WorldWideScience

Sample records for magnetic susceptibility artifacts

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts due to metallic foreign bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H; Narak, Jill; Thomas, William B

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility artifacts due to metallic foreign bodies may interfere with interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies. Additionally, migration of metallic objects may pose a risk to patients undergoing MR imaging. Our purpose was to investigate prevalence, underlying cause, and diagnostic implications of susceptibility artifacts in small animal MR imaging and report associated adverse effects. MR imaging studies performed in dogs and cats between April 2008 and March 2010 were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of susceptibility artifacts associated with metallic foreign bodies. Studies were performed using a 1.0 T scanner. Severity of artifacts was graded as 0 (no interference with area of interest), 1 (extension of artifact to area of interest without impairment of diagnostic quality), 2 (impairment of diagnostic quality but diagnosis still possible), or 3 (severe involvement of area of interest resulting in nondiagnostic study). Medical records were evaluated retrospectively to identify adverse effects. Susceptibility artifacts were present in 99/754 (13.1%) of MR imaging studies and were most common in examinations of the brachial plexus, thorax, and cervical spine. Artifacts were caused by identification microchips, ballistic fragments, skin staples/suture material, hemoclips, an ameroid constrictor, and surgical hardware. Three studies were nondiagnostic due to the susceptibility artifact. Adverse effects were not documented.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility, artifact volume in MRI, and tensile properties of swaged Zr-Ag composites for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Haruki; Tanaka, Yoji; Nomura, Naoyuki; Doi, Hisashi; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Ono, Takashi; Hanawa, Takao

    2017-02-01

    Zr-Ag composites were fabricated to decrease the magnetic susceptibility by compensating for the magnetic susceptibility of their components. The Zr-Ag composites with a different Zr-Ag ratio were swaged, and their magnetic susceptibility, artifact volume, and mechanical properties were evaluated by magnetic balance, three-dimensional (3-D) artifact rendering, and a tensile test, respectively. These properties were correlated with the volume fraction of Ag using the linear rule of mixture. We successfully obtained the swaged Zr-Ag composites up to the reduction ratio of 96% for Zr-4, 16, 36, 64Ag and 86% for Zr-81Ag. However, the volume fraction of Ag after swaging tended to be lower than that before swaging, especially for Ag-rich Zr-Ag composites. The magnetic susceptibility of the composites linearly decreased with the increasing volume fraction of Ag. No artifact could be estimated with the Ag volume fraction in the range from 93.7% to 95.4% in three conditions. Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and 0.2% yield strength of Zr-Ag composites showed slightly lower values compared to the estimated values using a linear rule of mixture. The decrease in magnetic susceptibility of Zr and Ag by alloying or combining would contribute to the decrease of the Ag fraction, leading to the improvement of mechanical properties.

  3. Evaluation of the susceptibility artifacts and tissue injury caused by implanted microchips in dogs on 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Miyoko; Ono, Shin; Kayanuma, Hideki; Honnami, Muneki; Muto, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2010-05-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a metallic implant raises concern over the potential complications, including susceptibility artifacts, implant migration, and heat injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate these complications in dogs with implanted microchips by evaluating MR images and the histopathological changes after 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI. Five dogs underwent microchip implantation in the cervicothoracic area. One month later, the area was imaged using 1.5T MRI in three dogs. The microchips were removed surgically together with the surrounding tissue in all dogs. There was significant signal loss and image distortion over a wide range around the area where the microchip was implanted. This change was consistent with susceptibility artifacts, which rendered the affected area including the spinal cord undiagnostic. The artifact was more extensive in T2*-weighted images (gradient-echo) and less extensive in proton density-weighted images (fast spin-echo with short echo time). Histopathologically, all microchips were well-encapsulated with granulation tissue, and there were no evidence of migration of microchips. Cell debris and a moderate number of degenerated cells with fibrin were seen in the inner layer of the granulation tissue in each dog that underwent MRI. These changes were very subtle and did not seem to be clinically significant. The results of this study suggest that, in 1.5T MRI, susceptibility artifacts produced by implanted microchips can be marked, although the dogs with implants appeared to be scanned safely.

  4. A method for estimating and removing streaking artifacts in quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Nian; Yu, Fang; Han, Hui; Cao, Wei; Romero, Rebecca; Tantiwongkosi, Bundhit; Duong, Timothy Q; Liu, Chunlei

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI method for quantifying tissue magnetic property. In the brain, it reflects the molecular composition and microstructure of the local tissue. However, susceptibility maps reconstructed from single-orientation data still suffer from streaking artifacts which obscure structural details and small lesions. We propose and have developed a general method for estimating streaking artifacts and subtracting them from susceptibility maps. Specifically, this method uses a sparse linear equation and least-squares (LSQR)-algorithm-based method to derive an initial estimation of magnetic susceptibility, a fast quantitative susceptibility mapping method to estimate the susceptibility boundaries, and an iterative approach to estimate the susceptibility artifact from ill-conditioned k-space regions only. With a fixed set of parameters for the initial susceptibility estimation and subsequent streaking artifact estimation and removal, the method provides an unbiased estimate of tissue susceptibility with negligible streaking artifacts, as compared to multi-orientation QSM reconstruction. This method allows for improved delineation of white matter lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis and small structures of the human brain with excellent anatomical details. The proposed methodology can be extended to other existing QSM algorithms.

  5. MRI Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Al Nasser Assi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available   "nMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become more and more frequently used in medical imaging diagnostic in recent years. Radiologists and technicians working at these systems are relatively often confronted with image artifacts related to the radiowave with strong magnetic in the scanner. Many artifacts may be corrected or modulated through an understanding of their cause. This requires familiarity with scanner design; theory of operation; and image acquisition. The purpose of this review article is to present the most relevant artifacts that arise in MRI scanner, to provide some physical background on the formation of artifacts, and to suggest strategies to reduce or avoid these artifacts. The most frequent artifacts that can occur during MRI scanning are Motion related artifacts; Para-magnetic artifacts; Phase Wrap artifacts; Frequency artifacts; Susceptibility artifacts; Clipping artefact; Chemical Shift artifact and "Zebra" artefact .    "n  

  6. Streaking Artifact Reduction for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping of Sources with Large Dynamic Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongjiang; Dibb, Russell; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Yawen; Xu, Jianrong; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI technique for measuring tissue magnetic susceptibility in 3D. While there are numerous algorithms developed to solve this ill-posed inverse problem, estimating susceptibility maps with a wide range of values is still problematic. In cases such as large veins, contrast agent uptake, and intracranial hemorrhages, extreme susceptibility values in focal areas cause severe streaking artifacts. To enable the reduction of these artifacts while preserving subtle susceptibility contrast, a two-level QSM reconstruction algorithm (STAR-QSM) was developed in this study by tuning a regularization parameter to automatically reconstruct both large and small susceptibility values. Compared to current state-of-the-art QSM methods such as iLSQR, STAR-QSM significantly reduced streaking artifacts while preserving sharp boundaries for blood vessels of mouse brains in vivo and fine anatomical details of high resolution mouse brains ex vivo. Brain image data from patients with cerebral hematoma and multiple sclerosis further illustrated the superiority of this method in reducing streaking artifacts caused by large susceptibility sources while maintaining sharp anatomical details. STAR-QSM is implemented in STI Suite, a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. PMID:26313885

  7. PROPELLER (periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction) and EPI diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 3.0 T: pontine magnetic susceptibility artifacts depend on pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Chul Ho; Kim, In Soo [College of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    In the case of well pneumatized sphenoid sinus, magnetic susceptibility artifact can be visualized at the brainstem and especially at the pons on echo-planar imaging (EPI) diffusion-weighted imaging. Fast spin-echo periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) is a novel imaging method that can reduce these artifacts. In 3.0 T MR, we first evaluate the degree of the relationship of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus with the occurrence of magnetic susceptibility artifacts (MSA) on the echo planar imaging (EPI) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and we evaluated using PROPELLER-DWI for cancellation of MSAs of the pons in the patients who had MSAs on the EPI-DWI. Sixty subjects (mean age: 58 years old and there were 30 men) who were classified according to the two types of sphenoid sinus underwent EPI-DWI. The two types of sphenoid sinus were classified by the degree of pneumatization on the sagittal T2-weighted image. The type-1 sphenoid sinus was 0% to less than 50% aeration of the bony sellar floor, and type-2 was 50% or more aeration of the boney sellar floor. Each of 10 subjects (n = 20/60, mean age: 53) of the two types had PROPELLER and EPI-DWI performed simultaneously. We first evaluated the absence or presence of MSAs at the pons in the two types, and we compared EPI and PROPELLER-DWI in the subjects who underwent the two MR sequences simultaneously. We used 3.0 T MR (Signa VHi, GE, MW, U.S.A.) with a standard head coil. All the MR images were interpreted by one neuroradiologiest. For the type-1, two (6.7%) cases had MSAs and 28 (93.7%) cases did not have MSAs on the EPI-DWI. For the type-2, twenty-seven (90%) cases had MSAs and 3 (10%) cases did not have MSAs on the EPI-DWI. The degree of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus was related with the occurrence of MSAs of the pons, according to the chi-square test ({rho} = 0.000). All twenty cases who had PROPELLER-DWI performed had no MASs at the pons regardless of

  8. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Artifacts by dental materials on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a valuable method for evaluation of the head and neck. Unfortunately, metallic devices associated with certain dental fillings and appliances often cause variable artifacts that can obscure normal or pathologic conditions on MR and computed tomography. In this work, we assessed the MR appearance of dental prosthetic materials in vitro and in vivo including precious alloys, nonprecions alloys, resin, amalgam and titanium alloy. For in vivo studies, these materials were placed in healthy volunteer's mouths and then images were assessed. Analysis of the appearance of shape and extent of artifact, and observed influence of these artifacts on the image interpretation at 0.2 Tesla permanent type MR scanner were valuated. Material used as temporary or permanent filling of crowns such as amalgam, precious alloy and, microfilled resin did not cause artifact on the image. The size of the artifact produced by the nonprecious alloys was influenced by the ferromagnetism of the object and the volume prosthesis, and was related to the scanning sequence. Nonprecious alloys produced minimal local signal distortion, where precious alloys, and dental resin had no effect on the MR images in vivo. These results were mainly from a low field strength MR scanner used in this study.

  10. Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    NASA Headquarters sent a list of items to KSC that were deemed potential artifacts. These items played arole in the Shuttle Program's development and maintenance. Because these items are national assets, many are of interest to museums, schools, other government entities, etc. upon the Space Shuttle's retirement. The list contains over 500 items. All of these items need to be located, photographed, and catalogued with accompanying specific data that needs to be gathered. Initial research suggests that this is a time, labor, and cost intensive project. The purpose of my project was to focus on 20-60 of these 500 items, gather the necessary data, and compile them in a way that can be added to by other users when/if the project goes into full effect.

  11. Artifacts and pitfalls in shoulder magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Gustavo Felix; Macedo, Tulio Augusto Alves

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the diagnosis of shoulder lesions, in many cases becoming the method of choice. However, anatomical variations, artifacts and the particularity of the method may be a source of pitfalls, especially for less experienced radiologists. In order to avoid false-positive and false-negative results, the authors carried out a compilation of imaging findings that may simulate injury. It is the authors' intention to provide a useful, consistent and comprehensive reference for both beginner residents and skilled radiologists who work with musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging, allowing for them to develop more precise reports and helping them to avoid making mistakes.

  12. [Joint correction for motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenchuan; Fang, Sheng; Guo, Hua

    2014-06-01

    Aiming at motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we proposed a joint correction method in this paper to correct the two kinds of artifacts simultaneously without additional acquisition of navigation data and field map. We utilized the proposed method using multi-shot variable density spiral sequence to acquire MRI data and used auto-focusing technique for image deblurring. We also used direct method or iterative method to correct motion induced phase errors in the process of deblurring. In vivo MRI experiments demonstrated that the proposed method could effectively suppress motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts and achieve images with fine structures. In addition, the scan time was not increased in applying the proposed method.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility properties of polluted soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of magnetic properties using magnetic susceptibility (X) and frequency-dependent susceptibility (Xfd) was conducted on representative modern pollutants, which include smelted slag dust, automobile exhaust dust and coal ash. Their magnetic susceptibility values are more than 500×10-8 m3/kg, and frequency-dependent susceptibility values less than 3%, indicating that ample ferrimagnetic and scanty superparamagnetic grains occurred in the studied pollutants. Similar to the artificially synthetic polluted soils, the industrially-polluted soils display a negative relationship between magnetic susceptibility and frequency-dependent susceptibility. However, the unpolluted soils, e.g. the Quaternary loess in the Chinese Loess Plateau, show a positive relationship between them. In this note, we propose a convenient and effective approach for identifying the polluted soils.

  14. Materials with low DC magnetic susceptibility for sensitive magnetic measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Khatiwada, Rakshya; Kendrick, Rachel; Khosravi, Marjan; Peters, Michael; Smith, Erick; Snow, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Materials with very low DC magnetic susceptibility have many scientific applications. To our knowledge however, relatively little research has been conducted with the goal to produce a totally nonmagnetic material. This phrase in our case means after spatially averaging over macroscopic volumes, it possesses an average zero DC magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the DC magnetic susceptibility of three different types of nonmagnetic materials at room temperature: (I) solutions of paramagnetic salts and diamagnetic liquids, (II) liquid gallium-indium alloys and (III) pressed powder mixtures of tungsten and bismuth. The lowest measured magnetic susceptibility among these candidate materials is in the order of 10^-9 cgs volume susceptibility units, about two orders of magnitude smaller than distilled water. In all cases, the measured concentration dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is consistent with that expected for the weighted sum of the susceptibilities of the separate components within...

  15. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  16. Are Movement Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging a Real Problem?-A Narrative Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havsteen, Inger; Ohlhues, Anders; Madsen, Kristoffer H

    2017-01-01

    Movement artifacts compromise image quality and may interfere with interpretation, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications with low signal-to-noise ratio such as functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging, and when imaging small lesions. High image resolution has high sensitiv......Movement artifacts compromise image quality and may interfere with interpretation, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications with low signal-to-noise ratio such as functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging, and when imaging small lesions. High image resolution has high...... sensitivity to motion artifacts and often prolongs scan time that again aggravates movement artifacts. During the scan fast imaging techniques and sequences, optimal receiver coils, careful patient positioning, and instruction may minimize movement artifacts. Physiological noise sources are motion from...

  17. Magnetic susceptibility of tetragonal titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Pankey, T.; Grant, F.A.

    1960-01-01

    Careful measurements have been made of the magnetic susceptibility of the rutile and anatase crystalline forms of titanium dioxide. The magnetic susceptibility of a single crystal of high-purity rutile was found to be (0.067??0.0015)??10-6 emu per gram, and was temperature-independent from 55??to 372??K. Difficulty was encountered in obtaining a good value of the magnetic susceptibility of anatase because of impurities. However, a value of 0.02??10-6 emu per gram was obtained as a maximum value for anatase powder. A discussion is given for the different values obtained for anatase and rutile. ?? 1960 The American Physical Society.

  18. Integrated SSFP for functional brain mapping at 7 T with reduced susceptibility artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kaibao; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Peng; Zuo, Zhentao; Chen, Zhongwei; Wang, Bo; Martin, Thomas; Wang, Yi; Chen, Lin; He, Sheng; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) offers an alternative and potentially important tool to the standard gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) for functional MRI (fMRI). Both passband and transition band based bSSFP have been proposed for fMRI. The applications of these methods, however, are limited by banding artifacts due to the sensitivity of bSSFP signal to off-resonance effects. In this article, a unique case of the SSFP-FID sequence, termed integrated-SSFP or iSSFP, was proposed to overcome the obstacle by compressing the SSFP profile into the width of a single voxel. The magnitude of the iSSFP signal was kept constant irrespective of frequency shift. Visual stimulation studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of fMRI using iSSFP at 7 T with flip angles of 4° and 25°, compared to standard bSSFP and gradient echo (GRE) imaging. The signal changes for the complex iSSFP signal in activated voxels were 2.48 ± 0.53 (%) and 2.96 ± 0.87 (%) for flip angles (FA) of 4° and 25° respectively at the TR of 9.88 ms. Simultaneous multi-slice acquisition (SMS) with the CAIPIRIHNA technique was carried out with iSSFP scanning to detect the anterior temporal lobe activation using a semantic processing task fMRI, compared with standard 2D GE-EPI. This study demonstrates the feasibility of iSSFP for fMRI with reduced susceptibility artifacts, while maintaining robust functional contrast at 7 T.

  19. Reduction hybrid artifacts of EMG-EOG in electroencephalography evoked by prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Wan, Xiaohong; Zeng, Ke; Ni, Yinmei; Qiu, Lirong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-12-01

    Objective. When prefrontal-transcranial magnetic stimulation (p-TMS) performed, it may evoke hybrid artifact mixed with muscle activity and blink activity in EEG recordings. Reducing this kind of hybrid artifact challenges the traditional preprocessing methods. We aim to explore method for the p-TMS evoked hybrid artifact removal. Approach. We propose a novel method used as independent component analysis (ICA) post processing to reduce the p-TMS evoked hybrid artifact. Ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to decompose signal into multi-components, then the components were separated with artifact reduced by blind source separation (BSS) method. Three standard BSS methods, ICA, independent vector analysis, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) were tested. Main results. Synthetic results showed that EEMD-CCA outperformed others as ICA post processing step in hybrid artifacts reduction. Its superiority was clearer when signal to noise ratio (SNR) was lower. In application to real experiment, SNR can be significantly increased and the p-TMS evoked potential could be recovered from hybrid artifact contaminated signal. Our proposed method can effectively reduce the p-TMS evoked hybrid artifacts. Significance. Our proposed method may facilitate future prefrontal TMS-EEG researches.

  20. Artifacts in musculoskeletal MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh R; Chin, Michael S M; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-02-01

    MR imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of a vast number of pathologies and is of foremost importance in the evaluation of spine, joints, and soft tissue structures of the musculoskeletal system. MR imaging is susceptible to various artifacts that may affect the image quality or even simulate pathologies. Some of these artifacts have gained special importance with the use of higher field strength magnets and with the increasing need for MR imaging in postoperative patients, especially those with previous joint replacements or metallic implants. Artifacts may arise from patient motion or could be due to periodic motion, such as vascular and cardiac pulsation. Artifacts could also arise from various protocol errors including saturation, wraparound, truncation, shading, partial volume averaging, and radiofrequency interference artifacts. Susceptibility artifact occurs at interfaces with different magnetic susceptibilities and is of special importance with increasing use of metallic joint replacement prostheses. Magic angle phenomenon is a special type of artifact that occurs in musculoskeletal MR imaging. It is essential to recognize these artifacts and to correct them because they may produce pitfalls in image interpretation.

  1. Magnetic Susceptibility of Wet vs. Dry Sediment and Mass Normalized vs. Volume Normalized Magnetic Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Hruba, J.; Nabelek, L.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of magnetic susceptibility in sediments represents a fast and non-destructive technique that can be used to deduce the concentration of magnetic minerals [1, 2]. Magnetic minerals change their magnetic properties with temperature [3]. Heating (during a fire, laboratory, with the purpose of manufacturing a product, etc.) can modify a number of sediment properties [4, 5]. Heat-induced sediment mineralogical changes may cause irreversible changes in the sediment mineral structure and composition, and they occur at a wide range of temperature [6]. We provided measurements of magnetic susceptibility on samples from the Stara Jimka (SJ) paleo lacustrine site in the Bohemian Forest using magnetic susceptibility meter MS-30. Sediment samples of approximately 0.2 cm thickness were weighed and put into plastic containers. First, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were taken on wet samples. Then the containers were put into the oven and sediment was dried at temperature of 110°C. After drying and cooling to room temperature, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were repeated. Dry samples were also weighed. Comparison of magnetic susceptibility of dry versus wet samples showed higher values of magnetic susceptibility of dry samples. This enhancement was probably caused during oven-drying, when constituents of sediment (mainly clays) underwent heat-induced changes. We also compared volume normalized values of magnetic susceptibility with mass normalized values. Mass normalized magnetic susceptibility was burdened by greater noise. References: [1] QUIJANO, L. et al. 2001. Magnetic Susceptibilty in Topsoils and Bulk Cores of Cultivated Calcisols. [2] DEARING, J. A. 1994. Environmental Magnetic Susceptibility. [3] HANESCH, M. and SCHOLGER, R. 2005. The Influence of Soil Type on the Magnetic Susceptibility Measured throughout Soil Profiles. [4] FARWIG, V. J. et al. 2004. The Effects of Heating on Mineral Magnetic Enhancement of Soils. [5] KLETETSCHKA, G

  2. The magnetic susceptibility of European agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, K.; Reimann, C.

    2012-04-01

    The GEMAS (Geochemical mapping of agricultural soils) project, a cooperation project between EuroGeoSurveys and Eurometaux, aims at providing soil quality data for Europe. Samples of arable soil were taken during 2008 at an average density of 1 site/2500 km2 covering the member states of the European Union (except Malta and Romania) and several neighbouring countries (e.g., Norway, Serbia, Ukraine). While the primary aim of the GEMAS project is to produce REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of CHemicals - EC, 2006) consistent soil geochemistry data at the continental scale, the data set is also optimally apt to provide the first continental scale overview of magnetic properties in European soils. Soil samples from the upper 20 cm were taken as composites from 5 sites spread over a ca. 100 m2 area in a large agricultural field (Ap-sample). The samples were air dried and sieved to pass a 2 mm nylon screen. Weight normalized magnetic susceptibility of these dried samples was measured using a Sapphire Instruments SI2B susceptibility meter with dynamic background removal. The here presented maps of magnetic susceptibility in relation to geochemical composition and geological structures for the first time allow to outline the large scale influence of tectonics and climate on magnetic mineral concentration in European soils. The data set also provides the background variability for regional studies aiming to relate magnetic susceptibility of soils to local contamination sources.

  3. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  4. Magnetic susceptibilities of cluster-hierarchical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Susan R.; Berker, A. Nihat

    1984-02-01

    The exact magnetic susceptibilities of hierarchical models are calculated near and away from criticality, in both the ordered and disordered phases. The mechanism and phenomenology are discussed for models with susceptibilities that are physically sensible, e.g., nondivergent away from criticality. Such models are found based upon the Niemeijer-van Leeuwen cluster renormalization. A recursion-matrix method is presented for the renormalization-group evaluation of response functions. Diagonalization of this matrix at fixed points provides simple criteria for well-behaved densities and response functions.

  5. Magnetic Susceptibility in the Vertebral Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, F.; Nagele, T.; Lutz, O.; Pfeffer, K.; Giehl, J.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic resonance method is described which provides good-quality field-mapping images of the spine, although the in vivo signals from red bone marrow of the vertebral bodies exhibit similar fractions of lipid and water protons with their chemical-shift difference of 3.4 ppm. The susceptibilities of bone marrow and intervertebral disks were examined in 20 cadaveric human spines, 9 healthy volunteers, and 9 patients with degenerative disk alterations. The influence of geometrical properties was studied in cylindrical spine phantoms of different size and contents with different susceptibility. The measurements reveal interindividual differences of the susceptibility of the intervertebral disks in healthy subjects. Three out of nine degenerated disks with low signal in T2-weighted spin-echo images showed irregularities of the field distribution within the nucleus pulposus.

  6. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficko, Bradley W., E-mail: Bradley.W.Ficko@Dartmouth.edu; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-03-15

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R{sup 2}=0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R{sup 2}>0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. - Highlights: • Development of a nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging model • Demonstration of nonlinear SMI with primary and harmonic frequencies • Demonstration of nonlinear SMI with primary and intermodulation

  7. Magnetic susceptibility and hardness of Au-xPt-yNb alloys for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyama, Emi; Inui, Shihoko; Hamada, Kenichi; Honda, Eiichi; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2013-09-01

    Metal devices in the human body induce serious metal artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Metals artifacts are mainly caused by a volume magnetic susceptibility (χv) mismatch between a metal device and human tissue. In this research, Au-xPt-yNb alloys were developed for fabricating MRI artifact-free biomedical metal devices. The magnetic properties, hardness and phase constitutions of these alloys were investigated. The Au-xPt-8Nb alloys showed satisfactory χv values. Heat treatments did not clearly change the χv values for Au-xPt-8Nb alloys. The Vickers hardness (HV) of these two alloys was much higher than that of high-Pt alloys; moreover, aging at 700°C increased the HV values of these two alloys. A dual phase structure consisting of face-centered cubic α1 and α2 phases was observed and aging at 700°C promoted phase separation. The Au-5Pt-8Nb and Au-10Pt-8Nb alloys showed satisfactory χv values and high hardness and are thus suggested as candidates for MRI artifact-free alloys for biomedical applications.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging artifacts caused by brackets of various materials - An in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti Razdan; Rani, M S

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the artifacts caused by various brackets materials on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Six cases were included - one control case, one case each with teeth bonded in the maxillary arch with composite brackets, ceramic brackets, stainless steel brackets, ceramic brackets in the maxillary anterior region and stainless steel brackets in the premolar region, and one case with teeth bonded in the maxillary and mandibular arch wit...

  9. Voltage control of the magnetic coercive field: Multiferroic coupling or artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vopsaroiu, M.; Cain, M. G.; Woolliams, P. D.; Weaver, P. M.; Stewart, M.; Wright, C. D.; Tran, Y.

    2011-03-01

    The ability to dynamically tune the coercive field of magnetic thin films is a powerful tool for applications, including in magnetic recording disk technologies. Recently, a number of papers have reported the electrical voltage control of the coercive field of various magnetic thin films in multiferroic composites. Theoretically, this is possible in magneto-electric (ME) multiferroics due to the piezoferroelectric component that can be electrically activated to dynamically modify the properties of the magnetic component of the composite via a direct or strain mediated ME coupling. In this paper we fabricated and examined such structures and we determined that the magnetic coercive field reduction is most likely due to a heating effect. We concluded that this effect is probably an artifact that cannot be attributed to a multiferroic coupling.

  10. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2=0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2>0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI.

  11. TRUNCATION ARTIFACT IN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES OF THE CANINE SPINAL CORD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Tommaso; Lam, Richard; Priestnall, Simon L; Lamb, Christopher R

    2016-11-01

    The truncation artifact in magnetic resonance (MR) images is a line of abnormal signal intensity that occurs parallel to an interface between tissues of markedly different signal intensity. In order to demonstrate the truncation artifact in sagittal images of the canine spinal cord and the effect of changing spatial resolution, we conducted an experimental in vitro study. A section of fixed canine spinal cord was imaged using a 1.5T magnet. Spatial resolution was increased by increasing the acquisition matrix and reconstruction matrix, producing series of T2-weighted (T2w) images with the following pixel sizes: A, 1.6 (vertical) × 2.2 mm(2) (horizontal); B, 1.2 × 1.7 mm(2) ; C, 0.8 × 1.1 mm(2) ; D, 0.4 × 0. 6 mm(2) . Plots of mean pixel value across the cord showed variations in signal intensity compatible with truncation artifact, which appeared as a single, wide central hyperintense zone in low-resolution images and as multiple narrower zones in high spatial resolution images. Even in images obtained using the highest spatial resolution available for the MR system, the edge of the spinal cord was not accurately defined and the central canal was not visible. The experiment was repeated using an unfixed spinal cord specimen with focal compression applied to mimic a pathologic lesion. Slight hyperintensity was observed within the spinal cord at the site of compression although the cord was normal histologically. Results of this study suggest that caution should be applied when interpreting hyperintensity affecting the spinal cord in T2w sagittal images of clinical patients because of the possibility that the abnormal signal could represent a truncation artifact.

  12. Artifacts in field free line magnetic particle imaging in the presence of inhomogeneous and nonlinear magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medimagh Hanne

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI is an emerging medical imaging modality that detects super-paramagnetic particles exploiting their nonlinear magnetization response. Spatial encoding can be realized using a Field Free Line (FFL, which is generated, rotated and translated through the Field of View (FOV using a combination of magnetic gradient fields and homogeneous excitation fields. When scaling up systems and/or enlarging the FOV in comparison to the scanner bore, ensuring homogeneity and linearity of the magnetic fields becomes challenging. The present contribution describes the first comprehensive, systematic study on the influence of magnetic field imperfections in FFL MPI. Methods: In a simulation study, 14 different FFL scanner setups have been examined. Starting from an ideal scanner using perfect magnetic fields, defined imperfections have been introduced in a range of configurations (nonlinear gradient fields, inhomogeneous excitation fields, or inhomogeneous receive fields, or a combination thereof. In the first part of the study, the voltage induced in the receive channels parallel and perpendicular to the FFL translation have been studied for discrete FFL angles. In the second part, an imaging process has been simulated comparing different image reconstruction approaches. Results: The induced voltage signals demonstrate illustratively the effect of the magnetic field imperfections. In images reconstructed using a Radon-based approach, the magnetic field imperfections lead to pronounced artifacts, especially if a deconvolution using the point spread function is performed. In images reconstructed using a system function based approach, variations in local image quality become visible. Conclusion: For Radon-based image reconstruction in FFL MPI in the presence of inhomogeneous and nonlinear magnetic fields, artifact correction methods will have to be developed. In this regard, a first approach has recently been presented by

  13. Role of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of magnetic susceptibility weighted imaging in evaluation of brain lesions. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... SWI detects the signal loss created by disturbance of a homogeneous magnetic field; these ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of artificial lumbar disks: safety and metal artifacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chang-wei; LIU Liu; WANG Jian; DONG Ai-sheng; LU Jian-ping; HE Shi-sheng; LI Ming

    2009-01-01

    Background This study was to investigate the safety of two types of commercially available lumbar artificial discs (CHARITE and PRODISC -L) during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure in a 1.5-Tesla MR system, and to evaluate the size of metal artifacts on the MR image for different sequences.Methods A 1.5-Tesla clinical MR imaging system was used. The degree of deflection of the endplates of two artificial discs was evaluated by an angle-measurement instrument at the portals of the MRI scanner. The heating effect of the radio frequency (RF) magnetic field was evaluated by using "worst-case" imaging sequences on a human cadaver implanted with an artificial lumbar disc at the L5/S1 intervertebral disc location. The temperatures of the tissue adjacent to the implant, and of the L4/L5 intervertebral disc (used as a control) were measured, respectively, using a digital probe thermometer before and after the MRI scan sequence. A rectangular water phantom was designed to evaluate the metal artifacts of these two artificial discs under different MR imaging sequences.Results The maximal deflection angle of the endplate of the implants under a static MR field was 7.5 and 6.0 degrees, for the CHARITE and PRODISC -L, respectively. The difference between temperature rise of tissue adjacent to the two types of artificial discs and the temperature rise of the L4/L5 control location was 0.4 and 0.6℃, respectively. The size of metal artifacts on images of TSE (T1/T2-weighted), STIR and Turbo Dark Fluid sequences were relatively less than those of TSE fat saturation, Flash and SE (T1-weighted) sequences.Conclusions The CHARITE and the PRODISC -L artificial disc do not present an additional hazard or risk to a patient undergoing an MRI procedure using a scanner operating with a static magnetic field of 1.5T or lower. Image artifacts from the implants may present problems if the anatomical region of interest is in or near the area where these implants are located (e

  15. Artifacts reduction in strain maps of tagged magnetic resonance imaging using harmonic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daolei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is a noninvasive technique for examining myocardial function and deformation. Tagged MRI can also be used in quasistatic MR elastography to acquire strain maps of other biological soft tissues. Harmonic phase (HARP provides automatic and rapid analysis of tagged MR images for the quantification and visualization of myocardial strain. We propose a new artifact reduction method in strain maps. Image intensity of the DC component is estimated and subtracted from spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM tagged MR images. DC peak interference in harmonic phase extraction is greatly reduced after DC component subtraction. The proposed method is validated using both simulated and MR acquired tagged images. Strain maps are obtained with better accuracy and smoothness after DC component subtraction.

  16. Rock magnetic evidence of non-random raw material selection criteria in Cerro Toledo Obsidian Artifacts from Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregovich, A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Steffen, A.; Sternberg, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Stone tools are one of the most enduring forms of ancient human behavior available to anthropologists. The geologic materials that comprise stone tools are a reflection of the rocks that were available locally or through trade, as are the intended use of the tools and the knapping technology needed to produce them. Investigation of the rock magnetic and geochemical characteristics of the artifacts and the geological source materials provides a baseline to explore these past behaviors. This study uses rock magnetic properties to explore the raw material selection criteria involved in the production of obsidian tools in the region around Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Obsidian is locally abundant and was traded by tribes across the central United States. Here we compare the rock magnetic properties of a sample of obsidian projectile points (N =25) that have been geochemically sourced to the Cerro Toledo obsidian flow with geological samples collected from four sites within the same flow (N =135). This collection of archaeological artifacts, albeit small, contains representatives of at least 8 different point styles that were used over 6000 years from the Archaic into the Late Prehistoric. Bulk rock hysteresis parameters (Mr, Ms, Bc, and Bcr) and low-field susceptibility (Χ) measurements show that the projectile points generally contain a lower concentration of magnetic minerals than the geologic samples. For example, the artifacts' median Ms value is 2.9 x 10-3 Am2kg-1, while that of the geological samples is 6.5 x 10-3 Am2kg-1. The concentration of magnetic minerals in obsidian is a proxy for the concentration of microlites in general, and this relationship suggests that although obsidian was locally abundant, toolmakers employed non-random selection criteria resulting in generally lower concentrations of microlites in their obsidian tools.

  17. EXTREMELY LOW FREQUENCY MAGNETIC FIELD SUSCEPTIBILITY OF VISUAL DISPLAY UNITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field susceptibility is an index of visual display unit (VDU) quality and performance. This paper provided field measured data on the susceptibility for a large variety of VDUs. A test rig was built to study the susceptibility of VDUs to magnetic fields at fundamental and third harmonic frequencies. It was found that the susceptibility level is largely dependent on refresh rate of the VDU and the orientation of the external ELF field. It was also found that the VDU susceptibility is significantly increased in the presence of harmonic frequency magnetic fields. About 30% of the tested samples have susceptibility levels higher than that stated in IEC 1000-4-8 standard.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, magnetic moment and characterization of Carancas meteorite

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, Domingo

    2015-01-01

    On September, 15th, 2007, in the community of Carancas (Puno, Peru) a stony meteorite formed a crater explosive type with a mean diameter of 13.5 m. some samples meteorite fragments were collected. The petrologic analysis performed corresponds to a meteorite ordinary chondrite H 4-5. In this paper we have analyzed the magnetic properties of a meteorite fragment with a proton magnetometer. Also in order to have a complete characterization of the Carancas meteorite and its crater, from several papers, articles and reports, we have made a compilation of the most important characteristics and properties of this meteorite.

  19. Sinogram-based coil selection for streak artifact reduction in undersampled radial real-time magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, H Christian M; Frahm, Jens

    2016-10-01

    Streak artifacts are a common problem in radial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We therefore developed a method for automatically excluding receiver coil elements which lead to these artifacts. The proposed coil selection relates to real-time MRI data based on highly undersampled radial acquisitions. It exploits differences between high- and low-resolution sinograms reconstructed from datasets acquired during preparatory scans. Apart from phantom validations, the performance was assessed for real-time MRI studies of different human organ systems in vivo. The algorithm greatly reduces streak artifact strength without compromising image quality in other parts of the image. It is robust with respect to different experimental settings and fast to be included in the online reconstruction pipeline for real-time MRI. The proposed method enables a fast reduction of streak artifacts in radial real-time MRI.

  20. Evaluation of Field Map and Nonlinear Registration Methods for Correction of Susceptibility Artifacts in Diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sijia; Peterson, Daniel J.; Gatenby, J. C.; Li, Wenbin; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Madhyastha, Tara M.

    2017-01-01

    Correction of echo planar imaging (EPI)-induced distortions (called “unwarping”) improves anatomical fidelity for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional imaging investigations. Commonly used unwarping methods require the acquisition of supplementary images during the scanning session. Alternatively, distortions can be corrected by nonlinear registration to a non-EPI acquired structural image. In this study, we compared reliability using two methods of unwarping: (1) nonlinear registration to a structural image using symmetric normalization (SyN) implemented in Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs); and (2) unwarping using an acquired field map. We performed this comparison in two different test-retest data sets acquired at differing sites (N = 39 and N = 32). In both data sets, nonlinear registration provided higher test-retest reliability of the output fractional anisotropy (FA) maps than field map-based unwarping, even when accounting for the effect of interpolation on the smoothness of the images. In general, field map-based unwarping was preferable if and only if the field maps were acquired optimally.

  1. Magnetic susceptibility of the Xifeng section and its paleoclimate significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yubing; CHEN Tianhu; XIE Qiaoqin

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) is one of the most important indicators of the East-Asia summer monsoon. Presented in this study is a high resolution magnetic susceptibility record from the Xifeng section, which consists of Quaternary loess-paleosol sequence and Pliocene red clay. Variations in magnetic susceptibility are well correlated with the δ18O record in deep-sea sediments and the eolian flux of Greenland. The climatic evolution in the Xifeng section shows that since the Late Tertiary, the driving force of the East-Asia paleo-monsoon is correlated with solar radiation on a 10-ka time scale.

  2. Toward Modelling Topsoil Magnetic Susceptibility for Demining Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, J. A.; Dearing, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Landmine Monitor estimates that landmines cause up to 20,000 fatalities and casualties worldwide every year, in over 100 countries affected by landmine contamination. Although detection technologies have become more sophisticated, the metal detector still remains the most widely employed detection system in landmine affected regions. With increased use of minimum metal mines, the performance and sensitivity of metal detectors are increasingly challenged. In addition to mine constituents, depth of burial and orientation, soil properties significantly affect metal detection capabilities. Soils with high magnetic susceptibility, in particular those dominated by viscous components, interfere with the response signal in both frequency and time domain metal detection systems. Using Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) as a pilot region, we created an expert system to predict topsoil susceptibility from environmental information within a SOTER data base. Initially, the knowledge base is constructed from published relationships of environmental parameters and magnetic susceptibility and knowledge of experts in the field of soil magnetism. The knowledge base is underpinned by environmental conditions that are known to enhance or reduce magnetic susceptibility in topsoils. Where semi-quantitative data exists, transfer-functions are used to provide first approximations of susceptibility classes and offer a basis for a probability score for the susceptibility class. As a first approximation, susceptibility values are categorized into five continuous classes delimited by published magnetic susceptibility ranges in topsoils. The predicted susceptibility maps result in regional contrasts, delineated by the spatial scale of the environmental information. Further development of the model using a Baysean rule-based system with fuzzy boundaries is anticipated. Validation of the model is proposed using archived soil survey samples from BiH. In addition to providing essential data for

  3. Breast Imaging Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Teresa G

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts appear on breast images for a number of reasons. Radiologic technologists play an important role in identifying artifacts that can help or hinder breast cancer diagnosis and in minimizing artifacts that degrade image quality. This article describes various artifacts that occur in breast imaging, along with their causes. The article focuses on artifacts in mammography, with a heavy emphasis on digital mammography, and on magnetic resonance imaging of the breast. Artifacts in ultrasonography of the breast, digital breast tomosynthesis, and positron emission mammography also are discussed.

  4. A comparative study of metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Hemmaty, Yasmin Babael; Roushan, Zahra Atrkar; Khademi, Jalil [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study was performed to compare the metal artifacts from common metal orthodontic brackets in magnetic resonance imaging. A dry mandible with 12 intact premolars was prepared, and was scanned ten times with various types of brackets: American, 3M, Dentaurum, and Masel orthodontic brackets were used, together with either stainless steel (SS) or nickel titanium (NiTi) wires. Subsequently, three different sequences of coronal and axial images were obtained: spin-echo T1-weighted images, fast spin-echo T2-weighted images, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. In each sequence, the two sequential axial and coronal images with the largest signal-void area were selected. The largest diameters of the signal voids in the direction of the X-, Y-, and Z-axes were then measured twice. Finally, the mean linear values associated with different orthodontic brackets were analyzed using one-way analysis of variation, and the results were compared using the independent t-test to assess whether the use of SS or NiTi wires had a significant effect on the images. Statistically significant differences were only observed along the Z-axis among the four different brands of orthodontic brackets with SS wires. A statistically significant difference was observed along all axes among the brackets with NiTi wires. A statistically significant difference was found only along the Z-axis between nickel-free and nickel-containing brackets. With respect to all axes, the 3M bracket was associated with smaller signal-void areas. Overall, the 3M and Dentaurum brackets with NiTi wires induced smaller artifacts along all axes than those with SS wires.

  5. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography caused by dental materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klinke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artifacts caused by dental restorations, such as dental crowns, dental fillings and orthodontic appliances, are a common problem in MRI and CT scans of the head and neck. The aim of this in-vitro study was to identify and evaluate the artifacts produced by different dental restoration materials in CT and MRI images. METHODS: Test samples of 44 materials (Metal and Non-Metal commonly used in dental restorations were fabricated and embedded with reference specimens in gelatin moulds. MRI imaging of 1.5T and CT scan were performed on the samples and evaluated in two dimensions. Artifact size and distortions were measured using a digital image analysis software. RESULTS: In MRI, 13 out of 44 materials produced artifacts, while in CT 41 out of 44 materials showed artifacts. Artifacts produced in both MRI and CT images were categorized according to the size of the artifact. SIGNIFICANCE: Metal based restoration materials had strong influence on CT and less artifacts in MRI images. Rare earth elements such as Ytterbium trifluoride found in composites caused artifacts in both MRI and CT. Recognizing these findings would help dental materials manufacturers and developers to produce materials which can cause less artifacts in MRI and CT images.

  6. Magnetic Susceptibilities as they appeared to me - An Amperian approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bosch, A.

    2008-08-15

    Starting from scratch, the book narrates a systematic story of the basic ideas you need for understanding quasi static magnetic susceptibilities. The story leans on the authors 25 year experience measuring susceptibilities following the Faraday technique (related with solid state physics, radiation effects, materials and magneto chemistry). The base of magnetism, the current-current interaction, is the linkage between the topics treated. The number of mathematical equations are reduced to a minimum and can be skipped without losing the thread of the story. The story is positive towards the sound bases of magnetism. However, room is left for the interpretation of measuring data. As the word susceptibility covers different meanings, the story answers for different situations the question: what is susceptible to what for creating what?

  7. Incidental ferumoxytol artifacts in clinical brain MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, Bruce A.; Campeau, Norbert G.; Carr, Carrie M.; Diehn, Felix E.; McDonald, Jennifer S.; Miller, Gary M.; Kaufmann, Timothy J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Ferumoxytol (Feraheme) is a parenteral therapy approved for treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The product insert for ferumoxytol states that it may affect the diagnostic ability of MRI for up to 3 months. However, the expected effects may not be commonly recognized among clinical neuroradiologists. Our purpose is to describe the artifacts we have seen at our institution during routine clinical practice. We reviewed the patients at our institution that had brain MRI performed within 90 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. The imaging was reviewed for specific findings, including diffusion-weighted imaging vascular susceptibility artifact, gradient-echo echo-planar T2*-weighted vascular susceptibility artifact, SWI/SWAN vascular susceptibility artifact, hypointense vascular signal on T2-weighted images, pre-gadolinium contrast vascular enhancement on magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) imaging, and effects on post-gadolinium contrast T1 imaging. Multiple artifacts were observed in patients having a brain MRI within 3 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. These included susceptibility artifact on DWI, GRE, and SWAN/SWI imaging, pre-gadolinium contrast increased vascular signal on MPRAGE imaging, and decreased expected enhancement on post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging. Ferumoxytol can create imaging artifacts which complicate clinical interpretation when brain MRI is performed within 3 days of administration. Recognition of the constellation of artifacts produced by ferumoxytol is important in order to obviate additional unnecessary examinations and mitigate errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  8. Complex susceptibility measurements of a suspension of magnetic beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fannin, P.C. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: pfannin@tcd.ie; Mac Oireachtaigh, C. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Cohen-Tannoudji, L. [Laboratoire Colloides et Materiaux Divises, CNRS UMR7612, ESPCI, 10 Rue Vauquelin, F-75005 Paris (France); Bertrand, E. [Laboratoire Colloides et Materiaux Divises, CNRS UMR7612, ESPCI, 10 Rue Vauquelin, F-75005 Paris (France); Bibette, J. [Laboratoire Colloides et Materiaux Divises, CNRS UMR7612, ESPCI, 10 Rue Vauquelin, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2006-05-15

    Measurements of the frequency and field dependence of the complex magnetic susceptibility, {chi}{sub s}({omega},H)={chi}{sub s}{sup '}({omega},H)-i{chi}{sub s}{sup '}'({omega},H), of a suspension of magnetic beads in water over the frequency range 200Hz to 1MHz are presented. The magnetic polarizing field, H, is applied to the sample, first in a forward direction and then in a reverse direction and from a plot of the static susceptibility, {chi}{sub 0S}, against polarizing field H, the existence of a hysteresis effect is demonstrated.

  9. Body MR Imaging: Artifacts, k-Space, and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Susie Y; Seethamraju, Ravi T; Patel, Pritesh; Hahn, Peter F; Kirsch, John E; Guimaraes, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is challenging because of the complex interaction of multiple factors, including motion arising from respiration and bowel peristalsis, susceptibility effects secondary to bowel gas, and the need to cover a large field of view. The combination of these factors makes body MR imaging more prone to artifacts, compared with imaging of other anatomic regions. Understanding the basic MR physics underlying artifacts is crucial to recognizing the trade-offs involved in mitigating artifacts and improving image quality. Artifacts can be classified into three main groups: (a) artifacts related to magnetic field imperfections, including the static magnetic field, the radiofrequency (RF) field, and gradient fields; (b) artifacts related to motion; and (c) artifacts arising from methods used to sample the MR signal. Static magnetic field homogeneity is essential for many MR techniques, such as fat saturation and balanced steady-state free precession. Susceptibility effects become more pronounced at higher field strengths and can be ameliorated by using spin-echo sequences when possible, increasing the receiver bandwidth, and aligning the phase-encoding gradient with the strongest susceptibility gradients, among other strategies. Nonuniformities in the RF transmit field, including dielectric effects, can be minimized by applying dielectric pads or imaging at lower field strength. Motion artifacts can be overcome through respiratory synchronization, alternative k-space sampling schemes, and parallel imaging. Aliasing and truncation artifacts derive from limitations in digital sampling of the MR signal and can be rectified by adjusting the sampling parameters. Understanding the causes of artifacts and their possible solutions will enable practitioners of body MR imaging to meet the challenges of novel pulse sequence design, parallel imaging, and increasing field strength.

  10. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  11. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  12. Ac magnetic susceptibility study of in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, L; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S; Serna, C J; Morales, M P [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); MejIas, R; Barber, D F [Centro Nacional de BiotecnologIa, CNB-CSIC, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Lazaro, F J, E-mail: lucia@icmm.csic.es [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Materiales y Fluidos, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2011-06-29

    We analysed magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution, before and after cytokine conjugation, in a mouse model by ac susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Mice received repeated intravenous injections of nanoparticle suspension for two weeks and they were euthanized 1 h after the last injection. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues. The rest of the particles may probably be metabolized or excreted by the organism. Our findings indicate that the adsorption of interferon to DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles changes their biodistribution, reducing the presence of nanoparticles in lungs and therefore their possible toxicity. The specific targeting of the particles to tumour tissues by the use of an external magnetic field has also been studied. Magnetic nanoparticles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the targeted tissue and quantified by ac magnetic susceptibility.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility and exchange coupling in the mineral ardennite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Donnay, G.

    1969-01-01

    Ardennite, a rare silicate mineral, contains about 19 wt.% manganese. Some of the manganese atoms are in positions which are close enough to allow negative exchange and hence a reduction of the total magnetic susceptibility. It is shown that the susceptibility can be accounted for approximately by the treatment of Earnshaw and Lewis (1958) for S = 5 2 and a Hamiltonian H = -2g??Hb-2JS1??S2. ?? 1969.

  14. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of rocks induced by experimental deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhou

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the influence of the rheological process on the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS of rocks is studied experimentally. The cylindrical samples of quartz-magnetite rock undergo a process under the confining stress of 300 MPa, temperature of 500-800 °C and strain rate of 5 ´ 10-5 - 1 ´ 10-4/s. The residual deformation after the above process ranges 9-42%, depending on the experimental condition. It is found that the magnetic susceptibilities and the shapes of magnetic grains in these samples are almost isotropic before deformation. After being deformed, these samples show certain amounts of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and the axes of maximum principal susceptibilities deviate from the original ones more or less. Furthermore, the grains become oblate-ellipsoidal and a certain preferred orientation occurs. The grain shape anisotropy seems to be the main reason for AMS formation. It appears that there is a limitation of the piezomagnetic theory in explaining some tectonomagnetic phenomena. The results obtained in this study imply that ductile deformation at high temperature and pressure in depth during a long time-process may result in another kind of response in rock magnetism, which could be a new mechanism of tectonomagnetic variation.

  15. Geostatistical Microscale Study of Magnetic Susceptibility in Soil Profile and Magnetic Indicators of Potential Soil Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Fabijańczyk, Piotr; Magiera, Tadeusz; Rachwał, Marzena

    Directional variograms, along the soil profile, can be useful and precise tool that can be used to increase the precision of the assessment of soil pollution. The detail analysis of spatial variability in the soil profile can be also an important part of the standardization of soil magnetometry as a screening method for an assessment of soil pollution related to the dust deposition. The goal of this study was to investigate the correlation between basic parameters of spatial correlations of magnetic susceptibility in the soil profile, such as a range of correlation and a sill, and selected magnetometric indicators of soil pollution. Magnetic indicators were an area under the curve of magnetic susceptibility versus a depth in the soil profile, values of magnetic susceptibility at depths ranging from 1 to 10 cm, and maximum and background values of magnetic susceptibility in the soil profile. These indicators were previously analyzed in the literature. The results showed that a range of correlation of magnetic susceptibility was significantly correlated with magnetic susceptibility measured at depths 1, 2, and 3 cm. It suggests that a range of correlation is a good measure of pollutants' dispersion in the soil profile. The sill of the variogram of magnetic susceptibility was found to be significantly correlated with the area under the curve of plot of magnetic susceptibility that is related to the soil pollution. In consequence, the parameters of microscale spatial variability of magnetic susceptibility in s soil profile are important measures that take into consideration the spatial aspect of s soil pollution.

  16. Magnetic irreversibility in granular superconductors: ac susceptibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F.; Obradors, X.; Fontcuberta, J. (ICMAB, CSIC, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)); Vallet, M.; Gonzalez-Calbet, J. (Lab. Magnetismo Aplicado, RENFE-U.C. Madrid, Las Matas (Spain))

    1991-12-01

    Ac susceptibility measurements of a ceramic weak-coupled superconductor in very low ac fields (2mG, 111Hz) are reported. We present evidence for the observation of the magnetic irreversibility following a ZFC-FC thermal cycling by means of ac susceptibilty measurements. It is shown that this technique also reflect local magnetic field effects in granular superconductors, as previously suggested in microwave surface resistance and I-V characteristics. (orig.).

  17. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 9000 Mayaguez, PR 00681 PR (United States); Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1006 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32603 (United States); Orange, François [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Guinel, Maxime J.-F. [Department of Physics and Nanoscopy Facility, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 70377, San Juan, PR 00936-8377 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and polystyrene/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory–Huggins interaction parameters. - Highlights: • Oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were dispersed in polymer melts. • MNPs dispersed well in polybutadiene but not in polystyrene. • Dynamic magnetic susceptibility (DMS) measurements assessed presence of aggregates. • DMS predictions were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. • The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter correlated with MNP dispersion.

  18. Understanding the Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements by Using an Analytical Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, M. E.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Sosa, M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Baffa, O.

    2008-01-01

    A description of the measurement procedure, related theory and experimental data analysis of the magnetic susceptibility of materials is given. A short review of previous papers in the line of this subject is presented. This work covers the whole experimental process, in detail, and presents a pragmatic approach for pedagogical sake. (Contains 2…

  19. Calculation of nonlinear magnetic susceptibility tensors for a uniaxial antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Siew-Choo; Osman, Junaidah; Tilley, D. R.

    2000-11-01

    In this paper, we present a derivation of the nonlinear susceptibility tensors for a two-sublattice uniaxial antiferromagnet up to the third-order effects within the standard definition by which the rf magnetization m is defined as a power series expansion in the rf fields h with the susceptibility tensors χ(q) as the coefficients. The starting point is the standard set of torque equations of motion for this problem. A complete set of tensor elements is derived for the case of a single-frequency input wave. Within a circular polarization frame (pnz) expressions are given for the first-order susceptibility, second-harmonic generation, optical rectification, third-harmonic generation and intensity-dependent susceptibility. Some of the coefficients with representative resonance features in the far infrared are illustrated graphically and we conclude with a brief discussion of the implications of the resonance features arising from the calculations and their potential applications.

  20. Dynamic magnetic hysteresis and nonlinear susceptibility of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Yuri P.; Ouari, Bachir; Titov, Serguey V.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear ac stationary response of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles subjected to both external ac and dc fields of arbitrary strength and orientation is investigated using Brown's continuous diffusion model. The nonlinear complex susceptibility and dynamic magnetic hysteresis (DMH) loops of an individual antiferromagnetic nanoparticle are evaluated and compared with the linear regime for extensive ranges of the anisotropy, the ac and dc magnetic fields, damping, and the specific antiferromagnetic parameter. It is shown that the shape and area of the DMH loops of antiferromagnetic particles are substantially altered by applying a dc field that permits tuning of the specific magnetic power loss in the nanoparticles.

  1. Accuracy of MRI-based Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russek, Stephen; Erdevig, Hannah; Keenan, Kathryn; Stupic, Karl

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map tissue susceptibility to identify microbleeds associated with brain injury and pathologic iron deposits associated with neurologic diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Field distortions with a resolution of a few parts per billion can be measured using MRI phase maps. The field distortion map can be inverted to obtain a quantitative susceptibility map. To determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements, a set of phantoms with paramagnetic salts and nano-iron gels were fabricated. The shapes and orientations of features were varied. Measured susceptibility of 1.0 mM GdCl3 solution in water as a function of temperature agreed well with the theoretical predictions, assuming Gd+3 is spin 7/2. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry. The paramagnetic susceptibility sits on top of the much larger diamagnetic susceptibility of water (-9.04 x 10-6), which leads to errors in the SQUID measurements. To extract out the paramagnetic contribution using standard magnetometry, measurements must be made down to low temperature (2K). MRI-based susceptometry is shown to be as or more accurate than standard magnetometry and susceptometry techniques.

  2. Optical measurement of anisotropic magnetic susceptibility for diamagnetic fine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Kohki; Mogi, Iwao; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an apparatus that allows the observation of the transient rotational motion of fine particles under a high magnetic field in order to determine anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. The anisotropic susceptibilities of spherical nanoparticles of bismuth and commercially available carbon nanofibers were determined. The estimated Δχ = 3.9 × 10-5 of spherical bismuth nanoparticles with a diameter of 370 nm was fairly consistent with the value determined previously by the magnetic field dependence of diffraction peak intensity in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, but was slightly smaller than the value for the bulk crystal. In contrast, the transient behavior of carbon nanofibers did not obey the theoretical motion of a single crystal. The wide distribution of fiber lengths, the irregularity of the structure in the fiber, and the connections between the fibers are suggested for the anomalous behavior.

  3. Magnetic Susceptibility of Molecular Carbon: Nanotubes and Fullerite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, A. P.; Haddon, R. C.; Zhou, O.; Fleming, R. M.; Zhang, J.; McClure, S. M.; Smalley, R. E.

    1994-07-01

    Elemental carbon can be synthesized in a variety of geometrical forms, from three-dimensional extended structures (diamond) to finite molecules (C60 fullerite). Results are presented here on the magnetic susceptibility of the least well-understood members of this family, nanotubes and C60 fullerite. (i) Nanotubes represent the cylindrical form of carbon, intermediate between graphite and fullerite. They are found to have significantly larger orientation-averaged susceptibility, on a per carbon basis, than any other form of elemental carbon. This susceptibility implies an average band structure among nanotubes similar to that of graphite. (ii) High-resolution magnetic susceptibility data on C60 fullerite near the molecular orientational-ordering transition at 259 K show a sharp jump corresponding to 2.5 centimeter-gram-second parts per million per mole of C60. This jump directly demonstrates the effect of an intermolecular cooperative transition on an intramolecular electronic property, where the susceptibility jump may be ascribed to a change in the shape of the molecule due to lattice forces.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging artifacts caused by brackets of various materials - An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Razdan

    2012-01-01

    Patients who might require repeated MRI scans, can be treated orthodontically with ceramic/composite/anterior ceramic and posterior stainless steel brackets. When the region of interest is above the orbit or beyond the posterior wall of the pharynx, no demonstrable artifacts were recorded with various types of brackets included in the present study.

  5. Detecting compaction disequilibrium with anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwehr, Kurt; Tauxe, Lisa; Driscoll, Neal; Lee, Homa

    2006-11-01

    In clay-rich sediment, microstructures and macrostructures influence how sediments deform when under stress. When lithology is fairly constant, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) can be a simple technique for measuring the relative consolidation state of sediment, which reflects the sediment burial history. AMS can reveal areas of high water content and apparent overconsolidation associated with unconformities where sediment overburden has been removed. Many other methods for testing consolidation and water content are destructive and invasive, whereas AMS provides a nondestructive means to focus on areas for additional geotechnical study. In zones where the magnetic minerals are undergoing diagenesis, AMS should not be used for detecting compaction state. By utilizing AMS in the Santa Barbara Basin, we were able to identify one clear unconformity and eight zones of high water content in three cores. With the addition of susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization, and isothermal remanent magnetization rock magnetic techniques, we excluded 3 out of 11 zones from being compaction disequilibria. The AMS signals for these three zones are the result of diagenesis, coring deformation, and burrows. In addition, using AMS eigenvectors, we are able to accurately show the direction of maximum compression for the accumulation zone of the Gaviota Slide.

  6. Spectroscopic AC susceptibility imaging (sASI) of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficko, Bradley W., E-mail: Bradley.W.Ficko@Dartmouth.edu; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurements to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement set and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R{sup 2}=0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R{sup 2}=0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R{sup 2}=0.97, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. - Highlights: • Development of an AC susceptibility imaging model. • Comparison of AC susceptibility imaging (ASI) and susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI). • Demonstration of ASI and spectroscopic ASI (sASI) using three different magnetic nanoparticle types. • SASI scan separation of three different magnetic nanoparticles samples using 5 spectroscopic frequencies. • Demonstration of biological feasibility of sASI.

  7. MRI检查常见伪影的产生机制及解决措施%Discussion of formation mechanism and solutions of artifacts commonly seen in magnetic resonance imaging examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何卫红; 方向军; 陈伟

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究磁共振成像中常见伪影的产生原因与抑制方法,以减少MRI 检查时产生的伪影,提高图像质量,为临床提供良好的影像资料.方法:收集我院168 例患者不同类型和不同程度MRI 图像伪影病例,进行系统性分析,其中,四肢扫描17 例,脊柱扫描37 例,头颈部扫描71 例,腹部扫描43 例.结果:卷褶伪影36 例,占21.4%;容积效应伪影10 例,占5.9%;化学位移伪影12 例,占7.2%;运动伪影66 例,占39.2%;磁化率伪影及金属伪影24 例,占14.3%;交叉伪影9 例,占5.4%;截断伪影11 例,占6.6%.结论:了解各种伪影产生的机制,利用各种有效技术抑制或消除图像伪影,对提高图像质量和提高诊断率具有重要意义.%Objective: To reduce the artifacts generated in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination, improve the image quality and provide good image data for clinical use by studying the generation reasons and suppression methods of artifacts commonly seen in MRI examination. Methods: Medical records with different types and varying degrees of MR image artifacts of 168 patients of our hospital were collected for systematic analysis, of which 17 cases were limbs scan, 37 cases were spine scan, 71 cases were head and neck scan and 43 cases were abdomen scan. Results: There were 36 cases of folded artifacts, accounting for 2.4%, 10 cases of volume effect artifacts, accounting for 5.9%, 12 cases of chemical shift artifacts, accounting for 7.2%, 66 cases of motion artifacts, accounting for 39.2%, 24 cases of magnetic susceptibility artifacts, accounting for 4.3%, 9 cases of cross artifacts, accounting for 5.4% and 11 cases of truncation artifacts, accounting for 6.6%. Conclusion: Understanding the generation mechanism of various artifacts and using various effective techniques to suppress or eliminate image artifacts are of important significance to improve the image quality and the diagnos -tic rate.

  8. Transient artifacts in a flare observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveros, J C Martínez; Hudson, H S; Casas, J C Buitrago

    2013-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides a new tool for the systematic observation of white-light flares, including Doppler and magnetic information as well as continuum. In our initial analysis of the highly impulsive \\gamma-ray flare SOL2010-06-12T00:57 (Mart'{\\i}nez Oliveros et al., Solar Phys., 269, 269, 2011), we reported the signature of a strong blueshift in the two footpoint sources. Concerned that this might be an artifact due to aliasing peculiar to the HMI instrument, we undertook a comparative analysis of Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG++) observations of the same flare, using the PArametric Smearing Correction ALgorithm (PASCAL) algorithm to correct for artifacts caused by variations in atmospheric smearing. This analysis confirms the artifactual nature of the apparent blueshift in the HMI observations, finding weak redshifts at the footpoints instead. We describe the use of PASCAL with GONG++ observations as a complement to the SDO ...

  9. Magnetic susceptibility artifacts in a diffuse brain injury and their pathological significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Miyakita, Yasuji; Matsuzawa, Motoshi; Sakakibara, Yohtaro; Takahara, Taro; Yamaguchi, Toshio [St. Marianna Univ. (Japan). Yokohama City Seibu Hospital

    1998-07-01

    In our study, FLAIR images and multishot echo planar imaging T2-weighted images (EPI T2-WI) were used in addition to conventional T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images and T2-weighted sagittal images. In this series we focused our attention on small parenchymatous lesions of a mild or moderate form of diffuse brain injury. These injuries are shown as high intensity areas on T2-weighted images (T2-high intensity lesions) but are not visualized in CT images. This series consisted of 29 patients who were diagnosed with diffuse brain injury and whose CT scans showed a Diffuse Injury I or II. Nineteen patients were studied in an acute or subacute stage. In all but 3 patients, small T2-high intensity lesions were found in the brain parenchyma. In the follow-up study brain edema was suggested because the lesions tended to be absent within 3 months in T2-weighted images and FLAIR. In 10 patients examined during a chronic stage. Small hemorrhages in patients with Diffuse Injury II were shown with variable intensities on the conventional T1- and T2-weighted images, but were visualized with low intensity in an EPI T2-WI. In diffuse brain injuries, small T2-high intensity lesions have been considered to be brain edema or ischemic insults. Our data however, suggested that microhemorrhages associated with brain edema were resent in most of the supratentorial lesions, and in more than a half of the lesions in the corpus callosum and the brain stem. These findings appear similar to contusions, which are defined as traumatic bruises of the neural parenchyma. The use of MRI has increased our understanding of in vivo pathological changes in mild or moderate forms of diffuse brain injury. (K.H.)

  10. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  11. MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0T scanner: motion artifacts and patient acceptability compared with closed bore magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangard, Christopher; Paszek, Jennifer; Berg, Frank; Eyl, Gesa; Kessler, Josef; Lackner, Klaus; Gossmann, Axel

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate motion artifacts and patient acceptability of MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0T scanner. Thirty six claustrophobic patients were enrolled prospectively, 34 of which had previous MR examinations in closed bore magnets. Anxiety and pain during MR examination in an open 1.0T scanner were evaluated by visual analogue scales and various tests. Influence of motion artifacts on image quality was evaluated by two radiologists independently using a five-point scale. Additionally, 36 non-claustrophobic patients delivered a reference value of a non-claustrophobic population for the visual analogue anxiety scale. Termination rate of MR imaging of highly claustrophobic patients decreased from 58.3% (n=21) in closed bore magnets to 8.3% (n=3) in the open scanner (pclaustrophobic patients compared with closed bore magnets. Motion artifacts did not influence image quality.

  12. Nonlinear dynamic susceptibilities of interacting and noninteracting magnetic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Joensson, P; García-Palacios, J L; Svedlindh, P

    2000-01-01

    The linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of solid dispersions of nanosized maghemite gamma-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 particles have been measured for three samples with a volume concentration of magnetic particles ranging from 0.3% to 17%, in order to study the effect of dipole-dipole interactions. Significant differences between the dynamic response of the samples are observed. While the linear and cubic dynamic susceptibilities of the most dilute sample compare reasonably well with the corresponding expressions proposed by Raikher and Stepanov for noninteracting particles, the nonlinear dynamic response of the most concentrated sample exhibits at low temperatures similar features as observed in a Ag(11 at% Mn) spin glass.

  13. The AC magnetic susceptibility of high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, M

    2001-01-01

    This research concerns the development of AC magnetic susceptometers and use of susceptometers in analysing high temperature superconductors. Two of the designs were a differential magnetic susceptometer (DMS) and a double coil screening susceptometer (DCSS) whose descriptions are given in detail including coil design, field measurements, susceptometer operation, experimental instrumentation, phase adjustment, susceptometer calibration and sensitivity for each design. Theoretical details are given regarding each design in order to calculate the complex external and internal susceptibility. Investigation concerning the demagnetisation factor of different geometries, and the significant features and limitation for each design are also provided. The susceptometers were applied to a wide range of YBCO samples, which includes bulk samples with different geometry (i.e. Slabs, disk, powder and thick film) and thin films with different oxygen contents. Several silver sheathed Bi-2223 tapes were also involved. This al...

  14. Mapping soil magnetic susceptibility and mineralogy in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr; Sukhorada, Anatoliy

    2017-04-01

    Soil suatainable planning is fundamental for agricultural areas. Soil mapping and modeling are increasingly used in agricultural areas in the entire world (Brevik et al., 2016). They are beneficial to land managers, to reduce soil degradation, increase soil productivity and their restoration. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) methods are low cost and accurate for the developing maps of agricultural areas.. The objective of this work is to identify the minerals responsible for MS increase in soils from the two study areas in Poltava and Kharkiv region. The thermomagnetic analyses were conducted using the KLY-4 with an oven apparatus. The hysteresis parameters were measured with the Rotating Magnetometer at the Geophysical Centre Dourbes, Belgium. The results showed that all of samples from Kharkiv area and the majortity of the samples collected in Poltava area represent the pseudo single domain (PSD) zone particles in Day plot. According to Hanesch et al. (2006), the transformation of goethite, ferrihydrite or hematite to a stronger ferrimagnetic phase like magnetite or maghemite is common in strongly magnetic soils with high values of organic carbon content. In our case of thermomagnetic study, the first peak on the heating curve near 260 ˚C indicates the presence of ferrihydrite which gradually transforms into maghemite (Jordanova et al., 2013). A further decrease in the MS identified on the heating curve may be related to the transformation of the maghemite to hematite. A second MS peak on the heating curve near 530 ˚C and the ultimate loss of magnetic susceptibility near 580 ˚C were caused by the reduction of hematite to magnetite. The shape of the thermomagnetic curves suggests the presence of single domain (SD) particles at room temperature and their transformation to a superparamagnetic (SP) state under heating. Magnetic mineralogical analyses suggest the presence of highly magnetic minerals like magnetite and maghemite as well as slightly magnetic goethite

  15. MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0 T scanner: Motion artifacts and patient acceptability compared with closed bore magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangard, Christopher [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: cbangard@gmx.de; Paszek, Jennifer [Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: jennypaszek@gmx.de; Berg, Frank [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: frank.berg@uk-koeln.de; Eyl, Gesa [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: gesa.eyl@gmx.de; Kessler, Josef [Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: kessler@nf.mpg.de; Lackner, Klaus [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: klaus.lackner@uk-koeln.de; Gossmann, Axel [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: axel.gossmann@uni-koeln.de

    2007-10-15

    Objective: To evaluate motion artifacts and patient acceptability of MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0 T scanner. Subjects and methods: Thirty six claustrophobic patients were enrolled prospectively, 34 of which had previous MR examinations in closed bore magnets. Anxiety and pain during MR examination in an open 1.0 T scanner were evaluated by visual analogue scales and various tests. Influence of motion artifacts on image quality was evaluated by two radiologists independently using a five-point scale. Additionally, 36 non-claustrophobic patients delivered a reference value of a non-claustrophobic population for the visual analogue anxiety scale. Results: Termination rate of MR imaging of highly claustrophobic patients decreased from 58.3% (n = 21) in closed bore magnets to 8.3% (n = 3) in the open scanner (p {<=} 0.001). Anxiety during MR examination was reduced from 87.1 {+-} 16.7 (closed magnets) to 30.4 {+-} 30.8 (open magnet) (p {<=} 0.001) on visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 100. Influence of motion artifacts on image quality was very little (inter-rater reliability r = 0.74; p < 0.01). Conclusions: MR imaging using an open 1.0 T scanner yielded a significantly decreased anxiety and subsequently an improved acceptability in claustrophobic patients compared with closed bore magnets. Motion artifacts did not influence image quality.

  16. Zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations and magnetic susceptibility of itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯登录; 姜恩永; 白海力

    2002-01-01

    Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) magnetization, field-cooled (FC) magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility and majorhysteresis loops of itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO3 have been measured at magnetic ordering temperatures ranging from5 to 160 K. An empirical model is proposed to calculate the measured ZFC magnetization. The result indicates that thecalculated ZFC magnetization compares well with the measured one. Based on the generalized Preisach model, boththe ZFC and FC curves are reproduced by numerical simulations. The critical temperature and critical exponents aredetermined by measuring the ac magnetic susceptibility in different bias magnetic fields at temperatures in the vicinityof the point of phase transition.

  17. 磁共振图像伪影的产生机理及其解决办法的研究%Magnetic Resonance Imaging Artifact Generating Mechanism and Solution Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海滨; 张蔚

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the magnetic resonance imaging artifact emergence mechanism, this paper discusses the disposal of MRI artifacts solution. Methods A retrospective analysis of 87 cases of Hitachi 0.3 T, GE sl.5 T, GE MRI scanner T 3.0 image artifacts. Results Common artifacts of magnetic resonance mainly have: RF artifact, gradient artifact, motion artifact, and chemical shift artifact, wrap artifact and metal artifacts. Conclusion Understanding reasons of magnetic resonance imaging artifact, finding solutions, are important to improve image quality and increase diagnosis rate.%目的 研究磁共振成像伪影产生的机理,探讨磁共振伪影处理的解决办法.方法 回顾性分析了87例日立0.3T、GE 1.5T、GE 3.0T磁共振扫描仪的图像伪影.结果 磁共振常见的儿种伪影主要有:射频伪影、梯度伪影、运动伪影、化学位移伪影、卷摺伪影及金属伪影.结论 了解磁共振图像伪影的产生原因,寻找解决办法,对改善图像质量,提高诊断率具有重要意义.

  18. 减少头部运动伪影及磁敏感伪影的propller技术应用价值评价%To Reduce the Head Motion Artifact and Magnetic Sensitive Artifacts Propller Technology Application Value Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海博

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨 Propl er 技术对减少头部运动伪影及磁敏感伪影的应用价值。方法我院于2010年3月至2013年对55例磁共振头颅检查时躁动或难以自控的患者,进行常规 FRFSE T2WI 和 Propel er T2WI 轴位扫描;对33例磁敏感伪影明显者行常规扩散加权图像(DWI)和Propel er DWI 扫描。观察并对照分析 FRFSE T2WI 和 Propel er T2WI 以及 DWI 与 Propel er DWI 的图像质量状况。结果通过 T2WI 检查55例,对存在明显运动伪影的患者行 Propel er T2WI 扫描后明显减少或消除了运动伪影,与 T2WI 检查结果相比差异明显,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。DWI 检查33例患者有显著磁敏感伪影,采用 ProDel er DWI 后,与 DWI 检查结果相比差异明显,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论应用 Propel er 技术能够明显减少或消除 T2WI 及 DWI 上运动伪影及磁敏感伪影,值得推广应用。%Objective To study the Propl er technology to reduce the head motion artifact and the application value of the magnetic sensitive artifact. Methods Our hospital from March 2010 to 2013, 55 cases of MRI head check agitation or patients with difficult to control, for regular FRFSE T2WI and Propel er T2WI axial scanning; 33 cases of magnetic sensitive artifact obvious line of conventional diffusion weighted image (DWI) can and Propel er DWI scan can. Observation and contrast analysis FRFSE T2WI and Propel er T2WI and DWI and Propel er can DWI image quality can. Results Through T2WI check 55 cases of patients with obvious motion artifact line Propel er T2WI scan significantly reduce or eliminate the motion artifacts, clear difference compared with T2WI results, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). DWI examination can 33 patients had significant magnetic sensitive artifacts, adopting ProDeller DWI, can clear difference compared with DWI results can, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion Application of Propel er technology

  19. Correlation of AC Loss Data from Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements with YBCO Film Quality (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0100 CORRELATION OF AC LOSS DATA FROM MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS WITH YBCO FILM QUALITY (POSTPRINT) Paul N...CORRELATION OF AC LOSS DATA FROM MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS WITH YBCO FILM QUALITY (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT...spreading of the temperature-dependent ac susceptibility curves with increasing applied magnetic field, the quality of the YBCO film generally

  20. Effect of Anti-dots on the Magnetic Susceptibility in a Superconducting Long Prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, C. A.; Joya, Miryam R.; Barba-Ortega, J.

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of a long mesoscopic superconducting square prism containing one/two (dot) anti-dots is calculated in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau theoretical model. This magnetic susceptibility shows jumps at each of the vortex transition fields. We studied the influence of the number, size and geometry of the anti-dots on the magnetic susceptibility in a superconducting sample. We found interesting physical behavior when several kinds of materials filled into the anti-dot are considered.

  1. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization-magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, K., E-mail: tsukada@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T. [The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Bito, Y. [Central Research Lab., Hitachi. Ltd., 1-280 Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  3. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements as a Proxy for Hydrocarbon Biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewafy, F.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Werkema, D.; Revil, A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Skold, M.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements have been commonly used in paleoclimate studies, as a proxy for environmental pollution such as heavy metal contamination, and for delineating zones of oil seeps related to hydrocarbon exploration. Few studies have assessed the use of MS measurements for mapping zones of oil pollution. In this study, we investigated the variation in magnetic susceptibility across a hydrocarbon contaminated site undergoing biodegradation. Our objective was to investigate if MS measurements could be used as a proxy indicator of intrinsic bioremediation linked to the activity of iron reducing bacteria. An improved understanding of the mechanisms generating geophysical signatures associated with microbial enzymatic activity could permit the development of geophysical imaging technologies for long-term, minimally invasive and sustainable monitoring of natural biodegradation at oil spill sites. We used a Bartington MS probe to measure MS data along fifteen boreholes within contaminated (both free phase and dissolved phase hydrocarbon plumes) and clean areas. Our results show the following: (1) an enhanced zone of MS straddling the water table at the contaminated locations, not observed at the clean locations; (2) MS values within the free product plume are higher compared to values within the dissolved product plume; (3) the MS values within the vadoze zone above the free product plume are higher compared to values within the dissolved product plume; 4) the zone of high MS is thicker within the free product plume compared to the dissolved product plume. We suggest that the zone of enhanced MS results from the precipitation of magnetite related to the oxidation of the hydrocarbons coupled to iron reduction. Our data documents a strong correlation between MS and hydrocarbon concentration. We conclude that recognition of these zones of enhanced magnetite formation allows for the application of MS measurements as a: (1) low cost, rapid monitoring

  4. Critical behaviour of the local magnetic susceptibility in a ferromagnetic film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1985-07-01

    The nearest-neighbour Ising model of a ferromagnetic film in which couplings between surface spins may differ from couplings between remaining spins is considered. Using the mean-field approximation, the local magnetic susceptibility defined as the derivative of the local magnetization with respect to the external uniform magnetic field is obtained. The behaviour of the local magnetic susceptibility near the ordinary, surface-bulk and surface phase transitions and in a range of temperatures where physical quantities have pseudocritical behaviour is discussed. The critical behaviour of the local magnetic susceptibility in a three-dimensional semi-infinite model is also given for comparison.

  5. Models for the magnetic ac susceptibility of granular superferromagnetic CoFe/Al$_2$O$_3$

    OpenAIRE

    Petracic, O.; Glatz, A.; Kleemann, W.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetization and magnetic ac susceptibility, $\\chi = \\chi' - i \\chi''$, of superferromagnetic systems are studied by numerical simulations. The Cole-Cole plot, $\\chi''$ vs. $\\chi'$, is used as a tool for classifying magnetic systems by their dynamical behavior. The simulations of the magnetization hysteresis and the ac susceptibility are performed with two approaches for a driven domain wall in random media. The studies are motivated by recent experimental results on the interacting nano...

  6. Approximate relationship of coal bed methane and magnetic characteristics of rock via magnetic susceptibility logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonghui; Wu, Jiansheng; Zhang, Pingsong; Xiao, Pengfei

    2012-02-01

    In coal bed methane (CBM) exploration, how to improve the accuracy for locating and evaluating the CBM deposits is still a problem due to the rarity of occurrence of CBM. Combined with the distribution of the CBM content in the Huainan coalfield, the approximate relationship between the occurrence of CBM and the magnetic properties of the coal bed and adjacent mudstone have been widely discussed by magnetic logging. Experimental results show that magnetic susceptibility of the coal bed and adjacent mudstone would clearly increase with the CBM content in a coal bed. According to the results of the experiment, the prediction of the CBM content has been accomplished for different coal beds, and the results are consistent with the distribution of the CBM content throughout the whole coalfield. Preliminary data analysis reveals that there is indeed a correlation between the changes of magnetic rock characteristics and the occurrence of the CBM, and this finding may shed some light on the evaluation of CBM.

  7. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  8. Quantification of entanglement from magnetic susceptibility for a Heisenberg spin 1/2 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Singh, Harkirat; Das, Diptaranjan; Sen, Tamal K. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, PO BCKV Campus Main Office, Mohanpur – 741252, Nadia, West Bengal (India); Mitra, Chiranjib, E-mail: chiranjib@iiserkol.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, PO BCKV Campus Main Office, Mohanpur – 741252, Nadia, West Bengal (India)

    2012-10-01

    We report temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization and quantification of entanglement from the experimental data for dichloro (thiazole) copper (II), a Heisenberg spin chain system. The plot of magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature indicates an infinite spin chain. Isothermal magnetization measurements (as functions of magnetic field) were performed at various temperatures below the antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering, where the AFM correlations persist significantly. These magnetization curves are fitted to the Bonner–Fisher model. Magnetic susceptibility is used as an entanglement witness to quantify the amount of entanglement in the system. -- Highlights: ► Magnetic properties of a Heisenberg spin chain system are studied. ► Experimental data is fitted to theoretical models. ► Magnetic susceptibility is used as a macroscopic witness of entanglement. ► Entanglement is extracted from experimental data.

  9. Zero-velocity magnetophoretic method for the determination of particle magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watarai, Hitoshi; Duc, Hoang Trong Tien; Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Zhang, Tianyi; Tsukahara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    A simple zero-velocity method to determine the particle magnetic susceptibility by measuring the magnetophoretic velocity was proposed. The principle is that the magnetophoretic velocity of a particle in a liquid medium must be zero when the magnetic susceptibilities of the medium and the particle are equal, or the gravity force and the magnetophoretic force are balanced. By changing the medium magnetic susceptibility and measuring the magnetophoretic velocity of a particle, the particle magnetic susceptibility was determined from the medium magnetic susceptibility under the zero-velocity condition. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated for polystyrene particles using a Dy(III) solution in the horizontal migration mode and different organic solvents in the vertical migration mode.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  11. Non-Magnetic Factors Affecting Magnetic Susceptibility of the Loess-Paleosol Sequences in the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Feng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Several different proposals have been adopted to explain the linkage between the magnetic susceptibility of loess-paleosol sequences and the associated past climate. First, the intensity of dustfall controlled the variation in the susceptibility. Second, the degree of pedogenesis controlled the variation. A third proposal states that the susceptibility signal is a result of the competing processes between pedogenic enhancement and detrital inheritance. This paper examines the acceptability as the summer monsoon proxy from nonmagnetic perspectives. Several conclusions can be drawn from our data. First, clay translocation within the Last Interglacial paleosol S1 profiles must have moved some of the magnetic minerals downward so that the susceptibility reflects only the post-translocation distribution of the magnetic susceptibility-producing minerals. Second, the best-developed paleosol S1S3 (equivalent to MIS 5e) at most of the sections studied is not well expressed by the magnetic susceptibility because this paleosol developed in underlying coarse loess (L2) and coarse textures tend to lower the susceptibility. Third, carbonate concentration is negatively correlated with the magnetic susceptibility or suppresses the magnetic susceptibility peak when the susceptibility enhancement exceeds the carbonate dilution effect. It should be stressed that the susceptibility signal and its contributors in eolian sequences can be site- and time-dependent within the Chinese Loess Plateau. A stronger eolian component northwestward and a stronger pedogenic component southeastward are the general trends, but the trends can be complicated by those site- and time-dependent factors. Therefore, a more comprehensive model is needed to more precisely address the relationship between the paleoclimate and the proxy.

  12. Automatic Artifact Removal from Electroencephalogram Data Based on A Priori Artifact Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG is susceptible to various nonneural physiological artifacts. Automatic artifact removal from EEG data remains a key challenge for extracting relevant information from brain activities. To adapt to variable subjects and EEG acquisition environments, this paper presents an automatic online artifact removal method based on a priori artifact information. The combination of discrete wavelet transform and independent component analysis (ICA, wavelet-ICA, was utilized to separate artifact components. The artifact components were then automatically identified using a priori artifact information, which was acquired in advance. Subsequently, signal reconstruction without artifact components was performed to obtain artifact-free signals. The results showed that, using this automatic online artifact removal method, there were statistical significant improvements of the classification accuracies in both two experiments, namely, motor imagery and emotion recognition.

  13. Complex magnetic susceptibility setup for spectroscopy in the extremely low-frequency range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.W.M.; Bakelaar, I.A.; Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    A sensitive balanced differential transformer was built to measure complex initial parallel magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.01–1000 Hz range. The alternating magnetic field can be chosen sufficiently weak that the magnetic structure of the samples is only slightly perturbed and the low freq

  14. Zero—field—cooled and field—cooled magnetizations and magnetic susceptibility of itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯登录; 姜恩永; 等

    2002-01-01

    Zero-field-cooled(ZFC) magnetization,field-cooled(FC) magnetization,ac magnetic susceptibility and major hysteresis loops of itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO3 have been measured at magnetic ordering temperatures ranging from 5 to 160K.An empirical model is proposed to calculate the measured ZFC magnetization.The result indicates that the calculated ZFC magnetization compares well with the measured one.Based on the generalized Preisach model.both the ZFC and FC curves are reproduced by numerical simulations.The critical temperature and critical exponents are determined by measuring the ac magnetic susceptibility in different bias magnetic fields at temperatures in the vicinity of the point of phase transition.

  15. Metal-related artifacts in instrumented spine. Techniques for reducing artifacts in CT and MRI: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stradiotti, P; Curti, A; Castellazzi, G; Zerbi, A

    2009-06-01

    The projectional nature of radiogram limits its amount of information about the instrumented spine. MRI and CT imaging can be more helpful, using cross-sectional view. However, the presence of metal-related artifacts at both conventional CT and MRI imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and disease. We reviewed the literature about overcoming artifacts from metallic orthopaedic implants at high-field strength MRI imaging and multi-detector CT. The evolution of multichannel CT has made available new techniques that can help minimizing the severe beam-hardening artifacts. The presence of artifacts at CT from metal hardware is related to image reconstruction algorithm (filter), tube current (in mA), X-ray kilovolt peak, pitch, hardware composition, geometry (shape), and location. MRI imaging has been used safely in patients with orthopaedic metallic implants because most of these implants do not have ferromagnetic properties and have been fixed into position. However, on MRI imaging metallic implants may produce geometric distortion, the so-called susceptibility artifact. In conclusion, although 140 kV and high milliamperage second exposures are recommended for imaging patients with hardware, caution should always be exercised, particularly in children, young adults, and patients undergoing multiple examinations. MRI artifacts can be minimized by positioning optimally and correctly the examined anatomy part with metallic implants in the magnet and by choosing fast spin-echo sequences, and in some cases also STIR sequences, with an anterior to posterior frequency-encoding direction and the smallest voxel size.

  16. Static dipole magnetic susceptibilities of relativistic hydrogenlike atoms: A semianalytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poszwa, A.; Rutkowski, A.

    2007-03-01

    The binding energies and magnetic susceptibilities for states evolving from 1s1/2 , 2s1/2 , 2p1/2 , 2p3/2 , 3s1/2 , 3d3/2 , and 3d5/2 are calculated using power-series solutions of the Dirac equation for hydrogenic atoms in static and uniform magnetic B . The accuracy of the binding energies for low and medium magnetic fields exceeds that of previous variational calculations. In the low-magnetic-field limit the highly accurate values of energies are used to determine the relativistic Paschen-Back effect and relativistic magnetic susceptibilities by expansion of the fully relativistic energy into power series of the parameter B/Z2 . The linear term of this series is related to the relativistic Paschen-Back effect and the square term is proportional to the relativistic dipole magnetic susceptibility of the atom.

  17. Classification of soil magnetic susceptibility and prediction of metal detector performance: case study of Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetz, Holger; Altfelder, Sven; Hennings, Volker; Igel, Jan

    2009-05-01

    Soil magnetic properties can seriously impede the performance of metal detectors used in landmine clearance operations. For a proper planning of clearance operations pre-existing information on soil magnetic susceptibility can be helpful. In this study we briefly introduce a classification system to assess soil magnetic susceptibilities from geoscientific maps. The classification system is based on susceptibility measurements conducted on archived lateritic soil samples from 15 tropical countries. The system is applied to a soil map of Angola, resulting in a map that depicts soil magnetic susceptibilities as a worst case scenario. An additional layer depicting the surveyed mine affected communities in Angola is added to the map, which demonstrates that a large number of those are located in areas where soil is expected to impede metal detector performance severely.

  18. Longitudinal Susceptibility of S = 1/2 Low-Dimensional Heisenberg Ferromagnet in a Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yuan; XIANG Ying; HU Ai-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal susceptibility of the spin-1/2 low-dimensional Heisenberg ferromagnet in a magnetic field, is studied by the Green's function method within the random phase approximation. The static and dynamic longitudinal susceptibilities are calculated in the low- and high-field regions. Power laws for the position and height of the static susceptibility maximum are shown not to support the predictions of Landau theory.

  19. Magnetic susceptibility of the QCD vacuum in a nonlocal SU(3) PNJL model

    CERN Document Server

    Pagura, V P; Noguera, S; Scoccola, N N

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of the QCD vacuum is analyzed in the framework of a nonlocal SU(3) Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Considering two different model parametrizations, we estimate the values of the $u$ and $s$-quark tensor coefficients and magnetic susceptibilities and then we extend the analysis to finite temperature systems. Our numerical results are compared to those obtained in other theoretical approaches and in lattice QCD calculations.

  20. A partial susceptibility approach to analysing the magnetic properties of environmental materials: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shanju; Dearing, John A.; Bloemendal, Jan

    1999-09-01

    An approach to expressing the magnetic properties of environmental materials in terms of the contributions of the magnetic susceptibilities of specific magnetic components is reported. The approach links the partial susceptibilities of discrete particles, domains or mineral fractions with the concentration-dependent parameters by means of multiple linear regression methods. The case study, using the Liverpool street dust data set, demonstrates that the technique is able to model the contributions of the main magnetic components satisfactorily. Several factors may have a significant impact on the regression results. These include the validity of the linear proportional relationships between partial susceptibilities and the relevant concentration-dependent parameters, the adequacy of the variable selection procedure and the regression model, and the suitability of certain magnetic parameters.

  1. Magnetic field dependent polarizability and electric field dependent diamagnetic susceptibility of a donor in Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukrishnaveni, M.; Srinivasan, N.

    2016-09-01

    The polarizability and diamagnetic susceptibility values of a shallow donor in Si are computed. These values are obtained for the cases bar{E}allel bar{B} and bar{E} bot bar{B}. The anisotropy introduced by these perturbations are properly taken care of in the expressions derived for polarizability and magnetic susceptibility. Our results show that the numerical value of the contribution from electric field to diamagnetic susceptibility is several orders smaller than that of the magnetic field effect. Polarizability values are obtained in a magnetic field by two different methods. The polarizability values decrease as the intensity of magnetic field increases. Using the Clausius-Mossotti relation, the anisotropic values of the refractive indices for different magnetic fields are estimated.

  2. Universal logarithmic temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of one-dimensional electrons at critical values of magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Vekua, Temo

    2014-01-01

    We study the leading low temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility of one-dimensional electrons with fixed total number of particles at the magnetic fields equal to zero temperature critical values where magnetic field induces commensurate-incommensurate quantum phase transitions. For free and repulsively interacting electrons there is only one such critical field corresponding to the transition to the fully polarized state. For attractively interacting electrons besides saturation fi...

  3. Dynamic magnetic susceptibility of systems with long-range magnetic order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannette, Matthew Dano [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The utility of the TDR as an instrument in the study of magnetically ordered materials has been expanded beyond the simple demonstration purposes. Results of static applied magnetic field dependent measurements of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility, χ, of various ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials showing a range of transition temperatures (1-800 K) are presented. Data was collected primarily with a tunnel diode resonator (TDR) at different radio-frequencies (~10-30 MHz). In the vicinity of TC local moment ferromagnets show a very sharp, narrow peak in χ which is suppressed in amplitude and shifted to higher temperatures as the static bias field is increased. Unexpectedly, critical scaling analysis fails for these data. It is seen that these data are frequency dependent, however there is no simple method whereby measurement frequency can be changed in a controllable fashion. In contrast, itinerant ferromagnets show a broad maximum in χ well below TC which is suppressed and shifts to lower temperatures as the dc bias field is increased. The data on itinerant ferromagnets is fitted to a semi-phenomenological model that suggests the sample response is dominated by the uncompensated minority spins in the conduction band. Concluding remarks suggest possible scenarios to achieve frequency resolved data using the TDR as well as other fields in which the apparatus may be exploited.

  4. Static electric and magnetic multipole susceptibilities for Dirac one-electron atoms in the ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmytkowski, Radosław; Łukasik, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    We present tabulated data for several families of static electric and magnetic multipole susceptibilities for hydrogenic atoms with nuclear charge numbers from the range 1 ⩽ Z ⩽ 137. Atomic nuclei are assumed to be point-like and spinless. The susceptibilities considered include the multipole electric polarizabilities α E L → E L and magnetizabilities (magnetic susceptibilities) χ M L → M L with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4 (i.e., the dipole, quadrupole, octupole and hexadecapole ones), the electric-to-magnetic cross-susceptibilities α E L → M(L - 1) with 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 5 and α E L → M(L + 1) with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4, the magnetic-to-electric cross-susceptibilities χ M L → E(L - 1) with 2 ⩽ L ⩽ 5 and χ M L → E(L + 1) with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4 (it holds that χ M L → E(L ∓ 1) =α E(L ∓ 1) → M L), and the electric-to-toroidal-magnetic cross-susceptibilities α E L → T L with 1 ⩽ L ⩽ 4. Numerical values are computed from general exact analytical formulas, derived by us elsewhere within the framework of the Dirac relativistic quantum mechanics, and involving generalized hypergeometric functions 3F2 of the unit argument.

  5. Magnetic susceptibility application : A window onto ancient environments and climatic variations: Foreword

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, Anne Christine; Whalen, M. T.; Hladil, J.; Chadimova, L.; Chen, D.; Spassov, S.; Boulvain, F.; Devleeschouwer, X.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) is a powerful tool, which is being applied increasingly on sedimentary rocks to constrain stratigraphic correlations, or as a palaeo-environmental or palaeo-climatic tool. The origin of the magnetic minerals responsible for the variations in MS can be linked to various

  6. Magnetic susceptibility application : A window onto ancient environments and climatic variations: Foreword

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, Anne Christine; Whalen, M. T.; Hladil, J.; Chadimova, L.; Chen, D.; Spassov, S.; Boulvain, F.; Devleeschouwer, X.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) is a powerful tool, which is being applied increasingly on sedimentary rocks to constrain stratigraphic correlations, or as a palaeo-environmental or palaeo-climatic tool. The origin of the magnetic minerals responsible for the variations in MS can be linked to various p

  7. Magnetic studies of archaeological obsidian: Variability of eruptive conditions within obsidian flows is key to high-resolution artifact sourcing (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Frahm, E.; Muth, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have endeavored to use petrophysical traits of obsidian, particularly its magnetic properties, as an alternative to conventional geochemical sourcing, one of the greatest successes in archaeological science. Magnetic approaches, however, have not seen widespread application due to their mixed success. In a time when geochemical analyses can be conducted non-destructively, in the field, and in a minute or two, magnetic measurements of obsidian must offer novel archaeological insights to be worthwhile, not merely act as a less successful version of geochemistry. To this end, we report the findings of a large-scale study of obsidian magnetism, which includes 912 geological obsidian specimens and 97 artifacts measured for six simple magnetic parameters. Based on these results, we propose, rather than using magnetic properties to source artifacts to a particular obsidian flow (inter-flow sourcing), these properties are best used to differentiate quarrying sites within an individual flow (intra-flow sourcing). The magnetic properties within an individual flow are highly variable, due to the fact that a single flow experiences a wide array of cooling rates, absolute temperatures, viscosities, deformation, and oxidation. These conditions affect the concentrations, compositions, size distributions, shapes, and spatial arrangements of magnetic grains within an obsidian specimen and, thus, its intrinsic magnetic properties. This variability decreases dramatically at spatial scales of individual outcrops, and decreases even further at scales of hand samples. Thus, magnetic data appear to shift the scale of obsidian sourcing from flows to quarries and, in turn, enable new insights into raw-material procurement strategies, group mobility, lithic technology, and the organization of space and production. From a geologic perspective, the magnetic variability of obsidian can be broadly interpreted within the context of the igneous processes that were active during

  8. Probe imaging studies of magnetic susceptibility and permeability for sensitive characterisation of carbonate reservoir rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, Aleksandr; Bigaliyeva, Akmaral; Dubinin, Vladislav

    2016-04-01

    In this study were disclosed the main principals of identifying petrophysical properties of carbonate reservoirs such as porosity, permeability and magnetic susceptibility. While exploring and developing reservoir there are significant diversity of tasks that can be solved by appropriate knowledge of properties which are listed above. Behavior of fluid flow, distribution of hydrocarbons and other various industrial applications can be solved by measuring areal distribution of these petrophysical parameters. The results demonstrate how magnetic probe and hysteresis measurements correlate with petrophysical parameters in carbonate reservoirs. We made experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of how much magnetic susceptibility depends on the porosity of the rocks and analyzed data with graphics. In theoretical model of the carbonate rocks we considered calcite, dolomite, quartz and combinations of calcite and dolomite, calcite and Fe-dolomite, calcite and quartz, calcite and aragonite with increasing concentrations of the dolomite, Fe-dolomite, quartz and aragonite up to 50% with step of 5%. Here we defined dependence of magnetic susceptibility from the porosity: the higher porosity measurements, the less slope of magnetic susceptibility, consequently mass magnetization is higher for diamagnetic and lower for paramagnetic carbonate rocks, but in the both cases magnetic susceptibility tries to reach zero with increasing of the total porosity. Rock measurements demonstrate that reservoir zones of the low diamagnetic magnetic susceptibility are generally correlated with higher permeability and also porosity distribution. However for different carbonate reservoirs we establish different relationships depending on the complexity of their mineralogy and texture. Application of integral understanding in distribution of permeability, porosity and mineral content in heterogeneous carbonates represented by this approach can be useful tool for carbonate reservoir

  9. Calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling (COSMOS): a method for conditioning the inverse problem from measured magnetic field map to susceptibility source image in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Kressler, Bryan; Wang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility differs among tissues based on their contents of iron, calcium, contrast agent, and other molecular compositions. Susceptibility modifies the magnetic field detected in the MR signal phase. The determination of an arbitrary susceptibility distribution from the induced field shifts is a challenging, ill-posed inverse problem. A method called "calculation of susceptibility through multiple orientation sampling" (COSMOS) is proposed to stabilize this inverse problem. The field created by the susceptibility distribution is sampled at multiple orientations with respect to the polarization field, B(0), and the susceptibility map is reconstructed by weighted linear least squares to account for field noise and the signal void region. Numerical simulations and phantom and in vitro imaging validations demonstrated that COSMOS is a stable and precise approach to quantify a susceptibility distribution using MRI.

  10. RHIC susceptibility to variations in systematic magnetic harmonic errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell, G.F.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.

    1994-08-01

    Results of a study to determine the sensitivity of tune to uncertainties of the systematic magnetic harmonic errors in the 8 cm dipoles of RHIC are reported. Tolerances specified to the manufacturer for tooling and fabrication can result in systematic harmonics different from the expected values. Limits on the range of systematic harmonics have been established from magnet calculations, and the impact on tune from such harmonics has been established.

  11. Magnetic susceptibility of Inconel alloys 718, 625, and 600 at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira B.; Mitchell, Michael R.; Murphy, Allan R.; Goldfarb, Ronald B.; Loughran, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    After a hydrogen fuel bleed valve problem on the Discovery Space Shuttle was traced to the strong magnetization of Inconel 718 in the armature of the linear variable differential transformer near liquid hydrogen temperatures, the ac magnetic susceptibility of three samples of Inconel 718 of slightly different compositions, one sample of Inconel 625, and on sample of Inconel 600 were measured as a function of temperature. Inconel 718 alloys are found to exhibit a spin glass state below 16 K. Inconel 600 exhibits three different magnetic phases, the lowest-temperature state (below 6 K) being somewhat similar to that of Inconel 718. The magnetic states of the Inconel alloys and their magnetic susceptibilities appear to be strongly dependent on the exact composition of the alloy.

  12. Magnetic Susceptibility Analysis of Soil Affected by Hydrocarbon in Wonocolo Traditional Oil Field, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfah, Melianna; Wijatmoko, Bambang; Fitriani, Dini

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of soil affected by hydrocarbon was studied through cored soil samples in two zones (Zone One and Zone Two) of an oil field in Wonocolo Village, East Java. We also collected soil samples as the background from a residential area near the oil field (Zone Three). The Zone One, consisted two cores near producing well; the Zone Two consisted two cores obtained from near a dry hole well and a discontinued well; and the Zone Three consisted two cores to validate the initial soil magnetic susceptibility value in this area. The hydrocarbon content measurement was also done for the upper part of each cores using distillation method to identify the correlation between magnetic susceptibility and hydrocarbon content. From magnetic susceptibility measurement in dual frequency, samples from the Zone One and Zone Two have magnetic susceptibility range from 6,1 × 10-8 m3kg-1 - 160 × 10-8 m3kg-1 and 15,7 × 10-8 m3kg-1 - 417,9 × 10-8 m3kg-1, respectively. Whereas background samples from Zone Three have magnetic susceptibility range from 4,8 × 10-8 m3kg-1 to 81,1 × 10-8 m3kg-1. We found low χfd (%) in samples with high magnetic susceptibility values, shown that there was no indication of superparamagnetic minerals in the samples. The hydrocarbon content measurement shows the value range of 8% - 14% only exists in the upper part of all cores in Zone One and one core in Zone Two. From this analysis, we assume that other than the volume of the hydrocarbon content in soil, the period of petroleum hydrocarbon deposition in soil and the fossil fuel combustion generated in the study site could differently increase the soil magnetic susceptibility value in this area. Positive correlation between the two parameters hopefully could contribute to develop environmental magnetic methods for detecting oil spills in soil, especially to remediate former hydrocarbon exploration and production area.

  13. Identification of the vortex glass phase by harmonics of the AC magnetic susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Adesso, M G; Polichetti, M.; Pace, S.

    2005-01-01

    We compared the AC magnetic susceptibility behaviour for the vortex glass phase and for the creep phenomena with an inhomogeneous pinning potential. The temperature dependence of the harmonics of the susceptibility have been numerically simulated with these two models, and we studied them as a function of the frequency, in terms of Cole-Cole plots. From our analysis we show that it is possible to distinguish between the two different phases, because of their clear differences in the Cole-Cole...

  14. Micromagnetic susceptometer for the measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of the actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nave, S. E.

    1979-08-01

    A device with the sensitivity for measuring the magnetic susceptibility of small volume samples (10/sup -7/ cm/sup 3/) as a function of temperature from 4.2K to 300K is described as designed specifically for measurements with microgram or submicrogram quantities of the actinide metals. Specifically, results are given for the susceptibility of curium-248 in the temperature range from 4.2K to 300K.

  15. Relationship between Magnetic Susceptibility and Heavy Metals Concentration in Polluted Soils of Lenjanat Region, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi M. H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the relationship between soil magnetic susceptibility and the content of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Fe on 233 samples from polluted soils of Lenjanat Region in the Isfahan. The aim was to investigate the suitability of such measurements for indicating heavy metal pollution. Heavy metal contents were determined after extraction with nitric acid. Basic soil characteristics were determined using common methods. Geochemical analysis of soil samples showed close correlation between Cd, Ni and Fe. Cd concentration was the highest of all the elements studied. The correlation between the analyzed metals and magnetic susceptibility are positive and significant for Fe and Cu. Results suggests that magnetic susceptibility can be used as a guideline to find contaminated urban areas with Fe and Cu in this region.

  16. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; Suszeptibilitaetseffekte in der Kernspinresonanzbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-07-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  17. Comparison between theory and simulations for the magnetization and the susceptibility of polydisperse ferrofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, I; Nagy, S; Dietrich, S

    2013-11-20

    The influence of polydispersity on the magnetization of ferrofluids is studied based on a previously published magnetization equation of state (Szalai and Dietrich, 2011 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 23 326004) and computer simulations. The polydispersity of the particle diameter is described by the gamma distribution function. Canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to test these theoretical results for the initial susceptibility and the magnetization. The results for the magnetic properties of the polydisperse systems turn out to be in quantitative agreement with our present simulation data. In addition, we find good agreement between our theory and experimental data for magnetite-based ferrofluids.

  18. D.C. electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of polythiophene doped with iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Ashish B.; Kelkar, Deepali S.

    2013-06-01

    Polythiophene was chemically synthesized, undoped and then re-doped with iodine. FTIR spectra confirm iodine doping. XRD analysis is used to calculate crystallinity of the samples. Electrical conductivity measurements were carried out using two probe technique in the temperature range from 300 K to 373 K. Undoped and doped samples show semi conducting nature. After doping the conductivity increases by eight orders of magnitude at 318 K. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out using Guoy's method, both samples show diamagnetic nature. Conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that predominant charge carriers, in the iodine doped polythiophene, are bipolarons.

  19. Magnetic susceptibility of Al2RE compounds in crystal and liquid states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.S. Uporova; S.A. Uporov; V.E. Sidorov

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of Al2RE (RE=Y,Ce,Sm,Gd,Dy,Ho,Yb) compounds was studied experimentally in wide temperature (T=290-2000 K) and field (B=0.3-1.3 T) intervals.The abnormal increase in susceptibility beginning above the melting point was fixed for all the compositions.The values for the effective magnetic moments per RE atoms in these compounds were found to be smaller than the values typical for free ions RE3+.The results were discussed in supposition of the directed bonds between aluminum and rare-earth atoms.

  20. Low-temperature magnetic susceptibility of concentrated ferrofluids: The influence of polydispersity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Alexey O., E-mail: Alexey.Ivanov@usu.ru; Elfimova, Ekaterina A.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper we address the question of theoretical explanation of extremely high low-temperature initial magnetic susceptibility of concentrated ferrofluids. These laboratory synthesized samples [A.F. Pshenichnikov, A.V. Lebedev, J. Chem. Phys. 121(11) (2004) 5455; Colloid J. 67(2) (2005) 189] demonstrated the record-breaking values χ∼120–150 at temperatures ∼ 230–240 K. The existing models predict such high susceptibility only under the assumption of unreasonably large dipolar coupling constant, which is out of the range of applicability. Here we calculate the second virial contribution to susceptibility for polydisperse ferrofluid, modeled by the dipolar hard sphere fluid. In the resulting expression there exists the parameter, which plays a part of dipolar coupling constant and which is defined in a form of double averaging of high powers of particle sizes over the granulometric distribution. For real particle size distribution this effective parameter at least twice exceeds the commonly defined polydisperse dipolar coupling constant. We show that the low-temperature magnetic susceptibility of the record-breaking ferrofluids could be explained theoretically on the basis of the first terms of the polydisperse second virial contribution in combination with the second-order modified mean field model. - Highlights: • Record-breaking magnetic susceptibility of ferrofluids at low temperatures. • Second virial contribution to magnetic susceptibility of polydisperse ferrofluids. • Interparticle dipole correlations are more pronounced in dense ferrofluids. • Presented model describes the ferrofluid susceptibility χ∼120 at temperature 240 K.

  1. Effects of Size, deGennes and Ginzburg-Landau Parameters on the Magnetic Susceptibility of an Isotropic Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, C. A.; González, J. D.; Barba-Ortega, J.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic signature of a nanoscopic superconductor immersed in a magnetic applied field H_e is calculated numerically. The calculated magnetic susceptibility partial M / partial H_e of a superconducting nanoprism shows discontinuities and a quasiperiodic modulation at the vortex transition fields H_T (fields for which one or several vortices enter/leave the sample). In this contribution, we studied the influence of the sample size, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ and the deGennes parameter b on the magnetic susceptibility in a type-II isotropic superconductor. We found distinct signatures of the magnetic susceptibility when superconducting samples of two and three dimensions are considered.

  2. AC susceptibility as a tool to probe the dipolar interaction in magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Landi, Gabriel T.; Arantes, Fabiana R; Cornejo, Daniel R.; Bakuzis, Andris F.; Andreu, Irene; Natividad, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The dipolar interaction is known to substantially affect the properties of magnetic nanoparticles. This is particularly important when the particles are kept in a fluid suspension or packed inside nano-carriers. In addition to its usual long-range nature, in these cases the dipolar interaction may also induce the formation of clusters of particles, thereby strongly modifying their magnetic anisotropies. In this paper we show how AC susceptibility may be used to obtain important information re...

  3. Obtaining the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L. M. O.; Resende, S. M.; Leite Alves, H. W.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic field interactions with particles, as observed in magnetophoresis, are becoming important tool to understand the nature of the iron role in heme molecular complex, besides other useful applications. Accurate estimations of some macroscopic magnetic properties from quantum mechanical calculations, such as the magnetic susceptibility, can also check the reliability of the heme microscopic models. In this work we report, by using the Stoner criterion, a simple way to obtain the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from Density Functional Theory calculations. Some of our calculated structural properties and electronic structure show good agreement with both the available experimental and theoretical data, and the results show that its groundstate is a triplet 3A state. From the obtained results, we have evaluated the exchange interaction energy, J = 0.98 eV, the associated magnetic energy gain, Δ EM =-0.68 eV, and the magnetic susceptibility, χ0=1.73 ×10-6 cm3/mol for the heme alone (with uncompleted Fe ligands). If we consider the heme complex with the two histidine residues (completing the Fe ligands), we have then obtained χ0=5.27 ×10-12 cm3/g, which is in good agreement with experimental magnetophoresis data.

  4. Obtaining the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from DFT calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. O. Pereira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field interactions with particles, as observed in magnetophoresis, are becoming important tool to understand the nature of the iron role in heme molecular complex, besides other useful applications. Accurate estimations of some macroscopic magnetic properties from quantum mechanical calculations, such as the magnetic susceptibility, can also check the reliability of the heme microscopic models. In this work we report, by using the Stoner criterion, a simple way to obtain the magnetic susceptibility of the heme complex from Density Functional Theory calculations. Some of our calculated structural properties and electronic structure show good agreement with both the available experimental and theoretical data, and the results show that its groundstate is a triplet 3A state. From the obtained results, we have evaluated the exchange interaction energy, J = 0.98 eV, the associated magnetic energy gain, ΔEM=−0.68 eV, and the magnetic susceptibility, χ0=1.73×10−6 cm3/mol for the heme alone (with uncompleted Fe ligands. If we consider the heme complex with the two histidine residues (completing the Fe ligands, we have then obtained χ0=5.27×10−12 cm3/g, which is in good agreement with experimental magnetophoresis data.

  5. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene) alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene) alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same interval as the

  6. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same

  7. The AC multi-harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurement setup at the LNF-INFN

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shenghao; Di Gioacchino, Daniele; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    The AC magnetic susceptibility is a fundamental method in materials science, which allows to probe the dynamic magnetic response of magnetic materials and superconductors. The LAMPS laboratory at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the INFN hosts an AC multi-harmonic magnetometer that allows performing experiments with an AC magnetic field ranging from 0.1 to 20 Gauss and in the frequency range from 17 to 2070 Hz. A DC magnetic field from 0 to 8 T produced by a superconducting magnet can be applied, while data may be collected in the temperature range 4.2-300 K using a liquid He cryostat under different temperature cycles setups. The first seven AC magnetic multi-harmonic susceptibility components can be measured with a magnetic sensitivity of 1x10-6 emu and a temperature precision of 0.01 K. Here we will describe in detail about schematic of the magnetometer, special attention will be dedicated to the instruments control, data acquisition framework and the user-friendly LabVIEW-based software platform.

  8. 3D linear inversion of magnetic susceptibility data acquired by frequency domain EMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesson, J.; Tabbagh, A.; Simon, F.-X.; Dabas, M.

    2017-01-01

    Low induction number EMI instruments are able to simultaneously measure a soil's apparent magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity. This family of dual measurement instruments is highly useful for the analysis of soils and archeological sites. However, the electromagnetic properties of soils are found to vary over considerably different ranges: whereas their electrical conductivity varies from ≤ 0.1 to ≥ 100 mS/m, their relative magnetic permeability remains within a very small range, between 1.0001 and 1.01 SI. Consequently, although apparent conductivity measurements need to be inverted using non-linear processes, the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility can be approximated through the use of linear processes, as in the case of the magnetic prospection technique. Our proposed 3D inversion algorithm starts from apparent susceptibility data sets, acquired using different instruments over a given area. A reference vertical profile is defined by considering the mode of the vertical distributions of both the electrical resistivity and of the magnetic susceptibility. At each point of the mapped area, the reference vertical profile response is subtracted to obtain the apparent susceptibility variation dataset. A 2D horizontal Fourier transform is applied to these variation datasets and to the dipole (impulse) response of each instrument, a (vertical) 1D inversion is performed at each point in the spectral domain, and finally the resulting dataset is inverse transformed to restore the apparent 3D susceptibility variations. It has been shown that when applied to synthetic results, this method is able to correct the apparent deformations of a buried object resulting from the geometry of the instrument, and to restore reliable quantitative susceptibility contrasts. It also allows the thin layer solution, similar to that used in magnetic prospection, to be implemented. When applied to field data it initially delivers a level of contrast

  9. Magnetic susceptibility at zero and nonzero chemical potential in QCD and QED

    CERN Document Server

    Orlovsky, V D

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of the quark matter in QCD is calculated in a closed form for an arbitrary chemical potential \\mu. For small \\mu, \\mu T^2, the oscillations as functions of eB occur, characteristic of the de Haas-van Alphen effect. Results are compared with available lattice data.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Costagli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1 in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM. Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  11. Magnetic susceptibility in the deep layers of the primary motor cortex in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagli, M; Donatelli, G; Biagi, L; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Siciliano, G; Tosetti, M; Cosottini, M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1) in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN) impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR) T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). Measures of magnetic susceptibility correlated with the expected concentration of non-heme iron in different regions of the cerebral cortex in healthy subjects. In ALS patients, significant increases in magnetic susceptibility co-localized with the T2* hypointensity observed in the middle and deep layers of M1. The magnetic susceptibility, hence iron concentration, of the deep cortical layers of patients' M1 subregions corresponding to Penfield's areas of the hand and foot in both hemispheres significantly correlated with the clinical scores of UMN impairment of the corresponding limbs. QSM therefore reflects the presence of iron deposits related to neuroinflammatory reaction and cortical microgliosis, and might prove useful in estimating M1 iron concentration, as a possible radiological sign of severe UMN burden in ALS patients.

  12. Magnetic Susceptibility as a Proxy for Investigating Microbial Mediated Iron Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. Our objective was to determine if MS can be used as an intrinsic bioremediation indicator due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria. A contaminated and an uncontaminated core were r...

  13. Anisotropic magnetic susceptibility of erbium and ytterbium in zircon, ZrSiO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.N.; Briggs, Charles; Tsang, T.; Senftle, F.; Alexander, Corrine

    1977-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made for both Er- and Yb-doped (1̃03ppm) zircon single crystals with the magnetic field perpendicular and parallel to the [001] axis. Large susceptibility anisotropies were found in both cases. Our observed anisotropies of ZrSiO4: Yb indicate small populations (1̃9%) of Yb ions at the axial (tetragonal) sites, as the susceptibility of ZrSiO4: Yb would be nearly isotropic if the Yb ions only occupied the orthorhombic sites. For Er3+ in orthorhombic sites of zircon, our data indicate that the first excited state is paramagnetic with gx = 9 and gy 5̃ at 20 cm-1 above the ground state (gx 0̃, gy 1̃5). The first excited state is quite similar to the ground states observed for Er3+ in many host lattices. ?? 1977.

  14. Analysis of the susceptibility of condensed oxygen under high pressures and in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilit Doğan, E.; Yurtseven, H.

    2017-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is analyzed at some constant pressures by a power-law formula using the experimental data from the literature for the α - β and β - γ transitions in oxygen. A weak discontinuous (nearly continuous) transition occurring from the α to the β phase, becomes more discontinuous (weakly first order) for the β - γ transition as observed experimentally, which can be explained in terms of the critical exponents deduced from our analysis. The magnetic field dependence of the differential susceptibility is also analyzed in this study for the α -O2 at 4.2 K by a power-law formula using the experimental data. λ-type of observed behaviour of the differential susceptibility is discussed in terms of our analysis for the α -O2 .

  15. Magnetoresistance, susceptibility and magnetization measurements on RNiBC compounds (R = Er, Ho, Dy, Tb, and Gd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tróchez, J. C.; Sánchez, D. R.; Giordanengo, B.; Fontes, M. B.; Continentino, Múcio; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. M.

    1997-08-01

    We studied magnetic behavior of the RNiBC compounds by magnetic and transport measurements. At low temperatures, each compound has different magnetic structure. Magnetoresistivity data are in good accordance with theory of magnetic elementary interactions, susceptibility reveals the magnetic transition and Curie Weiss behavior and magnetization shows low value of the saturation compared with the free R+3 ion that confirm that crystalline electric field is strong as in the RNi2B2C series.

  16. Global Lithospheric Apparent Susceptibility Distribution Converted from Geomagnetic Models by CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Magnetic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jinsong; Chen, Chao; Xiong, Xiong; Li, Yongdong; Liang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Recently, because of continually accumulated magnetic measurements by CHAMP satellite and Swarm constellation of three satellites and well developed methodologies and techniques of data processing and geomagnetic field modeling etc., global lithospheric magnetic anomaly field models become more and more reliable. This makes the quantitative interpretation of lithospheric magnetic anomaly field possible for having an insight into large-scale magnetic structures in the crust and uppermost mantle. Many different approaches have been utilized to understand the magnetized sources, such as forward, inversion, statistics, correlation analysis, Euler deconvolution, signal transformations etc. Among all quantitative interpretation methods, the directly converting a magnetic anomaly map into a magnetic susceptibility anomaly map proposed by Arkani-Hamed & Strangway (1985) is, we think, the most fast quantitative interpretation tool for global studies. We just call this method AS85 hereinafter for short. Although Gubbins et al. (2011) provided a formula to directly calculate the apparent magnetic vector distribution, the AS85 method introduced constraints of magnetized direction and thus corresponding results are expected to be more robust especially in world-wide continents. Therefore, in this study, we first improved the AS85 method further considering non-axial dipolar inducing field using formulae by Nolte & Siebert (1987), initial model or priori information for starting coefficients in the apparent susceptibility conversion, hidden longest-wavelength components of lithospheric magnetic field and field contaminations from global oceanic remanent magnetization. Then, we used the vertically integrated susceptibility model by Hemant & Maus (2005) and vertically integrated remanent magnetization model by Masterton et al. (2013) to test the validity of our improved method. Subsequently, we applied the conversion method to geomagnetic field models by CHAMP and Swarm satellite

  17. In situ measurement of alternating current magnetic susceptibility of Pd-hydrogen system for determination of hydrogen concentration in bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamaru, Satoshi; Hara, Masanori; Matsuyama, Masao

    2012-07-01

    An alternating current magnetic susceptometer for use as a hydrogen gauge for hydrogen-storage materials was designed and developed. The experimental system can simultaneously measure the hydrogen equilibrium pressure and the magnetic susceptibility of metal hydrides. The background voltage of the susceptometer was stabilized for a long period of time, without any adjustments, by attaching an efficient compensation circuit. The performance of the susceptometer at a static hydrogen concentration was demonstrated by measuring the magnetic susceptibility of a Pd-hydrogen system under equilibrium conditions. The in situ measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of Pd during hydrogen absorption was carried out using the susceptometer. Since the in situ magnetic susceptibility obtained at a lower initial hydrogen pressure agreed with the magnetic susceptibility measured at a static hydrogen concentration, the susceptometer could be used to determine the hydrogen concentration in Pd in situ. At a higher initial hydrogen pressure, enhancement of the magnetic susceptibility was observed at the beginning of hydrogen absorption because the magnetic moments induced by the large temporary strain generated in the Pd affected the magnetic susceptibility.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetoresistance of neutron-irradiated doped SI whiskers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druzhinin, A.A., E-mail: druzh@polynet.lviv.ua [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera Str., 12, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Ostrovskii, I.P.; Khoverko, Yu.M. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera Str., 12, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Rogacki, K. [International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Wroclaw (Poland); Litovchenko, P.G.; Pavlovska, N.T. [Institute of Nuclear Researches, NAS of Ukraine, 47, Prospect Nauky, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Pavlovskyy, Yu.V.; Ugrin, Yu.O. [Ivan Franko Drohobych State Pedagogical University, 24, Franko str., 82100 Drohobych (Ukraine)

    2015-11-01

    The effect of 8.6·10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2} fast neutron irradiation on the magnetic susceptibility and magnetoresistance of Si whiskers with impurity concentration near metal–insulator transition (MIT) has been studied. Neutron irradiated specimens with boron concentration away of MIT are mainly diamagnetic with a small amount of paramagnetic centers originated from dangling bonds on the whisker surface. It has been established that at temperatures near 4.2 K, a significant contribution to the conductivity is made by light charge carriers of low concentration but with high mobility. The as grown whiskers with impurity concentration correspondent to MIT showed hysteresis loops in magnetization at temperature of liquid helium. Besides hysteresis loops in magnetoresistance was observed for whiskers under compression stress at low temperature up to 7 K. The possible reason of the effect can be magnetic interaction between impurities centers in subsurface region of the whisker with the orbital moment of dangle bounds in the whisker core–shell interstices. - Highlights: • Neutron irradiation influence on magnetic susceptibility of Si whiskers is studied. • Neutron irradiated Si whiskers with boron concentration away of MIT are diamagnetic. • Whiskers in the vicinity to MIT showed hysteresis loops in magnetoresistance. • Whiskers in the vicinity to MIT showed hysteresis loops in magnetic susceptibility.

  19. Can the magnetic susceptibility record of Chinese Red Clay sequence be used for palaeomonsoon reconstructions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoyong; Han, Yan; Liu, Xiuming; Chang, Liao; Lü, Bin; Chen, Qu; Guo, Xuelian; Yan, Junhui; Yan, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Red Clay underlying the loess-palaeosol sequences on the Chinese Loess Plateau is an eolian deposit. There is a controversy over whether magnetic susceptibility (χ) variations in Red Clay sequence can be used as an indicator of summer palaeomonsoon intensity. This study investigates the magnetic mineralogy, magnetic concentration and magnetic grain size distribution of Jiaxian Red Clay with multimagnetic methods. Our results indicate that the magnetic properties of Jiaxian Red Clay are similar to those of the Quaternary loess-palaeosol sequences, and ultrafine ferrimagnetic grains produced during pedogenesis are responsible for an increase in susceptibility, therefore the χ enhancement mechanism of Red Clay is similar to that of the overlying loess-palaeosol sequences. This paper explores χ variations in the Red Clay sequence through spatial and temporal analysis. The susceptibility variation of six sites along a NNE to SSW transect correlate to palaeoclimatic cycles, so χ can be used to trace the summer palaeomonsoon intensity from a spatial perspective. However, a simple loess-derived calibration function cannot be used to quantitative reconstruct the palaeomonsoon intensity variations thought time. An adjusted calibration function for palaeosols from Red Clay sequence needs to be developed, so that χ can be used to quantitative reconstruct palaeomonsoon intensity. Further study is necessary to develop such a transfer function.

  20. Mapping soil erosion using magnetic susceptibility. A case study in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Nazarok

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic element grouping of the magnetic susceptibility (MS values is conducted. The relation between MS values and erosion index is shown. The objective of the investigation is study of the information about magnetic susceptibility of soils as a diagnostic criterion to erodibility. The investigations were conducted in the limits of Tcherkascy Tishki territory, Kharkiv district. The soils of the territory are presented by catenary row of chernozems. The study area was used in the field crop rotation. The soil conservation technologies have not been applied. The data analyze confirmed high correlation of the MS, erosive index and humus content. The possibility of MS cartogram using at the soil erodibility map is presented. The magnetic methods can be extensively used at the soil erosion investigations thanks to the speed and low cost.

  1. Magnetic susceptibility at high fields of Pb{sub 2}V{sub 3}O{sub 9}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waki, T. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: twac@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Tsujii, N. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Itoh, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Michioka, C. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yoshimura, K. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Suzuki, O. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Kitazawa, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Kido, G. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2007-08-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility was measured for the S=12 quasi one dimensional antiferromagnet Pb{sub 2}V{sub 3}O{sub 9} under the steady magnetic field up to {mu}{sub 0}H=30 T. This material has alternating exchange interaction and a spin-gap at zero magnetic field. An anomaly of magnetic susceptibility indicating the field-induced antiferromagnetic long-range order was observed in high magnetic fields. The Neel temperature at high fields is much lower than the calculated value based on the standard mean-field theory of field-induced magnetic order.

  2. Artifacts in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shin Gu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments.

  3. Artifacts as Conventional Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Deborah R.; Callanan, Maureen A.

    2007-01-01

    What underlies children's understanding of artifacts? Studies suggest that beginning around age 7, people reason about artifacts in terms of the inventor's purpose--termed "the design stance." Our two studies emphasize another component of artifact understanding--the cultural nature of artifacts--by demonstrating people's sensitivity to an…

  4. The complex initial reluctivity, permeability and susceptibility spectra of magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, N. C.

    2015-03-01

    The HF complex permeability spectrum of a magnetic material is deduced from the measured impedance spectrum, which is then normalized to a series permeability spectrum. However, this series permeability spectrum has previously been shown to correspond to a parallel magnetic circuit, which is not appropriate. Some of the implications of this truth are examined. This electric/magnetic duality has frustrated efforts to interpret the shape of the complex magnetic permeability spectra of materials, and has hindered the application of impedance spectroscopy to magnetic materials. In the presence of magnetic loss, the relationship between the relative magnetic permeability and the magnetic susceptibility is called into question. The use of reluctivity spectra for expressing magnetic material properties is advocated. The relative loss factor, tanδm/μi is shown to be an approximation for the imaginary part of the reluctivity. A single relaxation model for the initial reluctivity spectra of magnetic materials is presented, and its principles are applied to measurements of a high permeability ferrite. The results are presented as contour plots of the spectra as a function of temperature.

  5. Environmental mechanism of magnetic susceptibility changes of lacustrine sediments from Lake Hulun, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡守云; 王苏民; Erwin; Appel; 吉磊

    2000-01-01

    The changes of magnetic susceptibility (κ) are correlated with those of corresponding sedimentological, geochemical, mineralogical and biological results, which verifies that κ can be taken as one of the environmental proxies. However, usually the exact origin of magnetic signal is poorly understood, and is difficult to relate with the environmental evolution. Magnetic properties of material derived from the catchment and sedimentary environment may affect the accumulation, preservation, or authigenesis and diagenesis of magnetic minerals. In the Lake Hulun region in Inner Mongolia, it is found that muddy sediments, deposited during high water level period (corresponding to humid climate), have comparatively high κ values. In contrast, the sandy sediments, deposited during low water level period (corresponding to arid climate), have low κ values. Detailed rock magnetic investigation confirms that detrital magnetite derived from volcanic rocks in the catchment exists in both muddy and sandy sediments

  6. Very high field magnetization and AC susceptibility of native horse spleen ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertin, R.P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Room 201, Science and Technology Center, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)]. E-mail: robert.guertin@tufts.edu; Harrison, N. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Zhou, Z.X. [MS6056, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); McCall, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Drymiotis, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    The magnetization of native horse spleen ferritin protein is measured in pulsed magnetic fields to 55 T at T=1.52 K. The magnetization rises smoothly with negative curvature due to uncompensated Fe{sup 3+} spins and with a large high field slope due to the underlying antiferromagnetic ferritin core. Even at highest fields the magnetic moment is only {approx}4% of the saturation moment of the full complement of Fe{sup 3+} in the ferritin molecule. The AC magnetic susceptibility, {chi} {sub AC}(T,f), responding to the uncompensated spins, reaches a maximum near the superparamagnetic blocking temperature with the temperature of the maximum, T {sub M}, varying with excitation frequency, T {sub M} {sup -1} {alpha} log f for 10{<=}f{<=}10{sup 4} Hz.

  7. Eddy currents in the anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility measurement - A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, Josef; Hrouda, Frantisek

    2016-04-01

    Analytical solutions of Maxwell equations for eddy currents caused by AC field in a conductive sphere, known from 1950s, provide a general formula for magnetic susceptibility. It contains the parameters describing the sphere (its size, conductivity and permeability), surrounding medium (permeability) and the applied field (frequency). The formula is complex and without numerical evaluation it is difficult to distinguish the real (in-phase) and imaginary (out-of-phase) part of susceptibility. Representing all the parameters by only two, relative permeability (sphere vs. medium) and skin ratio (summarizing the effect of sphere size, conductivity and permeability, and frequency of the field), we derive approximate formulas for both phases and the phase angle. These are valid for a reasonable range of parameters (from rock magnetism point of view) and enable us to study their influence. The in-phase susceptibility depends very weakly on the fourth power of the skin ratio while the out-of-phase susceptibility depends more strongly on its second power. The coefficients of the dependence are expressed by means of relative permeability. The approximations of in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibilities provide a possibility to assess possible effects of eddy currents in rocks in case of low content of conductive minerals and solve problems of the type by which size one piece of a mineral in the measured sample can produce a phase shift that is observed by measurement. Examples of magnetite and pyrrhotite are given.

  8. Ultrasound Artifacts - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönhof, J A

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of artifacts is essential for the competent use of ultrasound. Artifacts are method-based and should be differentiated from image errors of another genesis. They are logical and occur because the conditions required for image generation do not fully correspond to the reality. Artifacts occur due to disregard of the true dimensions of sound lobes (slice-thickness artifacts and bow artifacts, range ambiguities) and due to different types of mirroring with different appearances. There are also comet-tail-like artifacts such as comet-tail and ring-down artifacts.

  9. PET/CT Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  10. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    We increasingly interact with multiple interactive artifacts with overlapping capabilities during our daily activities. It has previously been shown that the use of an interactive artifact cannot be understood in isolation, but artifacts must be understood as part of an artifact ecology, where ar...... in artifact ecologies cannot be understood as static, instead they evolve dynamically over time. We provide activity theory-based concepts to explain these dynamics....

  11. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  12. Non-perturbative treatment of molecules in linear magnetic fields: calculation of anapole susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I; Fliegl, Heike

    2013-10-28

    In the present study a non-perturbative approach to ab initio calculations of molecules in strong, linearly varying, magnetic fields is developed. The use of London atomic orbitals (LAOs) for non-uniform magnetic fields is discussed and the standard rationale of gauge-origin invariance is generalized to invariance under arbitrary constant shifts of the magnetic vector potential. Our approach is applied to study magnetically induced anapole moments (or toroidal moments) and the related anapole susceptibilities for a test set of chiral and nonchiral molecules. For the first time numerical anapole moments are accessible on an ab initio level of theory. Our results show that the use of London atomic orbitals dramatically improves the basis set convergence also for magnetic properties related to non-uniform magnetic fields, at the cost that the Hellmann-Feynman theorem does not apply for a finite LAO basis set. It is shown that the mixed anapole susceptibility can be related to chirality, since its trace vanishes for an achiral molecule.

  13. Frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility of magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles embedded in PAA hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T; Philipse, Albert P; Erné, Ben H

    2013-05-14

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network.

  14. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H. Erné

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid-based hydrogels (PAA. To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network.

  15. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T.; Philipse, Albert P.; Erné, Ben H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network. PMID:23673482

  16. Identification of Heavy Metal Pollution Derived From Traffic in Roadside Soil Using Magnetic Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pingguo; Ge, Jing; Yang, Miao

    2017-06-01

    The study integrates surface and vertical distribution of magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal contents (Pb, Cu, Zn and Fe) to characterize the signature of vehicle pollutants in roadside soils at Linfen city, China. Sites with reforestation and without vegetation cover were investigated. The results showed that magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal contents were higher at the roadside without trees than in the reforest belt. The variations of magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal contents decreased both with distance and with depth. The maximum value was observed at 5-10 m away from the roadside edge. The vertical distribution in soil revealed accumulation of pollutants in 0-5 cm topsoils. The average contents were higher than the background values and in the order Fe (107.21 g kg(-1)), Zn (99.72 mg kg(-1)), Pb (90.99 mg kg(-1)), Cu (36.14 mg kg(-1)). Coarse multi domain grains were identified as the dominating magnetic particles. Multivariate statistical and SEM/EDX analyses suggested that the heavy metals derived from traffic sources. Trees act as efficient receptors and green barrier, which can reduce vehicle derived pollution.

  17. Rotational dynamics of magnetic silica spheres studied by measuring the complex magnetic susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claesson, E.M.; Erne, B.H.; Philipse, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The weak permanent magnetic dipole moment of cobalt ferrite-doped colloidal silica spheres was increased by exposure to a saturating magnetic field. The resulting change of the rotational dynamics of the magnetic microspheres in a weak alternating field was measured from low to high volume fraction

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and its relationship with paleoenvironments, diagenesis and remagnetization: examples from the Devonian carbonates of Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, A.-C.; Dekkers, M.J.; Mabille, C.; Boulvain, F.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the origin of the initial magnetic susceptibility (χin) signal in carbonate sequences, a rock magnetic investigation that includes analysis of acquisition curves of the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and hysteresis parameters, was undertaken on Devonian carbonates from

  19. Anisotropies of anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility of marly clays from Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagnotti

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Marly clays from an Upper Pliocene unit at Valle Ricca (Rorne were investigated for their Anisotropy of Anhysteretic Remanence (AAR and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS. The study of AAR was accomplished for the first time in ltaly, developing a suitable laboratory technique and adapting a standard statistical procedure. The comparison between anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility anisotropies discriminates the fabric of the ferromagnetic fraction from that of the paramagnetic matrix of the rock. The separation of fabric components was applied to distinguish subsequent geological processes that affected the total rock fabric. The results indicate that the clayey units are particularly suitable for the empirical investigation of fabric to strain relationship in weakly deformed rocks.

  20. Universal linear-temperature dependence of static magnetic susceptibility in iron-pnictides

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guang-Ming; Su, Yue-Hua; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Weng, Zheng-Yu; Lee, Dung-Hai; Xiang, Tao

    2008-01-01

    A universal linear-temperature dependence of the uniform magnetic susceptibility has been observed in the nonmagnetic normal state of iron-pnictides. This non-Pauli and non-Curie-Weiss-like paramagnetic behavior cannot be understood within a pure itinerant picture. We argue that it results from the existence of a wide antiferromagnetic fluctuation window in which the local spin-density-wave correlations exist but the global directional order has not been established yet.

  1. Reinvestigation of superconducting phase diagram of UGe{sub 2} by AC magnetic susceptibility experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, S. [Deptartment of Physics, University of Nagoya, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan)]. E-mail: f060214d@mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Deguchi, K. [Deptartment of Physics, University of Nagoya, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan); Aso, N. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan); Homma, Y. [Oarai Branch, Inst. for Mater. Research, University of Tohoku, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y. [Oarai Branch, Inst. for Mater. Research, University of Tohoku, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Sato, N.K. [Deptartment of Physics, University of Nagoya, Nagoya, 464-8602 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    We report a superconducting phase diagram of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe{sub 2} investigated by AC magnetic susceptibility measurements. In contrast to previous phase diagrams, we found that the superconducting transition temperature and volume fraction show a 'M-shaped' structure as a function of pressure. From this observation, we suggest that both of two critical points will play a crucial role in the occurrence of superconductivity in UGe{sub 2}.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility, transport properties, XPS and electronic structure of UCoGa{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morkowski, J.A. E-mail: jmorkows@ifmpan.poznan.pl; Szajek, A.; Bukowski, Z.; Sulkowski, C.; Troc, R.; Chelkowska, G

    2004-05-01

    Monocrystals of the tetragonal compound UCoGa{sub 5} were grown. Magnetic susceptibility, electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power were measured both along the tetragonal c-axis and in the perpendicular direction. The electronic band structure was calculated by the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method in the atomic sphere approximation, with spin-orbit interactions taken into account. The X-ray photoemission spectrum was measured and calculated with a satisfactory agreement.

  3. Test of magnetic susceptibility and grain-size age models of loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ages of the stratigraphic boundary MIS1/2 and MIS3/4 of the Yuanbu loess section in Linxia are used as the basis of the nodal control age. The age of MIS1/2 and MIS3/4 are obtained from the latest international research result-the climatic events recorded in the stalagmite in the Hulu Cave in Nanjing, that MIS1/2 is 11.5 kaB. P. and MIS3/4 is 59.8 kaB.P.. The ages of the two climatic events contain three nodal age control models (Model 1: 0 kaB. P. -59.8 kaB. P.; Model 2: 0 kaB. P. -11.5 kaB. P. and 11.5kaB. P. -59.8 kaB. P.; Model 3: 11.5 kaB. P. -59.8 kaB. P. ), which are used as the nodal control age separately. The deposition times of various stratigraphic horizons are calculated by using the magnetic susceptibility age model and grain-size age model, and then compared with each other. In addition, the AMS14C age, OSL age and the ages of YD and H events are compared with the ages of the corresponding horizons calculated by the three models of nodal control ages. From the analyses of lithologic characters and climatic stages it has been found that both the magnetic susceptibility age model and the grain-size age model have some defects. Because the accurate control ages are selected as the nodal points of the glacial period or interglacial period, the stratigraphic deposition times determined by the high resolution of magnetic susceptibility age model and grain-size age model approximate to the actual ages. As for the relative accuracy of the two age models, the magnetic susceptibility age model is more accurate than the grain-size age model.

  4. Magnetic Susceptibility of Soil to Differentiate Soil Environments in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Vogelei Ramos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The interest in new techniques to support digital soil mapping (DSM is increasing. Numerous studies pointed out that the measure of magnetic susceptibility (MS can be extremely useful in the identification of properties related with factors and processes of soil formation, applied to soil mapping. This study addressed the effectiveness of magnetic soil susceptibility to identify and facilitate the distinction of different pedogenic environments of a representative hillslope in the highland Planalto Médio in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS, Brazil. In a 350-ha area in the municipality of Santo Augusto, RS, a representative transect was selected, trenches opened for soil characterization and 29 grid points marked at regular distances of 50 m, where soil samples were collected (layers 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.15, 0.15-0.30, and 0.30-0.60 m to analyze soil properties. Data from the transect samples were subjected to descriptive statistics. Limits of the pedogenetic environments along the slope were identified by the Split Moving Window (SMW Boundary Analysis. The combined use of soil magnetic susceptibility and the SMW technique was effective in identifying different pedogenetic environments in the study area.

  5. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Torres-Díaz, I. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Chiu-Lam, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hernández, M. [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation. - Highlights: • Method to estimate the contributions of the relaxation mechanism to the magnetic response. • Method applies to cases where the Brownian and Néel peaks do not overlap. • The method applies for ferrofluids prepared with as–synthesized particles.

  6. Improved lumen visualization in metallic vascular implants by reducing RF artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, LW; Bakker, CJG; Viergever, MA

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a method is proposed for MRI of the lumen of metallic vascular implants, like stents or vena cava filters. The method is based on the reduction of artifacts caused by flow, susceptibility, and RIF eddy currents. Whereas both flow artifacts and susceptibility artifacts are well underst

  7. Metal-induced artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of a biodegradable magnesium alloy versus titanium and stainless steel controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Luechinger, Roger [University and ETH Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland); Frauenfelder, Thomas; Guggenberger, Roman; Farshad-Amacker, Nadja; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Beck, Stefan [Synthes GmbH, Zuchwil (Switzerland)

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate metal artifacts induced by biodegradable magnesium - a new class of degradable biomaterial that is beginning to enter the orthopedic routine - on CT and MRI compared to standard titanium and steel controls. Different pins made of titanium, stainless steel, and biodegradable magnesium alloys were scanned using a second-generation dual-energy multidetector CT and a 1.5-T MR scanner. In CT, quantitative assessment of artifacts was performed by two independent readers by measuring the noise in standardized regions of interest close to the pins. In MRI, the artifact diameter was measured. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients. Artifacts were compared using Mann Whitney U tests. In comparison to stainless steel, biodegradable magnesium alloys induced significantly fewer artifacts in both 1.5-T MRI (p = 0.019-0.021) and CT (p = 0.003-0.006). Compared to titanium, magnesium induced significantly less artifact-related noise in CT (p = 0.003-0.008). Although artifacts were less on MRI for biodegradable magnesium compared to titanium, this result was not statistically significant. Biodegradable magnesium alloys induce substantially fewer artifacts in CT compared to standard titanium and stainless steel, and fewer artifacts in MRI for the comparison with stainless steel. (orig.)

  8. Preparation of novel bovine hemoglobin surface-imprinted polystyrene nanoparticles with magnetic susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; HE XiWen; CHEN LangXing; ZHANG YuKui

    2009-01-01

    In this research,a surface imprinting strategy has been adopted in protein imprinting.Bovine hemoglobin surface-imprinted polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with magnetic susceptibility have been synthesized through multistage core-shell polymerization system using 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA)as functional and cross-linking monomers.SuperparamagneUc molecularly imprinted polystyrene nanospheres with poly(APBA) thin films have been synthesized and used for the first time for protein molecular imprinting in an aqueous solution.The magnetic susceptibility is imparted through the successful encapsulation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles.The morphology,adsorption,and recognition properties of superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy,X-ray diffraction,thermogravimetric analysis,and vibrating sample magnetometer.Rebinding experimental results show that poly(APBA) MIPs-coated superparamagnetic PS nanoparticles have high adsorption capacity for template protein bovine hemoglobin and comparatively low nonspecific adsorption.The imprinted superparamagnetlc nanoparticles could easily reach the adsorption equilibrium and achieve magnetic separation in an external magnetic field,thus avoiding some problems of the bulk polymer.

  9. Preparation of novel bovine hemoglobin surface-imprinted polystyrene nanoparticles with magnetic susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this research, a surface imprinting strategy has been adopted in protein imprinting. Bovine hemo-globin surface-imprinted polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with magnetic susceptibility have been syn-thesized through multistage core-shell polymerization system using 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) as functional and cross-linking monomers. Superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polystyrene nanospheres with poly(APBA) thin films have been synthesized and used for the first time for protein molecular imprinting in an aqueous solution. The magnetic susceptibility is imparted through the successful encapsulation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The morphology, adsorption, and recognition prop-erties of superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer. Rebinding experimental results show that poly(APBA) MIPs-coated superparamagnetic PS nanoparticles have high adsorption capacity for template protein bovine hemoglobin and compara-tively low nonspecific adsorption. The imprinted superparamagnetic nanoparticles could easily reach the adsorption equilibrium and achieve magnetic separation in an external magnetic field, thus avoid-ing some problems of the bulk polymer.

  10. Second-order-like cluster-monomer transition within magnetic fluids and its impact upon the magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Xiang, Qing; Massa, Letícia O; Qu, Fanyao; Morais, Paulo C; Liu, Wenzhong

    2012-03-05

    The low-field (below 5 Oe) ac and dc magnetic response of a magnetic fluid [MF] sample in the range of 305 to 360 K and 410 to 455 K was experimentally and theoretically investigated. We found a systematic deviation of Curie's law, which predicts a linear temperature dependence of inverse initial susceptibility in the range of our investigation. This finding, as we hypothesized, is due to the onset of a second-order-like cluster-to-monomer transition with a critical exponent which is equal to 0.50. The susceptibility data were well fitted by a modified Langevin function, in which cluster dissociation into monomers, at the critical temperature [T*], was included. In the ac experiments, we found that T* was reducing from 381.8 to 380.4 K as the frequency of the applied field increases from 123 to 173 Hz. In addition, our ac experiments confirm that only monomers respond for the magnetic behavior of the MF sample above T*. Furthermore, our Monte Carlo simulation and analytical results support the hypothesis of a thermal-assisted dissociation of chain-like structures.PACS: 75.75.-C; 75.30.Kz; 75.30.Cr.

  11. Magnetic Susceptibility of liquid Gd-NM (NM = Cu, Ga, Ge) alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakura, Hironori; Tahara, Shuta; Okada, Tatsuya; Ohno, Satoru

    2017-08-01

    For rare earth alloys, the indirect interaction of RKKY is at work between rare-earth atoms. Therefore, the magnetism of them depends on the number of conduction electrons and the distance between rare-earth metals. In this work, to reveal the relationship between the number of conduction electrons and magnetic property of rare earth metal alloys, magnetic susceptibility measurements for liquid Gd-NM (NM = Cu, Ga, Ge) was performed by Faraday method. As the results, it was observed that the sign of paramagnetic Curie temperature of Cu-Gd alloys are positive at all composition, while Ga-Gd and Ge-Gd alloys show negative paramagnetic Curie temperature at certain composition. Moreover, it was indicated when the alloy at certain composition shows highest melting temperature, it has the lowest paramagnetic Curie temperature.

  12. Environmental mechanism of magnetic susceptibility changes of lacustrine sediments from Lake Hulun, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The changes of magnetic susceptibility (κ) are correlated with those of corresponding sedimentological, geochemical, mineralogical and biological results, which verifies that κ can be taken as one of the environmental proxies. However, usually the exact origin of magnetic signal is poorly understood, and is difficult to relate with the environmental evolution. Magnetic properties of material derived from the catchment and sedimentary environment may affect the accumulation, preservation, or authigenesis and diagenesis of magnetic minerals. In the Lake Hulun region in Inner Mongolia, it is found that muddy sediments, deposited during high water level period (corresponding to humid climate), have comparatively high κ values. In contrast, the sandy sediments, deposited during low water level period (corresponding to arid climate), have low κ values. Detailed rock magnetic investigation confirms that detrital magnetite derived from volcanic rocks in the catchment exists in both muddy and sandy sediments. During high water level period, secondary ferrimagnetic iron sulphide was produced in muddy sediments under relatively reductive conditions. Ferrimagnetic iron sulphide, coexisting with detrital magnetite, predominates the magnetic properties of muddy sediments, resulting in increasing κ. This paper reveals the significance of authigenic ferrimagnetic iron sulphide produced after sediment deposition.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility and relation to initial 87Sr/86Sr for granitoids of the central Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, P.C.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Kistler, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of more than 6000 samples of granitic rock from the Mariposa 1?? by 2?? quadrangle, which crosses the central part of the Sierra Nevada batholith between 37?? and 38??N latitude, shows that magnetic susceptibility values are above 10-2 SI units in the east and central parts of the batholith and drop abruptly to less than 10-3 SI units in the western foothills. In a narrow transitional zone, intermediate values (10-3 to 10-2) prevail. Magnetic susceptibility appears to decrease slightly westward within the zones of both high and low values. Magnetic susceptibility in plutonic rocks is chiefly a function of the abundance of magnetite, which depends, in turn, on the total iron content of the rocks and their oxidation ratio. Correlations of magnetic susceptibility with initial 87Sr/86Sr suggest that oxidation ratios have been inherited from the source regions for the magmas from which the rocks crystallized. Reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ by organic carbon or other reducing substances may also have affected magnetic susceptibility. -from Authors

  14. Dental material artifacts on MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, D B; Holshouser, B A; Engstrom, H I; Tjan, A H; Christiansen, E L; Catelli, W F

    1988-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the head and neck is becoming an important aid in evaluating pathologic conditions of the brain, midface, and pharynx. Certain dental materials cause artifacts during MR imaging of the lower midface. These artifacts can obscure the normal anatomy. This study describes the degree of artifact production caused by various materials commonly used in dental restorations. Of the materials tested, those causing artifacts were made of stainless steel, such as orthodontic bands used for braces, and pins or posts that are commonly drilled into teeth to provide structure or stability before filling. Materials used as temporary or permanent fillings or crowns--such as amalgam, gold alloy, aluminum, microfilled resin, and polyvinyl acrylics--did not cause artifacts in the images.

  15. Magnetic susceptibility of oxygen adsorbed on the surface of spherical and fibrous activated carbon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Kawamura

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic susceptibilities of oxygen adsorbed on the surface of bead-shaped activated carbon and activated carbon fibers were evaluated as a function of temperature between 4.2 K and 300 K, and found to exhibit a sharp peak at around 50 K. This implies that the adsorbed oxygen molecules form an antiferromagnetic state. The relation between the susceptibility and the adsorbed mass suggest that the thickness of the adsorbed oxygen is thin enough to consider a two-dimensional structure for bead–shaped activated carbon and carbon fibers across the fiber axis but thick enough to regard it as three-dimensional along the fiber axis. The result is discussed with reference to the study on one-dimensional oxygen array.

  16. No K/T boundary at Anjar, Gujarat, India: Evidence from magnetic susceptibility and carbon isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H J Hansen; D M Mohabey; P Toft

    2001-06-01

    The paper describes the variation pattern of magnetic susceptibility of Lameta sediments and isotopic variation of organic 13C from Chui Hill, Bergi, Kholdoda, Pisdura and Girad. The susceptibility pattern and a negative carbon isotopic anomaly allows fixation of the K/T boundary at these localities and they dier in these aspects from the inter-trappean sediments at Anjar. Paleomagnetic measurements of the Anjar sediment and the overlying basalt ow demonstrate reversed polarity. The Lameta sediments with dinosaur nests at Kheda and the overlying intertrappean sediments are of normal polarity The clay layers at Anjar, associated closely with Ir-enrichments, are strongly leached, rhyolitic bentonites containing low-quartz paramorphs after high-quartz with glass inclusions. It is concluded, that the inter-trappean lake deposits at Anjar were deposited in the early part of magnetochron 29R and are unrelated to the K/T boundary.

  17. Magnetic susceptibility of QCD at zero and at finite temperature from the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, G S; Constantinou, M; Costa, M; Endrodi, G; Katz, S D; Panagopoulos, H; Schaefer, A

    2012-01-01

    The response of the QCD vacuum to a constant external (electro)magnetic field is studied through the tensor polarization of the chiral condensate and the magnetic susceptibility at zero and at finite temperature. We determine these quantities using lattice configurations generated with the tree-level Symanzik improved gauge action and N_f=1+1+1 flavors of stout smeared staggered quarks with physical masses. We carry out the renormalization of the observables under study and perform the continuum limit both at T>0 and at T=0, using different lattice spacings. Finite size effects are studied by using various spatial lattice volumes. The magnetic susceptibilities \\chi_f reveal a diamagnetic behavior; we obtain at zero temperature \\chi_u=-(2.08 +/- 0.08) 1/GeV^2, \\chi_d=-(2.02 +/- 0.09) 1/GeV^2 and \\chi_s=-(3.4 +/- 1.4) 1/GeV^2 for the up, down and strange quarks, respectively, in the MSBar scheme at a renormalization scale of 2 GeV. We also find the polarization to change smoothly with the temperature in the con...

  18. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. F.; Zhou, F. Y.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are 316L stainless steel, Co–Cr alloys and Ti-based alloys, the magnetic susceptibilities of the zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1–1.29 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1 for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti–6Al–4V, ~3.5 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1, CP Ti and Ti–6Al–7Nb, ~3.0 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1), and one-sixth that of Co–Cr alloys (Co–Cr–Mo, ~7.7 × 10‑6 cm3·g‑1). Among the Zr–Ru alloy series, Zr–1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr–Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  19. EPR and Magnetic Susceptibility Investigation of Fe Ions in B2O3-SrF2 Glass Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of an oxide-fluoride mixed vitreous matrix 2B2O3@SrF2, were explored by using Fe impurities as probes. Information about the structural units involving iron ions, their valence state, the strengths and type of interactions involving them was obtained using EPR spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  20. Influence of Packing Size of Magnetic Filter on Efficiency of Catching Impurities with Different Dispersibility and Susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of influence of the size of a single filter packing on efficiency of catching impurities with various dispersity and magnetic susceptibility. It is revealed that the time of transferring of the process of cluster forming to stable state depends on packing size. The results can be used to make multilevel packings of magnetic filters.

  1. Zero-temperature perturbative calculation of the magnetic susceptibility of the free fermion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccariello, Salvino; De Col, Alvise [Dipartimento di Fisica ' G Galilei' and Unita INFM, Padova (Italy)

    2001-11-01

    Using the zero-temperature perturbative expansion, we show how to obtain the correct value of the magnetic susceptibility of a system of free fermions at zero temperature. To this aim, it is first observed that the Feynman rules for the perturbative expansion of the Green function substantially do not change when the ground state is substituted with a generic eigenstate of the unperturbed system. Then, the requirement that the resulting Green function has the correct Lehmann representation uniquely determines the unperturbed eigenstate which yields the interacting ground state by adiabatically switching on the interaction. (author)

  2. Self-assembled magnetic bead biosensor for measuring bacterial growth and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Paivo; McNaughton, Brandon H; Albertson, Theodore; Sinn, Irene; Mofakham, Sima; Elbez, Remy; Newton, Duane W; Hunt, Alan; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-08-20

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is one of the major concerns of modern healthcare worldwide, and the development of rapid, growth-based, antimicrobial susceptibility tests is key for addressing it. The cover image shows a self-assembled asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) biosensor developed for rapid detection of bacterial growth. Using the biosensors, the minimum inhibitory concentration of a clinical E. coli isolate can be measured within two hours, where currently tests take 6-24 hours. A 16-well prototype is also constructed for simple and robust observation of the self-assembled AMBR biosensors.

  3. Effects of phase constitution on magnetic susceptibility and mechanical properties of Zr-rich Zr-Mo alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyalatu; Kondo, Ryota; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Doi, Hisashi; Nomura, Naoyuki; Hanawa, Takao

    2011-12-01

    The effects of the microstructures and phases of Zr-rich Mo alloys on their magnetic susceptibilities and mechanical properties were investigated in order to develop a Zr alloy with low magnetic susceptibility for use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The magnetic susceptibility was measured with a magnetic susceptibility balance, while mechanical properties were evaluated by a tensile test. The microstructure was evaluated with an X-ray diffractometer, an optical microscope, and a transmission electron microscope. Evaluation of the microstructures revealed that the α' phase was the dominant form at less than 2% Mo content in the as-cast alloy. The ω phase was formed in as-cast Zr-3Mo but disappeared with aging at 973 K. Magnetic susceptibility was reflected in the phase constitution: the susceptibility showed a local minimum at Zr-(0.5-1)Mo with mostly α' phase and a minimum at Zr-3Mo with mostly β and ω phases. The magnetic susceptibility of as-cast Zr-3Mo increased at 973 K due to disappearance of the ω phase. However, the susceptibility was still as low as that of as-cast Zr-1Mo. The ultimate tensile strength of α'-based Zr-Mo alloys was tailored from 674 to 970 MPa, and the corresponding elongation varied from 11.1% to 2.9%. Because Zr-Mo alloys containing ω phase were found, through tensile tests, to be brittle this phase should be avoided, irrespective of the low magnetic susceptibility, in order to maintain mechanical reliability. Elongation of the Zr-3Mo alloy was dramatically improved when the phase constitution was changed to α and β phases by aging at 973 K for 86.4 ks. The magnetic susceptibilities of the α'-based Zr-Mo alloys are one-third those of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb, and thus these Zr alloys are useful for medical devices under MRI. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inter-band effects of magnetic field on orbital susceptibility and Hall conductivity - case of bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2006-07-03

    Interband effects of magnetic field on orbital susceptibility and Hall conductivity have been theoretically studied with special reference to single crystal bismuth (Bi), whose energy bands near the band-edges are similar to those of Dirac electrons. It has long been known that orbital susceptibilty in Bi has a maximum when the Fermi energy is located in the band-gap and then the density of states at the Fermi energy is vanishing. This implies that the magnetic field induces persistent current even in the insulating state. On the other hand, weak-field Hall conductivity, which reflects transport current, has turned out to be vanishing if the Fermi energy is in the band-gap. Interesting possibility has been pointed out of the inter-band contributions to the Hall conductivity once the Fermi energy lies slightly in the energy band. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. A preliminary attempt to identify atmospherically-derived pollution particles in English topsoils from magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, K. L.; Dearing, J. A.; Baban, S. M. J.; Loveland, P.

    This study identifies topsoils in England having increased magnetic susceptibility (xlf) values attributable to the presence of anthropogenically produced pollution particles, such as fly-ash. The database consists of 1176 topsoils taken at 10 km intervals across the whole of England, and tested for magnetic susceptibility at low and high frequencies. Soils containing significant concentrations of pollution particles were identified using two criteria; xlf (values > 0.38 10-6m3kg-1) and xfd% (values < 3%). The ‘polluted’ topsoils are located in the south-east around London, the Midlands, the north around the conurbations of Manchester, Merseyside and West Yorkshire, and in the north-east around Newcastle and Teeside. The heavy metal concentration of the soils are elevated above background levels, and have strong positive relationships with magnetic susceptibility and other magnetic parameters.

  6. [Heavy Metals Accmultio in the Caofeidian Reclamation Soils: Indicated by Soil Magnetic Susceptibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Zhou, Qian; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Hai-bo; Hu, Xue-feng; Luo, Yong-ming

    2016-04-15

    The environmental magnetism method has been widely applied to identify soil heavy metal pollution, which is characterized by simplicity, efficiency, non-destructivity and sensitivity. The present study used magnetic susceptibility to assess the accumulation of heavy metals in soils of the Caofeidian industrial zone which is a typical reclamation area in northern China. The study area was divided into three sub-zones based on the function, including industrial zone, living zone, natural tidal flat and wetland. A total of 35 topsoil samples (0-10 cm) and 3 soil profiles were collected from the three sub-zones. Magnetic susceptibility (X(lf)), iron oxide (Fe2O3) contents and heavy metals contents (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Mn and V) of the samples were analyzed. The results showed that X(lf) values and heavy metals contents exhibited higher spatial variability in the top soil of the industrial zone, indicating the severe impacts of industrial activities. In the soil profiles of the industrial and living zones, all heavy metals were enriched to different degrees in the upper layer (0-20 cm). However, there was no significant change of heavy metal contents in the soil profiles of tidal flat which was far from the industrial area. The X(lf) value was significantly (P soil. This indicated that X(lf) could be used as an indicator for heavy metal accumulation in the industrial zone. However, the X(lf) value was not suitable to be an indicator to show the heavy metal accumulation in the soils of living zone and natural tidal flat. This might be associated with the different sources of magnetic materials among the different sub-zones and the special characteristics of the soils in the tidal flat and wetland.

  7. RECONSTRUCTING PALEO-SMT POSITIONS ON THE CASCADIA MARGIN USING MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Joel [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Phillips, Stephen [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Magnetic susceptibility (κ) is a mixed signal in marine sediments, representing primary depositional and secondary diagenetic processes. Production of hydrogen sulfide via anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) and organoclastic sulfate reduction above the SMT can result in the dissolution of iron oxides, altering κ in sediments in methane gas and gas hydrate bearing regions. We investigated records of κ on the Cascadia margin (ODP Sites 1249 and 1252; IODP Site 1325) using a Zr/Rb heavy mineral proxy from XRF core scanning to identify intervals of primary detrital magnetic susceptibility and intervals and predict intervals affected by magnetite dissolutions. We also measured total sulfur content, grain size distributions, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and magnetic mineral assemblage. The upper 100 m of Site 1252 contains a short interval of κ driven by primary magnetite, with multiple intervals (> 90 m total) of decreased κ correlated with elevated sulfur content, consistent with dissolution of magnetite and re-precipitation of pyrite. In the upper 90 m of Site 1249, κ is almost entirely altered by diagenetic processes, with much of the low κ explained by a high degree of pyritization, and some intervals affected by the precipitation of magnetic iron sulfides. At Site 1325, κ between 0-20 and 51-73 mbsf represents primary mineralogy, and in the interval 24-51 mbsf, κ may be reduced due to pyritization. This integrated approach allows for a prediction of primary κ and the amount of κ loss at each site when compared to actual κ measurements. In the case of magnetite dissolution and full pyritization, these drawdowns in κ are supported by sulfur measurements, and the exposure times of magnetite to hydrogen sulfide can be modeled. The presence of methane and methane hydrates at these sites, as well as large variations in TOC content, suggest that the past migration rates of the SMT and variation in sulfate

  8. Magnetic susceptibility and element composition mangrove sediments in Malang, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzahro, Rosyida; Zulaikah, Siti; Diantoro, Markus; Budi, Pranitha Septiana

    2017-07-01

    Mangrove sediment has a unique environmental absorption characteristics, as it has two sources of sediment which are from allocthonous sediment and authochtonous sediment. In this research, the mangrove sediment samples are taken from Clungup Mangrove Conservation in Malang, East Java, Indonesia. The samples are taken from four spots around the mouth of the river, and four spots around mangrove conservation. Those samples are analyzed based on the magnetic characteristics and the element composition to reveal the magnetic properties and element composition so in the future they can be used as indicators to trace the source of magnetic minerals that are precipitated in the mangrove ecosystem. The magnetic susceptibility value based on mass for mangrove sediment around the river area h as the range of (38,8-2130)×10-8m3kg-1, while for the conservation area has the range of (0,97-122,5)×10-8m3kg-1. Based on XRF analysis, the mangrove sediment both from the river area and mangrove conservation area has a non-metallic element S, Br, metallic element Ca, Si, Al, K, Ti, Sr, and heavy metallic element Fe, Ni, Cu, Cr, Zn, Zr, Mn, and V, with the highest concentration of Fe element followed by Ca, Al, Si, and Ti.

  9. Thermomagnetic behavior of magnetic susceptibility – heating rate and sample size effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eJordanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermomagnetic analysis of magnetic susceptibility k(T was carried out for a number of natural powder materials from soils, baked clay and anthropogenic dust samples using fast (11oC/min and slow (6.5oC/min heating rates available in the furnace of Kappabridge KLY2 (Agico. Based on the additional data for mineralogy, grain size and magnetic properties of the studied samples, behaviour of k(T cycles and the observed differences in the curves for fast and slow heating rate are interpreted in terms of mineralogical transformations and Curie temperatures (Tc. The effect of different sample size is also explored, using large volume and small volume of powder material. It is found that soil samples show enhanced information on mineralogical transformations and appearance of new strongly magnetic phases when using fast heating rate and large sample size. This approach moves the transformation at higher temperature, but enhances the amplitude of the signal of newly created phase. Large sample size gives prevalence of the local micro- environment, created by evolving gases, released during transformations. The example from archeological brick reveals the effect of different sample sizes on the observed Curie temperatures on heating and cooling curves, when the magnetic carrier is substituted magnetite (Mn0.2Fe2.70O4. Large sample size leads to bigger differences in Tcs on heating and cooling, while small sample size results in similar Tcs for both heating rates.

  10. Geophysical monitoring of simulated graves with resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, conductivity and GPR in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carlos Martin; Pringle, Jamie K; Saumett, Miguel; Evans, Gethin T

    2016-04-01

    In most Latin American countries there are significant numbers of both missing people and forced disappearances, ∼71,000 Colombia alone. Successful detection of buried human remains by forensic search teams can be difficult in varying terrain and climates. Three clandestine burials were simulated at two different depths commonly encountered in Latin America. In order to gain critical knowledge of optimum geophysical detection techniques, burials were monitored using: ground penetrating radar, magnetic susceptibility, bulk ground conductivity and electrical resistivity up to twenty-two months post-burial. Radar survey results showed good detection of modern 1/2 clothed pig cadavers throughout the survey period on 2D profiles, with the 250MHz antennae judged optimal. Both skeletonised and decapitated and burnt human remains were poorly imaged on 2D profiles with loss in signal continuity observed throughout the survey period. Horizontal radar time slices showed good anomalies observed over targets, but these decreased in amplitude over the post-burial time. These were judged due to detecting disturbed grave soil rather than just the buried targets. Magnetic susceptibility and electrical resistivity were successful at target detection in contrast to bulk ground conductivity surveys which were unsuccessful. Deeper burials were all harder to image than shallower ones. Forensic geophysical surveys should be undertaken at suspected burial sites.

  11. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  12. Magnetic susceptibility variations of carbonates controlled by sea-level changes——Examples in Devonian to Carboniferous strata in southern Guizhou Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世红; 王训练; 朱鸿

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents magnetic susceptibility results of 578 samples from three De-vono-Carboniferous carbonate successions in the Yangtze Block. They indicate that the magnetic susceptibility variations in carbonates are controlled by ancient sea-level changes. It is particularly so if the supply of detrital materials was low, when the magnetic susceptibility was mainly controlled by the content of authigenic minerals. If the supply of detrital materials was high, the average susceptibility value would be higher, but there is still a correlation between susceptibility and sea-level curves. A sea level rise would lead to a decrease in the content of the detrital materials, and therefore to a decrease in the susceptibility values. On the top of HST, the uplift and exposure events may lead to elevated magnetic susceptibility values. Carbonate susceptibilities can therefore be considered as one of the environmental proxy data for the research of sequence stratigraphy.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility variations of carbonates controlled by sea-level changes--Examples in Devonian to Carboniferous strata in southern Guizhou Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents magnetic susceptibility results of 578 samples from three Devono-Carboniferous carbonate successions in the Yangtze Block. They indicate that the magnetic susceptibility variations in carbonates are controlled by ancient sea-level changes. It is particularly so if the supply of detrital materials was low, when the magnetic susceptibility was mainly controlled by the content of authigenic minerals. If the supply of detrital materials was high, the average susceptibility value would be higher, but there is still a correlation between susceptibility and sea-level curves. A sea level rise would lead to a decrease in the content of the detrital materials, and therefore to a decrease in the susceptibility values. On the top of HST, the uplift and exposure events may lead to elevated magnetic susceptibility values. Carbonate susceptibilities can therefore be considered as one of the environmental proxy data for the research of sequence stratigraphy.

  14. Molecular engineering of lanthanide ion chelating phospholipids generating assemblies with a switched magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabettini, Stéphane; Massabni, Sarah; Hodzic, Arnel; Durovic, Dzana; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Ishikawa, Takashi; Fischer, Peter; Windhab, Erich J; Walde, Peter; Kuster, Simon

    2017-08-09

    Lanthanide ion (Ln(3+)) chelating amphiphiles are powerful molecules for tailoring the magnetic response of polymolecular assemblies. Mixtures of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine-diethylene triaminepentaacetate (DMPE-DTPA) complexed to Ln(3+) deliver highly magnetically responsive bicelles. Their magnetic properties are readily tuned by changing the bicellar size or the magnetic susceptibility Δχ of the bilayer lipids. The former technique is intrinsically bound to the region of the phase diagram guarantying the formation of bicelles. Methods aiming towards manipulating the Δχ of the bilayer are comparatively more robust, flexible and lacking. Herein, we synthesized a new Ln(3+) chelating phospholipid using glutamic acid as a backbone: DMPE-Glu-DTPA. The chelate polyhedron was specifically engineered to alter the Δχ, whilst remaining geometrically similar to DMPE-DTPA. Planar asymmetric assemblies hundreds of nanometers in size were achieved presenting unprecedented magnetic alignments. The DMPE-Glu-DTPA/Ln(3+) complex switched the Δχ, achieving perpendicular alignment of assemblies containing Dy(3+) and parallel alignment of those containing Tm(3+). Moreover, samples with chelated Yb(3+) were more alignable than the Tm(3+) chelating counterparts. Such a possibility has never been demonstrated for planar Ln(3+) chelating polymolecular assemblies. The physico-chemical properties of these novel assemblies were further studied by monitoring the alignment behavior at different temperatures and by including 16 mol% of cholesterol (Chol-OH) in the phospholipid bilayer. The DMPE-Glu-DTPA/Ln(3+) complex and the resulting assemblies are promising candidates for applications in numerous fields including pharmaceutical technologies, structural characterization of membrane biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy, as contrasting agents for magnetic resonance imaging, and for the development of smart

  15. Influence of dipolar interactions on the magnetic susceptibility spectra of ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindt, Julien O.; Camp, Philip J.; Kantorovich, Sofia S.; Elfimova, Ekaterina A.; Ivanov, Alexey O.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility of a ferrofluid is calculated under the assumption that the constituent particles undergo Brownian relaxation only. Brownian-dynamics simulations are carried out in order to test the predictions of a recent theory [A. O. Ivanov, V. S. Zverev, and S. S. Kantorovich, Soft Matter 12, 3507 (2016), 10.1039/C5SM02679B] that includes the effects of interparticle dipole-dipole interactions. The theory is based on the so-called modified mean-field approach and possesses the following important characteristics: in the low-concentration, noninteracting regime, it gives the correct single-particle Debye-theory results; it yields the exact leading-order results in the zero-frequency limit; it includes particle polydispersity correctly from the outset; and it is based on firm theoretical foundations allowing, in principle, systematic extensions to treat stronger interactions and/or higher concentrations. The theory and simulations are compared in the case of a model monodisperse ferrofluid, where the effects of interactions are predicted to be more pronounced than in a polydisperse ferrofluid. The susceptibility spectra are analyzed in detail in terms of the low-frequency behavior, the position of the peak in the imaginary (out-of-phase) part, and the characteristic decay time of the magnetization autocorrelation function. It is demonstrated that the theory correctly predicts the trends in all of these properties with increasing concentration and dipolar coupling constant, the product of which is proportional to the Langevin susceptibility χL. The theory is in quantitative agreement with the simulation results as long as χL≲1 .

  16. Magnetic susceptibility induced white matter MR signal frequency shifts--experimental comparison between Lorentzian sphere and generalized Lorentzian approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J; He, X; Yablonskiy, D A

    2014-03-01

    The nature of the remarkable phase contrast in high-field gradient echo MRI studies of human brain is a subject of intense debates. The generalized Lorentzian approach (He and Yablonskiy, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2009;106:13558-13563) provides an explanation for the anisotropy of phase contrast, the near absence of phase contrast between white matter and cerebrospinal fluid, and changes of phase contrast in multiple sclerosis. In this study, we experimentally validate the generalized Lorentzian approach. The Generalized Lorentzian Approach suggests that the local contribution to frequency shifts in white matter does not depend on the average tissue magnetic susceptibility (as suggested by Lorentzian sphere approximation), but on the distribution and symmetry of magnetic susceptibility inclusions at the cellular level. We use ex vivo rat optic nerve as a model system of highly organized cellular structure containing longitudinally arranged myelin and neurofilaments. The nerve's cylindrical shape allowed accurate measurement of its magnetic susceptibility and local frequency shifts. We found that the volume magnetic susceptibility difference between nerve and water is -0.116 ppm, and the magnetic susceptibilities of longitudinal components are -0.043 ppm in fresh nerve, and -0.020 ppm in fixed nerve. The frequency shift observed in the optic nerve as a representative of white matter is consistent with generalized Lorentzian approach but inconsistent with Lorentzian sphere approximation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Uncertainty of spatial distributions of soil magnetic susceptibility in areas of different type of land cover and anthropogenic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Jaroslaw; Fabijańczyk, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    There is still a high interest in the improvement of soil magnetometry procedures that would increase its accuracy. Soil magnetometry is usually used as a fast screening method that is used to assess the degree of soil pollution. As the magnetometric measurements do not provide the exact information about the concentration of elements in soil, it is very important to determine the uncertainty of the spatial distributions of soil magnetic susceptibility. The goal of this study was to analyze and present geostatistical methods of assessing the uncertainty of spatial distribution of soil magnetic susceptibility in areas of different land cover and anthropogenic pressure. In particular, spatial distributions of magnetic susceptibility measured on the soil surface using a MS2D Bartington device were calculated using indicator methods that make it possible to calculate the probability of exceeding the critical levels of soil magnetic susceptibility. Measurements were performed in areas located in the Upper Silesian Industrial Area in Poland, and in Norway. In these areas soil magnetic susceptibility was measured on the soil surface using a MS2D Bartington device. Additionally, soil samples were taken in order to perform chemical measurements that included the determination of a concentration of selected elements. Acknowledgment The research leading to these results has received funding from the Polish-Norwegian Research Programme operated by the National Centre for Research and Development underthe Norwegian Financial Mechanism 2009-2014 in the frame of Project IMPACT - Contract No Pol-Nor/199338/45/2013.

  18. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in the Siilinjärvi carbonatite complex, eastern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almqvist, Bjarne; Karell, Fredrik; Högdahl, Karin; Malehmir, Alireza; Heino, Pasi; Salo, Aleksi

    2017-04-01

    We present a set of AMS measurements on samples from the Siilinjärvi alkaline-carbonatite complex in eastern Finland. The complex has a tabular shape (ca. 16 km long, 1.5 km wide) that strikes north-south and is constrained within a steeply dipping N-S oriented deformation zone. It consists of a mixture of lithologies, including carbonatite, fenite and glimmerite (mica-rich rocks), which is hosted within a Precambrian granite and gneiss. After emplacement of the carbonatite, the complex was subsequently intruded by diabase dykes. Deformation has occurred in several episodes after dyke intrusions, and strain is heterogeneously distributed among the different lithologies. Strain localizes mainly within glimmerite and carbonatite, and at the contacts between dykes and glimmerite/carbonatite where shear zones develop locally. Structures provide indications for both simple (strike-slip) and pure shear components in the deformation history of the complex, although the former may dominate. Thirty-six localities were sampled, providing 272 specimens for AMS measurements, within the southern and eastern parts of the Siilinjärvi open-pit mine (within the complex), mainly from diabase dykes, glimmerite and carbonatites; a smaller number of samples were collected from fenite. Sampling was carried out in order to investigate magnetic fabrics in relation to the emplacement of the dykes and their structural relationship to the glimmerite/carbonatite. Structural measurements were made to accompany the magnetic fabric study. The magnetic fabric shows a magnetic foliation plane that is oriented north-south, with sub-horizontal k3-axes oriented nearly east-west. Magnetic lineation (k1) clusters sub-vertically, but does show a tendency to spread along the north-south magnetic foliation great circle. The dataset can be further divided into two sub-sets based on the bulk susceptibility (km) and degree of anisotropy (P). The bulk of the data set ( 70 %), belonging to samples of diabase

  19. Three-dimensional analysis of magnetic susceptibility in areas with different type of land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Fabijańczyk, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    The knowledge of the type of semivariance and its parameters such as nugget-effect, range of correlation and sill, that quantitatively characterize spatial variability of a studied environmental phenomenon, can be essential for both measurements planning and analysis of results. In particular this is the truth in the case of magnetometric measurements of soil pollution. Field magnetometry is internationally recognized as valuable, convenient and affordable tool for soil pollution screening and assessment. However, this geophysical method usually requires support of detailed statistical and geostatistical analyses. The goal of this study was to evaluate the parameters of spatial variability of soil magnetic susceptibility depending on the terrain usage. To do so, several types of study area were specially selected: forest, arable field and urban park. Some of the study areas were neighboring to each other, in order to ensure that the anthropogenic pressure was the same at each site. In order to analyze soil magnetic susceptibility in 3-dimensional space, measurements were performed on the soil surface and in soil profile, using the MS2D and MS2C Bartington instruments, respectively. MS2D measurements were performed using quasi-regular grids, and at each sample point 10 single MS2D readings were carried out in the circle with the diameter of about 2 meters. MS2C measurements were performed using soil cores collected in the field, down to the depth of about 30cm. Such approach combines the advantages of both types of measurements and allows to get deeper insight into the distribution of soil pollution. As the first step of the analysis, the semivariances of magnetic susceptibility were calculated and thoroughly modeled for all different forms of land use, on the basis of only the MS2D measurements. Then, the MS2D and MS2C measurements were jointed into one three-dimensional data set, and were used together to calculate and model the semivariances. Finally, the

  20. The rehydroxylation dating of archeological baked-clay artifacts for determination paleomagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalin, Georgii; Gareev, Bulat; Nourgaliev, Danis; Fedorchenko, Diana

    2016-04-01

    If confirmed, the rehydroxylation dating method proposed by Wilson et al. would be a major achievement for archeological and geological sciences. This method would indeed make it possible to date potentially all fired-clay artifacts (fragments of pottery or of architectural bricks) unearthed in excavation contexts and/or recovered from old buildings, offering to archeologists exceptional time constraints that are at the basis of most archeological issues. Together with that, determination of magnetic characteristics of fired-clay artifacts allows to build paleosecular variations. We present new results obtained from thermo-gravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry measurements coupled with mass spectrometry analyses to identify rehydroxylation water and link it with age of ceramic. A variety of archeological artifacts was collected from different excavations conducted on the territory of the Republic of Tatarstan, Russia. Magnetic measurements include thermomagnetic analysis, coercitive spectrometry, magnetic susceptibility measurement versus temperature. Paleomagnetic studies include measurement of paleointensity. The main aim of paleomagnetic investigations is to reconstruct magnetic field behavior during last centuries and made paleosecular variations (PSV) for Volga region.

  1. Enhancement of Second- and Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibilities in Magnetized Semiconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Singh; P. Aghamkar; S. Duhan

    2008-01-01

    Using electromagnetic treatment, an expression of effective nonlinear optical susceptibility Xe[= Xe(2) + Xe(3) E] is obtained for Ⅲ-Ⅴ semiconducting crystals in an applied transverse dc magnetic field under off-resonant transition regime. The origin of nonlinear interaction lies in nonlinear polarization arising from the crystal properties such as piezoelectricity and electrostriction. Numerical estimates have been made by a representative n-InSb crystal at 77K duly irradiated by a pulsed lO.6-μm CO2 laser under off-resonant transition regime. Efforts are dedicated to optimizing doping level and externally applied dc magnetic field to achieve maximum Xe(2) and Xe(3). The results are found to be in good agreement with the available literature. The analysis shows that Xe(2) and Xe(3)can be significantly enhanced in doped Ⅲ-Ⅴ semiconductors by the proper selection of doping concentration and dc magnetic field, which confirms its potential as a candidate material for the fabrication of nonlinear optical devices.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the magnetic susceptibility and anisotropy of Nd(OH)3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, S.

    1985-08-01

    Measurements are reported on the magnetic susceptibilities and anisotropies of single crystals of Nd(OH)3 in the temperature range between 300 and 77 K. The intermediate-coupling scheme with J mixing under the crystal field of C3h symmetry is used to obtain the crystal-field energy levels and their eigenfunctions. Matrix elements of the Coulomb, spin-orbit, and crystal-field interactions within the f3 configuration are calculated. The g values are found to be g=3.65+/-0.01 and g⊥=1.95+/-0.01 in close agreement with the experimental values quoted by P. D. Scott (Ph.D. dissertation, Yale University, 1970). The calculated crystal-field splitting explains successfully the temperature dependence of the specific heat as observed by Chirico and Westrum [J. Chem. Thermodyn. 12, 311 (1980)] in the temperature range between 350 and 20 K. Saturated magnetizations parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field are found to be 271 and 145 emu/cm3, respectively.

  3. Investigation of the complex susceptibility of magnetic beads containing maghemite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fannin, P.C. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: pfannin@tcd.ie; Cohen-Tannoudji, L. [Laboratoire Colloides et Materiaux Divises, CNRS UMR7612, ESPCI, 10 Rue Vauquelin, F-75005, Paris (France); Bertrand, E. [Laboratoire Colloides et Materiaux Divises, CNRS UMR7612, ESPCI, 10 Rue Vauquelin, F-75005, Paris (France); Giannitsis, A.T. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Mac Oireachtaigh, C. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Bibette, J. [Laboratoire Colloides et Materiaux Divises, CNRS UMR7612, ESPCI, 10 Rue Vauquelin, F-75005, Paris (France)

    2006-08-15

    We report on frequency and field-dependent complex susceptibility, {chi}{sub s}({omega})={chi}{sub s}{sup '}({omega})-i{chi}{sub s}{sup '}'({omega}), measurements of a magnetic colloidal system consisting of 200nm spherical beads, containing maghemite ({gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles. The relaxation properties of both the magnetic colloid and a free suspension of the {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles, are investigated over the frequency range 200Hz-1MHz. Under a polarizing field H, an absorption peak is detected in the {chi}{sub s}{sup '}' component at frequencies f{sub max} between 1.1 and 1.7kHz. We show that this absorption peak can be attributed to the Neel relaxation of the inner maghemite nanoparticles. It is also shown that the general trend for the value of f{sub max} and the amplitude of both {chi}{sub s}{sup '} and {chi}{sub s}{sup '}' is to increase with increasing H. Furthermore, the relation between {chi}{sub s}{sup '}({omega}) and {chi}{sub s}{sup '}'({omega}) and their dependence on frequency, {omega}/2{pi}, is investigated by means of the magnetic analogue of the Cole-Cole plot and a measure of the Cole-Cole distribution parameter {alpha}{sub s} is determined.

  4. Artifacts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Scalcione, Luke R; Gimber, Lana H; Lorenz, Eileen J; Witte, Russell S

    2014-02-01

    During the past 2 decades, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) has been increasingly utilized in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal trauma and diseases with results comparable with MR imaging. US has an advantage over other cross-sectional modalities in many circumstances due to its superior spatial resolution and ability to allow dynamic assessment. When performing musculoskeletal US, the examiner has to be knowledgeable in the complex anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and US imaging technique. Additionally, he or she must be familiar with several common imaging artifacts in musculoskeletal US that may be mistaken for pathology, as well as several artifacts that frequently accompany pathologic conditions. These artifacts may occur with both B-mode gray-scale and Doppler imaging. In this article, we discuss common artifacts seen in musculoskeletal US and techniques to avoid or minimize these artifacts during clinical US examinations.

  5. Effect of electron-electron interaction on the magnetic moment and susceptibility of a parabolic GaAs quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Aalu; Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Sankar, I. V.; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-11-01

    The problem of a parabolically confined two-dimensional semiconductor GaAs quantum dot with two interacting electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field and the spin-Zeeman interaction is studied using a method of numerical diagonalization. The energy spectrum is calculated as a function of the magnetic field. The magnetic moment (M) and the magnetic susceptibility (χ) show zero temperature diamagnetic peaks due to the exchange induced singlet-triplet transitions. The position and the number of these peaks depend both on the confinement strength of the quantum dot and the strength of the electron-electron interaction (β) .

  6. Magnetic susceptibility at zero and nonzero chemical potential in QCD and QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlovsky, V. D.; Simonov, Yu. A.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility of the quark and electron gas is calculated in a closed form for any chemical potential μ summing the whole Matsubara series. For the quark gas and small μ≪T a strong rise with T is found due to Polyakov loop factors L(T), in good agreement with lattice data. For the electron gas the lowest Matsubara term (n = 1) contributes 40% larger than the exact answer. In the case of small T, √ {eB} ≳ T, the oscillations as functions of eB occur, characteristic of the de Haas-van Alphen effect. Results are compared with available lattice data and with the case of relativistic electron gas, which obtains putting L(T)≡1.

  7. Fahr disease: use of susceptibility-weighted imaging for diagnostic dilemma with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Neslin; Solak, Aynur; Genc, Berhan; Kulu, Ugur

    2015-08-01

    Fahr disease (FD) is a well-defined rare neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by idiopathic bilateral symmetric extensive striopallidodentate calcifications. The patients may present with diverse manifestations, most commonly movement disorder, cognitive impairment, and ataxia. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be critical for accurate diagnosis because it is difficult to reliably identify calcifications by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a relatively new 3D gradient-echo (GE) MR sequence with special phase and magnitude processing. SWI phase images can recognize calcifications definitively with higher sensitivity compared to other MRI sequences. In this article, we present two cases of FD with different manifestations and neuroimaging in different age groups and genders, which were diagnosed by SWI and confirmed with CT, and we discuss the contribution of SWI in the diagnosis of FD. In conclusion, we suggest integrating SWI with MRI protocol to identify calcifications in suspicion of neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Magnetic susceptibility data for some exposed bedrock in the western conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, Mark E.; Bultman, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    In-place rock magnetic susceptibility measurements for 746 sites in the western conterminous United States are reported in a database. Of these 746 sites, 408 sites are in the Silverton Caldera area of the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. Of the 408 sites in the Silverton Caldera area, 106 sites are underground. The remaining 338 sites outside the Silverton Caldera area were on outcropping rock, are distributed from southern Arizona to northwestern Wyoming, and include data from California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Rock-density measurements are included for some sites. These data have been collected by various U.S. Geological Survey studies from 1991 through 2012 and are intended to help improve geophysical modeling of the Earth’s crust in the Western United States. A map-based graphical user interface is included to facilitate use of the data.

  9. Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatry: present utility and future promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renshaw, P.F.; Levin, J.M.; Kaufman, M.J.; Ross, M.H. [Brain Imaging Center, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02178 (United States); Lewis, R.F.; Harris, G.J. [Neuroimaging Research Laboratory, New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) provides a noninvasive means to create high resolution maps of the regional distribution of cerebral blood volume (CBV). Most DSC MRI studies conducted to date have focused on the evaluation of patients with cerebral neoplasms, ischemia or infarction, and epilepsy. However, preliminary work suggests that DSC MRI may also provide clinically important information for the evaluation of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, especially dementia and schizophrenia. Additionally, with appropriate modification, DSC MRI may be used to reliably evaluate the effects of pharmacological challenges on cerebral hemodynamics. As pharmacotherapy is an important component in the treatment of a range of psychiatric disorders, the dynamic assessment of changes in cerebral perfusion associated with drug administration may ultimately lead to the development of ``brain function tests`` for a wide range of disorders. (orig.) With 4 figs., 50 refs.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity of graphene in two-band Harrison model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Hamze; Bagheri, Mehran; Khodadadi, Jabbar

    2015-11-01

    Using a two-band tight-binding Harrison model and Green's function technique, the influences of both localized σ and delocalized π electrons on the density of states, the Pauli paramagnetic susceptibility, and the heat capacity of a graphene sheet are investigated. We witness an extension in the bandwidth and an increase in the number of Van-Hove singularities as well. As a notable point, besides the magnetic nature which includes diamagnetism in graphene-based nanosystems, a paramagnetic behavior associated with the itinerant π electrons could be occurred. Further, we report a Schottky anomaly in the heat capacity. This study asserts that the contribution of both σ and π electrons play dominant roles in the mentioned physical quantities.

  11. Magnetic susceptibility as a proxy for investigating microbially mediated iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewafy, Farag M.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Werkema, D. Dale, Jr.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Revil, André; Skold, Magnus; Delin, Geoffrey N.

    2011-11-01

    We investigated magnetic susceptibility (MS) variations in hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. Our objective was to determine if MS can be used as an intrinsic bioremediation indicator due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria. A contaminated and an uncontaminated core were retrieved from a site contaminated with crude oil near Bemidji, Minnesota and subsampled for MS measurements. The contaminated core revealed enriched MS zones within the hydrocarbon smear zone, which is related to iron-reduction coupled to oxidation of hydrocarbon compounds and the vadose zone, which is coincident with a zone of methane depletion suggesting aerobic or anaerobic oxidation of methane is coupled to iron-reduction. The latter has significant implications for methane cycling. We conclude that MS can serve as a proxy for intrinsic bioremediation due to the activity of iron-reducing bacteria iron-reducing bacteria and for the application of geophysics to iron cycling studies.

  12. Susceptibility weighted imaging: a new tool in magnetic resonance imaging of stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India); Kesavadas, C. [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)], E-mail: chandkesav@yahoo.com; Thomas, B.; Gupta, A.K.; Thamburaj, K.; Kapilamoorthy, T. Raman [Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum (India)

    2009-01-15

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) technique that is exquisitely sensitive to paramagnetic substances, such as deoxygenated blood, blood products, iron, and calcium. This sequence allows detection of haemorrhage as early as 6 h and can reliably detect acute intracerebral parenchymal, as well as subarachnoid haemorrhage. It detects early haemorrhagic transformation within an infarct and provides insight into the cerebral haemodynamics following stroke. It helps in the diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis. It also has applications in the work-up of stroke patients. The sequence helps in detecting microbleeds in various conditions, such as vasculitis, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy, subacute infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL), amyloid angiopathy, and Binswanger's disease. The sequence also aids in the diagnosis of vascular malformations and perinatal cerebrovascular injuries. This review briefly illustrates the utility of this MR technique in various aspects of stroke diagnosis and management.

  13. Effect of Low-Frequency AC Magnetic Susceptibility and Magnetic Properties of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tsung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the low-frequency alternate-current (AC magnetic susceptibility (χac and hysteresis loop of various MgO thickness in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ determined coercivity (Hc and magnetization (Ms and correlated that with χac maxima. The multilayer films were sputtered onto glass substrates and the thickness of intermediate barrier MgO layer was varied from 6 to 15 Å. An experiment was also performed to examine the variation of the highest χac and maximum phase angle (θmax at the optimal resonance frequency (fres, at which the spin sensitivity is maximal. The results reveal that χac falls as the frequency increases due to the relationship between magnetization and thickness of the barrier layer. The maximum χac is at 10 Hz that is related to the maximal spin sensitivity and that this corresponds to a MgO layer of 11 Å. This result also suggests that the spin sensitivity is related to both highest χac and maximum phase angle. The corresponding maximum of χac is related to high exchange coupling. High coercivity and saturation magnetization contribute to high exchange-coupling χac strength.

  14. Distribution characteristics of magnetic susceptibility of the surface sediments in the southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic distributions of magnetic susceptibility (MS) are analyzed on the basis of susceptibility of 172 surface sediment samples in the southern Yellow Sea (SYS). The preliminary results are as follows: first, the distributions clearly correspond to different modern sediment assemblages in the continental sea, which indicates different sediment origins. With the 30 μCGS isoline being taken as demarcation line, the study area can then be divided into section H (high MS value area) and section L (low MS value area). Section H is mainly adjacent to land with two main sources of the Changjiang River and the Huanghe River.Section L is mainly an eddy sediment area, where Yellow Sea Cold Water is entrenched all the year round. The distribution pattern of MS could tell apart strong or weak hydrodynamic conditions and has a close relation to the circulation system in this area. At the areas of the SYS Circumfluent and northern East China Sea (NECS) Circumfluent (weak hydrodynamic), the MS has low values, while in the areas of Coastal Current (strong hydrodynamic), the values are high. At the same time, the oxidizing areas tend to take on higher MS, while the reducing areas have lower one. It seems safe to say that the MS in the continental sea reflects more of the sediment origin and sedimentary environment, which is different from that of loess, lake and surface soil as a climate proxy.

  15. Distribution characteristics of magnetic susceptibility of the surface sediments in the southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GEShulan; SHIXuefa; HANYibing

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic distributions of magnetic susceptibility (MS) are analyzed on the basis of susceptibility of 172 surface sediment samples in the southern Yellow Sea (SYS). The preliminary results are as follows: first, the distributions clearly correspond to different modern sediment assemblages in the continental sea, which indicates different sediment origins. With the 30 μCGS isoline being taken as demarcation line, the study area can then be divided into section H (high MS value area) and section L (low MS value area). Section H is mainly adjacent to land with two main sources of the Changjiang River and the Huanghe River.Section L is mainly an eddy sediment area, where Yellow Sea Cold Water is entrenched all the year round. The distribution pattern of MS could tell apart strong or weak hydrodynamic conditions and has a close relation to the circulation system in this area. At the areas of the SYS Circumfluent and northern East China Sea (NECS) Circumfluent (weak hydrodynamic), the MS has low values, while in the areas of Coastal Current (strong hydrodynamic), the values are high.At the same time, the oxidizing areas tend to take on higher MS, while the reducing areas have lower one. It seems safe to say that the MS in the continental sea reflects more of the sediment origin and sedimentary environment, which is different from that of loess, lake and surface soil as a climate proxy.

  16. Design and development of novel MRI compatible zirconium- ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H F; Zhou, F Y; Li, L; Zheng, Y F

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, novel MRI compatible zirconium-ruthenium alloys with ultralow magnetic susceptibility were developed for biomedical and therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments. The results demonstrated that alloying with ruthenium into pure zirconium would significantly increase the strength and hardness properties. The corrosion resistance of zirconium-ruthenium alloys increased significantly. High cell viability could be found and healthy cell morphology observed when culturing MG 63 osteoblast-like cells and L-929 fibroblast cells with zirconium-ruthenium alloys, whereas the hemolysis rates of zirconium-ruthenium alloys are zirconium-ruthenium alloys (1.25 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)-1.29 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1) for zirconium-ruthenium alloys) are ultralow, about one-third that of Ti-based alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, ~3.5 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1), CP Ti and Ti-6Al-7Nb, ~3.0 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)), and one-sixth that of Co-Cr alloys (Co-Cr-Mo, ~7.7 × 10(-6) cm(3)·g(-1)). Among the Zr-Ru alloy series, Zr-1Ru demonstrates enhanced mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance and cell viability with lowest magnetic susceptibility, and thus is the optimal Zr-Ru alloy system as therapeutic devices under MRI diagnostics environments.

  17. Prediction of Ba, Mn and Zn for tropical soils using iron oxides and magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques Júnior, José; Arantes Camargo, Livia; Reynaldo Ferracciú Alleoni, Luís; Tadeu Pereira, Gener; De Bortoli Teixeira, Daniel; Santos Rabelo de Souza Bahia, Angelica

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural activity is an important source of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soil worldwide but particularly in heavily farmed areas. Spatial distribution characterization of PTE contents in farming areas is crucial to assess further environmental impacts caused by soil contamination. Designing prediction models become quite useful to characterize the spatial variability of continuous variables, as it allows prediction of soil attributes that might be difficult to attain in a large number of samples through conventional methods. This study aimed to evaluate, in three geomorphic surfaces of Oxisols, the capacity for predicting PTEs (Ba, Mn, Zn) and their spatial variability using iron oxides and magnetic susceptibility (MS). Soil samples were collected from three geomorphic surfaces and analyzed for chemical, physical, mineralogical properties, as well as magnetic susceptibility (MS). PTE prediction models were calibrated by multiple linear regression (MLR). MLR calibration accuracy was evaluated using the coefficient of determination (R2). PTE spatial distribution maps were built using the values calculated by the calibrated models that reached the best accuracy by means of geostatistics. The high correlations between the attributes clay, MS, hematite (Hm), iron oxides extracted by sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (Fed), and iron oxides extracted using acid ammonium oxalate (Feo) with the elements Ba, Mn, and Zn enabled them to be selected as predictors for PTEs. Stepwise multiple linear regression showed that MS and Fed were the best PTE predictors individually, as they promoted no significant increase in R2 when two or more attributes were considered together. The MS-calibrated models for Ba, Mn, and Zn prediction exhibited R2 values of 0.88, 0.66, and 0.55, respectively. These are promising results since MS is a fast, cheap, and non-destructive tool, allowing the prediction of a large number of samples, which in turn enables detailed mapping of

  18. Detection of coal combustion products in stream sediments by chemical analysis and magnetic-susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franciskovic-Bilinski, S. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2008-02-15

    Coal slag and ash, obtained from burning coal in a textile factory in Duga Resa (Croatia) was discharged directly into the Mreznica River for 110 y (1884-1994), from where it travelled to the Korana River and further to the Kupa River at Karlovac, a total of about 50 km from its source. Of 54 elements determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in the {lt}2 mm sediment fraction, a number of anomalously high levels were recorded. The geoaccumulation index (I{sub geo}) for the anomalous elements were: Hg (1.88), B (4.05), Na (1.44). Al (2.05), V (1.65), Cr (1.20), Fe (1.18), Ni (2.10), Cu (2.37), Sr (0.97), Zr (3.27), Mo (3.34) and U (4.03). Low-field magnetic susceptibility (MS) was measured for each sample. The I{sub geo} for MS in the anomalous region is 5.85. Correlation analysis showed good correlation ({gt}0.90) of MS with: B (0.96), U (0.95), Zr (0.94), Sr (0.93), Na (0.92), Mo (0.92) and Ni (0.90). Cluster analysis of R-modality indicates that MS is linked to B, Mo, Na and U. Low correlation of MS with Fe (0.36) suggests that Fe in stream sediments is not in a ferromagnetic form. Neither maghemite, nor magnetite phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the sediments. Low-field magnetic susceptibility provides an indicator of contamination of river sediments by transported coal slag and ash, although it cannot be prescribed to a single element.

  19. Artifacts and essentialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Susan A

    2013-09-01

    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner "essence" that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic because of its provenance), but ordinary artifacts likewise receive value from their history (e.g., a worn and tattered blanket may have special value if it was one's childhood possession). Moreover, in some cases, object history may be thought to have causal effects on individual artifacts, much as an animal essence has causal effects. I review empirical support for these claims and consider the implications for both artifact concepts and essentialism. This perspective suggests that artifact concepts cannot be contained in a theoretical framework that focuses exclusively on similarity or even function. Furthermore, although there are significant differences between essentialism of natural kinds and essentialism of artifact individuals, the commonalities suggest that psychological essentialism may not derive from folk biology but instead may reflect more domain-general perspectives on the world.

  20. Magnetic susceptibility, chemical element content and morphology of magnetic mineral in surface sediment of Kamp Walker and Hubay rivers as an inlet of Sentani lake, Papua-Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulaikah, Siti; Sisinggih, Dian; Bungkang, Yusuf; Dani, Zem; Ong, Mahfud David

    2017-07-01

    As an inlet of Sentani lake, Kamp Walker and Hubay rivers have a different environment characteristic, i.e. Kamp Walker has a proximate inhabitant, while Hubay has a relatively more natural environment. In this study, we conduct measurement of magnetic susceptibility, Fe content and morphology of magnetic mineral extracted from the two rivers surface sediment. The magnetic susceptibility of low frequency (χlf) of sediment samples from the two rivers are varies from 11.11 × 10-6 kg/m3 to 24.96 10-6 kg/m3 for Kamp Walker with dependence frequency susceptibility (χfd) from 0.031% to 0.367%. Meanwhile, for HubayRivers we find the χlf varies from 4.56 × 10-6 kg/m3 to 16.93 × 10-6 kg/m3 and χfd from 0.104% to 1.033%. Fe content of the sample from the two river are also has a different average i.e around 60% for Hubay and 50% for Kamp Walker, that may because of the source of magnetic minerals on sediment are mainly a lithogenic magnetic mineral in Hubay, and anthropogenic magnetic mineral in Kamp Walker. The morphology of magnetic mineral, based on the SEM image shows a rounded and crystalline shape.

  1. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatebe, Ken, E-mail: Ken.Tatebe@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Ramsay, Elizabeth; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, 281 Hillmount Road, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Bronskill, Michael [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. Methods: The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Results: Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Conclusions: Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device

  2. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebe, Ken; Ramsay, Elizabeth; Mougenot, Charles; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device orientations. These new strategies are being

  3. The initial magnetic susceptibility of polydisperse ferrofluids: A comparison between experiment and theory over a wide range of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyova, Anna Y.; Goldina, Olga A.; Ivanov, Alexey O.; Lebedev, Aleksandr V.; Elfimova, Ekaterina A.

    2016-08-01

    Temperature dependencies of the static initial magnetic susceptibility for ferrofluids at various concentrations are studied using experiment and statistical-mechanical theories. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are carried out for twelve samples of magnetite-based fluids stabilized with oleic acid over a wide range of temperatures (210 K ≲T ≲ 390 K); all samples have the same granulometric composition but different volume ferroparticle concentrations (0.2 ≲ φ ≲ 0.5). Experimental results are analyzed using three theories: the second-order modified mean-field theory (MMF2) [A. O. Ivanov and O. B. Kuznetsova, Phys. Rev. E 64, 41405 (2001)]; its correction for polydisperse ferrofluids arising from Mayer-type cluster expansion and taking into account the first terms of the polydisperse second virial coefficient [A. O. Ivanov and E. A. Elfimova, J. Magn. Magn. Mater 374, 327 (2015)]; and a new theory based on MMF2 combined with the first terms of the polydisperse second and third virial contributions to susceptibility. It turns out that the applicability of each theory depends on the experimental sample density. If twelve ferrofluid samples are split into three groups of strong, moderate, and low concentrated fluids, the temperature dependences of the initial magnetic susceptibility in each group are very precisely described by one of the three theories mentioned above. The determination of a universal formula predicting a ferrofluid susceptibility over a broad range of concentrations and temperatures remains as a challenge.

  4. Basaltic lava characterization using magnetic susceptibility identification and presence of opaque minerals in Ijen volcanic complex, Banyuwangi, East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, Aditya; Hafidz, Abd.; Bijaksana, Satria; Abdurrachman, Mirzam

    2017-07-01

    Reliable volcanic map and deep understanding of magmatic processes are very important in exploration of natural resources and mitigation of volcanic hazards. The conservative method in volcanic mapping still depends on qualitative approach thus it often failed to characterize volcanic products properly. Rock magnetic methods are quantitative approaches that classify rocks based on their magnetic properties. In this study, magmatic processes in basaltic lavas from Ijen volcanic complex in Banyuwangi, East Java were studied using combined rock magnetic and petrogenesis approaches. Samples of basaltic lavas from 13 localities, taken from three eruption sources were measuredfor their mass-specific magnetic susceptibility. The samples were then also subjected to petrographic and X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF) analyses for their minerals composition and petrogenesis. Preliminary results show that the distinction in magnetic characters might be due to the quantity of magnetic minerals contained in rocks.

  5. Using magnetic susceptibility to discriminate between soil moisture regimes in selected loess and loess-like soils in northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaee, Morteza; Ayoubi, Shamsollah; Khormali, Farhad; Lu, Sheng Gao; Karimzadeh, Hamid Reza

    2016-04-01

    This study used discriminant analysis to determine the efficacy of magnetic measures for discriminating between four soil moisture regimes in northern Iran. The study area was located on loess deposits and loess-like soils containing similar parent material. Four soil moisture regimes including aridic, xeric, udic, and aquic were selected. A total of 25 soil profiles were drug from each regime and composite soil samples were collected within the moisture control section. A set of magnetic measures including magnetic susceptibility at low (χlf) and high (χhf) frequencies, frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility (χfd), saturation isothermal remnant magnetization (SIRM), and isothermal remnant magnetization (IRM100 mT, IRM 20 mT) were measured in the laboratory. Dithionite citrate bicarbonate (Fed) and acid oxalate (Feo) contents of all soil samples were also determined. The lowest and highest χlf and χhf were observed in aquic and udic moisture regimes, respectively. A similar trend was obtained for Fed and Fed-Feo. The significant positive correlation between Fed and SIRM (r = 0.60; P < 0.01) suggested the formation of stable single domains (SSD) due to pedogenic processes. The results of discriminant analysis indicated that a combination of magnetic measures could successfully discriminate between the selected moisture regimes in the study area (average accuracy = 80%). It can thus be concluded that magnetic measures could be applied as a powerful indicator for differentiation of soil moisture regimes in the study area.

  6. The magnetic susceptibility measurements of turbidity current sediments from Fuxian Lake of Yunnan Province and their correlations with earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper has advanced a new method for determining historical earthquakes. Its object of study is lake sediments. The research method is environmental magnetism represented by susceptibility. The purpose is extracting historical earthquake informations from lake sediments to explore the correlation between the turbidity current sediments initiated by the earthquakes and historical earthquakes round Fuxian Lake.

  7. Rock magnetic properties, magnetic susceptibility, and organic geochemistry comparison in core LZ1029-7 Lake El'gygytgyn, Far Eastern Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Murdock

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility measurements performed on initial short (3–16 m cores taken from Lake El'gygytgyn exhibited a large range in values. This observation led to the suggestion of widespread magnetite dissolution within the sediments due to anoxic conditions within the lake. Rock magnetic properties and their comparison with magnetic susceptibility, Total Organic Carbon (TOC, and bulk δ13Corg proxies in core LZ1029-7 provide an insight into the character of the magnetic minerals present within the lake and can further the understanding of processes that may be present in the newer long core sediments Susceptibility measurements (χ of discrete samples corroborate the two order of magnitude difference seen in previous continuous susceptibility measurements (κ, correlating high values with interglacial periods and low values with glacial intervals. Hysteresis parameters defined the majority of the magnetic material to be magnetite of PSD size. TOC values increase while δ13Corg values decrease in one section of LZ1029-7, which is defined as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, and help confine the age of the core to approximately 62 kyr. Increases in TOC during the most recent glacial interval suggest increased preservation of organic carbon during these times High TOC and low magnetic susceptibility during the LGM support the theory of perennial ice cover during glacial periods, which would lead to lake stratification and therefore anoxic bottom water conditions. Low temperature magnetic measurements also confirmed the presence of magnetite, but also indicated titanomagnetite, siderite and/or rhodochrosite, and vivianite were present. The latter three minerals are found only in anoxic environments, and further support the notion of magnetite dissolution.

  8. Rock magnetic properties, magnetic susceptibility, and organic geochemistry comparison in core LZ1029-7 Lake El'gygytgyn, Russia Far East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Murdock

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility measurements performed on initial short (~ 16 m cores PG1351 taken from Lake El'gygytgyn exhibited a large range in values. This observation led to the suggestion of widespread magnetite dissolution within the sediments due to anoxic conditions within the lake. Rock magnetic properties and their comparison with magnetic susceptibility, total organic carbon (TOC, and bulk δ13Corg proxies in core LZ1029-7, taken from the same site as the previously drilled PG1351, provide an insight into the character of the magnetic minerals present within the lake and can further the understanding of processes that may be present in the newer long core sediments. Susceptibility measurements (χ of discrete samples corroborate the two order of magnitude difference seen in previous continuous susceptibility measurements (κ, correlating high values with interglacial periods and low values with glacial intervals. Hysteresis parameters indicate that the majority of the magnetic material to be magnetite of PSD size. TOC values increase while δ13Corg values decrease in one section of LZ1029-7, which is defined as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, and help confine the age of the core to approximately 62 ka. Increases in TOC during the most recent glacial interval suggest increased preservation of organic carbon during this period. High TOC and low magnetic susceptibility during the LGM support the theory of perennial ice cover during glacial periods, which would lead to lake stratification and therefore anoxic bottom water conditions. Low temperature magnetic measurements confirmed the presence of magnetite, but also indicated titanomagnetite and possibly siderite, rhodochrosite, and/or vivianite were present. The latter three minerals are found only in anoxic environments, and further support the notion of magnetite dissolution.

  9. Constraints on deformation of the Southern Andes since the Cretaceous from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; Hernandez-Moreno, Catalina; Ghiglione, Matias C.; Speranza, Fabio; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Lodolo, Emanuele

    2015-12-01

    The southernmost segment of the Andean Cordillera underwent a complex deformation history characterized by alternation of contractional, extensional, and strike-slip tectonics. Key elements of southern Andean deformation that remain poorly constrained, include the origin of the orogenic bend known as the Patagonian Orocline (here renamed as Patagonian Arc), and the exhumation mechanism of an upper amphibolite facies metamorphic complex currently exposed in Cordillera Darwin. Here, we present results of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) from 22 sites in Upper Cretaceous to upper Eocene sedimentary rocks within the internal structural domain of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina). AMS parameters from most sites reveal a weak tectonic overprint of the original magnetic fabric, which was likely acquired upon layer-parallel shortening soon after sedimentation. Magnetic lineation from 17 sites is interpreted to have formed during compressive tectonic phases associated to a continuous N-S contraction. Our data, combined with the existing AMS database from adjacent areas, show that the Early Cretaceous-late Oligocene tectonic phases in the Southern Andes yielded continuous contraction, variable from E-W in the Patagonian Andes to N-S in the Fuegian Andes, which defined a radial strain field. A direct implication is that the exhumation of the Cordillera Darwin metamorphic complex occurred under compressive, rather than extensional or strike-slip tectonics, as alternatively proposed. If we agree with recent works considering the curved Magallanes fold-and-thrust belt as a primary arc (i.e., no relative vertical-axis rotation of the limbs occurs during its formation), then other mechanisms different from oroclinal bending should be invoked to explain the documented radial strain field. We tentatively propose a kinematic model in which reactivation of variably oriented Jurassic faults at the South American continental margin controlled

  10. Artifacts in diagnostic ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Hindi A; Peterson C; Barr RG

    2013-01-01

    Ammar Hindi,1 Cynthia Peterson,2 Richard G Barr3,41Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 2Department of Allied Health, Kent State University, Salem, OH, USA; 3Department of Radiology, Northeastern Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA; 4Radiology Consultants, Youngstown, OH, USAAbstract: Ultrasound artifacts are encountered daily in clinical practice and may be a source of confusion on interpretation. Some artifacts arise secondary to improper...

  11. 扫描优化在消除高磁场MRI伪影中的应用效果观察%Scanning Optimization in the Elimination of Clinical Observation of High Magnetic Field Artifacts in MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国财; 易海玲; 孙占友

    2014-01-01

    目的对扫描优化在消除高磁场MRI伪影中的应用展开观察,为日后的临床工作提供参考。方法选择2010年1月~2013年12月前来我院进行扫描检查的患者1500例为研究对象,通过随机的方式分为观察组与对照组,每组患者各750例。对照组患者选择我院MR扫描仪进行扫描检查,观察组患者采用经过工程师和技师多方面分析问题后的扫描仪进行扫描,其中应用了一些抑制伪影的措施。观察两组患者的扫描情况。结果对照组的出现伪影的人数为150例(20%),观察组出现伪影的人数为50例(6.7%),后者明显低于前者。结论通过扫描优化,可以有效的消除高磁场MRI伪影,得到更加清晰的结果,为患者的临床诊断与治疗提供更大的帮助。%Objective To scan optimization in eliminating the application of high magnetic field MRI artifacts, to provide the reference for future clinical work. Methods January 2010 ~ December 2013 patients to the hospital for a scan 1500 cases as the research object, through the way of random divided into observation group and control group, each group of patients in 750 cases. Control group patients select our MR scanner to scan, observation group of patients after approved by the engineer and technician multi-analysis question using the scanner to scan, some measure to restrain the artifacts used in it. Scanning of observing two groups of patients. Results The number of artifacts in the control group of 150 cases (20%), the number of artifacts observation group of 50 cases (6.7%), the lat er is obviously lower than the former. Conclusion By scanning optimization, can ef ectively eliminate the high magnetic field MRI artifacts, get clearer as a result, for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of the patients to provide more help.

  12. Rock magnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility(AMS) of earthquake affected soft sediments: Examples from Shillong and Latur (Deccan Trap), India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, B. V., ,, Dr.; Gawali, Mr. Praveen B.; Deenadayalan, K., ,, Dr.; Ramesh, D. S., ,, Prof.

    2017-04-01

    Rock magnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of earthquake affected soft sediments: Examples from Shillong and Latur (Deccan Trap), India. B.V.Lakshmi, Praveen B.Gawali, K.Deenadayalan and D.S.Ramesh Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, plot 5, sector 18, Near Kalamboli Highway, New Panvel(W), Navi Mumbai 410218 Combined rock magnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies on earthquake induced soft and non-soft sediments from Shillong and Latur, India have thrown up interesting results. The morphology of hysteresis loops, the pattern of isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition, and temperature dependence of susceptibility indicate that titano-magnetite/magnetite is the main magnetic carrier in these sediments. We also analyzed the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of liquefaction features within the seismically active Dauki fault, Shillong Plateau. We discovered that host sediments (non-liquefied), are characterized by an oblate AMS ellipsoid and liquefied sediment are characterized by a triaxial AMS ellipsoid, well grouped maximum susceptibility axis K1 (NNW-SSE trend). Field evidence and AMS analysis indicate that most of these features were emplaced by injection inferred to be due to seismically triggered fluidization. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of deformed and undeformed unconsolidated clay samples of Deccan Trap terrain from the 2000-year-old paleoearthquake site of Ther village, Maharashtra, India, was also studied. Such deposits are rare in the compact basaltic terrain because of which the results acquired are very important. The undeformed clay samples exhibit typical sedimentary fabric with an oblate AMS ellipsoid, whereas the deformed samples are tightly grouped in the inferred compression direction, probably effected by an earthquake, exhibiting prolate as well as oblate AMS ellipsoids. Rock magnetic and AMS methodology can help understand the behavior of different sediments to the

  13. Determination of Magnetic Parameters of Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) Core-Shell Nanoparticles from Nonlinear Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvorotka, Ihor I.; Pavlyk, Lyubomyr P.; Ubizskii, Sergii B.; Buryy, Oleg A.; Savytskyy, Hrygoriy V.; Mitina, Nataliya Y.; Zaichenko, Oleksandr S.

    2017-04-01

    Method of determining of magnetic moment and size from measurements of dependence of the nonlinear magnetic susceptibility upon magnetic field is proposed, substantiated and tested for superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNP) of the "magnetic core-polymer shell" type which are widely used in biomedical technologies. The model of the induction response of the SPNP ensemble on the combined action of the magnetic harmonic excitation field and permanent bias field is built, and the analysis of possible ways to determine the magnetic moment and size of the nanoparticles as well as the parameters of the distribution of these variables is performed. Experimental verification of the proposed method was implemented on samples of SPNP with maghemite core in dry form as well as in colloidal systems. The results have been compared with the data obtained by other methods. Advantages of the proposed method are analyzed and discussed, particularly in terms of its suitability for routine express testing of SPNP for biomedical technology.

  14. Comparison of optomagnetic and AC susceptibility readouts in a magnetic nanoparticle agglutination assay for detection of C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, Jeppe; Parmvi, Mattias; Strömberg, Mattias

    2017-01-01

    conjugated with CRP antibodies. Both methods detect agglutination as a shift to lower frequencies in measurements of the dynamics in response to an applied oscillating magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility method probes the magnetic response whereas the optomagnetic technique probes the modulation...... of laser light transmitted through the sample. The two techniques provided highly correlated results upon agglutination when they measure the decrease of the signal from the individual MNPs (turn-off detection strategy), whereas the techniques provided different results, strongly depending on the read...

  15. Metastable Zr-Nb alloys for spinal fixation rods with tunable Young's modulus and low magnetic resonance susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X L; Li, L; Niinomi, M; Nakai, M; Zhang, D L; Suryanarayana, C

    2017-10-15

    Good ductility, low magnetic susceptibility, and tunable Young's modulus are highly desirable properties for materials usage as spinal fixation rods. In this study, the effects of niobium content on the microstructure, magnetic susceptibility, and mechanical properties of Zr-xNb (13≤x≤23wt%) alloys were investigated. For the Zr-15Nb and Zr-17Nb alloys, a remarkable increase in Young's modulus was achieved due to the occurrence of deformation-induced ω phase transformation. This was the result of the competition of two factors associated with the Nb content: an increase of the stability of β phase and a decrease of the amount of athermal ω phase with increasing Nb content. When the Nb content was 15% or 17%, the amount of deformation-induced ω phase was maximum. Moreover, the magnetic susceptibility decreased with the deformation-induced β→ω phase transformation, and the Zr-17Nb alloy with apparent kink bands exhibited a smaller amount of springback than the Zr-15Nb alloy with {332} 〈113〉 mechanical twins. Furthermore, the ions released from the Zr-xNb alloys in accelerated immersion tests were at a very low level. The combination of low initial Young's modulus, and its remarkable variation induced by deformation, low magnetic susceptibility, good ductility, and smaller springback make the Zr-17Nb alloy a potential candidate for spinal fixation rods. For the rods of spinal fixation devices, it is important but difficult to lower the springback for bending formativeness while keeping the low initial Young's modulus for biocompatibility and lower the magnetic susceptibility for postoperative examination simultaneously. In this study, Zr-17Nb alloy was successfully developed via deformation-induced ω phase transformation during loading, simultaneously meeting the abovementioned properties for spinal fixation rods. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic susceptibility of Dirac fermions, Bi-Sb alloys, interacting Bloch fermions, dilute nonmagnetic alloys, and Kondo alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buot, Felix A.; Otadoy, Roland E. S.; Rivero, Karla B.

    2017-03-01

    Wide ranging interest in Dirac Hamiltonian is due to the emergence of novel materials, namely, graphene, topological insulators and superconductors, the newly-discovered Weyl semimetals, and still actively-sought after Majorana fermions in real materials. We give a brief review of the relativistic Dirac quantum mechanics and its impact in the developments of modern physics. The quantum band dynamics of Dirac Hamiltonian is crucial in resolving the giant diamagnetism of bismuth and Bi-Sb alloys. Quantitative agreement of the theory with the experiments on Bi-Sb alloys has been achieved, and physically meaningful contributions to the diamagnetism has been identified. We also treat relativistic Dirac fermion as an interband dynamics in uniform magnetic fields. For the interacting Bloch electrons, the role of translation symmetry for calculating the magnetic susceptibility avoids any approximation to second order in the field. The expressions for magnetic susceptibility of dilute nonmagnetic alloys give a firm theoretical foundation of the empirical formulas used in fitting experimental results. The unified treatment of all the above calculations is based on the lattice Weyl-Wigner formulation of discrete phase-space quantum mechanics. For completeness, the magnetic susceptibility of Kondo alloys is also given since Dirac fermions in conduction band and magnetic impurities exhibit Kondo effect.

  17. Anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks as a tool for direct determination of magnetic subfabrics of some minerals: an introductory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrouda, František; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, Josef; Pokorný, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility measured in alternating field can in general be resolved into a component that is in-phase with the applied field and a component that is out-of-phase. While in non-conductive diamagnetic, paramagnetic and many ferromagnetic materials the phase is effectively zero, in some ferromagnetic minerals, such as pyrrhotite, hematite, titanomagnetite or small magnetically viscous grains of magnetite, it is clearly non-zero. The anisotropy of out-of-phase susceptibility (opAMS) can then be used as a tool for the direct determination of the magnetic subfabrics of the minerals with non-zero phase. The error in determination of out-of-phase susceptibility non-linearly increases with decreasing phase angle. This may result in imprecise determination of the opAMS in specimens with very low phase angle. The degree of opAMS is higher than that of ipAMS, which may in contrast result in slightly increasing precision n the opAMS determination. It is highly recommended to inspect the results of the statistical tests of each specimen and to exclude the specimens whose opAMS is determined with insufficient precision from further processing. In rocks, whose magnetism is dominated by the mineral with non-zero out-of-phase susceptibility, the principal directions of the opAMS and ipAMS are virtually coaxial, while the degree of opAMS is higher than that of ipAMS. In some specific cases, the opAMS provides us with similar data to those provided by anisotropies of low-field dependent susceptibility and frequency-dependent susceptibility. The advantage of the opAMS compared to the other two anisotropies is its simultaneous measurement with the ipAMS during one measuring process, while the other two anisotropies require the AMS measurements in several fields or at least at two operating frequencies.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility of MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites using Laplace transform and the Routh-Hurwitz criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fano, Walter Gustavo, E-mail: gustavo.gf2005@gmail.co [Faculty of Engineering, National University of the Patagonia San Juan Bosco, Ruta 1 km4, (9000) Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut (Argentina); Boggi, Silvina; Razzitte, Adrian Cesar [Faculty of Engineering, University of Buenos Aires, Av. Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    This paper is devoted to study the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion from the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites using a phenomenological model with the gyromagnetic spin contribution and domain wall contribution. The magnetodynamic equation and the harmonic oscillator equation have been used to obtain the domain walls and the spin contribution of the magnetic susceptibility. The ferrite materials have been considered as linear, time invariant, isotropic and homogeneous, and the magnetization vector is proportional to the magnetic field vector. The resulting expression of the magnetization in time domain of both ferrites under study has been obtained by mean of the inverse Laplace transformation applying the residue method. The poles of the magnetic susceptibility have negative real parts, which ensures that the response decays exponentially to zero as the time increase. The degree of the numerator's polynomial of the magnetic susceptibility is less than the degree of denominator's polynomial in the magnetic susceptibility function: and the poles are located in the half left s-plane. Then the system is bounded-input, bounded-output (BIBO), and the results agree with the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion for the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites. - Research Highlights: Laplace transform of the magnetic susceptibility of the MnZn and NiZn soft ferrites. Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion of magnetic materials. Bode plot of magnetic susceptibility. Inverse Laplace transform using residue theorem.

  19. Spatial variability of soil magnetic susceptibility in an agricultural field located in Eastern Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menshov, Oleksandr; Pereira, Paulo; Kruglov, Oleksandr

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) have been used to characterize soil properties. It gives an indirect information about heavy metals content and degree of human impacts on soil contamination derived from atmospheric pollution (Girault et al., 2011). This method is inexpensive in relation to chemical analysis and very useful to track soil pollution, since several toxic components deposited on soil surface are rich in particulates produced by oxidation processes (Boyko et al., 2004; Morton-Bernea et al., 2009). Thus, identify the spatial distribution of MS is of major importance, since can give an indirect information of high metals content (Dankoub et al., 2012). This allows also to distinguish the pedogenic and technogenic origin magnetic signal. For example Ukraine chernozems contain fine-grained oxidized magnetite and maghemite of pedogenic origin formed by weathering of the parent material (Jeleńska et al., 2004). However, to a correct understanding of variables distribution, the identification of the most accurate interpolation method is fundamental for a better interpretation of map information (Pereira et al., 2013). The objective of this work is to study the spatial variability of soil MS in an agricultural fields located in the Tcherkascy Tishki area (50.11°N, 36.43 °E, 162 m a.s.l), Ukraine. Soil MS was measured in 77 sampling points in a north facing slope. To estimate the best interpolation method, several interpolation methods were tested, as inverse distance to a weight (IDW) with the power of 1,2,3,4 and 5, Local Polynomial (LP) with the power of 1 and 2, Global Polynomial (GP), radial basis functions - spline with tension (SPT), completely regularized spline (CRS), multiquatratic (MTQ), inverse multiquatratic (IMTQ), and thin plate spline (TPS) - and some geostatistical methods as, ordinary kriging (OK), Simple Kriging (SK) and Universal Kriging (UK), used in previous works (Pereira et al., 2014). On average, the soil MS of the studied plot had 686

  20. 口腔用金属材料的磁共振伪影的检测%Primary Observation by Measuring Magnetic Resonance Artifacts Caused by Metallic Dental Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解春; 俞立英; 周艺; 林江

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the existence and extent of magnetic resonance(MR) artifacts caused by frequently used metallic dental materials and to compare the influence of different MRI sequences on artifacts. Methods A total of 22 kinds and 25 metallic dental samples were tested with 1.5 T MR imager and gradient-echo sequence. Spin-echo and fast spin-echo were added to parts of these samples. Results Of all the 25 metallic dental samples, 11 including gold, amalgam, and silver point did not produce artifact. Titanium alloy and porcelain product fused in metal had mild artifacts. Whereas the remaining 12 samples such as the retention pin and pivot pin showed severe artifacts. Artifacts produced by retention pin, nickel chromium crown and so on were less severe on fast spin-echo. Conclusions Attention should be paid to some of the metallic dental materials, which could cause severe MR artifacts and image degradation, when undergoing face,jaw and head MR examination. Artifacts can be alleviated by using proper metallic materials or choosing proper imaging sequence and parameters.%目的检测口腔内常用金属材料在磁共振检查时是否产生伪影和伪影的严重程度;并比较不同检查序列 对伪影的影响。方法对22种25件口腔内常用金属材料做了磁共振成像测试,磁共振仪磁感应强度为1.5 T,所 用序列是梯度回波,部分材料加做自旋回波和快速自旋回波。结果铸金片、银汞合金、银尖等11件试样无伪影; 钛合金和金属烤瓷成品有轻度伪影;牙用固位钉、椿钉12件试样有严重伪影。牙用固位钉、镍铬合金冠等材料在 快速自旋回波图像上伪影减轻。结论部分口腔内金属材料会引起严重伪影,影响图像质量,所以在做口腔颌面 部和脑部磁共振成像时,须引起重视。通过合理选择金属材料,合理选择成像序列和参数可以减轻伪影。

  1. Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine Fast Reduction of Undersampling Artifacts in Radial MR Angiography with 3D Total Variation on Graphics Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Florian; Unger, Markus; Diwoky, Clemens; Clason, Christian; Pock, Thomas; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Objective Subsampling of radially encoded MRI acquisitions in combination with sparsity promoting methods opened a door to significantly increased imaging speed, which is crucial for many important clinical applications. In particular, it has been shown recently that total variation (TV) regularization efficiently reduces undersampling artifacts. The drawback of the method is the long reconstruction time which makes it impossible to use in daily clinical practice, especially if the TV optimization problem has to be solved repeatedly to select a proper regularization parameter. Materials and Methods The goal of this work was to show that for the case of MR-Angiography, TV filtering can be performed as a post-processing step, in contrast to the common approach of integrating TV penalties in the image reconstruction process. With this approach it is possible to use TV algorithms with data fidelity terms in image space, which can be implemented very efficiently on graphic processing units (GPUs). The combination of a special radial sampling trajectory and a full 3D formulation of the TV minimization problem is crucial for the effectiveness of the artifact elimination process. Results and Conclusion The computation times of GPU-TV show that interactive elimination of undersampling artifacts is possible even for large volume data sets, in particular allowing the interactive determination of the regularization parameter. Results from phantom measurements and in vivo angiography data sets show that 3D TV, together with the proposed sampling trajectory, leads to pronounced improvements in image quality. However, while artifact removal was very efficient for angiography data sets in this work, it cannot be expected that the proposed method of TV post-processing will work for arbitrary types of scans. PMID:20352289

  2. Geomagnetic field intensity and quantitative paleorainfall reconstruction from Chinese loess using 10Be and magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W.; zhou, W.; Li, C.; Wu, Z.; White, L.; Xian, F.

    2011-12-01

    7Be is produced in the atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation reactions and carried to the ground attached to aerosols, usually encapsulated in rain or snow. Numerous studies have shown that its flux to the ground is proportional to rainfall amount. Unfortunately, with a half life of only a few weeks, this observation has little relevance for reconstruction past rainfall amounts in paleosoils. Fortunately, 7Be has a long-lived sister isotope (10Be) with a half life of ~1.5 Ma which can be used for such purposes. There are a number of complications, however. First, 10Be atmospheric production rate changes when the geomagnetic field intensity changes. Secondly, 10Be half life is long enough that 10Be which fell to the ground attached to dust some time in the past can become resuspended, meaning that there are two sources of 10Be, one meteoric, and the other recycled aeolian dust. Fortunately, we have found a method to deconvolute this knotty situation and have applied it to soils of the Chinese Loess Plateau, allowing us to reconstruct records of both geomagnetic field intensity and paleorainfall. To do so, we use the additional parameters magnetic susceptibility and coercivity to help define the inherited amount of each component, and to define what fraction of the variations in 10Be are associated with magnetic field fluctuations, versus that linked to rainfall variations. We also use a sediment age/depth model to convert 10Be concentration to 10Be flux, and finally, we use the modern 7Be vs. rainfall relationship and 10Be/7Be atmospheric production rate ratio to calculate quantitative paleorainfall rates. We have used these techniques to generate several such records ranging from the Holocene to MIS13 (Circa 525 ka BP), and will compare some of these to U-series dated speleothem records of δ18O.

  3. Impacts of geology and land use on magnetic susceptibility and selected heavy metals in surface soils of Mashhad plain, northeastern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Haghnia, Gholam Hosain; Ayoubi, Shamsollah; Safari, Tayebeh

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is a fast, inexpensive and reliable technique for estimating and monitoring the anthropogenic contamination of soil with heavy metals. However, it is essential to determine the factors affecting magnetic susceptibility before applying this technique to environmental studies. The objectives of this study were to investigate i) the effect of parent materials and land use on the magnetic susceptibility and concentrations of Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn, and ii) capability of magnetic susceptibility as an indicator of anthropogenic heavy metals contamination of soil in Mashhad plain, northeastern Iran. One hundred seventy-eight composite surface soil samples (0-10 cm) were taken. The aqua-regia extractable concentrations of Fe, Ni, Zn and Pb were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Magnetic susceptibility at low and high frequency (χlf and χhf) were measured and frequency dependent susceptibility (χfd) was calculated. The average concentrations of Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn were 22,812, 61.4, 74.1 and 31.6 mg kg- 1, respectively. The highest contents of Pb (69.1 mg kg- 1) and Zn (149 mg kg- 1) were observed in urban area. The highest concentration of Ni was 41,538 mg kg- 1 observed in the soils developed from ultramafic rocks. Magnetic susceptibility varied from 20.3 on marly sediments to 311.8 × 10- 8 m3 kg- 1 on ultramafic rocks. A positive strong correlation (Pvalue < 0.01, r = 0.88) was obtained between Ni and χlf. There were no significant relationships between Zn and Pb with χlf, therefore it seems that magnetic susceptibility has not been affected significantly by anthropogenic activities which enhanced Pb and Zn concentrations in urban soils. The results indicated that magnetic susceptibility was mainly controlled by Ni containing minerals with lithogenic origin. Therefore, in the soils studied, magnetic susceptibility could not be employed as indicator of anthropogenic contamination of soil with heavy metals.

  4. Granular Responses of GdBa2Cu3O7-δ Using ac Magnetic Susceptibility Measurement under ac and dc Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namuco, S. B.; Lao, M. L.; Sarmago, R. V.

    Granularity of bulk materials has a great impact on the characterization of superconductors as well as its path towards room temperature applications. Bulk GdBCO that has crystal formation and Tc close to YBCO were fabricated using the conventional solid state route method. AC magnetic susceptibility measurement is done on the sample to observe the granular responses brought about by small magnetic field values that is superimposed with DC magnetic field. Results show that compared to YBCO, GdBCO show more sensitive behaviour with the addition of DC magnetic field. It is shown in the results that abrupt response in the AC loss peaks observed in χ" is more prominent in GdBCO even at lower applied magnetic fields.

  5. Magnetic susceptibility as an indicator to paleo-environmental pollution in an urban lagoon near Istanbul city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpar, Bedri; Unlu, Selma; Altinok, Yildiz; Ongen, Sinan

    2014-05-01

    For assessing anthropogenic pollution, magnetic susceptibility profiles and accompanying data were measured along three short cores recovered at the southern part of an urban lagoon; Kucukcekmece, Istanbul, Turkey. This marine inlet, connected to the Sea of Marmara by a very narrow channel, was used as a drinking water reservoir 40-50 years ago before it was contaminated by municipal, agricultural and industrial activities, mainly carried by three streams feeding the lagoon. The magnetic signals decrease gradually from the lake bottom towards the core base showing some characteristic anomalies. These signatures were tested as an environmental magnetic parameter against the lithological diversity (silici-clastic, total organic matter and carbonate), metal enrichments with larger variations (Pb, Mn, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, U and Al) and probable hydrocarbon contamination. Mineral assemblage was determined by a computer driven X-ray diffractometer. The heavy metal concentrations and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) were measured by ICP-MS and UVF spectrometry, respectively. Magnetic susceptibility shows slightly higher values in interlayers containing higher silici-clastic material and organic content which may suggest first-order changes in the relative supplies of terrigenous and biogenic materials. On the basis of cluster analyses, enhanced magnetic signals could be correlated with the elevated concentrations of Co, Zn, U, Pb and TPH along the cores. The Pb concentrations at the upper parts of the cores were higher than the "Severe Effect Level" and could pose a potential risk for living organisms. Greater amounts of organic carbon tend to accumulate in muddy sediments. In fact, there are a few studies reporting some relationship between enhanced magnetic signals and organic contamination mainly due to petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons. In conclusion, the magnetic susceptibility changes in sedimentary depositional environments could be used as a rapid and cost

  6. Application of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility to large-scale fault kinematics: an evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Antonio M.; Roman-Berdiel, Teresa; Marcén, Marcos; Oliva-Urcia, Belen; Soto, Ruth; Garcia-Lasanta, Cristina; Calvin, Pablo; Pocovi, Andres; Gil-Imaz, Andres; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Vernet, Eva; Santolaria, Pablo; Osacar, Cinta; Santanach, Pere; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Villalain, Juan Jose

    2017-04-01

    Major discontinuities in the Earth's crust are expressed by faults that often cut across its whole thickness favoring, for example, the emplacement of magmas of mantelic origin. These long-lived faults are common in intra-plate environments and show multi-episodic activity that spans for hundred of million years and constitute first-order controls on plate evolution, favoring basin formation and inversion, rotations and the accommodation of deformation in large segments of plates. Since the post-Paleozoic evolution of these large-scale faults has taken place (and can only be observed) at shallow crustal levels, the accurate determination of fault kinematics is hampered by scarcely developed fault rocks, lack of classical structural indicators and the brittle deformation accompanying fault zones. These drawbacks are also found when thick clayey or evaporite levels, with or without diapiric movements, are the main detachment levels that facilitate large displacements in the upper crust. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) provides a useful tool for the analysis of fault zones lacking fully developed kinematic indicators. However, its meaning in terms of deformational fabrics must be carefully checked by means of outcrop and thin section analysis in order to establish the relationship between the orientation of magnetic ellipsoid axes and the transport directions, as well as the representativity of scalar parameters regarding deformation mechanisms. Timing of faulting, P-T conditions and magnetic mineralogy are also major constraints for the interpretation of magnetic fabrics and therefore, separating ferro- and para-magnetic fabric components may be necessary in complex cases. AMS results indicate that the magnetic lineation can be parallel (when projected onto the shear plane) or perpendicular (i.e. parallel to the intersection lineation) to the transport direction depending mainly on the degree of shear deformation. Changes between the two end-members can

  7. X-ray scattering and magnetic susceptibility study of doped CuGeO sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y J; Lamarra, S C; Chou, F C; Kim, Y J; Masuda, T; Tsukada, I; Uchinokura, K; Birgeneau, R J

    2003-01-01

    We report comprehensive synchrotron x-ray scattering and magnetic susceptibility studies of the doped spin-Peierls materials Cu sub 1 sub - sub x Zn sub x GeO sub 3 and CuGe sub 1 sub - sub y Si sub y O sub 3. Temperature versus dopant concentration phase diagrams are mapped out for both Zn and Si dopants. The phase diagrams of both Cu sub 1 sub - sub x Zn sub x GeO sub 3 and CuGe sub 1 sub - sub y Si sub y O sub 3 closely resemble that of Cu sub 1 sub - sub x Mg sub x GeO sub 3 , including the observation that the spin gap is established at a much higher temperature than the temperature at which the spin-Peierls dimerization attains long-range order. The spin-Peierls transitions in doped samples exhibit unusual phase transition behavior, characterized by highly rounded phase transitions, Lorentzian squared lineshapes, and very long relaxation times. Phenomenological explanations for these observations are given by considering the effects of competing random bond interactions as well as random fields generate...

  8. Magnetic Susceptibility as a Tool for Investigating Igneous Rocks—Experience from IODP Expedition 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger C. Searle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of magnetic susceptibility have been commonly used on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODPexpeditions to study minor lithological variations (forexample, those related to climatic cycles in sedimentary rocks, but they have been less frequently used on igneous rocks, although important post-cruise studies have utilized them (e.g., Ildefonse and Pezard, 2001. Here I report its use (and that of the closely related electrical conductivity on IODP Expedition 304 to examine igneous crustal rocks. Expedition 304/305 targeted the Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and recovered a suite of igneous rocks comprising mainly gabbros, troctolites, and some diabases (Blackman et al., 2006; Ildefonse et al., 2006, 2007; IODP Expeditions 304 and 305 Scientists, 2005. Shipboard measurements (on D/V JOIDES Resolution of physical properties were made to characterize lithological units and alteration products, to correlate cored material with down-hole logging data, and to interpret broader-scale geophysical data.

  9. Signal changes in cortical laminar necrosis - evidence from susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Santhosh, Kannath; Thomas, Bejoy; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman; Bodhey, Narendra; Pendharker, Hima; Patro, Satyanarayana [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India)

    2009-05-15

    Two types of infarcts can be identified depending on the circumstances leading to its generation-infarcts with pannecrosis and infarcts with selective neuronal loss. Cortical laminar necrosis (CLN) can occur due to various etiologies of which infarctions and hypoxia are the commonest. Infarction results in pannecrosis whereas hypoxia and incomplete infarction result in selective neuronal loss with the presence of viable cells, glial proliferations, and deposition of paramagnetic substances. We investigated patients with CLN with susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), a technique highly sensitive to even traces of paramagnetic agents or hemorrhagic components. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients diagnosed with CLN as per standard criterion. Demographic characteristics and etiologies were recorded. Findings in magnetic resonance images including SWI were analyzed. We identified 11 patients with CLN, six males and five females with age range of 4-64 years. Etiologies included hypoxia in two patients and infarction in the nine patients. SWI detected diffuse linear hypointensities along the gyral margins in CLN due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Linear dot like hypointensities were identified in one patient with infarction. CLN due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy display linear gyral hypointensities and basal ganglia hypointensities that are identifiable in SWI and may represent mineralization. This might be related to iron transport across the surviving neurons from basal ganglia to the cortex, which is not possible in complete infarction. SWI may be helpful in understanding the pathophysiological aspects of CLN due to complete infarction and hypoxia. (orig.)

  10. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol of the Normal Canine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina L.; Pease, Anthony P.; Ballegeer, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI) is routinely performed as a supplement to conventional MRI in human medicine for patients with intracranial neoplasia and cerebrovascular events. There is minimal data on the use of DSC-MRI in veterinary patients and a DSC-MRI protocol in the veterinary patient has not been described. Sixteen normal dogs, 6 years or older were recruited for this study. The sample population included 11 large dogs (>11 kg) and 5 small dogs (11 kg, a useable AIF and perfusion map was generated. One dog less than 11 kg received the same contrast dose and rate. In this patient, the protocol did not generate a useable AIF. The remainder of the dogs less than 11 kg followed a protocol of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast media at 1.5 ml/s with a 10 ml saline flush at 1.5 ml/s. A useable AIF and perfusion map was generated in the remaining dogs <11 kg using the higher contrast dose and slower rate protocol. This study establishes a contrast dose and administration rate for canine DSC-MRI imaging that is different in dogs greater than 11 kg compared to dogs less than 11 kg. These protocols may be used for future applications to evaluate hemodynamic disturbances in canine intracranial pathology.

  11. Magnetic resonance susceptibility weighted imaging in detecting intracranial calcification and hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-zhen; QI Jian-pin; ZHAN Chuan-jia; SHU Hong-ge; ZHANG Lin; WANG Cheng-yuan; XIA Li-ming; HU Jun-wu; FENG Ding-yi

    2008-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) is better than routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting intracranial calcification. This study aimed to assess the value of MR susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in the detection and differentiation of intracranial calcification and hemorrhage.Methods Enrolled in this study were 35 patients including 13 cases of calcification demonstrated by CT and 22 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage. MR sequences used in all the subjects included axial T1WI, T2WI and SWI. The phase shift (PS) of calcification and hemorrhage on SWI was calculated and their signal features on corrected phase images were compared. The sensitivity of T1WI, T2WI and SWI in detecting intracranial calcification and hemorrhage was analyzed statistically.Results The detection rate of SWI for cranial calcification was 98.2%, significantly higher than that of T1 Wl and T2WI. It was not significantly different from that of CT (P >0.05). There were 49 hemorrhagic lesions at different stages detected n SWI, 30 on T2WI and 18 on T1WI. The average PS of calcification and hemorrhage was +0.734han routine MRI in detecting micro-hemorrhage, SWI may play an important role in differentiating cerebral diseases associated with calcification or hemorrhage.

  12. Correspondence between neutron depolarization and higher order magnetic susceptibility to investigate ferromagnetic clusters in phase separated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Kaustuv; Samal, D; Bera, A K; Elizabeth, Suja; Yusuf, S M; Kumar, P S Anil

    2014-01-08

    It is a tough task to distinguish a short-range ferromagnetically correlated cluster-glass phase from a canonical spin-glass-like phase in many magnetic oxide systems using conventional magnetometry measurements. As a case study, we investigate the magnetic ground state of La0.85Sr0.15CoO3, which is often debated based on phase separation issues. We report the results of two samples of La0.85Sr0.15CoO3 (S-1 and S-2) prepared under different conditions. Neutron depolarization, higher harmonic ac susceptibility and magnetic relaxation studies were carried out along with conventional magnetometry measurements to differentiate subtle changes at the microscopic level. There is no evidence of ferromagnetic correlation in the sample S-2 attributed to a spin-glass phase, and this is compounded by the lack of existence of a second order component of higher harmonic ac susceptibility and neutron depolarization. A magnetic relaxation experiment at different temperatures complements the spin glass characteristic in S-2. All these signal a sharp variance when we consider the cluster-glass-like phase (phase separated) in S-1, especially when prepared from an improper chemical synthesis process. This shows that the nonlinear ac susceptibility is a viable tool to detect ferromagnetic clusters such as those the neutron depolarization study can reveal.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as proxy method to monitor soil pollution: the case study of S. Nicola di Melfi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Caggiano, Rosa; Coppola, Rosa; Macchiato, Maria; Ragosta, Maria

    2010-10-01

    The development of in situ, cheep, noninvasive, and fast strategies for soil monitoring is a crucial task for environmental research. In this paper, we present the results of three field surveys carried out in an industrial area of Southern Italy: S. Nicola di Melfi. The monitoring procedure is based on soil magnetic susceptibility measurements carried out by means of experimental protocols that our research group developed during the last years. This field surveys is supported by both geological characterization of the area and analytical determinations of metal concentrations in soils. Magnetic studies were carried out not only in situ but also in laboratory. Results show that, taking into account the influence due to the geomorphologic difference, soil magnetic susceptibility is an optimal indicator of the anthropogenic impact. So, our monitoring strategy discloses that the combined use of magnetic susceptibility measurements and soil geomorphology information may be used as a useful tool for the temporal monitoring of pollution evolution and for a fast screening of polluted zones.

  14. Magnetic susceptibility to identify landscape segments on a detailed scale in the region of Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana dos Reis Barrios

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural potential is generally assessed and managed based on a one-dimensional vision of the soil profile, however, the increased appreciation of sustainable production has stimulated studies on faster and more accurate evaluation techniques and methods of the agricultural potential on detailed scales. The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using soil magnetic susceptibility for the identification of landscape segments on a detailed scale in the region of Jaboticabal, São Paulo State. The studied area has two slope curvatures: linear and concave, subdivided into three landscape segments: upper slope (US, concave, middle slope (MS, linear and lower slope (LS, linear. In each of these segments, 20 points were randomly sampled from a database with 207 samples forming a regular grid installed in each landscape segment. The soil physical and chemical properties, CO2 emissions (FCO2 and magnetic susceptibility (MS of the samples were evaluated represented by: magnetic susceptibility of air-dried fine earth (MS ADFE, magnetic susceptibility of the total sand fraction (MS TS and magnetic susceptibility of the clay fraction (MS Cl in the 0.00 - 0.15 m layer. The principal component analysis showed that MS is an important property that can be used to identify landscape segments, because the correlation of this property within the first principal component was high. The hierarchical cluster analysis method identified two groups based on the variables selected by principal component analysis; of the six selected variables, three were related to magnetic susceptibility. The landscape segments were differentiated similarly by the principal component analysis and by the cluster analysis using only the properties with higher discriminatory power. The cluster analysis of MS ADFE, MS TS and MS Cl allowed the formation of three groups that agree with the segment division established in the field. The grouping by cluster

  15. Susceptibility of CoFeB/AlOx/Co Magnetic Tunnel Junctions to Low-Frequency Alternating Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tsung Chen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This investigation studies CoFeB/AlOx/Co magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ in the magnetic field of a low-frequency alternating current, for various thicknesses of the barrier layer AlOx. The low-frequency alternate-current magnetic susceptibility (χac and phase angle (θ of the CoFeB/AlOx/Co MTJ are determined using an cac analyzer. The driving frequency ranges from 10 to 25,000 Hz. These multilayered MTJs are deposited on a silicon substrate using a DC and RF magnetron sputtering system. Barrier layer thicknesses are 22, 26, and 30 Å. The X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD include a main peak at 2θ = 44.7° from hexagonal close-packed (HCP Co with a highly (0002 textured structure, with AlOx and CoFeB as amorphous phases. The full width at half maximum (FWHM of the Co(0002 peak, decreases as the AlOx thickness increases; revealing that the Co layer becomes more crystalline with increasing thickness. χac result demonstrates that the optimal resonance frequency (fres that maximizes the χac value is 500 Hz. As the frequency increases to 1000 Hz, the susceptibility decreases rapidly. However, when the frequency increases over 1000 Hz, the susceptibility sharply declines, and almost closes to zero. The experimental results reveal that the mean optimal susceptibility is 1.87 at an AlOx barrier layer thickness of 30 Å because the Co(0002 texture induces magneto-anisotropy, which improves the indirect CoFeB and Co spin exchange-coupling strength and the χac value. The results concerning magnetism indicate that the magnetic characteristics are related to the crystallinity of Co.

  16. Model calculation of the static magnetic susceptibility in light rare earth metallic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Y.; Parlebas, J. C.

    1991-05-01

    Using the impurity Anderson model in the large N_f approximation, where N_f is the orbital and spin degeneracy of the f level, we calculate the zero temperature static paramagnetic susceptibility of light rare earth metallic systems. The calculation is performed for large values of the Coulomb U_ff electron-electron interactions with respect of the V hybridization of f1 and f2 configurations with the conduction states (i.e. f0 configuration) : we only keep the leading terms in a development in successive powers of 1/U_ff and V. Our numerical results on the magnetic susceptibility start from a simple analytic expression and are discussed in terms of the f level position, the hybridization V, the shape and filling of the conduction band and also the finite U_ff effects. Finally we present calculated curves for the susceptibility versus V in connection with the αγ transition of cerium and utilizing the same parameters as those used previously to obtain core level LIII absorption spectra : also in the case of the susceptibility, the hybridization appears to be an important parameter to describe the phase change from γ to α cerium. Nous utilisons le modèle d'Anderson à une impureté dans l'approximation des grands N_f où N_f est la dégénérescence d'orbitale et de spin du niveau f et nous calculons alors la susceptibilité paramagnétique statique (à température nulle) dans les systèmes métalliques de terres rares légères. Nous effectuons notre calcul pour des valeurs de l'interaction de Coulomb U_ff grandes par rapport à l'hybridation V des configurations f1 et f2 avec les états de conduction (c.-à-d. la configuration f0): nous ne retenons que les termes les plus imporatnts dans un développement en puissances successives de 1/U_ff et V. Ensuite nous discutons nos résultats numériques à partir d'une forme analytique simple obtenue pour la susceptibilité magnétique en fonction de la position du niveau f, de l'hybridation V, de la forme et du

  17. Magnetization and susceptibility of a parabolic InAs quantum dot with electron-electron and spin-orbit interactions in the presence of a magnetic field at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D. Sanjeev; Mukhopadhyay, Soma; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-11-01

    The magnetization and susceptibility of a two-electron parabolic quantum dot are studied in the presence of electron-electron and spin-orbit interactions as a function of magnetic field and temperature. The spin-orbit interactions are treated by a unitary transformation and an exactly soluble parabolic interaction model is considered to mimic the electron-electron interaction. The theory is finally applied to an InAs quantum dot. Magnetization and susceptibility are calculated using canonical ensemble approach. Our results show that Temperature has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility in the diamagnetic regime whereas electron-electron interaction reduces them. The temperature however reduces the height of the paramagnetic peak. The Rashba spin-orbit interaction is shown to shift the paramagnetic peak towards higher magnetic fields whereas the Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction shifts it to the lower magnetic field side. Spin-orbit interaction has no effect on magnetization and susceptibility at larger temperatures.

  18. Facts in artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Bindhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Examination of microscopic sections of animal tissues reveals facts which are not always related to its normal histology or pathology. Processing of tissue specimens consists of lengthy procedures from the stage of surgical removal to the stained and mounted microscopic sections. Defects are common in tissue sections as a result of faulty procedures. These defects are referred to as artifacts. They lead to misinterpretation of histopathological diagnosis but at times they throw limelight into diagnosis. This paper attempts to put together all the facts regarding the various artifacts that are encountered in histopathology.

  19. Controlling Modelling Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    as the high-level model, so that they can be directly compared. There are two key ideas in our approach — a temporal abstraction, where we only look at the state of the system at certain observable points in time, and a spatial abstraction, where we project onto a smaller state space that summarises...... artifacts that were inadvertently introduced. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to reason about modelling artifacts, given a detailed model and a highlevel (more abstract) model of the same system. By a series of automated abstraction steps, we lift the detailed model to the same state space...

  20. Antiferromagnetism in the organic conductor bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6]: Static magnetic susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kell; Tomkiewicz, Yaffa; Bechgaard, Klaus

    1982-01-01

    temperature, evidence for magnetic crossover is observed. The experimental results show (TMTSF)2X, X- = AsF6- and PF6- to be members of a family with quite similar physical properties. The data are discussed on the basis of Overhauser's treatment of itinerant antiferromagnetism.......The anisotropy in the static magnetic susceptibility of bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6] has been investigated above and below the metal-to-insulator transition for a range of fields between 0.5 and 30 kG. The results are consistent with the expectations...

  1. Magnetic Susceptibility Signals to Reconstruct Lena River Freshwater Discharge Events in the Laptev Sea and Neelov Bay, Russian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, J.; Williams, D. F.; Karabanov, E. B.; Kuzmin, M.; Buchinskyi, V.

    2004-12-01

    River discharge into the Arctic is known to cause changes in sea ice production and consecutively affect global climate. The Russian Lena River is one of the major contributors into the Arctic Ocean, delivering approximately 770 km3/year of freshwater and about 21 x106/year tons of suspended material. Here we present preliminary evidence of fresh water discharge events from the Lena River into the Laptev Sea, Russian Arctic. During two separate coring-oceanographic expeditions in July and September, 2003, over 25 piston, gravity and vibro cores were collected from Neelov Bay and along a transect that extends from the delta floodplain onto the Laptev shelf. Preliminary results from our cores demonstrate that high magnetic susceptibility signals are a good indicator of river sediments deposition and provide an estimate of the number and magnitude of the river discharge. Sedigraph analyses in combination with Wet Sieving analysis (grain size > 3phi) reveal changes in grain size distributions and accurate grain size compositions along the core, which are well correlated with high magnetic susceptibility peaks. Based on lithostratigraphic interpretations and magnetic susceptibility correlations, at least 6 major sections are identified as possible discharge events in two transects that extends from the Lena River Delta into the Laptev Sea Shelf. The magnitude of the magnetic susceptibility peaks appears to reflect the strength of flow and the resulting spatial distribution of sediments during each deposition event associated with each unit. In Neelov Bay, cores in Transect 2 show the possibility that terrestrial material may be from a different source than Bykovskaya channel in the south-east part of the bay. This terrestrial material may be transported from coastal sources by wave refraction or by wind, and/or submarine currents. Future work will help us to understand and reconstruct the chronology of observed sedimentological events.

  2. Relationship between chemical composition and magnetic susceptibility in the alkaline volcanics from the Isparta area, SW Turkey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ömer Elitok; Züheyr Kamacı; M Nuri Dolmaz; Kamil Yılmaz; Meltem Şener

    2010-12-01

    Potassium-rich volcanic rocks in the Isparta area (SW Turkey)consist mainly of older (Pliocene) volcanic rock suites (e.g., lamprophyre, basaltic trachyandesite, trachyandesite, trachyte) and younger (Quaternary) caldera forming lava dome/flows (e.g., tephriphonolite, trachyte) and pyroclastics (ash/pumice fall deposits and ignimbritic flows). The magnetic susceptibility () was performed for both groups. The magnetic susceptibility value of the less evolved rocks characterized by SiO2 > 57 wt%(e.g., basaltic trachyandesite, tephriphonolite, lamprophyric rocks) and having mostly mafic phenocrysts such as pyroxene, amphibole, and biotite-phlogopite is over 10 (10−3 [SI]). Fine to medium-grained and subhedral to anhedral opaque minerals are scattered especially in the matrix phase of the less evolved volcanic rocks. However, the value of the more evolved rocks (e.g., trachyte and trachyandesites) with SiO2 over 57 wt%vary between 0.1 and 28, but most of them below 10.SI values are negatively correlated with SiO2, Na2O, but positively correlated with Fe2O3, CaO, MnO, P2O5 and MgO contents, suggesting inverse variation of SI with fractionation of potassic magma. That is to say that less evolved volcanic rocks have relatively higher magnetic susceptibility values in the volcanic suite.Fine to medium-grained and subhedral to anhedral Fe-Ti oxides are scattered mainly in the matrix phase of the less evolved volcanics, presumably cause the pronounced relatively higher magnetic susceptibility.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility and Landau diamagnetism of a quantum collisional Plasmas with arbitrary degree of degeneration of electronic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Latyshev, A V

    2013-01-01

    The kinetic description of magnetic susceptibility and Landau diamagnetism of quantum collisional plasmas with any degeration of electronic gas is given. The correct expression of electric conductivity of quantum collisional plasmas with any degeration of electronic gas (see A. V. Latyshev and A. A. Yushkanov, Transverse electrical conductivity of a quantum collisional plasma in the Mermin approach. - Theor. and Math. Phys., V. 175(1):559-569 (2013)) is used.

  4. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST...

  5. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST...

  6. Detection of microcalcifications by characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects using MR phase image cross-correlation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baheza, Richard A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Welch, E. Brian [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Gochberg, Daniel F. [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, and Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Sanders, Melinda [Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Harvey, Sara [Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Gore, John C. [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Physics and Astronomy, and Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.yankeelov@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science and Departments of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, and Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2310 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a new method for detecting calcium deposits using their characteristic magnetic susceptibility effects on magnetic resonance (MR) images at high fields and demonstrate its potential in practice for detecting breast microcalcifications. Methods: Characteristic dipole signatures of calcium deposits were detected in magnetic resonance phase images by computing the cross-correlation between the acquired data and a library of templates containing simulated phase patterns of spherical deposits. The influence of signal-to-noise ratio and various other MR parameters on the results were assessed using simulations and validated experimentally. The method was tested experimentally for detection of calcium fragments within gel phantoms and calcium-like inhomogeneities within chicken tissue at 7 T with optimized MR acquisition parameters. The method was also evaluated for detection of simulated microcalcifications, modeled from biopsy samples of malignant breast cancer, inserted in silico into breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) of healthy subjects at 7 T. For both assessments of calcium fragments in phantoms and biopsy-based simulated microcalcifications in breast MRIs, receiver operator characteristic curve analyses were performed to determine the cross-correlation index cutoff, for achieving optimal sensitivity and specificity, and the area under the curve (AUC), for measuring the method’s performance. Results: The method detected calcium fragments with sizes of 0.14–0.79 mm, 1 mm calcium-like deposits, and simulated microcalcifications with sizes of 0.4–1.0 mm in images with voxel sizes between (0.2 mm){sup 3} and (0.6 mm){sup 3}. In images acquired at 7 T with voxel sizes of (0.2 mm){sup 3}–(0.4 mm){sup 3}, calcium fragments (size 0.3–0.4 mm) were detected with a sensitivity, specificity, and AUC of 78%–90%, 51%–68%, and 0.77%–0.88%, respectively. In images acquired with a human 7 T scanner, acquisition times below 12

  7. Task-evoked brain functional magnetic susceptibility mapping by independent component analysis (χICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, independent component analysis (ICA) is performed on an fMRI magnitude dataset to analyze brain functional mapping (AICA). By solving the inverse problem of fMRI, we can reconstruct the brain magnetic susceptibility (χ) functional states. Upon the reconstructed χ dataspace, we propose an ICA-based brain functional χ mapping method (χICA) to extract task-evoked brain functional map. A complex division algorithm is applied to a timeseries of fMRI phase images to extract temporal phase changes (relative to an OFF-state snapshot). A computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) model is used to reconstruct a 4D brain χ response dataset. χICA is implemented by applying a spatial InfoMax ICA algorithm to the reconstructed 4D χ dataspace. With finger-tapping experiments on a 7T system, the χICA-extracted χ-depicted functional map is similar to the SPM-inferred functional χ map by a spatial correlation of 0.67 ± 0.05. In comparison, the AICA-extracted magnitude-depicted map is correlated with the SPM magnitude map by 0.81 ± 0.05. The understanding of the inferiority of χICA to AICA for task-evoked functional map is an ongoing research topic. For task-evoked brain functional mapping, we compare the data-driven ICA method with the task-correlated SPM method. In particular, we compare χICA with AICA for extracting task-correlated timecourses and functional maps. χICA can extract a χ-depicted task-evoked brain functional map from a reconstructed χ dataspace without the knowledge about brain hemodynamic responses. The χICA-extracted brain functional χ map reveals a bidirectional BOLD response pattern that is unavailable (or different) from AICA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between chemical composition and magnetic susceptibility in sediment cores from Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J N Pattan; G Parthiban; V K Banakar; A Tomer; M Kulkarni

    2008-04-01

    Three sediment cores in a north–south transect (3°N to 13°S) from different sediment types of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are studied to understand the possible relationship between magnetic susceptibility () and Al, Fe, Ti and Mn concentrations. The calcareous ooze core exhibit lowest (12.32 × 10-7m3 kg−1), Al (2.84%), Fe (1.63%) and Ti (0.14%), terrigenous clay core with moderate (29.9 × 10-7 m3 kg−1) but highest Al (6.84%), Fe (5.20%) and Ti (0.44%), and siliceous ooze core with highest (38.06 × 10-7 m3 kg−1) but moderate Al (4.49%), Fe (2.80%) and Ti (0.19%) contents. The distribution of and detrital proxy elements (Al, Fe, and Ti) are identical in both calcareous and siliceous ooze. Interestingly, in terrigenous core, the behaviour of is identical to only Ti content but not with Al and Fe suggesting possibility of Al and Fe having a non-detrital source. The occurrence of phillipsite in terrigenous clay is evident by the Al-K scatter plot where trend line intersects K axis at more than 50% of total K suggesting excess K in the form of phillipsite. Therefore, the presence of phillipsite might be responsible for negative correlation between and Al ( = −0.52). In siliceous ooze the strong positive correlations among , Alexc and Feexc suggest the presence of authigenic Fe-rich smectite. High Mn content (0.5%) probably in the form of manganese micronodules is also contributing to in both calcareous and siliceous ooze but not in the terrigenous core where mean Mn content (0.1%) is similar to crustal abundance. Thus, systematically records the terrigenous variation in both the biogenic sediments but in terrigenous clay it indirectly suggests the presence of authigenic minerals.

  9. The Rehydroxylation Dating of Archeological Baked-Clay Artifacts for Determination Paleomagnetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalin, G. A.; Gareev, B. I.; Nourgaliev, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    If confirmed, the rehydroxylation dating method proposed by Wilson et al. would be a major achievement forarcheological and geological sciences. This method would indeed make it possible to date potentially all fired-clayartifacts (fragments of pottery or of architectural bricks) unearthed in excavation contexts and/or recovered fromold buildings, offering to archeologists exceptional time constraints that are at the basis of most archeologicalissues. Together with that, determination of magnetic characteristics of fired-clay artifacts allows to build paleosecularvariations.We present new results obtained from thermo-gravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry measurements coupledwith mass spectrometry analyses to identify rehydroxylation water and link it with age of ceramic. A varietyof archeological artifacts was collected from different excavations conducted on the territory of the Republic ofTatarstan, Russia.Magnetic measurements include thermomagnetic analysis, coercitive spectrometry, magnetic susceptibility measurementversus temperature. Paleomagnetic studies include measurement of paleointensity. The main aim of paleomagneticinvestigations is to reconstruct magnetic field behavior during last centuries and made paleosecularvariations (PSV) for Volga region.

  10. Controlling Modelling Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    the possible configurations of the system (for example, by counting the number of components in a certain state). We motivate our methodology with a case study of the LMAC protocol for wireless sensor networks. In particular, we investigate the accuracy of a recently proposed high-level model of LMAC......When analysing the performance of a complex system, we typically build abstract models that are small enough to analyse, but still capture the relevant details of the system. But it is difficult to know whether the model accurately describes the real system, or if its behaviour is due to modelling...... artifacts that were inadvertently introduced. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to reason about modelling artifacts, given a detailed model and a highlevel (more abstract) model of the same system. By a series of automated abstraction steps, we lift the detailed model to the same state space...

  11. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...... and the emergence of the technological community involved in designing and manufacturing computer chips. The community is structured in a way that reflects the underlying physical nature silicon and the numerous other materials and chemicals involved. But it also reflects the human agency of defining new projects...... instrument. It is found that technological progress is not hindered, but rather aided by the use of imperfect principles, abstractions and representations of reality. The power of such imperfections is discussed and generalized....

  12. Metrological multispherical freeform artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, Gernot; Wiegmann, Axel; Siepmann, Jens; Schulz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Precisely known artifacts are required to characterize the accuracy of asphere and freeform measuring instruments. To this end the best knowledge of the surface characteristics in conjunction with a low measurement uncertainty are necessary. Because this is a challenging task for typical freeform surfaces used in optical systems, the concept of "metrological" artifacts is introduced. We have developed a multispherical freeform artifact for performance tests of tactile touch probe and contact-free optical measuring systems. The measurement accuracy of the complete form and the deviation from calibrated spherical sections can thus be determined. The radius calibration of multiple spherical sections is performed with an extended radius measuring procedure by interferometry. Evaluated surface forms of different measuring methods and the radii determined can be compared to each other. In this study, a multispherical freeform specimen made of copper, with two differing radii, has been measured by two optical measuring methods, a full field measuring tilted-wave interferometer and a high accuracy cylinder coordinate measuring machine with an optical probe. The surface form measurements are evaluated and compared, and the radii determined are compared to the results of a radius measurement bench.

  13. The Latitudinal Gradient of Rainfall, Mineralogy, Albedo and Magnetic Susceptibility in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. R.; Balsam, W.; Schaaf, C.; Yang, X.; Zhang, Q.; Ji, J.; Rossman, G.; Garimella, S.; Oldfield, F.; Lyons, J. R.; Ellwood, B.; Hartman, H.; Hicks, E.; Mansot, J. L.; Cesaire, T.; Thomas, P.

    2008-12-01

    In order to investigate the effect of climate on soil and surface sediment properties we examined four transects around the Sahara Desert. The transects were located in Mali, Niger, Benin, Togo, Egypt and Morocco and, with the exception of Egypt, each crossed a significant climatological rainfall gradient. The Egyptian transect was designed to characterize one of the driest portions of the Sahara Desert. Our study included laboratory measurements of mineralogy (XRD), elemental composition (XRF), grain size, optical reflectance (lab), magnetic susceptibility (MS)and remanences. In addition, albedo was determined from the MODIS satellite imagery from space. Many of our laboratory measurements exhibited variations with the rainfall gradient. Iron oxides (hematite and goethite), kaolinite, Al2O3, and TiO2 increased with increasing rainfall whereas SiO2, illite, and grain size decreased with increasing rainfall. Both laboratory-determined reflectivity and satellite-determine albedo decreased as rainfall increased. In part, this decrease in reflectivity/albedo with increasing rainfall appears to be the result of hematite, the dominant coloring agent for the soil in this region and the origin of the 'red' Sahel. The physical interpretation of these results centers on rainfall as a long-term leaching agent of surface material, and the control of physical properties by specific mineralogy. SiO2 is highly reflective and iron oxides are strongly absorptive in the visible range. The solubility of SiO2 in rainwater is orders of magnitude larger than all the iron oxides, with hematite the least soluble. It has long been recognized that leaching by rainfall produces dark red laterite in the near-surface oxidizing environment, a prominent geological feature throughout the high rainfall belt of West Africa. Laterite beds represent simultaneous enrichments of all iron oxides and a reduction in SiO2 by leaching. In the Sahara desert where rainfall is minimal (<10 mm/yr), SiO2 is

  14. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, S.; Dee, J.T.; Philipse, A.P.; Erné, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking

  15. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, S.; Dee, J.T.; Philipse, A.P.; Erné, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking o

  16. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  17. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system.

  18. The Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2011-01-01

    Although devices of all shapes and sizes currently dominate the technological landscape, human–computer interaction (HCI) as a field is not yet theoretically equipped to match this reality. In this article we develop the human–artifact model, which has its roots in activity theoretical HCI....... By reinterpreting the activity theoretical foundation, we present a framework that helps addressing the analysis of individual interactive artifacts while embracing that they are part of a larger ecology of artifacts. We show how the human–artifact model helps structuring the understanding of an artifact's action......-possibilities in relation to the artifact ecology surrounding it. Essential to the model is that it provides four interconnected levels of analysis and addresses the possibilities and problems at these four levels. Artifacts and their use are constantly developing, and we address development in, and of, use. The framework...

  19. [Susceptibility weighted magnetic resonance sequences "SWAN, SWI and VenoBOLD": technical aspects and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodel, J; Rodallec, M; Gerber, S; Blanc, R; Maraval, A; Caron, S; Tyvaert, L; Zuber, M; Zins, M

    2012-05-01

    Susceptibility-weighted MR sequences, T2 star weighted angiography (SWAN, General Electric), Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI, Siemens) and venous blood oxygen level dependant (VenoBOLD, Philips) are 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence that provide a high sensitivity for the detection of blood degradation products, calcifications, and iron deposits. For all these sequences, an appropriate echo time allows for the visualization of susceptibility differences between adjacent tissues. However, each of these sequences presents a specific technical background. The purpose of this review was to describe 1/the technical aspects of SWAN, VenoBOLD and SWI sequences, 2/the differences observed in term of contrast within the images, 3/the key imaging findings in neuroimaging using susceptibility-weighted MR sequences.

  20. Evaluation of diamagnetic susceptibility effect on magnetic resonance phase images using gradient echo. On the partial volume effect in calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Toshiharu; Yamada, Naoaki; Yamada, Yukinori; Doi, Toyozo [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    To examine the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to visualize the diamagnetic susceptibility effects of calcification, phantom experiments using small lead balls in a dilute solution of copper chloride in water were carried out. Gradient echo phase images of the phantoms were obtained using varying imaging parameters (TR, TE, flip angle, slice thickness), and phase shift due to the lead balls was measured. Five choroid plexuses and three pineal glands with calcification were also examined using gradient echo phase images. As a result, it could be seen that the phase shift increased in proportion to both echo time and the ratio held by lead and calcification in a voxel (partial volume effect), and was independent of repetition time and flip angle. It could be confirmed that the gradient echo phase images are useful for detecting the diamagnetic susceptibility effects of calcification. (author).

  1. Magnetic Susceptibility in Surface Sediments in the Southern South China Sea and Its Implication for Sub-sea Methane Venting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhong; Yan Wen; Tang Xianzan; Liu Jianguo; Chen Muhong; Yang Huaping

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of magnetic variability and their possible implication for sub-sea methane venting,magnetic susceptibility (MS) of 145 surface sediment samples from the southern South China Sea (SCS) was investigated.Magnetic particles extracted from 20 representative samples were also examined for their mineral,chemical compositions and micromorphology.Results indicate that MS values range between -7.73×10-8 and 45.06x10-8 m3/kg.The high MS zones occur at some hydrecarbon-bearing basins and along main tectonic zones,and low ones are distributed mainly within the river delta or along continental shelves.Iron concretions and manganese concretions are not main contributors for high MS values in sediments,while authigenic iron sulphide minerals are possibly responsible for the MS enhancement.This phenomenon is suspected to be produced by the reducing environment where the high upward venting methane beneath the seafloor reacts with seawater sulfate,resulting in seep precipitation of highly susceptible intermediate mineral pyrrhotite,greigite and paramagnetic pyrite.It suggests that MS variability is possibly one of the geochemical indicators for mapping sub-sea zones of methane venting in the southern SCS.

  2. Lithology and chronology of ice-sheet fluctuations (magnetic susceptibility of cores from the western Ross Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Anne E.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of the marine geology part of WAIS include reconstructing the chronology and areal extent of ice-sheet fluctuations and understanding the climatic and oceanographic influences on ice-sheet history. As an initial step toward attaining these goals, down-core volume magnetic susceptibility (MS) logs of piston cores from three N-S transects in the western Ross Sea are compared. The core transects are within separate petrographic provinces based on analyses of till composition. The provinces are thought to reflect the previous locations of ice streams on the shelf during the last glaciation. Magnetic susceptibility is a function of magnetic mineral composition, sediment texture, and sediment density. It is applied in the western Ross Sea for two purposes: (1) to determine whether MS data differentiates the three transects (i.e., flow lines), and thus can be used to make paleodrainage reconstructions of the late Wisconsinan ice sheet; and (2) to determine whether the MS data can aid in distinguishing basal till diamictons from diamictons of glacial-marine origin and thus, aid paleoenvironmental interpretations. A comparison of the combined data of cores in each transect is presented.

  3. Magnetic field induced third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation in a ZnMgSe strained quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, J. Abraham Hudson, E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com; Peter, A. John, E-mail: a.john.peter@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, SSM Institute of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul-624002 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Third order susceptibility of third order harmonic generation is investigated in a Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se/Zn{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}Se/Zn{sub 0.1}Mg{sub 0.9}Se quantum well in the presence of magnetic field strength. The confinement potential is considered as the addition of energy offsets of the conduction band (or valence band) and the strain-induced potential in our calculations. The material dependent effective mass is followed throughout the computation because it has a high influence on the electron energy levels in low dimensional semiconductor systems.

  4. Two novel CPs with double helical chains based rigid tripodal ligands: Syntheses, crystal structures, magnetic susceptibility and fluorescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Hou, Xiang-Yang; Zhai, Quan-Guo; Hu, Man-Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Two three-dimensional coordination polymers (CPs), namely [Cd(bpydb)- (H2bpydb)]n·0.5nH2O (1), and [Cu2(bpydb)2]n (2) (2,6-di-p-carboxyphenyl-4,4'- bipyridine1 = H2bpydb), containing a novel double-helical chains, which have been solvothermal synthesized, characterized, and structure determination. CPs 1-2 reveal the new (3,5)-net and (3,6)-net alb topology, respectively. The fluorescence properties of CPs 1-2 were investigated, and magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that compound 1 has dominating antiferromagnetic couplings between metal ions.

  5. Search for continuous gravitational waves: improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Keitel, David; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2013-01-01

    The standard multi-detector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances (lines). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on det...

  6. Magnetic Susceptibility and Geochemistry Records in the Yax-1 Borehole in the Chicxulub Impact Crater: A paleoclimatic approach in the K/Pg and P/E Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marca-Castillo, M.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Fucugauchi, J. U.; Buitrón Sánchez, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    Chicxulub impact crater is located in the northwestern sector of Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. It is the best-preserved multi-ring impact crater on Earth. Several studies have been focused in this crater structure due its association with the Cretaceous/Paleogenous boundary events. The aim of this study is document the abrupt climate changes during the K/Pg and P/E boundaries based on the stratigraphy, magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility) and geochemical (major elements) records in the Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) borehole in the Chicxulub impact crater. The Yax 1 was drilled at 20° 44' 38.45'' N, 89° 43' 6.70'' W. Two intervals from 830 to 750 and between 750 and 700 m depth were selected for this study. Magnetic susceptibility logs and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) measures were taken every 10 cm using a Bartington magnetic susceptibility meter and a Thermo Scientific Niton XL3tGOLDD XRF analyzer. Results show variations in magnetic susceptibility logs and major elements (Ca, Si, Fe, Ti and Si) content in the K/Pg boundary at ca. 794 m depth. Magnetic susceptibility decrease abruptly, Ca values increase, and the other elements show low values. Geochemical results, manly the Ca-record, suggest that the P/E boundary might have happened around 745 m depth. These values are compared with 13C isotopes and they coincide with the Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE), suggesting their relationship with the abrupt climate change and with the ocean acidification.

  7. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 {+-} 0.1 vs. 2.88 {+-} 0.1 (before) and 1.8 {+-} 0.4 vs 2.83 {+-} 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 {+-} 0.43 and 2.81 {+-} 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 {+-} 6.6 vs. 140.8 {+-} 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 {+-} 25.4 vs. 466.3 {+-} 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  8. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, B Z; Lummen, T T A; van Loosdrecht, P H M; Dhalenne, G; Zakirov, A R

    2010-07-14

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R(2)Ti(2)O(7) (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the site and bulk susceptibilities of the pyrochlore lattice are derived taking into account long range dipole-dipole interactions and anisotropic exchange interactions between the nearest neighbor rare earth ions. The sets of crystal field parameters and anisotropic exchange coupling constants have been determined and their variations along the lanthanide series are discussed.

  9. Research of artifacts and compensation technology in high-field strength abdominal MRI%高场强腹部MRI伪影及补偿技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦社伟; 连建敏; 闫峰山; 史大鹏; 管民

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the cause and solution of the artifacts of abdominal imaging in high-field strength MRI scanning.Methods The artifacts from 112 cases of abdominal MR scanning were analyzed the cause,and were compensated by different techniques.Results High-field strength MRI scanning revealed respiratory motion artifacts in 43 cases,vascular pulsation artifacts in 12,chemical shift artifacts in 12,plait artifacts in 18,magnetic susceptibility artifacts in 20 and machine artifacts in 7.The artifacts in 98 cases were eliminated or reduced by adjusting respiratory gating parameters,using abdominal binder,respiratory retraining,adding saturated band upon or below scanning field,adopting fat suppression technique,enlarging field of view,adopting over sampling technique,removing metal foreign body,and adopting PROPELLER technology.Conclusion To correct the scanning parameters and methods based on the causes of artifacts can reduce the artifacts in abdominal MRI and improve the quality of MR images.%目的 探讨腹部高场强MRI检查伪影产生的原因及解决方法.方法 行高场强腹部MRI检查图像有不同程度伪影的112例患者,分析其伪影产生原因,并采用不同技术进行补偿.结果 112患者中呼吸运动伪影43例,血管搏动伪影12例,化学位移伪影12例,卷褶伪影18例,磁敏感伪影20例,设备伪影7例,经调整呼吸门控、腹部施加腹带、再次呼吸训练、扫描视野上下施加预饱和带、应用脂肪抑制技术、增加视野、应用过采样技术、去除金属异物、应用螺旋桨扫描技术等方法,98例伪影消失或减轻.结论 针对伪影产生原因改变扫描参数或扫描方法,可减少腹部高场强MRI图像的伪影,提高图像质量.

  10. The curved Magallanes fold and thrust belt: Tectonic insights from a paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, F.; Roperch, P.; Hervé, F.; Diraison, M.; Espinoza, M.; Arriagada, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Magallanes fold and thrust belt (FTB) presents a large-scale curvature from N-S oriented structures north of 52°S to nearly E-W in Tierra del Fuego Island. We present a paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) study from 85 sites sampled in Cretaceous to Miocene marine sediments. Magnetic susceptibility is lower than 0.0005 SI for 76 sites and mainly controlled by paramagnetic minerals. AMS results indicate that the sedimentary fabric is preserved in the undeformed areas of Tierra del Fuego and the more external thrust sheets units, where an incipient lineation due to layer parallel shortening is recorded. Prolate AMS ellipsoids, indicating a significant tectonic imprint in the AMS fabric, are observed in the internal units of the belt. AMS results show a good correlation between the orientation of the magnetic lineation and the fold axes. However, in Península Brunswick, the AMS lineations are at ~20° counterclockwise to the strike of the fold axes. Pretectonic stable characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) were determined in seven sites. A counterclockwise rotation (21.2° ± 9.2°) is documented by ChRM data from four sites near the hinge of the belt in Península Brunswick and near Canal Whiteside while there is no evidence of rotation near the nearly E-W oriented Vicuña thrust within Tierra del Fuego. The curved shape of the Cenozoic Magallanes FTB is not related to vertical axis rotation, and thus, the Magallanes FTB can be considered as a primary arc.

  11. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Hansen, Adam E; Keller, Sune H;

    2015-01-01

    substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET...... images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. RESULTS: The MR-based volume of the susceptibility......% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility artifact on the MR-AC attenuation map. CONCLUSIONS: Metallic dental work may cause severe MR signal voids. The resulting PET...

  12. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Hansen, Adam E.; Keller, Sune

    2015-01-01

    substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET...... images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. RESULTS: The MR-based volume of the susceptibility......% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility artifact on the MR-AC attenuation map. CONCLUSIONS: Metallic dental work may cause severe MR signal voids. The resulting PET...

  13. Applying the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility technique to the study of the tectonic evolution of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt

    OpenAIRE

    Dudzisz, Katarzyna; Szaniawski, Rafał; Michalski, Krzysztof; Manby, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) method to determine the orientation of the principal tectonic strain directions developed during the formation of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB). The AMS measurements and extensive rock-magnetic studies of the Lower Triassic rocks reported here were focused on the recognition of the magnetic fabric, the identification of ferromagnetic minerals and an estimation of the influence of ferro- and paramagne...

  14. Enhancing k-space quantitative susceptibility mapping by enforcing consistency on the cone data (CCD) with structural priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan; Wang, Yi; Liu, Tian

    2016-02-01

    The inversion from the magnetic field to the magnetic susceptibility distribution is ill-posed because the dipole kernel, which relates the magnetic susceptibility to the magnetic field, has zeroes at a pair of cone surfaces in the k-space, leading to streaking artifacts on the reconstructed quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). A method to impose consistency on the cone data (CCD) with structural priors is proposed to improve the solutions of k-space methods. The information in the cone region is recovered by enforcing structural consistency with structural prior, while information in the noncone trust region is enforced to be consistent with the magnetic field measurements in k-space. This CCD method was evaluated by comparing the initial results of existing QSM algorithms to the QSM results after CCD enhancement with respect to the COSMOS results in simulation, phantom, and in vivo human brain. The proposed method demonstrated suppression of streaking artifacts and the resulting QSM showed better agreement with reference standard QSM compared with other k-space based methods. By enforcing consistency with structural priors in the cone region, the missing data in the cone can be recovered and the streaking artifacts in QSM can be suppressed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Static magnetic susceptibility, crystal field and exchange interactions in rare earth titanate pyrochlores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malkin, B. Z.; Lummen, T. T. A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Dhalenne, G.; Zakirov, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental temperature dependence (T = 2-300 K) of single crystal bulk and site susceptibilities of rare earth titanate pyrochlores R2Ti2O7 (R = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) is analyzed in the framework of crystal field theory and a mean field approximation. Analytical expressions for the s

  16. Improving the method of low-temperature anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (LT-AMS) measurements in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issachar, R.; Levi, T.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Marco, S.; Weinberger, R.

    2016-07-01

    This study examines the limitations of the method of low-temperature anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (LT-AMS) measurements in air and presents technical improvements that significantly reduce the instrumental drift and measurement errors. We analyzed the temperature profile of porous chalk core after cooling in liquid nitrogen and found that the average temperature of the sample during the LT-AMS measurement in air is higher than 77K and close to 92K. This analysis indicates that the susceptibility of the paramagnetic minerals are amplified by a factor ˜3.2 relative to that of room temperature AMS (RT-AMS). In addition, it was found that liquid nitrogen was absorbed in the samples during immersing and contributed diamagnetic component of ˜-9 × 10-6 SI to the total mean susceptibility. We showed that silicone sheet placed around and at the bottom of the measuring coil is an effective thermal protection, preventing instrument drift by the cold sample. In this way, the measuring errors of LT-AMS reduced to the level of RT-AMS, allowing accurate comparison with standard AMS measurements. We examined the applicability of the LT-AMS measurements on chalk samples that consist weight) of paramagnetic minerals and showed that it helps to efficiently enhance the paramagnetic fabric. The present study offers a practical approach, which can be applied to various types of rocks to better delineate the paramagnetic phase using conventional equipment.

  17. Density, porosity and magnetic susceptibility of the Ko\\v{s}ice meteorite shower and homogeneity of its parent meteoroid

    CERN Document Server

    Kohout, Tomáš; Tóth, Juraj; Husárik, Marek; Gritsevich, Maria; Britt, Daniel; Borovička, Jiří; Spurný, Pavel; Igaz, Antal; Svoreň, Ján; Kornoš, Leonard; Vereš, Peter; Koza, Július; Zigo, Pavol; Gajdoš, Štefan; Világi, Jozef; Čapek, David; Krišandová, Zuzana; Tomko, Dušan; Šilha, Jiří; Schunová, Eva; Bodnárová, Marcela; Búzová, Diana; Krejčová, Tereza

    2014-01-01

    Bulk and grain density, porosity, and magnetic susceptibility of 67 individuals of Ko\\v{s}ice H chondrite fall were measured. The mean bulk and grain densities were determined to be 3.43 g/cm$^\\text{3}$ with standard deviation (s.d.) of 0.11 g/cm$^\\text{3}$ and 3.79 g/cm$^\\text{3}$ with s.d. 0.07 g/cm$^\\text{3}$, respectively. Porosity is in the range from 4.2 to 16.1%. The logarithm of the apparent magnetic susceptibility (in 10$^\\text{-9}$ m$^\\text{3}$/kg) shows narrow distribution from 5.17 to 5.49 with mean value at 5.35 with s.d. 0.08. These results indicate that all studied Ko\\v{s}ice meteorites are of the same composition down to ~g scale without presence of foreign (non-H) clasts and are similar to other H chondrites. Ko\\v{s}ice is thus a homogeneous meteorite fall derived from a homogeneous meteoroid.

  18. Simultaneous Quantitative MRI Mapping of T1, T2* and Magnetic Susceptibility with Multi-Echo MP2RAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, Tobias; Möller, Harald E.; Schäfer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of relaxation times is essential for understanding the biophysical mechanisms underlying contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative experiments, while offering major advantages in terms of reproducibility, may benefit from simultaneous acquisitions. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of simultaneously recording relaxation-time and susceptibility maps with a prototype Multi-Echo (ME) Magnetization-Prepared 2 RApid Gradient Echoes (MP2RAGE) sequence. T1 maps can be obtained using the MP2RAGE sequence, which is relatively insensitive to inhomogeneities of the radio-frequency transmit field, B1+. As an extension, multiple gradient echoes can be acquired in each of the MP2RAGE readout blocks, which permits the calculation of T2* and susceptibility maps. We used computer simulations to explore the effects of the parameters on the precision and accuracy of the mapping. In vivo parameter maps up to 0.6 mm nominal resolution were acquired at 7 T in 19 healthy volunteers. Voxel-by-voxel correlations and the test-retest reproducibility were used to assess the reliability of the results. When using optimized paramenters, T1 maps obtained with ME-MP2RAGE and standard MP2RAGE showed excellent agreement for the whole range of values found in brain tissues. Simultaneously obtained T2* and susceptibility maps were of comparable quality as Fast Low-Angle SHot (FLASH) results. The acquisition times were more favorable for the ME-MP2RAGE (≈ 19 min) sequence as opposed to the sum of MP2RAGE (≈ 12 min) and FLASH (≈ 10 min) acquisitions. Without relevant sacrifice in accuracy, precision or flexibility, the multi-echo version may yield advantages in terms of reduced acquisition time and intrinsic co-registration, provided that an appropriate optimization of the acquisition parameters is performed. PMID:28081157

  19. Spin-glass-like behaviour in ball milled Fe{sub 30}Cr{sub 70} alloy studied by ac magnetic susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Blanco, D.; Gorria, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 9455 (United States); Perez, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Cuello, Gabriel J. [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Blanco, J.A., E-mail: jabr@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > Spin-glass-like behaviour o owing an re-entrant spin-glass transition. > No critical divergence observed in the maxima of the real and magnetic susceptibility on ball milled Fe{sub 30}Cr{sub 70}. > High temperature Curie-Weiss behavior of the magnetic susceptibility on ball milled Fe{sub 30}Cr{sub 70}. > Moderate shift of the freezing temperature per frequency in ball milled Fe{sub 30}Cr{sub 70} obtained from the temperature dependence of the real magnetic susceptibility - Abstract: Nominal nanostructured Fe{sub 30}Cr{sub 70} obtained from ball milling during 110 h has been investigated from dc magnetization and ac magnetic susceptibility. The as-milled sample is not monophasic and is formed of two phases, Fe{sub 20{+-}2}Cr{sub 80{+-}2} ({approx}86 {+-} 2%) and iron ({approx}14 {+-} 2%). The ac susceptibility measurements show evidence of a re-entrant spin-glass-like transition for the Fe{sub 20}Cr{sub 80} phase below 30 K. The shift of the freezing temperature per frequency decade is moderate when compared to that found in conventional spin-glass alloys. A Vogel-Fulcher activation process can be used to explain the frequency variation. The results are also analyzed in terms of Cole-Cole formalism for extracting information of relaxation time ({tau} {approx} 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -4} s).

  20. From Ecological Sounding Artifacts Towards Sonic Artifact Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of sonic interaction design has been focused on the interaction between a single user and an artifact. This strongly limits one of the fundamental aspects of music as a social and interactive experience. In this paper we propose sonic artifact ecologies as a mean to examine...

  1. Spherical artifacts on ferrograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In the past, hollow spheres detected on ferrograms have been interpreted as being due to fretting, abrasion, cavitation erosion, and fatigue-related processes. Here it is reported that such spheres were found to result from the fact that a routine grinding operation on a steel plate was carried out about 20 feet away from the ferrograph. A similar grinding operation was performed on a piece of low carbon steel a few feet from the ferrograph, and after a few minutes of grinding, the resulting ferrogram contained thousands of particles of which more than 90% were spherical. Because of the widespread occurrence of ordinary grinding operations, it seems prudent that those utilizing the ferrograph be cognizant of this type of artifact.

  2. Artifacts in digital images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three kinds of artifacts unique to digital images are illustrated, namely aliasing caused by undersampling, interference phenomena caused by improper display of images, and harmonic overtones caused by quantization of amplitudes. Special attention is given to undersampling when the sample size and interval are the same. It is noted that this situation is important because it is typical of solid-state cameras. Quantization of image data of necessity introduces energy at harmonic overtones of the image spectrum. This energy is aliased if the frequency of the overtones is greater than 0.5 cycle/pixel. It cannot be selectively removed from the image through filtering, and the best way to suppress it is to maximize the amplification of the sensor before digital encoding.

  3. Archaeology, Artifacts, and Cosmochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2017-06-01

    PSRD covers research that ascertains the content, formation, and evolution of our Solar System and planetary systems in general. Our archives are full of sample-based studies of extraterrestrial materials that relate to the building of planets, moons, and minor bodies. Rarely do we cover the cosmochemistry of artifacts, but the importance of cosmochemistry is abundantly clear in this story of artisan iron beads of archaeological significance and the quest to find the source meteorite. Twenty-two meteoritic iron beads, recovered from mounds in Havana, Illinois of the Hopewell people and culture, have been identified as pieces of the Anoka iron meteorite, according to work by Timothy McCoy (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution), Amy Marquardt (undergraduate intern at the NMNH/SI and now at the University of Colorado at Boulder), John Wasson (UCLA), Richard Ash (University of Maryland), and Edward Vicenzi (SI).

  4. Sound as artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  5. Magnetic susceptibility of Alq{sub 3} powder, pure and Al-doped 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Franklyn, E-mail: frburke@tcd.i [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Abid, Mohamed; Stamenov, Plamen; Coey, J.M.D. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-05-15

    Single-crystal nanowires several microns long and 100-200 nm in diameter were grown by physical vapour deposition from mixed Alq{sub 3}/gamma-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. The crystals are orthorhombic Al-doped 8-hydroxyquinoline. The molar susceptibility is -3x10{sup -9} at room temperature, and it shows a Curie-law upturn below about 50 K. The approach to saturation at low temperature indicates a density of S=1/2 defects 4x10{sup -4} per formula unit. Pure 8-hydroxyquinoline and aluminium (Alq{sub 3}) behave similarly. Pressed pellets exhibit much increased paramagnetic susceptibility due to iron ions scavanged from the steel die. Subsequent melting of these samples produces a ferromagnetic signal of order 0.01 A m{sup 2} kg{sup -1}, which is attributed to metallic iron nanoclusters in the organic material.

  6. Magnetization at the interface of Cr2O3 and paramagnets with large stoner susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shi; Street, M.; Wang, Junlei; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Binek, Ch; Dowben, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    From the Cr 2p3/2 x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal, there is clear evidence of interface polarization with overlayers of both Pd and Pt on chromia (Cr2O3). The residual boundary polarization of chomia is stronger for a Pt overlayer than in the case of a Pd overlayer. The reduction of chromia boundary magnetization with a paramagnetic metal overlayer, compared to the free surface, is interpreted as a response to the induced spin polarization in Pt and Pd. Magnetization induced in a Pt overlayer, via proximity to the chromia boundary magnetization, is evident in the polar magneto-optical Kerr measurements. These results are essential to explainations why Pt and Pd are excellent spacer layers for voltage controlled exchange bias, in the [Pd/Co] n /Pd/Cr2O3 and [Pt/Co] n /Pt/Cr2O3 perpendicular magneto-electric exchange bias systems. The findings pave the way to realize ultra-fast reversal of induced magnetization in a free moment paramagnetic layer, with possible application in voltage-controlled magnetic random access memory.

  7. Magnetization at the interface of Cr2O3 and paramagnets with large stoner susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shi; Street, M; Wang, Junlei; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Binek, Ch; Dowben, P A

    2017-03-15

    From the Cr 2p3/2 x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal, there is clear evidence of interface polarization with overlayers of both Pd and Pt on chromia (Cr2O3). The residual boundary polarization of chomia is stronger for a Pt overlayer than in the case of a Pd overlayer. The reduction of chromia boundary magnetization with a paramagnetic metal overlayer, compared to the free surface, is interpreted as a response to the induced spin polarization in Pt and Pd. Magnetization induced in a Pt overlayer, via proximity to the chromia boundary magnetization, is evident in the polar magneto-optical Kerr measurements. These results are essential to explainations why Pt and Pd are excellent spacer layers for voltage controlled exchange bias, in the [Pd/Co] n /Pd/Cr2O3 and [Pt/Co] n /Pt/Cr2O3 perpendicular magneto-electric exchange bias systems. The findings pave the way to realize ultra-fast reversal of induced magnetization in a free moment paramagnetic layer, with possible application in voltage-controlled magnetic random access memory.

  8. Automated equipment for determining the magnetic susceptibility of steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Snizhnoi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Automated equipment for determining the susceptibility of steels and alloys proposed. The principle of operation of equipment units and their main characteristics are presented. Microprocessor system with AVR microcontrollers from ATMEL for equipment used. The algorithm of the program a microprocessor system for automatic operation of equipment considered. Dependence of the current compensation of the current force field as a text file on your computer equipment can be formed.

  9. MR imaging differentiation of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) based on relaxation and magnetic susceptibility properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Olaf; Levin, Johannes; Ahmadi, Seyed-Ahmad; Plate, Annika; Reiser, Maximilian F; Bötzel, Kai; Giese, Armin; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the MR imaging behavior of ferrous (Fe(2+)) and ferric (Fe(3+)) iron ions in order to develop a noninvasive technique to quantitatively differentiate between both forms of iron. MRI was performed at 3 T in a phantom consisting of 21 samples with different concentrations of ferrous and ferric chloride solutions (between 0 and 10 mmol/L). A multi-echo spoiled gradient-echo pulse sequence with eight echoes was used for both T 2* and quantitative susceptibility measurements. The transverse relaxation rate, R 2* = 1/T 2*, was determined by nonlinear exponential fitting based on the mean signals in each sample. The susceptibilities, χ, of the samples were calculated after phase unwrapping and background field removal by fitting the spatial convolution of a unit dipole response to the measured internal field map. Relaxation rate changes, ΔR 2*(c Fe), and susceptibility changes, Δχ(c Fe), their linear slopes, as well as the ratios ΔR 2*(c Fe) / Δχ(c Fe) were determined for all concentrations. The linear slopes of the relaxation rate were (12.5 ± 0.4) s(-1)/(mmol/L) for Fe(3+) and (0.77 ± 0.09) s(-1)/(mmol/L) for Fe(2+) (significantly different, z test P relaxation behaviors in MRI but similar susceptibility patterns. These properties can be used to differentiate ferrous and ferric samples.

  10. Consistent behaviour of AC susceptibility and transport properties in magnetic superconductor RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Očko, M.; Živkovic, I.; Prester, M.; Drobac, Dj.; Ariosa, D.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D.

    2004-02-01

    We report on AC susceptibility, resistivity, thermopower and measurements of sintered magnetic superconductor RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8. The antiferromagnetic phase transition at 133 K is seen clearly in the AC susceptibility as well as in the derivative of resistivity and thermopower. Above the antiferromagnetic transition, we have found some new evidences of the similarity between HTC compounds and the magnetic superconductor. The onset of superconductivity is observed by both transport methods at 46 K, and an explanation why it is not seen in the AC susceptibility data is given. The end of the SC transition occurs at about 24 K in all measured properties. We discuss the steps of broad SC transition, especially the maximum in susceptibility at 34 K, and compare our results with related studies reported in the literature.

  11. Consistent behaviour of AC susceptibility and transport properties in magnetic superconductor RuSr{sub 2}GdCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocko, M. E-mail: ocko@ifs.hr; Zivkovic, I.; Prester, M.; Drobac, Dj.; Ariosa, D.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D

    2004-02-01

    We report on AC susceptibility, resistivity, thermopower and measurements of sintered magnetic superconductor RuSr{sub 2}GdCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The antiferromagnetic phase transition at 133 K is seen clearly in the AC susceptibility as well as in the derivative of resistivity and thermopower. Above the antiferromagnetic transition, we have found some new evidences of the similarity between HTC compounds and the magnetic superconductor. The onset of superconductivity is observed by both transport methods at 46 K, and an explanation why it is not seen in the AC susceptibility data is given. The end of the SC transition occurs at about 24 K in all measured properties. We discuss the steps of broad SC transition, especially the maximum in susceptibility at 34 K, and compare our results with related studies reported in the literature.

  12. Applying the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility technique to the study of the tectonic evolution of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dudzisz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS method to determine the orientation of the principal tectonic strain directions developed during the formation of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB. The AMS measurements and extensive rock-magnetic studies of the Lower Triassic rocks reported here were focused on the recognition of the magnetic fabric, the identification of ferromagnetic minerals and an estimation of the influence of ferro- and paramagnetic minerals on magnetic susceptibility. At most sites, the paramagnetic minerals controlled the magnetic susceptibility, and at only one site the impact of ferromagnetic minerals was higher. The AMS technique documented the presence of different types of magnetic fabrics within the sampled sites. At two sites, a normal (Kmin perpendicular to the bedding magnetic fabric of sedimentary origin was detected. This was associated with a good clustering of the maximum AMS axes imposed by tectonic strain. The Kmax magnetic lineation directions obtained here parallel the general NNW–SSE trend of the WSFTB fold axial traces and thrust fronts. The two other investigated sites possessed mixed and inverted fabrics, the latter of which appear to reflect the presence of iron-bearing carbonates.

  13. Camera artifacts in IUE spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegman, O. W.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    This study of emission line mimicking features in the IUE cameras has produced an atlas of artifiacts in high-dispersion images with an accompanying table of prominent artifacts and a table of prominent artifacts in the raw images along with a medium image of the sky background for each IUE camera.

  14. Teaching World Cultures through Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching world cultures in the middle-level geography classroom presents challenges both because of the complexity of culture and because of the characteristics of students of this age. One effective way to teach about a culture is through the use of cultural artifacts. This article discusses how to collect and use cultural artifacts in the…

  15. Intention, History, and Artifact Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Claims that people determine whether something is a member of a given artifact kind by inferring that it was successfully created with the intention that it belong to that kind. Discusses function-based and intentional-historical accounts of artifact concepts. Concludes that a rich set of inferential capacities is needed to constitute a theory of…

  16. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts of five commondental materials%5种常用口腔材料的磁共振伪影比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐亦生; 余日胜

    2015-01-01

    Objective  To compare five materials commonly used in dentistry, including three types of metals and two types of ceramics, by using different sequences of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) field strengths (0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T). Methods  Three types of metals and two types of ceramics that were fabricated into the same size and thickness as an incisor crown were placed in a plastic tank filled with saline. The crowns were scanned using an magnetic resonance (MR) machine at 0.35, 1.5, and 3.0 T field strengths. The T1WI and T2WI images were obtained. The differences of various materials in different artifacts of field MR scans were determined. Results  The zirconia crown presented no significant artifacts when scanned under the three types of MRI field strengths. The artifacts of casting ceramic were minimal. All dental precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain, and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy showed varying degrees of artifacts under the three MRI field strengths. Conclusion  Zirconia and casting ceramics present almost no or faint artifacts. By contrast, precious metal alloys, nickel-chromium alloy dental porcelain and cobalt-chromium ceramic alloy display MRI artifacts. The artifact area increase with increasing magnetic field.%目的:  比较口腔科常用的3种金属和2种陶瓷材料在0.35、1.5及3 T 3种场强磁共振成像(MRI)不同序列中形成伪影的差异。方法  将3种金属和2种陶瓷材料制作成同样大小及厚度的中切牙内冠,将其置入盛满生理盐水的塑料罐体中,分别在0.35、1.5和3

  17. In vivo screening of hepatocellular carcinoma using AC susceptibility of anti-alpha fetoprotein-activated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Jie Chieh

    Full Text Available With antibody-mediated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs applied in cancer examinations, patients must pay at least twice for MNP reagents in immunomagnetic reduction (IMR of in vitro screening and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of in vivo tests. This is because the high maintenance costs and complex analysis of MRI have limited the possibility of in vivo screening. Therefore, this study proposes novel methods for in vivo screening of tumors by examining the AC susceptibility of bound MNPs using scanning superconducting-quantum-interference-device (SQUID biosusceptometry (SSB, thereby demonstrating high portability and improved economy. The favorable agreement between in vivo tests using SSB and MRI demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo screening using SSB for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC targeted by anti-alpha fetoprotein (AFP-mediated MNPs. The magnetic labeling was also proved by in vitro tests using SSB and biopsy assays. Therefore, patients receiving bioprobe-mediated MNPs only once can undergo in vivo screening using SSB in the future.

  18. Paleomagnetic and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS analyses of the Plio-Pleistocene extensional Todi basin, Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alfonsi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years paleomagnetic investigations within the Apennine chain have revealed that the area is characterized by a complex pattern of deformation, not linkable to a simple and homogeneous process. In order to estimate the amount, sense and timing of vertical axis rotations within the Central Apennines, Neogene continental basins have been investigated for paleomagnetic studies. The paleomagnetic results obtained in the Plio-Pleistocene Todi basin showed that the Upper Pliocene-Lower Pleistocene evolution, associated with major dip-slip tectonics, has not involved vertical axis rotation since that time. The Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility analysis (AMS, carried out on the same samples treated for paleomagnetic determination, revealed the presence of two groups of specimens characterized by different magnetic lineation directions. One direction trends NE-SW and is parallel to the orientation of the regional extension stress typical of the area. This direction is observed throughout the northern basin. The other, restricted to the southern basin, trends N-S and shows no links with the tectonic, hydrological-sedimentary conditions of the area. The results of the AMS analysis will be presented and discussed in the light of the rock magnetic results and the tectonic framework of the area.

  19. Magnetic susceptibility study of Ce{sup 3+} in PbCeA (A=Te, Se, S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratens, X., E-mail: xgratens@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Isber, S., E-mail: si00@aub.edu.lb [American University of Beirut, Department of Physics, Bliss Street, PO Box 11-0236, Beirut 1107-2020 (Lebanon); Charar, S., E-mail: salam.charar@iut-nimes.fr [Group d' Etudes des Semiconducteurs (GES), Universite Montpellier II, CC074, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Golacki, Z. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pl.02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-09-15

    The magnetic susceptibility of Pb{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}A (A=S, Se and Te) crystals with Ce{sup 3+} concentrations 0.006{<=}x{<=}0.036 was investigated in the temperature range from 2 K to 300 K. The magnetic susceptibility data was found to be consistent with a {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} lowest manifold for Ce{sup 3+} ions with a crystal-field splitting {Delta}=E({Gamma}{sub 8})-E({Gamma}{sub 7}) of about 340 K, 440 K and 540 K for Pb{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}Te, Pb{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}Se, and Pb{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}S, respectively. For all the three compounds the doublet {Gamma}{sub 7} lies below the {Gamma}{sub 8} quadruplet which confirms the substitution of Pb{sup 2+} by Ce{sup 3+} ions in the host crystals. The observed values for the crystal-field splitting are in good agreement with the calculated ones based on the point-charge model. Moreover, the effective Lande factors were determined by X-band ({approx}9.5 GHz), electron paramagnetic measurements (EPR) to be g=1.333, 1.364, and 1.402 for Ce ions in PbA, A = S, Se and Te, respectively. The small difference with the predicted Lande factor g of 10/7 for the {Gamma}{sub 7} (J=5/2) ground state was attributed to crystal-field admixture. - Highlights:: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic susceptibility of Pb{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}A (A=Te, Se and S). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Computed the zero-field splitting of Ce{sup 3+} ion in lead chalcogenides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Explained the existence of four Ce{sup 3+} sites in PbA (A=Te, Se and S).

  20. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune;

    2015-01-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected...... to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the non-attenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical...... air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed...

  1. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune

    2015-01-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected...... to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the non-attenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical...... air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed...

  2. Experimental mathematics on the magnetic susceptibility of the square lattice Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukraa, S [LPTHIRM and Departement d' Aeronautique, Universite de Blida (Algeria); Guttmann, A J; Jensen, I [ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematics and Statistics of Complex Systems, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hassani, S; Zenine, N [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, BP 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Maillard, J-M [LPTMC, Universite de Paris, Tour 24, 4eme etage, case 121, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Nickel, B [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: boukraa@mail.univ-blida.dz, E-mail: tonyg@ms.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: I.Jensen@ms.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: maillard@lptmc.jussieu.fr, E-mail: maillard@lptl.jussieu.fr, E-mail: njzenine@yahoo.com

    2008-11-14

    We calculate very long low- and high-temperature series for the susceptibility {chi} of the square lattice Ising model as well as very long series for the five-particle contribution {chi}{sup (5)} and six-particle contribution {chi}{sup (6)}. These calculations have been made possible by the use of highly optimized polynomial time modular algorithms and a total of more than 150 000 CPU hours on computer clusters. The series for {chi} (low- and high-temperature regimes), {chi}{sup (5)} and {chi}{sup (6)} are now extended to 2000 terms. In addition, for {chi}{sup (5)}, 10 000 terms of the series are calculated modulo a single prime, and have been used to find the linear ODE satisfied by {chi}{sup (5)} modulo a prime. A diff-Pade analysis of the 2000 terms series for {chi}{sup (5)} and {chi}{sup (6)} confirms to a very high degree of confidence previous conjectures about the location and strength of the singularities of the n-particle components of the susceptibility, up to a small set of 'additional' singularities. The exponents at all the singularities of the Fuchsian linear ODE of {chi}{sup (5)} and the (as yet unknown) ODE of {chi}{sup (6)} are given: they are all rational numbers. We find the presence of singularities at w = 1/2 for the linear ODE of {chi}{sup (5)}, and w{sup 2} = 1/8 for the ODE of {chi}{sup (6)}, which are not singularities of the 'physical' {chi}{sup (5)} and {chi}{sup (6)}, that is to say the series solutions of the ODE's which are analytic at w = 0. Furthermore, analysis of the long series for {chi}{sup (5)} (and {chi}{sup (6)}) combined with the corresponding long series for the full susceptibility {chi} yields previously conjectured singularities in some {chi}{sup (n)}, n {>=} 7. The exponents at all these singularities are also seen to be rational numbers. We also present a mechanism of resummation of the logarithmic singularities of the {chi}{sup (n)} leading to the known power-law critical behaviour occurring in

  3. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  4. The effect of pressure on the magnetic susceptibility of RInCu4 (R = Gd, Er and Yb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svechkarev, I. V.; Panfilov, A. S.; Dolja, S. N.; Nakamura, H.; Shiga, M.

    1999-06-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of the intermetallic compounds RInCu4 (R = Gd, Er and Yb) was measured under helium gas pressure up to 2 kbar at the fixed temperatures 78, 150 and 300 K. For YbInCu4, which exhibits a first-order valence phase transition at TVicons/Journals/Common/simeq" ALT="simeq" ALIGN="TOP"/>40 K, the Grüneisen parameter for the Kondo energy, icons/Journals/Common/Omega" ALT="Omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>Kicons/Journals/Common/equiv" ALT="equiv" ALIGN="TOP"/>-dlnTK/dlnV = -32, is large and typical for Ce-based heavy-fermion systems in magnitude but opposite in sign. The effect of atomic disorder is discussed on the basis of the data for a chemically disordered sample; the pressure effect at T = 78 K is strongly enhanced due to the spatial dispersion of pressure-sensitive TV, and hence dTV/dP = -2.0 K kbar-1 is obtained by assuming a Gaussian distribution of TV. On the basis of an extrapolation of the experimental pressure dependence, a (P,T) phase diagram is proposed for YbInCu4. Reference compounds with stable f moments, GdInCu4 and ErInCu4, show negligible pressure dependences of the susceptibility.

  5. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analysis of the Cantera Ignimbrite, San Luis Potosi, México: flow source recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Miranda, C. I.; Torres-Hernández, J. R.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was selected as the key technique to find the source of the widespread Cantera Ignimbrite and to seek its possible relationship with the San Luis Potosí Caldera. Eighteen sites (372 specimens from 155 cores) from the Oligocene Cantera Ignimbrite were sampled. AMS was measured on a KLY2 Kappabridge. AMS data were processed with Anisoft 3 software using Jelinek statistics as well as `SpheriStat' principal components and density distribution. Mean susceptibilities range from 290 to 5026 × 10-6 SI (average = 2526 × 10-6 SI). The anisotropy degree ( P j) ranges from 1.005 to 1.055, with only one site displaying a value of 1.134 ( P j average = 1.031). AMS ellipsoid shapes are mostly oblate, with the T-factor ranging from 0.843 to 0.144 ( T average = 0.529), although one site is mainly prolate ( T = -0.005), and three additional sites have an important proportion of prolate specimens. Magnetic fabrics of most sites shows k3 axes around nearly circular distributions and k 1- k 2 axes around elongated-girdle distributions defining sub-horizontal foliation planes; exceptions to this are related to sites with a significant percentage of prolate specimens. Flow directions inferred from AMS analysis indicate several ignimbrite sources located along selected NW-SE linear features (faults and fractures such as El Potosino Fault) as well as along the rim of the caldera structure. The geometry of volcanic outcrops, the NW-SE faulting-fracture system, as well as the AMS results suggest that this is a caldera structure resembling the trapdoor-type (Lipman, 1997).

  6. Investigating media artifacts with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    The dissertation’s aim is to explore the everyday relevance media artifacts have for young children. It discusses and further develops analytical concepts that are committed to taking the children’s perspectives on possibilities and limitations of such artifacts seriously. These conceptual...... developments are rooted in the author’s participation in a daycare practice in Berlin, Germany. The daycare’s situational approach precisely attempted to draw on the children’s everyday life experiences so as to engage in problem-oriented learning projects, on media artifacts and beyond....

  7. Non-Universal temperature dependencies of the low frequency ac magnetic susceptibility in high Tc superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, D.; Celani, F.; Tripodi, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Testa, A.M. [Consiglio Nazionale per le Ricerche, Monterotondo, RM, (Italy). Istituto di Chimica dei Materiali; Pace, S. [INFM, Univ. Salerno, Salerno (Italy). Dept. of Physics

    1999-07-01

    The paper is organized as follows. In Sec. 2 the non-linear diffusion problem is formulated in terms of a partial differential equation, together with the parallel resistor model for the 1-5 characteristics. To study in some detail the effects of thermally activated processes in different cases, we have chosen different temperature functional dependencies for the pinning potential, U{sub p}(T), and the critical current density, J{sub c}(T), related to particular pinning models. Local magnetic field profiles, magnetization cycles and {chi}n (T) are discussed in Sec. 3. Moreover, a comparison of numerical results with available experimental data and analytical approximated predictions is also presented. Finally, Sec. 4 is devoted to summary and conclusions.

  8. Modalities of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in fine-grained sedimentary rocks deformed in a contraction-dominated setting - A case study of the Central Armorican Domain, Brittany, France

    OpenAIRE

    Haerinck, Tom

    2014-01-01

    An integrated rock-magnetic and mineralogical approach is performed for a case study of low-grade metasedimentary rocks from the Central Armorican Domain (CAD). The objective is twofold. Firstly, gaining a better understanding of the relation between the mineral sources of magnetic susceptibility and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Secondly, verifying whether the magnetic fabrics have a potential as a regional strain marker. For this goal, a lithostratigraphical reference uni...

  9. Application of orthorhombic standardization in magnetic susceptibility studies of localized spin models with S=1, 3/2, 2, 5/2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pełka, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Pelka@ifj.edu.pl [H. Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, E. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Rudowicz, Czesław [Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    The standardization idea is nowadays tacitly accepted in EMR area, however, its usefulness in magnetism studies has not been fully recognized as yet. This idea arises due to intrinsic features of orthorhombic Hamiltonians of any physical nature, including the crystal (ligand) field (CF/LF) Hamiltonians or the zero-field splitting (ZFS) ones. Standardization limits the ratio of the orthorhombic parameter to the axial one to a fixed range between 0 and a specific value that depends on the notation used. For the ZFS parameters expressed in the conventional spin Hamiltonian (SH) notation the ratio λ=E/D can always be limited to the range (0, ±1/3) by appropriate choice of coordinate system. Implications of standardization of orthorhombic spin Hamiltonians for interpretation of experimental magnetic susceptibility data are considered. Using a numerical example, we show the existence of alternative solutions for ZFS parameters potentially obtainable from fitting experimental magnetic data and discuss their importance. For the first time algebraic applications of the standardization to the expressions for magnetic susceptibility tensor derived earlier for localized spin models with S=1, 3/2, 2, 5/2 and with rhombic anisotropy are explored. The numerical and algebraic results allow us to formulate an 'invariance principle'. These considerations facilitate interpretation of experimental magnetic data and provide an additional check of correctness of analytical magnetic susceptibility expressions.

  10. Cytological artifacts masquerading interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Khushboo; Mehendiratta, Monica; Rehani, Shweta; Kumra, Madhumani; Sharma, Rashi; Kardam, Priyanka

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cytological artifacts are important to learn because an error in routine laboratory practice can bring out an erroneous result. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of delayed fixation and morphological discrepancies created by deliberate addition of extraneous factors on the interpretation and/or diagnosis of an oral cytosmear. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out using papanicolaou and hematoxylin and eosin-stained oral smears, 6 each from 66 volunteer dental students with deliberate variation in fixation delay timings, with and without changes in temperature, undue pressure while smear making and intentional addition of contaminants. The fixation delay at room temperature was carried out at an interval of every 30 minutes, 1 day and 1 week and was continued till the end of 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month, respectively. The temperature variations included 60 to 70°C and 3 to 4°C. Results: Light microscopically, the effect of delayed fixation at room temperature appeared first on cytoplasm followed by nucleus within the first 2 hours and on the 4th day, respectively, till complete cytoplasmic degeneration on the 23rd day. However, delayed fixation at variable temperature brought faster degenerative changes at higher temperature than lower temperature. Effect of extraneous factors revealed some interesting facts. Conclusions: In order to justify a cytosmear interpretation, a cytologist must be well acquainted with delayed fixation-induced cellular changes and microscopic appearances of common contaminants so as to implicate better prognosis and therapy. PMID:24648667

  11. Reference-free removal of EEG-fMRI ballistocardiogram artifacts with harmonic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Poulsen, Catherine; Pierce, Eric T; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N

    2016-03-01

    Combining electroencephalogram (EEG) recording and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers the potential for imaging brain activity with high spatial and temporal resolution. This potential remains limited by the significant ballistocardiogram (BCG) artifacts induced in the EEG by cardiac pulsation-related head movement within the magnetic field. We model the BCG artifact using a harmonic basis, pose the artifact removal problem as a local harmonic regression analysis, and develop an efficient maximum likelihood algorithm to estimate and remove BCG artifacts. Our analysis paradigm accounts for time-frequency overlap between the BCG artifacts and neurophysiologic EEG signals, and tracks the spatiotemporal variations in both the artifact and the signal. We evaluate performance on: simulated oscillatory and evoked responses constructed with realistic artifacts; actual anesthesia-induced oscillatory recordings; and actual visual evoked potential recordings. In each case, the local harmonic regression analysis effectively removes the BCG artifacts, and recovers the neurophysiologic EEG signals. We further show that our algorithm outperforms commonly used reference-based and component analysis techniques, particularly in low SNR conditions, the presence of significant time-frequency overlap between the artifact and the signal, and/or large spatiotemporal variations in the BCG. Because our algorithm does not require reference signals and has low computational complexity, it offers a practical tool for removing BCG artifacts from EEG data recorded in combination with fMRI.

  12. Relationship between magnetic susceptibility-weighted imaging and pathologic grading of brain gliomas%脑神经胶质瘤磁敏感加权成像与病理分级之间的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄鹤; 何宁; 张玉东; 谭晓天

    2008-01-01

    目的:探讨磁敏感加权成像(magnetic susceptibility-weighted imaging,MSWI)在评估脑神经胶质瘤病理分级中的价值.方法:对60例病理学证实为脑神经胶质瘤的患者行磁共振(magnetic resonance,MR)快速自旋回波(turbo spin echo,TSE)和双回波快速小角度激发(fast low angle shot,FLASH)-T2*WI(TE为15和35 ms)磁敏感序列扫描.比较这3种序列所产生的磁敏感伪影(magnetic susceptibility artifact,MSA)的差异.对MSA[个数、最大直径和最低信噪比(signal-to-noise ratio,SNR)]与WHO病理分级和Ki-67的表达进行相关性分析.结果:多样本秩和检验和独立样本方差分析FLASH-T2*WI(TE为15和35 ms)和TSE序列这3种序列的MSA差异有统计学意义(χ2=21.331,P=0.001;F=44.517 和 6.839,P<0.001).Pearson相关分析显示,WHO病理分级与MSA的个数、最大直径和SNR均相关(r分别为0.737、0.624和-0.528,P=0.000);Ki-67的表达与MSA的个数、最大直径和SNR也均相关(r分别为O.687、0.577 和 -0.533,P=0.000).结论:应用MSWI可有效地评价术前脑神经胶质瘤的病理分级,且利用延长TE时间所产生的MSA可以更好地对脑神经胶质瘤的病理分级进行评估.

  13. Pollution detected innovation of hazardous and toxic substance disposal by magnetic susceptibility method in Cikijing River, Rancaekek for testing water quality standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prananda, Yovan; Taufik, Febri; Alief, R.; Fikrianti, S.; M. Hardian, T.; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Water pollution can defect surround the source of pollution. An example is Cikijing River, located in Rancaekek, Bandung which has expected contaminated by water disposal. Total loss approach by Total Economic Valuation is Rp 11.385.847.532.188 (± 11.4 trillion). One of the dangerous effect is the water quality in there. The aim of this research is to know and prove water disposal contaminated in that river. This research was conducted by mapping the magnetic anomaly which obtained from the surrounding river. Afterward, modeling the research is conducted to get the susceptibility value. In the previous research, the geological condition of our research field is Kosambi Formation (clay, sandstone, shale). The Kosambi Formation susceptibility value estimated 0.017cgs unit there after it used to be background susceptibility. As the result of modeling magnetic anomaly from the anomaly map, the susceptibility contrast shows negative value. The relation between magnetic anomaly and susceptibility indicated the hazardous and toxic substance pollution, which affected Cikijing River and around there.

  14. Using Bulk Magnetic Susceptibility to Resolve Internal and External Signals in the NMR Spectra of Plant Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar-Hill, Yair; Befroy, Douglas E.; Pfeffer, Philip E.; Ratcliffe, R. George

    1997-07-01

    Internal and external NMR signals from a variety of plant cells and plant tissues can be resolved by changing the bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) of the perfusing medium with [Gd (EDTA)]-or Dy(DTPA-BMA). This separation is observed in samples consisting of cylindrical cells oriented along theB0field, and is consistent with established theoretical predictions about BMS effects. Evidence is presented that the shifted signals represent material outside the tissue as well as some contribution from intercellular spaces and cell walls, while intracellular signals are unshifted. The paramagnetic complexes used to separate the signals are shown to be nontoxic and to have no effect on a number of transport processes. The method has been applied to roots, shoots, and giant algal cells, facilitating the interpretation of thein vivospectra from a range of biologically important magnetic isotopes. The potential of the method for studies of transport is illustrated with experiments showing: (i)14N/15N isotopic exchange of nitrate in roots; (ii) the influx of HDO into root and shoot segments; and (iii) the use of saturation transfer to follow water movement into and out of plant cells.

  15. Millennial-centennial Scales Climate Changes of Holocene Indicated by Magnetic Susceptibility of High-resolution Section in Salawusu River Valley China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yingxia; LI Baosheng; WEN Xiaohao; QIU Shifan; WANG Fengnian; NIU Dongfeng; LI Zhiwen

    2010-01-01

    The upmost segment(Holocene series)of the Milanggouwan stratigraphic section(MGS1)in the Salawusu River valley shows 11 sedimentary cycles of dune sands and fluvio-lacustrine facies,or dune sands and paleosols.The analysis of the magnetic susceptibility of this segment suggests that there are 11 magnetic susceptibility cycles with the value alternating from low to high,in which the layers of the dune sands correspond to the lower value of the magnetic susceptibility and the layers of fluvio-lacustrine facies and paleosols correspond to the higher peaks.The study reveals that the low and high magnetic susceptibility values indicate the climate dominated by cold-arid winter monsoon and warm-humid summer monsoon of East Asia,respectively,and the study area has experienced at least 22 times of mil-lennial-centennial scales climate alternation from the cold-arid to the warm-humid during the Holocene.In terms of the time and the climate nature,the variations basically correspond to those of the North Atlantic and some records of cold-warm changes in China as well.They might be caused by the alternation of winter and summer monsoons in the Mu Us Desert induced by global climate fluctuations in the Holocene.

  16. Magnetic susceptibility as a high-resolution correlation tool and as a climatic proxy in Paleozoic rocks - Merits and pitfalls: Examples from the Devonian in Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, A.-C.; De Vleeschouwer, D.; Boulvain, F.; Claeys, P.; Fagel, N.; Humblet, M.; Mabille, C.; Michel, J.; Sardar Abadi, M.; Pas, D.; Dekkers, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility (χin) measurements are quick and sensitive enabling the creation of high-resolution records; making χin an attractive correlation tool and a proxy for paleoclimate and paleoenvironments. In geologically young material – foremost in Cenozoic sediments – χin belongs t

  17. High-Resolution Magnetic Susceptibility Stratigraphy Spanning Late Devonian Global Change from a New Scientific Drillcore in Canning Basin, Northwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, M. R.; Raub, T. D.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Playton, T. E.; Hocking, R. M.; Haines, P.; Tulipani, S.

    2010-12-01

    New shallow scientific drillcore has been recovered through the Frasnian-Famennian extinction boundary in northwest Australia’s Canning Basin. Previous work in the McWhae Ridge outcrop belt has identified patterns of turnover in trilobites and other fauna, change from sponge- and coral-dominated reefs to post-extinction microbial-dominated reefs, apparent sea level changes, and carbon isotopic evidence of late Devonian crisis. Continuous magnetic susceptibility (MS) stratigraphy yields highly structured oscillations spanning ~42 m of reef-slope carbonate. These oscillations appear to identify late Frasnian “Kellwasser” events and they may record sedimentary response to orbital variations, establishing a high-resolution relative chronostratigraphy of late Devonian global change. Magnetic susceptibility stratigraphy has been proposed as a generally useful chronometer for late Devonian time. Most of fifteen published MS stratigraphies crossing the Frasnian-Famennian boundary appear to share major excursions with the new McWhae Ridge result. Although upland tectonism in Canning Basin may be a caveat to straightforward eustatic interpretation of magnetic susceptibility variations, we suggest the higher-resolution and fresh drillcore context of this result prioritizes it as a standard for Frasnian-Famennian magnetic susceptibility variation.

  18. The Physical Property of Susceptibility for One-Dimensional Ferrimagnetic Chain with Alternating Spins 1 and 1/2 in Finite Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Gang; HAN Ru-Shan

    2001-01-01

    We further calculate the dependence of xT on T in high magnetic fields,where X denotes susceptibility and T is temperature,using our previous research work - Green function's decoupling approximate approach,for the one-dimensional ferrimagnetic chain with alternating spins 1 and 1/2.We find a linear correlation in certain range of magnetic field between the temperature of xT maximum and the magnetic field.Moreover,we simply analyze its physical meaning by our approach.``

  19. Exploring the Magnetic Susceptibility of a Haldane Compound Sm2BaNiO5: Optical Spectroscopy of Sm^{3+} Kramers Doublets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, A. S.; Klimin, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    An optical spectroscopic study of quasi-Haldane chain nickelate Sm2BaNiO5 is presented. A temperature-dependent splitting of the ground-state Kramers doublet of the Sm^{3+} ion due to an antiferromagnetic ordering at TN = 55 K has been obtained experimentally and used to calculate the Schottky-type anomaly in magnetic susceptibility. The value of the magnetic moment of Sm^{3+} ion at zero temperature has been estimated within the model of the ground doublet. One-dimensional magnetic behavior of the nickel subsystem is emphasized.

  20. [The magnetic susceptibility of the melanin in the eyes of representatives of different vertebrate classes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagal'skaia, E O

    1995-01-01

    The magnetoperceptivity (Chi) and element composition of eye pigment epitelium (EPE) melanin in vertebrate animals were measured. The minimal values of EPE Chi were found in winter-sleeping and anabiotic animals (Ursus arctos, Rana temporaria). The magnetoperception was high in migrating animals (Oncorhynchus keta, 0. gorbuscha, Anas crecca) and in wild gray rats as well, EPE magnetoperceptivity in albino rats wasn't practicaly established. In the majority of cases the quantity of magnetoperceptivity correlates with per-cent content of iron. The evident correlation between melanin magnet properties and the life strategy of the investigated animals allows to propose the participance of eye pigment epithelium in orientation and navigation of the animals.

  1. Influence of magnetic fields on hysteretic ac losses in bulk MgB{sub 2} superconductor investigated by using Hall probe ac susceptibility method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varilci, A [Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Abant Izzet Baysal University, 14280 Bolu (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We report the results of an investigation of the influence of magnetic fields on hysteretic ac losses in bulk MgB{sub 2} superconductor by using Hall probe ac susceptibility. The external magnetic field in this study had an ac part with frequency 10 Hz and magnitude in the range 240-1200 A m{sup -1} and no dc part. We have measured the imaginary part of the magnetic susceptibility and analysed data by using Bean's critical state model of cylindrical geometry for four different temperature values 39.55, 39.51, 39.47 and 39.41 K. The result of this analysis indicates that Bean's model is adequate to explain the experimental findings. Calculated hysteretic ac loss versus applied magnetic field curve is given by using the critical state model. We have also measured the magnetization versus applied magnetic field and determined the first critical magnetic field of a MgB{sub 2} sample as 500 A m{sup -1} at 35 K.

  2. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya [Ohu Univ., Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-09-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  3. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2014-03-01

    The standard multidetector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances ("lines"). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on detector data from the fifth LIGO science run. We find that the line-robust statistic retains the detection power of the standard F-statistic in Gaussian noise. In the presence of line artifacts it is more sensitive, even compared to the popular F-statistic consistency veto, over which it improves by as much as a factor of two in detectable signal strength.

  4. Structure, magnetic susceptibility, and specific heat of the spin-orbital-liquid candidate FeS c2S4 : Influence of Fe off-stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurkan, V.; Prodan, L.; Felea, V.; Filippova, I.; Kravtsov, V.; Günther, A.; Widmann, S.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Deisenhofer, J.; Loidl, A.

    2017-08-01

    We report structure, susceptibility, and specific heat studies of stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric poly- and single crystals of the A -site spinel compound FeS c2S4 . In stoichiometric samples, no long-range magnetic order is found down to 1.8 K. The magnetic susceptibility of these samples is field independent in the temperature range 10-400 K and does not show irreversible effects at low temperatures. In contrast, the magnetic susceptibility of samples with iron excess shows substantial field dependence at high temperatures and manifests a pronounced magnetic irreversibility at low temperatures with a difference between zero-field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) susceptibilities and a maximum at 10 K, reminiscent of a magnetic transition. Single-crystal x-ray diffraction of the stoichiometric samples revealed a single phase spinel structure without site inversion. In single crystalline samples with Fe excess, in addition to the main spinel phase, a second ordered single-crystal phase was detected with the diffraction pattern of a vacancy-ordered superstructure of iron sulfide, close to the 5C polytype F e9S10 . Specific heat studies reveal a broad anomaly, which evolves below 20 K in both stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric crystals. We show that the low-temperature specific heat can be well described by considering the low-lying spin-orbital electronic levels of F e2 + ions. Our results demonstrate significant influence of excess Fe ions on intrinsic magnetic behavior of FeS c2S4 and provide support for the spin-orbital liquid scenario proposed in earlier studies for the stoichiometric compound.

  5. Spatiotemporal filtering of MR-temperature artifacts arising from bowel motion during transurethral MR-HIFU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Alain, E-mail: aschmitt@sri.utoronto.ca [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, 281 Hillmount Road, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Chopra, Rajiv [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canadaand Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390-9061 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Transurethral MR-HIFU is a minimally invasive image-guided treatment for localized prostate cancer that enables precise targeting of tissue within the gland. The treatment is performed within a clinical MRI to obtain real-time MR thermometry used as an active feedback to control the spatial heating pattern in the prostate and to monitor for potential damage to surrounding tissues. This requires that the MR thermometry measurements are an accurate representation of the true tissue temperature. The proton resonance frequency shift thermometry method used is sensitive to tissue motion and changes in the local magnetic susceptibility that can be caused by the motion of air bubbles in the rectum, which can impact the performance of transurethral MR-HIFU in these regions of the gland. Methods: A method is proposed for filtering of temperature artifacts based on the temporal variance of the temperature, using empirical and dynamic positional knowledge of the ultrasonic heating beam, and an estimation of the measurement noise. A two-step correction strategy is introduced which eliminates artifact-detected temperature variations while keeping the noise level low through spatial averaging. Results: The filter has been evaluated by postprocessing data from five human transurethral ultrasound treatments. The two-step correction process led to reduced final temperature standard deviation in the prostate and rectum areas where the artifact was located, without negatively affecting areas distal to the artifact. The performance of the filter was also found to be consistent across all six of the data sets evaluated. The evaluation of the detection criterion parameter M determined that a value of M = 3 achieves a conservative filter with minimal loss of spatial resolution during the process. Conclusions: The filter was able to remove most artifacts due to the presence of moving air bubbles in the rectum during transurethral MR-HIFU. A quantitative estimation of the filter

  6. Acute Tumor Response to ZD6126 Assessed by Intrinsic Susceptibility Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P. Robinson

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI transverse relaxation rate R2* was investigated as an early acute marker of the response of rat GH3 prolactinomas to the vascular-targeting agent, ZD6126. Multigradient echo (MGRE MRI was used to quantify R2*, which is sensitive to tissue deoxyhemoglobin levels. Tumor R2* was measured prior to, and either immediately for up to 35 minutes, or 24 hours following administration of 50 mg/kg ZD6126. Following MRI, tumor perfusion was assessed by Hoechst 33342 uptake. Tumor R2* significantly increased to 116 ± 4% of baseline 35 minutes after challenge, consistent with an ischemic insult induced by vascular collapse. A strong positive correlation between baseline R2* and the subsequent increase in R2* measured 35 minutes after treatment was obtained, suggesting that the baseline R2* is prognostic for the subsequent tumor response to ZD6126. In contrast, a significant decrease in tumor R2* was found 24 hours after administration of ZD6126. Both the 35-minute and 24-hour R2* responses to ZD6126 were associated with a decrease in Hoechst 33342 uptake. Interpretation of the R2* response is complex, yet changes in tumor R2* may provide a convenient and early MRI biomarker for detecting the antitumor activity of vascular-targeting agents.

  7. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Hansen, Adam E.; Keller, Sune;

    2015-01-01

    images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. RESULTS: The MR-based volume of the susceptibility......-induced signal voids on the MR-AC attenuation maps was between 1.6 and 520.8 mL. The corresponding/resulting bias of the reconstructed tracer distribution was localized mainly in the area of the signal void. The mean and maximum SUVs averaged across all patients increased after inpainting by 52% (± 11%) and 28......% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility artifact on the MR-AC attenuation map. CONCLUSIONS: Metallic dental work may cause severe MR signal voids. The resulting PET...

  8. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region: implications for Dixon-based attenuation correction in PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Hansen, Adam E; Keller, Sune H; Fischer, Barbara M [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Rasmussen, Jacob H [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Law, Ian; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Lauze, Francois [Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Beyer, Thomas [Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20/4L, Vienna, A-1090 (Austria); Andersen, Flemming L [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark)

    2015-03-11

    In the absence of CT or traditional transmission sources in combined clinical positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems, MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The susceptibility effects due to metal implants challenge MR-AC in the neck region of patients with dental implants. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and magnitude of subsequent PET image distortions following MR-AC. A total of 148 PET/MR patients with clear visual signal voids on the attenuation map in the dental region were included in this study. Patients were injected with [{sup 18}F]-FDG, [{sup 11}C]-PiB, [{sup 18}F]-FET, or [{sup 64}Cu]-DOTATATE. The PET/MR data were acquired over a single-bed position of 25.8 cm covering the head and neck. MR-AC was based on either standard MR-AC{sub DIXON} or MR-AC{sub INPAINTED} where the susceptibility-induced signal voids were substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. The MR-based volume of the susceptibility-induced signal voids on the MR-AC attenuation maps was between 1.6 and 520.8 mL. The corresponding/resulting bias of the reconstructed tracer distribution was localized mainly in the area of the signal void. The mean and maximum SUVs averaged across all patients increased after inpainting by 52% (± 11%) and 28% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility

  9. Magnetic properties of high temperature superconductors. AC susceptibility and magnetostriction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heill, L.K.

    1995-05-01

    The author of this thesis has measured the ac magnetic response function {mu} = {mu}`+i{mu}`` in melt-powder-melt-growth YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (Y123) with insulating Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} (Y211) and in single crystal YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (SC) in applied dc fields up to 8 T, oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the crystalline c-axis. Both samples are cubes with sides of about 1 mm. The response of the two samples was mapped out as a function of temperature, excitation field amplitude and frequency, dc field and field orientation. It is found that for both samples the loss peak line (LPL) and hence the irreversibility line (IL) exists at higher temperatures and fields for perpendicular field orientation than for parallel. Strong frequency but weak amplitude dependence is observed for parallel orientation, vice versa for perpendicular orientation. The measured response is strongly non-linear for perpendicular orientation, and intermediate between linear (ohmic) and extremely non-linear (Bean critical state) for parallel orientation. The situation at parallel orientation is close to but above the transition into a vortex solid state, and a power law temperature dependence with exponent 1.5 is obtained for the vortex glass transition line. For perpendicular orientation the response is consistent with that expected in a vortex solid. Pinning barriers are found by means of thermal activation analysis. Anomalous loss peaks {mu}``(T) are observed for the SC sample for intermediate fields in perpendicular orientation. Large magnetostriction is found in a flat single crystal Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} sample at low temperature and fields up to 6 T applied along the c-axis. 332 refs., 59 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Time as An Important Soil-Forming Factor Influencing Modern and Ancient Magnetic Susceptibility Enhancement Along the Delaware River Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcomb, G. E.; Peppe, D. J.; Driese, S. G.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is an increasingly popular low-cost method for rapidly assessing paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental impact on buried soils. The goal of this study is to determine the primary influence(s) on soil magnetic susceptibility along floodplain, terrace and upland soils in the middle Delaware River Valley, USA, using environmental magnetic, pedologic, and stratigraphic techniques. Two-hundred thirty samples were collected from age-constrained sandy, quartz-rich, floodplain, terrace, and upland soils (Entisols, Inceptisols). A Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) and post-hoc Tukey-Kramer (T-K) (α=0.05) multiple comparisons analysis on 176 mass-specific low-field susceptibility (Xlf) assays show that A and B horizons are magnetically enhanced compared to C and E horizons (p<0.0001). Results of descriptive soil micromorphology show that A and B horizons contain anywhere from 10-50% more amorphous organic matter and clay films along pores than do C and E horizons. Enhanced Xlf values also correlate positively (R^2=0.63) with the soil molecular weathering ratio of Alumina/Bases, suggesting that increased weathering likely results in the formation of pedogenic magnetic minerals and enhanced magnetic susceptibility signal. Additional K-W and T-K testing show that Xlf results, when grouped by floodplain-terrace designation (i.e., chronofunction) are significantly different (p<0.0001). The older T3 terrace and upland Xlf values (0.34±0.14 10^-6 m^3 kg^-1) are greater than the younger T2 terrace (0.18±0.06 10^-6 m^3 kg^-1) values, which are greater than modern floodplain (0.09±0.01 10^-6 m^3 kg^-1) Xlf values. These data suggest that longer intervals of soil formation enhance the Χlf value. This hypothesis is further supported when 159 Xlf values are plotted vs. age for the entire Holocene. A locally-weighted regression smoothing curve (LOESS) shows two distinct intervals of magnetic enhancement during previously established dry intervals, the early and late

  11. Model analysis of magnetic susceptibility of Sr2IrO4 : A two-dimensional Jeff=1/2 Heisenberg system with competing interlayer couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Tomohiro; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Jackeli, George; Takagi, Hidenori

    2016-12-01

    We report the analysis of magnetic susceptibility χ (T ) of Sr2IrO4 single crystal in the paramagnetic phase. We formulate the theoretical susceptibility based on isotropic Heisenberg antiferromagnetism incorporating the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction exactly, and include the interlayer couplings in a mean-field approximation. χ (T ) above TN was found to be well described by the model, indicating the predominant Heisenberg exchange consistent with the microscopic theory. The analysis points to a competition of nearest and next-nearest-neighbor interlayer couplings, which results in the up-up-down-down configuration of the in-plane canting moments identified by the diffraction experiments.

  12. Effect of Low-Frequency Alternative-Current Magnetic Susceptibility in Ni80Fe20 Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tsung Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction (XRD results indicate that the NiFe thin films had a face-centered cubic (FCC structure. Post-annealing treatment increased the crystallinity of NiFe films over those at room temperature (RT, suggesting that NiFe crystallization yields FCC (111 texturing. Post-annealing treatments increase crystallinity over that obtained at RT. This paper focuses on the maximum alternative-current magnetic susceptibility (χac value of NiFe thin films with resonance frequency (fres at low frequencies from 10 Hz to 25000 Hz. These results demonstrate that the χac of NiFe thin films increased with post-annealing treatment and increasing thickness. The NiFe (111 texture suggests that the relationship between magneto-crystalline anisotropy and the maximum χac value with optimal resonance frequency (fres increased spin sensitivity at optimal fres. The results obtained under the three conditions revealed that the maximum χac value and optimal fres of a 1000 Å-thick NiFe thin film are 3.45 Hz and 500 Hz, respectively, following postannealing at TA=250°C for 1 h. This suggests that a 1000 Å NiFe thin film post-annealed at TA=250°C is suitable for gauge sensor and transformer applications at low frequencies.

  13. Magnetic susceptibility variations of the Ediacaran cap carbonates in the Yangtze platform and their implications for paleoclimate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data were obtained from 11 sections of the Doushantuo (Ediacaran) cap carbonate that directly overlies the Nantuo glacial diamictite in the southeastern margin of the Yangtze platform. The MS data revealed two regionally correlatable peaks at the bottom and top of the cap carbonate, separated by an interval of low values. The lower MS peak coincides with high percentage of insoluble siliciclastic residues that are compositionally identical to the matrix of the underlying diamictite, suggesting its origin controlled mainly by detrital components during the first phase of cap carbonate deposition at the end of the glaciation. The upper MS peak is associated with high clay content and iron sulfides, and can be interpreted as either derived from enhanced greenhouse weathering that could have brought more terrigenous components into the ocean, or the result of ocean anoxia at the late stage of cap carbonate deposition that could led to formation of abundant iron sulfides. The regionally consistent MS curves from the cap carbonates provided the first geophysical record for the rapid climate change from icehouse to greenhouse conditions in the aftermath of the Neoproterozoic "snowball Earth" event.

  14. Comparative research on soil magnetic susceptibility and Chroma and grain of grassland soil and farmland soil in alpine region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Yuan; Guangchao, Cao; Chongyi, E.; Gang, Jiang; Youjing, Yuan; Cheng, Xiang

    2017-03-01

    This thesis aims at researching unchanged perennial farmland and grassland soil on the northern of Qinghai Lake basin and differences between soil magnetic susceptibility, chroma and soil particle size composition of grassland and farmland in lengthways profile(0-60cm). The result shows that the distinction of Xlf between grassland and farmland is smaller above 15cm, and farmland Xlf is finer than grassland below 15cm. The Xfd of grassland is finer than farmland above 30cm, which has a little difference below 30cm. Farmland chroma value is finer than the grassland generally. The lightness of grassland has increased trend and farmland has the decrease trend above 30cm, the lightness of grassland and farmland has no other changes below 30cm, the change of redness and yellowness in lengthways profile has a decrease trend from 0 to 60cm; the clay and silt content of grassland are finer than farmland except sand content; the sand maximum content of farmland in 0-10cm segment; 20 to 35 cm segment sand content decrease and began to increase from 35-60cm segment; the soil particle size composition has a big difference, in particular, when it is above 30cm, it has a little difference below 30cm.

  15. A study on transformation of some transition metal oxides in molten steelmaking slag to magnetically susceptible compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatokha V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development of steelmaking requires solving a number of environmental problems. Economically feasible and environmentally friendly recycling of slag wastes is of special concern. Research of the team representing National Metallurgical Academy of Ukraine, Royal Institute of Technology, Carnegie Mellon University and URS Corp revealed a possibility of the controlled phase transformations in the liquid silicate melts followed by formation of the magnetically susceptible compounds. This approach enables selective recovery of metal values from slag. In this paper, the results obtained and further research directions are discussed. A possibility to exploit physical properties of the transition metals, typical for the metallurgical slags (such as Fe, Mn, V and others, and corresponding specific properties of their compounds, such as non-stoichiometry, mixed valency, pseudomorphosis, thermodynamic stability etc, in production of value-added materials from slag wastes is discussed. The results of the studies of thermodynamics and kinetics of oxidation in slags followed by phase transformation with binary, ternary and complex oxides under various physicochemical conditions are discussed in the view of their application for production of the materials with predefined physical properties. Peculiarities of precipitation in slags with various basicities are analysed and demonstrate capacity of the proposed approach in the production of the material with a given structure and size - for example, nano-sized crystals with structure of spinel. The approaches towards industrial realization of the developed method are also discussed.

  16. Evaluation of Audio Compression Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herrera Martinez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with subjective evaluation of audio-coding systems. From this evaluation, it is found that, depending on the type of signal and the algorithm of the audio-coding system, different types of audible errors arise. These errors are called coding artifacts. Although three kinds of artifacts are perceivable in the auditory domain, the author proposes that in the coding domain there is only one common cause for the appearance of the artifact, inefficient tracking of transient-stochastic signals. For this purpose, state-of-the art audio coding systems use a wide range of signal processing techniques, including application of the wavelet transform, which is described here. 

  17. A cluster-glass magnetic state in R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds evidenced by AC-susceptibility and neutron scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubkin, A F; Sherstobitova, E A; Terentyev, P B; Hoser, A; Baranov, N V

    2013-06-12

    AC- and DC-susceptibility, high-field magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements have been performed in order to study the magnetic state of R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds. The results show that both compounds undergo cluster-glass freezing upon cooling below Tf. According to the neutron diffraction a long-range magnetic order is absent down to 2 K and magnetic clusters with short-range incommensurate antiferromagnetic correlations exist not only below Tf but also in a wide temperature range above the freezing temperature (at least up to 2Tf). A complex cluster-glass magnetic state existing in Ho5Pd2 and Tb5Pd2 down to low temperatures results in rather complicated magnetization behavior in DC and AC magnetic fields. Such an unusual magnetic state in compounds with a high rare-earth concentration may be associated with the layered type of their crystal structure and with substantial atomic disorder, which results in frustrations in the magnetic subsystem.

  18. Magnetic Anisotropic Susceptibility Studies on Impact Structures in the Serra Geral Basalt, Paraná Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, A. P.; MacDonald, W. D.

    2009-12-01

    Studies of magnetic properties of shocked basalt are underway for two impact craters in the 132 Ma Serra Geral basalt of southern Brazil: the Vista Alegre crater (25.95°S, 41.69°W) in the state of Paraná, with a diameter of 12.4 km, and the Vargeão crater (26.81°S, 52.17°W) in Santa Catarina, of 9.5 km. Shatter cones and quartz planar deformation features (pdfs) have been found at both structures. Uplifted crater rims and external ejecta deposits have been removed by erosion at both craters. The interior of the Vista Alegre crater contains ejecta fallback deposits, typically reworked and weathered, and basalts of the crater floor are poorly exposed. In contrast, shocked basalts are exposed across the interior of the Vargeão structure, ejecta fallback deposits have been removed by erosion, and a central domal uplift of quartzose strata from beneath the basalt is found. Discounting the possibility of differential erosion rates, these differences might suggest that the Vargeão is the older of the two structures. Laboratory experiments elsewhere have suggested that major axes of the ellipse of anisotropic susceptibility (K1 major; K3 minor) could be aligned with the direction of propagation of the shockwave accompanying impact processes. Insufficient exposures exist at Vista Alegre to test this hypothesis. Oriented samples along a NNW-trending diametral profile across the better exposed Vargeão structure did not show a radial alignment of either K1 or K3 relative to the centre of that structure. In general, the mean susceptibility at Vargeão is lower towards the center; the degree of anisotropy is low (Pj<1.01), and the highest degree of anisotropy is in basalts adjacent to the central uplift. The shape factor (T) varies considerably (-0.5 (prolate) to +0.7 (oblate)); most magnetofabrics are oblate. Only 3 of 16 sites are prolate, and those are near the crater margin. K3 (minimum) axes are mainly steep, with a mean direction steep and slightly north of the

  19. Magnetic resonance visualization of conductive structures by sequence-triggered direct currents and spin-echo phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibofner, Frank; Wojtczyk, Hanne; Graf, Hansjörg, E-mail: hansjoerg.graf@med.uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: drGraf@t-online.de [Section on Experimental Radiology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen D-72076 (Germany); Clasen, Stephan [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen D-72076 (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Instrument visualization in interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly performed via susceptibility artifacts. Unfortunately, this approach suffers from limited conspicuity in inhomogeneous tissue and disturbed spatial encoding. Also, susceptibility artifacts are controllable only by sequence parameters. This work presents the basics of a new visualization method overcoming such problems by applying sequence-triggered direct current (DC) pulses in spin-echo (SE) imaging. SE phase images allow for background free current path localization. Methods: Application of a sequence-triggered DC pulse in SE imaging, e.g., during a time period between radiofrequency excitation and refocusing, results in transient field inhomogeneities. Dependent on the additional z-magnetic field from the DC, a phase offset results despite the refocusing pulse. False spatial encoding is avoided by DC application during periods when read-out or slice-encoding gradients are inactive. A water phantom containing a brass conductor (water equivalent susceptibility) and a titanium needle (serving as susceptibility source) was used to demonstrate the feasibility. Artifact dependence on current strength and orientation was examined. Results: Without DC, the brass conductor was only visible due to its water displacement. The titanium needle showed typical susceptibility artifacts. Applying triggered DC pulses, the phase offset of spins near the conductor appeared. Because SE phase images are homogenous also in regions of persistent field inhomogeneities, the position of the conductor could be determined with high reliability. Artifact characteristic could be easily controlled by amperage leaving sequence parameters unchanged. For an angle of 30° between current and static field visualization was still possible. Conclusions: SE phase images display the position of a conductor carrying pulsed DC free from artifacts caused by persistent field inhomogeneities. Magnitude and phase

  20. Translation balance for measuring magnetic susceptibilities at high or low temperatures (1962); Balance de translation pour la mesure des susceptibilites magnetiques a haute ou basse temperature (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise, A.; Peuch, M.A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A translation balance is described for the measurement of the magnetic susceptibilities of liquids or solids in the temperature range from 1.7 to 1400 deg. K. Measurements are made within a magnetic field adjustable from 3400 to 16000 oersteds, in any desired atmosphere. Susceptibilities between 10{sup -8} and 10{sup -4} u.e.m. C.G.S., can be measured. (authors) [French] La balance de translation decrite ici permet la mesure des susceptibilites magnetiques des liquides ou des solides dans la gamme de temperature allant de 1,7 a 1400 deg. K. Les mesures sont effectuees dans un champ magnetique ajustable de 3400 a 16000 oersteds, sous atmosphere controlee. La gamme des mesures de susceptibilite s'etend de 10{sup -8} a 10{sup -4} u.e.m. C.G.S. (auteurs)

  1. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  2. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  3. Technical artifacts: An integrated perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgo, S.; Franssen, M.P.M.; Garbacz, P.; Kitamura, Y.; Mizoguchi, R.; Vermaas, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are always interested in distinguishing natural and artificial entities although there is no sharp demarcation between the two categories. Surprisingly, things do not improve when the second type of entities is restricted to the arguably more constrained realm of physical technical artifacts.

  4. Modeling Software Processes and Artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Klaas; Bosch, Jan; Mitchell, Stuart

    1997-01-01

    The workshop on Modeling Software Processes and Artifacts explored the application of object technology in process modeling. After the introduction and the invited lecture, a number of participants presented their position papers. First, an overview is given on some background work, and the aims, as

  5. A record of Quaternary humidity fluctuations on the NE Tibetan Plateau based on magnetic susceptibility variations in lacustrine sediments of the Qaidam Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herb, Christian; Koutsodendris, Andreas; Zhang, Weilin; Appel, Erwin; Pross, Jörg; Fang, Xiaomin

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (?) and other magnetic proxies play an important role in paleoclimatic studies as they hold the potential for high-resolution records of past environmental change. Nevertheless, it is necessary to understand the cause of the variation in magnetic proxies by comparing them to more direct climate proxies such as pollen or stable isotopes. In this study we have compiled a high-resolution magnetic proxy dataset of the ca. 940-m-long core SG-1, which was drilled in the lacustrine sediments of the western Qaidam Basin on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. Our record spans the entire Quaternary (~2.8 to 0.1 Ma). The magnetic susceptibility record is compared to the Artemisia/Chenopodiaceae (A/C) ratio, which is used to discriminate between dry and more humid phases in the Qaidam Basin, based on (i) 41 samples spanning the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT; ~1 Ma BP) and (ii) additional 40 samples selected from intervals of minimum and maximum ? values throughout the core. For the drill core SG-1, we observe a high correlation of the A/C ratio with ? results: minima of ? correspond to maxima of the A/C ratio (representing more humid phases) and vice versa. Additionally, spectral analysis of the ? record shows the emergence of the 100-ka Milankovitch cycle after the MPT. This testifies to the fact that cyclic variation of ? represents a response to global climate change.

  6. Using magnetic susceptibility to facilitate more rapid, reproducible and precise delineation of hydric soils in the midwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, D.A.; Arruda, N.K.; Bramstedt, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    Standard field indicators, currently used for hydric soil delineations [USDA-NRCS, 1998. Field indicators of hydric soils in the United States, Version 4.0. In: G.W. Hurt et al. (Ed.), United States Department of Agriculture-NRCS, Fort Worth, TX], are useful, but in some cases, they can be subjective, difficult to recognize, or time consuming to assess. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements, acquired rapidly in the field with a portable meter, have great potential to help soil scientists delineate and map areas of hydric soils more precisely and objectively. At five sites in Illinois (from 5 to 15 ha in area) with contrasting soil types and glacial histories, the MS values of surface soils were measured along transects, and afterwards mapped and contoured. The MS values were found to be consistently higher in well-drained soils and lower in hydric soils, reflecting anaerobic deterioration of both detrital magnetite and soil-formed ferrimagnetics. At each site, volumetric MS values were statistically compared to field indicators to determine a critical MS value for hydric soil delineation. Such critical values range between 22??10-5 and 33??10-5 SI in silty loessal or alluvial soils in Illinois, but are as high as 61??10-5 SI at a site with fine sandy soil. A higher magnetite content and slower dissolution rate in sandy soils may explain the difference. Among sites with silty parent material, the lowest critical value (22??10-5 SI) occurs in soil with low pH (4.5-5.5) since acidic conditions are less favorable to ferrimagnetic mineral neoformation and enhance magnetite dissolution. Because of their sensitivity to parent material properties and soil pH, critical MS values must be determined on a site specific basis. The MS of studied soil samples (0-5 cm depth) is mainly controlled by neoformed ultrafine ferrimagnetics and detrital magnetite concentrations, with a minor contribution from anthropogenic fly ash. Neoformed ferrimagnetics are present in all samples

  7. Time-Transgressive Nature of the Magnetic Susceptibility Record across the Chinese Loess Plateau at the Pleistocene/Holocene Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Dong

    Full Text Available The loess stratigraphic boundary at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition defined by the magnetic susceptibility (MS has previously been assumed to be synchronous with the Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 2/1 boundary, and approximately time-synchronous at different sections across the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP. However, although this assumption has been used as a basis for proxy-age model of Chinese loess deposits, it has rarely been tested by using absolute dating methods. In this study, we applied a single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR protocol to the 45-63 μm quartz grain-size fraction to derive luminescence ages for the last glacial and Holocene sections of three loess sections on a transect from southeast to northwest across the CLP. Based on the 33 closely spaced optically stimulated luminescence (OSL samples from the three sections, OSL chronologies were established using a polynomial curve fit at each section. Based on the OSL chronology, the timing of the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary, as defined by rapid changes in MS values, is dated at ~10.5 ka, 8.5 ka and 7.5 ka in the Yaoxian section, Jingchuan and Huanxian sections respectively. These results are clearly inconsistent with the MIS 2/1 boundary age of 12.05 ka, and therefore we conclude that the automatic correlation of the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, as inferred from the MS record, with the MIS 2/1 boundary is incorrect. The results clearly demonstrate that the marked changes in MS along the southeast to northwest transect are time-transgressive among the different sites, with the timing of significant paleosol development as indicated by the MS record being delayed by 3-4 ka in the northwest compared to the southeast. Our results suggest that this asynchronous paleosol development during the last deglacial was caused by the delayed arrival of the summer monsoon in the northwest CLP compared to the southeast.

  8. Influence of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) on paleomagnetic sampling in volcanic glasses: a case study on rheomorphic ignimbrites of the Yellowstone hotspot-track, southern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, D.; Coe, R. S.; Murphy, J.; Bodiford, S.; Kelly, H.; Foster, S.; Spinardi, F.; Reichow, M. K.; Knott, T.; Branney, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale explosive volcanism, associated with the Yellowstone hotspot, occurred in the central Snake River Plain between 12.5-8 Ma. It is characterized by unusually high-temperature, intensely welded, rheomorphic rhyolitic ignimbrites, typical of what is now known as 'Snake River (SR)-type volcanism'. Individual eruption volumes likely exceed 450 km3 but are poorly known due to the difficulty of correlating units between widely spaced (50-200 km) exposures along the north and south of the plain, when some occurred too close-spaced in time for radiometric resolution. Our goal is to use a combination of paleomagnetic, petrographic, chemical and field characterization to establish robust correlations, allowing us to develop a regional stratigraphy, and constrain ignimbrite eruption volumes and frequencies. This presentation focuses on how to sample rheomorphic, SR-type ignimbrites for paleomagnetic studies given the potential effects of hot, rheomorphic deformation. Individual SR-type ignimbrite cooling-units have an upper and lower glassy margins (vitrophyre) enclosing a lithoidal (microcrystalline) zone. We have sampled dozens of ignimbrites in detail and have observed that the lithoidal interiors are preferable to the glassy margins for paleomagnetic studies. We hypothesize that the glassy margins retain an anisotropic fabric related to emplacement compaction and/or shearing that affects their ability to accurately record the magnetic field during cooling. In the lithoidal interiors this anisotropic fabric was overprinted by continued grain growth and/or alteration and, therefore, may accurately record the paleomagnetic field. Paleomagnetic samples from vitrophyres generally have a higher anisotropy in magnetic susceptibility than lithoidal samples. The remanent magnetic directions recorded in samples with high anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility are often deflected away from the site mean and closer to the plane of easy magnetic susceptibility. Since the

  9. Magnetic susceptibility of dust-loaded leaves as a proxy of traffic-related heavy metal pollution in Kathmandu city, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Pitambar; Blaha, Ulrich; Appel, Erwin

    Dust-loaded tree leaves from Kathmandu have been analyzed for magnetic susceptibility ( χ) and heavy metal (HM) contents. For 221 samples of leaves of cypress (mainly Cupressus corneyana), silky oak ( Grevillea robusta) and bottlebrush ( Callistemon lanceolatus), χ has a range of (0.01-54)×10 -8 m 3 kg -1 with a median of about 10.0×10 -8 m 3 kg -1. Trees situated close to the busy road intersections, near the main bus station and sectors of roads with steep slope yield elevated susceptibility. Chemical analysis of 20 samples of varying susceptibility by atomic absorption spectrometry yields the following maximum HM contents: Fe (1.3 wt%), Mn (281.9 ppm), Zn (195.2 ppm), Cu (41.5 ppm), Pb (38.4 ppm), Ni (8.1 ppm), Cr (6.4 ppm), Co (4.1 ppm) and Cd (1.2 ppm). The logarithmic susceptibility on dry mass basis ( χ) shows significant linear relationship with HM contents: Pearson's correlation coefficient r>0.8 with Zn, Fe, Cr; r>0.7 with Mn, Cu; r>0.6 with Pb, Ni. Magnetic phases are of soft (magnetite/maghemite) and hard (hematite) coercivities. Microscopy of magnetic extracts reveals spherules (mostly of 2-20 μm diameter) originated from vehicle exhausts through the combustion process as well as crystalline grains of lithogenic origin. The dust accumulation in leaves took place mainly after monsoon (beginning of October 2001) till the sampling period (first half of February 2002). Despite the dependence of susceptibility and HM contents on a variety of spatial and temporal factors (amount of particulate matter (PM), efficiency of deposition/removal of PM by wind, precipitation, birds etc.), a significant correlation of susceptibility to HM implies that the former serves as an effective proxy of metallic pollution. Hence, susceptibility-based bio-monitoring technique is recommended as an economic and rapid tool for assessment of environmental pollution in urban areas like Kathmandu.

  10. A Contrastive Analysis on Artifact Degree Caused by Oral Metal Crown with Four Sequences of 1. 5 T Magnetic Reso-nance Imaging%四种序列1.5 T磁共振成像口腔金属冠引起伪影程度的对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高岚; 廉云敏; 崔彩霞; 肖铁朋; 陈磊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe and evaluate the metallic artifacts caused by dental metal crowns with four se-quences of magnetic resonance imaging in T2*/GRE,T2W/IR,T2W/FSE and T1W/SE. Methods Crowns made from four different materials( Co-Gr,Ni-Gr,Ti alloy and Pure-Ti)were included in this study. The experimental animal was a ripe crossbreed dog and the crowns were fabricated for its upper right second premolar. Each mental crown was examined by a head MRI(1. 5 T)scan with four sequences of T2*/GRE,T2W/IR,T2W/FSE and T1W/SE,respectively. The existence and ex-tent of the artifacts were assessed and compared. Results All metal crowns produced artifacts. The sequence T2*/GRE exhibited significantly wider artifact than the others(P<0. 05). For any of the test alloy crown,artifacts were seen on more MRI slices in the sequence T2*/GRE than in other three sequences which produced similar artifact presentation(P<0. 05). Conclusion A-nalysis of the artifact size and artifact-related imaging slices demonstrated that among all the four sequences,T2*/GRE has the strongest influence while the other three sequences contributed equally to artifact generation.%目的:探讨在有金属冠存在的情况下,1.5 T磁共振成像T2*/梯度回波序列( GRE)、T2W/反转恢复自旋回波(IR)、T2W/快速自旋回波序列(FSE)、T1W/自旋回波序列(SE)4种序列产生伪影的程度。方法给实验犬依次佩戴钴铬合金、镍铬合金、低钛合金、纯钛金属4种金属冠,按序进行4种序列常规1.5 T磁共振成像的颅脑扫描,分别测量4种序列在4种金属冠存在下所产生伪影的最大面积并计数金属伪影涉及图像的层数,对测量结果进行统计分析。结果各金属冠在1.5 T磁共振成像4种序列均产生了伪影。4种序列钴铬合金、镍铬合金、低钛合金、纯钛金属伪影最大面积比较,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05);其中T2W/IR组、T2W/FSE组、T1W/SE组较T2*/GRE

  11. The magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and dielectric constant of hexagonal YMnO3, LuMnO3 and ScMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomuta, D. G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Nieuwenhuys, G. J.; Mydosh, J. A.

    2001-05-01

    We report the magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and dielectric constant for high-purity polycrystalline samples of three hexagonal manganites: YMnO3, LuMnO3 and ScMnO3. These materials can exhibit a ferroelectric transition at very high temperatures (TFE>700 K). At lower temperatures there is magnetic ordering of the frustrated Mn3+ spins (S = 2) on a triangular Mn lattice (YMnO3: TN = 71 K LuMnO3: TN = 90 K and ScMnO3: TN = 130 K). The transition is characterized by a sharp kink in the magnetic susceptibility at TN below which it continues to increase due to the frustration on the triangular lattice. The specific heat shows one clear continuous phase transition at TN, which is independent of external magnetic field up to 9 T with an entropy content as expected for Mn3+ ions. The temperature-dependent dielectric constant displays a distinct anomaly at TN.

  12. Slow relaxation of the magnetization in an Isostructural series of Zinc-lanthanide complexes: an integrated EPR and AC susceptibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amjad, Asma; Madalan, Augustin; Andruh, Marius; Caneschi, Andrea; Sorace, Lorenzo; University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Bucharest, Romania Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Lanthanide based molecular complexes have shown potential to behave as single molecule magnets proficient to function above cryogenic temperatures. In this work we explore the dynamics of one such family, [Zn(LH)2Ln](NO3)3 .6H2O - (Ln = Nd3+, Dy3+, Tb3+, Ho3+, Er3+, Yb3+) . The series has a single lanthanide ion as a magnetic center in a low symmetry environment; the dynamics and energy landscape of the series is explored using X-band EPR, AC and DC susceptibility over a range of temperature, field and frequency. DC magnetic data show χT value consistent with expected behavior. EPR spectra for Er3+ and Yb3+ complexes shows EPR spectra typical for easy-plane and quasi-isotropic systems respectively, thus explaining the lack of out of phase susceptibility even in an external applied filed. However, Dy3+ derivative show slow relaxation of the magnetization in zero field up to 15 K and is, accordingly EPR silent.

  13. Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) P-wave velocity, gamma-ray density, and magnetic susceptibility whole-core logs of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release includes Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) P-wave velocity, gamma-ray density, and magnetic susceptibility whole-core logs of sediment...

  14. Method of magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. Experimental measurements for geologic structures determination; Methode de cartographie de susceptibilite magnetique sur carottes de forage. Mesures experimentales pour la determination de structures geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delrive, C.

    1993-11-08

    The evaluation of the safety of a deep geologic repository for dangerous materials requires the knowledge of the interstitial system of the surrounding host rock. A method is proposed for the determination of geologic structures (in particular fractures) from the magnetic susceptibility mapping of drilled cores. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated using a SQUID magneto-gradient meter. A measurement tool using a new magnetic susceptibility captor and a testing bench have been developed. This tool allows the measurement of rocks with a magnetic susceptibility greater than 10{sup -5} SI units and can generate magnetic susceptibility maps with 4 x 4 mm{sup 2} pixels. A magnetic visibility criterion has been defined which allows to foresee if a structure is visible or not. According to the measurements done, it is shown that any centimeter-scale structure with a sufficient magnetic contrast (20%) with respect to the matrix is visible. Therefore, the dip and the orientation of such structure can be determined with a 3 degree and a 5 degree precision, respectively. The position of the structure along the core axis is known with a 4 mm precision. On the other hand, about half of the magnetic contrasts observed do not correspond to the visual analyses and can be explained by very small variations of the mineralogic composition. This last point offers some interesting ways for future research using magnetic susceptibility mapping. (J.S.). 31 refs., 90 figs., 18 tabs., 2 photos., 6 appends.

  15. Withanolide artifacts formed in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cong-Mei; Zhang, Huaping; Gallagher, Robert J; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2013-11-22

    Methanol solutions of the main withanolides (6-8) naturally present in Physalis longifolia yielded five artificial withanolides (1-5), including three new compounds (1-3). Withanolides 1 and 2 were identified as intramolecular Michael addition derivatives, while withanolides 3-5 were the result of intermolecular Michael addition. A comprehensive literature investigation was conducted to identify potential withanolide Michael addition artifacts isolated from Solanaceous species to date.

  16. Zero-field NMR of nematic liquid crystals with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies. [Propyl-, pentyl-, and heptylbicyclo-hexylcarbonitriles, p-ethoxybenzylidene-p-butylaniline (EBBA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, A.M.; Luzar, M.; Pines, A.

    1987-04-09

    Nematic liquid crystal systems with positive and negative magnetic susceptibility anisotropies are studied by NMR in high and zero magnetic fields. The behavior of the system in zero field is dictated by the form of the zero-field Hamiltonian, the symmetry of the liquid crystal phase, and the initial state of the magnetization. Zero-field evolution is initiated both with and without the use of dc pulsed fields in the field cycle. Pulsed dc fields are also used to remove the effects of residual field inhomogeneities by zero-field spin echoes. The order parameters measured in an applied field and in the absence of a field are found to be the same within experimental error for both types of liquid crystal.

  17. Vortex dynamics and irreversibility line in optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 from ac susceptibility and magnetization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, G.; Carretta, P.; de Renzi, R.; Sanna, S.; Palenzona, A.; Putti, M.; Tropeano, M.

    2011-05-01

    Ac susceptibility and static magnetization measurements were performed in the optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 superconductor. The field-temperature phase diagram of the superconducting state was drawn, and, in particular, the features of the flux lines were derived. The dependence of the intragrain depinning energy on the magnetic field intensity was derived in the thermally activated flux-creep framework, enlightening a typical 1/H dependence in the high-field regime. The intragrain critical current density was extrapolated in the zero-temperature and zero-magnetic-field limit, showing a remarkably high value Jc0(0)~2×107 A/cm2, which demonstrates that this material is rather interesting for potential future technological applications.

  18. Studies on Range of Artifacts from CoCr Alloy in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.%钴铬合金磁共振成像伪影范围的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄海蓉; 李蓉; 郦妙尔; 石卓瑾

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the range of artifacts generated by CoCr alloy. Methods: Groupl: 5mm×5mm ×1mm alloies were embedded in 50mm×50mm×50mm agar. They were compared artifacts from CoCr with other five dental materials in MRI T1 sequences. Group2: CoCr restorations were embedded in 150mm× 150mm×150mm agar. The range of artifacts was observed. Results: The artifacts from CoCr had shown significant distoration compared with other five dental materials. Group2: the numbers of slices that the atifacts influence in maxillary and mandible in transverse, coronal and sagittal planes were 15,19,19,15,18,18. In transverse image, the height of artifact was 8-11 times of the crown, and 4 - 5 times width of crown. Conclusion: CoCr had a significant influence on artifacts in MRI, which involved many slices.%目的:研究钴铬修复体磁共振成像伪影范围.方法:组一制作5 mm×5 mm×1 mm钴铬合金,放置于T1序列中,比较钴铬与其他5种修复材料磁共振成像伪影大小.组二用钴铬合金制作中切牙、尖牙、第二前磨牙金属底冠、第一二磨牙金属冠,放置于T1序列中,观察磁共振伪影范围.结果:组一中钴铬合金成像伪影最大.组二中钴铬合金冠在上,下颌矢状面上,冠状面,横断面上伪影涉及层数分别为15、19、19、15、18、18.在横断面上显示的单颗牙成像,伪影平均高度是牙冠平均高度的8~10倍,宽度为4~5倍.结论:钴铬合金对磁共振影响最大,其修复体涉及扫描层数多.

  19. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method.

  20. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping-Based Microscopy of Magnetic Resonance Venography (QSM-mMRV for In Vivo Morphologically and Functionally Assessing Cerebromicrovasculature in Rat Stroke Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chi Hsieh

    Full Text Available Abnormal cerebral oxygenation and vessel structure is a crucial feature of stroke. An imaging method with structural and functional information is necessary for diagnosis of stroke. This study applies QSM-mMRV (quantitative susceptibility mapping-based microscopic magnetic resonance venography for noninvasively detecting small cerebral venous vessels in rat stroke model. First, susceptibility mapping is optimized and calculated from magnetic resonance (MR phase images of a rat brain. Subsequently, QSM-mMRV is used to simultaneously provide information on microvascular architecture and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2, both of which can be used to evaluate the physiological and functional characteristics of microvascular changes for longitudinally monitoring and therapeutically evaluating a disease model. Morphologically, the quantification of vessel sizes using QSM-mMRV was 30% smaller than that of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI, which eliminated the overestimation of conventional SWI. Functionally, QSM-mMRV estimated an average SvO2 ranging from 73% to 85% for healthy rats. Finally, we also applied QSM to monitor the revascularization of post-stroke vessels from 3 to 10 days after reperfusion. QSM estimations of SvO2 were comparable to those calculated using the pulse oximeter standard metric. We conclude that QSM-mMRV is useful for longitudinally monitoring blood oxygen and might become clinically useful for assessing cerebrovascular diseases.

  1. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping-Based Microscopy of Magnetic Resonance Venography (QSM-mMRV) for In Vivo Morphologically and Functionally Assessing Cerebromicrovasculature in Rat Stroke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Chi; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Liao, Min-Chiao; Yang, Jenq-Lin; Su, Chia-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal cerebral oxygenation and vessel structure is a crucial feature of stroke. An imaging method with structural and functional information is necessary for diagnosis of stroke. This study applies QSM-mMRV (quantitative susceptibility mapping-based microscopic magnetic resonance venography) for noninvasively detecting small cerebral venous vessels in rat stroke model. First, susceptibility mapping is optimized and calculated from magnetic resonance (MR) phase images of a rat brain. Subsequently, QSM-mMRV is used to simultaneously provide information on microvascular architecture and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), both of which can be used to evaluate the physiological and functional characteristics of microvascular changes for longitudinally monitoring and therapeutically evaluating a disease model. Morphologically, the quantification of vessel sizes using QSM-mMRV was 30% smaller than that of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), which eliminated the overestimation of conventional SWI. Functionally, QSM-mMRV estimated an average SvO2 ranging from 73% to 85% for healthy rats. Finally, we also applied QSM to monitor the revascularization of post-stroke vessels from 3 to 10 days after reperfusion. QSM estimations of SvO2 were comparable to those calculated using the pulse oximeter standard metric. We conclude that QSM-mMRV is useful for longitudinally monitoring blood oxygen and might become clinically useful for assessing cerebrovascular diseases.

  2. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies of Campanian–Maastrichtian sediments of Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, Tamil Nadu, India: An appraisal to Paleocurrent directions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Papanna; M Venkateshwarlu; V Periasamy; R Nagendra

    2014-03-01

    Oriented samples of sediments from Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, south India, were studied for low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to unravel the magnetic fabrics and paleocurrent directions. The results of AMS parameters of the sediments indicate primary depositional fabrics for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu sandstone formations and secondary fabric for Kallankurichchi limestone formation. The obtained low degree of anisotropy (), oblate shape AMS ellipsoid and distribution of maximum (1) and minimum (3) susceptibility axes on equal area projection confirm the primary sedimentary fabric for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations. In the case of ferruginous, lower arenaceous, Gryphaea limestone and upper arenaceous limestone beds of Kallankurichchi Formation have recorded more than one fabric. The observed AMS parameters like shape factor () (prolate to oblate), value and random distribution of minimum (3) and maximum (1) susceptibility axes are supported for secondary fabrics in Kallankurichchi Formation as a result of post-depositional processes. Based on petrographic studies, it can be established that 1 AMS axis of biotite mineral could represent the flow direction. The established paleocurrent direction for Sillakkudi is NW–SE direction while Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations recorded NE–SW direction. Overall the paleoflow directions observed for Ariyalur Group is NE–SW to NW–SE.

  3. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies of Campanian-Maastrichtian sediments of Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, Tamil Nadu, India: An appraisal to Paleocurrent directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanna, G.; Venkateshwarlu, M.; Periasamy, V.; Nagendra, R.

    2014-03-01

    Oriented samples of sediments from Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, south India, were studied for low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to unravel the magnetic fabrics and paleocurrent directions. The results of AMS parameters of the sediments indicate primary depositional fabrics for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu sandstone formations and secondary fabric for Kallankurichchi limestone formation. The obtained low degree of anisotropy ( P j ), oblate shape AMS ellipsoid and distribution of maximum ( K 1) and minimum ( K 3) susceptibility axes on equal area projection confirm the primary sedimentary fabric for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations. In the case of ferruginous, lower arenaceous, Gryphaea limestone and upper arenaceous limestone beds of Kallankurichchi Formation have recorded more than one fabric. The observed AMS parameters like shape factor ( T) (prolate to oblate), q value and random distribution of minimum ( K 3) and maximum ( K 1) susceptibility axes are supported for secondary fabrics in Kallankurichchi Formation as a result of post-depositional processes. Based on petrographic studies, it can be established that K 1 AMS axis of biotite mineral could represent the flow direction. The established paleocurrent direction for Sillakkudi is NW-SE direction while Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations recorded NE-SW direction. Overall the paleoflow directions observed for Ariyalur Group is NE-SW to NW-SE.

  4. High Magnetic Susceptibility in a Highly Saline Sulfate-Rich Aquifer Undergoing Biodegradation of Hydrocarbon Results from Sulfate Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atekwana, E. A.; Enright, A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Bernier, R.; Beaver, C. L.; Rossbach, S.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the chemical and stable carbon isotope composition of groundwater in a highly saline aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbon. Our aim to evaluate hydrocarbon degradation and to constrain the geochemical conditions that generated high anomalous magnetic susceptibility (MS) signatures observed at the water table interface. The occurrence of high MS in the water table fluctuating zone has been attributed to microbial iron reduction, suggesting the use of MS as a proxy for iron cycling. The highly saline aquifer had total dissolved solids concentrations of 3.7 to 29.3 g/L and sulfate concentrations of 787 to 37,100 mg/L. We compared our results for groundwater locations with high hydrocarbon contamination (total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) >10 mg/L), at lightly contaminated (TPH contaminations. Our results for the terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3-), dissolved iron (Fe2+) , dissolved manganese (Mn2+), sulfate (SO42-) and methane (CH4) suggest a chemically heterogeneous aquifer, probably controlled by heterogeneous distribution of TEAs and contamination (type of hydrocarbon, phase and age of contamination). The concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) ranged from 67 to 648 mg C/L and the stable carbon isotope (δ13CDIC) ranged from -30.0‰ to 1.0 ‰ and DIC-δ13CDIC modeling indicates that the carbon in the DIC is derived primarily from hydrocarbon degradation. The concentrations of Fe2+ in the aquifer ranged from 0.1 to 55.8 mg/L, but was mostly low, averaging 2.7+10.9 mg/L. Given the low Fe2+ [AE1] in the aqueous phase and the high MS at contaminated locations, we suggest that the high MS observed does not arise from iron reduction but rather from sulfate reduction. Sulfate reduction produces H2S which reacts with Fe2+ to produce ferrous sulfide (Fe2+S) or the mixed valence greigite (Fe2+Fe3+2S4). We conclude that in highly saline aquifers with high concentrations of sulfate and contaminated with

  5. Alias subtraction more efficient than conventional zero-padding in the Fourier-based calculation of the susceptibility induced perturbation of the magnetic field in MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Job G; Bakker, Chris J G

    2012-08-01

    Forward calculation of the susceptibility induced field shift by Fourier-based procedures requires spatial zero-padding to prevent aliasing artifacts (periodic wrap-around). Padding with a factor of two gives accurate results, however, halves the maximal attainable resolution, and slows down the calculation, which may hamper the feasibility of real-time calculations. Herein is proposed to first perform the calculation at the original resolution--allowing aliasing-and to remove aliasing with an additional convolution in a lower resolution, to alleviate these restrictions regarding memory size and calculation speed, a procedure we termed "virtual" zero-padding. Virtual zero-padding was numerically and experimentally tested and validated with conventional zero-padding and the analytical solution (in the case of spheres) on several phantoms. A demonstration of the increased efficiency is given by implementing virtual zero-padding in a dynamic calculation procedure. The improved efficiency is expected to be relevant regarding the ongoing increase in spatial and temporal resolution in ultra-high-field MRI. Procedures are presented for circular convolution using the discrete Green's function and k-space filtering using the continuous Green's function.

  6. Artifacts in three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faletra, Francesco Fulvio; Ramamurthi, Alamelu; Dequarti, Maria Cristina; Leo, Laura Anna; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pandian, Natesa

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is subject to the same types of artifacts encountered on two-dimensional TEE. However, when displayed in a 3D format, some of the artifacts appear more "realistic," whereas others are unique to image acquisition and postprocessing. Three-dimensional TEE is increasingly used in the setting of percutaneous catheter-based interventions and ablation procedures, and 3D artifacts caused by the metallic components of catheters and devices are particularly frequent. Knowledge of these artifacts is of paramount relevance to avoid misinterpretation of 3D images. Although artifacts and pitfalls on two-dimensional echocardiography are well described and classified, a systematic description of artifacts in 3D transesophageal echocardiographic images and how they affect 3D imaging is still absent. The aim of this review is to describe the most relevant artifacts on 3D TEE, with particular emphasis on those occurring during percutaneous interventions for structural heart disease and ablation procedures.

  7. Imaging technique for magnetic susceptibility and resistivity by electromagnetic tomography. 1. Numerical experiments; EM tomography ni yoru taijiritsu to hiteiko no imaging gijutsu. 1. Suchi jikken ni yoru kisoteki kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakashita, S.; Fukuoka, K. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    This paper proposes imaging techniques which utilize electromagnetic waves in a wide frequency band for magnetic susceptibility and resistivity, and describes the basic investigation results by numerical experiments. The electromagnetic tomography generates electromagnetic waves by passing current through a receiving coil, to measure their magnetic components by an induction coil. The magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic waves can be handled as a pseudo-static one, when the current is passed at a sufficiently low frequency, and the field response measured by an induction coil contains information mainly regarding magnetic susceptibility. The field generates induction as transmitting frequency is increased, and the measured magnetic response contains mainly regarding resistivity. They can be measured for imaging susceptibility, when distance between the holes is 50 to 100m or less and transmitting frequency is 100 to 10Hz or less. The use of the expanded Born approximation allows to establish a high-speed model for imaging resistivity. 23 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Anisotropies of field-dependent in-phase and out-of-phase magnetic susceptibilities of some pyrrhotite-bearing rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrouda, Frantisek; Chadima, Martin; Jezek, Josef

    2017-04-01

    Pyrrhotite shows strong and non-linear variations of both the in-phase and out-of-phase magnetic susceptibilities with magnetizing field unlike to magnetite and paramagnetic minerals whose susceptibility is field independent if measured in low fields. Consequently, the magnetic sub-fabric of pyrrhotite unaffected by magnetite/paramagnetics can be directly investigated either through the anisotropy of field-dependent in-phase susceptibility (hdAMS) or through the anisotropy of out-of-phase susceptibility (opAMS). If the driving fields used for the susceptibility measurement are really low, within the range of validity of the Rayleigh Law, both the field-dependent component of the hdAMS and the opAMS are represented by the field-independent second rank Rayleigh Tensor. The determination of the Rayleigh Tensor via hdAMS requires the AMS measurements in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range, while in the determination of the Rayleigh Tensor via opAMS the measurement in one field is sufficient. It should be noted that if the AMS is measured by the KLY5 Kappabridge, the opAMS is measured simultaneously with standard in-phase AMS (ipAMS) during one measuring process. The Rayleigh Tensors determined by the above two methods should be more or less identical provided that the opAMS of pyrrhotite is dominantly due to weak field hysteresis, virtually unaffected by electrical eddy currents or viscous relaxation. In a collection of various pyrrhotite-bearing rocks, both the hdAMS and opAMS were investigated using the KLY5 Kappabridge and the correlations between the Rayleigh Tensors determined by the above two methods were made in terms of the anisotropy degree, shape parameter, and the orientations of principal directions. Reasonable correlations were found indicating that the pyrrhotite opAMS is dominantly due to weak field hysteresis. As the opAMS is measured automatically and simultaneously with standard ipAMS, the advantage of the opAMS in the determination of the

  9. Ferromagnetic resonance, transverse bias initial inverse susceptibility and torque studies of magnetic properties of Co2MnSi thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devolder T.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic properties of Co2MnSi thin films of 20 nm and 50 nm in thickness grown by radio frequency sputtering on a-plane sapphire substrates have been studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed that the cubic Co2MnSi axis is normal to the substrate and that well defined preferential in-plane orientations are present. The static magnetic properties were studied at room temperature by conventional magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE, transverse bias initial inverse susceptibility and torque (TBIIST MOKE. The dynamic magnetic properties were investigated by micro-strip ferromagnetic resonance (MS-FMR at room temperature. The resonance and TBIIST measurements versus the direction of the in-plane applied magnetic field reveal that the in-plane anisotropy results from the superposition of a two-fold and a four-fold symmetry. The directions of the principal axes of the twofold anisotropy are sample dependent. The angular dependence of remanent normalized magnetizations and coercive fields, studied by MOKE are analyzed within the frame of a coherent rotation model. A good agreement is observed between the field anisotropy values obtained from MSFMR and from TBIIST data. Frequency and angular dependence of FMR linewidth has been studied. Apparent damping coefficient of 0.0112 has been measured for 50 nm thick sample.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility as a direct measure of oxidation state in LiFePO4 batteries and cyclic water gas shift reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyk, Thomas; Eikerling, Michael

    2015-08-14

    The possibility of correlating the magnetic susceptibility to the oxidation state of the porous active mass in a chemical or electrochemical reactor was analyzed. The magnetic permeability was calculated using a hierarchical model of the reactor. This model was applied to two practical examples: LiFePO4 batteries, in which the oxidation state corresponds with the state-of-charge, and cyclic water gas shift reactors, in which the oxidation state corresponds to the depletion of the catalyst. In LiFePO4 batteries phase separation of the lithiated and delithiated phases in the LiFePO4 particles in the positive electrode gives rise to a hysteresis effect, i.e. the magnetic permeability depends on the history of the electrode. During fast charge or discharge, non-uniform lithium distributionin the electrode decreases the hysteresis effect. However, the overall sensitivity of the magnetic response to the state-of-charge lies in the range of 0.03%, which makes practical measurement challenging. In cyclic water gas shift reactors, the sensitivity is 4 orders of magnitude higher and without phase separation, no hysteresis occurs. This shows that the method is suitable for such reactors, in which large changes of the magnetic permeability of the active material occurs.

  11. Indications of Coupled Carbon and Iron Cycling at a Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Site from Time-Lapse Magnetic Susceptibility (MS) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A.; Slater, L. D.; Atekwana, E. A.; Rossbach, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Bekins, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired at hydrocarbon contaminated sites have documented enhanced MS within the smear zone (zone of water table fluctuation at hydrocarbon contaminated location) coincident with the free phase (mobile or free liquids moving down through the unsaturated zone independent of the direction of flow of the groundwater or surface water) hydrocarbon plume These studies suggest that magnetic susceptibility can be used as a tool to: (1) infer regions of hydrocarbon contamination, and (2) investigate intrinsic bioremediation by iron reducing bacteria. We performed a campaign of time-lapse MS monitoring at the National Crude Oil Spill Fate and Natural Attenuation Research Site (Bemidji, MN) between July 2011 and August 2015. This highly instrumented site has multiple boreholes installed through the free phase, dissolved phase and uncontaminated portions of the aquifer impacted by an oil spill resulting from a pipeline rupture in 1979. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) data acquired in 2011 showed that MS values in the smear zone are higher than in the dissolved phase plume and background, leading to the hypothesis that MS measurements could be used to monitor the long-term progress of biodegradation at the site. However, repeated MS data acquired in 2014 and 2015 showed strong changes in the character of the MS signal in the smear zone with multiple free phase contamination locations showing a strong suppression of the signal relative to that observed in 2011. Other locations in the dissolved phase of the plume show evidence for vertical migration of the zone of enhanced MS, possibly due to changes in the redox profiles driven by hydrology. Such changes in the MS signal are hypothesized to result from either variations in Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios in the magnetite or changes in the magnetite concentration associated with coupled carbon and iron biogeochemistry. This work is generating a unique time-lapse geophysical dataset providing information on

  12. New insights into the paleoclimatic interpretation of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization of Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Li, Bingshuai

    2016-11-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility (χ-T curves) and magnetization (M-T curves) has been used as a routine rock magnetic tool to characterize the magnetic mineralogy and magnetic granulometry of Chinese loess/palaeosols. However, paleoclimatic interpretation of these thermomagnetic analyses remains controversial. In the present study, total organic carbon (TOC), thermomagnetic and low-temperature magnetic experiments on Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) have been conducted. We found that the M (T) cooling curves at room temperature were mostly lower than the corresponding heating curves, whereas for the χ (T) analyses the cooling curves at room temperature were always much higher than the heating curves. Low-temperature magnetic measurements demonstrated that a large amount of superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles were produced during the thermal treatment and resulted in the aforementioned differences. This finding further indicated that the use of the M - T curves to estimate the relative content of maghemite in the loess/paleosols from the CLP was problematic. In addition, a positive correlation exists between the TOC and the frequency-dependent susceptibility (χFD) in the CLP, suggesting that stronger pedogenesis would result in the simultaneous increase in the content of both maghemite and organic matter. Consequently, the parameters △χ1 (representing the relative content of pedogenic maghemite), △χ2 ([χph-χ] +△χ1) and χph (related to the organic matter concentration), which can be calculated from the χ - T analyses, can potentially be used as new indicators of pedogenesis and paleoclimate in Central Asia and the CLP.

  13. New insights into the palaeoclimatic interpretation of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and magnetization of Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Jinbo; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Li, Bingshuai

    2017-02-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility (χ-T curves) and magnetization (M-T curves) has been used as a routine rock magnetic tool to characterize the magnetic mineralogy and magnetic granulometry of Chinese loess/palaeosols. However, palaeoclimatic interpretation of these thermomagnetic analyses remains controversial. In the present study, total organic carbon (TOC), thermomagnetic and low-temperature magnetic experiments on Mid-Late Pleistocene loess/palaeosols in Central Asia and the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) have been conducted. We found that the M (T) cooling curves at room temperature were mostly lower than the corresponding heating curves, whereas for the χ (T) analyses the cooling curves at room temperature were always much higher than the heating curves. Low-temperature magnetic measurements demonstrated that a large amount of superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles were produced during the thermal treatment and resulted in the aforementioned differences. This finding further indicated that the use of the M-T curves to estimate the relative content of maghemite in the loess/palaeosols from the CLP was problematic. In addition, a positive correlation exists between the TOC and the frequency-dependent susceptibility (χFD) in the CLP, suggesting that stronger pedogenesis would result in the simultaneous increase in the content of both maghemite and organic matter. Consequently, the parameters ▵χ1 (representing the relative content of pedogenic maghemite), ▵χ2 ([χph - χ] +▵χ1) and χph (related to the organic matter concentration), which can be calculated from the χ-T analyses, can potentially be used as new indicators of pedogenesis and palaeoclimate in Central Asia and the CLP.

  14. Prevalência de artefatos em exames de ressonância magnética do abdome utilizando a seqüência GRASE: comparável com as melhores seqüências rápidas? Prevalence of artifacts in abdominal magnetic resonance imaging using GRASE sequence: a comparison with TSE sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Vieira Francisco

    2005-09-01

    ência semelhante e geralmente sem interferência na avaliação das imagens.OBJECTIVE: To determine the overall frequency of artifacts per type and grade using the GRASE sequence in abdominal magnetic resonance; to compare GRASE sequences with two previously selected TSE sequences as well as sequences with best signal-noise ratio and lower incidence of artifacts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective self-paired study was carried out in 86 patients submitted to upper abdominal magnetic resonance using a GRASE sequence obtained upon respiratory triggered and fat suppression and six TSE T2-weighted sequences. Among the six TSE sequences, those bearing the best signal-noise ratio and lower number of artifacts were previously selected, which consisted of those performed with fat suppression and respiratory triggering: one using a conventional body coil (sequence 1 and a second sequence using a synergy coil (sequence 2. Image analysis was carried out by two observers upon consensus regarding the presence, grade and type of artifact thereon. Subsequently, data were statistically analyzed using the Friedman test and chi-square. RESULTS: The absolute frequency of artifacts in all sequences was 65.02%. Most common artifacts in the three sequences analyzed were breathing (30% and pulsation (33% artifacts. Only in 3% of the cases artifacts interfered with the analysis of the images. The frequency of artifacts in the different sequences was: GRASE, 67.2%; TSE sequence 1, 62.2%; TSE sequence 2, 65.5%. There was no significant statistical difference between artifact frequency seen with GRASE and TSE sequences (p = 0.845; NS. CONCLUSION: GRASE and TSE T2-weighted, respiratory triggered, fat suppressed sequences often produce artifacts, notwithstanding the coil, although, with similar frequency and generally without interfering with the evaluation of the images.

  15. Doping evolution of the magnetic susceptibility and transport properties of Fe{sub 1+{delta}T}e{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Kremer, R K; Lin, C T [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    A study of the doping evolution of the magnetic susceptibility and transport properties was performed on Fe{sub 1+{delta}T}e{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} (x = 0, 0.22, 0.32, 0.37 and 0.40) single crystals grown by the self-flux method. For x = 0, 0.22 and 0.32 the paramagnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) in the high-temperature regime can be well fitted with a modified Curie-Weiss law. The Curie-Weiss temperature {theta}{sub p} systematically decreases with increasing Se content, indicating the breakdown of the predominant antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions originating from FeTe (x = 0). Bulk superconductivity is established for x = 0.37 and 0.40, while {chi}(T) monotonically increases with increasing temperature in the high-temperature regime, as widely observed in iron arsenides. The resistivity {rho}{sub ab} simultaneously changes from a semiconducting behavior for x = 0, 0.22, and 0.32 to metallic transport below 200 K for x = 0.37 and 0.40. A sudden drop of the Hall coefficient R{sub H} from positive to negative values signifies the AFM transition of the sample for x = 0 at T{sub N} = 68 K, as evidenced by the magnetic susceptibility measurements. For x = 0.22 and 0.32, R{sub H} is positive and monotonically increases with decreasing temperature. A dramatic change in R{sub H} is observed for x = 0.37 and 0.40, where the positive R{sub H} starts to decrease below T{sub N} = 68 K. A change of sign further occurs at 40 K for x = 0.40. The anomalous doping-dependent behavior for both magnetic susceptibility {chi}(T) and Hall coefficient R{sub H} can be interpreted with the scenario that the Fe{sub 1+{delta}T}e{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} system undergoes a critical transition from the ({pi}, 0) magnetic order of FeTe to the dominant ({pi}, {pi}) spin fluctuations of FeSe with the establishment of bulk superconductivity.

  16. Investigation of the ac magnetic field dependence of the first and the third harmonics of the ac susceptibility in a granular Bi-2223 sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozogul, O. [Ankara University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Tandogan, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    The field and temperature dependencies of the first and third harmonics of the ac magnetic susceptibilities of a granular Bi-2223 superconductor have been investigated. Model calculations have been performed on the basis of a theoretical model that incorporates collective creep concepts in a critical-state equation by considering the temperature-dependent effective volume fraction. The predictions of the model for the field and temperature dependencies of the first and third harmonics were found to be in good agreement with experimental data. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in Yellowstone National Park, USA; Beikoku Yellowstone kokuritsu koen ni okeru genchi jikaritsu sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuma, S. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    For the purpose of interpreting data of the aeromagnetic anomalies in Yellowstone National Park in the U.S.A., in-situ magnetization intensity measurements have been carried out in 1994 and 1995 on geological outcrops of rocks in that area. Comparisons and discussions were given on the measurement results, and existing rock magnetic data and aeromagnetic anomaly data available for the area. Outside the Yellowstone caldera, part of granitic gneisses among the Precambrian granitic gneisses and crystalline schists distributed to the north has an abnormally high magnetization intensity of 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI. This could be a powerful anomaly source for the high magnetic anomaly in this area. Paleogene volcanic rocks distributed widely in the eastern part of the park also have magnetization intensity as high as 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI or higher, which are also thought a powerful anomaly source in this area. Part of Pleistocene basalts which are exposed partially in the western part of the park has also very high magnetization intensity at 1 {times} 10 {sup -2} SI or higher. This suggests correlation with the magnetic anomaly in the east-west direction distributed in this area. Quaternary rhyolites are more magnetic than Quaternary welded tuffs, which should give greater effects to the magnetic anomaly. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer studies of [FeX3](ClO4)2.H2O with X = bpz, bpy, phen or tpy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J. C.; Hamdeh, H. H.; Kirgan, R.; Rillema, D. P.

    2008-03-01

    Magnetic studies have been made on several tris-chelated iron complex compounds [FeX3](ClO4)2.H2O with aromatic nitrogen heterocycle ligands X = bpz (2,2'-bipyrazine), bpy (2,2'-bipyridine), phen (1,10-phenanthroline) or tpy (2,2':6,2''-terpyridine). SQUID data (2-300 K and 0.01-1 T) yielded small effective magnetic moments, which are characteristic of low-spin Fe(II), in agreement with the isomer shift and quadrupole splitting values from Mössbauer measurements (4-300 K, 0-5 T). Meanwhile, apart from the expected diamagnetism, a positive term of temperature-independent paramagnetic susceptibility prevails in most cases.

  19. Cleaning MEG artifacts using external cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, I; Abeles, M

    2013-07-15

    Using EEG, ECoG, MEG, and microelectrodes to record brain activity is prone to multiple artifacts. The main power line (mains line), video equipment, mechanical vibrations and activities outside the brain are the most common sources of artifacts. MEG amplitudes are low, and even small artifacts distort recordings. In this study, we show how these artifacts can be efficiently removed by recording external cues during MEG recordings. These external cues are subsequently used to register the precise times or spectra of the artifacts. The results indicate that these procedures preserve both the spectra and the time domain wave-shapes of the neuromagnetic signal, while successfully reducing the contribution of the artifacts to the target signals without reducing the rank of the data.

  20. Paleoclimatic implications of magnetic susceptibility in Late Pliocene-Quaternary sediments from deep drilling core SG-1 in the western Qaidam Basin (NE Tibetan Plateau)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilin; Appel, Erwin; Fang, Xiaomin; Yan, Maodu; Song, Chunhui; Cao, Liwan

    2012-06-01

    Lake sediments are important archives of paleoclimate change and erosion history. A 938.5 m long core (SG-1) of lacustrine sediments, dated at 2.77 Ma to 0.1 Ma, was obtained from the western Qaidam Basin in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, consisting of dark grayish mudstone and grayish siltstone, intercalated with salts and fine sandstones in the upper part. Magnetic susceptibility data, combined with detailed rock magnetic properties, were analyzed for revealing the significance of ferro(i)magnetic concentration for past changes of climate and erosion. Mass-specific susceptibility (χ) shows a striking cyclic and long-term variation. Samples with high χ values are dominated by magnetite and maghemite with pseudo-single-domain properties. In contrast, samples with low χ values contain maghemite from single-domain to multidomain and, additionally, a significant fraction of hematite. The driving mechanism of χ variation can be explained by three alternative models: (1) different source regions with alternations of wind and cryoclastic erosion in a wider hinterland (dry-cold climate) and surface runoff erosion from a narrower area (more humid climate) and (2 and 3) low-temperature oxidation, occurring either in the lake sediments (dry climate) or in the catchment area during weathering (more humid climate). Trends of χ match with changes in sedimention rates and are roughly synchronous with the deep-sea δ18O record on a glacial-interglacial timescale. Therefore, the concentration of magnetic minerals in the western Qaidam Basin sediments is likely controlled by both tectonic influence and paleoenvironmental changes but can be best interpreted by alternations and trends of dry-cold and more humid periods due to Asian drying and global cooling.

  1. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  2. Estimates of flow direction for calc-alkaline welded tuffs and paleomagnetic data reliability from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements: Central San Juan Mountains, southwest Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Brooks B.

    1982-07-01

    Flow directions are estimated from the measurement of the magnetic fabric of 106 samples, collected at 18 sites in four welded tuff units in the central San Juan Mountains of southern Colorado. The estimates assume that the tuffs generally flowed directly away from the extrusive vents and that the lineations of magnetic grains within the tuffs represent the flow direction at individual sites. Errors in the estimation may arise from topographic variation, rheomorphism (post-emplacement mass flow) within the tuff, and other factors. Magnetic lineation is defined as the site mean anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility maximum azimuth. A test on the flow directions for individual units is based on the projection of lineation azimuths and their intersection within or near the known source caldera for the tuff. This test is positive for the four units examined. Paleomagnetic results for these tuffs are probably reliable indicators of the geomagnetic field direction in southwest Colorado, during the time (28.2-26.5 Ma) of emplacement.

  3. In situ XRD, XAS, and magnetic susceptibility study of the reduction of ammonium nickel phosphate NiNH4PO4 x H2O into nickel phosphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhault, Gilles; Afanasiev, Pavel; Loboué, Hermione; Geantet, Christophe; Cseri, Tivadar; Pichon, Christophe; Guillot-Deudon, Catherine; Lafond, Alain

    2009-04-06

    The reduction of the ammonium nickel phosphate NiNH(4)PO(4) x H(2)O precursor into nickel phosphide (Ni(2)P), a highly active phase in hydrotreating catalysis, was studied using a combination of magnetic susceptibility and in situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. The transformation of NiNH(4)PO(4) x H(2)O into Ni(2)P could be divided into three distinguishable zones: (1) from room temperature to 250 degrees C, the NiNH(4)PO(4) x H(2)O structure was essentially retained; (2) from 300 to 500 degrees C, only an amorphous phase was observed; (3) above 500 degrees C, a crystallization process occurred with the formation of Ni(2)P. An in situ XAS study and magnetic susceptibility measurements clearly revealed for the first time that the amorphous region corresponds to the nickel pyrophosphate phase alpha-Ni(2)P(2)O(7). The phosphate reduction into phosphide did not start before 550 degrees C and led to the selective formation of Ni(2)P at 650 degrees C.

  4. Two Novel μ-Oxo Diiron(Ⅲ) Schiff Base Complexes: X-ray Diffraction Analyses, IR, UV-Vis, CD spectra, Magnetic Susceptibility and Electrochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮文娟; 胡国航; 王树军; 田建华; 王庆伦; 朱志昂

    2005-01-01

    The novel μ-oxo diiron(Ⅲ) Schiff base complexes, {[Fe(tbusalphn)]2(μ-O)} (1) [tbusalphn=N,N'-o-pheny-lenebis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylideneiminato)] and { [Fe(R,R-salchxn)]2(μ-O)} (2) [R,R-salchxn=N,N'-R,R-cyclo-hexanebis(salicylideneiminato)] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, spectroscopy,magnetic susceptibility, electrochemical measurements and X-ray diffraction techniques. X-my analyses revealed that the complex 1-CH3OH has nearly linear Fe-O-Fe angle of 176.5(2)° due to their steric crowding of ligands owing bulky substitute group, while fairly bent Fe-O-Fe angle was allowed by the reduced steric crowding of the ligands in 2-CaH6N2-0.5C2H5OH [149.6(1)°]. FT-IR, UV-Vis, CD spectra, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammogram (CV) of complexes 1 and 2 have been further investigated.

  5. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in welded tuffs: application to a welded-tuff dyke in the tertiary Trans-Pecos Texas volcanic province, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, John A.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Sachs, Scott D.

    1989-06-01

    Consideration of published anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies on welded ignimbrites suggests that AMS fabrics are controlled by groundmass microlites distributed within the existing tuff fabric, the sum result of directional fabrics imposed by primary flow lineation, welding, and (if relevant) rheomorphism. AMS is a more sensitive indicator of fabric elements within welded tuffs than conventional methods, and usually yields primary flow azimuth estimates. Detailed study of a single densely welded tuff sample demonstrates that the overall AMS fabric is insensitive to the relative abundances of fiamme, matrix and lithics within individual drilled cores. AMS determinations on a welded-tuff dyke occurring in a choked vent in the Trans-Pecos Texas volcanic field reveals a consistent fabric with a prolate element imbricated with respect to one wall of the dyke, while total magnetic susceptibility and density exhibit axially symmetric variations across the dyke width. The dyke is interpreted to have formed as a result of agglutination of the erupting mixture on a portion of the conduit wall as it failed and slid into the conduit, followed by residual squeezing between the failed block and in situ wallrock. Irrespective of the precise mechanism, widespread occurrence of both welded-tuff dykes and point-welded, aggregate pumices in pyroclastic deposits may imply that lining of conduit walls by agglutionation during explosive volcanic eruptions is a common process.

  6. 许昌市路尘磁化率空间分布特征及其污染指示意义%Spatial Distribution of Road Dust Magnetic Susceptibility of Xuchang and Its Pollutional Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫慧; 吴国玺; 李京忠; 李东

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnetic susceptibility characteristics of the urban road dust to reflect the city's pollution is an important part of the environmental magnetic studies. The results of road dust magnetic susceptibility of Xuchang city show that: Road dust magnetic susceptibility ranges from 98.33~600.92×10-8 m3·kg-1, and the average value is 319.72× 10-8 m3·kg-1, frequency magnetic susceptibility ranges from 0.20~5.94%, with an average of 1.92%. The high magnetic susceptibility values and the low frequency magnetic susceptibility suggest that road dust has less super paramagnetic particles content, and the high magnetic susceptibility is mainly caused by the magnetic particle deposition due to human activities. Spatial characters of road dust magnetic susceptibility display a decreasing trend from northwest to southeast, which mainly caused by the city's function zoning, population density, traffic flux and environmental quality. The road dust samples of Tiexi District and the Old District have the highest magnetic susceptibility values, reflecting the serious environmental pollution that caused by high population density, heavy traffic flux and industrial activities. In East District, High-tech Development District and Southeast District the road dust magnetic susceptibility values are lower, indicating the better environmental condition. Moreover, due to the heavy traffic in the commercial centers and the freeway entrances, road dust magnetic susceptibility values are higher than those in surrounding areas. The magnetic susceptibility characteristics of road dust can intuitively reflect the pollution of the city.%  利用Bartinton MS2型双频磁化率仪对许昌市的路尘磁化率进行了研究,结果表明:1)许昌市城区路尘磁化率在98.33×10-8~600.92×10-8 m3/kg,平均值为319.72×10-8 m3/kg,频率磁化率在0.20%~5.94%,平均为1.92%,这种高磁化率值和低频率磁化率组合表明路尘中超顺磁颗粒含量较少,磁化率的高

  7. Magnetic susceptibility and electron magnetic resonance study of monovalent potassium doped manganites Pr{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4−x}K{sub x}MnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaljaoui, R., E-mail: thaljaoui@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, B.P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Al. Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Pękała, K. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Pękała, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Al. Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Boujelben, W. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, B.P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Szydłowska, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Al. Żwirki i Wigury 101, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Fagnard, J.-F.; Vanderbemden, P. [SUPRATEC, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (B28), University of Liege (Belgium); Cheikhrouhou, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, B.P. 1171, 3000 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Orthorhombic monovalent doped manganites Pr0.6Sr0.4-xKxMnO3 (x = 0.05 to 0.2). •Unit cell volume decreases with K content. •Curie temperature decreases with K content. •Electron magnetic resonance determines low temperature limit of paramagnetic phase. -- Abstract: The monovalent potassium doped manganites Pr{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4−x}K{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0.05–0.2) are characterized using the complementary magnetic susceptibility and electron resonance methods. In paramagnetic phase the temperature variations of the inverse magnetic susceptibility and the inverse intensity of resonance signal obey the Curie–Weiss law. A similarity in temperature variation of resonance signal width and the adiabatic polaron conductivity points to the polaron mechanism controlling the resonance linewidth. The low temperature limit of the pure paramagnetic phase is determined from the electron resonance spectra revealing the mixed phase spread down to the Curie temperature.

  8. Carbon fiber intramedullary nails reduce artifact in postoperative advanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimel, Melissa N. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Riedel, Elyn R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Healey, John H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This study assessed whether radiolucent carbon fiber reinforced-polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) intramedullary nails decreased hardware artifact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in vitro and in an oncologic patient population. In vitro and clinical evaluations were done. A qualitative assessment of metal artifact was performed using CFR-PEEK and titanium nail MRI phantoms. Eight patients with a femoral or tibial prophylactic CFR-PEEK nail were retrospectively identified. All patients had postoperative surveillance imaging by MRI, CT, and were followed for a median 20 months (range, 12-28 months). CFR-PEEK images were compared to images from a comparative group of patients with titanium femoral intramedullary nails who had a postoperative MRI or CT. A musculoskeletal-trained radiologist graded visualization of the cortex, corticomedullary junction, and bone-muscle interface, on T1-weighted (T1W), STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-saturated (T1W FS) sequences of both groups with a five-point scale, performing independent reviews 4 months apart. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a weighted kappa. Substantially less MRI signal loss occurred in the CFR-PEEK phantom than in the titanium phantom simulation, particularly as the angle increased with respect to direction of the static magnetic field. CFR-PEEK nails had less MRI artifact than titanium nails on scored T1W, STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1W FS MRI sequences (p ≤ 0.03). The mean weighted kappa was 0.64, showing excellent intraobserver reliability between readings. CFR-PEEK intramedullary nail fixation is a superior alternative to minimize implant artifact on MRI or CT imaging for patients requiring long bone fixation. (orig.)

  9. Padé approximations for the magnetic susceptibilities of Heisenberg antiferromagnetic spin chains for various spin values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, J M; Benner, H; Kremer, R K

    2013-02-13

    The temperature dependence of the spin susceptibilities of S = 1, 3/2, 2, 5/2 and 7/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic 1D spins chains with nearest-neighbor coupling was simulated via quantum Monte Carlo calculations, within the reduced temperature range of 0.005 ≤ T* ≤ 100, and fitted to a Padé approximation with deviations between the simulated and fitted data of the same order of magnitude as or smaller than the quantum Monte Carlo simulation error. To demonstrate the practicality of our theoretical findings, we compare these results with the susceptibility of the well known 1D chain compound TMMC ([(CH(3))(4)N[MnCl(3)

  10. A more advantageous and reliable alternative method than widely used anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) for determination of vent locations of ignimbrites: High resolution x-ray tomography (micro-CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, O.; Atici, G.; Aydar, E.; Tatar, Ä.°.

    2012-04-01

    Most of knowledge of the flow dynamics and mechanisms of pyroclastic flows comes from examination of their deposits. Until recent date, orientations of flow components such as pumice and lithics were used in order to estimate the vent positions for ignimbrite deposits. Recently, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) is widely used for determination of flow directions and source positions of ignimbrites. Owing to the fact that individual grains of most minerals are magnetically anisotropic, magnetic anisotropy works as a petrofabric tool. Magnetically anisotropic minerals magnetize in certain directions which are governed by primarily by crystallography and/or grain shape. Elongate fragments carried in a pyroclastic density current (ignimbrite) may become aligned by the current motion and by interactions with other grains as well as with the substrate. By accepting that the orientation of long axis are parallel to the flow direction and by assuming that the multi domain magnetic minerals have maximum susceptibilities parallel to their long axis, the maximum susceptibility orientations determined by AMS were accepted as the flow directions. However, this condition is not always in this way, unfortunately. Maximum susceptibility orientations perpendicular to the flow axis were determined from AMS measurements from ignimbrite samples having dominantly single domain magnetic minerals. Because the maximum susceptibility orientations of single domain magnetic grains (diameter ≤ 1µm) are perpendicular to their long-axes. AMS results from samples having dominantly multi domain magnetic particles are already controversial. The occurence of paramagnetic minerals such as biotite in rocks complicates the interpretation of AMS results. The physical origin of the AMS fabric in ignimbrites remains still enigmatic. The emplacement temperatures, lithification and welding degrees, and alteration occurred during cooling after emplacements operate to change the magnetic

  11. Evaluating an artifact in design science research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available as the artifact which was evaluated. This example from practice can contribute towards an enhanced understanding of the evaluation of DSR artifacts and the contribution of program theory during both the ex ante and ex post part of the development....

  12. Reducing of gradient induced artifacts on the ECG signal during MRI examinations using Wilcoxon filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiogramm (ECG is the state-of-the-art signal for gating in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and patient monitoring. Using the ECG for gating and monitoring during the magnetic resonance imaging examination is a high challenging task due to the superimposition of the magnetohydrodynamic effect, radio-frequency (RF pulses and fast switching gradient magnetic fields. The gradient induced artifacts hamper the correct QRS detection which is needed for correct gating and heart rate calculation and ECG displaying for patient monitoring. To suppress the gradient artifacts from the ECG signal acquired during MRI, a technique based on the Wilcoxon filter was developed. It was evaluated using ECG signals of 14 different subjects acquired in a 3 T MRI scanner. It could be shown reliable results for reducing gradient induced artifacts in the ECG signal in real-time.

  13. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...

  14. MR imaging differentiation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} based on relaxation and magnetic susceptibility properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, Olaf [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Levin, Johannes [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Munich (Germany); Ahmadi, Seyed-Ahmad; Plate, Annika; Boetzel, Kai [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F.; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Giese, Armin [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Center for Neuropathology and Prion Research, Munich (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the MR imaging behavior of ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) and ferric (Fe{sup 3+}) iron ions in order to develop a noninvasive technique to quantitatively differentiate between both forms of iron. MRI was performed at 3 T in a phantom consisting of 21 samples with different concentrations of ferrous and ferric chloride solutions (between 0 and 10 mmol/L). A multi-echo spoiled gradient-echo pulse sequence with eight echoes was used for both T{sub 2}* and quantitative susceptibility measurements. The transverse relaxation rate, R{sub 2}* = 1/T{sub 2}*, was determined by nonlinear exponential fitting based on the mean signals in each sample. The susceptibilities, χ, of the samples were calculated after phase unwrapping and background field removal by fitting the spatial convolution of a unit dipole response to the measured internal field map. Relaxation rate changes, ΔR{sub 2}*(c{sub Fe}), and susceptibility changes, Δχ(c{sub Fe}), their linear slopes, as well as the ratios ΔR{sub 2}*(c{sub Fe}) / Δχ(c{sub Fe}) were determined for all concentrations. The linear slopes of the relaxation rate were (12.5 ± 0.4) s{sup -1}/(mmol/L) for Fe{sup 3+} and (0.77 ± 0.09) s{sup -1}/(mmol/L) for Fe{sup 2+} (significantly different, z test P < 0.0001). The linear slopes of the susceptibility were (0.088 ± 0.003) ppm/(mmol/L) for Fe{sup 3+} and (0.079 ± 0.006) ppm/(mmol/L) for Fe{sup 2+}. The individual ratios ΔR{sub 2}*/Δχ were greater than 40 s{sup -1}/ppm for all samples with ferric solution and lower than 20 s{sup -1}/ppm for all but one of the samples with ferrous solution. Ferrous and ferric iron ions show significantly different relaxation behaviors in MRI but similar susceptibility patterns. These properties can be used to differentiate ferrous and ferric samples. (orig.)

  15. The Many Faces of Computational Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Harper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Building on data from fieldwork at a medical department, this paper focuses on the varied nature of computational artifacts in practice. It shows that medical practice relies on multiple heterogeneous computational artifacts that form complex constellations. In the hospital studied...... the computational artifacts are both coordinative, image-generating, and intended for the control of nuclear-physical and chemical processes. Furthermore, the paper entails a critique of the notion of ‘computer support’, for not capturing the diverse constitutive powers of computer technology; its types if you will....... The paper is a step towards establishing a lexicon of computational artifacts in practice. It is a call for a wider effort to systematically conceptualise the multiple and specifiable ways in which computational artifacts may be part of work activities. This is for the benefit of design and our...

  16. A method for quantitative assessment of artifacts in EEG, and an empirical study of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Simon L; Looney, David; Mandic, Danilo P; Kidmose, Preben

    2014-01-01

    Wearable EEG systems for continuous brain monitoring is an emergent technology that involves significant technical challenges. Some of these are related to the fact that these systems operate in conditions that are far less controllable with respect to interference and artifacts than is the case for conventional systems. Quantitative assessment of artifacts provides a mean for optimization with respect to electrode technology, electrode location, electronic instrumentation and system design. To this end, we propose an artifact assessment method and evaluate it over an empirical study of 3 subjects and 5 different types of artifacts. The study showed consistent results across subjects and artifacts.

  17. Correlating cation ordering and voltage fade in a lithium-manganese-rich lithium-ion battery cathode oxide: a joint magnetic susceptibility and TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Debasish; Sefat, Athena S; Li, Jianlin; Meisner, Roberta A; Rondinone, Adam J; Payzant, E Andrew; Abraham, Daniel P; Wood, David L; Daniel, Claus

    2013-11-28

    Structure-electrochemical property correlation is presented for lithium-manganese-rich layered-layered nickel manganese cobalt oxide (LMR-NMC) having composition Li1.2Co0.1Mn0.55Ni0.15O2 (TODA HE5050) in order to examine the possible reasons for voltage fade during short-to-mid-term electrochemical cycling. The Li1.2Co0.1Mn0.55Ni0.15O2 based cathodes were cycled at two different upper cutoff voltages (UCV), 4.2 V and 4.8 V, for 1, 10, and 125 cycles; voltage fade was observed after 10 and 125 cycles only when the UCV was 4.8 V. Magnetic susceptibility and selected-area electron diffraction data showed the presence of cation ordering in the pristine material, which remained after 125 cycles when the UCV was 4.2 V. When cycled at 4.8 V, the magnetic susceptibility results showed the suppression of cation ordering after one cycle; the cation ordering diminished upon further cycling and was not observed after 125 cycles. Selected-area electron diffraction data from oxides oriented towards the [0001] zone axis revealed a decrease in the intensity of cation-ordering reflections after one cycle and an introduction of spinel-type reflections after 10 cycles at 4.8 V; after 125 cycles, only the spinel-type reflections and the fundamental O3 layered oxide reflections were observed. A significant decrease in the effective magnetic moment of the compound after one cycle at 4.8 V indicated the presence of lithium and/or oxygen vacancies; analysis showed a reduction of Mn(4+) (high spin/low spin) in the pristine oxide to Mn(3+) (low spin) after one cycle. The effective magnetic moment was higher after 10 and 125 cycles at 4.8 V, suggesting the presence of Mn(3+) in a high spin state, which is believed to originate from distorted spinel (Li2Mn2O4) and/or spinel (LiMn2O4) compounds. The increase in effective magnetic moments was not observed when the oxide was cycled at 4.2 V, indicating the stability of the structure under these conditions. This study shows that structural

  18. Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

    2010-03-01

    A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

  19. MR susceptibility imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyn, Jeff

    2013-04-01

    This work reviews recent developments in the use of magnetic susceptibility contrast for human MRI, with a focus on the study of brain anatomy. The increase in susceptibility contrast with modern high field scanners has led to novel applications and insights into the sources and mechanism contributing to this contrast in brain tissues. Dedicated experiments have demonstrated that in most of healthy brain, iron and myelin dominate tissue susceptibility variations, although their relative contribution varies substantially. Local variations in these compounds can affect both amplitude and frequency of the MRI signal. In white matter, the myelin sheath introduces an anisotropic susceptibility that has distinct effects on the water compartments inside the axons, between the myelin sheath, and the axonal space, and renders their signals dependent on the angle between the axon and the magnetic field. This offers opportunities to derive tissue properties specific to these cellular compartments.

  20. Geochemistry and Cyclostratigraphy of Magnetic Susceptibility data from the Frasnian-Famennian event interval in western Canada: Insights in the pattern and timing of a biotic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, M. T.; De Vleeschouwer, D.; Sliwinski, M. G.; Claeys, P. F.; Day, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Cyclostratigraphic calibration of magnetic susceptibility data along with stable isotopic and geochemical proxy data for redox, productivity, and detrital input from western Canada provide insight into the pace and timing of the Late Devonian, Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) biotic crisis. Two organic-rich shales that, in much of the world, display geochemical anomalies indicating low oxygen conditions and carbon burial characterize the F-F event. These events, referred to as the Lower and Upper Kellwasser events (LKE & UKE), have been linked to the evolutionary expansion of deeply rooted terrestrial forests and the concomitant changes in soil development and chemical weathering and changes in Late Devonian climate. Our geochemical data record relatively high levels of redox sensitive trace metals (Mo, U, V), proxies for biological productivity (Ba, Cu, Ni, Zn), and detrital input (Al, Si, Ti, Zr) during both events. C stable isotopic data generated from organic matter records a 3-4‰ positive excursion during both events. Each event is recorded in lowstand and/or early transgressive facies. These data corroborate hypotheses about enhanced biological productivity, driven by heightened terrestrial detrital input, leading to low oxygen conditions and decreases in biotic diversity during during relatively low stands of Late Devonian sea level. Age dating of such events in deep time is problematic due to insufficient biochronologic control. Each event is within one conodont biostratigraphic zone, with durations on the order of 0.5-1.0 Ma. Time series analysis of high-resolution magnetic susceptibility data identified 16 long eccentricity cycles (405 ky) during the Frasnian stage and one in the earliest Famennian stage. The geochemical anomalies associated with the LKE and UKE are recorded over 7 and 14 m of stratigraphic section respectively. These strata represent only a portion of a 405 ky long eccentricity cycle and astronomical tuning implies that the LKE likely occurred

  1. Low-temperature magnetic susceptibility and zero-field splitting in some high-spin manganese(III) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cofield, M.L.; Bryan, P.S.

    1986-02-03

    We have determined the value of the ground-state zero-field splitting parameter D for several high-spin d/sup 4/ Mn(III) compounds from average susceptibility measurements down to 5 K with a SQUID magnetometer. The zero-field splittings in these compounds are similar to some results reported for Mn(III) porphyrins and are insensitive to ligand structure and axial halide binding, in contrast to what has been reported for the analogous Fe(III) compounds. (orig./HBR).

  2. Influence of the angle between cleavage and bedding on the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and the degree of phyllosilicate preferred orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacker, T. N.; Sintubin, M.

    2003-04-01

    Due to the common scarcity of strain markers and the often fine-grained lithologies, performing strain analyses in slate belts may be difficult. As an alternative, one may use methods such as phyllosilicate preferred orientation (X-ray pole figure goniometry) and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). However, a large number of factors influence the results of these analytical methods. One of the factors is the angle between cleavage and bedding. The study area is the Brabant Massif, a single-phase deformed, low-grade slate belt in N-Belgium consisting of a steep Cambrian core surrounded by Ordovician-Silurian sequences. In the southern part of the Cambrian core, the transition between steeply plunging folds, considered typical for the steep core, and gently plunging folds, considered characteristic for the peripheral Ordovician-Silurian sequences, occurs in homogeneous mudstones of the Lower Cambrian Oisquercq Formation. In these deposits mica and chlorite show a similar degree of preferred orientation. Mica is always aligned along the cleavage, whereas chlorite is aligned along the bedding. Clear intersection pole figure patterns characterise samples with large cleavage/bedding angles, whereas flattening fabrics only become apparent for samples with small cleavage/bedding angles. For both mica and chlorite, the degree of preferred orientation is higher for samples with small cleavage/bedding angles. The magnetic fabric shows prolate susceptibility ellipsoids for samples with large cleavage/bedding angles and oblate susceptibility ellipsoids for samples with small cleavage/bedding angles (cf. Housen et al., 1993). The short axis of the susceptibility ellipsoid is generally oriented perpendicular to bedding, occasionally perpendicular to cleavage or with an intermediate orientation. The long axis of the susceptibility ellipsoid is always parallel to the cleavage/bedding intersection. The shape parameter T shows an almost linear relationship with respect to

  3. Visual quality beyond artifact visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Judith A.

    2013-03-01

    The Electronic imaging community has devoted a lot of effort to the development of technologies that can predict the visual quality of images and videos, as a basis for the delivery of optimal visual quality to the user. These systems have been based for the most part on a visibility-centric approach, assuming the more artifacts are visible, the higher is the annoyance they provoke, the lower the visual quality. Despite the remarkable results achieved with this approach, recently a number of studies suggested that the visibility-centric approach to visual quality might have limitations, and that other factors might influence the overall quality impression of an image or video, depending on cognitive and affective mechanisms that work on top of perception. In particular, interest in the visual content, engagement and context of usage have been found to impact on the overall quality impression of the image/video. In this paper, we review these studies and explore the impact that affective and cognitive processes have on the visual quality. In addition, as a case study, we present the results of an experiment investigating on the impact of aesthetic appeal on visual quality, and we show that users tend to be more demanding in terms of visual quality judging beautiful images.

  4. A particle accelerator probes artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Dran, J C; Salomon, J

    2002-01-01

    The AGLAE system is made up of a 2 mega volts electrostatic accelerator and of 3 irradiation lines: one leads to a vacuum enclosure in which targets are irradiated and the 2 others lines are designed to irradiate targets under an air or helium atmosphere. The AGLAE system is located in the premises of the Louvre museum in Paris and is devoted to the study of cultural objects through ion beam analysis (IBA). 4 techniques are used: -) proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) -) proton-induced gamma ray (PIGE) -) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NRS) and -) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). A decisive progress has permitted the direct analysis of artifacts without sampling. The object itself is set just a few millimeters away from the exit window of the beam in an air or helium atmosphere. The exit window must be resistant enough to bear the atmospheric pressure and the damages caused by the proton beam but must be thin enough to not deteriorate the quality of the beam. By using a 10 sup - sup 7 m thick exit w...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of stents. Quantitative in vitro examination at 3 Tesla; Magnetresonanztomographie von Stents. Quantitative MR-Untersuchungen in vitro bei 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Julia [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Sektion Experimentelle Radiologie; Fachhochschule Jena (Germany). Fachbereich Medizintechnik; Nguyen-Trong, Thien-Hoa; Haehnel, Stefan [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie; Bellemann, Matthias E. [Fachhochschule Jena (Germany). Fachbereich Medizintechnik; Heiland, Sabine [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Sektion Experimentelle Radiologie; Neurologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Neuroradiologie

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively study MR artifacts of various stents on the basis of in vitro experiments. We were particularly interested whether sequence type and orientation of the stent with respect to the static magnetic field influences the artifact. We examined 18 stents of different material (nitinol, stainless steel, cobalt alloy), different design of the stent meshes (AccuLink, OmniLink, DynaLink, Xact, Protoge, Wallstent Monorail), different diameter (5-10 mm) and different length (18-58 mm) with a turbo spin echo (TSE), a 2D-fast low angle shot (FLASH) and a 3D-FLASH sequence. The MR images were examined qualitatively with respect to possible artifacts. Furthermore we examined the MR data quantitatively: The contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) was determined both within the stent and outside (within the tube); based on these values we calculated the transparency factor P, furthermore we calculated the apparent vascular lumen within the tube and within the stent. The stents made of stainless steel and cobalt alloy displayed severe susceptibility artifacts. Therefore the vessel lumen within the stent could not be assessed. The nitinol stents showed different artifact patterns: The AccuLink and DynaLink stents showed less artifacts compared to the Xact and Protoge stents. Besides the susceptibility artifacts we found artifacts due to RF shielding by the stent mesh, particularly in TSE sequences. A MR control of patients after stenting is possible and may yield diagnostic information when using the AccuLink or DynaLink stents. However, it is important to make sure that the stent is MR safe for the field strength used for the examination. (orig.)

  6. The electronic properties, electronic heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of monolayer boron nitride graphene-like structure in the presence of electron-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have studied the influences of electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling and chemical potential on the boron nitride graphene-like sheet. In particular, by starting the Green's function technique and Holstein model, the electronic density of states (DOS), electronic heat capacity (EHC) and magnetic susceptibility (MS) of this system have been investigated in the context of self-consistent second order perturbation theory which has been implemented to find the electronic self-energy. Our findings show that the band gap size decreases (increases) with e-ph coupling (chemical potential) parameters. The Schottky anomaly (crossover) decreases in EHC (MS) as soon as e-ph coupling increases. Also, the corresponding temperature with Schottky anomaly is considerably affected by e-ph coupling.

  7. Unusual Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropy in Untwinned La{sub 2{minus}x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} Single Crystals in the Lightly Doped Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, A. N.; Ando, Yoichi; Komiya, Seiki; Tsukada, I.

    2001-07-02

    We present a study of the magnetic susceptibility {chi} in carefully detwinned La{sub 2{minus}x}Sr {sub x}CuO{sub 4} single crystals in the lightly doped region (x=0{endash}0.03) , which demonstrates a remarkable in-plane anisotropy of the spin system. This anisotropy, {chi}{sub a}/{chi}{sub b} , is found to persist after the long-range antiferromagnetic (AF) order is destroyed by hole doping, suggesting that doped holes break the AF order into domains in which the spin alignment is kept essentially intact. It turns out that the freezing of the spins taking place at low temperatures is also notably anisotropic, implying that the {open_quotes}spin-glass{close_quotes} feature is governed by the domain structure as well.

  8. Unusual Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropy in Untwinned La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} Single Crystals in the Lightly Doped Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, A. N.; Ando, Yoichi; Komiya, Seiki; Tsukada, I.

    2001-07-02

    We present a study of the magnetic susceptibility {chi} in carefully detwinned La{sub 2-x}Sr {sub x}CuO{sub 4} single crystals in the lightly doped region (x=0--0.03) , which demonstrates a remarkable in-plane anisotropy of the spin system. This anisotropy, {chi}{sub a}/{chi}{sub b} , is found to persist after the long-range antiferromagnetic (AF) order is destroyed by hole doping, suggesting that doped holes break the AF order into domains in which the spin alignment is kept essentially intact. It turns out that the freezing of the spins taking place at low temperatures is also notably anisotropic, implying that the ''spin-glass'' feature is governed by the domain structure as well.

  9. Single-crystal growth, crystallography, magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, and thermal expansion of the antiferromagnetic S=1 chain compound CaV[subscript 2]O[subscript 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niazi, A.; Bud' ko, S.L.; Schlagel, D.L.; Yan, J.Q.; Lograsso, T.A.; Kreyssig, A.; Das, S.; Nandi, S.; Goldman, A.I.; Honecker, A.; McCallum, R.W.; Reehuis, M.; Pieper, O.; Lake, B.; Johnston, D.C.; (Ames; Gö); (tingen); (HMI); (MXPL-F)

    2009-05-01

    The compound CaV{sub 2}O{sub 4} contains V{sup +3} cations with spin S=1 and has an orthorhombic structure at room temperature containing zigzag chains of V atoms running along the c axis. We have grown single crystals of CaV{sub 2}O{sub 4} and report crystallography, static magnetization, magnetic susceptibility x, ac magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity C{sub p}, and thermal expansion measurements in the temperature T range of 1.8--350 K on the single crystals and on polycrystalline samples. An orthorhombic-to-monoclinic structural distortion and a long-range antiferromagnetic (AF) transition were found at sample-dependent temperatures T{sub S}{approx}108--145 K and T{sub N}{approx}51--76 K, respectively. In two annealed single crystals, another transition was found at {approx}200 K. In one of the crystals, this transition is mostly due to V{sub 2}O{sub 3} impurity phase that grows coherently in the crystals during annealing. However, in the other crystal the origin of this transition at 200 K is unknown. The x(T) shows a broad maximum at {approx}300 K associated with short-range AF ordering and the anisotropy of x above T{sub N} is small. The anisotropic x(T{yields}0) data below T{sub N} show that the (average) easy axis of the AF magnetic structure is the b axis. The C{sub p}(T) data indicate strong short-range AF ordering above T{sub N}, consistent with the x(T) data. We fitted our x data by a J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} S=1 Heisenberg chain model, where J{sub 1}(J{sub 2}) is the (next)-nearest-neighbor exchange interaction. We find J{sub 1}{approx}230 K and surprisingly, J{sub 2}/J{sub 1}{approx}0 (or J{sub 1}/J{sub 2}{approx}0). The interaction J{sub {perpendicular}} between these S=1 chains leading to long-range AF ordering at T{sub N} is estimated to be J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 1}{approx_equal}0.04.

  10. Mammographic Artifacts on Full-Field Digital Mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Song, ByungJoo; Jung, Haijo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the incidence of full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) artifacts with three systems at two institutions and compares the artifacts between two detector types and two grid types. A total of 4,440 direct and 4,142 indirect FFDM images were reviewed by two radiologists, and artifacts were classified as patient related, hardware related, and software processing. The overall incidence of FFDM artifacts was 3.4 % (292/8,582). Patient related artifacts (motion artifacts and ...

  11. Origin of the magnetic susceptibility maximum in CaCu3Ru4O12 and electronic states in the A-site substituted compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ting-Hui; Sakurai, Hiroya; Yu, Shan; Kato, Harukazu; Tsujii, Naohito; Yang, Hung-Duen

    2017-07-01

    CaCu3Ru4O12 shows a broad maximum at around 200 K in temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility, whose origin is under debate. The present study addresses this problem, using high-quality samples of Ca1 -xAxCu3Ru4O12 (A = La, Na, and Sr) made by high-pressure synthesis technique. Unlike in a previous report, the maximum shifts to lower temperatures for the La substitution, becomes obscure by the Na substitution, and is less influenced by the Sr substitution. This behavior strongly suggests that the susceptibility maximum is caused by a sharp peak in the density of states just above the Fermi level, which induces strong spin fluctuations. Furthermore, the nature of electronic states of LaCu3Ru4O12 and NaCu3Ru4O12 are discussed; the former likely bears a Kondo character, and the latter has spin fluctuations of different origin below approximately 150 K.

  12. Magnetic-dipole-to-electric-quadrupole cross-susceptibilities for relativistic hydrogenlike atoms in some low-lying discrete energy eigenstates

    CERN Document Server

    Stefańska, Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present tabulated data for magnetic-dipole-to-electric-quadrupole cross-susceptibilities ($\\chi_{\\textrm{M}1 \\to \\textrm{E}2}$) for Dirac one-electron atoms with a pointlike, spinless and motionless nucleus of charge $Ze$. Numerical values of this susceptibility for the hydrogen atom ($Z=1$) and for hydrogenic ions with $2 \\leqslant Z \\leqslant 137$ are computed from the general analytical formula, recently derived by us [P. Stefa{\\'n}ska, Phys. Rev. A 93 (2016) 022504], valid for an arbitrary discrete energy eigenstate. In this work we provide 30 tables with the values of $\\chi_{\\textrm{M}1 \\to \\textrm{E}2}$ for the ground state, and also for the first, the second and the third set of excited states (i.e.: 2s$_{1/2}$, 2p$_{1/2}$, 2p$_{3/2}$, 3s$_{1/2}$, 3p$_{1/2}$, 3p$_{3/2}$, 3d$_{3/2}$, 3d$_{5/2}$, 4s$_{1/2}$, 4p$_{1/2}$, 4p$_{3/2}$, 4d$_{3/2}$, 4d$_{5/2}$, 4f$_{5/2}$ and 4f$_{7/2}$) of the relativistic hydrogenlike atoms. The value of the inverse of the fine-structure constant used in the...

  13. β Zr–Nb–Ti–Mo–Sn alloys with low Young's modulus and low magnetic susceptibility optimized via a cluster-plus-glue-atom model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Chang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, Qing, E-mail: wangq@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Ruiqian [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Li, Qun [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dai, Xun [Science and Technology on Reactor Fuel and Materials Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu 610041 (China); Dong, Chuang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-02-25

    The multi-element Zr-based bio-alloys are optimized for reaching lower Young's modulus and magnetic susceptibility by introducing the cluster-plus-glue-atom model to realize the composition design. A general cluster formulas of [(Mo,Sn)–(Zr,Ti){sub 14}]Nb{sub x} (x=1, 3) was obtained from the model and alloy rods with a diameter of 3 mm were prepared by copper-mold suction-casting processing. The β structural stabilities of the designed alloys were studied by the valence electron concentration (VEC). Among the β-Zr alloys, the [(Mo{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5})–Zr{sub 14}]Nb{sub 1} (Zr{sub 87.5}Nb{sub 6.25}Mo{sub 3.13}Sn{sub 3.13} at%) and [(Mo{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5})–(Zr{sub 13}Ti)]Nb{sub 1} (Zr{sub 81.25}Nb{sub 6.25}Ti{sub 6.25}Mo{sub 3.13}Sn{sub 3.13} at%) alloys, corresponding to the lower β stability limit, display lower Young's moduli (77–79 GPa), lowest magnetic susceptibilities (2.12×10{sup −6}–2.13×10{sup −6} cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}), as well as higher Vickers hardness (288–311 HV)

  14. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using Active Shape Models and k-Nearest-Neighbors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.;

    2014-01-01

    n combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental...... artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient...... vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume...

  15. Automatic Identification of Artifact-Related Independent Components for Artifact Removal in EEG Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan; Nathan, Viswam; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. These activities can be decoded by signal processing techniques. However, EEG recordings are always contaminated with artifacts which hinder the decoding process. Therefore, identifying and removing artifacts is an important step. Researchers often clean EEG recordings with assistance from independent component analysis (ICA), since it can decompose EEG recordings into a number of artifact-related and event-related potential (ERP)-related independent components. However, existing ICA-based artifact identification strategies mostly restrict themselves to a subset of artifacts, e.g., identifying eye movement artifacts only, and have not been shown to reliably identify artifacts caused by nonbiological origins like high-impedance electrodes. In this paper, we propose an automatic algorithm for the identification of general artifacts. The proposed algorithm consists of two parts: 1) an event-related feature-based clustering algorithm used to identify artifacts which have physiological origins; and 2) the electrode-scalp impedance information employed for identifying nonbiological artifacts. The results on EEG data collected from ten subjects show that our algorithm can effectively detect, separate, and remove both physiological and nonbiological artifacts. Qualitative evaluation of the reconstructed EEG signals demonstrates that our proposed method can effectively enhance the signal quality, especially the quality of ERPs, even for those that barely display ERPs in the raw EEG. The performance results also show that our proposed method can effectively identify artifacts and subsequently enhance the classification accuracies compared to four commonly used automatic artifact removal methods.

  16. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in the giant Lac Tio hemo-ilmenite ore body (Quebec Province, Canada): source and geological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolle, O.; Diot, H.; Bascou, J.; Charlier, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Lac Tio hemo-ilmenite ore body is a magmatic ilmenite deposit that crops out in the 1.06 Ga Lac Allard anorthosite which is part of the Havre-Saint-Pierre anorthosite suite, one of many AMCG (Anorthosite-Mangerite-Charnockite-(rapakivi) Granite) suites from the Grenville province of North America. It is the world's largest hard-rock ilmenite deposit, with reserves still estimated at ca. 138 Mt after 60 years of mining exploitation (Charlier et al., 2010). The magnetic properties of the Lac Tio ore body were first studied in the 50s and 60s (e.g. Hargraves, 1959; Carmichael, 1961), and have recently been reinvestigated by McEnroe et al. (2007). All these works focused on the high and stable natural remanent magnetization of the hemo-ilmenite ore (up to 120 A/m) that was shown to reside in the exsolution intergrowths of hematite and ilmenite, following the theory of lamellar magnetism (McEnroe et al., 2007). The present study investigates the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS; e.g. Borradaile and Jackson, 2004) of 46 samples from the Lac Tio ore body and its anorthosite wall rocks. The bulk magnetic susceptibility (Km) in the ore, which is essentially made up of hemo-ilmenite (commonly >75 wt.%) and plagioclase, ranges from 5.3 to 115.9 x 10-3 SI. Not surprisingly, samples with high Km values (>7 x 10-3 SI) usually contain magnetite, either as small grains or as plates replacing some hematite exsolutions. Km ranges from 0.35 to 3.8 x 10-3 SI in the host anorthosite, as well as in plagicolase-rich layers found within the hemo-ilmenite ore. Such relatively low values reflect minor to trace amounts of Fe-Ti oxides (ilmeno-hematite, hemo-ilmenite, magnetite) and pyroxenes. The hemo-ilmenite ore displays a shape-preferred orientation of the hematite lamellae that exsolved parallel to the basal (0001) plane of the ilmenite host grains. Thus, the ore has a lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) for the hemo-ilmenite grains. Electron backscatter diffraction

  17. Susceptibility Imaging in Glial Tumor Grading; Using 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) System and 32 Channel Head Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Omer; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Hakyemez, Bahattin

    2017-01-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a velocity compensated, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) spoiled gradient-echo sequence that uses magnitude and filtered-phase data. SWI seems to be a valuable tool for non-invasive evaluation of central nervous system gliomas. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) ratio is one of the best noninvasive methods for glioma grading. Degree of intratumoral susceptibility signal (ITSS) on SWI correlates with rCBV ratio and histopathological grade. This study investigated the effectiveness of ITSS grading and rCBV ratio in preoperative assessment. Thirty-one patients (17 males and 14 females) with histopathogical diagnosis of glial tumor undergoing routine cranial MRI, SWI, and perfusion MRI examinations between October 2011 and July 2013 were retrospectively enrolled. All examinations were performed using 3T apparatus with 32-channel head coil. We used ITSS number for SWI grading. Correlations between SWI grade, rCBV ratio, and pathological grading were evaluated. ROC analysis was performed to determine the optimal rCBV ratio to distinguish between high-grade and low-grade glial tumors. There was a strong positive correlation between both pathological and SWI grading. We determined the optimal rCBV ratio to discriminate between high-grade and low-grade tumors to be 2.21. In conclusion, perfusion MRI and SWI using 3T MR and 32-channel head coil may provide useful information for preoperative glial tumor grading. SWI can be used as an accessory to perfusion MR technique in preoperative tumor grading.

  18. Mechanism of formation of volcanic bombs: insights from a pilot study of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and preliminary assessment of analytical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2017-07-01

    Volcanic bombs and achneliths are a special type of pyroclastic fragments formed by mildly explosive volcanic eruptions. Models explaining the general shapes of those particles can be divided in two broad categories. The most popular envisages the acquisition of shapes of volcanic bombs as the result of the rush of air acting on a fluid clot during flight, and it includes many variants. The less commonly quoted model envisages their shapes as the result of forces acting at the moment of ejection of liquid from the magma pool in the conduit, experiencing an almost negligible modification through its travel through air. Quantitative evidence supporting either of those two models is limited. In this work, I explore the extent to which the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) might be useful in the study of mechanisms of formation of volcanic bombs by comparing measurements made on two spindle and two bread-crusted bombs. The results of this pilot study reveal that the degree of anisotropy of spindle bombs is larger, and their principal susceptibility axes are better clustered than on bread-crusted bombs. Also, the orientation of the principal susceptibility axes is consistent with two specific models (one of the in-flight variants and the general ejection model). Consequently, the reported AMS measurements, albeit limited in number, indicate that it is reasonable to focus attention on only two specific models to explain the acquisition of the shapes of volcanic bombs. Based on a parallel theoretical assessment of analytical models, a third alternative is outlined, envisaging volcanic bomb formation as a two-stage process that involves the bursting of large ( m) gas bubbles on the surface of a magma pond. The new model advanced here is also consistent with the reported AMS results, and constitutes a working hypothesis that should be tested by future studies richer in data. Fortunately, since this work also establishes that AMS can be used to determine magnetic

  19. Gamma-ray spectrometry, electrical resistivity, and magnetic susceptibility of agricultural soils in the Northwest region of the Parana State, Brazil; Gamaespectrometria, resistividade eletrica e susceptibilidade magnetica de solos agricolas no noroeste do estado do Parana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becegato, Valter Antonio [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina-UDESC, Centro de Ciencias Agroveterinarias, Lages, SC (Brazil); Ferreira, Francisco Jose Fonseca, E-mail: becegato@cav.udesc.br, E-mail: francisco.ferreira@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (LPGA/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia. Lab. de Pesquisas em Geofisica Aplicada

    2005-10-15

    Gamma-ray spectrometry, electrical resistivity, and magnetic susceptibility measurements were taken from agricultural areas near the City of Maringa, in the Northwest region of the Parana state, south Brazil, in order to characterize the spatial distribution of radionuclides (K, eU, and eTh), the apparent resistivity, and the magnetic susceptibility determined for soils. Three different types of soils are present in this agricultural area: Alfisoil, clayey texture Oxisoil, both deriving from Lower Cretaceous basalts of the Serra Geral Formation; and medium texture Oxisoil from reworked Serra Geral and Goio-Ere formations, the latter deriving from sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Caiua Group. It could be observed that in more clayey soils both concentration of radionuclides and susceptibility values are higher than in more sandy soils, especially due to the higher adsorption in the former and to the higher availability of magnetic minerals in the latter. The average ppm and Bq Kg{sup -1} grades for K, eU, and eTh in the areas under anthropic activity are of 1766-54.75, 0.83-10.22, and 1.78-7.27, respectively. These grades are significantly higher than those of non-occupied or non-fertilized areas (1101-34.15 K, 0.14-1.69 eU, and 1.31-5.36 eTh in ppm and Bq Kg-1, respectively.) Correlations were observed between uranium and clay, uranium and magnetic susceptibility, uranium and organic matter, and between electric resistivity and clay grades. Varied concentrations of radionuclides were also observed in different fertilizer formulations applied to soy and wheat cultures. Apparent electric resistivity values between 25 and 647 Ohm.m and magnetic susceptibility values between 0.28 e 1.10 x 10-3 SI due to clay and magnetic minerals represented important soil discrimination factors in the study area that can be incorporated as easy, low-cost soil mapping tools. (author)

  20. The Ambivalent Ontology of Digital Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallinikos, Jannis; Aaltonen, Aleksi; Marton, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Digital artifacts are embedded in wider and constantly shifting ecosystems such that they become increasingly editable, interactive, reprogrammable, and distributable. This state of flux and constant transfiguration renders the value and utility of these artifacts contingent on shifting webs...... of functional relations with other artifacts across specific contexts and organizations. By the same token, it apportions control over the development and use of these artifacts over a range of dispersed stakeholders and makes their management a complex technical and social undertaking. These ideas...... are illustrated with reference to (1) provenance and authenticity of digital documents within the overall context of archiving and social memory and (2) the content dynamics occasioned by the findability of content mediated by Internet search engines. We conclude that the steady change and transfiguration...

  1. Preliminary organizational culture scale focused on artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavia, Tomas

    2006-12-01

    In this preliminary study, an Organizational Culture Scale was developed to assess cultural artifacts according to Schein's typology (1985). It includes a set of cultural artifacts to measure the extent to which an organization is more or less traditional. A total of 249 managers from a range of different companies responded to the items. Preliminary analysis yielded a one-dimensional scale with 14 items with high internal consistency and homogeneity.

  2. Preliminary organizational culture scale focused on artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavia, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    In this preliminary study, an organizational culture scale was developed to assess cultural artifacts according to Schein´s typology (1985). It includes a set of cultural artifacts to measure the extent to which an organization is more or less traditional. A total of 249 managers from a range of different companies responded to the items. Preliminary analysis yielded a one-dimensional scale with 14 items with high internal consistency and homogeneity.

  3. Internal fabrics in magmatic plutons emplaced in extended brittle crust - insight from analogue models with AMS (Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Masoud; Zavada, Prokop; Machek, Matej; Roxerova, Zuzana

    2016-04-01

    Magma emplacement in extended brittle crust was simulated by injecting plaster of Paris (magma) into a large sandbox with central deformable rubber sheet. Analog magma is during the experiments injected through small circular inlet cut in the center of the elastic sheet. Injection force oscillation during the steadily evacuating analog magma was recorded during the experiments and regularly showed 3-4 increases followed by a quick drop. The recorded oscillation amplitude is largest for static injection without extension of the sandbox, which formed a columnar body with concentric and zonal internal fabric. Experiments including normal or oblique 20% extension resulted in along rift axis elongated oblate ellipsoidal pluton with rift parallel ridges in the top part of the pluton. Inspection of horizontal profiles show bone-shaped internal zoning patterns limited by conjugate sets of shear zones. Orientation of these internal shear zones is correlated with the sand-clock fault pattern developed in the overburden sand pack. Another set of shear zones parallel with the long axes of the plutons (rift axis) are associated with successive emplacement of distinct plaster pulses during the buildup of the entire body. The innermost lastly emplaced pulses of plaster display weak vertical magnetic fabrics with vertical lineations, while the outer shells of already emplaced plaster reveal stronger and margin parallel oblate magnetic fabrics with subhorizontal lineations. We interpret the vertical innermost fabrics as a result of active ascent of plaster from the injection inlet, while the fabrics in the outer zones likely reflect push due to inflation of the inner domain reflected in the reworking of the magnetic fabric.

  4. Dispersing artifacts in FT-STS: a comparison of set point effects across acquisition modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, A. J.; Tremblay-Johnston, Y.-S.; Grothe, S.; Chi, S.; Dosanjh, P.; Johnston, S.; Burke, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    Fourier-transform scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (FT-STS), or quasiparticle interference, has become an influential tool for the study of a wide range of important materials in condensed matter physics. However, FT-STS in complex materials is often challenging to interpret, requiring significant theoretical input in many cases, making it crucial to understand potential artifacts of the measurement. Here, we compare the most common modes of acquiring FT-STS data and show through both experiment and simulations that artifact features can arise that depend on how the tip height is stabilized throughout the course of the measurement. The most dramatic effect occurs when a series of dI/dV maps at different energies are acquired with simultaneous constant current feedback; here a feature that disperses in energy appears that is not observed in other measurement modes. Such artifact features are similar to those arising from real physical processes in the sample and are susceptible to misinterpretation.

  5. Evolution of Cu-Zn-Si oxide catalysts in the course of reduction and reoxidation as studied by in situ X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and magnetic susceptibility methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minyukova, T.P.; Shtertser, N.V.; Khassin, A.A.; Plyasova, L.M.; Kustova, G.N.; Zaikovskii, V.I.; Shvedenkov, Y.G.; Baronskaya, N.A.; van den Heuvel, J.C.; Kuznetsova, A.V.; Davydova, L.P.; Yur'eva, T.M.

    2008-01-01

    The reduced and reoxidized Cu-Zn-Si oxide catalysts as layered copper-zinc hydroxo silicates with the zincsilite structure were studied using in situ and ex situ X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility. The catalysts wer

  6. MR imaging artifacts and parallel imaging techniques with calibration scanning: a new twist on old problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanasak, Nathan E; Kelly, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The application of parallel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasing as clinicians continue to strive for improved spatial and temporal resolution, benefits that arise from the use of fewer phase encodings during imaging. To reconstruct images, extra information is needed to map the spatial sensitivity of each coil element, which may be accomplished by acquiring a calibration image in one common implementation of parallel MR imaging. Although obtaining a quick calibration image is an efficient method for gathering this information, corruption of the image or disharmony with subsequent images may lead to errors in reconstruction. Although conventional MR imaging sequences may be employed with parallel MR imaging, the altered image reconstruction introduces several new artifacts and changes the appearance of conventional artifacts. The altered appearance of traditional artifacts may obscure the source of the problem, and, in some cases, the severity of artifacts associated with parallel MR imaging may be exacerbated, hindering image interpretation. Several artifacts arise in the context of parallel MR imaging, including both traditional artifacts and those associated with parallel MR imaging.

  7. On the zero-field orbital magnetic susceptibility of Bloch electrons in graphene-like solids: Some rigorous results

    CERN Document Server

    Savoie, Baptiste

    2012-01-01

    Starting with a nearest-neighbors tight-binding model, we rigorously investigate the bulk zero-field orbital susceptibility of a non-interacting Bloch electrons gas in graphene-like solids at fixed temperature and density of particles. In the zero-temperature limit and in the semiconducting situation, we derive a complete expression which holds for an arbitrary number of bands with possible degeneracies. In the particular case of a two-bands gapped model, all involved quantities are exactly written down. Besides the formula we obtain have the special feature to be suitable for numerical computations since it only involves the eigenvalues and associated eigenfunctions of the Bloch Hamiltonian, together with the derivatives (up to the second order) w.r.t. the quasi-momentum of the matrix-elements of the Bloch Hamiltonian. Finally we give a simple application for the two-bands gapped model by considering the case of a dispersion law which is linear w.r.t. the quasi-momentum in the gapless limit. Through this ins...

  8. Magnetic order and electronic properties of Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} material for lithium-ion batteries: ESR and magnetic susceptibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suleimanov, N.M. [E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kazan (Russian Federation); Kazan State Power Engineering University, Kazan (Russian Federation); Prabaharan, S.R.S. [VIT University, School of Electronics Engineering, Chennai (India); Khantimerov, S.M.; Nizamov, F.A. [E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Kazan (Russian Federation); Michael, M.S. [SSN College of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Chennai (India); Drulis, H.; Wisniewski, P. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research of Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-08-15

    We describe the application of electron spin resonance (ESR) and magnetic susceptibility methods to study the magnetic properties and valence state of transition metal ions in Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}(MoO4){sub 3} polyanion compound previously studied for its cathode-active properties in lithium containing batteries. ESR measurements of Li{sub 2}Mn{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 3} have shown the presence of Mn{sup 2+} ions in the octahedral environment of oxygen ions. It is found that the part of manganese ions occupy the anti-site positions in lithium sublattice. The absence of the ESR signal from molybdenum ions indicates that they are non-magnetic and adopt the 6{sup +} valence state. Considerable overlapping between 3d orbitals of transition metal and 2p oxygen orbitals has been experimentally established. This leads to the indirect exchange interaction and antiferromagnetic ordering of manganese ions at 1.4 K. (orig.)

  9. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Fox, Tim [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Dhabaan, Anees, E-mail: anees.dhabaan@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  10. Body MRI artifacts in clinical practice: a physicist's and radiologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Martin J; Mitchell, Donald G

    2013-08-01

    The high information content of MRI exams brings with it unintended effects, which we call artifacts. The purpose of this review is to promote understanding of these artifacts, so they can be prevented or properly interpreted to optimize diagnostic effectiveness. We begin by addressing static magnetic field uniformity, which is essential for many techniques, such as fat saturation. Eddy currents, resulting from imperfect gradient pulses, are especially problematic for new techniques that depend on high performance gradient switching. Nonuniformity of the transmit radiofrequency system constitutes another source of artifacts, which are increasingly important as magnetic field strength increases. Defects in the receive portion of the radiofrequency system have become a more complex source of problems as the number of radiofrequency coils, and the sophistication of the analysis of their received signals, has increased. Unwanted signals and noise spikes have many causes, often manifesting as zipper or banding artifacts. These image alterations become particularly severe and complex when they are combined with aliasing effects. Aliasing is one of several phenomena addressed in our final section, on artifacts that derive from encoding the MR signals to produce images, also including those related to parallel imaging, chemical shift, motion, and image subtraction.

  11. Two isostructural layered oxohalide compounds containing Mn{sup 2+}, Te{sup 4+} and Si{sup 4+}; crystal structure and magnetic susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Iwan [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kremer, Reinhard K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Johnsson, Mats, E-mail: mats.johnsson@mmk.su.se [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-10-15

    The new compounds Mn{sub 4}(TeO{sub 3})(SiO{sub 4})X{sub 2} (X=Br, Cl) were synthesized by solid state reactions in sealed evacuated silica tubes. The compounds crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/m with the unit cell parameters a=5.5463(3) Å (5.49434(7) Å), b=6.4893(4) Å (6.44184(9) Å), c=12.8709(7) Å (12.60451(18) Å), β=93.559(5)° (94.1590(12)°) and Z=2 for the respective Br and Cl analogues. Manganese adopts various distorted coordination polyhedra; [MnO{sub 6}] octahedra, [MnO{sub 5}] tetragonal pyramids and [MnO{sub 2}X{sub 2}] tetrahedra. Other building blocks are [SiO{sub 4}] tetrahedra and [TeO{sub 3}] trigonal pyramids. The structure is made up from layers having no net charge that are connected via weak Van der Waal interactions. The layers that are parallel to (1 1 0) consist of two manganese oxide sheets which are separated by [SiO{sub 4}] tetrahedra. On the outer sides of the sheets are the [MnO{sub 2}X{sub 2}] tetrahedra and the [TeO{sub 3}] trigonal pyramids connected so that the halide ions and the stereochemically active lone pairs on the tellurium atoms protrude from the layers. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal a Curie law with a Weiss temperature of θ=−153(3) K for temperatures ≥100 K and indicate antiferromagnetic ordering at T{sub N} ∼4 K. Possible structural origins of the large frustration parameter of f=38 are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Table of contents caption. The new compounds Mn{sub 4}(TeO{sub 3})(SiO{sub 4})X{sub 2} (X=Br, Cl) are layered with weak Van der Waal interactions in between the layers. Manganese adopts various distorted coordination polyhedral, other building blocks are [SiO{sub 4}] tetrahedra and [TeO{sub 3}] trigonal pyramids. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperatures and a large frustration parameter. - Highlights: • Two new isostructural oxohalide compounds are described. • The compounds are the first examples of

  12. Reconstructing design, explaining artifacts: philosophical reflections on the design and explanation of technical artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ridder, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Philosophers of science have by and large neglected technology. In this book, I have tried to do something about this lacuna by analyzing a few aspects of technical artifacts from a philosophical angle. The project was part of the research program "The Dual Nature of Technical Artifacts" based at De

  13. The magnetic susceptibility characteristic and its environmental significance of roadside soil in Xi′an city%西安城市路边土壤磁化率特征及其环境意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈景辉; 卢新卫

    2011-01-01

    采集西安城市主干道路边表层土壤样品,分析了土壤样品的理化指标及As、Co、Cr、Cu、Mn、Ni、Pb和Zn的含量,并测定了样品的磁化率.结果表明:土壤样品的低频和高频磁化率均值分别为181.7×10-8和171.9×10-8m3/kg;低频和高频磁化率与烧失量和沙粒含量呈显著正相关,与黏粒和粉砂粒含量呈显著负相关,与Co、Cu、Pb和Zn含量呈显著正相关,与Mn含量呈显著负相关,与As、Co、Cr、Cu、Mn、Ni、Pb和Zn 8种元素的污染负荷指数呈显著正相关.磁化率可以指示西安城市路边土壤重金属的整体污染水平,可以反映路边土壤磁性升高的主要人为源为交通污染及工业企业排放.%The physio-chemical indicators,heavy metal concentrations of As,Co,Cr,Cu,Mn,Ni,Pb,Zn and magnetic susceptibility in the roadside soils collected from the main streets of Xi′an city were determined.The results showed that the average values of low and high frequency magnetic susceptibility are 181.7×10-8 and 171.9×10-8 m3/kg,respectively.The low and high frequency magnetic susceptibility are positive correlated with loss on ignition(LOI) and sand content significantly,while negative correlated with clay and silt content significantly.Low and high frequency magnetic susceptibility are also positive correlated with Co,Cu,Pb and Zn significantly,but negative correlated with Mn significantly.The pollution loading index of As,Co,Cr,Cu,Mn,Ni,Pb and Zn is also positive correlated with low and high frequency magnetic susceptibility significantly.The magnetic susceptibility can indicate the pollution level of heavy metal in roadside soil of Xi′an city,and reflect traffic pollution and industrial activities emissions are the main human sources leading to soil magnetism rising.

  14. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Demonstrates Reduced Periventricular Cerebral Blood Flow in Dogs with Ventriculomegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Schmidt

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The nature of ventriculomegaly in dogs is still a matter of debate. Signs of increased intraventricular pressure and atrophy of the cerebral white matter have been found in dogs with ventriculomegaly, which would imply increased intraventricular pressure and, therefore, a pathological condition, i.e., to some extent. Reduced periventricular blood flow was found in people with high elevated intraventricular pressure. The aim of this study was to compare periventricular brain perfusion in dogs with and without ventriculomegaly using perfusion weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging to clarify as to whether ventriculomegaly might be associated with an increase in intraventricular pressure. Perfusion was measured in 32 Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS with ventriculomegaly, 10 CKCSs were examined as a control group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF was measured using free-hand regions of interest (ROI in five brain regions: periventricular white matter, caudate nucleus, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. CBF was significantly lower in the periventricular white matter of the dogs with ventriculomegaly (p = 0.0029 but not in the other ROIs. Reduction of periventricular CBF might imply increase of intraventricular pressure in ventriculomegaly.

  15. MPEG recompression detection based on block artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiqi; Wu, Min; Huang, Jiwu

    2008-02-01

    With sophisticated video editing technologies, it is becoming increasingly easy to tamper digital video without leaving visual clues. One of the common tampering operations on video is to remove some frames and then re-encode the resulting video. In this paper, we propose a new method for detecting this type of tampering by exploring the temporal patterns of the block artifacts in video sequences. We show that MPEG compression introduces different block artifacts into various types of frames and that the strength of the block artifacts as a function over time has a regular pattern for a given group of pictures (GOP) structure. When some frames are removed from an MPEG video file and the file is then recompressed, the block artifacts introduced by the previous compression would remain and affect the average of block artifact strength of the recompressed one in such a way that depends on the number of deleted frames and the type of GOP used previously. We propose a feature curve to reveal the compression history of an MPEG video file with a given GOP structure, and use it as evidence to detect tampering. Experimental results evaluated on common video benchmark clips demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-07-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best facilitated to make their practice more inquiry based if they are provided with a mediating artifact. In this study the artifact is a model 5E, which is a conceptual way of thinking, to help teachers reflect on their practice. The aim is to encourage teachers to make changes themselves, by applying extended use of inquiry into their practice. This mediated artifact could thus be used across different national contexts. The main research question is; how can the 5E model as a mediating artifact enhance TPD? The article addresses the processes of the use of the 5E model and its influence on teachers' perception of the model. This is in order for teachers to conceptualize their goals related to inquiry and scientific thinking, and to solve the problems involved in achieving those goals in their own contexts. The study concludes that, after the intervention, the teachers' approaches and strategies demonstrate greater emphasis on learning.

  17. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility - a simple tool for distinction the sediment provenance and post-depositional processes in floodplain sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famera, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomas; Elznicova, Jitka

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility is highly appreciated in sedimentary and environmental geology. It may also reflect provenance of the sediment and post-depositional changes therein, including soil-forming processes. We studied the applicability of Fe-normalization of mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (MS) and Ti-normalization of Fe concentrations in description of fluvial sediments from five different catchments. We dealt with two catchments with some "mafic" source rocks (Fe-rich rocks) and three almost purely "felsic" catchments (source rocks with dominant quartz and feldspars). The fine-grained floodplain sediments (from clayey silts to fine sands) were obtained by drill coring and analysed for Fe and Ti concentrations using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) and MS using kappabridge. To correct MS for the sedimentological grain-size effects and possible magnetic enrichment, we used background functions constructed in the same way like for heavy metals. The representative profiles downward the floodplain sediments demonstrate the following MS stratigraphy: (1) 15-50 cm thick top stratum A, usually with MS and heavy metal enrichment, (2) underlying stratum B with stable values of MS, MS/Fe and Fe/Ti and (3) the lowermost stratum C with variable Fe concentrations and MS and high-chroma reductimorphic features due to micro-accumulations of Fe and Mn oxides in discoloured matrix, or grey colour due to permanently removed Fe(III) oxide pigment. The boundary between strata B and C can be at a depth of several decimetres to more than 1 metre depending on the thickness of floodplain fines, site-specific river incision and water table fluctuation. For the construction of MS background functions we used Fe concentrations as an independent variable (a predictor). It allows for calculation of MS of sediments as it would not be affected by post-depositional changes and pollution. Pristine MS is than predicted for any sample using formula MS_PRISTINE = const·cFe + const

  18. Voxel-Based Correlation between Coregistered Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Suspected Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallin, L.; Axelsson, R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Svensson, L.; Juhlin, P.; Wiberg, M. Kristoffersen; Frank, A. [Division of Radiology, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Current diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is made by clinical, neuropsychologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be valuable in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, as well as in assessing prognosis. Purpose: To compare SPECT and MRI in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Material and Methods: 24 patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls, were investigated with SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO, Ceretec; GE Healthcare Ltd., Little Chalsont UK) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a contrast-enhancing gadobutrol formula (Gadovist; Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR images was calculated. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were then performed in 24 different brain areas using brain registration and analysis of SPECT studies (BRASS; Nuclear Diagnostics AB, Stockholm (SE)) on both SPECT and DSC-MRI. Results: Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR showed a high correlation, with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.94. ROI analyses of 24 regions showed significant differences between the control group and AD patients in 10 regions using SPECT and five regions in DSC-MR. Conclusion: SPECT remains superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological perfusion, and DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer disease.

  19. Voxel-Based Correlation between Coregistered Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Suspected Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallin, L.; Axelsson, R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Svensson, L.; Juhlin, P.; Wiberg, M. Kristoffersen; Frank, A. (Division of Radiology, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Current diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is made by clinical, neuropsychologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be valuable in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, as well as in assessing prognosis. Purpose: To compare SPECT and MRI in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Material and Methods: 24 patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls, were investigated with SPECT using 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO, Ceretec; GE Healthcare Ltd., Little Chalsont UK) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a contrast-enhancing gadobutrol formula (Gadovist; Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR images was calculated. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were then performed in 24 different brain areas using brain registration and analysis of SPECT studies (BRASS; Nuclear Diagnostics AB, Stockholm (Sweden)) on both SPECT and DSC-MRI. Results: Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR showed a high correlation, with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.94. ROI analyses of 24 regions showed significant differences between the control group and AD patients in 10 regions using SPECT and five regions in DSC-MR. Conclusion: SPECT remains superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological perfusion, and DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer disease

  20. Reduction of Artifacts in Images from MR Truncated Data Using Singularity Spectrum Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆建华; 庄天戈

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the theory of signal singularity spectrum analysis (SSA) is proposed. Using SSA theory, a new method is presented to reduce truncation artifacts in magnetic resonance (MR) image due to truncated spectrum data. In the scheme, after detecting signal singularity locations using wavelet analysis in spectrum domain, SSA mathematic model is constructed, where weight coefficients are determined by known truncated spectrum data. Then, the remainder of the truncated spectrum can be obtained using SSA. Experiment and simulation results show that the SSA method will produce fewer artifacts in MR image from truncated spectrum than existing methods.

  1. Investigation of magnetic spin glass property in La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample using non-linear AC susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Punith V., E-mail: drvldayal@gmail.com; Manju, M. R., E-mail: drvldayal@gmail.com; Dayal, Vijaylakshmi, E-mail: drvldayal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Maharaja Institute of Technology, Mysore-571438, Karnataka (India)

    2014-04-24

    We present a comprehensive study on origin of Spin Glass (SG) property in polycrystalline La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} perovskite oxide using linear and higher order ac susceptibility (χ) measurements. The third order harmonic susceptibility (χ{sub 3}) vs. temperature (K) with varying magnetic fields from 0.95 to 9.45 Oe and the divergence in their χ{sub 3} (max) allows us to infer the SG behavior occurring in the sample possibly due to co-operative freezing of the spins.

  2. A Language of Objects and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    This is a conceptual inquiry about materiality. It gives an introductory overview to the vocabulary of materiality in a chosen selection of theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objects as it is used within practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. The examined intellec......This is a conceptual inquiry about materiality. It gives an introductory overview to the vocabulary of materiality in a chosen selection of theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objects as it is used within practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. The examined...... intellectual traditions are interpretive-cultural approaches; activity theory; and sociology of translation. Similarities and differences are presented in the way these three distinct intellectual traditions conceptualize the array of material objects and artifacts which are central in the tales of practice...

  3. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  4. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  5. Dissociation of O(2-)2 defects into paramagnetic O(-) in wide band-gap insulators - A magnetic susceptibility study of magnesium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batllo, F.; Leroy, R. C.; Parvin, K.; Freund, F.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of single-crystal MgO has been measured in the temperature range 300-1000 K, using a Faraday balance. The high-purity crystal (less than 100 ppm transition metals), grown from the melt in a H2O-containing atmosphere, was found to be paramagnetic due to the presence of defects on the O(2-) sublattice. The defects derive from OH(-) introduced into the MgO matrix by the dissolution of traces of H2O during crystal growth. The OH(-) converts into O(2-)2 and H2. Each O(2-)2 represents two coupled, spin-paired O(-) states. The observed strongly temperature-dependent paramagnetism can be described by three contributions that overlay the intrinsic diamagnetism of MgO and arise from the low level of transition-metal impurities, O(-) generated by 0(2-)2 dissociation, and O(-) states trapped by quenching from high temperatures from previous experiments.

  6. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  7. Contribution of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to reconstruct flooding characteristics of a 4220 BP tsunami from a thick unconsolidated structureless deposit (Banda Aceh, Sumatra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassmer, Patrick; Gomez, Christopher; Iskandasyah, T. Yan W. M.; Lavigne, Franck; Sartohadi, Junun

    2015-07-01

    One of the main concerns of deciphering tsunami sedimentary records along seashore is to link the emplaced layers with marine high energy events. Based on a combination of morphologic features, sedimentary figures, grain size characteristics, fossils content, microfossils assemblages, geochemical elements, heavy minerals presence; it is, in principle, possible to relate the sedimentary record to a tsunami event. However, experience shows that sometimes, in reason of a lack of any visible sedimentary features, it is hard to decide between a storm and a tsunami origin. To solve this issue, the authors have used the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) to evidence the sediment fabric. The validity of the method for reconstructing flow direction has been proved when applied on sediments in the aftermath of a tsunami event, for which the behaviour was well documented (2004 IOT). We present herein an application of this method for a 56 cm thick paleo-deposit dated 4220 BP laying under the soil covered by the 2004 IOT, SE of Banda Aceh, North Sumatra. We analysed this homogenous deposit, lacking of any visible structure, using methods of classic sedimentology to confirm the occurrence of a high energy event. We then applied AMS technique that allowed the reconstruction of flow characteristics during sediment emplacement. We show that all the sequence was emplaced by uprush phases and that the local topography played a role on the re-orientation of a part of the uprush flow, creating strong reverse current. This particular behaviour was reported by eyewitnesses during the 2004 IOT event.

  8. Changes in susceptibility signs on serial T2*-weighted single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo images in acute embolic infarction: comparison with recanalization status on 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, Yuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Kinoshita, Fumiko [Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels - Akita, Department of Radiology, Akita (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    The present study compares changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo T2*-weighted images (GRE-EPI) with vascular status on follow-up magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in acute embolic infarction. Twenty consecutive patients with acute embolic infarction repeatedly underwent MR imaging including GRE-EPI and MRA using a 1.5-T MR superconducting system. All patients underwent initial MR examination within 24 h of onset and follow-up MR imaging within 1 month after onset. Changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI were compatible with vascular status on follow-up MRA in 19 of the 20 patients. Susceptibility signs disappeared with complete recanalization in 13 patients, migrated with partial recanalization in 3, did not change together with the absence of recanalization in 2, and became extended together with the absence of recanalization in 1. Cerebral hemorrhage obscured susceptibility signs in the one remaining patient. Susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI can reflect changes in an acute embolus, such as recanalization or migration, in this study. Serial GRE-EPI in acute embolism complements the diagnostic certainty of MRA by directly detecting an embolus as a susceptibility sign. (orig.)

  9. Studying the Creation of Design Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher J.; Hevner, Ala n R.; Weber, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    and information systems represents a highly interconnected locus in which both the generative processes of building design artifacts and articulating constructs used to evaluate their quality take place. We address this interconnectedness with an extended process-oriented research design enabling multi......-modal neurophysiological data analyses. We posit that our research will provide more comprehensive assessments of the efficacy of design processes and the evaluation of the qualities of the resulting design artifacts.......As software and information systems (IS) increase in functional sophistication, perceptions of IS quality are changing. Moving beyond issues of performance efficiency, essential qualities such as fitness for purpose, sustainability, and overall effectiveness become more complex. Creating software...

  10. Artifacts of Functional Electrical Stimulation on Electromyograph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ren-quan; ZHANG Ding-guo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate different factors of the artifact in surface electromyography (EMG) signal caused by functional electrical stimulation (FES). The factors investigated include the size of stimulation electrode pads, the amplitude, frequency, and pulse width of the stimulation waveform and the detecting electrode points. We calculate the root mean square (RMS) of EMG signal to analyze the effect of these factors on the M-wave properties. The results indicate that the M-wave mainly depends on the stimulation amplitude and the distribution of detecting electrodes, but not on the other factors. This study can assist the reduction of artifact and the selection of detecting electrode points.

  11. 黄土高原风成沉积物磁化率各向异性研究%ANISOTROPY OF MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY OF EOLIAN SEDIMENTS IN THE CHINESE LOESS PLATEAU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张睿; 岳乐平; 弓虎军; 张云翔; 李建星

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of the Chinese loess-paleosol sequence in the Northwest China represents a proxy climate index related to the East Asian summer monsoon intensity. In contrast to the loess deposits, the magnetic susceptibility is almost independent of each other in the red clay, thus challenging the validity of the readily measurable magnetic susceptibility in describing the monsoon evolution history recorded by the red clay. Concentration variation of pedogenic magnetite and maghemite produced during pedogenesis is considered as the main reason for variation of magnetic susceptibility of the loess-red clay sediments. However no identical view on formation of magnetite and maghemite via inorganic precipitation or organic process was proved,the latter including the mediation of Fe-reducing bacteria which may be termed a ' Biologically Induced Mineralisation' ( BIM ) process and magnetotactic bacteria process called a ' Biologically Organised Mineralisation ' ( BOM ) process. The organic matter content and morphological characteristics of magnetic mineral in the eolian sediments have great potential for the study of magnetic minerals genesis and variation of magnetic susceptibility. In this paper,the Zhaojiachuan section (35°45'N, 107°49'E) in Xifeng town is selected for this study. This section is located in the centre of Dongzhiyuan which is the largest Yuan in the Chinese Loess Plateau, Gansu Province. The present day mean annual temperature is about 8. 7℃ with a range of -22. 4 ~35. 1℃ ,and the mean annual precipitation is 555mm in this region. The profile contains an upper about 170m alternating loess-paleosol sequence and a lower red clay with a thickness of about 55m. The loess-paleosol sequence is traditionally subdivided into five major stratigraphic units. From the surface downward these are; Holocene Black Loam ( S0 ) , late Pleistocene Malan Loess(L1 ) , Middle Pleistocene Upper Lishi Loess ( S1-L9) and Lower Lishi Loess ( S9 ~ L15

  12. Mirror Image Video Artifact: An Under-Reported Digital Video-EEG Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Michael A; Levis, William H; Bhatt, Amar B

    2017-01-01

    Synchronous video recording can be helpful in EEG recordings, especially in recognition of seizures and in rejection of artifacts. However, video recordings themselves are also subject to the risk of contamination by artifacts. We report a unique case in which a digital video artifact was identified, occurring during synchronous video-EEG recording, albeit independently of the EEG tracing itself. A synchronous digital video-EEG recording was performed on a 67-year-old male who presented in focal motor status epilepticus. During the initial review of the data, right-sided abnormalities on EEG apparently corresponded with (ipsilateral) right arm motor activity on video, suggesting a nonsensical anatomical localization. However, review of the patient's chart and discussion with the EEG technologist led to the recognition that the video data recorded a mirror image of the true findings of left arm motor activity. Review of the software settings led to the discovery that the video recording was inverted along the vertical axis, leading to mirror image video artifact. Recognition of this video artifact allowed for accurate interpretation of the study-that right hemispheric EEG abnormalities correlated appropriately with (contralateral) left arm twitching. Effective communication between the EEG reading physician, the treating team, and the EEG technologist is critical for recognition of such artifacts, for proper EEG interpretation, and for appropriate patient management. Mirror image video artifact affirms that bedside evaluation, astute technologists, and attentive EEG reading physicians remain important, even in the presence of video recording.

  13. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility used to detect coring-induced sediment disturbance and filter palaeomagnetic secular variation data: IODP sites M0061 and M0062 (Baltic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowball, Ian; Almqvist, Bjarne; Lougheed, Bryan; Svensson, Anna; Wiers, Steffen; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio

    2017-04-01

    Inspired by palaeomagnetic data obtained from two sites (M0061 and M0062) cored during IODP Expedition 347 - Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment we studied the Hemsön Alloformation, which is a series of brackish water muds consisting of horizontal planar and parallel laminated (varved) silty clays free from bioturbation. We determined the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and characteristic remanence (ChRM) directions of a total of 1,102 discrete samples cut from (i) IODP cores recovered by an Advanced Piston corer and (ii) a series of six sediment cores recovered from the same sites by a Kullenberg piston corer. Systematic core splitting, sub-sampling methods and measurements were applied to all sub-samples. We experimentally tested for field-impressed AMS of these muds, in which titanomagnetite carries magnetic remanence and this test was negative. The AMS is likely determined by paramagnetic minerals. As expected for horizontally bedded sediments, the vast majority of the K1 (maximum) and K2 (intermediate) axes had inclinations close to 0 degrees and the AMS shape parameter (T) indicates an oblate fabric. The declinations of the K1 and K2 directions of the sub-samples taken from Kullenberg cores showed a wide distribution around the bedding plane, with no preferred alignment along any specimen axis. Exceptions are samples from the upper 1.5 m of some of these cores, in which the K1 and K2 directions were vertical, the K3 (minimum) axis shallow and T became prolate. We conclude that the Kullenberg corer, which penetrated the top sediments with a pressure of approximately 15 bar, occasionally under-sampled during penetration and vertically stretched the top sediments. Sub-samples from the upper sections of Kullenberg cores had relatively steep ChRM inclinations and we rejected samples that had a prolate, vertically oriented AMS ellipsoid. Surprisingly, the declinations of the K1 axis of all sub-samples taken from IODP APC core sections, which were not oriented

  14. Reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF) for EEG artifact reduction in simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyrl, David; Krausz, Gunther; Koschutnig, Karl; Edlinger, Günter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) combines advantages of both methods, namely high temporal resolution of EEG and high spatial resolution of fMRI. However, EEG quality is limited due to severe artifacts caused by fMRI scanners. Approach. To improve EEG data quality substantially, we introduce methods that use a reusable reference layer EEG cap prototype in combination with adaptive filtering. The first method, reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF), uses adaptive filtering with reference layer artifact data to optimize artifact subtraction from EEG. In the second method, multi band reference layer adaptive filtering (MBRLAF), adaptive filtering is performed on bandwidth limited sub-bands of the EEG and the reference channels. Main results. The results suggests that RLAF outperforms the baseline method, average artifact subtraction, in all settings and also its direct predecessor, reference layer artifact subtraction (RLAS), in lower (mean-square voltage reduction and power reduction of EEG provided that physiological EEG components such as occipital EEG alpha power and visual evoked potentials (VEP) are preserved. We demonstrate that both, RLAF and MBRLAF, improve VEP quality. For that, we calculate the mean-squared-distance of single trial VEP to the mean VEP and estimate single trial VEP classification accuracies. We found that the average mean-squared-distance is lowest and the average classification accuracy is highest after MBLAF. RLAF was second best. Significance. In conclusion, the results suggests that RLAF and MBRLAF are potentially very effective in improving EEG quality of simultaneous EEG-fMRI. Highlights We present a new and reusable reference layer cap prototype for simultaneous EEG-fMRI We introduce new algorithms for reducing EEG artifacts due to simultaneous fMRI The algorithms combine a reference layer and adaptive filtering Several evaluation criteria suggest superior

  15. Vibration-synchronized magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of myocardial elasticity changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgeti, Thomas; Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Hirsch, Sebastian; Krefting, Dagmar; Klatt, Dieter; Niendorf, Thoralf; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2012-04-01

    Vibration synchronized magnetic resonance imaging of harmonically oscillating tissue interfaces is proposed for cardiac magnetic resonance elastography. The new approach exploits cardiac triggered cine imaging synchronized with extrinsic harmonic stimulation (f = 22.83 Hz) to display oscillatory tissue deformations in magnitude images. Oscillations are analyzed by intensity threshold-based image processing to track wave amplitude variations over the cardiac cycle. In agreement to literature data, results in 10 volunteers showed that endocardial wave amplitudes during systole (0.13 ± 0.07 mm) were significantly lower than during diastole (0.34 ± 0.14 mm, P magnetic resonance imaging improves the temporal resolution of magnetic resonance elastography as it overcomes the use of extra motion encoding gradients, is less sensitive to susceptibility artifacts, and does not suffer from dynamic range constraints frequently encountered in phase-based magnetic resonance elastography.

  16. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and im