wave

  5. The field line map approach for simulations of magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Stegmeir, Andreas; Maj, Omar; Hallatschek, Klaus; Lackner, Karl

    2015-01-01

    In the presented field line map approach the simulation domain of a tokamak is covered with a cylindrical grid, which is Cartesian within poloidal planes. Standard finite-difference methods can be used for the discretisation of perpendicular (w.r.t.~magnetic field lines) operators. The characteristic flute mode property $\\left(k_{\\parallel}\\ll k_{\\perp}\\right)$ of structures is exploited computationally by a grid sparsification in the toroidal direction. A field line following discretisation of parallel operators is then required, which is achieved via a finite difference along magnetic field lines. This includes field line tracing and interpolation or integration. The main emphasis of this paper is on the discretisation of the parallel diffusion operator. Based on the support operator method a scheme is constructed which exhibits only very low numerical perpendicular diffusion. The schemes are implemented in the new code GRILLIX, and extensive benchmarks are presented which show the validity of the approach ...

  6. Using photoelastic coating method for diagnostics of mechanical stresses in a model of the toroidal magnet of a tokamak with a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiments on measuring mechanical stresses in a conducting turn of a model of a toroidal tokamak magnet with a strong field and combined adiabatic compression of plasma filament by a photoelastic coating method for pulse magnetic fields up to 10Tl are stated. The photoelastic method is based on that some isotropic transparent materials gain the temporary double refraction property i.e. become anisotropic. A thin layer of an optically active material is coated or glued on the object under investigation. Displacements of corresponding points of the surface of an optically active (photoelastic) layer appear during the surface deformation of the object investigated. Possibility for using photoelastic coating method for diagnostics of the model of the toroidal tokamak magnet with a strong magnetic field and combined adiabatic compression of plasma filament in the range of pulse magnetic fields up to 10Tl is shown. Regimes with fast (t approximately 0.25ms) and slow (t approximately 1.5ms) growths of a magnetic field in the magnet model were investigated

  7. A procedure for the design of snowflake magnetic configurations in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the design of snowflake (SF) plasma configurations in tokamaks. The SF configuration represents a promising solution for the power exhaust and divertor design problem due to its ability to flare the scrape-off layer in the vicinity of the SF point. SF plasma configurations have been successfully achieved in tokamaks like Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV), DIII-D and National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), and are under investigation for future tokamaks such as DEMO. The first attempts to determine such new plasma configurations have picked out the inherent difficulties in obtaining them with low coil currents and in controlling the associated equilibria against external disturbances and modeling errors. This paper presents a novel procedure based on the linearized model of the plasma for the design of an SF divertor configuration. Moreover, a procedure for the optimization of the poloidial field coil system is proposed. The effectiveness of the techniques is demonstrated with an application to DEMO. (paper)

  8. Computational challenges in magnetic-confinement fusion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoli, A.; Brunner, S.; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Ricci, P.; Sauter, O.; Villard, L.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic-fusion plasmas are complex self-organized systems with an extremely wide range of spatial and temporal scales, from the electron-orbit scales (~10-11 s, ~ 10-5 m) to the diffusion time of electrical current through the plasma (~102 s) and the distance along the magnetic field between two solid surfaces in the region that determines the plasma-wall interactions (~100 m). The description of the individual phenomena and of the nonlinear coupling between them involves a hierarchy of models, which, when applied to realistic configurations, require the most advanced numerical techniques and algorithms and the use of state-of-the-art high-performance computers. The common thread of such models resides in the fact that the plasma components are at the same time sources of electromagnetic fields, via the charge and current densities that they generate, and subject to the action of electromagnetic fields. This leads to a wide variety of plasma modes of oscillations that resonate with the particle or fluid motion and makes the plasma dynamics much richer than that of conventional, neutral fluids.

  9. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedditch, John, E-mail: john.hedditch@sydney.edu.au; Bowden-Reid, Richard, E-mail: rbow3948@physics.usyd.edu.au; Khachan, Joe, E-mail: joe.khachan@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Whales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  10. Confinement of ultra-cold neutron in a multiple cusp magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Nobumichi; Inoue, Nobuyuki; Nihei, Hitoshi; Kinosita, Ken-ichi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-08-01

    A new confinement system of ultra-cold neutrons is proposed. The neutron bottle is made of a rectangular vacuum chamber with the size of 40 cm x 40 cm x 30 cm covered with arrays of bar type permanent magnets. The operation of bottle requires neither cooling system nor high electric power supply, and thereby the bottle is appropriate to use in the room which is located in controlled area. The maximum kinetic energy of neutrons confined is 20 neV. Experimental scheme to test the performance of the bottle is described. (author)

  11. Simulating the magnetized liner inertial fusion plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments [Simulating the MagLIF plasma confinement with smaller-scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herrmann, M. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sinars, D. B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Slutz, S. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-06-20

    The recently proposed magnetized liner inertial fusion approach to a Z-pinch driven fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 056303 (2010)] is based on the use of an axial magnetic field to provide plasma thermal insulation from the walls of the imploding liner. The characteristic plasma transport regimes in the proposed approach cover parameter domains that have not been studied yet in either magnetic confinement or inertial confinement experiments. In this article, an analysis is presented of the scalability of the key physical processes that determine the plasma confinement. The dimensionless scaling parameters are identified and conclusion is drawn that the plasma behavior in scaled-down experiments can correctly represent the full-scale plasma, provided these parameters are approximately the same in two systems. Furthermore, this observation is important in that smaller-scale experiments typically have better diagnostic access and more experiments per year are possible.

  12. Rotation, turbulence and transport in the Tokamak de Varennes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was undertaken to achieve greater understanding of the process of transport in a plasma under magnetic confinement in a tokamak while measuring different characteristics (speed, poloidal and toroidal rotation, ionic temperature, local emissivity, etc.) of different ionic populations (carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, etc.). An attempt was made to establish at what point transport behaviour diverges from the neoclassical theory and becomes anomalous. (L.L.) (5 figs., 1 ref.)

  13. Inverse Magnetic Catalysis within a Confining Contact Interaction Model for Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Aftab

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the impact of an external magnetic field on the chiral symmetry and confinement-deconfinement transition temperatures by using a vector-vector contact interaction model for quarks regularized so as to include an explicit confining scale in the corresponding gap equation. Exploring the evolution of the chiral condensate and the confining scale with temperature $T$ and magnetic field strength $eB$ ($e$ represents the fundamental electric charge), we determine the pseudo-critical temperatures for the chiral ($T_c^\\chi$) and deconfinement ($T_c^c$) transitions from their inflection points, respectively. By construction, $T_c^\\chi= T_c^c$ in the chiral limit. Within a mean field approximation, we observe the magnetic catalysis phenomenon, characterized by a rising behavior of $T_c^\\chi$ and $T_c^c$ with growing $eB$. Considering a lattice inspired running coupling which monotonically decreases with $eB$, inverse magnetic catalysis takes place in our model. Our findings are also in agreement with predic...

  14. Quantifying fusion born ion populations in magnetically confined plasmas using ion cyclotron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Carbajal, L; Chapman, S C; Cook, J W S

    2016-01-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) offers unique promise as a diagnostic of the fusion born alpha-particle population in magnetically confined plasmas. Pioneering observations from JET and TFTR found that ICE intensity $P_{ICE}$ scales approximately linearly with the measured neutron flux from fusion reactions, and with the inferred concentration, $n_\\alpha/n_i$, of fusion-born alpha-particles confined within the plasma. We present fully nonlinear self-consistent kinetic simulations that reproduce this scaling for the first time. This resolves a longstanding question in the physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement and stability in MCF plasmas. It confirms the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MCI) as the likely emission mechanism and greatly strengthens the basis for diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future burning plasmas.

  15. Seiberg-Witten and 'Polyakov-like' Magnetic Bion Confinements are Continuously Connected

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-06-01

    We study four-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric pure-gauge (Seiberg-Witten) theory and its N = 1 mass perturbation by using compactification on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}. It is well known that on R{sup 4} (or at large S{sup 1} size L) the perturbed theory realizes confinement through monopole or dyon condensation. At small S{sup 1}, we demonstrate that confinement is induced by a generalization of Polyakov's three-dimensional instanton mechanism to a locally four-dimensional theory - the magnetic bion mechanism - which also applies to a large class of nonsupersymmetric theories. Using a large- vs. small-L Poisson duality, we show that the two mechanisms of confinement, previously thought to be distinct, are in fact continuously connected.

  16. Quasi-2D confinement of a BEC in a combined optical and magnetic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have added an optical potential to a conventional time-averaged orbiting potential (TOP) trap to create a highly anisotropic hybrid trap for ultracold atoms. Axial confinement is provided by the optical potential; the maximum frequency currently obtainable in this direction is 2.2 kHz for rubidium. The radial confinement is independently controlled by the magnetic trap and can be a factor of 700 times smaller than in the axial direction. This large anisotropy is more than sufficient to confine condensates with ∼105 atoms in a quasi-2D (Q2D) regime, and we have verified this by measuring a change in the free expansion of the condensate; our results agree with a variational model

  17. An observational evaluation of magnetic confinement in the winds of BA supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, M.; Wade, G. A.; Petit, V.; Grunhut, J.; Neiner, C.; Hanes, D.; MiMeS Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic wind confinement has been proposed as one explanation for the complex wind structures of supergiant stars of spectral types B and A. Observational investigation of this hypothesis was undertaken using high-resolution (λ/Δλ ˜ 65 000) circular polarization (Stokes V) spectra of six late B- and early A-type supergiants (β Ori, B8Iae; 4 Lac, B9Iab; η Leo, A0Ib; HR1040, A0Ib; α Cyg, A2Iae; ν Cep, A2Iab), obtained with the instruments ESPaDOnS and Narval at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Bernard Lyot Telescope. Least-squares deconvolution (LSD) analysis of the Stokes V spectra of all stars yields no evidence of a magnetic field, with best longitudinal field 1σ error bars ranging from ˜0.5 to ˜4.5 G for most stars. Spectrum synthesis analysis of the LSD profiles using Bayesian inference yields an upper limit with 95.4 per cent credibility on the polar strength of the (undetected) surface dipole fields of individual stars ranging from 3 to 30 G. These results strongly suggest that magnetic wind confinement due to organized dipolar magnetic fields is not the origin of the wind variability of BA supergiant stars. Upper limits for magnetic spots may also be inconsistent with magnetic wind confinement in the limit of large spot size and filling factor, depending on the adopted wind parameters. Therefore, if magnetic spots are responsible for the wind variability of BA supergiant stars, they likely occupy a small fraction of the photosphere.

  18. Experimental study of external kink instabilities in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of power through controlled thermonuclear fusion reactions in a magnetically confined plasma holds promise as a means of supplying mankind's future energy needs. The device most technologically advanced in pursuit of this goal is the tokamak, a machine in which a current-carrying toroidal plasma is thermally isolated from its surroundings by a strong magnetic field. To be viable, the tokamak reactor must produce a sufficiently large amount of power relative to that needed to sustain the fusion reactions. Plasma instabilities may severely limit this possibility. In this work, I describe experimental measurements of the magnetic structure of large-scale, rapidly-growing instabilities that occur in a tokamak when the current or pressure of the plasma exceeds a critical value relative to the magnetic field, and I compare these measurements with theoretical predictions

  19. Confinement of the Sun's interior magnetic field, with implications for lithium burning

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Toby S

    2010-01-01

    The simplest interior magnetic field B_i that can explain the observed uniform rotation of the Sun's radiative envelope is an axial dipole stabilized by a deep toroidal field. It can explain the uniform rotation only if confined in the polar caps. The field must be prevented from diffusing up into the high-latitude convection zone, whose slower rotation must remain decoupled from the radiative interior. This paper describes new analytical and numerical solutions of the relevant magnetohydrodynamic equations showing that such confinement and decoupling is dynamically possible by means of a laminar "magnetic confinement layer" at the bottom of the tachocline. With realistic values of the microscopic diffusivities, a weak laminar downwelling flow U~10^{-5}cm/s over the poles is enough to enforce exponential decay of B_i with altitude, in a confinement layer only a fraction of a megameter thick. Downwelling in the polar tachocline is implied both by helioseismic observations, combined with elementary dynamics, an...

  20. Nonlinear competition of turbulent structures and improved confinement in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear competition of turbulent structures and their roles in transport are investigated by using three-dimensional simulation code of resistive drift wave turbulence in magnetized cylindrical plasmas. Selective formation of zonal flows and streamers has been obtained by controlling the strength of damping of the zonal flow. In addition, there is an energy path from the drift waves to a flute type structure, which is linearly stable, and it becomes effective just below the stability boundary of the zonal flow. The flute structure directly induces transport effectively, and affects the drift waves and the zonal flow. A large amplitude zonal flow is formed selectively even with existence of the flute structure. The property of the particle confinement is investigated by changing the particle source intensity, which controls the strength of driving of the drift waves. The characteristic of the particle confinement changes according to turbulent states, and an improved confinement regime is obtained in the zonal flow dominant state. Study on cylindrical plasmas reveals the fundamental mechanism of improved confinement in the magnetized plasma with influence of turbulent structural formation. (paper)

  1. Proposals for an influential role of small tokamaks in mainstream fusion physics and technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small tokamaks may significantly contribute to the better understanding of phenomena in a wide range of fields such as plasma confinement and energy transport; plasma stability in different magnetic configurations; plasma turbulence and its impact on local and global plasma parameters; processes at the plasma edge and plasma-wall interaction; scenarios of additional heating and non-inductive current drive; new methods of plasma profile and parameter control; development of novel plasma diagnostics; benchmarking of new numerical codes and so on. Furthermore, due to the compactness, flexibility, low operation costs and high skill of their personnel small tokamaks are very convenient to develop and test new materials and technologies, which because of the risky nature cannot be done in large machines without preliminary studies. Small tokamaks are suitable and important for broad international cooperation, providing the necessary environment and manpower to conduct dedicated joint research programmes. In addition, the experimental work on small tokamaks is very appropriate for the education of students, scientific activities of post-graduate students and for the training of personnel for large tokamaks. All these tasks are well recognised and reflected in documents and understood by the large tokamak teams. Recent experimental results will be presented of contributions to mainstream fusion physics and technology research on small tokamaks involved in the IAEA Coordinated Research Project 'Joint Research using small tokamaks', started in 2004

  2. An Observational Evaluation of Magnetic Confinement in the Winds of BA Supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Shultz, M; Petit, V; Grunhut, J; Neiner, C; Hanes, D

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic wind confinement has been proposed as one explanation for the complex wind structures of supergiant stars of spectral types B and A. Observational investigation of this hypothesis was undertaken using high-resolution ({\\lambda}/{\\Delta}{\\lambda} {\\sim} 65,000) circular polarization (Stokes V ) spectra of six late B and early A type supergiants ({\\beta} Ori, B8Iae; 4 Lac, B9Iab; {\\eta} Leo, A0Ib; HR1040, A0Ib; {\\alpha} Cyg, A2Iae; {\

  3. Development of 2D/3D equilibrium codes for magnetically confined fusion experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Trevisan, Gregorio Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The present work is the result of a three-year Ph.D. research project carried out at Consorzio RFX on magnetically confined plasmas. Research on controlled thermonuclear fusion is currently being pursued by many countries throughout the world, thanks to its promise of a relatively clean and abundant energy source. The next steps for the international community are the construction and operation of a large device, ITER, considered as the last fusion physics experiment with respect to the tokam...

  4. Magnetic Bion Condensation: A New Mechanism ofConfinement and Mass Gap in Four Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-09-25

    In recent work, we derived the long distance confining dynamics of certain QCD-like gauge theories formulated on small S{sup 1} x R{sup 3} based on symmetries, an index theorem and abelian duality. Here, we give the microscopic derivation. The solution reveals a new mechanism of confinement in QCD(adj) in the regime where we have control over both perturbative and nonperturbative aspects. In particular, consider SU(2) QCD(adj) theory with 1 {le} n{sub f} {le} 4 Majorana fermions, a theory which undergoes gauge symmetry breaking at small S{sup 1}. If the magnetic charge of the BPS monopole is normalized to unity, we show that confinement occurs due to condensation of objects with magnetic charge 2, not 1. Due to index theorems, we know that such an object cannot be a two identical monopole configuration. Its net topological charge must vanish, and hence it must be topologically indistinguishable from the perturbative vacuum. We construct such objects, the magnetically charged, topologically null molecules of a BPS monopole and {bar K}{bar K} antimonopole, which we refer as magnetic bions. An immediate puzzle with this proposal is the apparent Coulomb repulsion between BPS-{bar K}{bar K} pair. An attraction which overcomes the Coulomb repulsion between the two is induced by 2n{sub f} -fermion exchange. Bion condensation is also the mechanism of confinement in N = 1 SYM on the same four-manifold. The SU(N) generalization hints a possible hidden integrability behind nonsupersymmetric QCD of affine Toda type, and allows us to analytically compute the string tensions and thicknesses. We currently do not know the extension to R{sup 4}.

  5. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Using Small Tokamaks. It contains 22 papers on a wide variety of research aspects, including diagnostics, design, transport, equilibrium, stability, and confinement. Some of these papers are devoted to other concepts (stellarators, compact tori). Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Magnetic bion condensation: A new mechanism of confinement and mass gap in four dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Unsal, Mithat

    2007-01-01

    In recent work, we derived the long distance confining dynamics of certain QCD-like gauge theories formulated on small $S^1 \\times \\R^3$ based on symmetries, an index theorem and abelian duality. Here, we give the microscopic derivation. The solution reveals a new mechanism of confinement in QCD(adj) in the regime where we have control over both perturbative and nonperturbative aspects. In particular, consider $SU(2) QCD(adj)$ theory with $1 \\leq n_f \\leq 4$ Majorana fermions, a theory which undergoes gauge symmetry breaking at small $S^1$. If the magnetic charge of the BPS monopole is normalized to unity, we show that confinement occurs due to condensation of objects with magnetic charge 2, not 1. Due to index theorems, we know that such an object cannot be a two identical monopole configuration. Its net topological charge must vanish, and hence it must be topologically indistinguishable from the perturbative vacuum. We construct such objects, the magnetically charged, topologically null molecules of a BPS m...

  7. A Positronium Molecule Confined in a Two-Dimensional Space Under a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2004-01-01

    Making use of hyperspherical coordinates, we investigate the qualitative features of the ground and lowlying states of a positronium molecule confined in a two-dimensional (2D) space under a magnetic field. We find that a positronium molecule has more bound states in 2D than in 3D. With the increase of the magnetic field, the second bound state experiences a transition in angular momentum. The result shows that symmetry plays an essential role in the energy spectrum of low-lying states.

  8. A Magnetic Confinement vs. Rotation Classification of Massive-Star Magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, V; Wade, G A; Cohen, D H; Sundqvist, J O; Gagné, M; Apellániz, J Maíz; Oksala, M E; Bohlender, D A; Rivinius, Th; Henrichs, H F; Alecian, E; Townsend, R H D; ud-Doula, A

    2012-01-01

    Building on results from the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) project, this paper shows how a two-parameter classification of massive-star magnetospheres in terms of the magnetic wind confinement (which sets the Alfv\\'en radius RA) and stellar rotation (which sets the Kepler co-rotation radius RK) provides a useful organisation of both observational signatures and theoretical predictions. We compile the first comprehensive study of inferred and observed values for relevant stellar and magnetic parameters of 64 confirmed magnetic OB stars with Teff > 16 kK. Using these parameters, we locate the stars in the magnetic confinement-rotation diagram, a log-log plot of RK vs. RA. This diagram can be subdivided into regimes of centrifugal magnetospheres (CM), with RA > RK, vs. dynamical magnetospheres (DM), with RK > RA. We show how key observational diagnostics, like the presence and characteristics of Halpha emission, depend on a star's position within the diagram, as well as other parameters, especially the expe...

  9. Transport and turbulence in a magnetized plasma (application to tokamak plasmas); Transport et turbulence dans un plasma magnetise (application aux plasmas de tokamaks)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y

    2004-03-01

    This document gathers the lectures made in the framework of a Ph.D level physics class dedicated to plasma physics. This course is made up of 3 parts : 1) collisions and transport, 2) transport and turbulence, and 3) study of a few exchange instabilities. More precisely the first part deals with the following issues: thermonuclear fusion, Coulomb collisions, particles trajectories in a tokamak, neo-classical transport in tokamaks, the bootstrap current, and ware pinch. The second part involves: particle transport in tokamaks, quasi-linear transport, resonance islands, resonance in tokamaks, from quasi to non-linear transport, and non-linear saturation of turbulence. The third part deals with: shift velocities in fluid theory, a model for inter-change instabilities, Rayleigh-Benard instability, Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and Hasegawa-Mima model. This document ends with a series of appendices dealing with: particle-wave interaction, determination of the curvature parameter G, Rossby waves.

  10. Scale size of magnetic turbulence in tokamaks probed with 30-MeV electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Entrop, I.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; R. Jaspers,; Finken, K.H.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of synchrotron radiation emitted by 30-MeV runaway electrons in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak show that the runaway population decays after switching on neutral beam injection (NBI). The decay starts only with a significant delay, which decreases with increasing NBI heating power. This delay pr

  11. Heat convection and transport barriers in low-magnetic-shear Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Schilham, A.M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Layers of reduced electron heat transport ("transport barriers") have been observed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project when the plasma is dominantly heated by electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Experiments into the properties of the transport barriers are reported. Modulation of the ECH powe

  12. Nonlinear Transition from Mitigation to Suppression of the Edge Localized Mode with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in the EAST Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Liu, Y Q; Gu, S; Yang, X; Guo, W; Shi, T; Jia, M; Wang, L; Lyu, B; Zhou, C; Liu, A; Zang, Q; Liu, H; Chu, N; Wang, H H; Zhang, T; Qian, J; Xu, L; He, K; Chen, D; Shen, B; Gong, X; Ji, X; Wang, S; Qi, M; Song, Y; Yuan, Q; Sheng, Z; Gao, G; Fu, P; Wan, B

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of a nonlinear transition from mitigation to suppression of the edge localized mode (ELM) by using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in the EAST tokamak is presented. This is the first demonstration of ELM suppression with RMPs in slowly rotating plasmas with dominant radio-frequency wave heating. Changes of edge magnetic topology after the transition are indicated by a gradual phase shift in the plasma response field from a linear magneto hydro dynamics modeling result to a vacuum one and a sudden increase of three-dimensional particle flux to the divertor. The transition threshold depends on the spectrum of RMPs and plasma rotation as well as perturbation amplitude. This means that edge topological changes resulting from nonlinear plasma response plays a key role in the suppression of ELM with RMPs. PMID:27661697

  13. New printed circuit boards magnetic coils in the vacuum vessel of J-TEXT tokamak for position measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, S. S.; Zhuang, G.; Zhang, M.; Xia, D. H.; Rao, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Pan, Y. [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gentle, K. [Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Four sets of magnetic diagnostic coils, which are printed on machinable ceramic printed circuit boards (PCB), are designed, fabricated, installed, and tested in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) vacuum vessel for detecting the plasma radial and vertical displacements relative to the geometric center of the vacuum vessel in Ohmic discharges. Each coordinate is determined by a pair of variable cross-section Rogowski and saddle coils, which measure the tangential and normal magnetic fields (relative to the coil surface). These coils are suitable for mass production and offer advantages in vacuum compatibility and temperature tolerance that are important for J-TEXT. Position measurements using PCB coils are compared with those from soft x-ray image system and match the position well.

  14. New printed circuit boards magnetic coils in the vacuum vessel of J-TEXT tokamak for position measurementa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, S. S.; Zhuang, G.; Zhang, M.; Xia, D. H.; Rao, B.; Zhang, X. Q.; Pan, Y.; Gentle, K.

    2010-10-01

    Four sets of magnetic diagnostic coils, which are printed on machinable ceramic printed circuit boards (PCB), are designed, fabricated, installed, and tested in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) vacuum vessel for detecting the plasma radial and vertical displacements relative to the geometric center of the vacuum vessel in Ohmic discharges. Each coordinate is determined by a pair of variable cross-section Rogowski and saddle coils, which measure the tangential and normal magnetic fields (relative to the coil surface). These coils are suitable for mass production and offer advantages in vacuum compatibility and temperature tolerance that are important for J-TEXT. Position measurements using PCB coils are compared with those from soft x-ray image system and match the position well.

  15. Nonlinear Transition from Mitigation to Suppression of the Edge Localized Mode with Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in the EAST Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Liu, Y Q; Gu, S; Yang, X; Guo, W; Shi, T; Jia, M; Wang, L; Lyu, B; Zhou, C; Liu, A; Zang, Q; Liu, H; Chu, N; Wang, H H; Zhang, T; Qian, J; Xu, L; He, K; Chen, D; Shen, B; Gong, X; Ji, X; Wang, S; Qi, M; Song, Y; Yuan, Q; Sheng, Z; Gao, G; Fu, P; Wan, B

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of a nonlinear transition from mitigation to suppression of the edge localized mode (ELM) by using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in the EAST tokamak is presented. This is the first demonstration of ELM suppression with RMPs in slowly rotating plasmas with dominant radio-frequency wave heating. Changes of edge magnetic topology after the transition are indicated by a gradual phase shift in the plasma response field from a linear magneto hydro dynamics modeling result to a vacuum one and a sudden increase of three-dimensional particle flux to the divertor. The transition threshold depends on the spectrum of RMPs and plasma rotation as well as perturbation amplitude. This means that edge topological changes resulting from nonlinear plasma response plays a key role in the suppression of ELM with RMPs.

  16. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Christopher G; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant NTV regimes including superbanana plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shea...

  17. Equilibrium reconstruction based on core magnetic measurement and its applications on equilibrium transition in Joint-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Zhuang, G., E-mail: ge-zhuang@hust.edu.cn; Jian, X.; Li, Q.; Liu, Y.; Gao, L.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Evaluation and reconstruction of plasma equilibrium, especially to resolve the safety factor profile, is imperative for advanced tokamak operation and physics study. Based on core magnetic measurement by the high resolution laser polarimeter-interferometer system (POLARIS), the equilibrium of Joint-TEXT (J-TEXT) plasma is reconstructed and profiles of safety factor, current density, and electron density are, therefore, obtained with high accuracy and temporal resolution. The equilibrium reconstruction procedure determines the equilibrium flux surfaces essentially from the data of POLARIS. Refraction of laser probe beam, a major error source of the reconstruction, has been considered and corrected, which leads to improvement of accuracy more than 10%. The error of reconstruction has been systematically assessed with consideration of realistic diagnostic performance and scrape-off layer region of plasma, and its accuracy has been verified. Fast equilibrium transitions both within a single sawtooth cycle and during the penetration of resonant magnetic perturbation have been investigated.

  18. New printed circuit boards magnetic coils in the vacuum vessel of J-TEXT tokamak for position measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four sets of magnetic diagnostic coils, which are printed on machinable ceramic printed circuit boards (PCB), are designed, fabricated, installed, and tested in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) vacuum vessel for detecting the plasma radial and vertical displacements relative to the geometric center of the vacuum vessel in Ohmic discharges. Each coordinate is determined by a pair of variable cross-section Rogowski and saddle coils, which measure the tangential and normal magnetic fields (relative to the coil surface). These coils are suitable for mass production and offer advantages in vacuum compatibility and temperature tolerance that are important for J-TEXT. Position measurements using PCB coils are compared with those from soft x-ray image system and match the position well.

  19. A midsize tokamak as a fast track to burning plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mazzucato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the conceptual design of a midsize tokamak as a fast track to the investigation of burning plasmas. It is shown that it could reach large values of energy gain (≥ 10 with only a modest improvement in confinement over the scaling that was used for designing the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER. This can be achieved by operating in a low plasma recycling regime that experiments indicate can lead to improved plasma confinement. The possibility of reaching the necessary conditions of low recycling using a different magnetic divertor from those currently employed in present experiments is discussed.

  20. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  1. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  2. First Observation of the High Field Side Sawtooth Crash and Heat Transfer during Driven Reconnection Processes in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, HK; Luhmann, NC; Donne, AJH; Classen, IGJ; Domier, CW; Mazzucato, E; Munsat, T; van de Pol, MJ; Xia, Z

    2005-12-01

    High resolution (temporal and spatial), two-dimensional images of electron temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations were employed to study driven reconnection processes in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. The combination of kink and local pressure driven instabilities leads to an "X-point" reconnection process that is localized in the toroidal and poloidal planes. The reconnection is not always confined to the magnetic surfaces with minimum energy. The heat transport process from the core is demonstrated to be highly collective rather than stochastic.

  3. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 2{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T., E-mail: shikama@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Zushi, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 2{sup 3}S–2{sup 3}P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  4. Efficiency of passive magnetic-confinement methods for rapidly rotating rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.

    1985-11-01

    Rapidly rotating, large-diameter rings have potential for use as low-cost electrical-energy storage devices. The efficiency of passive electromagnetic and electrodynamic methods to confine the rotating rings is investigated. Confinement methods examined include repulsive image force, repulsive null flux, attractive image force, and radially stable attractive. For each method the decay time is given in terms of the ring material properties and design parameters. The repulsive techniques are shown to have decay times of less than a day when optimized within a set of practical design constraints. The two attractive levitation methods result in the largest decay times, but are inherently unstable. When null-flux stabilizers are used with attractive levitation, the decay time is shown to depend on magnetic field inhomogeneity. Finally, an inherently stable and very efficient attractive levitation method is proposed. The new method is based on an analogy with alternating-gradient synchrotrons and should have application in high-speed ground transportation.

  5. Plasma column displacement measurements by modified Rogowski sine-coil and Biot-Savart/magnetic flux equation solution on IR-T1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razavi, M.; Mollai, M.; Khorshid, P. [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad Branch, Mashhad 91735-413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nedzelskiy, I. [Instituto de Plasma e Fusao Nuclear, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Islamic Azad University, Tehran 14665-678 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The modified Rogowski sine-coil (MRSC) has been designed and implemented for the plasma column horizontal displacement measurements on small IR-T1 tokamak. MRSC operation has been examined on test assembly and tokamak. Obtained results show high sensitivity to the plasma column horizontal displacement and negligible sensitivity to the vertical displacement; linearity in wide, {+-}0.1 m, range of the displacements; and excellent, 1.5%, agreement with the results of numerical solution of Biot-Savart and magnetic flux equations.

  6. SST and ADITYA tokamak research in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state operation of tokamaks plays an important role in high temperature magnetically confined plasma research. Steady state Superconducting Tokamak (SST) programme in India deals with the development of various technologies in this direction. SST-1 machine has been engineered and is being fabricated at the Institute for Plasma Research. The objectives of the machine are to study physics of plasma processes under steady state condition and develop the technologies related to steady state operation. Various sub-systems are being prototyped and developed. SST-1 is a large aspect ratio machine with a major radius of 1.1 m and a plasma minor radius of 0.2 m with elongation of 1.7 to 1.9 and triangularity of 0.5 to 0.7. It has been designed for 1000 sec operation at 3 T toroidal magnetic eld. Neutral beam Injection and Radio frequency heating systems are being developed to heat the plasma. Lower hybrid Current Drive system would sustain 200 kA of plasma current during 1000 sec operation. ADITYA tokamak has been upgraded with new diagnostics and RF heating systems. Thomson Scattering and ECE diagnostics have been operated. 200 kW Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) systems have been successfully commissioned. RF assisted initial breakdown experiments have been initiated with these systems. (author)

  7. ICRF wave propagation and absorption in tokamak and mirror magnetic fields: a full-wave calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global solutions for the ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) wave fields in a straight tokamak with rotational transform and in a poloidally symmetric mirror are calculated in the cold plasma limit. The component of the wave electric field parallel to B vector is assumed zero. Symmetry in each problem allows Fourier decomposition in one ignorable coordinate, and the remaining set of two coupled, two-dimensional partial differential equations is solved by finite differencing. Energy absorption and antenna impedance are calculated using a simple collisional absorption model. When large gradients in absolute value B along B vector are present in either geometry, ICRF heating at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance is observed. For the mirror, such gradients are always present. But for the tokamak, the rotational transform must be large enough that B vector . delB greater than or equal to 0(1). For smaller transforms more typical of real tokamaks, only heating at the two-ion hybrid resonance is observed. This suggests that direct resonant absorption at the fundamental ion cyclotron resonance may be possible in stellarators where B vector . delB approx. 0(1) naturally. 13 refs., 23 figs

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic theory of the global structure and magnetic components of the geodesic acoustic continuum modes in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg, C.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is used to investigate some of the fundamental properties of the geodesic acoustic continuum modes (GAMs) in tokamaks, including their global structure, their associated magnetic components both inside and outside the plasma, and effects of a non-circular cross section of the plasma. In addition to the well-known m=1 side-bands in the perturbed density and pressure of the (electrostatic) GAM, the MHD continuum GAM also includes a m=1 side-band in the perturbed toroidal magnetic field as well as m=2 side-bands in the perturbed density, pressure, poloidal flow and in the magnetic components δ {{B}r} and δ {{B}θ} (m is the poloidal mode number). These m=2 side-bands exist within the whole plasma and the magnetic components also outside the plasma, and the magnitudes of these components in the vacuum region are calculated in the paper. It is shown that, for plasmas with a conducting wall not too far from the plasma surface, the perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region is dominated by its poloidal component δ {{B}θ} , with poloidal dependence \\sin 2θ , in agreement with experiments. Aspects of the plasma equilibrium that affect the magnitude of the perturbed magnetic field in the vacuum region are discussed in the paper. Furthermore, the influence of a non-circular plasma cross section on the GAM frequency and on the spectrum of the global, perturbed magnetic field is analysed. It is found that the only significant effect of a non-circular cross section on the GAM frequency comes from elongation and its variation across the plasma radius. However, higher-order shaping effects, as well as finite aspect ratio, induce other Fourier components than m=2 in the magnetic halo that surrounds the GAM surface.

  9. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  10. Suppressing the neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks during anomalous transverse transport owing to predomination of the magnetic well effect over the bootstrap drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suppression of neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks under anomalous transverse transport conditions when the magnetic well effect predominates over the bootstrap drive is studied. Reduced equations of transfer are used in the description. Geodetic effects are considered during the magnetic well calculation. A criterion for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by the compound effect at an arbitrary level of the transverse heat transport by electrons and ions is derived

  11. Proceedings of JSPS-CAS Core University Program seminar on production and steady state confinement of high performance plasmas in magnetic confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The JSPS-CAS Core University Program (CUP) seminar on 'Production and steady-state confinement of high performance plasmas in magnetic confinement systems' was held from 27 July to 29 July 2005 in Institute of Plasma Physics, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, China. This seminar was organized in the framework of CUP in the field of plasma and nuclear fusion. About 50 persons including 20 Japanese attendees attended this seminar. Long time sustainment of high confinement and high beta plasmas is crucial for realization of an advanced nuclear fusion reactor. This seminar was motivated to summarize the results of CUP obtained in four years activities of CUP, and to extract crucial issues to be resolved near future, which must drive near and mid- term collaborations in the framework of CUP. The 32 of presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. Study of energy transport in Tore Supra Tokamak; Etude du transport de l`energie sur le Tokamak Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiziou, L.

    1995-12-18

    The goal of this thesis is to characterize the energy confinement and the heat transport in Tore Supra tokamak. The first chapter is an introduction to the different plasma confinement regimes: ohmic, low confinement and improved confinement regimes. The second chapter is devoted to the presentation of the different theoretical and empirical approaches about energy confinement and heat transport. In the third chapter an attempt of explanations for non-local transport phenomenons is given. A turbulence correlation length greater than the ionic Larmor radius seams to be a reasonable explanation. This theoretical study focusses on the possibility for modes coupling in a tokamak. This study tries to determine a radial correlation length considering the two principal coupling modes: toroidal and non-linear. Different transport regimes are discussed using an analytical model and considering the influence of one coupling with respect to the other. In chapter four, the measurements of current profiles and transport coefficients are presented. The codes used for the reconstruction of equilibrium and for the experimental determination of the diffusivity are briefly presented. In chapter five, experimental results of energy transport studies for Tore Supra plasmas are presented. The different modes are analysed in detail and the study focusses on the influence of magnetic shear in the improved confinement regime. Finally, the different parametric dependences of the electronic thermal diffusivity are compared to local transport models. 165 refs., 57 figs., 2 tabs., 2 appendix.

  13. Stability analysis of tokamak plasmas; Analyse de stabilite de plasmas de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdelle, C

    2000-10-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the energy transport is mainly turbulent. In order to increase the fusion reactions rate, it is needed to improve the energy confinement. The present work is dedicated to the identification of the key parameters leading to plasmas with a better confined energy in order to guide the future experiments. For this purpose, a numerical code has been developed. It calculates the growth rates characterizing the instabilities onset. The stability analysis is completed by the evaluation of the shearing rate of the rotation due to the radial electric field. When this shearing rate is greater than the growth rate the ion turbulence is fully stabilised. The shearing rate and the growth rate are determined from the density, temperature and security factor profiles of a given plasma. Three types of plasmas have been analysed. In the Radiative Improved modes of TEXTOR, high charge number ions seeding lowers the growth rates. In Tore Supra-high density plasmas, a strong magnetic shear and/or a more efficient ion heating linked to a bifurcation of the toroidal rotation direction (which is not understood) trigger the improvement of the confinement. In other Tore Supra plasmas, locally steep electron pressure gradients have been obtained following magnetic shear reversal. This locally negative magnetic shear has a stabilizing effect. In these three families of plasmas, the growth rates decrease, the confinement improves, the density and temperature profiles are steeper. This steepening induces an increase of the rotation shearing rate, which then maintains the confinement high quality. (author)

  14. Confinement and inhomogeneous broadening effects in the quantum oscillatory magnetization of quantum dot ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the magnetization of ensembles of etched quantum dots with a lateral diameter of 460 nm, which we prepared from InGaAs/InP heterostructures. The quantum dots exhibit 1/B-periodic de-Haas–van-Alphen-type oscillations in the magnetization M(B) for external magnetic fields B  >  2 T, measured by torque magnetometry at 0.3 K. We compare the experimental data to model calculations assuming different confinement potentials and including ensemble broadening effects. The comparison shows that a hard wall potential with an edge depletion width of 100 nm explains the magnetic behavior. Beating patterns induced by Rashba spin–orbit interaction (SOI) as measured in unpatterned and nanopatterned InGaAs/InP heterostructures are not observed for the quantum dots. From our model we predict that signatures of SOI in the magnetization could be observed in larger dots in tilted magnetic fields. (paper)

  15. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak; Reconstrucao do equilibrio no tokamak TCA/BR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Wanderley Pires de

    1996-12-31

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author) 68 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-01

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study has been

  17. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  18. Stimulated emission of fast Alfv\\'en waves within magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, J W S; Chapman, S C

    2016-01-01

    A fast Alfv\\'en wave with finite amplitude is shown to grow by a stimulated emission process that we propose for exploitation in toroidal magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Stimulated emission occurs while the wave propagates inward through the outer mid-plane plasma, where a population inversion of the energy distribution of fusion-born ions is observed to arise naturally. Fully nonlinear first principles simulations, which self-consistently evolve particles and fields under the Maxwell-Lorentz system, demonstrate this novel "alpha-particle channelling" scenario for the first time.

  19. Electric-field manipulation of spin states in confined non-magnetic/magnetic heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy spectrum and states of an electron in a non-magnetic/magnetic heterostructure placed between two materials (e.g. oxides) acting as barriers is studied in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular or parallel to the well. A potential step is formed at the interface between the non-magnetic and magnetic material in the presence of a magnetic field since spin-up electrons see a barrier whereas the spin-down ones see a well. A rich band structure is obtained which can be tuned by a perpendicular electric field. Numerical results are presented for a ZnSe/Zn1-xMnxSe heterostructure and their pertinence to spin-polarized transport is pointed out

  20. Fourth annual progress report on special-purpose materials for magnetically confined fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of Special Purpose Materials covers fusion reactor materials problems other than the first-wall and blanket structural materials, which are under the purview of the ADIP, DAFS, and PMI task groups. Components that are considered as special purpose materials include breeding materials, coolants, neutron multipliers, barriers for tritium control, materials for compression and OH coils and waveguides, graphite and SiC, heat-sink materials, ceramics, and materials for high-field (>10-T) superconducting magnets. The Task Group on Special Purpose Materials has limited its concern to crucial and generic materials problems that must be resolved if magnetic-fusion devices are to succeed. Important areas specifically excluded include low-field (8-T) superconductors, fuels for hybrids, and materials for inertial-confinement devices. These areas may be added in the future when funding permits

  1. Feasibility of alpha particle measurement in a magnetically confined plasma by CO2 laser Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion-product alpha particles will dominate the behavior of the next generation of ignited D-T fusion reactors. Advanced diagnostics will be required to characterize the energy deposition of these fast alpha particles in the magnetically confined plasma. For small-angle coherent Thomson scattering of a CO2 laser beam from such a plasma, a resonance in the scattered power occurs near 900 with respect to the magnetic field direction. This spatial concentration permits a simplified detection of the scattered laser power from the plasma using a heterodyne system. The signal produced by the presence of fusion-product alpha particles in an ignited plasma is calculated to be well above the noise level, which results from statistical variations of the background signal produced by scattering from free electrons. 7 refs

  2. Confined partial filament eruption and its reformation within a stable magnetic flux rope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Kayshap, Pradeep; Uddin, Wahab [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Filippov, Boris [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chandra, Ramesh [Department of Physics, D.S.B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Choudhary, Debi Prasad, E-mail: navin@aries.res.in, E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com [California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present observations of a confined partial eruption of a filament on 2012 August 4, which restores its initial shape within ≈2 hr after eruption. From the Global Oscillation Network Group Hα observations, we find that the filament plasma turns into dynamic motion at around 11:20 UT from the middle part of the filament toward the northwest direction with an average speed of ≈105 km s{sup –1}. A little brightening underneath the filament possibly shows the signature of low-altitude reconnection below the filament eruptive part. In Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å images, we observe an activation of right-handed helically twisted magnetic flux rope that contains the filament material and confines it during its dynamical motion. The motion of cool filament plasma stops after traveling a distance of ≈215 Mm toward the northwest from the point of eruption. The plasma moves partly toward the right foot point of the flux rope, while most of the plasma returns after 12:20 UT toward the left foot point with an average speed of ≈60 km s{sup –1} to reform the filament within the same stable magnetic structure. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, we find filament chirality to be sinistral, while the activated enveloping flux rope shows a clear right-handed twist. Thus, this dynamic event is an apparent example of one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). From the coronal magnetic field decay index, n, calculation near the flux rope axis, it is evident that the whole filament axis lies within the domain of stability (i.e., n < 1), which provides the filament stability despite strong disturbances at its eastern foot point.

  3. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended

  4. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-10-26

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended.

  5. Properties of highly electronegative plasmas produced in a multipolar magnetic-confined device with a transversal magnetic filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draghici, Mihai; Stamate, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    Highly electronegative plasmas were produced in Ar/SF6 gas mixtures in a dc discharge with multipolar magnetic confinement and transversal magnetic filter. Langmuir probe and mass spectrometry were used for plasma diagnostics. Plasma potential drift, the influence of small or large area biased...... electrodes on plasma parameters, the formation of the negative ion sheath and etching rates by positive and negative ions have been investigated for different experimental conditions. When the electron temperature was reduced below 1 eV the density ratio of negative ion to electron exceeded 100 even for very...... low amounts of SF6 gas. The plasma potential drift could be controlled by proper wall conditioning. A large electrode biased positively had no effect on plasma potential for density ratios of negative ions to electrons larger than 50. For similar electronegativities or higher a negative ion sheath...

  6. Poloidal beta and internal inductance measurement on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, B; Sun, Y W; Wan, B N; Qian, J P

    2007-09-01

    Poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) measurements are very important for tokamak operation. Much more plasma parameters can be inferred from the two parameters, such as the plasma energy confinement time, the plasma toroidal current profile, and magnetohydrodynamics instability. Using diamagnetic and compensation loop, combining with poloidal magnetic probe array signals, poloidal beta beta(theta) and internal inductance l(i) are measured. In this article, the measurement system and arithmetic are introduced. Different experimental results are given in different plasma discharges on HT-7 superconducting tokamak.

  7. Importance of the fine structure in a tokamak for the abnormal transport and the internal disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of energy transport in a Tokamak, in presence of magnetic islets, has been treated by decomposing this problem in different bricks. To assembly the different bricks the model of dynamic percolation, which couples by the intermediate of scattering coefficient, the activity of transport sites (islets size) to the profile of transported quantity (temperature profile) has been chosen. The results, got with this model, results connected to the hypothesis of a limited number of islets, agree with the different observations. A possible application of this model could be the exploration of different operating conditions of Tokamak and a research of improved confinement running. (N.C.). 149 refs., 85 figs

  8. Real-Time Bonner Sphere Spectrometry on the HL-2A Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunyu; Cao, Jing; Jiang, Xiaofei; Zhao, Yanfeng; Song, Xianying; Yin, Zejie

    2016-06-01

    Real-time Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) at the HL-2A tokamak for the neutron spectrum diagnostic is described. The spectrometer consists of eight different size Bonner spheres made of polyethylene and with a 3helium-filled detector in the center, pre-amplifiers, and parallel-processing data acquisition system (DAQ). Dynamic neutrons from plasma discharges of the HL-2A tokamak were measured and the real-time neutron spectrum was presented. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11375195) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB104003)

  9. Magnetic confinement of the solar tachocline: II. Coupling to a convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, A; Zahn, J -P

    2011-01-01

    The reason for the observed thinness of the solar tachocline is still not well understood. One of the explanations that have been proposed is that a primordial magnetic field renders the rotation uniform in the radiation zone. We test here the validity of this magnetic scenario through 3D numerical MHD simulations that encompass both the radiation zone and the convection zone. The numerical simulations are performed with the anelastic spherical harmonics (ASH) code. The computational domain extends from $0.07\\;R_\\odot$ to $0.97\\;R_\\odot$. In the parameter regime we explored, a dipolar fossil field aligned with the rotation axis can not remain confined in the radiation zone. When the field lines are allowed to interact with turbulent unstationary convective motions at the base of the convection zone, 3D effects prevent the field confinement. In agreement with previous work, we find that a dipolar fossil field, even when it is initially buried deep inside the radiation zone, will spread into the convective zone...

  10. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  11. Effect of spatial confinement on magnetic hyperthermia via dipolar interactions in Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadat, M E [University of Cincinnati; Patel, Ronak [University of Cincinnati; Sookoor, Jason [University of Cincinnati; Bud' ko, Sergey L [Ames Laboratory; Ewing, Rodney C [Stanford University; Zhang, Jiaming [Stanford University; Xu, Hong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Wang, Yilong [Tongji University School of Medicine; Pauletti, Giovanni M [University of Cincinnati; Mast, David B [University of Cincinnati; Shi, Donglu [University of Cincinnati

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the effect of nanoparticle confinement on the magnetic relaxation of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NP) was investigated by measuring the hyperthermia heating behavior in high frequency alternating magnetic field. Three different Fe3O4 nanoparticle systems having distinct nanoparticle configurations were studied in terms of magnetic hyperthermia heating rate and DC magnetization. All magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) systems were constructed using equivalent ~10nm diameter NP that were structured differently in terms of configuration, physical confinement, and interparticle spacing. The spatial confinement was achieved by embedding the Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the matrices of the polystyrene spheres of 100 nm, while the unconfined was the free Fe3O4 nanoparticles well-dispersed in the liquid via PAA surface coating. Assuming the identical core MNPs in each system, the heating behavior was analyzed in terms of particle freedom (or confinement), interparticle spacing, and magnetic coupling (or dipole-dipole interaction). DC magnetization data were correlated to the heating behavior with different material properties. Analysis of DC magnetization measurements showed deviation from classical Langevin behavior near saturation due to dipole interaction modification of the MNPs resulting in a high magnetic anisotropy. It was found that the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of the unconfined nanoparticle systems were significantly higher than those of confined (the MNPs embedded in the polystyrene matrix). This increase of SAR was found to be attributable to high Néel relaxation rate and hysteresis loss of the unconfined MNPs. It was also found that the dipole-dipole interactions can significantly reduce the global magnetic response of the MNPs and thereby decrease the SAR of the nanoparticle systems.

  12. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems Special issue containing papers presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.

    2010-08-01

    The history of fusion research resembles the way in which one builds skyscrapers: laying the first foundation stone, one thinks about the top of the skyscraper. At the early stages of fusion, when it became clear that the thermonuclear reactor would operate with DT plasma confined by the magnetic field, the study of the `top item'—the physics of 3.5 MeV alpha particles produced by the DT fusion reaction—was initiated. The first publications on this topic appeared as long ago as the 1960s. At that time, because the physics of alpha particles was far from the experimental demand, investigations were carried out by small groups of theoreticians who hoped to discover important and interesting phenomena in this new research area. Soon after the beginning of the work, theoreticians discovered that alpha particles could excite various instabilities in fusion plasmas. In particular, at the end of the 1960s an Alfvén instability driven by alpha particles was predicted. Later it turned out that a variety of Alfvén instabilities with very different features does exist. Instabilities with perturbations of the Alfvénic type play an important role in current experiments; it is likely that they will affect plasma performance in ITER and future reactors. The first experimental manifestation of instabilities excited by superthermal particles in fusion devices was observed in the PDX tokamak in 1983. In this device a large-scale instability—the so called `fishbone instability'—associated with ions produced by the neutral beam injection resulted in a loss of a large fraction of the injected energy. Since then, the study of energetic-ion-driven instabilities and the effects produced by energetic ions in fusion plasmas has attracted the growing attention of both experimentalists and theorists. Recognizing the importance of this topic, the first conference on fusion alpha particles was held in 1989 in Kyiv under the auspices of the IAEA. The meeting in Kyiv and several

  13. Magnetic Reconnection Rates and Energy Release in a Confined X-class Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Veronig, A M

    2015-01-01

    We study the energy-release process in the confined X1.6 flare that occurred on 22 October 2014 in AR 12171. Magnetic-reconnection rates and reconnection fluxes are derived from three different data sets: space-based data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 1600 {\\AA} filter onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and ground-based H$\\alpha$ and Ca II K filtergrams from Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory. The magnetic-reconnection rates determined from the three data sets all closely resemble the temporal profile of the hard X-rays measured by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), which are a proxy for the flare energy released into high-energy electrons. The total magnetic-reconnection flux derived lies between $4.1 \\times 10^{21}$ Mx (AIA 1600 {\\AA}) and $7.9 \\times 10^{21}$ Mx (H$\\alpha$), which corresponds to about 2 to 4% of the total unsigned flux of the strong source AR. Comparison of the magnetic-reconnection flux dependence on the GOES class for 27 eruptive events collected fr...

  14. SCR-1: Design and construction of a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes briefly the design and construction of a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma, called Stellarator of Costa Rica 1, or SCR-1; developed by the Plasma Physics Group of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, PlasmaTEC. The SCR-1 is based on the small Spanish stellarator UST1, created by the engineer Vicente Queral. The SCR-1 will employ stainless steel torus-shaped vacuum vessel with a major radius of 460.33 mm and a cross section radius of 110.25 mm. A typical SCR-1 plasma will have an average radius 42.2 mm and a volume of 8 liters (0.01 m3), and an aspect ratio of 5.7. The magnetic resonant field will be 0.0878 T, and a period of 2 (m=2) with a rotational transform of 0.3. The magnetic field will be provided by 12 modular coils, with 8 turns each, with an electrical current of 8704 A per coil (1088 A per turn of each coil). This current will be fed by a bank of cell batteries. The plasma will be heated by ECRH with magnetrons of a total power of 5 kW, in the first harmonic at 2.45 GHz. The expected electron temperature and density are 15 eV and 1017 m−3 respectively with an estimated confinement time of 7.30 x 10−4 ms. The initial diagnostics on the SCR-1 will consist of a Langmuir probe, a heterodyne microwave interferometer, and a field mapping system. The first plasma of the SCR-1 is expected at the end of 2011.

  15. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been done with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a region may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this Z-mode of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described

  16. Analysis of neutral hydrogenic emission spectra in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Balmer-α radiation by the excitation of thermal and fast neutral hydrogenic particles has been investigated in a magnetically confined fusion device, or tokamak, from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). From the diagnostic point of view, the emission from thermal neutrals is associated with passive spectroscopy and that from energetic neutrals that are usually injected from the outside of the tokamak to the active spectroscopy. The passive spectroscopic measurement for the thermal Balmer-α emission from deuterium and hydrogen estimates the relative concentration of hydrogen in a deuterium-fueled plasma and therefore, makes a useful tool to monitor the vacuum wall condition. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium obtained from this measurement qualitatively correlates with the energy confinement of the plasma. The Doppler-shifted Balmer-α components from the fast neutrals features the spectrum of the motional Stark effect (MSE) which is an essential principle for the measurement of the magnetic pitch angle profile. Characterization of this active MSE spectra, especially with multiple neutral beam lines crossing along the observation line of sight, has been done for the guideline of the multi-ion-source heating beam operation and for the optimization of the narrow bandpass filters that are required for the polarimeter-based MSE diagnostic system under construction at KSTAR.

  17. Numerical method to obtain the optimum configuration of external magnetic field coils in a tokamak device by non-linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In large tokamak devices in the next phase of fusion research, it seems that equilibrium of the toroidal plasma is maintained essentially by the external control loops and an air-core transformer is used instead of a conventional iron-core transformer. Under this situation the method based on the optimization process using the algorithm of a non-linear programming has been applied in determination of the optimum design of the external magnetic field coils including the control loops for maintaining magnetic field and primary windings of the air-core transformer. It is found that the method is useful for design of the control loops and primary windings in a practical tokamak. The results obtained so far are presented and the procedure of optimization is given in detail and comprehensively. (author)

  18. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  19. Evaluation of the toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasilov, Sergei V. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Institute of Plasma Physics National Science Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology” ul. Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institut für Theoretische Physik—Computational Physics, Technische Universität Graz Petersgasse 16, A–8010 Graz (Austria); Maassberg, Henning [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The toroidal torque driven by external non-resonant magnetic perturbations (neoclassical toroidal viscosity) is an important momentum source affecting the toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. The well-known force-flux relation directly links this torque to the non-ambipolar neoclassical particle fluxes arising due to the violation of the toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field. Here, a quasilinear approach for the numerical computation of these fluxes is described, which reduces the dimension of a standard neoclassical transport problem by one without model simplifications of the linearized drift kinetic equation. The only limiting condition is that the non-axisymmetric perturbation field is small enough such that the effect of the perturbation field on particle motion within the flux surface is negligible. Therefore, in addition to most of the transport regimes described by the banana (bounce averaged) kinetic equation also such regimes as, e.g., ripple-plateau and resonant diffusion regimes are naturally included in this approach. Based on this approach, a quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 [W. Kernbichler et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 3, S1061 (2008).] has been developed and benchmarked against a few analytical and numerical models. Results from NEO-2 stay in good agreement with results from these models in their pertinent range of validity.

  20. RCD Large Aspect-Ratio Tokamak Equilibrium with Magnetic Islands: a Perturbed Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.L.Braga

    2013-01-01

    Solutions of Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation with Reversed Current Density (RCD) profiles present magnetic islands when the magnetic flux is explicitly dependent on the poloidal angle.In this work it is shown that a typical cylindrical (large aspect-ratio) RCD equilibrium configuration perturbed by the magnetic tield of a circular loop (simulating a divertor) is capable of generate magnetic islands,due to the poloidal symmetry break of the GS equilibrium solution.

  1. SPECIAL TOPIC: A two-time-scale dynamic-model approach for magnetic and kinetic profile control in advanced tokamak scenarios on JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, D.; Mazon, D.; Ariola, M.; DeTommasi, G.; Laborde, L.; Piccolo, F.; Sartori, F.; Tala, T.; Zabeo, L.; Boboc, A.; Bouvier, E.; Brix, M.; Brzozowski, J.; Challis, C. D.; Cocilovo, V.; Cordoliani, V.; Crisanti, F.; DeLa Luna, E.; Felton, R.; Hawkes, N.; King, R.; Litaudon, X.; Loarer, T.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.; Nunes, I.; Surrey, E.; Zimmerman, O.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2008-10-01

    Real-time simultaneous control of several radially distributed magnetic and kinetic plasma parameters is being investigated on JET, in view of developing integrated control of advanced tokamak scenarios. This paper describes the new model-based profile controller which has been implemented during the 2006-2007 experimental campaigns. The controller aims to use the combination of heating and current drive (H&CD) systems—and optionally the poloidal field (PF) system—in an optimal way to regulate the evolution of plasma parameter profiles such as the safety factor, q(x), and gyro-normalized temperature gradient, \\rho _Te^*(x) . In the first part of the paper, a technique for the experimental identification of a minimal dynamic plasma model is described, taking into account the physical structure and couplings of the transport equations, but making no quantitative assumptions on the transport coefficients or on their dependences. To cope with the high dimensionality of the state space and the large ratio between the time scales involved, the model identification procedure and the controller design both make use of the theory of singularly perturbed systems by means of a two-time-scale approximation. The second part of the paper provides the theoretical basis for the controller design. The profile controller is articulated around two composite feedback loops operating on the magnetic and kinetic time scales, respectively, and supplemented by a feedforward compensation of density variations. For any chosen set of target profiles, the closest self-consistent state achievable with the available actuators is uniquely defined. It is reached, with no steady state offset, through a near-optimal proportional-integral control algorithm. Conventional optimal control is recovered in the limiting case where the ratio of the plasma confinement time to the resistive diffusion time tends to zero. Closed-loop simulations of the controller response have been performed in

  2. Special-purpose materials for magnetically confined fusion reactors. Third annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of Special Purpose Materials covers fusion reactor materials problems other than the first-wall and blanket structural materials, which are under the purview of the ADIP, DAFS, and PMI task groups. Components that are considered as special purpose materials include breeding materials, coolants, neutron multipliers, barriers for tritium control, materials for compression and OH coils and waveguides, graphite and SiC, heat-sink materials, ceramics, and materials for high-field (>10-T) superconducting magnets. It is recognized that there will be numerous materials problems that will arise during the design and construction of large magnetic-fusion energy devices such as the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and Demonstration Reactor (DEMO). Most of these problems will be specific to a particular design or project and are the responsibility of the project, not the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch. Consequently, the Task Group on Special Purpose Materials has limited its concern to crucial and generic materials problems that must be resolved if magnetic-fusion devices are to succeed. Important areas specifically excluded include low-field (8-T) superconductors, fuels for hybrids, and materials for inertial-confinement devices. These areas may be added in the future when funding permits

  3. Simulation of transition dynamics to high confinement in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, A H; Madsen, J; Naulin, V; Rasmussen, J Juul; Wan, B N

    2014-01-01

    The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in close agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST. Particularly, the slow transition with an intermediate dithering phase is well reproduced by the numerical solutions. Additionally, the model reproduces the experimentally determined L-H transition power threshold scaling that the ion power threshold increases with increasing particle density. The results hold promise for developing predictive models of the transition, essential for understanding and optimizing future fusion power reactors.

  4. Annual progress report on fusion plasma theory task I: magnetic confinement fusion plasma theory for the period January 1, 1984-September 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research performed under this contract over the past nine months has concentrated on some key tandem mirror plasma confinement and heating issues (heating at the second electron cyclotron harmonic, pumping of electrons by ICRF in Phaedrus, pondermotive force effects on MHD stability, moments approach to tandem mirror transport), and on some aspects of tokamak plasma confinement (long mean free path resistive MHD, Tokapole II equilibria with imbedded coils and internal separatrices, ballooning modes on a divertor separatrix). Progress in these and some other miscellaneous areas are briefly summarized in this progress report

  5. A CONCEPT FOR NEXT STEP ADVANCED TOKAMAK FUSION DEVICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A concept is introduced for initiating the design study of a special class of tokamak,which has a magnetic confinement configuration intermediate between contemporary advanced tokamak and the recently established spherical torus (ST,also well known by the name "spherical tokamak").The leading design parameter in the present proposal is a dimensionless geometrical parameter, the machine aspect ratio A=R0/a0=2.0,where the parameters a0 and R0 denote,respectively,the plasma (equatorial) minor radius and the plasma major radius.The aim of this choice is to technologically and experimentally go beyond the aspect ratio frontier (R0/a0≈2.5) of present day tokamaks and enter a broad unexplored domain existing on the (a0,R0) parameter space in current international tokamak database,between the data region already moderately well covered by the advanced conventional tokamaks and the data region planned to be covered by STs.Plasma minor radius a0 has been chosen to be the second basic design parameter, and consequently,the plasma major radius R0 is regarded as a dependent design parameter.In the present concept,a nominal plasma minor radius a0=1.2m is adopted to be the principal design value,and smaller values of a0 can be used for auxiliary design purposes,to establish extensive database linkage with existing tokamaks.Plasma minor radius can also be adjusted by mechanical and/or electromagnetic means to smaller values during experiments,for making suitable data linkages to existing machines with higher aspect ratios and smaller plasma minor radii.The basic design parameters proposed enable the adaptation of several confinement techniques recently developed by STs,and thereby a specially arranged central-bore region inside the envisioned tokamak torus,with retrieved space in the direction of plasma minor radius,will be available for technological adjustments and maneuverings to facilitate implementation of engineering instrumentation and real time high

  6. Compact ignition tokamak physics and engineering basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a high-field, compact tokamak design whose objective is the study of physics issues associated with burning plasmas. The toroidal and poloidal field coils employ a copper-steel laminate, manufactured by explosive-bonding techniques, to support the forces generated by the design fields: 10 T toroidal field at the plasma center; 21 T in the OH solenoid. A combination of internal and external PF coils provides control of the equilibrium and the ability to sweep the magnetic separatrix across the divertor plates during a pulse. At temperatures and βα levels characteristic of ITER designs, the fusion power in CIT approaches 800 MW and can be the limiting factor in the pulse length. Ignition requires that the confinement time exceed present L-mode scalings by about a factor of two, which is anticipated to occur as a result of the operational flexibility incorporated into the design. Conventional operating limits given by 20 e and qψ ≤ 3.2 have been chosen and, in the case of MHD limits, have been justified by ideal stability analysis. The power required for CIT ignition ranges from 10 MW to 40 MW or more, depending on confinement assumptions, and either ICRF or ECRF heating, or both, will be used. (author). 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  7. Reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations with several different computer codes based on the resistive MHD equations have shown that (m = 1, n = 1) tearing modes in tokamak plasmas grow by magnetic reconnection. The observable behavior predicted by the codes has been confirmed in detail from the waveforms of signals from x-ray detectors and recently by x-ray tomographic imaging

  8. Interpretation of D_alpha Imaging Diagnostics Data on the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    OpenAIRE

    Harhausen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The Tokamak configuration is a promising concept for magnetic confinement fusion. Cross-field transport in the plasma core leads to a plasma flux across the separatrix into the scrape-off layer, where it is guided along field lines towards the divertor targets. A return flux of neutral particles after plasma-wall interaction is directed towards the plasma chamber. Each discharge scenario is accompanied by a characteristic recycling pattern. The dominant mechanisms of neutralplasma...

  9. Active Control of 2/1 Magnetic Islands in the HBT-EP Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, G.A.; Cates, C.; Mauel, M.E.; Maurer, D.; Nadle, D.; Taylor, E.; Xiao, Q.; Wurden, G.A.; Reass, W.A.

    1997-11-18

    Closed and open loop control techniques were applied to growing m/n=2/1 rotating islands in wall stabilized plasmas in the HBT-EP tokamak. The approach taken by HBT-EP combines an adjustable segmented conducting wall (which slows the growth or stabilizes ideal external kinks) with a number of small (6{degree} wide) saddle coils located between the gaps of the conducting wall. In this paper we report demonstration of 2-phase island rotation control from 5 kHz to 15 kHz and observation of the phase instability which are well modeled by the single-helicity, predictions of nonlinear Rutherford island dynamics for 2/1 tearing modes including important effects of ion inertia and FLR which appears as a damping term in the model equations. The closed loop response of active feedback control of the 2/1 mode at moderate gain was observed to be in good agreement with the theory. We have also demonstrated suppression of the 2/1 island growth using an asynchronous frequency modulation drive which maintains the flow damping of the island by application of rotating control fields with frequencies alternating above and below the natural mode frequency. This frequency modulation control technique was also able to prevent disruptions normally observed to follow giant sawtooth crashes in the plasma core.

  10. Distance dependence of magnetic field effect inside confined environment of reverse micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Manas Kumar; Basu, Samita

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we emphasize on the distance dependence of the magnetic field effect (MFE) on the donoracceptor (D-A) pair inside the confined environment of AOT/H2O/n-heptane reverse micellar (RMs) system. For this study N, N-dimethyl aniline (DMA) is used as an electron donor while the protonated form of Acr is treated as an electron acceptor. We report of the occurrence of an associated excited state proton transfer with the photoinduced electron transfer between Acr and DMA forming corresponding radical pair (RP) and radical ion pairs (RIP). The fate of these reaction products has been tested in the presence of an external magnetic field (˜0.08T) by varying the size of the RMs. The MFE between Acr and DMA has been compared to the results with the earlier reported interactions between Acr and TEA (Chemical Physics Letters, 2011, 506, 205-210). We accentuate the importance of the localization of the D and A inside the RMs, and the intervening distance between the pair to be the critical component for observing substantial MFE.

  11. Chandra View of Magnetically Confined Wind in HD191612: Theory versus Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Yael; Zhekov, Svetozar A

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of the magnetic star HD191612 were acquired using the Chandra X-ray observatory at both maximum and minimum emission phases. We confirm the flux and hardness variations previously reported with XMM-Newton, demonstrating the great repeatability of the behavior of HD191612 over a decade. The line profiles appear typical for magnetic massive stars: no significant line shift, relatively narrow lines for high-Z elements, and formation radius at about 2R*. Line ratios confirm the softening of the X-ray spectrum at the minimum emission phase. Shift or width variations appear of limited amplitude at most (slightly lower velocity and slightly increased broadening at minimum emission phase, but within 1--2 sigma of values at maximum). In addition, a fully self-consistent 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the confined wind in HD191612 was performed. The simulation results were directly fitted to the data leading to a remarkable agreement overall between them.

  12. Spin waves propagation and confinement in magnetic microstructures; Propagation et confinement d'ondes de spin dans les microstructures magnetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailleul, M

    2002-10-01

    In this thesis, ferromagnetic thin film elements have been studied on a small scale ({mu}m) and at high frequencies (GHz). For those studies, a microwave spectrometer based on the use of micro-antennae has been developed. It had been applied to two different systems. In a first time, we have launched and detected spin waves in continuous films. This allowed us to describe both the transduction process and the relaxation law for long wavelength spin waves. In a second time, we have studied micrometer-wide stripe for which the magnetic ground state is inhomogeneous. The obtained microwave response has been interpreted in terms of micro-magnetic phase transitions and in terms of spin waves confinement. (author)

  13. Modular coils and finite-β operation of a quasi-axially symmetric tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasi-axially symmetric tokamaks (QA tokamaks) are an extension of the conventional tokamak concept. In these devices the magnetic field strength is independent of the generalized toroidal magnetic co-ordinate even though the cross-sectional shape changes. An optimized plasma equilibrium belonging to the class of QA tokamaks has been proposed by Nuehrenberg. It features the small aspect ratio of a tokamak while allowing part of the rotational transform to be generated by the external field. In this article, two particular aspects of the viability of QA tokamaks are explored, namely the feasibility of modular coils and the possibility of maintaining quasi-axial symmetry in the free-boundary equilibria obtained with the coils found. A set of easily feasible modular coils for the configuration is presented. It was designed using the extended version of the NESCOIL code (MERKEL, P., Nucl. Fusion 27 (1987) 867). Using this coil system, free-boundary calculations of the plasma equilibrium were carried out using the NEMEC code (HIRSHMAN, S.P., VAN RIJ, W.I., MERKEL, P., Comput. Phys. Commun. 43 (1986) 143). It is observed that the effects of finite β and net toroidal plasma current can be compensated for with good precision by applying a vertical magnetic field and by separately adjusting the currents of the modular coils. A set of fully three dimensional (3-D) auxiliary coils is proposed to exert control on the rotational transform in the plasma. Deterioration of the quasi-axial symmetry induced by the auxiliary coils can be avoided by adequate adjustment of the currents in the primary coils. Finally, the neoclassical transport properties of the configuration are examined. It is observed that optimization with respect to confinement of the alpha particles can be maintained at operation with finite toroidal current if the aforementioned corrective measures are used. In this case, the neoclassical behaviour is shown to be very similar to that of a conventional tokamak

  14. Plasma response to m/n  =  3/1 resonant magnetic perturbation at J-TEXT Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiming; Li, Jianchao; Wang, Nengchao; Yu, Q.; Chen, Jie; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Zhipeng; Ding, Yonghua; Jin, Hai; Li, Da; Li, Mao; Liu, Yang; Rao, Bo; Zhu, Lizhi; Zhuang, Ge; the J-TEXT Team

    2016-09-01

    The influence of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with a large m/n  =  3/1 component on electron density has been studied at J-TEXT tokamak by using externally applied static and rotating RMPs, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode number, respectively. The detailed time evolution of electron density profile, measured by the polarimeter–interferometer, shows that the electron density n e first increases (decreases) inside (around/outside) of the 3/1 rational surface (RS), and it is increased globally later together with enhanced edge recycling. Associated with field penetration, the toroidal rotation around the 3/1 RS is accelerated in the co-I p direction and the poloidal rotation is changed from the electron to ion diamagnetic drift direction. Spontaneous unlocking-penetration circles occur after field penetration if the RMPs amplitude is not strong enough. For sufficiently strong RMPs, the 2/1 locked mode is also triggered due to mode coupling, and the global density is increased. The field penetration threshold is found to be linearly proportional to n eL (line-integrated density) at the 3/1 RS but to (n eL)0.73 for n e at the plasma core. In addition, for rotating RMPs with a large 3/1 component, field penetration causes a global increase in electron density.

  15. The JT-60 tokamak machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JT-60 is a large tokamak experimental device under construction at JAERI with main device parameters of R=3.0m, a=0.95m, Bsub(t)=45kG, and Isub(p)=2.7Ma. Its basic aim is to produce and confine hydrogen plasmas of temperatures in a multi-keV range and of confinement times comparable to a second, and to study its plasma-physics properties as well as engineering problems associated with them. The JT-60 tokamak machine is mainly composed of a vacuum vessel, toroidal field (TF) coils, poloidal field (PF) coils, and support structures. The vacuum vessel is a high toroidal chamber with an egg-shaped crossection, consisting of sectorial rigid rings and parallel bellows made from Inconel 625. It is baked out at a maximum temperature up to 5000C. Several kinds of first walls made from molybdenum are bolt-jointed to the vacuum vessel for its protection. The vacuum vessel is almost completely finished with design and is deeply into manufacturing. The TF system consists of 18 unit coils located around a torus axis at regular intervals. The unit coil composed of two pancakes are wedge-shaped at the section close to a torus axis and encased in a high-manganese non-magnetic steel case. Fabrication of the TF coils will be finished in May 1981. The PF coils are composed of ohmic heating coils, vertical field coils, horizontal field coils, and quadrupole field coils located inside the TF coil bore and outside the vacuum vessel, and magnetic limiter coils placed in the vacuum vessel. Its mechanical and thermal design is almost completed are composed of the upper and lower support structures, support comuns of the vacuum vessel, and central column made from high-manganese non-magnetic steel. The structural analysis was completed including a seismic analysis and the fabrication is now in progress. The first plasma is expected to be produced in October 1984. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg, A.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  17. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullberg, A., E-mail: kulladam@ucla.edu; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  18. Importance of the fine structure in a tokamak for the abnormal transport and the internal disruptions; Importance de la structure magnetique fine dans un Tokamak pour le transport anormal et les disruptions internes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabot, R.

    1996-02-28

    The problem of energy transport in a Tokamak, in presence of magnetic islets, has been treated by decomposing this problem in different bricks. To assembly the different bricks the model of dynamic percolation, which couples by the intermediate of scattering coefficient, the activity of transport sites (islets size) to the profile of transported quantity (temperature profile) has been chosen. The results, got with this model, results connected to the hypothesis of a limited number of islets, agree with the different observations. A possible application of this model could be the exploration of different operating conditions of Tokamak and a research of improved confinement running. (N.C.). 149 refs., 85 figs.

  19. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L., E-mail: jeg@uga.edu, E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  20. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical reports contained in this collection of papers on research using small tokamaks fall into four main categories, i.e., (i) experimental work (heating, stability, plasma radial profiles, fluctuations and transport, confinement, ultra-low-q tokamaks, wall physics, a.o.), (ii) diagnostics (beam probes, laser scattering, X-ray tomography, laser interferometry, electron-cyclotron absorption and emission systems), (iii) theory (strong turbulence, effects of heating on stability, plasma beta limits, wave absorption, macrostability, low-q tokamak configurations and bootstrap currents, turbulent heating, stability of vortex flows, nonlinear islands growth, plasma-drift-induced anomalous transport, ergodic divertor design, a.o.), and (iv) new technical facilities (varistors applied to establish constant current and loop voltage in HT-6M), lower-hybrid-current-drive systems for HT-6B and HT-6M, radio-frequency systems for HT-6M ICR heating experimentation, and applications of fiber optics for visible and vacuum ultraviolet radiation detection as applied to tokamaks and reversed-field pinches. A total number of 51 papers are included in the collection. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high β-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect

  2. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  3. A study of runaway electron confinement and theory of neoclassical MHD turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis consists of two major studies: a study of runaway electron confinement and a theory of neoclassical MHD turbulence. The aim of the former is to study the structure of internal magnetic turbulence in tokamaks, which is thought by many to be responsible for the heat transport. The aim of the latter is to extend existing theories of MHD turbulence in tokamaks into experimentally relevant low-collisionality regimes. This section contains a theory of neoclassical pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and a theory of neoclassical resistivity-gradient-driven turbulence

  4. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author)

  5. Heat Diffusion across a Strong Stochastic Magnetic Field in Tokamak Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong; YU Qing-Quan

    2009-01-01

    We investigate heat diffusion across a local strong stochastic magnetic field by using eleven low-m perturbed magnetic islands.A maximum stochasticity of 38.82 between two neighboring rationed surfaces is attained.The correlation between the effective radied heat conductivity Xr and the ratio of the paredlel heat diffusion coefficient to the perpendicular coefficient,X||/X,is numericeally studied and compared with earlier work.

  6. SUPPRESSION OF TEARING MODES BY MEANS OF LOCALIZED ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The onset of tearing modes and the resulting negative effects on plasma performance set significant limits on the operational domain of tokamaks. Modes with toroidal mode number (n) larger than two cause only a minor reduction in energy confinement (<10%). Modes which have a dominant poloidal mode number (m) of three and n=2 lead to a significant reduction in confinement (<30%) at fixed power. The plasma pressure β (normalized to the magnetic field pressure) can be raised further, albeit with very small incremental confinement. Pushing to higher β often destabilizes the m=2/n=1 tearing mode which can lock to the wall and lead to a complete and rapid disruption of the plasma with potentially serious consequences for the tokamak. The β values at which these modes usually appear in conventional tokamak discharges are well below the limits calculated using ideal MHD theory. Therefore, the tearing modes can set effective upper limits on energy confinement and pressure. Significant progress has been made in stabilizing these modes by local current generation using electron cyclotron waves. The tearing mode is essentially a deficit in current flowing helically, resonant with the spatial structure of the local magnetic field. This forms an ''island'' where the magnetic flux is no longer monotonic. It was predicted theoretically [1,2] that replacement of this ''missing'' current would return the plasma to the state prior to the instability. Experiments on the ASDEX-Upgrade [3], JT-60U [4], and DIII-D [5] tokamaks have demonstrated stabilization of m=3/n=2 modes using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the current in the island. Following these initial experiments, recent work on the DIII-D tokamak has demonstrated two significant advances in application of this technique--extending the operational domain stable to m=3/n=2 modes to higher β and the first suppression of the more dangerous m=2/n=1 mode

  7. Comparison of confinement in resistive-shell reversed-field pinch devices with two different magnetic shell penetration times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravestijn, R. M.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew, E.

    2004-01-01

    A loop voltage is required to sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibrium. The configuration is characterized by redistribution of magnetic helicity but with the condition that the total helicity is maintained constant. The magnetic field shell penetration time, tgrs, has a critical role in the stability and performance of the RFP. Confinement in the EXTRAP device has been studied with two values of tgrs, first (EXTRAP-T2) with tgrs of the order of the typical relaxation cycle timescale and then (EXTRAP-T2R) with tgrs much longer than the relaxation cycle timescale, but still much shorter than the pulse length. Plasma parameters show significant improvements in confinement in EXTRAP-T2R. The typical loop voltage required to sustain comparable electron poloidal beta values is a factor of 3 lower in the EXTRAP-T2R device. The improvement is attributed to reduced magnetic turbulence.

  8. Plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, R D

    2003-01-01

    Detailed and authoritative, this volume examines the essential physics underlying international research in magnetic confinement fusion. It offers readable, thorough accounts of the fundamental concepts behind methods of confining plasma at or near thermonuclear conditions. Designed for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course in plasma physics, it also represents a valuable reference for professional physicists in controlled fusion and related disciplines.

  9. Inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the present status of the available key technologies for implosion experiments as regards the energy driver, pellet fabrication, diagnostics of dense and hot plasmas, and numerical simulations. It is shown that the development of the necessary conditions is well advanced so that it is now possible to proceed to the next step in the achievement of ignition and break-even. Various design studies for inertial confinement fusion reactors are also reviewed; from these studies it has become clear that inertial confinement fusion and magnetic confinement fusion are technologically complementary systems for future fusion reactors. (author). 172 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  10. Special section containing papers presented at the 13th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems (Beijing, China, 17-20 September 2013) Special section containing papers presented at the 13th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems (Beijing, China, 17-20 September 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z.

    2014-10-01

    In magnetic fusion plasmas, a significant fraction of the kinetic pressure is contributed by superthermal charged particles produced by auxiliary heating (fast ions and electrons) and fusion reactions (a-particles). Since these energetic particles are often far away from thermal equilibrium due to their non-Maxwellian distribution and steep pressure gradients, the free energy can excite electromagnetic instabilities to intensity levels well above the thermal fluctuations. The resultant electromagnetic turbulence could induce large transport of energetic particles, which could reduce heating efficiency, degrade overall plasma confinement, and damage fusion devices. Therefore, understanding and predicting energetic particle confinement properties are critical to the success of burning plasma experiments such as ITER since the ignition relies on plasma self-heating by a-particles. To promote international exchanges and collaborations on energetic particle physics, the biannual conference series under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) were help in Kyiv (1989), Aspenas (1991), Trieste (1993), Princeton (1995), JET/Abingdon (1997), Naka (1999), Gothenburg (2001), San Diego (2003), Takayama (2005), Kloster Seeon (2007), Kyiv (2009), and Austin (2011). The papers in this special section were presented at the most recent meeting, the 13th IAEA Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems, which was hosted by the Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing, China (17-20 September 2013). The program of the meeting consisted of 71 presentations, including 13 invited talks, 26 oral contributed talks, 30 posters, and 2 summary talks, which were selected by the International Advisory Committee (IAC). The IAC members include H. Berk, L.G. Eriksson, A. Fasoli, W. Heidbrink, Ya. Kolesnichenko, Ph. Lauber, Z. Lin, R. Nazikian, S. Pinches, S. Sharapov, K. Shinohara, K. Toi, G. Vlad, and X.T. Ding. The conference program

  11. Hα/ DαMeasurements Based on Photo Diode Array in the HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建坤; 吴振伟; 万宝年; 张先梅; 周倩

    2001-01-01

    Photo Diode Array (PDA) has been successfully applied in HT-7 tokamak experiments. The PDA system is almost free of electromagnetic interference from the machine. The system is compact and inexpensive, and it is convenient to be arranged in experiment. With the PDA system, the particle confinement time (Tp) has been systematically investigated. The relations such as Tp on the center-line-averaged electron density (ne), Tp on plasma current (Ip),and Tp on the toroidal magnetic field (Bt) have been obtained. The particle confinement under the Ion Berstain Wave (IBW) Heating has also been measured and analyzed.

  12. Magnetic Field Generation and Energy Confinement with Te> 500 eV in the SSPX Spheromak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, B.

    2007-11-01

    The understanding of confinement and energy transport in spheromaks is key the understanding the physics of spheromak formation and self-organization as well as addressing the feasibility of the concept as a reactor scenario. In the Sustained Spheromak Physics eXperiment (SSPX), increased understanding of the physics in building and sustaining self-organized magnetic equilibria has resulted in record electron temperatures Te> 500 eV and plasma currents of ˜ 1 MA on the magnetic axis. We find that the highest edge magnetic field magnitudes (and correspondingly high Te) is achieved when λ=μ0Igun ψgun is near (but slightly below) the Kruskal-Shafranov instability limit λKS2πL12.6,-1 where L is the length of the flux-conserver (0.5 m). Building on previously reported results, power-balance analysis has shown levels of electron thermal transport χebank we are able to highly tailor the gun current to take advantage of the sensitive dependence of spheromak performance on the plasma λ. When in this optimum operating range we also find that the efficiency of field build-up (defined as the ratio of edge poloidal magnetic field to gun current) is increased 20% over prior results, to ˜1.0 T/MA. Additionally this brings the efficiency of spheromak formation into numerical agreement with results from the NIMROD 3-D MHD code. Plasma energy evolution has been studied by taking time-resolved measurements of Te(r) and ne(r) indicating a distinct and robust feature of spheromak formation; a hollow-to-peaked temperature transition with an inverse relationship to the electron density. This feature, as well as sub-microsecond transport, is being studied with the upgrade of the Thomson scattering diagnostic to double-pulse operation. We also present recent results of the impact of charge-exchange losses on overall power balance and estimates of the plasma ion temperature as measured with a neutral particle analyzer.

  13. Sheared-flow induced confinement transition in a linear magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Carter, T. A.; Vincena, S.; Friedman, B.; Schaffner, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    A magnetized plasma cylinder (12 cm in diameter) is induced by an annular shape obstacle at the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. Sheared azimuthal flow is driven at the edge of the plasma cylinder through edge biasing. Strong fluctuations of density and potential ({delta}n/n{approx}e{delta}{phi}/kT{sub e}{approx}0.5) are observed at the plasma edge, accompanied by a large density gradient (L{sub n}={nabla}lnn{sup -1}{approx}2cm) and shearing rate ({gamma}{approx}300kHz). Edge turbulence and cross-field transport are modified by changing the bias voltage (V{sub bias}) on the obstacle and the axial magnetic field (B{sub z}) strength. In cases with low V{sub bias} and large B{sub z}, improved plasma confinement is observed, along with steeper edge density gradients. The radially sheared flow induced by ExB drift dramatically changes the cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations, which causes the wave-induced particle flux to reverse its direction across the shear layer. In cases with higher bias voltage or smaller B{sub z}, large radial transport and rapid depletion of the central plasma density are observed. Two-dimensional cross-correlation measurement shows that a mode with azimuthal mode number m=1 and large radial correlation length dominates the outward transport in these cases. Linear analysis based on a two-fluid Braginskii model suggests that the fluctuations are driven by both density gradient (drift wave like) and flow shear (Kelvin-Helmholtz like) at the plasma edge.

  14. Stochastic Ripple Diffusion of Energetic Particles in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Qing-Di; LONG Yong-Xing

    2004-01-01

    @@ The stochastic ripple diffusion is investigated in a realistic reversed magnetic shear discharge. Rippled field produces variations in the velocity of trapped particles leading to excursion of the tip position for successive banana bounces. When the excursion is large enough, the trapped energetic particles are lost rapidly via stochastic banana diffusion.

  15. Collisions between Dark Matter Confined High Velocity Clouds and Magnetized Galactic Disks: The Smith Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Galyardt, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The Galaxy's population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of $5 \\times 10^6\\,$M$_{\\odot}$ and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, $3 \\times 10^8$, or $1 \\times 10^9\\,$M$_{\\odot}$. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud's collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to $6.0 \\times 10^5\\,$M$_{\\odot}$ in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the ma...

  16. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  17. Fueling of magnetically confined plasmas by single- and two-stage repeating pneumatic pellet injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced plasma fueling systems for magnetic fusion confinement experiments are under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The general approach is that of producing and accelerating frozen hydrogenic pellets to speeds in the kilometer-per-second range using single shot and repetitive pneumatic (light-gas gun) pellet injectors. The millimeter-to-centimeter size pellets enter the plasma and continuously ablate because of the plasma electron heat flux, depositing fuel atoms along the pellet trajectory. This fueling method allows direct fueling in the interior of the hot plasma and is more efficient than the alternative method of injecting room temperature fuel gas at the wall of the plasma vacuum chamber. Single-stage pneumatic injectors based on the light-gas gun concept have provided hydrogenic fuel pellets in the speed range of 1--2 km/s in single-shot injector designs. Repetition rates up to 5 Hz have been demonstrated in repetitive injector designs. Future fusion reactor-scale devices may need higher pellet velocities because of the larger plasma size and higher plasma temperatures. Repetitive two-stage pneumatic injectors are under development at ORNL to provide long-pulse plasma fueling in the 3--5 km/s speed range. Recently, a repeating, two-stage light-gas gun achieved repetitive operation at 1 Hz with speeds in the range of 2--3 km/s

  18. Introduction to Gyrokinetic Theory with Applications in Magnetic Confinement Research in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.M. Tang

    2005-01-03

    The present lecture provides an introduction to the subject of gyrokinetic theory with applications in the area of magnetic confinement research in plasma physics--the research arena from which this formalism was originally developed. It was presented as a component of the ''Short Course in Kinetic Theory within the Thematic Program in Partial Differential Equations'' held at the Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Science (24 March 2004). This lecture also discusses the connection between the gyrokinetic formalism and powerful modern numerical simulations. Indeed, simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential modern tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was enabled by two key factors: (i) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (ii) access to powerful new computational resources.

  19. Control of magnetohydrodynamic stability by phase space engineering of energetic ions in tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J P; Chapman, I T; Coda, S; Lennholm, M; Albergante, M; Jucker, M

    2012-01-10

    Virtually collisionless magnetic mirror-trapped energetic ion populations often partially stabilize internally driven magnetohydrodynamic disturbances in the magnetosphere and in toroidal laboratory plasma devices such as the tokamak. This results in less frequent but dangerously enlarged plasma reorganization. Unique to the toroidal magnetic configuration are confined 'circulating' energetic particles that are not mirror trapped. Here we show that a newly discovered effect from hybrid kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic theory has been exploited in sophisticated phase space engineering techniques for controlling stability in the tokamak. These theoretical predictions have been confirmed, and the technique successfully applied in the Joint European Torus. Manipulation of auxiliary ion heating systems can create an asymmetry in the distribution of energetic circulating ions in the velocity orientated along magnetic field lines. We show the first experiments in which large sawtooth collapses have been controlled by this technique, and neoclassical tearing modes avoided, in high-performance reactor-relevant plasmas.

  20. Experimental investigation of turbulent transport at the edge of a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manuscript is devoted to the experimental investigation of particle transport in the edge region of the tokamak Tore Supra. The first part introduces the motivations linked to energy production, the principle of a magnetic confinement and the elements of physics essential to describe the dynamic of the plasma at the edge region. From data collected by a set of Langmuir probes and a fast visible imaging camera, we demonstrate that the particle transport is dominated by the convection of plasma filaments, structures elongated along magnetic field lines. They present a finite wave number, responsible for the high enhancement of the particle flux at the low field side of the tokamak. This leads to the generation of strong parallel flows, and the strong constraint of filament geometry by the magnetic shear. (author)

  1. Spheromak injection into a tokamak

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M R; Bellan, P. M.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the Caltech spheromak injection experiment [to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.] are reported. First, current drive by spheromak injection into the ENCORE tokamak as a result of the process of magnetic helicity injection is observed. An initial 30% increase in plasma current is observed followed by a drop by a factor of 3 because of sudden plasma cooling. Second, spheromak injection results in an increase of tokamak central density by a factor of 6. The high-current/high-density...

  2. Demountable low stress high field toroidal field magnet system for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of superconducting magnet system for large fusion reactors is described. Instead of winding large planar or multi-axis coils, as has been proposed in previous fusion reactor designs, the superconducting coils are made by joining together several prefabricated conductor sections. The joints can be unmade and sections removed if they fail. Conductor sections can be made at a factory and shipped to the reactor site for assembly. The conductor stress level in the assembled coil can be kept small by external support of the coil at a number of points along its perimeter, so that the magnetic forces are transmitted to an external warm reinforcement structure. This warm reinforcement structure can also be the primary containment for the fusion reactor, constructed similar to a PCRV (Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel) used in fission reactors. Low thermal conductivity, high strength supports are used to transfer the magnetic forces to the external reinforcement through a hydraulic system. The hydraulic supports are movable and can be programmed to accommodate thermal contraction and to minimize stress in the superconducting coil. (author)

  3. Instrumentation and controls of an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and controls (I and C) of an ignited plasma magnetically confined in a tokamak configuration needs increased emphasis in the following areas: (1) physics implications for control; (2) plasma shaping/position control; and (3) control to prevent disruptive instabilities. This document reports on the FY 1979 efforts in these and other areas. Also presented are discusssions in the areas of: (1) diagnostics suitable for the Engineering Test Facility (ETF); and (2) future research and development (R and D) needs. The appendices focus attention on some preliminary ideas about the measurement of the deuteron-triton (D-T) ratio in the plasma, synchrotron radiation, and divertor control. Finally, an appendix documenting the thermal consequences to the first wall of a MPD is presented

  4. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra

  5. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, F A; Fuhr, G; Monnier, A; Benkadda, S

    2014-01-01

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code (EMEDGE3D) with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindr...

  6. Tokamak burn control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research of the fusion plasma thermal instability and its control is reviewed. General models of the thermonuclear plasma are developed. Techniques of stability analysis commonly employed in burn control research are discussed. Methods for controlling the plasma against the thermal instability are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications to tokamak confinement concepts. Additional research which extends the results of previous research is suggested. Issues specific to the development of control strategies for mid-term engineering test reactors are identified and addressed. 100 refs., 24 figs., 10 tabs

  7. Observation of transverse and longitudinal modes in non-neutral electron clouds confined in a magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrostatic modes on non-neutral electron clouds confined in a magnetic mirror field have been investigated. The cloud contains 2 x 1011 electrons at an average kinetic energy of 0.3 MeV for a magnetic field with a peak intensity of 9 kG at the midplane. It was found that the cloud is moving azimuthally as well as longitudinally. The azimuthal motion has an m=1 spatial nature. The longitudinal modes have a more complicated nature, but their frequency equals that of the azimuthal mode

  8. Atoms confined in a penetrable potential: effect of the atom position on the electric and magnetic responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Coden, Diego S; Gomez, Sergio S; Romero, Rodolfo H, E-mail: rhromero@exa.unne.edu.ar [Instituto de Modelado e Innovacion Tecnologica, CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400) Corrientes (Argentina)

    2011-02-14

    We report results of the calculation of polarizability and the nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of two-electron atoms confined within an attractive Gaussian potential well. The electric and magnetic responses are obtained within the random phase approximation (RPA) of the polarization propagator. The influence of the depth and range of the potential on the electronic structure is also studied. The dependence of the parallel (along the displacement) and perpendicular components of the polarizability and shielding tensors on the distance of the atom to the centre of the well is calculated and rationalized as a dissociation-type process of the artificial diatomic molecule formed between the Coulomb and the well potentials.

  9. ATOMIC PHYSICS PROCESSES IMPORTANT TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCRAPE-OFF LAYER OF TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEST, W.P.; GOLDSMITH,; B. EVANS,T.E.; OLSON, R.J.

    2002-05-01

    The region between the well-confined plasma and the vessel walls of a magnetic confinement fusion research device, the scrape-off layer (SOL), is typically rich in atomic and molecular physics processes. The most advanced magnetic confinement device, the magnetically diverted tokamak, uses a magnetic separatrix to isolate the confinement zone (closed flux surfaces) from the edge plasma (open field lines). Over most of their length the open field lines run parallel to the separatrix, forming a thin magnetic barrier with the nearby vessel walls. In a poloidally-localized region, the open field lines are directed away from the separatrix and into the divertor, a region spatially separated from the separatrix where intense plasma wall interaction can occur relatively safely. Recent data from several tokamaks indicate that particle transport across the field lines of the SOL can be somewhat faster than previously thought. In these cases, the rate at which particles reach the vessel wall is comparable to the rate to the divertor from parallel transport. The SOL can be thin enough that the recycling neutrals and sputtered impurities from the wall may refuel or contaminate the confinement zone more efficiently than divertor plasma wall interaction. Just inside the SOL is a confinement barrier that produces a sharp pedestal in plasma density and temperature. Understanding neutral transport through the SOL and into the pedestal is key to understanding particle balance and particle and impurity exhaust. The SOL plasma is sufficiently hot and dense to excite and ionize neutrals. Ion and neutral temperatures are high enough that charge exchange between the neutrals and fuel and impurity ions is fast. Excitation of neutrals can be fast enough to lead to nonlinear behavior in charge exchange and ionization processes. In this paper the detailed atomic physics important to the understanding of the neutral transport through the SOL will be discussed.

  10. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to ∼1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to ∼1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described

  11. Drift Mode Growth Rate and Associated Ion Thermal Transport in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ai-Ke; QIU Xiao-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Drift mode linear growth rate and quasi-linear ion thermal transport in the reversed magnetic shear plasma are investigated by using the two-fluid theory, previously developed by Weiland and the Chalmers group [J. Nucl.Fusion, 29 (1989) 1810; ibid. 30 (1990) 983]. The theory is here extended to include both the radial electrical field shear (dEr/dr) and the electron fluid velocity (Ve) in the sheared coordinate system. Here, Ve describes the coupling between the safety factor q and the Er × B velocity V E. Their influences on the growth rate and associated ion thermal transport are obtained numerically. In addition, the ion heat pinch in the reversed shear plasma is observed. Qualitatively, the present conclusions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work, we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry, the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindrical geometry, but in toroidal geometry the convective thermal flux and the poloidal rotation appear only with the islands overlapping of the linear coupling between neighbouring poloidal wavenumbers m, m – 1, and m + 1

  13. Sawtooth driven particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial transport of particles in tokamaks is one of the most stringent issues faced by the magnetic confinement fusion community, because the fusion power is proportional to the square of the pressure, and also because accumulation of heavy impurities in the core leads to important power losses which can lead to a 'radiative collapse'. Sawteeth and the associated periodic redistribution of the core quantities can significantly impact the radial transport of electrons and impurities. In this thesis, we perform numerical simulations of sawteeth using a nonlinear tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic code called XTOR-2F to study the particle transport induced by sawtooth crashes. We show that the code recovers, after the crash, the fine structures of electron density that are observed with fast-sweeping reflectometry on the JET and TS tokamaks. The presence of these structure may indicate a low efficiency of the sawtooth in expelling the impurities from the core. However, applying the same code to impurity profiles, we show that the redistribution is quantitatively similar to that predicted by Kadomtsev's model, which could not be predicted a priori. Hence finally the sawtooth flushing is efficient in expelling impurities from the core. (author)

  14. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an overview of the Aries-I tokamak reactor study. The following topics are discussed on this tokamak: Systems studies; equilibrium, stability, and transport; summary and conclusions; current drive; impurity control system; tritium systems; magnet engineering; fusion-power-core engineering; power conversion; Aries-I safety design and analysis; design layout and maintenance; and start-up and operations

  15. Fast-ion losses induced by ELMs and externally applied magnetic perturbations in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase-space time-resolved measurements of fast-ion losses induced by edge localized modes (ELMs) and ELM mitigation coils have been obtained in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak by means of multiple fast-ion loss detectors (FILDs). Filament-like bursts of fast-ion losses are measured during ELMs by several FILDs at different toroidal and poloidal positions. Externally applied magnetic perturbations (MPs) have little effect on plasma profiles, including fast-ions, in high collisionality plasmas with mitigated ELMs. A strong impact on plasma density, rotation and fast-ions is observed, however, in low density/collisionality and q95 plasmas with externally applied MPs. During the mitigation/suppression of type-I ELMs by externally applied MPs, the large fast-ion bursts observed during ELMs are replaced by a steady loss of fast-ions with a broad-band frequency and an amplitude of up to an order of magnitude higher than the neutral beam injection (NBI) prompt loss signal without MPs. Multiple FILD measurements at different positions, indicate that the fast-ion losses due to static 3D fields are localized on certain parts of the first wall rather than being toroidally/poloidally homogeneously distributed. Measured fast-ion losses show a broad energy and pitch-angle range and are typically on banana orbits that explore the entire pedestal/scrape-off-layer (SOL). Infra-red measurements are used to estimate the heat load associated with the MP-induced fast-ion losses. The heat load on the FILD detector head and surrounding wall can be up to six times higher with MPs than without 3D fields. When 3D fields are applied and density pump-out is observed, an enhancement of the fast-ion content in the plasma is typically measured by fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) spectroscopy. The lower density during the MP phase also leads to a deeper beam deposition with an inward radial displacement of ≈2 cm in the maximum of the beam emission. Orbit simulations are used to test different models for 3D

  16. Triangularity effects on the collisional diffusion for elliptic tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this conference the effect of ellipticity and triangularity will be analyzed for axisymmetric tokamak in the collisional regime. Analytic forms for the magnetic field cross sections are taken from those derived recently by other authors [1,2]. Analytical results can be obtained in elliptic plasmas with triangularity by using an special system of tokamak coordinates recently published [3-5]. Our results show that triangularities smaller than 0.6, increases confinement for ellipticities in the range 1.2 to 2. This behavior happens for negative and positive triangularities; however this effect is stronger for positive than for negative triangularities. The maximum diffusion velocity is not obtained for zero triangularity, but for small negative triangularities. Ellipticity is also very important in confinement, but the effect of triangularity seems to be more important. High electric inductive field increases confinement, though this field is difficult to modify once the tokamak has been built. The analytic form of the current produced by this field is like that of a weak Ware pinch with an additional factor, which weakens the effect by an order of magnitude. The dependence of the triangularity effect with the Shafranov shift is also analyzed. References 1. - L. L. Lao, S. P. Hirshman, and R. M. Wieland, Phys. Fluids 24, 1431 (1981) 2. - G. O. Ludwig, Plasma Physics Controlled Fusion 37, 633 (1995) 3. - P. Martin, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2915 (2000) 4. - P. Martin, M. G. Haines and E. Castro, Phys. Plasmas 12, 082506 (2005) 5. - P. Martin, E. Castro and M. G. Haines, Phys. Plasmas 12, 102505 (2005)

  17. Banana orbits in elliptic tokamaks with hole currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Castro, E.; Puerta, J.

    2015-03-01

    Ware Pinch is a consequence of breaking of up-down symmetry due to the inductive electric field. This symmetry breaking happens, though up-down symmetry for magnetic surface is assumed. In previous work Ware Pinch and banana orbits were studied for tokamak magnetic surface with ellipticity and triangularity, but up-down symmetry. Hole currents appear in large tokamaks and their influence in Ware Pinch and banana orbits are now considered here for tokamaks magnetic surfaces with ellipticity and triangularity.

  18. A Moving Coordinate Numerical Method for Analyses of Electromagneto-Mechanical Coupled Behavior of Structures in a Strong Magnetic Field Aiming at Application to Tokamak Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weixin; Yuan, Zhensheng; Chen, Zhenmao

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of the electromagneto-mechanical coupling effect contributes greatly to the high accuracy estimation of the EM load of many EM devices, such as a tokamak structure during plasma disruption. This paper presents a method for the numerical analysis of the electromagneto-mechanical coupling effect on the basis of Maxwell's equations in the Lagrangian description and staggered load transfer scheme, which can treat the coupled behaviors of magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness effects at the same time. Codes were developed based on the ANSYS development platform and were applied to solve two typical numerical examples: the TEAM Problem 16 and dynamic behavior analysis of a shallow arch under electromagnetic force. The good consistency of numerical results and experimental data demonstrates the validity and accuracy of the proposed method and the related numerical codes.

  19. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  20. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can limit the performance and degrade the confinement of tokamak plasmas. The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV), unique for its capability to produce a variety of poloidal plasma shapes, has been used to analyse various instabilities and compare their behaviour with theoretical predictions. These instabilities are perturbations of the magnetic field, which usually extend to the plasma edge where they can be detected with magnetic pick-up coils as magnetic fluctuations. A spatially dense set of magnetic probes, installed inside the TCV vacuum vessel, allows for a fast observation of these fluctuations. The structure and temporal evolution of coherent modes is extracted using several numerical methods. In addition to the setup of the magnetic diagnostic and the implementation of analysis methods, the subject matter of this thesis focuses on four instabilities, which impose local and global stability limits. All of these instabilities are relevant for the operation of a fusion reactor and a profound understanding of their behaviour is required in order to optimise the performance of such a reactor. Sawteeth, which are central relaxation oscillations common to most standard tokamak scenarios, have a significant effect on central plasma parameters. In TCV, systematic scans of the plasma shape have revealed a strong dependence of their behaviour on elongation {kappa} and triangularity {delta}, with high {kappa}, and low {delta} leading to shorter sawteeth with smaller crashes. This shape dependence is increased by applying central electron cyclotron heating. The response to additional heating power is determined by the role of ideal or resistive MHD in triggering the sawtooth crash. For plasma shapes where additional heating and consequently, a faster increase of the central pressure shortens the sawteeth, the low experimental limit of the pressure gradient within the q = 1 surface is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The

  1. UCLA Tokamak Program Close Out Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robert John [UCLA/retired

    2014-02-04

    The results of UCLA experimental fusion program are summarized. Starting with smaller devices like Microtor, Macrotor, CCT and ending the research on the large (5 m) Electric Tokamak. CCT was the most diagnosed device for H-mode like physics and the effects of rotation induced radial fields. ICRF heating was also studied but plasma heating of University Type Tokamaks did not produce useful results due to plasma edge disturbances of the antennae. The Electric Tokamak produced better confinement in the seconds range. However, it presented very good particle confinement due to an "electric particle pinch". This effect prevented us from reaching a quasi steady state. This particle accumulation effect was numerically explained by Shaing's enhanced neoclassical theory. The PI believes that ITER will have a good energy confinement time but deleteriously large particle confinement time and it will disrupt on particle pinching at nominal average densities. The US fusion research program did not study particle transport effects due to its undue focus on the physics of energy confinement time. Energy confinement time is not an issue for energy producing tokamaks. Controlling the ash flow will be very expensive.

  2. Characterization of magnetically confined low-pressure plasmas produced by an electromagnetic field in argon-acetylene mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdessi, G. Al; Margot, J.; Clergereaux, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles formation was investigated in magnetically confined low-pressure plasma produced in argon-acetylene mixtures. The plasma characteristics were measured in order to identify the species involved in the dust particles formation. Their dependence on the operating conditions including magnetic field intensity, acetylene fraction in the gas mixture and operating pressure was examined. In contrast with noble gases, in the presence of acetylene, the electron temperature increases with the magnetic field intensity, indicating additional charged particles losses in the plasma. Indeed, in these conditions, larger hydrocarbon ions are produced leading to the formation of dust particles in the plasma volume. The observed dependence of positive ion mass distribution and density and relative negative ion density on the operating parameters suggests that the dust particles are formed through different pathways, where negative and positive ions are both involved in the nucleation.

  3. MHD analysis and heat transfer characteristics of liquid metal thin film flows in quasi-coplanar magnetic field for Tokamak liquid metal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical analysis of an open-channel liquid metal thin film with a quasi-coplanar strong applied magnetic field is carried out for a liquid metal divertor of tokamak device. The wall conductance ratio and the magnetic field inclinded angle appear to be the most important parameters to explain flow characteristics. As the flow rate increases, the velocity distribution with applied magnetic field is flat in the core region of flow and has jets at free surface of liquid metal film flow. In case of conductive walls, that effect is larger than insulated walls since open-channel, induced current circuits are constructed through walls, which causes a large magnetohydro-dynamic (MHD) drag in that region. In case with inclined magnetic field, as the flow rate increases, the film height increases and the flow experiences three regimes whether wall is conductive ro not. Regime 1 is dominant by the viscous force, regime 2 by the film height direction component of magnetic field (y component), and regime 3 by the channel width direction component of magnetic field (z component). Characteristics and limits of each regime are examined. Using calculated velocity distributions, heat transfer at the free surface is examined. In case of ordinary hydrodynamic flow, the heat removal characteristic is superior to the MHD case

  4. Minimization of a constitutive law error functional to solve a Cauchy problem arising in plasma physics: the reconstruction of the magnetic flux in the vacuum surrounding the plasma in a Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Faugeras, Blaise; Blum, Jacques; Boulbe, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method for the computation of the magnetic flux in the vacuum surrounding the plasma in a Tokamak is investigated. It is based on the formulation of a Cauchy problem which is solved through the minimization of a constitutive law error functional. Several numerical experiments are conducted which show the efficiency of the method.

  5. Effect of magnetic field on quantum state energies of an electron confined in the core of a double walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Khurshed A.; Bhat, Bashir Mohi Ud Din

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we report the effect of external magnetic field and core radius on the excited quantum state energies of an electron confined in the core of a double walled carbon nanotube. The goal is accomplished by using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillioun (WKB) approximation method within the effective mass approximation and confinement potential. All numerical analysis were carried out in a strong confinement regime. The results show that the electron energy increases with the increase in external magnetic field at a given core radii. The electron energy is also found to increase as the core radius of the CNT decreases and for core radius a > 5 nm the energy becomes almost zero. The effect of magnetic field on the excited state energies of the confined electron is more evident for smaller core radius acarbon nanotube quantum dot devices [1].

  6. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant has been performed. The tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb3Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs have been made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis has been made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered

  7. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  8. Advanced energy systems: 2XIIB: heating and containing magnetically confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments on the 2XIIB mirror machine have produced encouraging results: a buildup of hot ion densities to 4 x 1013 cm-3, ion temperatures of 13 keV (the highest ever observed in a major fusion experiment), and a confinement time exceeding 5 ms. Two major factors in these achievements were the injection of twelve 20-keV neutral beams to increase plasma temperature and the introduction of warm streaming plasma to suppress microinstabilities. With them, near-classical confinement of a hot plasma was demonstrated. We are now doubling the injected neutral beam energy to see if plasma stability and energy scaling of plasma confinement persist at higher ion temperatures

  9. Fusion an introduction to the physics and technology of magnetic confinement fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    This second edition of a popular textbook is thoroughly revised with around 25% new and updated content.It provides an introduction to both plasma physics and fusion technology at a level that can be understood by advanced undergraduates and graduate students in the physical sciences and related engineering disciplines.As such, the contents cover various plasma confinement concepts, the support technologies needed to confine the plasma, and the designs of ITER as well as future fusion reactors.With end of chapter problems for use in courses.

  10. Effect of a stochastic electric field on plasma confinement in FTU

    CERN Document Server

    Martorelli, Roberto; Carlevaro, Nakia

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a stochastic model for the behavior of electrons in a magnetically confined plasma having axial symmetry. The aim of the work is to provide an explanation for the density limit observed in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade machine. The dynamical framework deals with an electron embedded in a stationary and uniform magnetic field and affected by an orthogonal random electric field. The behavior of the average plasma profile is determined by the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation associated to the considered model and the disruptive effects of the stochastic electric field is shown. The comparison between the addressed model and the experimental data allows to fix the relevant spatial scale of such a stochastic field. It is found to be of the order of the Tokamak micro-physics scale, i.e. few millimeters. Moreover, it is clarified how the diffusion process outlines a dependence on the magnetic field as $\\sim B^{-3/2}$.

  11. Small-scale Magnetic Islands in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Particle Acceleration. II. Particle Energization inside Magnetically Confined Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ∼0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1–1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  12. Small-scale Magnetic Islands in the Solar Wind and Their Role in Particle Acceleration. II. Particle Energization inside Magnetically Confined Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabarova, Olga V.; Zank, Gary P.; Li, Gang; Malandraki, Olga E.; le Roux, Jakobus A.; Webb, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the role of heliospheric magnetic field configurations and conditions that favor the generation and confinement of small-scale magnetic islands associated with atypical energetic particle events (AEPEs) in the solar wind. Some AEPEs do not align with standard particle acceleration mechanisms, such as flare-related or simple diffusive shock acceleration processes related to interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs). As we have shown recently, energetic particle flux enhancements may well originate locally and can be explained by particle acceleration in regions filled with small-scale magnetic islands with a typical width of ˜0.01 au or less, which is often observed near the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). The particle energization is a consequence of magnetic reconnection-related processes in islands experiencing either merging or contraction, observed, for example, in HCS ripples. Here we provide more observations that support the idea and the theory of particle energization produced by small-scale-flux-rope dynamics (Zank et al. and Le Roux et al.). If the particles are pre-accelerated to keV energies via classical mechanisms, they may be additionally accelerated up to 1–1.5 MeV inside magnetically confined cavities of various origins. The magnetic cavities, formed by current sheets, may occur at the interface of different streams such as CIRs and ICMEs or ICMEs and coronal hole flows. They may also form during the HCS interaction with interplanetary shocks (ISs) or CIRs/ICMEs. Particle acceleration inside magnetic cavities may explain puzzling AEPEs occurring far beyond ISs, within ICMEs, before approaching CIRs as well as between CIRs.

  13. Two dimensional electron gas confined over a spherical surface: Magnetic moment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernando, A; Crespo, P [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, UCM-CSIC-ADIF, Las Rozas. P. O. Box 155, Madrid 28230 (Spain) and Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense (Spain); Garcia, M A, E-mail: antonio.hernando@adif.es [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC c/Kelsen, 5 Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2011-04-01

    Magnetism of capped nanoparticles, NPs, of non-magnetic substances as Au and ZnO is briefly reviewed. The source of the magnetization is discussed on the light of recent X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments. As magnetic dichroism analysis has pointed out impurity atoms bonded to the surface act as donor or acceptor of electrons that occupy the surface states. It is proposed that mesoscopic collective orbital magnetic moments induced at the surface states can account for the experimental magnetism characteristic of these nanoparticles. The total magnetic moment of the surface originated at the unfilled Fermi level can reach values as large as 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3} Bohr magnetons.

  14. Coil-type Fano Resonances: a Plasmonic Approach to Magnetic Sub-diffraction Confinement

    KAUST Repository

    Panaro, Simone

    2015-05-10

    Matrices of nanodisk trimers are introduced as plasmonic platforms for the generation of localized magnetic hot-spots. In Fano resonance condition, the optical magnetic fields can be squeezed in sub-wavelength regions, opening promising scenarios for spintronics.

  15. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on the Aries-I Tokamak: Design description; systems studies and economics; reactor plasma physics; magnet engineering; fusion-power-ore engineering; and environmental and safety features

  16. Bose-Einstein condensation in a tightly confining dc magnetic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.O. Mewes; M.R. Andrews; N.J. van Druten; D.M. Kurn; D.S. Durfee; W. Ketterle

    1996-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of sodium atoms has been observed in a novel "cloverleaf" trap. This trap combines tight confinement with excellent optical access, using only dc electromagnets. Evaporative cooling in this trap produced condensates of 5 x 10/6 atoms, a tenfold improvement over previous re

  17. Excitation kinetics of quantum dot induced by damped propagation of dopant: Role of confinement potential and magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Suvajit [Department of Chemistry, Hetampur Raj High School, Hetampur, Birbhum 731124, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • The excitation kinetics of doped quantum dot has been investigated. • The dopant propagation is damped. • Confinement sources couple with damping. • The coupling influences the excitation kinetics. - Abstract: We investigate the excitation kinetics of a repulsive impurity doped quantum dot as the dopant is propagating. The study assumes importance because of its intimate connection with impurity drift in nanodevices. The problem has been made more realistic by considering the dopant propagation to be damped. For simplicity, we have considered an inherently linear motion of the dopant with a Gaussian potential. The damping strength and the dot confinement sources of electric and magnetic origin have been found to fabricate the said kinetics in a delicate way. The present study sheds light on how the individual or combined variation of different confinement sources could design the excitation kinetics in presence of damping. However, in the overdamped region, we find attainment of stabilization in the excitation rate. The present investigation is believed to provide some useful perceptions in the phenomenon of damping that has potential importance in nanoelectronic applications.

  18. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  19. Confinement and Isotropization of Galactic Cosmic Rays by Molecular-Cloud Magnetic Mirrors When Turbulent Scattering Is Weak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical studies of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and observations of solar wind fluctuations suggest that MHD turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic at small scales, with smooth variations along the background magnetic field and sharp variations perpendicular to the background field. Turbulence with this anisotropy is inefficient at scattering cosmic rays, and thus the scattering rate ν may be smaller than has been traditionally assumed in diffusion models of Galactic cosmic-ray propagation, at least for cosmic-ray energies E above 1011-1012 eV at which self-confinement is not possible. In this paper, it is shown that Galactic cosmic rays can be effectively confined through magnetic reflection by molecular clouds, even when turbulent scattering is weak. Elmegreen's quasi-fractal model of molecular-cloud structure is used to argue that a typical magnetic field line passes through a molecular cloud complex once every ∼300 pc. Once inside the complex, the field line will in most cases be focused into one or more dense clumps in which the magnetic field can be much stronger than the average field in the intercloud medium (ICM). Cosmic rays following field lines into cloud complexes are most often magnetically reflected back into the ICM, since strong-field regions act as magnetic mirrors. For a broad range of cosmic-ray energies, a cosmic ray initially following some particular field line separates from that field line sufficiently slowly that the cosmic ray can be trapped between neighboring cloud complexes for long periods of time. The suppression of cosmic-ray diffusion due to magnetic trapping is calculated in this paper with the use of phenomenological arguments, asymptotic analysis, and Monte Carlo particle simulations. Formulas for the coefficient of diffusion perpendicular to the Galactic disk are derived for several different parameter regimes within the E-ν plane. In one of these parameter regimes in which scattering is weak, it

  20. Simulations of the operational control of a cryogenic plant for a superconducting burning-plasma tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, N

    2001-01-01

    In recent proposals for next generation superconducting tokamaks, such as the ITER project, the nuclear burning plasma is confined by magnetic fields generated from a large set (up to 100 GJ stored energy) of superconducting magnets. These magnets suffer heat loads in operation from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as eddy currents and AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and resistive heat generated at the current lead transitions to room temperature. The initial cryoplant for such a tokamak is expected to have a steady state capacity of up to about 85 kW at 4.5 K, comparable to the system installed for LHC at CERN. Experimental tokamaks are expected to operate at least initially in a pulsed mode with 20-30 short plasma pulses and plasma burn periods each day. A conventional cryoplant, consisting of a cold box and a set of primary heat exchangers, is ill-suited to such a mode of operation as the instantaneou...

  1. Anisotropic plasma with flows in tokamak: Steady state and stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adequate description of equilibrium and stability of anisotropic plasma with macroscopic flows in tokamaks is presented. The Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) approximation is consistently used to analyze anisotropic plasma dynamics. The admissible structure of a stationary flow is found to be the same as in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics with isotropic pressure (MHD), which means an allowance for the same relabeling symmetry as in ideal MHD systems with toroidally nested magnetic surfaces. A generalization of the Grad-Shafranov equation for the case of anisotropic plasma with flows confined in the axisymmetric magnetic field is derived. A variational principle was obtained, which allows for a stability analysis of anisotropic pressure plasma with flows, and takes into account the conservation laws resulting from the relabeling symmetry. This principle covers the previous stability criteria for static CGL plasma and for ideal MHD flows in isotropic plasma as well. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Analysis of fast ion induced instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, László

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices like tokamaks, it is crucial to confine the high energy fusion-born helium nuclei ($\\alpha$-particles) to maintain the energy equilibrium of the plasma. However, energetic ions can excite various instabilities which can lead to their enhanced radial transport. Consequently, these instabilities may degrade the heating efficiency and they can also cause harmful power loads on the plasma-facing components of the device. Therefore, the understanding of these modes is a key issue regarding future burning plasma experiments. One of the main open questions concerning energetic particle (EP) driven instabilities is the non-linear evolution of the mode structure. In this thesis, I present my results on the investigation of $\\beta$-induced Alfv\\'{e}n eigenmodes (BAEs) and EP-driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) observed in the ramp-up phase of off-axis NBI heated plasmas in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. These modes were well visible on several line-of-sights (LOSs) of the soft X-ra...

  3. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this report present the progress achieved to date on the Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project. This effort is an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique (CCFM). The overall objective of the effort is to develop and apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was established to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present the project is in the middle of its second budget period with the instrumentation on-site at TdeV. The first half of this budget period was used to complete total system tests at InterScience, Inc., dismantle and ship the hardware to TdeV, re-assemble and install the HNBP on the tokamak. Integration of the diagnostic into the TdeV facility has progressed to the point of first beam production and measurement on the plasma. At this time, the HNBP system is undergoing final de-bugging prior to re-start of machine operation in early Fall of this year

  4. Study of limiter H- and IOC-modes by control of edge magnetic shear and gas puffing in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of improved confinement regime, H-mode and IOC (improved Ohmic confinement) mode, are studied in circular limiter plasmas on JIPP T-IIU. When rapid ramp-down of plasma current (CRD) is used during auxiliary heating, the threshold heating power required for the L-H transition is reduced by 30-50%, compared with that in the case without CRD. This is interpreted as being due to enhancement of the global magnetic shear near the plasma edge by CRD. This model, based on edge magnetic shear is also applicable to the limiter H-mode obtained without CRD by high heating power. In the limiter configuration, the IOC-mode is obtained in ohmically heated, high density plasmas by gas puff control. This improvement may be attributed to a reduction of anomalous transport since radiation loss has only a minor effect. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs

  5. Numerical studies of edge localized instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new computational tool, edge localized instabilities in tokamaks equilibria (ELITE), has been developed to help our understanding of short wavelength instabilities close to the edge of tokamak plasmas. Such instabilities may be responsible for the edge localized modes observed in high confinement H-mode regimes, which are a serious concern for next step tokamaks because of the high transient power loads which they can impose on divertor target plates. ELITE uses physical insight gained from analytic studies of peeling and ballooning modes to provide an efficient way of calculating the edge ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability properties of tokamaks. This paper describes the theoretical formalism which forms the basis for the code

  6. Squeezed potato orbits in a magnetic well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that potato orbits in the near-axis region of a high beta tokamak are squeezed in a magnetic well. The squeezing factor is the same as that for the banana orbits derived in an earlier work [Phys. Plasmas 3, 2843 (1996)]. It depends on the energy of the particle. For high-energy particles, the size of the squeezed orbits is independent of their energy. This implies improved confinement for high-energy particles and for high beta tokamaks with advanced fuels

  7. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higaki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hhigaki@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 Japan (Japan); Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 1-2 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 Japan (Japan)

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  8. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Tightly Confining dc Magnetic Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewes, M.; Andrews, M.R.; van Druten, N.J.; Kurn, D.M.; Durfee, D.S.; Ketterle, W. [Department of Physics and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of sodium atoms has been observed in a novel {open_quote}{open_quote}cloverleaf{close_quote}{close_quote} trap. This trap combines tight confinement with excellent optical access, using only dc electromagnets. Evaporative cooling in this trap produced condensates of 5{times}10{sup 6} atoms, a tenfold improvement over previous results. We measured the condensate fraction and the repulsive mean-field energy, finding agreement with theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Angular confinement and direction-dependent transmission in graphene nanostructures with magnetic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masir, M. Ramezani; Vasilopoulos, P.; Matulis, A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluate the transmission through magnetic barriers in graphene-based nanostructures. Several particular cases are considered: a magnetic step, single and double barriers, δ -function barriers as well as barrier structures with inhomogeneous magnetic field profiles but with average magnetic field equal to zero. The transmission exhibits a strong dependence on the direction of the incident wave vector. In general the resonant structure of the transmission is significantly more pronounced for (Dirac) electrons with linear spectrum compared to that for electrons with a parabolic one.

  10. Phonon confinement effect on the polaron states in a double quantum ring structure in the presence of electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeranosyan, Mkrtich A., E-mail: myeranos@ysu.am [Yerevan State University, Faculty of Physics, Department of Solid State Physics, 1 Alex Manoogian, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia); State Engineering University of Armenia, Department of Microelectronics and Biomedical Devices, 105, V. Teryan, Yerevan 0009 (Armenia); Vartanian, Arshak L., E-mail: vardan@ysu.am [Yerevan State University, Faculty of Physics, Department of Solid State Physics, 1 Alex Manoogian, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia); Shahbandari, Abbas [Farhangiyan University, Bahonar Street, Niyayesh Cross, Farahzadi Avenue, Sanat Square, Tehran 1939614464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kirakosyan, Albert A. [Yerevan State University, Faculty of Physics, Department of Solid State Physics, 1 Alex Manoogian, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia)

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of effective mass approximation the polaron problem in double quantum ring structures in the presence of perpendicular electric and magnetic fields with taken into account the effect of phonon confinement is considered. We derived general expressions for the normalized eigenfunctions of the confined optical and interface optical phonon modes and the dispersion relation for interface optical phonons as well as electron–confined optical phonon and electron–interface optical phonon Fröhlich interaction Hamiltonians in the double quantum ring system. Results reveal that the electron–optical phonon coupling leads to the decrease of the electron ground state energy. We have shown that the polaron energy exhibits a pronounced local maximum (minimuum) in dependence on an electric (magnetic) field which corresponds to the sharp decrease (increase) of the polaronic contributions due to confined optical and interface optical phonon modes.

  11. Interaction of external n  =  1 magnetic fields with the sawtooth instability in low-q RFX-mod and DIII-D tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, C.; Martin, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Hanson, J.; Logan, N. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piovesan, P.; Turco, F.; Bialek, J.; Franz, P.; Jackson, G.; Lanctot, M. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E.; Terranova, D.; Turnbull, A.

    2016-10-01

    External n  =  1 magnetic fields are applied in RFX-mod and DIII-D low safety factor Tokamak plasmas to investigate their interaction with the internal MHD dynamics and in particular with the sawtooth instability. In these experiments the applied magnetic fields cause a reduction of both the sawtooth amplitude and period, leading to an overall stabilizing effect on the oscillations. In RFX-mod sawteeth eventually disappear and are replaced by a stationary m  =  1, n  =  1 helical equilibrium without an increase in disruptivity. However toroidal rotation is significantly reduced in these plasmas, thus it is likely that the sawtooth mitigation in these experiments is due to the combination of the helically deformed core and the reduced rotation. The former effect is qualitatively well reproduced by nonlinear MHD simulations performed with the PIXIE3D code. The results obtained in these RFX-mod experiments motivated similar ones in DIII-D L-mode diverted Tokamak plasmas at low q 95. These experiments succeeded in reproducing the sawtooth mitigation with the approach developed in RFX-mod. In DIII-D this effect is correlated with a clear increase of the n  =  1 plasma response, that indicates an enhancement of the coupling to the marginally stable n  =  1 external kink, as simulations with the linear MHD code IPEC suggest. A significant rotation braking in the plasma core is also observed in DIII-D. Numerical calculations of the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) carried out with PENT identify this torque as a possible contributor for this effect.

  12. Extremely shaped plasmas to improve the Tokamak concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is essential for human existence and our future depends on plentiful and accessible sources of energy. The world population is fast growing and the average energy used per capita increases. One of the greatest challenges for human beings is that of meeting the growing demand for energy in a responsible, equitable and sustainable way. The possibility to obtain energy by ‘fusing’ light atoms addresses these needs. Nuclear fusion reactions are clean, safe and the amount of fuel present on Earth (hydrogen isotopes) is practically inexhaustible and well distributed. Nuclear fusion is a natural process that occurs in all active stars like our Sun. Since the first demonstration of a deuterium fusion reaction (Rutherford 1933), researchers worldwide have tried to replicate this process on Earth by building a thermonuclear fusion reactor. Nevertheless, the challenge posed by the construction of a nuclear fusion reactor is greater than the one presented earlier by the development of a fission reactor. During the IAEA Conference in Geneva in the early 1958, L.A. Artsimovich declared: ‘Plasma physics is very difficult. Worldwide collaboration is needed for progress’ and E.Teller, at the same conference: ‘Fusion technology is very complex. It is almost impossible to build a fusion reactor in this century’. They were right. The extremely high temperature and density necessary to fuse hydrogen isotopes makes it difficult indeed to create a successful fusion reactor. Even though the physics of the fusion reaction appears clear, we are still facing problems on the road towards building the ‘box’ that can efficiently confine the hot gas in the state of plasma. The best results so far have been obtained confining a plasma with strong magnetic fields in a toroidal configuration (‘tokamak’). The Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas in Switzerland actively studies this promising configuration towards the development of a nuclear fusion reactor. The

  13. Identification of Plasma Boundary and Position for HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhongtian; Mao Guoping; Yang Qingwei; Zhang Jinghua; Gao Zhe; He Yexi

    2005-01-01

    Using the virtual-case principle, the plasma boundary, the plasma current center,and the x-point are identified for the HL-2A tokamak. The plasma current is represented by the current center and the virtual multipole moments which produce a magnetic flux in a form of polynomial. Adaptive parameters in the polynomial are determined by the least-square fit of the poloidal magnetic fields. The measurement of the magnetic field is performed using pick-up coils. The virtual-case principle is applied outside the plasma boundary. The virtual-case currents decide the position of the current center and produce a negative confinement magnetic field inside the plasma and the magnetic field generated by the plasma current outside the plasma boundary. The convergence is fast enough to get a picture between the sequent shots. The configuration reconstructed is in good agreement with the TV image taken by camera with a tangential view.

  14. LHCD experiments on tokamak CASTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short survey is given of the experimental activities at the small Prague tokamak CASTOR. They concern primarily the LH current drive using multijunction waveguide grills as launching antennae. During two last years the, efforts were focused on a study of the electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations under conditions of combined inductive/LHCD regimes and of the relation of the level of these fluctuations to the anomalous particles transport in tokamak CASTOR. Results of the study are discussed in some detail. (author). 24 figs., 51 refs

  15. Influence of the shear flow on electron cyclotron resonance plasma confinement in an axisymmetric magnetic mirror trap of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of shear flows of the dense plasma created under conditions of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) gas breakdown on the plasma confinement in the axisymmetric mirror trap (''vortex'' confinement) was studied experimentally and theoretically. A limiter with bias potential was set inside the mirror trap for plasma rotation. The limiter construction and the optimal value of the potential were chosen according to the results of the preliminary theoretical analysis. This method of ''vortex'' confinement realization in an axisymmetric mirror trap for non-equilibrium heavy-ion plasmas seems to be promising for creation of ECR multicharged ion sources with high magnetic fields, more than 1 T.

  16. Magnetic confinement and coupling in narrow-diameter Au–Ni nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelhas, Laura T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States); Banholzer, Matthew J. [Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry and International Institute for Nanotechnology, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, CA, 60208-3113 (United States); Mirkin, Chad A., E-mail: chadnano@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry and International Institute for Nanotechnology, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, CA, 60208-3113 (United States); Tolbert, Sarah H., E-mail: tolbert@chem.ucla.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Here we examine magnetic coupling in layered magnetic/nonmagnetic nanowires created using electrochemical deposition into nanoporous templates. By utilizing reproducible and tunable deposition methods, various aspect ratios and spacing between magnetic domains were created. Low aspect ratio disks were then coupled to high aspect ratio rods to control the mechanism for spin flip in the disk component of the system. The orthogonal relationship between the magnetic easy axis of the disk and rod geometries creates a multistate system with both in-plane and out-of-plane easy axes by balancing magnetic shape anisotropy with dipole coupling between the two layers. - Highlights: • Layered Ni–Au rods with precise dimensions were synthesized via electrochemical deposition into AAO templates. • Coupling between rod and disk shaped Ni segments was explored by varying the thickness of the Au spacers. • Magnetic hysteresis studies indicate that coupling between disk and rod magnetic easy axis can be used to control the mechanism for spin flips.

  17. Plasma formation and sustainment by a multijunction grill on the CASTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiofrequency power up to 40 kW, injected into the vacuum chamber of the CASTOR tokamak by a multijunction grill, was used for plasma production during the ramp-up phase of a toroidal magnetic field. When electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) appears inside the tokamak chamber for the given pumping frequency (f=1.25 GHz) plasma with a density greater than 2x1018 m-3 and a temperature of Te=10 to 40 eV is produced. The plasma is sustained at some lower value of density during the whole RF pulse. Simultaneously, a toroidal current of up to ≅ 0.2 kA is generated. The energy confinement time is estimated to be about 30 μs during the ECR breakdown. (author)

  18. Reference distribution functions for magnetically confined plasmas from the minimum entropy production theorem and the MaxEnt principle, subject to the scale-invariant restrictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnino, Giorgio, E-mail: gsonnino@ulb.ac.be [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Cardinali, Alessandro [EURATOM-ENEA Fusion Association, Via E. Fermi 45, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Steinbrecher, Gyorgy [EURATOM-MEdC Fusion Association, Physics Faculty, University of Craiova, Str. A.I. Cuza 13, 200585 Craiova (Romania); Peeters, Philippe [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Sonnino, Alberto [Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Ecole Polytechnique de Louvain (EPL), Rue Archimède, 1 bte L6.11.01, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nardone, Pasquale [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-12-09

    We derive the expression of the reference distribution function for magnetically confined plasmas far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. The local equilibrium state is fixed by imposing the minimum entropy production theorem and the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, subject to scale invariance restrictions. After a short time, the plasma reaches a state close to the local equilibrium. This state is referred to as the reference state. The aim of this Letter is to determine the reference distribution function (RDF) when the local equilibrium state is defined by the above mentioned principles. We prove that the RDF is the stationary solution of a generic family of stochastic processes corresponding to an universal Landau-type equation with white parametric noise. As an example of application, we consider a simple, fully ionized, magnetically confined plasmas, with auxiliary Ohmic heating. The free parameters are linked to the transport coefficients of the magnetically confined plasmas, by the kinetic theory.

  19. Stability of magnetic condensation and mass generation for confinement in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the functional renormalization group, we reexamine the stability of the Yang-Mills vacuum with a chromomagnetic condensation. We show that the Nielsen-Olesen instability of the Savvidy vacuum with a homogeneous chromomagnetic condensation disappears in the $SU(2)$ Yang-Mills theory. As a physical mechanism for maintaining the stability even for the small infrared cutoff, we argue that dynamical gluon mass generation occurs due to a BRST-invariant vacuum condensate of mass dimension-two, which is related to two-gluon bound states identified with glueballs. These results support the dual superconductor picture for quark confinement.

  20. Evolution of views on the structure of the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovrizhnykh, L. M., E-mail: lmkov@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Various methods of determining the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic systems (predominantly, in stellarators) and the evolution of views on this problem are discussed. Paradoxes encountered in solving this problem are analyzed, and ways of resolving them are proposed.

  1. Application of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance in determination of input power time of Damavand tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Ehsanallah; Sadeghi, Yahya; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2016-10-01

    In this study, magnetic measurement of poloidal fields were used to determine poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance of Damavand tokamak combination of poloidal beta and plasma internal inductance (β _p+{l_i}/{2} ), known as Shafranov parameter, was obtained experimentally in terms of normal and tangential components of the magnetic field. Plasma internal inductance and poloidal beta were obtained using parametrization method based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE) and compared with parabolic-like profile of toroidal current density approach for determination of the plasma internal inductance. Finding evolution of β _p+{l_i}/{2} and plasma internal inductance. Finding poloidal beta (Shafranov parameter and internal inductance) and using energy balance equation, thermal energy and energy confinement were determined qualitatively in terms of poloidal beta during a regular discharge of Damavand tokamak.

  2. Magnetic and dielectric studies of multiferroic CuO nanoparticles confined to porous glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charnaya, E.V., E-mail: charnaya@live.com [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Petrodvorets, St. Petersburg 198904 (Russian Federation); Lee, M.K. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tien, C. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701 Taiwan (China); Pak, V.N.; Formus, D.V. [Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, 6 Kazanskaya, St. Petersburg 191186 (Russian Federation); Pirozerskii, A.L.; Nedbai, A.I. [Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, Petrodvorets, St. Petersburg 198904 (Russian Federation); Ubyivovk, E.V. [Interdisciplinary Resource Center for Nanotechnology, St. Petersburg State University, Petrodvorets, St. Petersburg 198904 (Russian Federation); Baryshnikov, S.V. [Blagoveschensk State Pedagogical University, Blagoveschensk, 675002 (Russian Federation); Chang, L.J. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-15

    Dc magnetization and ac electric permittivity were measured for the CuO-porous glass nanocomposite made and for pressed powder CuO. Magnetization curves showed a bend between two linear segments for both the nanocomposite and bulk cupric oxide at 230 K evidencing that the temperature of the transition from the paramagnetic into multiferroic phase did not change noticeably under nanoconfinement. Results suggested also a reduction of the temperature of the second transition into the collinear antiferromagnetic phase. ZFC and FC magnetizations were found to bifurcate for the nanocomposite and bulk CuO. The bifurcation was accompanied with peaks on ZFC magnetization. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CuO nanoparticles embedded into porous glass compared to bulk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZFC and FC magnetizations bifurcate in the nanocomposite and bulk CuO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dc magnetization suggests a reduction of the temperature T{sub N1} till about 190 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature T{sub N2} of the transition into multiferroic phase did not change.

  3. Magnetic and dielectric studies of multiferroic CuO nanoparticles confined to porous glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dc magnetization and ac electric permittivity were measured for the CuO-porous glass nanocomposite made and for pressed powder CuO. Magnetization curves showed a bend between two linear segments for both the nanocomposite and bulk cupric oxide at 230 K evidencing that the temperature of the transition from the paramagnetic into multiferroic phase did not change noticeably under nanoconfinement. Results suggested also a reduction of the temperature of the second transition into the collinear antiferromagnetic phase. ZFC and FC magnetizations were found to bifurcate for the nanocomposite and bulk CuO. The bifurcation was accompanied with peaks on ZFC magnetization. - Highlights: ► CuO nanoparticles embedded into porous glass compared to bulk. ► ZFC and FC magnetizations bifurcate in the nanocomposite and bulk CuO. ► Dc magnetization suggests a reduction of the temperature TN1 till about 190 K. ► Temperature TN2 of the transition into multiferroic phase did not change.

  4. HECTOR: a code for the study of high energy charged particles in axisymmetric tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code for the study of high energy charged particles resulting primarily from thermonuclear reactions within the confining magnetic fields of non-circular axisymmetric tokamak plasmas is described. The trajectories of the particles are traced in the (C.O.M.) space using a new, fast, and efficient hybrid orbit following scheme based upon the drift equations in the guiding centre approximation and the constants of motion. The code includes the important Coulomb scattering processes of dynamical friction and pitch angle scattering. The code is specifically designed to operate within the experimental environment or in a predictive mode. (author)

  5. Environmental control of tritium use at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.J. Jr.; Lind, K.E.

    1978-12-01

    A primary objective of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Project (TFTR) is to demonstrate the production of fusion energy using the deuterium--tritium fusion reaction in a magnetically confined plasma system. This paper will discuss the various tritium control methods employed to minimize the release of tritium to the environment. The methods to be described include the containment and ALAP philosophy, engineered safety features, redundant tritium cleanup systems, redundant instrumentation and control systems, interlocks, monitoring systems, management controls, and waste handling systems. Estimates will be included concerning the impact of routine and accidental tritium releases with these control systems in place.

  6. Environmental control of tritium use at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary objective of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Project (TFTR) is to demonstrate the production of fusion energy using the deuterium--tritium fusion reaction in a magnetically confined plasma system. This paper will discuss the various tritium control methods employed to minimize the release of tritium to the environment. The methods to be described include the containment and ALAP philosophy, engineered safety features, redundant tritium cleanup systems, redundant instrumentation and control systems, interlocks, monitoring systems, management controls, and waste handling systems. Estimates will be included concerning the impact of routine and accidental tritium releases with these control systems in place

  7. Spin wave confinement

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    This book presents recent scientific achievements in the investigation of magnetization dynamics in confined magnetic systems. Introduced by Bloch as plane waves of magnetization in unconfined ferromagnets, spin waves currently play an important role in the description of very small magnetic systems ranging from microelements, which form the basis of magnetic sensors, to magnetic nano-contacts. The spin wave confinement effect was experimentally discovered in the 1990s in permalloy microstripes. The diversity of systems where this effect is observed has been steadily growing since then, and

  8. Separation of species of a binary fluid mixture confined in a channel in presence of a strong transverse magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Bishwaram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of a transverse magnetic field on separation of a binary mixture of incompressible viscous thermally and electrically conducting fluids confined between two stationary parallel plates are examined. Both the plates are maintained at constant temperatures. It is assumed that one of the components, which is rarer and lighter, is present in the mixture in a very small quantity. The equations governing the motion, temperature and concentration in Cartesian coordinate are solved analytically. The solution obtained for concentration distribution is plotted against the width of the channel for various values of non-dimensional parameters. It is found that the effect of transverse magnetic field is to separate the species of rarer and lighter component by contributing its effect directly to the temperature gradient and the pressure gradient. The effects of increase in the values of Hartmann number, magnetic Reynolds number, barodiffusion number, thermal diffusion number, electric field parameter and the product of Prandtl number and Eckert number are to collect the rarer and lighter component near the upper plate and throw away the heavier component towards the lower plate. The problem discussed here derives its application in the basic fluid dynamics separation processes to separate the rare component of the different isotopes of heavier molecules where electromagnetic method of separation does not work.

  9. Magnetic confinement effects on the particle escape from the loop top in stochastic acceleration models for solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, F.; Petrosian, V.

    2015-12-01

    Stochastic acceleration scenarios are among the most promising candidates to explain the high energies attained by particles in solar flares. Recent progress in the determination of fundamental acceleration parameters using novel techniques for the inversion of high resolution RHESSI hard X-ray spectra allows to determine non-thermal electron spectra at the loop top and foot points of a flare loop (Chen & Petrosian 2014). One outcome of this work is that the trapping and escape of the electrons is governed by wave particle scatterings and convergence of magnetic lines of force. Here, we present a computational study of the transport and escape processes of particles in the acceleration region. We employ a Fokker-Planck model, which includes pitch-angle scattering and magnetic mirroring in a non-uniform magnetic field. This allows to test analytical approximations for the particle escape times in the loop top region, which are helpful to constrain the key particle acceleration parameters. New perspectives will be given on how the insights gained from the analysis of the particle confinement will enable subsequent studies of a broader class of solar flares.

  10. MHD stability control in alternate confinement concept experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, E. B.

    2006-10-01

    High-quality plasma operation and good energy confinement in the alternate confinement experiments require control of ideal and resistive MHD instabilities. New experiments in the revitalized ICC program, supported by modern MHD computational capabilities, are demonstrating progress in this control which significantly extends previous work. Results from the classical tokamak are thereby extended into new parameter regimes, generating insight into the physics. We consider both toroidal and open concepts and, where appropriate, highlight comparisons with the tokamak, ST, and stellarator. The driving forces for ideal MHD modes are characterized using the Frieman-Rotenberg condition, which generalizes the stability analysis by including plasma flow. Stabilizing mechanisms include conducting walls (RFP, spheromak, FRC); plasma shaping as characterized by the magnetic dipole moment (spheromak, FRC); current-profile control (RFP, spheromak); sheared, super-Alfvénic flows (Z-pinch, centrifugal mirror); quadrupole magnetic wells (FRC, mirror); and high kinetic-energy density flow in good curvature regions (gas-dynamic trap). Resistive tearing is stabilized or limited by current profile control, primarily in the RFP and spheromak. Non-MHD mechanisms such as FLR can also be stabilizing and will be most effective if the MHD growth rate is minimized. Most of the experimental work to date has focused on global or large-scale modes; the possible consequences of short-wavelength or local modes will be explored. E. Frieman and M. Rotenberg, Rev. Mod. Phys. 32, 898 (1960).

  11. Density matrix for an electron confined in quantum dots under uniform magnetic field and static electrical field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pang Qian-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Using unitary transformations, this paper obtains the eigenvalues and the common eigenvector of Hamiltonian and a new-defined generalized angular momentum (Lz) for an electron confined in quantum dots under a uniform magnetic field (UMF) and a static electric field (SEF). It finds that the eigenvalue of Lz just stands for the expectation value of a usual angular momentum lz in the eigen-state. It first obtains the matrix density for this system via directly calculating a transfer matrix element of operator exp(-βH) in some representations with the technique of integral within an ordered products (IWOP) of operators, rather than via solving a Bloch equation. Because the quadratic homogeneity of potential energy is broken due to the existence of SEF, the virial theorem in statistical physics is not satisfactory for this system, which is confirmed through the calculation of thermal averages of physical quantities.

  12. Neoclassical transport of impurtities in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak plasmas are inherently comprised of multiple ion species. This is due to wall-bred impurities and, in future reactors, will result from fusion-born alpha particles. Relatively small concentrations of highly charged non-hydrogenic impurities can strongly influence plasma transport properties whenever n/sub I/e/sub I/2/n/sub H/e2 greater than or equal to (m/sub e//m/sub H/)/sup 1/2/. The determination of the complete neoclassical Onsager matrix for a toroidally confined multispecies plasma, which provides the linear relation between the surface averaged radial fluxes and the thermodynamic forces (i.e., gradients of density and temperature, and the parallel electric field), is reviewed. A closed set of one-dimensional moment equations is presented for the time evolution of thermodynamic and magnetic field quantities which results from collisional transport of the plasma and two dimensional motion of the magnetic flux surface geometry. The effects of neutral beam injection on the equilibrium and transport properties of a toroidal plasma are consistently included

  13. An Overview of Plasma Confinement in Toroidal Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dini, Fatemeh; Amrollahi, Reza; Khorasani, Sina

    2009-01-01

    This overview presents a tutorial introduction to the theory of magnetic plasma confinement in toroidal confinement systems with particular emphasis on axisymmetric equilibrium geometries, and tokamaks. The discussion covers three important aspects of plasma physics: Equilibrium, Stability, and Transport. The section on equilibrium will go through an introduction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, curvilinear system of coordinates, flux coordinates, extensions to axisymmetric equilibrium, Grad-Shafranov Equation (GSE), Green's function formalism, as well as analytical and numerical solutions to GSE. The section on stability will address topics including Lyapunov Stability in nonlinear systems, energy principle, modal analysis, and simplifications for axisymmetric machines. The final section will consider transport in toroidal systems. We present the flux-surface-averaged system of equations describing classical and non-classical transport phenomena. Applications to the small-sized high-aspect-ratio Damavand tokam...

  14. Magnetic confinement of neutral atoms based on patterned vortex distributions in superconducting disks and rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Chan, K S; Beian, M; Lim, M J; Dumke, R; 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.013404

    2012-01-01

    We propose and analyze neutral atom traps generated by vortices imprinted by magnetic field pulse sequences in type-II superconducting disks and rings. We compute the supercurrent distribution and magnetic field resulting from the vortices in the superconductor. Different patterns of vortices can be written by versatile loading field sequences. We discuss in detail procedures to generate quadrupole traps, self-sufficient traps and ring traps based on superconducting disks and rings. The ease of creating these traps and the low current noise in supercurrent carrying structures makes our approach attractive for designing atom chip interferometers and probes.

  15. Fractal diabolo antenna for enhancing and confining the optical magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.; Dai, H. T., E-mail: htdai@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparing Technology, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Sun, X. W., E-mail: xwsun@sust.edu.cn [South University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xue-Yuan Road, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518055 (China)

    2014-01-15

    We introduce fractal geometry to diabolo nanoantenna for higher magnetic field intensity enhancement, i.e. the Sierpiński triangle diabolo antenna (STDA). Numerical results show that higher iteration of the STDA is responsible for the higher enhancement and the red shift of the resonant wavelength. Further investigation demonstrates the enhancement can be improved by increasing the length of the antenna or its central strip. By designing diabolo antennas with fractal geometry, improving the magnetic field intensity enhancement and varying the resonance conditions can be achieved while keeping the constant antenna dimensions.

  16. Control of a burning tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, R.E.; Mandrekas, J.; Stacey, W.M.

    1993-03-01

    This report is a review of the literature relevant to the control of the thermonuclear burn in a tokamak plasma. Some basic tokamak phenomena are reviewed, and then control by modulation of auxiliary heating and fueling is discussed. Other possible control methods such as magnetic ripple, plasma compression, and impurity injection as well as more recent proposed methods such as divertor biasing and L- to H-mode transition are also reviewed. The applications of modern control theory to the tokamak burn control problem are presented. The control results are summarized and areas of further research are identified.

  17. The magnetic field and confined wind of the O star $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, G A; Donati, J F; Landstreet, J D; Petit, P; Strasser, S

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we confirm the presence of a globally-ordered, kG-strength magnetic field in the photosphere of the young O star $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C, and examine the properties of its optical line profile variations. A new series of high-resolution MuSiCoS Stokes $V$ and $I$ spectra has been acquired which samples approximately uniformly the rotational cycle of $\\theta^1$~Orionis~C. Using the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) multiline technique, we have succeeded in detecting variable Stokes $V$ Zeeman signatures associated with the LSD mean line profile. These signatures have been modeled to determine the magnetic field geometry. We have furthermore examined the profi le variations of lines formed in both the wind and photosphere using dynamic spectra. Based on spectrum synthesis fitting of the LSD profiles, we determine that the polar strength of the magnetic dipole component is $1150 \\la B_{\\rm d}\\la 1800$~G and that the magnetic obliquity is $27\\degr \\la \\beta \\la 68\\degr$, assuming $i=45\\pm 20\\degr$. The...

  18. Co-current toroidal rotation-driven and turbulent stresses with resonant magnetic perturbations in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, K. J.; Shi, Yuejiang; Liu, H.; Diamond, P. H.; Li, F. M.; Cheng, J.; Chen, Z. P.; Nie, L.; Ding, Y. H.; Wu, Y. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Rao, B.; Cheng, Z. F.; Gao, L.; Zhang, X. Q.; Yang, Z. J.; Wang, N. C.; Wang, L.; Jin, W.; Xu, J. Q.; Yan, L. W.; Dong, J. Q.; Zhuang, G.; J-TEXT Team

    2016-07-01

    The acceleration of the co-current toroidal rotations around resonant surfaces by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) through turbulence is presented. These experiments were performed using a Langmuir probe array in the edge plasmas of the J-TEXT tokamak. This study aims at understanding the RMP effects on edge toroidal rotations and exploring its control method. With RMPs, the flat electron temperature T e profile, due to magnetic islands, appears around resonant surfaces (Zhao et al 2015 Nucl. Fusion 55 073022). When the resonant surface is closer to the last closed flux surface, the flat T e profile vanishes with RMPs. In both cases, the toroidal rotations significantly increase in the direction of the plasma current around the resonant surfaces with RMPs. The characteristics of turbulence are significantly affected by RMPs around the resonant surfaces. The turbulence intensity profile changes and the poloidal wave vector k θ increases with RMPs. The power fraction of the turbulence components in the ion diamagnetic drift direction increases with RMPs. The measurements of turbulent Reynolds stresses are consistent with the toroidal flows that can be driven by turbulence. The estimations of the energy transfer between the turbulence and toroidal flows suggest that turbulence energy transfers into toroidal flows. The result has the implication of the intrinsic rotation being driven by RMPs via turbulence.

  19. Ion cyclotron emission in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection of α(3.5 MeV) fusion products will be of major importance for the achievement of self sustained discharges in fusion thermonuclear reactors. Due to their cyclotronic gyration in the confining magnetic field of a tokamak, α particles are suspected to radiate in the radio-frequency band [RF: 10-500 MHz]. Our aim is to determine whether detection of RF emission radiated from a reactor plasma can provide information concerning those fusion products. We observed experimentally that the RF emission radiated from fast ions situated in the core of the discharge is detectable with a probe located at the plasma edge. For that purpose, fast temporal acquisition of spectral power was achieved in a narrow frequency band. We also propose two complementary models for this emission. In the first one, we describe locally the energy transfer between the photon population and the plasma and we compute the radiation equilibrium taking place in the tokamak. α particles are not the unique species involved in the equilibrium and it is necessary to take into account all other species present in the plasma (Deuterium, Tritium, electrons,...). Our second model consists in the numerical resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov with the use of a variational formulation, in which all polarizations are considered and the 4 first cyclotronic harmonics are included in a 1-D slab geometry. The development of this second model leads to the proposal for an experimental set up aiming to the feasibility demonstration of a routine diagnostic providing the central α density in a reactor. (author)

  20. Suppression of the Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks under Anomalous Transverse Transport Conditions when the Magnetic Well Effect Predominates over the Bootstrap Drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the suppression of neoclassical tearing modes in tokamaks under anomalous transverse transport conditions when the magnetic well effect predominates over the bootstrap drive. It is stressed that the corresponding effect, which is called the compound suppression effect, depends strongly on the profiles of the electron and ion temperature perturbations. Account is taken of the fact that the temperature profile can be established as a result of the competition between anomalous transverse heat transport, on the one hand, and longitudinal collisional heat transport, longitudinal heat convection, longitudinal inertial transport, and transport due to the rotation of magnetic islands, on the other hand. The role of geodesic effects is discussed. The cases of competition just mentioned are described by the model sets of reduced transport equations, which are called, respectively, collisional, convective, inertial, and rotational plasmophysical models. The magnetic well is calculated with allowance for geodesic effects. It is shown that, for strong anomalous heat transport conditions, the contribution of the magnetic well to the generalized Rutherford equation for the island width W is independent of W not only in the collisional model (which has been investigated earlier) but also in the convective and inertial models and depends very weakly (logarithmically) on W in the rotational model. It is this weak dependence that gives rise to the compound effect, which is the subject of the present study. A criterion for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by the compound effect at an arbitrary level of the transverse heat transport by electrons and ions is derived and is analyzed for two cases: when the electron heat transport and ion heat transport are both strong, and when the electron heat transport is strong and the ion heat transport is weak

  1. D-D tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tokamak D-D reactor design, utilizing the advantages of a deuterium-fueled reactor but with parameters not unnecessarily extended from existing D-T designs, is presented. Studies leading to the choice of a design and initial studies of the design are described. The studies are in the areas of plasma engineering, first-wall/blanket/shield design, magnet design, and tritium/fuel/vacuum requirements. Conclusions concerning D-D tokamak reactors are stated

  2. In-situ analysis of the first wall by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in the TEXTOR tokamak: Dependence on the magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is considered as a promising method for in-situ diagnostic of the co-deposition and fuel retention during and in between plasma discharges in fusion devices. LIBS has been investigated intensively under laboratory conditions, while the application of LIBS in fusion devices is still in early stages. Moreover, the LIB processes are influenced by additional conditions in fusion devices, particularly the magnetic field. The experiments in TEXTOR show a significant enhancement in the spectral line emission and a deeper penetration of the laser-produced plasma into the edge plasma in the presence of magnetic field. These effects can be attributed to an increased confinement of the plasma by the magnetic field. The interference of magnetic field may compromise the quantitative interpretation of LIB spectra. Therefore, quantitative analysis of ITER-like co-deposits was done in laboratory without magnetic field as well as in TEXTOR with a magnetic field of Bt ∼ 2.25 T

  3. Modeling the Earth's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a realistic magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    Empirical data-based models of the magnetosphereic magnetic field have been widely used during recent years. However, the existing models (Tsyganenko, 1987, 1989a) have three serious deficiencies: (1) an unstable de facto magnetopause, (2) a crude parametrization by the K(sub p) index, and (3) inaccuracies in the equatorial magnetotail B(sub z) values. This paper describes a new approach to the problem; the essential new features are (1) a realistic shape and size of the magnetopause, based on fits to a large number of observed crossing (allowing a parametrization by the solar wind pressure), (2) fully controlled shielding of the magnetic field produced by all magnetospheric current systems, (3) new flexible representations for the tail and ring currents, and (4) a new directional criterion for fitting the model field to spacecraft data, providing improved accuracy for field line mapping. Results are presented from initial efforts to create models assembled from these modules and calibrated against spacecraft data sets.

  4. Geometric size effect on the extrinsic Gilbert damping in laterally confined magnetic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyon-Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Dong; You, Chun-Yeol; Park, Byong-Guk; Hong, Jung-Il

    2016-05-01

    We investigated spin dynamics in micron-length scale patterned thin films using the GPU-based micromagnetic simulation program. Spin precessional motion was induced by a Gaussian-pulse magnetic field. The effective Gilbert damping was examined by tracking the precessional motion of the spins, and we found that the damping constant depends on the size and shape of the pattern as well as the externally applied magnetic field. Additional extrinsic damping generated around the edge region was attributed to the dephasing effect between the fundamental spin wave and other spin wave modes. We find that the effect of extrinsic damping could be eliminated by proper adjustments of sample size, external bias field, position, and area of observation.

  5. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time. PMID:27796370

  6. Pre-ionization and spectroscopic diagnostic of plasma generated and confined by magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A θ-pinch system has been constructed with pre-heating devices with a total energy of 2 kJ. During this experiment a He Plasma was studied using the following three different diagnostics. a) Magnetic Probes b) Visible Spectroscopy using the Optical Multichannel Analyser - OMA c) Image Converter Camera. The experimental results have been checked with existing theoretical models. The electrical characteristics of the system were determined with the magnetic probe. The Doppler and Stark broadening effects of the λo = 4686 (angstrom) (HeII) have been used to determine the ionic temperature and electronic density respectively. The time evolution of these parameters was obtained using the OMA. The dynamics of the plasma were observed by high speed photography. Instabilities in the plasma columm have been observed. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical values was obtained. (author)

  7. Confined Harmonically Interacting Spin-Polarized Fermions in a Magnetic Field: Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    S. Foulon; Brosens, F.; Devreese, J. T.; Lemmens, L. F.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the combined influence of a magnetic field and a harmonic interparticle interaction on the thermodynamic properties of a finite number of spin polarized fermions in a confiment potential. This study is an extension using our path integral approach of symmetrized density matrices for identical particles. The thermodynamical properties are calculated for a three dimensional model of N harmonically interacting spin polarized fermions in a parabolic potential well in the presence o...

  8. Feedback control of current drive by using hybrid wave in tokamaks; Asservissement de la generation de courant par l`onde hybride dans un plasma de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnands, T.J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Sciences de la Matiere

    1997-03-01

    This work is focussed on an important and recent development in present day Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research and Tokamaks. The aim is to optimise the energy confinement for a certain magnetic configuration by adapting the radial distribution of the current. Of particular interest are feedback control scenarios with stationary modifications of the current profile using current, driven by Lower Hybrid waves. A new feedback control system has been developed for Tore Supra and has made a large number of new operation scenarios possible. In one of the experiments described here, there is no energy exchange between the poloidal field system and the plasma, the current is controlled by the power of the Lower Hybrid waves while the launched wave spectrum is used to optimise the current profile shape and the energy confinement. (author) 151 refs.

  9. Power Coupling of the Rotating Magnetic Field to the Plasma in the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Stephen; Schrank, Louis; Wurden, Glen; Brooks, Bob; Crawford, Ed; Guo, Houyang; Hoffman, Alan; Lotz, Dan; Slough, John; Votroubek, George

    2000-10-01

    Experimental results utilizing the rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive system at TCS are presented. The procedure at TCS is to form a hot, FRC (RFTP method); translate it to the confinement chamber; then drive a poloidal current in it with a RMF so that the magnetic flux is sustained. The goal is to sustain the flux so that the lifetime of the FRC becomes limited by particle inventory rather that resistive flux losses, as is presently the case. In addition, the RMF can form FRCs from a pre-ionized gas fill. Experiments to date have been conducted with the following properties: RMF field strengths of about 25 G (1 mWb flux), densities of about 0.5x10^19 m-3, electron temperatures of about 100 eV, and external fields of 150 G. This poster will address the coupling of the RMF power to the plasma, in particular, how this coupling varies with density and RMF properties (field strength, frequency, pulse width and relative phasing).

  10. Stress and Thermal Analysis of the In-Vessel Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Coils on the J-TEXT Tokamak%Stress and Thermal Analysis of the In-Vessel Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Coils on the J-TEXT Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝长端; 张明; 丁永华; 饶波; 岑义顺; 庄革

    2012-01-01

    A set of four in-vessel saddle coils was designed to generate a helical field on the J- TEXT tokamak to study the influences of the external perturbation field on plasma. The coils are fed with alternating current up to 10 kA at frequency up to 10 kHz. Due to the special structure, complex thermal environment and limited space in the vacuum chamber, Jt is very important to make sure that the coils will not be damaged when undergoing the huge electromagnetic forces in the strong toroidal field, and that their temperatures don't rise too much and destroy the in- sulation. A 3D finite element model is developed in this paper using the ANSYS code, stresses are analyzed to find the worst condition, and a mounting method is then established. The results of the stress and modal analyses show that the mounting method meets the strength requirements. Finally, a thermal analysis is performed to study the cooling process and the temperature distribution of the coils.

  11. LDRD final report on confinement of cluster fusion plasmas with magnetic fields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argo, Jeffrey W.; Kellogg, Jeffrey W.; Headley, Daniel Ignacio; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Waugh, Caleb J.; Lewis, Sean M.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Wisher, Matthew; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Bengtson, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Two versions of a current driver for single-turn, single-use 1-cm diameter magnetic field coils have been built and tested at the Sandia National Laboratories for use with cluster fusion experiments at the University of Texas in Austin. These coils are used to provide axial magnetic fields to slow radial loss of electrons from laser-produced deuterium plasmas. Typical peak field strength achievable for the two-capacitor system is 50 T, and 200 T for the ten-capacitor system. Current rise time for both systems is about 1.7 {mu}s, with peak current of 500 kA and 2 MA, respectively. Because the coil must be brought to the laser, the driver needs to be portable and drive currents in vacuum. The drivers are complete but laser-plasma experiments are still in progress. Therefore, in this report, we focus on system design, initial tests, and performance characteristics of the two-capacitor and ten-capacitors systems. The questions of whether a 200 T magnetic field can retard the breakup of a cluster-fusion plasma, and whether this field can enhance neutron production have not yet been answered. However, tools have been developed that will enable producing the magnetic fields needed to answer these questions. These are a two-capacitor, 400-kA system that was delivered to the University of Texas in 2010, and a 2-MA ten-capacitor system delivered this year. The first system allowed initial testing, and the second system will be able to produce the 200 T magnetic fields needed for cluster fusion experiments with a petawatt laser. The prototype 400-kA magnetic field driver system was designed and built to test the design concept for the system, and to verify that a portable driver system could be built that delivers current to a magnetic field coil in vacuum. This system was built copying a design from a fixed-facility, high-field machine at LANL, but made to be portable and to use a Z-machine-like vacuum insulator and vacuum transmission line. This system was sent to the

  12. The influence of the dynamic ergodic divertor on the radial electric field at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the influence of external Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on the radial electric field Er in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) at the Tokamak TEXTOR. Here, the RMPs are produced with the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED), a set of 16 helical perturbation coils located at the high field side of TEXTOR. Within this work, the base mode number of perturbations has been m/n=6/2. We have first investigated the influence of external torque from neutral heating beams on plasma rotation and Er. The ergodic zone causes an electron loss, and subsequently a vector j x vector B force driven by the compensating ion return current. In addition, the DED changes the global confinement properties. Depending on the edge safety factor (''field line twist'') qa, either increased or decreased particle confinement is observed. In case of the increased particle confinement (IPC) the increase in density (40%) and particle confinement time τp (30%) is correlated to the connection of field lines at the q=5/2 surface to the DED target, locally changing the transport properties and the Er. Transport is reduced and the Er shear is increased locally at q=5/2 up to 1.5 . 105s-1, while the Er becomes more positive. (orig.)

  13. The influence of the dynamic ergodic divertor on the radial electric field at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenen, Jan Willem

    2009-11-06

    In this work the influence of external Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on the radial electric field Er in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) at the Tokamak TEXTOR. Here, the RMPs are produced with the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor (DED), a set of 16 helical perturbation coils located at the high field side of TEXTOR. Within this work, the base mode number of perturbations has been m/n=6/2. We have first investigated the influence of external torque from neutral heating beams on plasma rotation and E{sub r}. The ergodic zone causes an electron loss, and subsequently a (vector)j x (vector)B force driven by the compensating ion return current. In addition, the DED changes the global confinement properties. Depending on the edge safety factor (''field line twist'') q{sub a}, either increased or decreased particle confinement is observed. In case of the increased particle confinement (IPC) the increase in density (40%) and particle confinement time {tau}{sub p} (30%) is correlated to the connection of field lines at the q=5/2 surface to the DED target, locally changing the transport properties and the E{sub r}. Transport is reduced and the E{sub r} shear is increased locally at q=5/2 up to 1.5 . 10{sup 5}s{sup -1}, while the E{sub r} becomes more positive. (orig.)

  14. Fluctuation reduction and enhanced confinement in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmas with a factor of ≥3 improvement in energy confinement have been achieved in the MST reversed-field pinch (RFP). These plasmas occur spontaneously, following sawtooth crashes, subject to constraints on, eg, toroidal magnetic field reversal and wall conditioning. Possible contributors to the improved confinement include a reduction of core-resonant, global magnetic fluctuations and a reduction of electrostatic fluctuations over the entire plasma edge. One feature of these plasmas is a region of strong ExB flow shear in the edge. Never before observed in conjunction with enhanced confinement in the RFP, such shear is common in enhanced confinement discharges in tokamaks and stellarators. Another feature of these plasmas is a new type of discrete dynamo event. Like sawtooth crashes, a common form of discrete dynamo, these events correspond to bursts of edge parallel current. The reduction of electrostatic fluctuations in these plasmas occurs within and beyond the region of strong ExB flow shear, similar to what is observed in tokamaks and stellarators. However, the reductions in the MST include fluctuations whose correlation lengths are larger than the width of the shear region. The reduction of the global magnetic fluctuations is most likely due to flattening of the μ=μ0 rvec J· rvec B/B2 profile. Flattening can occur, eg, due to the new type of discrete dynamo event and reduced edge resistivity. Enhanced confinement plasmas are also achieved in the MST when auxiliary current is applied to flatten the μ profile and reduce magnetic fluctuations. Unexpectedly, these plasmas also exhibit a region (broader than in the case above) of strong ExB flow shear in the edge, an edge-wide reduction of electrostatic fluctuations, and the new type of discrete dynamo event. Auxiliary current drive has historically been viewed as the principal route to fusion reactor viability for the RFP

  15. Inertial confinement fusion with direct electric generation by magnetic flux comparession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    A high-power-density laser-fusion-reactor concept in investigated in which directed kinetic enery imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium--in which the fusion target is centrally located--is maximized. In turn, this kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with, potentially, very high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the concept maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall can be many orders of magnitude less than is typical of D-T fusion reactor concepts.

  16. Current distributions in superconducting wires subject to a random orientation magnetic field, and corresponding to the Tokamak usual conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main themes of this thesis are: review of superconductivity principles; critical current in a random orientation magnetic field; the MHD model applied to superconductors (with comprehensive calculation of the field in a plate type conductor); the magnetization created by a variation of a random orientation magnetic field; the electric field in a superconductor in steady or quasi-steady state (MHD displacement, pinning and thermal effects). 145 figs., 166 refs

  17. Recent results from DIII-D and their implications for next generation tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxon, J.L.; Bramson, G.; Burrell, K.H.; Brooks, N.H.; Callis, R.W.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Chu, M.S.; Colleraine, A.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Freeman, R.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hong, R.; Howl, W.; Hsieh, C.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Jensen, T.; Kellman, A.G.; Kim, J.; Lao, L.L.; La Haye, R.; Leikind, B.; Lippmann, S.I.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T.C.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Mayberry, M.; Moeller, C.P.; Osborne, T.H.; Overskei, D.O

    1990-07-01

    Recent results from the DIII-D tokamak have provided significant contributions to the understanding of many of the elements of tokamak physics and the application of this understanding to the design of next generation devices including ITER and CIT. The limitations of magnetohydrodynamics stability on the values of plasma beta (the ratio of kinetic pressure to the containing pressure of the magnetic field) that can be attained has been experimentally demonstrated and found to be described by existing theory. Values of beta (10.7%) well in excess of those required for proposed devices (ITER and CIT) have been demonstrated. Regimes of confinement (H-mode) have been established that scale favorably to proposed next generation devices, and experiments demonstrating the dependence of the energy confinement on plasma size have been completed. Understanding of confinement is rapidly developing especially in the areas of bulk transport and the role of turbulence in the plasma edge. Key experimental results in areas of plasma transport and edge plasma phenomena are found to be in agreement with theories based on short wavelength turbulence. Control of the divertor heat loads and impurity influx has been demonstrated, and new progress has been made in the understanding of plasma edge phenomena. Experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating have not found regimes in which these waves can produce effective central ion heating. Electron cyclotron current drive experiments have demonstrated 70 kA of driven current in 400 kA discharges.

  18. Magnetic quadrupoles lens for hot spot proton imaging in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Chen, J.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Tan, F.; Hong, W.; Zhang, B. H.; Wang, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of DD-produced protons from an implosion hot spot region by miniature permanent magnetic quadrupole (PMQ) lens is proposed. Corresponding object-image relation is deduced and an adjust method for this imaging system is discussed. Ideal point-to-point imaging demands a monoenergetic proton source; nevertheless, we proved that the blur of image induced by proton energy spread is a second order effect therefore controllable. A proton imaging system based on miniature PMQ lens is designed for 2.8 MeV DD-protons and the adjust method in case of proton energy shift is proposed. The spatial resolution of this system is better than 10 μm when proton yield is above 109 and the spectra width is within 10%.

  19. ITER tokamak device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-07-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER, a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fueling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (1) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (2) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (3) first wall, (4) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (5) blanket/shield system, (6) maintenance equipment, (7) current drive and heating, (8) fuel cycle system, and (9) diagnostics.

  20. An engineering approach to the design and construction of a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma. SCR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly describes the design and construction of Stellarator of Costa Rica 1 (SCR-1) from an engineering perspective. SCR-1 is a small modular Stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma developed by the Plasma Physics Group of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica (ITCR). The SCR-1 is based on the small Spanish Stellarator UST 1 (Ultra Small Torus 1), created by engineer Vicente Queral. Some of the characteristics of the SCR-1 are the following: it will be a 2-field period modular stellarator with an aspect ratio ≈ 6; low shear configuration with core and edge rotational transform equal to 0.32 and 0.28; it will employ stainless steel torus-shaped vacuum vessel which will hold a plasma with an average radius a ≈ 42.2 mm, a volume of 8 liters (0.008 m3), and major radius R = 238 mm. This plasma will be confined by a magnetic field (B ≈ 90 mT) given by 12 modular coils with 12 turns each, carrying a current of 725 A per turn providing a total toroidal field (TF) current of 8.7 kA-turn per coil. The coils will be supplied by a bank of cell batteries of 120 V. Typical length of the plasma pulse will be between 4 s to 10 s. The plasma heating will be achieved by electron cyclotron radio-frequency (ECH) from two magnetrons providing a total power of 5 kW, at a frequency of 2.45 GHz corresponding to the first harmonic (B0 = 87.8 mT). The expected electron temperature and density are 15 eV and 7x1016 m-3 respectively. The initial diagnostics on the SCR-1 will consist of a Langmuir probe with a displacement system, a heterodyne microwave interferometer (frequency of 28 GHz, corresponding to a wavelength of λ = 10.71 mm). The first plasma of the SCR-1 is expected at the beginning of 2012. (author)

  1. MHD stability limits in the TCV Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimerdes, H. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can limit the performance and degrade the confinement of tokamak plasmas. The Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV), unique for its capability to produce a variety of poloidal plasma shapes, has been used to analyse various instabilities and compare their behaviour with theoretical predictions. These instabilities are perturbations of the magnetic field, which usually extend to the plasma edge where they can be detected with magnetic pick-up coils as magnetic fluctuations. A spatially dense set of magnetic probes, installed inside the TCV vacuum vessel, allows for a fast observation of these fluctuations. The structure and temporal evolution of coherent modes is extracted using several numerical methods. In addition to the setup of the magnetic diagnostic and the implementation of analysis methods, the subject matter of this thesis focuses on four instabilities, which impose local and global stability limits. All of these instabilities are relevant for the operation of a fusion reactor and a profound understanding of their behaviour is required in order to optimise the performance of such a reactor. Sawteeth, which are central relaxation oscillations common to most standard tokamak scenarios, have a significant effect on central plasma parameters. In TCV, systematic scans of the plasma shape have revealed a strong dependence of their behaviour on elongation {kappa} and triangularity {delta}, with high {kappa}, and low {delta} leading to shorter sawteeth with smaller crashes. This shape dependence is increased by applying central electron cyclotron heating. The response to additional heating power is determined by the role of ideal or resistive MHD in triggering the sawtooth crash. For plasma shapes where additional heating and consequently, a faster increase of the central pressure shortens the sawteeth, the low experimental limit of the pressure gradient within the q = 1 surface is consistent with ideal MHD predictions. The

  2. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems

  3. The Positions and Number of Flux Loops and Magnetic Probes for the HT-7U Superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈飙; 罗家融; 万宝年; 王华中

    2003-01-01

    The plasma shape and other paremeters such as βp, li is important for the tokamakdeveice where the plasma has a non-circular cross-section of sufficient elongation. The measueredsignals of magnetic probes and flux loops are used to reconstruct the plasma shape and thecurrent profile in device operation and plasma shape feed back control system. So the numberand positions of magnetic probes and flux loops provides the basis of the plasma reconstruction.This paper instroduce how to use EFIT code (equilibrium fitting code) to determine the numberand positions of the magnetic probes and flux loops. The simulation result is given also.

  4. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2009-03-31

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  5. Adiabatic Quasi-Spherical Compressions Driven by Magnetic Pressure for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NASH,THOMAS J.

    2000-11-01

    The magnetic implosion of a high-Z quasi-spherical shell filled with DT fuel by the 20-MA Z accelerator can heat the fuel to near-ignition temperature. The attainable implosion velocity on Z, 13-cm/{micro}s, is fast enough that thermal losses from the fuel to the shell are small. The high-Z shell traps radiation losses from the fuel, and the fuel reaches a high enough density to reabsorb the trapped radiation. The implosion is then nearly adiabatic. In this case the temperature of the fuel increases as the square of the convergence. The initial temperature of the fuel is set by the heating of an ion acoustic wave to be about 200-eV after a convergence of 4. To reach the ignition temperature of 5-keV an additional convergence of 5 is required. The implosion dynamics of the quasi-spherical implosion is modeled with the 2-D radiation hydrodynamic code LASNEX. LASNEX shows an 8-mm diameter quasi-spherical tungsten shell on Z driving 6-atmospheres of DT fuel nearly to ignition at 3.5-keV with a convergence of 20. The convergence is limited by mass flow along the surface of the quasi-spherical shell. With a convergence of 20 the final spot size is 400-{micro}m in diameter.

  6. Rotation profile flattening and toroidal flow shear reversal due to the coupling of magnetic islands in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, B.; Chen, M.; Classen, I. G. J.; Domier, C. W.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Luhmann, N. C.; Muscatello, C. M.; Okabayashi, M.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.

    2016-05-01

    The electromagnetic coupling of helical modes, even those having different toroidal mode numbers, modifies the distribution of toroidal angular momentum in tokamak discharges. This can have deleterious effects on other transport channels as well as on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and disruptivity. At low levels of externally injected momentum, the coupling of core-localized modes initiates a chain of events, whereby flattening of the core rotation profile inside successive rational surfaces leads to the onset of a large m/n = 2/1 tearing mode and locked-mode disruption. With increased torque from neutral beam injection, neoclassical tearing modes in the core may phase-lock to each other without locking to external fields or structures that are stationary in the laboratory frame. The dynamic processes observed in these cases are in general agreement with theory, and detailed diagnosis allows for momentum transport analysis to be performed, revealing a significant torque density that peaks near the 2/1 rational surface. However, as the coupled rational surfaces are brought closer together by reducing q95, additional momentum transport in excess of that required to attain a phase-locked state is sometimes observed. Rather than maintaining zero differential rotation (as is predicted to be dynamically stable by single-fluid, resistive MHD theory), these discharges develop hollow toroidal plasma fluid rotation profiles with reversed plasma flow shear in the region between the m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 islands. The additional forces expressed in this state are not readily accounted for, and therefore, analysis of these data highlights the impact of mode coupling on torque balance and the challenges associated with predicting the rotation dynamics of a fusion reactor—a key issue for ITER.

  7. An emerging understanding of H-mode discharges in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groebner, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    A remarkable degree of consistency of experimental results from tokamaks throughout the world has developed with regard to the phenomenology of the transition from L-mode to H-mode confinement in tokamaks. The transition is initiated in a narrow layer at the plasma periphery where density fluctuations are suppressed and steep gradients of temperature and density form in a region with large first and second radial derivatives in the [upsilon][sub E][sup [yields

  8. EBT: an alternate concept to tokamaks and mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowienka, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    The ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is a hybrid magnetic trap formed by a series of toroidally connected simple mirrors. It differs from a tokamak, the present main-line approach, in that plasma stability and heating are obtained in a current-free geometry by the application of steady-state, high power, electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) producing a steady-state plasma. The primary motivation for EBT confinement research is the potential for a steady-state, highly accessible reactor with high ..beta... In the present EBT-I/S device, electron confinement has been observed to agree with the predictions of theory. The major emphasis of the experimental program is on the further scaling of plasma parameters in the EBT-I/S machine with ECH frequency (10.6, 18, and 28 GHz), resonant magnetic field (0.3, 0.6, and 1 T), and heating power (30, 60, and 200 kW). In addition, substantial efforts are under way or planned in the areas of ion cyclotron heating, neutral beam heating, plasma-wall interactions, impurity control, synchrotron radiation, and divertors. Recently, EBT has been selected as the first alternative concept to be advanced to the proof-of-principle stage; this entails a major device scale-up to allow a reasonable extrapolation to a DT-burning facility. The status and future plans of the EBT program, in particular the proof-of-principle experiment (EBT-P), are discussed.

  9. Behavior of magnetic field fluctuations during dynamo activity and its effect on energy confinement in a reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K.; Hirano, Y.; Shimada, T.; Yagi, Y.; Maejima, Y.; Hirota, I.; Ogawa, K.

    1991-11-01

    Fluctuations of magnetic fields and related magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena are investigated in the TPE-1RM15 reversed-field pinch experiment [Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research, 1986 (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 2, p. 453]. Mode analysis of fluctuations measured by multichannel coils reveals that nonlinear interactions between m=1 and m=0 modes, such as nonlinear coupling and phase locking, play significant roles during a dynamo event (i.e., the flux genertion process in the sustainment phase), resulting in transition from an unstable state to a stable state. Behaviors of these fluctuations are found to be toroidally asymmetrical due to strong nonlinearity. Study of the current ramping experiment shows that the inverse of global energy confinement time depends on the squared fluctuation level offset linearly, which is consistent with the prediction of the transport model based on the diffusion of stochastic field lines. By examining the dependence of the resistive part of the loop voltage on the fluctuation level, the input power to the electrons and ions are estimated to be about 70% and 30% of the total input power, respectively.

  10. Behavior of magnetic field fluctuations during dynamo activity and its effect on energy confinement in a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluctuations of magnetic fields and related magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena are investigated in the TPE-1RM15 reversed-field pinch experiment [Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research, 1986 (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 2, p. 453]. Mode analysis of fluctuations measured by multichannel coils reveals that nonlinear interactions between m=1 and m=0 modes, such as nonlinear coupling and phase locking, play significant roles during a dynamo event (i.e., the flux genertion process in the sustainment phase), resulting in transition from an unstable state to a stable state. Behaviors of these fluctuations are found to be toroidally asymmetrical due to strong nonlinearity. Study of the current ramping experiment shows that the inverse of global energy confinement time depends on the squared fluctuation level offset linearly, which is consistent with the prediction of the transport model based on the diffusion of stochastic field lines. By examining the dependence of the resistive part of the loop voltage on the fluctuation level, the input power to the electrons and ions are estimated to be about 70% and 30% of the total input power, respectively

  11. Ion cyclotron emission in tokamak plasmas; Emission cyclotronique ionique dans les plasmas de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraboulet, D.

    1996-09-17

    Detection of {alpha}(3.5 MeV) fusion products will be of major importance for the achievement of self sustained discharges in fusion thermonuclear reactors. Due to their cyclotronic gyration in the confining magnetic field of a tokamak, {alpha} particles are suspected to radiate in the radio-frequency band [RF: 10-500 MHz]. Our aim is to determine whether detection of RF emission radiated from a reactor plasma can provide information concerning those fusion products. We observed experimentally that the RF emission radiated from fast ions situated in the core of the discharge is detectable with a probe located at the plasma edge. For that purpose, fast temporal acquisition of spectral power was achieved in a narrow frequency band. We also propose two complementary models for this emission. In the first one, we describe locally the energy transfer between the photon population and the plasma and we compute the radiation equilibrium taking place in the tokamak. {alpha} particles are not the unique species involved in the equilibrium and it is necessary to take into account all other species present in the plasma (Deuterium, Tritium, electrons,...). Our second model consists in the numerical resolution of the Maxwell-Vlasov with the use of a variational formulation, in which all polarizations are considered and the 4 first cyclotronic harmonics are included in a 1-D slab geometry. The development of this second model leads to the proposal for an experimental set up aiming to the feasibility demonstration of a routine diagnostic providing the central {alpha} density in a reactor. (author). 166 refs.

  12. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  13. Blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Naulin, Volker; Fundamenski, W.;

    2009-01-01

    The first experimental evidence showing the connection between blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation was obtained in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak. Holes as well as blobs are observed to be born in the edge shear layer, where zonal-flows shear off meso-scale coherent structures...... to the zonal flows via the turbulent Reynolds stress, resulting in nonlinear saturation of edge turbulence and suppression of meso-scale fluctuations. These findings carry significant implications for the mechanism of structure formation in magnetically confined plasma turbulence....

  14. Measurement of electron cyclotron emission on the T.F.R. Tokamak. Application to the study of disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the electron cyclotron radiation from the hot plasma confined by the magnetic field of the T.F.R. tokamak are presented. This emission, in the millimetre wavelength range, has been investigated with a set of two Fabry-Perot interferometers. In part of the spectrum, the plasma radiates as a blackbody. This characteristic has been exploited to measure routinely the electron temperature. New results have been obtained, in particular concerning the study of disruptions. The possibility of measuring the plasma density from the electron cyclotron emission in the part of the spectrum where the plasma is not opaque has been investigated

  15. Pellet refuelling of particle loss due to ELM mitigation with RMPs in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak at low collisionality

    CERN Document Server

    Valovič, M; Kirk, A; Suttrop, W; Cavedon, M; Fischer, L R; Garzotti, L; Guimarais, L; Kocsis, G; Cseh, G; Plőckl, B; Szepesi, T; Thornton, A; Mlynek, A; Tardini, G; Viezzer, E; Scannell, R; Wolfrum, E

    2015-01-01

    The complete refuelling of the plasma density loss (pump-out) caused by mitigation of Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) is demonstrated on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma is refuelled by injection of frozen deuterium pellets and ELMs are mitigated by external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). In this experiment relevant dimensionless parameters, such as relative pellet size, relative RMP amplitude and pedestal collisionality are kept at the ITER like values. Refuelling of density pump out requires a factor of two increase of nominal fuelling rate. Energy confinement and pedestal temperatures are not restored to pre-RMP values by pellet refuelling.

  16. Configuration studies for a small-aspect-ratio tokamak stellarator hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of modulated toroidal coils offers a new path to the tokamak-stellarator hybrids. Low-aspect-ratio configurations can be found with robust vacuum flux surfaces and rotational transform close to the transform of a reverse-shear tokamak. These configurations have clear advantages in minimizing disruptions and their effect and in reducing tokamak current drive needs. They also allow the study of low-aspect-ratio effects on stellarator confinement in small devices

  17. Experimental investigations of driven Alfven wave resonances in a tokamak plasma using carbon dioxide laser interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first direct observation of the internal structure of driven global Alfven eigenmodes in a tokamak plasma is presented. A carbon dioxide laser scattering/interferometer has been designed, built, and installed on the PRETEXT tokamak. By using this diagnostic system in the interferometer configuration, we have for the first time, thoroughly investigated the resonance conditions required for, and the spatial wave field structure of, driven plasma eigenmodes at frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency in a confined, high temperature, tokamak plasma

  18. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUMPHREYS,D.A; FERRON,J.R; JOHNSON,R.D; LEUER,J.A; PENAFLOR,B.G; WALKER,M.L; WELANDER,A.S; KHAYRUTDINOV,R.R; DOKOUKA,V; EDGELL,D.H; FRANSSON,C.M

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance.

  19. Effect of Magnetic Confinement Barrier Discharge on Surface Properties of PP%磁约束阻挡放电对PP表面性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    为提高聚合物材料的表面润湿性,采用磁约束大气压阻挡放电对聚丙烯薄膜进行处理.通过接触角测量仪、原子力显微镜和X射线光电子能谱仪分析和表征了聚丙烯薄膜在不同处理条件下的表面性能.结果表明:与无磁约束阻挡放电相比,磁约束阻挡放电能更好地降低聚丙烯薄膜表面的水接触角,材料表面粗糙度更大,在试样表面引入的含氧活性极性官能团更多,使材料表面润湿性提高.因此,磁约束能增强气体放电的效果.%In order to improve the surface wettability of polymer materials, polypropylene (PP) films were treated by magnetic confinement atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge. The surface properties of the PP films at different treatment conditions were analyzed and characterized by contact angle tester, atomic force microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that compared with the barrier discharge without magnetic confinement, the magnetic confinement barrier discharge treatment can decrease the water contact angle of the PP films better and increase the surface roughness, and more active polar groups including oxygen are introduced on the PP film surface, which make the surface wettability increase. Thus, the magnetic confinement can enhance the effect of gas discharge.

  20. Researches on the Neutral Gas Pressure in the Divertor Chamber of the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMingxu; LIBo; YANGZhigang; YANLongwen; HONGWenyu; YUANBaoshan; LIULi; CAOZeng; CUIChenghe; LIUYong; WANGEnyao; ZHANGNianman

    2003-01-01

    The neutral gas pressure in divertor chamber is a very basic and important physics parameter because it determines the temperature of charged particles, the thermal flux density onto divertor plates, the erosion of divertor plates, impurity retaining and exhausting, particle transportation and confinement performance of plasma in tokamaks. Therefore, the pressure measurement in divertor chamber is taken into account in many large tokamaks.