WorldWideScience

Sample records for magnetic resonance system

  1. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  2. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  3. Shimadzu magnetic resonance imaging system, SMT-50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Shiro; Nishida, Takayuki; Fujio, Yasuo

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, as a new modality of medical imaging, has already been put to practical applications on many clinical sites, through which a lot of clinical data has been accumulated. It can offer a powerful new probe of internal anatomy of the human body and its functions. Now that the MRI has established its effectiveness in diagnosis, a really practical MRI system which features high efficiency and economical design with high patient throughput is strongly called for. Introduced in this article is a superconductive magnet MRI system, SMT-50, operating at 5000 Gauss. It has realized an excellent diagnostic capability with such functions as multi-slice multi-echo imaging, high sensitive, surface coil technique and so on. High resolution image display (1024 x 1024 pixcel) unit and separate console system (viewing console and scanning console) will assist high patient throughput. The outline of the SMT-50 and its clinical data are reported here. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshiaki; Imai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Sigeru; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Tateno, Yukio; Ikehira, Hiroo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive technique for visualization of the cardiovascular system, and is used to evaluate tissue characteristics, cardiac function and blood flow abnormalities, as well as to obtain morphological information. In this paper we presented results of clinical and laboratory research obtained using conventional spin echo MRI with regard to cardiovascular anatomy, tissue characterization and physiology. Furthermore, experience with two new techniques, cine-MRI and volume-selected MR spectroscopy, and their potential clinical usefulness in detecting cardiovascular diseases are documented. (author)

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance applications in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ling; Liu Maili

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a state-of-the-art technology which has been widely applied in biological systems over the past decades. It is a powerful tool for macromolecular structure determination in solution, and has the unique advantage of being capable of elucidating the structure and dynamic behavior of proteins during vital biomedical processes. In this review, we introduce the recent progress in NMR techniques for studying the structure, interaction and dynamics of proteins. The methods for NMR based drug discovery and metabonomics are also briefly introduced. (authors)

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  7. Multiple systems atrophy: Differentiation and findings by Magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas Velez, Sergio Alberto; Alzate Betancur, Catalina Maria

    2006-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neuro degenerative disorder of undetermined cause, characterized clinically by Parkinson's, autonomic, cerebellar or pyramidal sing and symptoms. lts differentiation from Parkinson's disease may be difficult, mainly in the early stages owing to overlapping features. Magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated usefulness in MSA diagnosis and in differentiation with Parkinson's disease. One case with magnetic resonance findings is described

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antypas, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The difference between intracellular and extracellular proton relaxation rates provides the basis for the determination of the mean hemoglobin concentration (MHC) in red blood cells. The observed water T 1 relaxation data from red blood cell samples under various conditions were fit to the complete equation for the time-dependent decay of magnetization for a two-compartment system including chemical exchange. The MHC for each sample was calculated from the hematocrit and the intracellular water fraction as determined by NMR. The binding of the phosphorylcholine (PC) analogue, 2-(trimethylphosphonio)-ethylphosphate (phosphoryl-phosphocholine, PPC) to the PC binding myeloma proteins TEPC-15, McPC 603, and MOPC 167 was studied by 31 P NMR

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaap, M.S. van der; Valk, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this article a review is given of the use of magnetic resonance imaging for the central nervous system. An example of the screening of the population for multiple scelerosis is given. A good preliminary examination and the supply of relevant information to the person which performs the imaging is necessary. (R.B.). 9 figs.; 4 tabs

  10. Research on Wireless Power Transfer System via Magnetically Coupled Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Meng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to extend the transmission distance and improve the transmission efficiency of the traditional wireless power transmission(WPTsystem composed with the transmitting and receiving coil resonators based on magnetic resonance coupling,we proposed an effective method to add a magnetic core between repeating coil and receiving coil based on the single repeating three coils mode. This paper deduced a mathematical expression of the transmission efficiency,and built a model by the circuit theory,and also simulated the transmission system added with the magnetic core between repeating and receiving coil. Then we selected the flat magnetic core for test. At last,we verified the feasibility of the proposal by actual experiment.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan (Industrial NMR Centre and Div. of Physical Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvinskikh, Sergey V.; Furo, Istvan

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes results from a set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on Ca and Na montmorillonite samples interacting with water. The primary goal with these studies was to provide, in a non-invasive manner, a quantitative measure of bentonite distribution in extended samples during and after different physical processes such as swelling and sedimentation and on the time scale from minutes to years. Additionally, we also studied the distribution of foreign particles (such as native minerals as well as magnetic model particles) within bentonite systems and performed some diffusion NMR experiments with the aim of characterizing the state of colloids that form after clay dissolution. Both natural montmorillonites and purified and ion-exchanged montmorillonite clays were investigated. The primary variables were clay composition and water ionic strength. Bulk samples confined in a vertical tube and in a horizontal channel were investigated. A critical issue for the stability of clay buffer layer in deep underground repository is to prevent or minimize the release of clay particles into the water phase. In our experiments, the most significant particle losses were found for Na-MX80 clay exposed to water with low ionic strength. With increasing the concentration of CaCl 2 in the water phase both swelling and particle release are slowed down but not completely eliminated due probably to gradual change of water ion content via ion exchange with the clay itself. For natural MX80 samples, in spite of significant swelling expansion, no clay particle release above the sensitivity limit of 0.001 volume% was observed. Ca-MX80 exhibited the smallest expansion and no trace of clay particle released into the aqueous phase

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in central nervous system tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, Richa; Saksena, Sona; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in any form is a devastating disease, which in its most severe form involves the central nervous system (CNS), with a high mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis of CNS TB is necessary for appropriate treatment to reduce this morbidity and mortality. Routine diagnostic techniques involve culture and immunological tests of the tissue and biofluids, which are time-consuming and may delay definitive management. Noninvasive imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used in the diagnosis of neurotuberculosis, with MRI offering greater inherent sensitivity and specificity than CT scan. In addition to conventional MRI imaging, magnetization transfer imaging, diffusion imaging, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are also being evaluated for better tissue characterization in CNS TB. The current article reviews the role of various MRI techniques in the diagnosis and management of CNS TB

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of central nervous system haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; Hennessy, O.

    1993-01-01

    The variable magnetic resonance imaging appearances of central nervous system haemorrhage, both intra- and extra-axial, are described. These will vary with the type of image contrast (T1 or T2 weighting), the nature of the imaging sequence (spin-echo or gradient-echo) and the time from onset of haemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful technique for imaging haemorrhage in the central nervous system as it yields temporal information about haematoma development, and it is the only non-invasive means of imaging intraspinal haemorrhage. However, in the imaging of haematomas within 24 h of onset and in subarachnoid haemorrhage computed tomography is the investigation of choice. 13 refs., 6 figs

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aotsuka, Akiyo; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ikehira, Hiroo; Hashimoto, Takahiro

    1992-08-01

    We studied 18 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) by high field strength MRI: 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND), 4 Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and 8 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA). We also studied 30 Parkinson's disease (PD) and 10 age-matched controls. The diagnosis of SND, SDS, and OPCA were based on criteria after Hirayama et al (1985). Bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor were assessed with the summed scores of the signs used as the extrapyramidal scores. The mean extrapyramidal scores were not significantly different in patients with SND, SDS, OPCA, and PD. MRI studies were performed on 1.5 tesla MRI unit, using a T[sub 2]-weighted spin echo pulse sequence (TR2500 ms/TE40 ms). The width of the pars compacta signal in all subjects was measured by the method of Duguid et al (1986). Intensity profiles were made on a straight line perpendicular to the pars compacta through the center of the red nucleus on an image of the midbrain. We measured the width of the valley at half-height between the peaks of an index of the width of the pars compacta signal. The mean widths of the pars compacta signal were: 2.8[+-]0.4 mm (SND), 2.8[+-]0.7 mm (SDS), 3.6[+-]0.6 mm (OPCA), 2.7[+-]0.3 mm (PD), and 4.3[+-]0.6 mm (control). The mean widths of the pars compacta signal in PD, SND, and SDS were significantly narrower than that in the control group (p<0.05), while the OPCA group was not significantly narrower. The results may indicate that the time course of nigral involvement is milder in OPCA than in SND and SDS. The extrapyramidal signs in OPCA may be attributed mainly to the degeneration of the putamen rather than to that of the substantia nigra. Abnormal hypointensity in the posterolateral putamen was found in only one SND patient and in two OPCA patients, even though this finding has been frequently observed in MSA. Since no PD patients exhibited this finding, it may of some value in differentiating MSA from PD. (author).

  17. Content Based Retrieval System for Magnetic Resonance Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojachanets, Katarina

    2010-01-01

    The amount of medical images is continuously increasing as a consequence of the constant growth and development of techniques for digital image acquisition. Manual annotation and description of each image is impractical, expensive and time consuming approach. Moreover, it is an imprecise and insufficient way for describing all information stored in medical images. This induces the necessity for developing efficient image storage, annotation and retrieval systems. Content based image retrieval (CBIR) emerges as an efficient approach for digital image retrieval from large databases. It includes two phases. In the first phase, the visual content of the image is analyzed and the feature extraction process is performed. An appropriate descriptor, namely, feature vector is then associated with each image. These descriptors are used in the second phase, i.e. the retrieval process. With the aim to improve the efficiency and precision of the content based image retrieval systems, feature extraction and automatic image annotation techniques are subject of continuous researches and development. Including the classification techniques in the retrieval process enables automatic image annotation in an existing CBIR system. It contributes to more efficient and easier image organization in the system.Applying content based retrieval in the field of magnetic resonance is a big challenge. Magnetic resonance imaging is an image based diagnostic technique which is widely used in medical environment. According to this, the number of magnetic resonance images is enormously growing. Magnetic resonance images provide plentiful medical information, high resolution and specific nature. Thus, the capability of CBIR systems for image retrieval from large database is of great importance for efficient analysis of this kind of images. The aim of this thesis is to propose content based retrieval system architecture for magnetic resonance images. To provide the system efficiency, feature

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  19. Magnetic motion capture system using LC resonant magnetic marker composed of Ni-Zn ferrite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashi, S.; Toyoda, M.; Ohya, M.; Okazaki, Y.; Yabukami, S.; Ishiyama, K.; Arai, K. I.

    2006-01-01

    We have proposed a magnetic motion capture system using an LC resonant magnetic marker. The proposed system is composed of an exciting coil, an LC marker, and a 5x5-matrix search coil array (25 search coils). The LC marker is small and has a minimal circuit with no battery and can be driven wirelessly by the action of electromagnetic induction. It consists of a Ni-Zn ferrite core (3 mmφx10 mm) with a wound coil and a chip capacitor, forming an LC series circuit with a resonant frequency of 186 kHz. The relative position accuracy of the system is less than 1 mm within the area of 100 mm 3 up to 150 mm from the search coil array. Compared with dc magnetic systems, the proposed system is applicable for precision motion capture in optically isolated spaces without magnetic shielding because the system is not greatly influenced by earth field noise

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodama, Kazuhiro; Sato, Toshio; Koseki, Keijiro

    1987-09-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus manifested by neurologic symptoms. The results were compared with those of the concurrent X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT scans showed slight cerebral atrophy in four patients, including one with coexisting enlargement of the lateral ventricle. In three of them, MRI scans showed additional abnormal appearance, possibly reflecting cerebral infarction and reversible changes in water content of cerebral tissues. The findings of MRI and CT in a small series of patients was disappointing in the explanation of the occurrence of neurologic symptoms. (Namekawa, K.).

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Kazuhiro; Sato, Toshio; Koseki, Keijiro

    1987-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in five patients with systemic lupus erythematosus manifested by neurologic symptoms. The results were compared with those of the concurrent X-ray computed tomography (CT). CT scans showed slight cerebral atrophy in four patients, including one with coexisting enlargement of the lateral ventricle. In three of them, MRI scans showed additional abnormal appearance, possibly reflecting cerebral infarction and reversible changes in water content of cerebral tissues. The findings of MRI and CT in a small series of patients was disappointing in the explanation of the occurrence of neurologic symptoms. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Reem H A; Nassef, Amr A

    2010-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem disease where functional and structural abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Recently, transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhages have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. Evaluate brain changes in patients with systemic sclerosis using MRI. Thirty female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. An age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain MR examination. Central nervous system involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on MR evaluation than in the age-related control group, signifying a form of central nervous system vasculopathy. Such foci showed no definite correlation with disease duration, yet they showed significant correlation to severity of peripheral vascular disease, headaches, fainting attacks and depression in the group under study. Asymptomatic as well as symptomatic central nervous system ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and MRI is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  4. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  5. The OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G.; Bird, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying...... inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. Methods: MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working...... Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Results: Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables...

  6. Central nervous system lymphoma: magnetic resonance imaging features at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schwingel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This paper aimed at studying presentations of the central nervous system (CNS lymphoma using structural images obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODS: The MRI features at presentation of 15 patients diagnosed with CNS lymphoma in a university hospital, between January 1999 and March 2011, were analyzed by frequency and cross tabulation. RESULTS: All patients had supratentorial lesions; and four had infra- and supratentorial lesions. The signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images was predominantly hypo- or isointense. In the T2 weighted images, single lesions were associated with a hypointense signal component. Six patients presented necrosis, all of them showed perilesional abnormal white matter, nine had meningeal involvement, and five had subependymal spread. Subependymal spread and meningeal involvement tended to occur in younger patients. CONCLUSION: Presentations of lymphoma are very pleomorphic, but some of them should point to this diagnostic possibility.

  7. Optimal and Miniaturized Strongly Coupled Magnetic Resonant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technologies for communication and recharging devices have recently attracted significant research attention. Conventional WPT systems based either on far-field or near-field coupling cannot provide simultaneously high efficiency and long transfer range. The Strongly Coupled Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) method was introduced recently, and it offers the possibility of transferring power with high efficiency over longer distances. Previous SCMR research has only focused on how to improve its efficiency and range through different methods. However, the study of optimal and miniaturized designs has been limited. In addition, no multiband and broadband SCMR WPT systems have been developed and traditional SCMR systems exhibit narrowband efficiency thereby imposing strict limitations on simultaneous wireless transmission of information and power, which is important for battery-less sensors. Therefore, new SCMR systems that are optimally designed and miniaturized in size will significantly enhance various technologies in many applications. The optimal and miniaturized SCMR systems are studied here. First, analytical models of the Conformal SCMR (CSCMR) system and thorough analysis and design methodology have been presented. This analysis specifically leads to the identification of the optimal design parameters, and predicts the performance of the designed CSCMR system. Second, optimal multiband and broadband CSCMR systems are designed. Two-band, three-band, and four-band CSCMR systems are designed and validated using simulations and measurements. Novel broadband CSCMR systems are also analyzed, designed, simulated and measured. The proposed broadband CSCMR system achieved more than 7 times larger bandwidth compared to the traditional SCMR system at the same frequency. Miniaturization methods of SCMR systems are also explored. Specifically, methods that use printable CSCMR with large capacitors, novel topologies including meandered, SRRs, and

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  9. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  10. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  11. Gradient coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frese, G.; Siebold, H.

    1984-01-01

    A gradient coil system for an image-generating, nuclear magnetic resonance tomographic apparatus, particularly a zeugmatographic apparatus. The gradient coil system is arranged on a support body of rotational symmetry, illustratively a hollow cylindrical support body, having an axis which extends along the z-direction of an x, y, z coordinate system which has an origin in the center of imaging region. The gradient coil system contains two pairs of toroidal individual coils which are arranged symmetrically with respect to an x-y plane which extends through the center of the imaging region and which are arranged perpendicular to the z-axis. The direction of current flow in the individual coils of a coil pair is opposite to the direction of flow in the individual coils of the other coil pair. Moreover, further sets of coils are provided for generating field gradient Gx in the x-direction, and Gy in the y-direction. The hollow cylindrical shape of the support body on which the individual coils are arranged permit an imaging region having a substantially spherical volume with a substantially constant field gradient Gz to be achieved. Each of the coils has a predetermined linkage factor which corresponds to the product of the current flowing through the number of coil turns of the coil. Those coils which are arranged further from the plane of symmetry have a substantially larger linkage factor than the coils which are nearer to the plane of symmetry

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  14. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuanhu [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  15. Flow imaging of the cardiovascular system using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hitoshi; Sakakibara, Makoto; Sunami, Yuko

    1988-01-01

    Blood flow images by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 0.25 T unit were evaluated for nine normal volunteers and 108 subjects with a variety of cardiovascular abnormalities. Using the non-gated short-spin echo (SE) technique, blood flow in the cardiovascular systems was not imaged in the normal volunteers. Using end-systolic and end-diastolic SE techniques for the normal subjects, blood flow in the cardiac chambers was not clearly imaged. Blood flow in the ascending aorta and aortic arch often did not appear in the gated SE images of the normal subjects. However, blood flow in the descending aorta was often observed in the gated SE images. Blood flow imaging was demonstrated by both non-gated and gated SE techniques in regions where blood flow was relatively slow; for example, in the left atrium of mitral stenosis, in an aortic aneurysm, in a false lumen of an aortic dissection, and in the left ventricle having old myocardial infarction. Using the non-gated inversion recovery (IR) technique, no blood flow was imaged in the cardiovascular system except in the left atrium of one case with mitral stenosis. Using the non-gated short SE technique, there was good correlation between the thrombus formation and the presence of blood flow images in the left atria of 17 patients with mitral stenosis, and in the aneurysmal portions of the aorta or in the false lumens of aortic dissection of 18 patients. It was suggested that mural thrombi in such diseases were related to the relatively slow blood flow. Blood flow imaging easily distinguished stagnant blood flow from mural thrombi using non-gated short SE, end-systolic SE, and IR techniques. Thus, blood flow imaging using MRI should become an important means of evaluating the cardiovascular system. (author)

  16. A Method for Eddy Current Field Measurement in Permanent Magnet Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Rui

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a widely used medical imaging technique. In MRI system, gradient magnetic fields are used to code spatial information. However, the fast-switching electric currents in the gradients coils used to generate gradient fields also induce vortex electric field, often referred as eddy current, in the surrounding metal conductors. In this paper, a method for eddy current field measurement was proposed. Based on the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction, an eddy current field measuring device was designed. Combining hardware acquisition and software processing, the eddy current field was obtained by subtracting the ideal gradient field from the magnetic field measured experimentally, whose waveform could be displayed in real time. The proposed method was verified by experimental results.

  17. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  18. Resonant coherent quantum tunneling of the magnetization of spin-systems: Spin-parity effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Pablos, D; Garcia, N; de Raedt, H.A.

    1997-01-01

    We perform quantum dynamical calculations to study the reversal of the magnetization for systems of a few the presence of an external magnetic field at T=0 and with no dissipation. Collective quantum tunneling of the magnetization is demonstrated to occur only for some specific resonant values of

  19. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  20. Hemophilic arthropathy. A scoring system for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Marini, M.; Lopez-Fernandez, F.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define a system for scoring hemophilic arthropathy (HA) based on MR findings, providing for objective evaluation of the degree of joint involvement and evolution after on-demand administration of FVIII substitutional therapy or prophylactic treatment. A total of 133 MR examinations (89 basal and 44 during follow-up) were performed in 25 patients. Patients were divided in two groups depending on the therapy received and the length of time that the disease had been evolving at the start of the study. Group I was composed of 10 patients with secondary prophylaxis and group II was composed by 15 treated on demand. T1-weighted and T2*-weighted images performed on a 0.5-T unit were prospectively evaluated. The joint involvement was established on a scale of 0 (no abnormalities), I (minimal amount of hemosiderin), II (large amount of hemosiderin and isolated cartilaginous erosion), III (cartilage destruction, bone erosions, and subchondral cysts) to IV (large internal joint derangement, secondary osteoarthritis and/or ankylosis). At basal MR examination, patients of group I showed no abnormalities (n=28, 75.6%), grade I (n=3), and grade II (n=6) of HA. Patients of group II corresponded to MR grades III (n=21) and IV (n=11) of HA. The MR follow-up showed improvement in three joints of group I and worsening in 5 joints in group I and 2 joints in group II. Early signs of HA were detected in 10 joints with MR imaging but were underestimated on plain radiographs. Advanced degrees of HA were classified as severe under both imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance is the preferred imaging technique to assess HA. The earliest signs of joint damage, detected by MR, are overlooked by plain radiography. The MR scoring system can be used for evaluating HA. Follow-up MR should be performed to evaluate regression or worsening of the abnormalities, primarily in the case of patients with prophylaxis who usually suffer normal or early joint involvement not

  1. Hemophilic arthropathy. A scoring system for magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Marini, M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, Coruna (Spain); Lopez-Fernandez, F. [Department of Hematology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, Coruna (Spain)

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to define a system for scoring hemophilic arthropathy (HA) based on MR findings, providing for objective evaluation of the degree of joint involvement and evolution after on-demand administration of FVIII substitutional therapy or prophylactic treatment. A total of 133 MR examinations (89 basal and 44 during follow-up) were performed in 25 patients. Patients were divided in two groups depending on the therapy received and the length of time that the disease had been evolving at the start of the study. Group I was composed of 10 patients with secondary prophylaxis and group II was composed by 15 treated on demand. T1-weighted and T2*-weighted images performed on a 0.5-T unit were prospectively evaluated. The joint involvement was established on a scale of 0 (no abnormalities), I (minimal amount of hemosiderin), II (large amount of hemosiderin and isolated cartilaginous erosion), III (cartilage destruction, bone erosions, and subchondral cysts) to IV (large internal joint derangement, secondary osteoarthritis and/or ankylosis). At basal MR examination, patients of group I showed no abnormalities (n=28, 75.6%), grade I (n=3), and grade II (n=6) of HA. Patients of group II corresponded to MR grades III (n=21) and IV (n=11) of HA. The MR follow-up showed improvement in three joints of group I and worsening in 5 joints in group I and 2 joints in group II. Early signs of HA were detected in 10 joints with MR imaging but were underestimated on plain radiographs. Advanced degrees of HA were classified as severe under both imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance is the preferred imaging technique to assess HA. The earliest signs of joint damage, detected by MR, are overlooked by plain radiography. The MR scoring system can be used for evaluating HA. Follow-up MR should be performed to evaluate regression or worsening of the abnormalities, primarily in the case of patients with prophylaxis who usually suffer normal or early joint involvement not

  2. Oval gradient coils for an open magnetic resonance imaging system with a vertical magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Koki; Abe, Mitsushi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Existing open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems use biplanar gradient coils for the spatial encoding of signals. We propose using novel oval gradient coils for an open vertical-field MRI. We designed oval gradients for a 0.3T open MRI system and showed that such a system could outperform a traditional biplanar gradient system while maintaining adequate gradient homogeneity and subject accessibility. Such oval gradient coils would exhibit high efficiency, low inductance and resistance, and high switching capability. Although the designed oval Y and Z coils showed more heat dissipation and less cooling capability than biplanar coils with the same gap, they showed an efficient heat-dissipation path to the surrounding air, which would alleviate the heat problem. The performance of the designed oval-coil system was demonstrated experimentally by imaging a human hand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetism in heterogeneous thin film systems: Resonant X-ray scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortright, J.B.; Jiang, J.S.; Bader, S.D.; Hellwig, O.; Marguiles, D.T.; Fullerton, E.E.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic and chemical heterogeneity are common in a broad range of magnetic thin film systems. Emerging resonant soft x-ray scattering techniques are well suited to resolve such heterogeneity at relevant length scales. Resonant x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements laterally average over heterogeneity but can provide depth resolution in different ways, as illustrated in measurements resolving reversible and irreversible changes in different layers of exchange-spring heterostructures. Resonant small-angle scattering measures in-plane heterogeneity and can resolve magnetic and chemical scattering sources in different ways, as illustrated in measurements of granular alloy recording media

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. Comparison with X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajima, Toshio; Kagawa, Yoshihiro; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1987-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) have been performed in 169 consecutive patients with central nervous system diseases. The findings from the two methods were compared for the capacity to defect lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive than or equivalent to X-ray CT in detecting lesions - especially detecting. Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, spinal cord injury, and pituitary adenoma - in 158 patients (94 %). In six patients (10 %), lesion detection was possible only by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was inferior to X-ray CT in 11 patients (7 %) in detecting calcified lesions, meningioma, and cavernous hemangioma. (Namekawa, K.).

  5. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging phantoms: A review and the need for a system phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kathryn E; Ainslie, Maureen; Barker, Alex J; Boss, Michael A; Cecil, Kim M; Charles, Cecil; Chenevert, Thomas L; Clarke, Larry; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Finn, Paul; Gembris, Daniel; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Hill, Derek L G; Jack, Clifford R; Jackson, Edward F; Liu, Guoying; Russek, Stephen E; Sharma, Samir D; Steckner, Michael; Stupic, Karl F; Trzasko, Joshua D; Yuan, Chun; Zheng, Jie

    2018-01-01

    The MRI community is using quantitative mapping techniques to complement qualitative imaging. For quantitative imaging to reach its full potential, it is necessary to analyze measurements across systems and longitudinally. Clinical use of quantitative imaging can be facilitated through adoption and use of a standard system phantom, a calibration/standard reference object, to assess the performance of an MRI machine. The International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine AdHoc Committee on Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance was established in February 2007 to facilitate the expansion of MRI as a mainstream modality for multi-institutional measurements, including, among other things, multicenter trials. The goal of the Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance committee was to provide a framework to ensure that quantitative measures derived from MR data are comparable over time, between subjects, between sites, and between vendors. This paper, written by members of the Standards for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance committee, reviews standardization attempts and then details the need, requirements, and implementation plan for a standard system phantom for quantitative MRI. In addition, application-specific phantoms and implementation of quantitative MRI are reviewed. Magn Reson Med 79:48-61, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  7. Retrospective assessment of exposure to static magnetic fields during production and development of magnetic resonance imaging systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Suzan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313874050; Christopher, Yvette|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/27590184X; Engels, Hans; Slottje, Pauline|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/299345351; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    At present, the relationship between chronic exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and health effects is unclear. We developed a task-based deterministic model for estimating historical electromagnetic field exposure from the static B-field (B0) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, for a

  8. Study on frequency characteristics of wireless power transmission system based on magnetic coupling resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L. H.; Liu, Z. Z.; Hou, Y. J.; Zeng, H.; Yue, Z. K.; Cui, S.

    2017-11-01

    In order to study the frequency characteristics of the wireless energy transmission system based on the magnetic coupling resonance, a circuit model based on the magnetic coupling resonant wireless energy transmission system is established. The influence of the load on the frequency characteristics of the wireless power transmission system is analysed. The circuit coupling theory is used to derive the minimum load required to suppress frequency splitting. Simulation and experimental results verify that when the load size is lower than a certain value, the system will appear frequency splitting, increasing the load size can effectively suppress the frequency splitting phenomenon. The power regulation scheme of the wireless charging system based on magnetic coupling resonance is given. This study provides a theoretical basis for load selection and power regulation of wireless power transmission systems.

  9. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  10. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  13. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  14. Manufacturing of a superconducting magnet system for 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at KBSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B S; Choi, S; Yoon, J H; Park, J Y; Won, M S

    2012-02-01

    A magnet system for a 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source is being developed by the Korea Basic Science Institute. The configuration of the magnet system consists of 3 solenoid coils for a mirror magnetic field and 6 racetrack coils for a hexapole magnetic field. They can generate axial magnetic fields of 3.6 T at the beam injection part and 2.2 T at the extraction part. A radial magnetic field of 2.1 T is achievable at the plasma chamber wall. A step type winding process was employed in fabricating the hexapole coil. The winding technique was confirmed through repeated cooling tests. Superconducting magnets and a cryostat system are currently being manufactured.

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    Qualitative assessments of the hypertrophied myocardium were performed using spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 15 normotensive patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH), 10 hypertensive patients with concentric hypertrophy (CH) and 5 normal subjects (N). The changes of these values were evaluated related to cardiac cycle, and their usefulness in differentiating diseases. The wall thickness and internal dimension of the left ventricle (LV) in 10 cases were obtained using echocardiography and MRI, and there was a good correlation coefficient in wall thickness (r=0.987) and in internal dimension (r=0.991). Left ventricular short-axis images were obtained using ECG-gated spin-echo sequence (Te=30, 80 msec) and using inversion recovery sequence. T1 and T2 images were calculated at endsystolic and diastolic cardiac phases. The regional wall thickness (WT) and T1 and T2 values were measured in the anterior septum, anterior wall, lateral wall, posterior wall and posterior septum. Myocardial T1 and T2 values were significantly decreased in systole (T1: 185.6±37.9 msec, T2: 24.4±6.3 msec) compared to those in diastole (T1: 249.2±56.7 msec, T2: 31.7±9.4 msec). In both ASH and CH groups, significant correlations were observed between diastolic T1 values and WT (ASH: r=0.80, CH: r=0.45), and between diastolic T2 values and WT (ASH: r=0.58, CH: r=0.60). In the regions where diastolic WT were more than 17 mm, T1 values in the ASH group (343.4±40.5 msec) were significantly higher than those of the CH group (247.3±21.4 msec), although the mean wall thickness values were similar in both groups. These results indicate that myocardial relaxation times are related to cardiac cycle, wall thickness and types of hypertrophy. The T1 and T2 values at diastolic cardiac phase might be useful for distinguishing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertrophy due to hypertension. (author)

  17. Study on electromagnetic characteristics of the magnetic coupling resonant coil for the wireless power transmission system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxian; Liu, Yiping; Wei, Yonggeng; Song, Yilin

    2018-01-01

    The resonant coil design is taken as the core technology in the magnetic coupling resonant wireless power transmission system, which achieves energy transmission by the coupling of the resonant coil. This paper studies the effect of the resonant coil on energy transmission and the efficiency of the system. Combining a two-coil with a three-coil system, the optimum design method for the resonant coil is given to propose a novel coil structure. First, the co-simulation methods of Pspice and Maxwell are used. When the coupling coefficient of the resonant coil is different, the relationship between system transmission efficiency, output power, and frequency is analyzed. When the self-inductance of the resonant coil is different, the relationship between the performance and frequency of the system transmission is analyzed. Then, two-coil and three-coil structure models are built, and the parameters of the magnetic field of the coils are calculated and analyzed using the finite element method. In the end, a dual E-type simulation circuit model is used to optimize the design of the novel resonance coil. The co-simulation results show that the coupling coefficients of the two-coil, three-coil, and novel coil systems are 0.017, 0.17 and 0.0126, respectively. The power loss of the novel coil is 16.4 mW. There is an obvious improvement in the three-coil system, which shows that the magnetic leakage of the field and the energy coupling are relatively small. The new structure coil has better performance, and the load loss is lower; it can improve the system output power and transmission efficiency.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  19. Pulsed magnetic field generation suited for low-field unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunkar, Neelam Prabhu; Selvaraj, Jayaprakash; Theh, Wei-Shen; Weber, Robert; Mina, Mani

    2018-05-01

    Pulsed magnetic fields can be used to provide instantaneous localized magnetic field variations. In presence of static fields, pulsed field variations are often used to apply torques and in-effect to measure behavior of magnetic moments in different states. In this work, the design and experimental performance of a pulsed magnetic field generator suited for low static field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications is presented. One of the challenges of low bias field NMR measurements is low signal to noise ratio due to the comparable nature of the bias field and the pulsed field. Therefore, a circuit is designed to apply pulsed currents through an inductive load, leading to generation of pulsed magnetic fields which can temporarily overpower the effect of the bias field on magnetic moments. The designed circuit will be tuned to operate at the precession frequency of 1H (protons) placed in a bias field produced by permanent magnets. The designed circuit parameters may be tuned to operate under different bias conditions. Therefore, low field NMR measurements can be performed for different bias fields. Circuit simulations were used to determine design parameters, corresponding experimental measurements will be presented in this work.

  20. The design of photoelectric signal processing system for a nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Zhou, Binquan; Li, Hong; Zhao, Xinghua; Mu, Weiwei; Wu, Wenfeng

    2017-10-01

    Navigation technology is crucial to the national defense and military, which can realize the measurement of orientation, positioning, attitude and speed for moving object. Inertial navigation is not only autonomous, real-time, continuous, hidden, undisturbed but also no time-limited and environment-limited. The gyroscope is the core component of the inertial navigation system, whose precision and size are the bottleneck of the performance. However, nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope is characteristic of the advantage of high precision and small size. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope can meet the urgent needs of high-tech weapons and equipment development of new generation. This paper mainly designs a set of photoelectric signal processing system for nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on FPGA, which process and control the information of detecting laser .The photoelectric signal with high frequency carrier is demodulated by in-phase and quadrature demodulation method. Finally, the processing system of photoelectric signal can compensate the residual magnetism of the shielding barrel and provide the information of nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope angular velocity.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  2. [Analysis of accidents for magnetically induced displacement of the large ferromagnetic material in magnetic resonance systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, Yuya; Doi, Tsukasa; Ueyama, Tsuyoshi; Nishiki, Shigeo; Ogura, Akio; Kawamitsu, Hideaki; Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Okuaki, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    To improve magnetic resonance (MR) safety, we surveyed the accidents caused by large ferromagnetic materials brought into MR systems accidentally. We sent a questionnaire to 700 Japanese medical institutions and received 405 valid responses (58%). A total of 97 accidents in 77 institutions were observed and we analyzed them regarding incidental rate, the detail situation and environmental factors. The mean accident rate of each institute was 0.7/100,000 examinations, which was widely distributed (0-25.6/100,000) depending on the institute. In this survey, relatively small institutes with less than 500 beds tend to have these accidents more frequently (paccidents than those with less than 10 daily examinations. The institutes with 6-10 MR examinations daily have significantly more accidents than that with more than 10 daily MR examinations (paccidents were considered to be "prejudice" and "carelessness" but some advocate "ignorance." Though we could not find significant reduction in the institutes that have lectures and training for MR safety, we should continue lectures and training for MR safety to reduce accidents due to "ignorance."

  3. The longitudinal reliability and responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System (HOAMRIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, Ida K.; Eshed, Iris; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the interreader reliability of change scores and the responsiveness of the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis (OA) Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) Scoring System (HOAMRIS). Methods. Paired MRI (baseline and 5-yr followup) from 20 patients with hand OA were scored with known time se...

  4. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  6. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  7. Co-Funding for the Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan McLaughlin, Ph.D., Director, Division of Applied Science & Technology, NIBIB, NIH

    2008-10-01

    The XXIst International Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems (ICMRBS 2005), '60th anniversary of the discovery of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance,' was held between 16 and 21 January 2005 in Hyderabad, India. The meeting focused on a broad range of magnetic resonance methods as applied to studies of biological processes related to human health. The biennial ICMRBS has become the major venue for discussion of advances in nuclear and electron magnetic resonance (NMR & EMR/EPR) studies of the structure, dynamics, and chemical properties of important classes of biomolecules. Magnetic resonance has become an established tool in structural biology, and its special importance derives from its ability to provide atomic level information. It is becoming increasingly evident that the dynamic features of biomolecules, their intermolecular interactions, and accessible conformations in solution are data of key importance in understanding molecular recognition and function. NMR, which is already contributing to approximately 25% of the new structures being deposited with the Protein Data Bank, is destined to be a major player in the post genomic structure age with its emphasis on structure and function. In-vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results shed light on human metabolic processes and on the cellular ramifications of cancer, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other pathologies. New methodologies in metabonomics may lead to development of new drugs and medical diagnosis. The ICMRBS is the one conference that brings together experts from high-resolution NMR, solid state NMR, EPR, in-vivo MRS and MRI, and developers of instrumentation, techniques, software, and databases. Symposia at this ICMRBS are designed to continue the fruitful cross-fertilization of ideas that has been so successful in driving the spectacular advances in this field. ICMRBS 2005 maintained the traditional format of poster sessions, and

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  11. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  14. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  15. Development of a temperature-variable magnetic resonance imaging system using a 1.0T yokeless permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Y; Tamada, D; Kose, K

    2011-10-01

    A temperature variable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed using a 1.0 T permanent magnet. A permanent magnet, gradient coils, radiofrequency coil, and shim coil were installed in a temperature variable thermostatic bath. First, the variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneity with temperature was measured. The inhomogeneity has a specific spatial symmetry, which scales linearly with temperature, and a single-channel shim coil was designed to compensate for the inhomogeneity. The inhomogeneity was drastically reduced by shimming over a wide range of temperature from -5°C to 45°C. MR images of an okra pod acquired at different temperatures demonstrated the high potential of the system for visualizing thermally sensitive properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The galenic venous system: Surgical anatomy and its angiographic and magnetic resonance venographic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, Tuerker; Ozduman, Koray; Cavdar, Safiye; Oezek, M. Memet; Pamir, M. Necmettin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the adequacy of digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography in imaging of the galenic venous system for surgical planning of approaches to the pineal region. Anatomical dissections were carried out in 10 cadavers of several age groups and these were compared to imaging findings in 10 living subjects. Methods: The presence or absence of 10 predetermined veins or vein groupings belonging to the galenic venous system were prospectively analyzed in 10 cadaver dissections and imaging findings of 10 age matched human subjects. The studied vessels were the vein of galen, the internal cerebral veins, both basal vein of Rosenthals, internal occipital vein, occipitotemporal veins, precentral cerebellar veins, tectal veins, pineal veins, superior vermian veins (including superior cerebellar veins (SCVs)) and posterior pericallosal veins. Each of the subjects had both digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography studies performed. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography was performed using the transfemoral route and the venous phase was used for the study. Magnetic resonance venography was performed in 1.5 T MRI equipment using the 2D-TOF sequence. All studies were reported to be normal. Results: There was wide variation in the anatomy of the galenic venous system. There were interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related variations. Both the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography were efficient at demonstrating large veins. However, smaller veins were less readily demonstrated in either study. The general sensitivities of the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography for the galenic venous system were 45.5% and 32.5%, respectively. Surgically important veins were missed in most studies. Conclusions: Anatomically, the galenic venous system is highly variable. This variability is caused by interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related

  17. The galenic venous system: Surgical anatomy and its angiographic and magnetic resonance venographic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, Tuerker [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey) and Marmara University, Department of Anatomy, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: turkilic@tnn.net; Ozduman, Koray [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey); Cavdar, Safiye [Marmara University, Department of Anatomy, Istanbul (Turkey); Oezek, M. Memet [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey); Pamir, M. Necmettin [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-11-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the adequacy of digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography in imaging of the galenic venous system for surgical planning of approaches to the pineal region. Anatomical dissections were carried out in 10 cadavers of several age groups and these were compared to imaging findings in 10 living subjects. Methods: The presence or absence of 10 predetermined veins or vein groupings belonging to the galenic venous system were prospectively analyzed in 10 cadaver dissections and imaging findings of 10 age matched human subjects. The studied vessels were the vein of galen, the internal cerebral veins, both basal vein of Rosenthals, internal occipital vein, occipitotemporal veins, precentral cerebellar veins, tectal veins, pineal veins, superior vermian veins (including superior cerebellar veins (SCVs)) and posterior pericallosal veins. Each of the subjects had both digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography studies performed. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography was performed using the transfemoral route and the venous phase was used for the study. Magnetic resonance venography was performed in 1.5 T MRI equipment using the 2D-TOF sequence. All studies were reported to be normal. Results: There was wide variation in the anatomy of the galenic venous system. There were interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related variations. Both the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography were efficient at demonstrating large veins. However, smaller veins were less readily demonstrated in either study. The general sensitivities of the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography for the galenic venous system were 45.5% and 32.5%, respectively. Surgically important veins were missed in most studies. Conclusions: Anatomically, the galenic venous system is highly variable. This variability is caused by interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related

  18. Study of resonant magnet exciting system for the 3 GeV proton synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, Shoichiro; Zhang, Fengqing; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Tani, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Adachi, Toshikazu; Someya, Hirohiko [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Exciting system for magnets of the 3 GeV Proton synchrotron is under consideration. A resonant exciting system is studied, and two type of power supply are compared. One is a parallel supply that is used generally. Another is a modified series supply. Either of them uses IGBT sinusoidal converters. Capacity of the power converter of the series supply for bending magnets becomes 28.8 MVAp. This is lager more than twice compared with the parallel supply. In the other hand, the series supply has good control performance and flexibility. More study is necessary to decide finally. (author)

  19. Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of electron spin polarized systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelekhov, Denis V.; Selcu, Camelia; Banerjee, Palash; Chung Fong, Kin; Chris Hammel, P.; Bhaskaran, Harish; Schwab, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its excellent sensitivity opens the possibility for magnetic resonance studies of spin accumulation resulting from the injection of spin polarized currents into a para-magnetic collector. The method is based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance which requires low noise detection of cantilever displacement; so far, this has been accomplished using optical interferometry. This is undesirable for experiments on doped silicon, where the presence of light is known to enhance spin relaxation rates. We report a non-optical displacement detection scheme based on sensitive microwave capacitive readout

  20. Shimadzu magnetic resonance imaging system, SMT-50X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Kazuhiro; Yamauchi, Mikio; Shimizu, Koji; Fujio, Yasuo

    1990-01-01

    We have already had the passage of five years, since 0.5 T MRI system named SMT-50A had been announced. On the other hand, many severe efforts in the fields of both technic and diagnosis have been done to get higher image quality having more informations and they caused recent abrupt progress in MRI. To reply these demands, we have developed new 0.5T super-conductive MRI system 'SMT-50X', having the following features in the points of image quality, operability and economy. (1) RF antenna, called multipolarization has been developed. (2) Compact gantry having a large bore size has been designed for patient to get enough view in it. (3) Easier operation could be done by means of multitask software system. This paper introduces the outline, features and clinical images acquired by SMT-50X. (author)

  1. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in evaluation of central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolicki, L.; Bak, M.; Grieb, P.

    1996-01-01

    The article presents the current results of MR spectroscopy in evaluation of central nervous system. This method is useful in examination of brain ischemia, brain tumors, epilepsy; white matter disorders and degeneration diseases. MR spectroscopy is unique technique for in vivo examination of the brain in physiological and pathophysiological states. (author)

  2. Breast imaging and reporting data system (BIRADS): Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardivon, Anne A.; Athanasiou, Alexandra; Thibault, Fabienne; El Khoury, Carl

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the technical aspects and interpretation criteria in breast MR imaging based on the first edition of breast imaging and reporting data system (BIRADS) published by the American College of Radiology (ACR) in 2003. In a second article, practical cases will be proposed for training the readers. The major aims of using this lexicon are: first to use a logical and standardized description of MR lesions, secondly to obtain a structured MR report with a clear final impression (BIRADS assessment categories), and thirdly to help comparison between different clinical studies based on similar breast MRI terminology

  3. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Large Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichman, P.B.; Lavely, E.M.; Ritzwoller, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The general theory of surface NMR imaging of large electromagnetically active systems is considered, motivated by geophysical applications. A general imaging equation is derived for the NMR voltage response, valid for arbitrary transmitter and receiver loop geometry and arbitrary conductivity structure of the sample. When the conductivity grows to the point where the electromagnetic skin depth becomes comparable to the sample size, significant diffusive retardation effects occur that strongly affect the signal. Accounting for these now allows more accurate imaging than previously possible. It is shown that the time constant T 1 may in principle be inferred directly from the diffusive tail of the signal. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  4. A Wireless Magnetic Resonance Energy Transfer System for Micro Implantable Medical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Yang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the magnetic resonance coupling principle, in this paper a wireless energy transfer system is designed and implemented for the power supply of micro-implantable medical sensors. The entire system is composed of the in vitro part, including the energy transmitting circuit and resonant transmitter coils, and in vivo part, including the micro resonant receiver coils and signal shaping chip which includes the rectifier module and LDO voltage regulator module. Transmitter and receiver coils are wound by Litz wire, and the diameter of the receiver coils is just 1.9 cm. The energy transfer efficiency of the four-coil system is greatly improved compared to the conventional two-coil system. When the distance between the transmitter coils and the receiver coils is 1.5 cm, the transfer efficiency is 85% at the frequency of 742 kHz. The power transfer efficiency can be optimized by adding magnetic enhanced resonators. The receiving voltage signal is converted to a stable output voltage of 3.3 V and a current of 10 mA at the distance of 2 cm. In addition, the output current varies with changes in the distance. The whole implanted part is packaged with PDMS of excellent biocompatibility and the volume of it is about 1 cm3.

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  6. Study on efficiency of different topologies of magnetic coupled resonant wireless charging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, S.; Liu, Z. Z.; Hou, Y. J.; Zeng, H.; Yue, Z. K.; Liang, L. H.

    2017-11-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between the output power, the transmission efficiency and the frequency, load and coupling coefficient of the four kinds of magnetic coupled resonant wireless charging system topologies. Based on mutual inductance principle, four kinds of circuit models are established, and the expressions of output power and transmission efficiency of different structures are calculated. The difference between the two power characteristics and efficiency characteristics is compared by simulating the SS (series-series) and SP (series-parallel) type wireless charging systems. With the same parameters of circuit components, the SS structure is usually suitable for small load resistance. The SP structure can be applied to large load resistors, when the transmission efficiency of the system is required to keep high. If the operating frequency deviates from the system resonance frequency, the SS type system has higher transmission efficiency than the SP type system.

  7. Development of a new compact intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging system: concept and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akio; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Sora, Shigeo; Kimura, Toshikazu; Nishimura, Kengo; Itoh, Hirotaka; Shibahashi, Keita; Shono, Naoyuki; Machida, Toru; Hara, Naoko; Mikami, Nozomi; Harihara, Yasushi; Kawate, Ryoichi; Ochiai, Chikayuki; Wang, Weimin; Oguro, Toshiki

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during surgery has been shown to improve surgical outcomes, but the current intraoperative MRI systems are too large to install in standard operating suites. Although 1 compact system is available, its imaging quality is not ideal. We developed a new compact intraoperative MRI system and evaluated its use for safety and efficacy. This new system has a magnetic gantry: a permanent magnet of 0.23 T and an interpolar distance of 32 cm. The gantry system weighs 2.8 tons and the 5-G line is within the circle of 2.6 m. We created a new field-of-view head coil and a canopy-style radiofrequency shield for this system. A clinical trial was initiated, and the system has been used in 44 patients. This system is significantly smaller than previous intraoperative MRI systems. High-quality T2 images could discriminate tumor from normal brain tissue and identify anatomic landmarks for accurate surgery. The average imaging time was 45.5 minutes, and no clinical complications or MRI system failures occurred. Floating organisms or particles were minimal (1/200 L maximum). This intraoperative, compact, low-magnetic-field MRI system can be installed in standard operating suites to provide relatively high-quality images without sacrificing safety. We believe that such a system facilitates the introduction of the intraoperative MRI.

  8. Automated Modular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinical Decision Support System (MIROR): An Application in Pediatric Cancer Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Meeus, Emma M; Manias, Karen; Foster, Katharine; Peet, Andrew

    2018-05-02

    Advances in magnetic resonance imaging and the introduction of clinical decision support systems has underlined the need for an analysis tool to extract and analyze relevant information from magnetic resonance imaging data to aid decision making, prevent errors, and enhance health care. The aim of this study was to design and develop a modular medical image region of interest analysis tool and repository (MIROR) for automatic processing, classification, evaluation, and representation of advanced magnetic resonance imaging data. The clinical decision support system was developed and evaluated for diffusion-weighted imaging of body tumors in children (cohort of 48 children, with 37 malignant and 11 benign tumors). Mevislab software and Python have been used for the development of MIROR. Regions of interests were drawn around benign and malignant body tumors on different diffusion parametric maps, and extracted information was used to discriminate the malignant tumors from benign tumors. Using MIROR, the various histogram parameters derived for each tumor case when compared with the information in the repository provided additional information for tumor characterization and facilitated the discrimination between benign and malignant tumors. Clinical decision support system cross-validation showed high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating between these tumor groups using histogram parameters. MIROR, as a diagnostic tool and repository, allowed the interpretation and analysis of magnetic resonance imaging images to be more accessible and comprehensive for clinicians. It aims to increase clinicians' skillset by introducing newer techniques and up-to-date findings to their repertoire and make information from previous cases available to aid decision making. The modular-based format of the tool allows integration of analyses that are not readily available clinically and streamlines the future developments. ©Niloufar Zarinabad, Emma M Meeus, Karen Manias

  9. Optimization of output power and transmission efficiency of magnetically coupled resonance wireless power transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rongge; Guo, Xiaoting; Cao, Shaoqing; Zhang, Changgeng

    2018-05-01

    Magnetically coupled resonance (MCR) wireless power transfer (WPT) system is a promising technology in electric energy transmission. But, if its system parameters are designed unreasonably, output power and transmission efficiency will be low. Therefore, optimized parameters design of MCR WPT has important research value. In the MCR WPT system with designated coil structure, the main parameters affecting output power and transmission efficiency are the distance between the coils, the resonance frequency and the resistance of the load. Based on the established mathematical model and the differential evolution algorithm, the change of output power and transmission efficiency with parameters can be simulated. From the simulation results, it can be seen that output power and transmission efficiency of the two-coil MCR WPT system and four-coil one with designated coil structure are improved. The simulation results confirm the validity of the optimization method for MCR WPT system with designated coil structure.

  10. Computer-Aided Diagnosis Systems for Brain Diseases in Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Yamashita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the basics and recent researches of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD systems for assisting neuroradiologists in detection of brain diseases, e.g., asymptomatic unruptured aneurysms, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and multiple sclerosis (MS, in magnetic resonance (MR images. The CAD systems consist of image feature extraction based on image processing techniques and machine learning classifiers such as linear discriminant analysis, artificial neural networks, and support vector machines. We introduce useful examples of the CAD systems in the neuroradiology, and conclude with possibilities in the future of the CAD systems for brain diseases in MR images.

  11. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  12. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  16. Assessment of the lymphatic system in patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrmann, Christian, E-mail: christian.lohrmann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg i. Br. (Germany); Foeldi, Etelka, E-mail: foeldi@foeldiklinik.de [Foeldi Clinic for Lymphology, Hinterzarten, Roesslehofweg 2-6, D-79856 Hinterzarten (Germany); Langer, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.langer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg i. Br. (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To assess the lymphatic system in patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis by magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: 15 patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis were examined by magnetic resonance imaging. Three locations were examined: first, the lower leg and foot region; second, the upper leg and the knee region; and third, the pelvic with retroperitoneal and abdominal region. For magnetic resonance lymphangiography a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo and a T2-weighted 3D-TSE sequence was used. Results: The size of the genital lymphangiomas, which were revealed in all patients, varied between 5 and 83 mm. In 47% of the patients lymphangiomas were detected at the level of the lower legs, and in 87% of the patients at the level of the upper leg and retroperitoneum. Furthermore, lymphangiomas were seen in the inguinal and pelvic region in 100% and intraabdominally in 40% of the patients. The lymphangiomas extended into the abdominal wall in 93% of the examined patients. A chylous pleural effusion was revealed in 20% and a chylous ascites in 13% of patients. 93% of patients suffered due to the diffuse lymphangiomatous pathologies from a lymphedema of the lower extremities, while a generalized lymphedema of the trunk was found in 87% of the patients. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and accurate minimal-invasive imaging modality for the evaluation of the lymphatic system in patients with diffuse lymphangiomatosis. Since the localization and extension of the lymphangiomas are important prognostic factors, it is crucial to perform a safe radiologic evaluation with a high resolution for the patient's therapeutic planning.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  5. Value of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis of central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, I.; Sicinska, J.; Szymanska, E.; Rudnicka, L.; Furmanek, M.; Walecki, J.; Olszewska, M.; Rudnicka, L.; Walecki, J.

    2006-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease characterized by vascular abnormalities and fibrotic changes in skin and internal organs. The aim of the study was to investigate involvement of the central nervous system in systemic sclerosis and the value of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of central nervous system involvement in systemic sclerosis. 26 patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms in the course of systemic sclerosis were investigated for central nervous system abnormalities by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Among these 26 symptomatic patients lesions in brain MRI and CT examinations were present in 54% and in 50% patients respectively. Most common findings (in 46% of all patients), were symptoms of cortical and subcortical atrophy, seen in both, MRI and CT. Single and multiple focal lesions, predominantly in the white matter, were detected by MRI significantly more frequently as compared to CT (62% and 15% patients respectively). These data indicate that brain involvement is common in patients with severe systemic sclerosis. MRI shows significantly higher than CT sensitivity in detection focal brain lesions in these patients. (author)

  6. A transportable magnetic resonance imaging system for in situ measurements of living trees: the Tree Hugger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M; Aptaker, P S; Cox, J; Gardiner, B A; McDonald, P J

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the design of the 'Tree Hugger', an open access, transportable, 1.1 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system for the in situ analysis of living trees in the forest. A unique construction employing NdFeB blocks embedded in a reinforced carbon fibre frame is used to achieve access up to 210 mm and to allow the magnet to be transported. The magnet weighs 55 kg. The feasibility of imaging living trees in situ using the 'Tree Hugger' is demonstrated. Correlations are drawn between NMR/MRI measurements and other indicators such as relative humidity, soil moisture and net solar radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  8. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji and others

    1989-04-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author).

  9. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author)

  10. SNS Resonance Control Cooling Systems and Quadrupole Magnet Cooling Systems DIW Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magda, Karoly [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    This report focuses on control of the water chemistry for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Resonance Control Cooling System (RCCS)/Quadrupole Magnet Cooling System (QMCS) deionized water (DIW) cooling loops. Data collected from spring 2013 through spring 2016 are discussed, and an operations regime is recommended.It was found that the RCCS operates with an average pH of 7.24 for all lines (from 7.0 to 7.5, slightly alkaline), the average low dissolved oxygen is in the area of < 36 ppb, and the main loop average resistivity of is > 14 MΩ-cm. The QMCS was found to be operating in a similar regime, with a slightly alkaline pH of 7.5 , low dissolved oxygen in the area of < 45 ppb, and main loop resistivity of 10 to 15 MΩ-cm. During data reading, operational corrections were done on the polishing loops to improve the water chemistry regime. Therefore some trends changed over time.It is recommended that the cooling loops operate in a regime in which the water has a resistivity that is as high as achievable, a dissolved oxygen concentration that is as low as achievable, and a neutral or slightly alkaline pH.

  11. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  12. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  16. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  18. Peliosis hepatis and systemic lupus erythematosus: A rare condition identified by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alves Cordeiro

    Full Text Available Summary Peliosis hepatis is a rare benign disorder characterized by the presence of multiple cavities filled with blood with no preferential localization in the liver parenchyma. It may be related to several etiologic conditions, especially infections and toxicity of immunosuppressive drugs. To our knowledge, there are only three articles reporting the association between peliosis hepatis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this report, we describe a case of this rare condition, highlighting the importance of magnetic resonance imaging. A short review of this subject is also presented.

  19. Realization of quantum state privacy amplification in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Liang; Wang, Chuan; Long, Gui Lu

    2010-01-01

    Quantum state privacy amplification (QSPA) is the quantum analogue of classical privacy amplification. If the state information of a series of single-particle states has some leakage, QSPA reduces this leakage by condensing the state information of two particles into the state of one particle. Recursive applications of the operations will eliminate the quantum state information leakage to a required minimum level. In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of a quantum state privacy amplification protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system. The density matrices of the states are constructed in the experiment, and the experimental results agree well with theory.

  20. The ViewRay system: magnetic resonance-guided and controlled radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutic, Sasa; Dempsey, James F

    2014-07-01

    A description of the first commercially available magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided radiation therapy (RT) system is provided. The system consists of a split 0.35-T MR scanner straddling 3 (60)Co heads mounted on a ring gantry, each head equipped with independent doubly focused multileaf collimators. The MR and RT systems share a common isocenter, enabling simultaneous and continuous MRI during RT delivery. An on-couch adaptive RT treatment-planning system and integrated MRI-guided RT control system allow for rapid adaptive planning and beam delivery control based on the visualization of soft tissues. Treatment of patients with this system commenced at Washington University in January 2014. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Paramagnetic contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Presently, a variety of radiofrequency (RF) and magnetic field gradient pulse sequences is used to manipulate magnetic resonance (MR) image contrast. Such manipulation may be performed by altering the RF pulse sequence repetition time (TR), the spin-echo delay time (TE), the inversion-delay time (TI), and the flip angle. The detection and characterization of a lesion or structure may thus be optimized. Although such contrast manipulation is noninvasive, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) still suffers somewhat from lack of specificity. Also, the use of multiple imaging sequences to locate and characterize a lesion may prolong the imaging time and, thus, might place an economic burden on the system. Paramagnetic pharmaceuticals offer promise in this regard. They shorten tissue relaxation times, thus permitting the use of shorter imaging parameters, and in some circumstances, may obviate additional and more time-consuming pulse sequences. Paramagnetics could expand the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and provide functional information with regard to tissue perfusion, tissue viability, and blood-brain barrier integrity

  2. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  4. Analysis on the power and efficiency in wireless power transfer system via coupled magnetic resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingjie

    2018-06-01

    The analysis of characteristics of the power and efficiency in wireless power transmission (WPT) system is the theoretical basis of magnetic coupling resonant wireless power transmission (MCR-WPT) technology. The electromagnetic field theory was employed to study the variation of the coupling degree of the two electromagnetic coils with the parameters of the coils. The equivalent circuit was used to analyze the influence of different factors on the transmission power and efficiency of the WPT system. The results show that there is an optimal radius ratio between the two coils, which makes the mutual inductance of the coils the largest. Moreover, when the WPT system operates in the under-coupling state, the transmission power of the system drops sharply, and there is a frequency splitting of the power when in the over-coupling state.

  5. Applications of Magnetic Resonance in Model Systems: Tumor Biology and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Gillies

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor presents a unique challenge as a system in which the dynamics of the relationship between vascularization, the physiological environment and metabolism are continually changing with growth and following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies have demonstrated quantifiable linkages between the physiological environment, angiogenesis, vascularization and metabolism of tumors. The dynamics between these parameters continually change with tumor aggressiveness, tumor growth and during therapy and each of these can be monitored longitudinally, quantitatively and non-invasively with MRI and MRS. An important aspect of MRI and MRS studies is that techniques and findings are easily translated between systems. Hence, pre-clinical studies using cultured cells or experimental animals have a high connectivity to potential clinical utility. In the following review, leaders in the field of MR studies of basic tumor physiology using pre-clinical models have contributed individual sections according to their expertise and outlook. The following review is a cogent and timely overview of the current capabilities and state-of-the-art of MRI and MRS as applied to experimental cancers. A companion review deals with the application of MR methods to anticancer therapy.

  6. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  7. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  8. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  10. Organization of the human motor system as studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI), because of its superior resolution and unlimited repeatability, can be particularly useful in studying functional aspects of the human motor system, especially plasticity, and somatotopic and temporal organization. In this survey, while describing studies that have reliably used BOLD fMRI to examine these aspects of the motor system, we also discuss studies that investigate the neural substrates underlying motor skill acquisition, motor imagery, production of motor sequences; effect of rate and force of movement on brain activation and hemispheric control of motor function. In the clinical realm, in addition to the presurgical evaluation of neurosurgical patients, BOLD fMRI has been used to explore the mechanisms underlying motor abnormalities in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders and the mechanisms underlying reorganization or plasticity of the motor system following a cerebral insult

  11. Towards Establishing a Standardized Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System for Temporomandibular Joints in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolend, Mirkamal A; Twilt, Marinka; Cron, Randy Q

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The temporomandibular joints (TMJs) are frequently affected in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Early detection is challenging, as major variation is present in scoring TMJ pathology on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Consensus-driven development and validation...... of a MRI scoring system for TMJs has important clinical utility in timely improvement of diagnosis, and serving as an outcome measure. We report on a multi-institutional collaboration towards developing a TMJ MRI scoring system for JIA. METHODS: Seven readers independently assessed MRI scans from 21...... preferable for assessing minor joint changes over time. Eight items were considered sufficiently reliable and/or important for integration into the consensus scoring system: bone marrow edema and enhancement (avICC=0.57-0.61; %SDD=±45-63% prior to re-defining), condylar flattening (0.95-0.96; ±23...

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  14. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  18. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems using magnetic resonance imaging and Monte Carlo computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. This method uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the anatomical makeup of an individual. A new MRI technique is also employed that is capable of resolving the fat and water content of the human tissue. This anatomical and biochemical information is used to model a mathematical phantom. Monte Carlo methods are then used to simulate the transport of radiation throughout the phantom. By modeling the detection equipment of the in vivo measurement system into the code, calibration factors are generated that are specific to the individual. Furthermore, this method eliminates the need for surrogate human structures in the calibration process. A demonstration of the proposed method is being performed using a fat/water matrix

  19. A low noise photoelectric signal acquisition system applying in nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qilin; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Xinghua; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Binquan; Hu, Zhaohui

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope serves as a new generation of strong support for the development of high-tech weapons, it solves the core problem that limits the development of the long-playing seamless navigation and positioning. In the NMR gyroscope, the output signal with atomic precession frequency is detected by the probe light, the final crucial photoelectric signal of the probe light directly decides the quality of the gyro signal. But the output signal has high sensitivity, resolution and measurement accuracy for the photoelectric detection system. In order to detect the measured signal better, this paper proposed a weak photoelectric signal rapid acquisition system, which has high SNR and the frequency of responded signal is up to 100 KHz to let the weak output signal with high frequency of the NMR gyroscope can be detected better.

  20. Optimization design of wireless charging system for autonomous robots based on magnetic resonance coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Wireless charging is the key technology to realize real autonomy of mobile robots. As the core part of wireless power transfer system, coupling mechanism including coupling coils and compensation topology is analyzed and optimized through simulations, to achieve stable and practical wireless charging suitable for ordinary robots. Multi-layer coil structure, especially double-layer coil is explored and selected to greatly enhance coupling performance, while shape of ferrite shielding goes through distributed optimization to guarantee coil fault tolerance and cost effectiveness. On the basis of optimized coils, primary compensation topology is analyzed to adopt composite LCL compensation, to stabilize operations of the primary side under variations of mutual inductance. Experimental results show the optimized system does make sense for wireless charging application for robots based on magnetic resonance coupling, to realize long-term autonomy of robots.

  1. Complementary role of magnetic resonance imaging in the study of the fetal urinary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Huertas, M; Culiañez Casas, M; Molina García, F S; Carrillo Badillo, M P; Pastor Pons, E

    2016-01-01

    Urinary system birth defects represent the abnormality most often detected in prenatal studies, accounting for 30% to 50% of all structural anomalies present at birth. The most common disorders are urinary tract dilation, developmental variants, cystic kidney diseases, kidney tumors, and bladder defects. These anomalies can present in isolation or in association with various syndromes. They are normally evaluated with sonography, and the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered only in inconclusive cases. In this article, we show the potential of fetal MRI as a technique to complement sonography in the study of fetal urinary system anomalies. We show the additional information that MRI can provide in each entity, especially in the evaluation of kidney function through diffusion-weighted sequences. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization design of wireless charging system for autonomous robots based on magnetic resonance coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junhua; Hu, Meilin; Cai, Changsong; Lin, Zhongzheng; Li, Liang; Fang, Zhijian

    2018-05-01

    Wireless charging is the key technology to realize real autonomy of mobile robots. As the core part of wireless power transfer system, coupling mechanism including coupling coils and compensation topology is analyzed and optimized through simulations, to achieve stable and practical wireless charging suitable for ordinary robots. Multi-layer coil structure, especially double-layer coil is explored and selected to greatly enhance coupling performance, while shape of ferrite shielding goes through distributed optimization to guarantee coil fault tolerance and cost effectiveness. On the basis of optimized coils, primary compensation topology is analyzed to adopt composite LCL compensation, to stabilize operations of the primary side under variations of mutual inductance. Experimental results show the optimized system does make sense for wireless charging application for robots based on magnetic resonance coupling, to realize long-term autonomy of robots.

  3. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  4. Base for a remote quality control system for magnetic resonance images machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Dalmau, Evelio R; Cabal Mirabal, Carlos; Noda Guerra, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The medical images systems convert characteristic of the tissues in gray levels or color, using a physical method and a specific mathematical transformation. In Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) these levels have a multi-parametric dependence, this a reason of their strong presence in the daily clinical practice. This technological complexity, the high costs and the importance that have these study for the patient's life, confer to the Quality Control (QC) human, technological, economic and juridical implications. Several international groups dedicated to the QC in MRI and diversity of approaches to carry out the tests of acceptance and periodic control of the quality exist. The characterization is habitually carried out, with global methods that don't allow a detailed quantitative parametric study. A novel system of quantitative control was developed based on quantitative describers by slices and temporal. This system is formed for: 1) standard methodology of acquisition of the experimental data, 2) subsystem of functions and programs developed in MatLab, 3) subsystem of graphics and reports, and 4) the expert. It is used successfully in the characterization and the periodic control of MRI machines of several magnetic fields in Cuba and in Venezuela. They were defined and established quantitative descriptors for MRI machines. The software flexibility allows carry out the QC to any machine facilitating the standardization and its use in multi-center studies. The retrospective and predictive value of the system was demonstrated. They feel the bases for the remote realization of the test

  5. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

  6. Performance and analysis of wireless power charging system from room temperature to HTS magnet via strong resonance coupling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y. D.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, T. W.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The technology of supplying the electric power by wireless power transfer (WPT) is expected for the next generation power feeding system since it can supply the power to portable devices without any connectors through large air gap. As such a technology based on strongly coupled electromagnetic resonators is possible to deliver the large power and recharge them seamlessly; it has been considered as a noble option to wireless power charging system in the various power applications. Recently, various HTS wires have now been manufactured for demonstrations of transmission cables, motors, MAGLEV, and other electrical power components. However, since the HTS magnets have a lower index n value intrinsically, they are required to be charged from external power system through leads or internal power system. The portable area is limited as well as the cryogen system is bulkier. Thus, we proposed a novel design of wireless power charging system for superconducting HTS magnet (WPC4SM) based on resonance coupling method. As the novel system makes possible a wireless power charging using copper resonance coupled coils, it enables to portable charging conveniently in the superconducting applications. This paper presented the conceptual design and operating characteristics of WPC4SM using different shapes' copper resonance coil. The proposed system consists of four components; RF generator of 370 kHz, copper resonance coupling coils, impedance matching (IM) subsystem and HTS magnet including rectifier system

  7. Performance and analysis of wireless power charging system from room temperature to HTS magnet via strong resonance coupling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. D.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, T. W.; Kim, J. S. [Suwon Science College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C. Y. [Korea Railroad Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The technology of supplying the electric power by wireless power transfer (WPT) is expected for the next generation power feeding system since it can supply the power to portable devices without any connectors through large air gap. As such a technology based on strongly coupled electromagnetic resonators is possible to deliver the large power and recharge them seamlessly; it has been considered as a noble option to wireless power charging system in the various power applications. Recently, various HTS wires have now been manufactured for demonstrations of transmission cables, motors, MAGLEV, and other electrical power components. However, since the HTS magnets have a lower index n value intrinsically, they are required to be charged from external power system through leads or internal power system. The portable area is limited as well as the cryogen system is bulkier. Thus, we proposed a novel design of wireless power charging system for superconducting HTS magnet (WPC4SM) based on resonance coupling method. As the novel system makes possible a wireless power charging using copper resonance coupled coils, it enables to portable charging conveniently in the superconducting applications. This paper presented the conceptual design and operating characteristics of WPC4SM using different shapes' copper resonance coil. The proposed system consists of four components; RF generator of 370 kHz, copper resonance coupling coils, impedance matching (IM) subsystem and HTS magnet including rectifier system.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  9. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  10. Relationship between higher cortical dysfunction and the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Yamada, Yoichi; Yukawa, Susumu [Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and organic lesions was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to clarify the etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. The subjects were 10 patients with SLE, and higher cortical dysfunction was observed in 8 (80%) of the 10 patients. Five (82.5%) of the 8 patients showed abnormal MRI findings. The findings of higher cortical dysfunction were consistent with the MRI findings in 1 of the 5 patients, but not in the remaining four. MRI revealed no lesion despite the presence of higher cortical dysfunction in three patients. These results suggest that the association of organic changes and functional changes in cerebral nerve cells is important for etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. (author).

  11. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumours of the central nervous systems: a clinical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graif, M.; Steiner, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical application of the intravascular paramagnetic contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging of tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) has been assessed over the past 3 years. Various patterns of contrast enhancement were observed, and situations in MRI where the administration of contrast medium may be useful have been defined. These include lesions which are isointense with normal brain matter, the separation of tumour from surrounding oedema, evaluation of the degree of blood-brain barrier breakdown, delineation of tumours obscured by overlying calcification on computed tomography (CT) and in the investigation of lesions in anatomical areas where CT has known limitations (brain, stem, cervical spine). Changes in relaxation times in normal and abnormal tissues following contrast medium, toxicity and dosage of gadolinium-DTPA, and MRI pulse sequence techniques are reviewed. (author)

  12. A digital receiver module with direct data acquisition for magnetic resonance imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weinan; Sun, Hongyu; Wang, Weimin

    2012-10-01

    A digital receiver module for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with detailed hardware implementations is presented. The module is based on a direct sampling scheme using the latest mixed-signal circuit design techniques. A single field-programmable gate array chip is employed to perform software-based digital down conversion for radio frequency signals. The modular architecture of the receiver allows multiple acquisition channels to be implemented on a highly integrated printed circuit board. To maintain the phase coherence of the receiver and the exciter in the context of direct sampling, an effective phase synchronization method was proposed to achieve a phase deviation as small as 0.09°. The performance of the described receiver module was verified in the experiments for both low- and high-field (0.5 T and 1.5 T) MRI scanners and was compared to a modern commercial MRI receiver system.

  13. Intracerebral lesions associated with systemic lupos erythematosus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poniatowska, R.; Krawczyk, R.; Boguslawska, R.; Palasik, W.; Kuczynska, A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the involvement of central nervous system in brain magnetic resonance studies in patients with SLE. The MR study of the brain was carried out on 47 patients with these neurological symptoms: hemiparesis (15 cases), seizures (2), headache and vertigo (5), balance disorders (3), nausea (2), vision disorders (6). The MR findings were: in 15 cases single and in 5 multiple small focuses, coexistence of small and large focuses in 4 cases, subtentorial focuses in 3 (2 in cerebellum, 1 in pons), lesions in deep structures in 3 cases. In 1 case occlusion of internal carotid artery siphon with large ischemic focus, in 1 bleeding to choroid plexus occurred. The dominant were disseminated white matter lesions in subcortical and periventricular regions. In 16 case MR examinations showed cortical-subcortical atrophy. MR study allows us to assess severity of CNS involvement in course of SLE and helps to start a correct treatment. (author)

  14. Relationship between higher cortical dysfunction and the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeshima, Etsuko; Maeshima, Shinichiro; Yamada, Yoichi; Yukawa, Susumu

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and organic lesions was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to clarify the etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. The subjects were 10 patients with SLE, and higher cortical dysfunction was observed in 8 (80%) of the 10 patients. Five (82.5%) of the 8 patients showed abnormal MRI findings. The findings of higher cortical dysfunction were consistent with the MRI findings in 1 of the 5 patients, but not in the remaining four. MRI revealed no lesion despite the presence of higher cortical dysfunction in three patients. These results suggest that the association of organic changes and functional changes in cerebral nerve cells is important for etiology of higher cortical dysfunction in SLE. (author)

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and abnormal visual system in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A.P.; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Rostrup, Egill

    2000-01-01

    in very young infants and in infants with brain damage. We examined 15 preterm infants, 12 children suspected of having a cerebral visual impairment and 10 children with a normal visual system, all of whom were either spontaneously asleep or sedated with chloral hydrate. Cortical response to stroboscopic...... showed a signal decrease. The activated cortical volumes showed a linear relation to age for healthy children younger than 90 weeks PMA, but were small in children with visual impairment. In two children with unilateral damage to the optic radiations, activation was strongly asymmetrical with greatest......Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in young children may provide information about the development of the visual cortex, and may have predictive value for later visual performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of fMRI for examining cerebral processing of vision...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  19. Diffusion tensor analysis with nuclear magnetic resonance in human central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Naoki

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to measure the diffusivity of water molecules. In central nervous system, anisotropic diffusion, which is characterized by apparent diffusion tensor D app ξ , is thought to be related to neuronal fiber tract orientation. For precise observation of anisotropic diffusion, it is needed to determine the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of D app ξ . Once D app ξ is estimated from a series of diffusion weighted images, a tissue's orthotropic principal axes and diffusivity of each direction are determined from eigenvalues and eigenvectors of D app ξ . There are several methods to represent anisotropic diffusion with D app ξ . Examples are diffusion ellipsoids constructed in each voxel depicting both these principal axes and the mean diffusion length in these directions, trace invariant values and its mapping image, largest eigenvalue, and ratio of largest eigenvalue to the other eigenvalue. In this study, the author investigated practical procedure to analyze diffusion tensor D app ξ using both of spin-echo end echo-planer diffusion weighted imagings with 3-tesla magnetic resonance machine in human brain. The ellipsoid representation provided particularly useful information about microanatomy including neuronal fiber tract orientation and molecular mobility reflective of microstructure. Furthermore, in the lesion of Wallerian degeneration, the loss of anisotropy of local apparent diffusion was observed. It is suggested that the function of axons can be observed via degree of anisotropy of apparent diffusion. Consequently, diffusion tensor analysis is expected to be a powerful, noninvasive method capable of quantitative and functional evaluation of the central nervous system. (author)

  20. Advantages and disadvantages of contemporary magnetic resonance systems (resistive, permanent and superconductive)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, R.; Matuszek, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to assess the advantages and disadvantages of the operating MRI systems. There are 3 basic types of magnets useful for producing the B field: permanent magnet, resistive magnet and superconductive magnet. The authors compare basic features of those magnets including field strength, homogeneity, temporal stability and direction. The time of examination and the cost of exploitation was also discussed. In conclusions there are no significant differences between superconductive and resistive mid-field MRI systems. However the MRI spectroscopy and functional imaging requires high magnetic field which can be obtain only with superconductive magnet. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed ferritin as an iron-induced pathological model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balejcikova, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Strbak, Oliver [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Baciak, Ladislav [Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology STU, Radlinskeho 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kovac, Jozef [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Masarova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Frollo, Ivan [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Dobrota, Dusan [Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Kopcansky, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Iron, an essential element of the human body, is a significant risk factor, particularly in the case of its concentration increasing above the specific limit. Therefore, iron is stored in the non-toxic form of the globular protein, ferritin, consisting of an apoferritin shell and iron core. Numerous studies confirmed the disruption of homeostasis and accumulation of iron in patients with various diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular or neurological conditions), which is closely related to ferritin metabolism. Such iron imbalance enables the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a sensitive technique for the detection of iron-based aggregates through changes in the relaxation times, followed by the change in the inherent image contrast. For our in vitrostudy, modified ferritins with different iron loadings were prepared by chemical reconstruction of the iron core in an apoferritin shell as pathological model systems. The magnetic properties of samples were studied using SQUID magnetometry, while the size distribution was detected via dynamic light scattering. We have shown that MRI could represent the most advantageous method for distinguishing native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin which, after future standardisation, could then be suitable for the diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation. - Highlights: • MRI is the sensitive technique for detecting iron-based aggregates. • Reconstructed Ferritin is suitable model system of iron-related disorders. • MRI allow distinguish of native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin. • MRI could be useful for diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation.

  4. Metamaterial-based transmit and receive system for whole-body magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tim; Liebig, Thorsten; Mallow, Johannes; Bruns, Christian; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Svedja, Jan Taro; Chen, Zhichao; Rennings, Andreas; Scheich, Henning; Plaumann, Markus; Hauser, Marcus J B; Bernarding, Johannes; Erni, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high fields (UHF), such as 7 T, provides an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and has led to unprecedented high-resolution anatomic images and brain activation maps. Although a variety of radio frequency (RF) coil architectures have been developed for imaging at UHF conditions, they usually are specialized for small volumes of interests (VoI). So far, whole-body coil resonators are not available for commercial UHF human whole-body MRI systems. The goal of the present study was the development and validation of a transmit and receive system for large VoIs that operates at a 7 T human whole-body MRI system. A Metamaterial Ring Antenna System (MRAS) consisting of several ring antennas was developed, since it allows for the imaging of extended VoIs. Furthermore, the MRAS not only requires lower intensities of the irradiated RF energy, but also provides a more confined and focused injection of excitation energy on selected body parts. The MRAS consisted of several antennas with 50 cm inner diameter, 10 cm width and 0.5 cm depth. The position of the rings was freely adjustable. Conformal resonant right-/left-handed metamaterial was used for each ring antenna with two quadrature feeding ports for RF power. The system was successfully implemented and demonstrated with both a silicone oil and a water-NaCl-isopropanol phantom as well as in vivo by acquiring whole-body images of a crab-eating macaque. The potential for future neuroimaging applications was demonstrated by the acquired high-resolution anatomic images of the macaque's head. Phantom and in vivo measurements of crab-eating macaques provided high-resolution images with large VoIs up to 40 cm in xy-direction and 45 cm in z-direction. The results of this work demonstrate the feasibility of the MRAS system for UHF MRI as proof of principle. The MRAS shows a substantial potential for MR imaging of larger volumes at 7 T UHF. This new technique may provide new diagnostic potential

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  6. A medical software system for volumetric analysis of cerebral pathologies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Kappus, Christoph; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    In this contribution, a medical software system for volumetric analysis of different cerebral pathologies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is presented. The software system is based on a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm and helps to overcome the time-consuming process of volume determination during monitoring of a patient. After imaging, the parameter settings-including a seed point-are set up in the system and an automatic segmentation is performed by a novel graph-based approach. Manually reviewing the result leads to reseeding, adding seed points or an automatic surface mesh generation. The mesh is saved for monitoring the patient and for comparisons with follow-up scans. Based on the mesh, the system performs a voxelization and volume calculation, which leads to diagnosis and therefore further treatment decisions. The overall system has been tested with different cerebral pathologies-glioblastoma multiforme, pituitary adenomas and cerebral aneurysms- and evaluated against manual expert segmentations using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Additionally, intra-physician segmentations have been performed to provide a quality measure for the presented system.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics in four dogs with central nervous system neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzefall, Birgit; Driver, Colin J; Benigni, Livia; Davies, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Neosporosis is a polysystemic disease that can affect dogs of any age and can cause inflammation of the central nervous system. Antemortem diagnosis can be challenging, as clinical and conventional laboratory test findings are often nonspecific. A previous report described cerebellar lesions in brain MRI studies of seven dogs and proposed that these may be characteristic for central nervous system Neosporosis. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe MRI characteristics in another group of dogs with confirmed central nervous system neosporosis and compare them with the previous report. The hospital's database was searched for dogs with confirmed central nervous system neosporosis and four observers recorded findings from each dog's MRI studies. A total of four dogs met inclusion criteria. Neurologic examination was indicative of a forebrain and cerebellar lesion in dog 2 and multifocal central nervous system disease in dogs 1, 3, and 4. Magnetic resonance imaging showed mild bilateral and symmetrical cerebellar atrophy in three of four dogs (dogs 2, 3, 4), intramedullary spinal cord changes in two dogs (dogs 3, 4) and a mesencephalic and metencephalic lesion in one dog (dog 2). Multifocal brain lesions were recognized in two dogs (dogs 1, 4) and were present in the thalamus, lentiform nucleus, centrum semiovale, internal capsule, brainstem and cortical gray matter of the frontal, parietal or temporal lobe. Findings indicated that central nervous system neosporosis may be characterized by multifocal MRI lesions as well as cerebellar involvement in dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Anti-saturation system for surface nuclear magnetic resonance in efficient groundwater detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Yujing; Sun, Yong; Lin, Tingting

    2017-06-01

    Compared to other geophysical techniques, the surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) method could provide unique insights into the hydrologic properties of groundwater in the subsurface. However, the SNMR signal is in the order of nanovolts (10-9 V), and the complex environmental noise, i.e., the spike and the harmony noise (10-4 V), can reach up to 105 times the signal amplitude. Saturation of the amplifier is therefore a serious problem in current SNMR systems. In this study, we propose an anti-saturation method based on an instantaneous floating-point amplifier. The gain of a programmable amplifier is controlled by the value of the input signal. A regulating speed of 50 kS/s is thus achieved to satisfy the self-adaptive adjustment of the real-time SNMR system, which replaces the original man-made setting gain. A large dynamic range of 192.65 dB with a 24-bit high speed analog-digital converter module is then implemented. Compared to traditional SNMR instruments, whose magnification factor is fixed during the experiment, our system can effectively inhibit the distortion of the SNMR signal in both laboratory and field settings. Furthermore, an improved SNR, which is realized by the real-time SNMR system, enables the accurate inversion of the aquifer. Our study broadens the applicability of SNMR systems to use in and around developed areas.

  9. Magnetically integrated high step-up resonant DC-DC converter for distributed photovoltaic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinnikov, Dmitri; Chub, Andrii; Liivik, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    In this paper magnetically integrated resonant single-switch quasi-Z-source DC-DC converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for the low-cost photovoltaic microconverter. The derivation of the topology and its basic operation principle are explained. Generalized design guidelines...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Determinations of Structure and Reaction Kinetics of Epoxy/Amine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    AD- AISA 542 MCDONNELL DOUGLAS RESEARCH LABS ST LOUIS MO FIG 7/4 MAGNETIC RESONANCE DETERMINATIONS OF STRUCTURE AND REACTION KIN--ETC (U) DEC Al I M...solvent content (methylene chloride). DD I JAN73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When Doe Fntered

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of living systems : Applications in comparative physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDenThillart, G; VanWaarde, A

    The most attractive feature of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is the noninvasive and nondestructive measurement of chemical compounds in intact tissues. MRS already has many applications in comparative physiology, usually based on observation of P-31, since the levels of phosphorus

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  13. An intra-neural microstimulation system for ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Paul M; Watkins, Roger H; O'Neill, George C; Ackerley, Rochelle; Sanchez-Panchuelo, Rosa; McGlone, Francis; Brookes, Matthew J; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T

    2017-10-01

    Intra-neural microstimulation (INMS) is a technique that allows the precise delivery of low-current electrical pulses into human peripheral nerves. Single unit INMS can be used to stimulate individual afferent nerve fibres during microneurography. Combining this with neuroimaging allows the unique monitoring of central nervous system activation in response to unitary, controlled tactile input, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) providing exquisite spatial localisation of brain activity and magnetoencephalography (MEG) high temporal resolution. INMS systems suitable for use within electrophysiology laboratories have been available for many years. We describe an INMS system specifically designed to provide compatibility with both ultra-high field (7T) fMRI and MEG. Numerous technical and safety issues are addressed. The system is fully analogue, allowing for arbitrary frequency and amplitude INMS stimulation. Unitary recordings obtained within both the MRI and MEG screened-room environments are comparable with those obtained in 'clean' electrophysiology recording environments. Single unit INMS (current met. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  16. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  17. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  20. Simulation Research of Magnetically-coupled Resonant Wireless Power Transfer System with Single Intermediate Coil Resonator Based on S Parameters Using ANSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ANSYS can be a powerful tool to simulate the process of energy exchange in magnetically-coupled resonant wireless power transfer system. In this work, the MCR-WPT system with single intermediate coil resonator is simulated and researched based on scattering parameters using ANSYS Electromagnetics. The change rule of power transfer efficiency is reflected intuitively through the scattering parameters. A new method of calculating the coupling coefficient is proposed. A cascaded 2-port network model using scattering parameters is adopted to research the efficiency of transmission. By changing the relative position and the number of turns of the intermediate coil, we find some factors affecting the efficiency of transmission. Methods and principles of designing the MCR-WPT system with single intermediate coil resonator are obtained. And these methods have practical value with design and optimization of system efficiency.

  1. Primary Angiitis of the Central Nervous System: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Spectrum of Parenchymal, Meningeal, and Vascular Lesions at Baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulouis, Grégoire; de Boysson, Hubert; Zuber, Mathieu; Guillevin, Loïc; Meary, Eric; Costalat, Vincent; Pagnoux, Christian; Naggara, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system remains challenging. To report an overview and pictorial review of brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system and to determine the distribution of parenchymal, meningeal, and vascular lesions in a large multicentric cohort. Adult patients from the French COVAC cohort (Cohort of Patients With Primary Vasculitis of the Central Nervous System), with biopsy or angiographically proven primary angiitis of the central nervous system and brain magnetic resonance imaging available at the time of diagnosis were included. A systematic imaging review was performed blinded to clinical data. Sixty patients met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 45 years (±12.9). Patients initially presented focal deficit(s) (83%), headaches (53%), cognitive disorder (40%), and seizures (38.3%). The most common magnetic resonance imaging finding observed in 42% of patients was multiterritorial, bilateral, distal acute stroke lesions after small to medium artery distribution, with a predominant carotid circulation distribution. Hemorrhagic infarctions and parenchymal hemorrhages were also frequently found in the cohort (55%). Acute convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage was found in 26% of patients and 42% demonstrated pre-eminent leptomeningeal enhancement, which is found to be significantly more prevalent in biopsy-proven patients (60% versus 28%; P =0.04). Seven patients had tumor-like presentations. Seventy-seven percent of magnetic resonance angiographic studies were abnormal, revealing proximal/distal stenoses in 57% and 61% of patients, respectively. Adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system is a heterogenous disease, with multiterritorial, distal, and bilateral acute stroke being the most common pattern of parenchymal lesions found on magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings suggest a higher than previously thought prevalence of hemorrhagic transformation and other hemorrhagic

  2. Grading system for migrated lumbar disc herniation on sagittal magnetic resonance imaging. An agreement study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Y.; Jeong, T.S. [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, T.; Jeon, J.Y. [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    Migrated lumbar disc herniations (LDHs) in the sagittal plane are common. Disc migration grading can be applied as a useful measurement tool in the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome evaluation of migrated LDH. No study has evaluated the reliability of migrated LDH grading. We evaluated the reliability and functionality of the current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading system for migrated LDH. We assessed a six-level grading system developed based on sagittal MRI and graded according to the direction (rostral and caudal) and degree (low, high, and very high) of disc migration. One-hundred and one migrated LDHs treated with minimally invasive endoscopic discectomy were analyzed independently by two experienced radiologists. Intraobserver and interobserver agreements were assessed by kappa statistics. The most common migrated LDH grade was grade 4 (30.94%; caudal, low-grade migration). Rostral and caudal migrations were more common in the upper and lower lumbar levels, respectively. Interobserver agreement in the grading of migrated LDH was good at both the first (kappa = 0.737) and second assessment (kappa = 0.657). The intraobserver agreement for reader 1 was very good (kappa = 0.827) and for reader 2 was good (kappa = 0.620). The current grading system for migrated LDH was found to be reliable and functional with good interobserver and intraobserver agreement. It may be useful in the interpretation of disc migration patterns and outcomes of various minimally invasive surgical procedures. (orig.)

  3. Investigations of the human visual system using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollias, Spyros S.

    2004-01-01

    The application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in studies of the visual system provided significant advancement in our understanding of the organization and functional properties of visual areas in the human cortex. Recent technological and methodological improvements allowed studies to correlate neuronal activity with visual perception and demonstrated the ability of fMRI to observe distributed neural systems and to explore modulation of neural activity during higher cognitive processes. Preliminary applications in patients with visual impairments suggest that this method provides a powerful tool for the assessment and management of brain pathologies. Recent research focuses on obtaining new information about the spatial localization, organization, functional specialization and participation in higher cognitive functions of visual cortical areas in the living human brain and in further establishment of the method as a useful clinical tool of diagnostic and prognostic significance for various pathologic processes affecting the integrity of the visual system. It is anticipated that the combined neuroimaging approach in patients with lesions and healthy controls will provide new insight on the topography and functional specialization of cortical visual areas and will further establish the clinical value of the method for improving diagnostic accuracy and treatment planning

  4. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankine, Leith J., E-mail: Leith_Rankine@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Mein, Stewart [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Oldham, Mark [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, H. Harold, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  5. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankine, Leith J.; Mein, Stewart; Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen; Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin; Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe; Oldham, Mark; Li, H. Harold

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  6. Design and investigations of the superconducting magnet system for the multipurpose superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinschert, K; Lang, R; Mäder, J; Rossbach, J; Spädtke, P; Komorowski, P; Meyer-Reumers, M; Krischel, D; Fischer, B; Ciavola, G; Gammino, S; Celona, L

    2012-02-01

    The production of intense beams of heavy ions with electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRIS) is an important request at many accelerators. According to the ECR condition and considering semi-empirical scaling laws, it is essential to increase the microwave frequency together with the magnetic flux density of the ECRIS magnet system. A useful frequency of 28 GHz, therefore, requires magnetic flux densities above 2.2 T implying the use of superconducting magnets. A cooperation of European institutions initiated a project to build a multipurpose superconducting ECRIS (MS-ECRIS) in order to achieve an increase of the performances in the order of a factor of ten. After a first design of the superconducting magnet system for the MS-ECRIS, the respective cold testing of the built magnet system reveals a lack of mechanical performance due to the strong interaction of the magnetic field of the three solenoids with the sextupole field and the magnetization of the magnetic iron collar. Comprehensive structural analysis, magnetic field calculations, and calculations of the force pattern confirm thereafter these strong interactions, especially of the iron collar with the solenoidal fields. The investigations on the structural analysis as well as suggestions for a possible mechanical design solution are given.

  7. Design of a Resonant Magnetic Perturbation ELM Suppression System for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarici, G.; Becoulet, M.; Nardon, E.; Saille, A.; Thomas, P.R.; Verger, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The suppression of ELMs with a Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP), as demonstrated in DIIID experiments, is an attractive solution to the problem of divertor target erosion in ITER. Ideally, the RMP should be strong at the plasma edge and weak in the core, which requires the installation of the RMP coils as close as possible to the plasma. In both ITER and JET, an installation within the vacuum vessel would subject the coils to neutron irradiation, tritium contamination and all the problems of furnishing cooling and electrical services, across many interfaces. It has been proposed to install an '' ITER prototype '' RMP on JET. The nearest ex-vessel location, which avoids these difficulties and permits a suitable perturbation field, is between the poloidal field coils, P3 and P4. The proposed RMP system consists of 18 upper and 18 lower Ergodic field coils, arranged around the torus and located ∼ 2.5 m from the plasma edge. Each coil measures 0.9 m poloidally and 1.8 m toroidally, with a 30 cm cross-section and a weight near 1,4 tonne. 400 kA per coil are necessary to produce the radial magnetic field perturbation required for a plasma of 4 MA/3.4 T. Using a standard rectangular water-cooled conductor (OFHC copper plate 50 x 12.5 mm 2 with two holes inside), the coil can be built by winding 6 x 12 turns. In order to generate the required toroidal mode, n = 3, the current direction inside the coils will alternate every 3 coils. Vertical forces, up to 36 tonnes, and radial forces, up to 18 tonnes, due to the interaction between the machine main magnetic field and the coil current are withstood by a circular structure of 4 m diameter, made-out of 2 cm thick stainless-steel plates. Since the structure is toroidally continuous, the total radial forces counter balance each-other, whilst, via vertical supports, the vertical forces are taken by the 8 iron limbs of the external magnetic circuit. The installation of the coils is simplified by the circular geometry of the

  8. Resonant coherent quantum tunneling of the magnetization of spin-½ systems : Spin-parity effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pablos, D.; García, N.; Raedt, H. De

    1997-01-01

    We perform quantum dynamical calculations to study the reversal of the magnetization for systems of a few spin-½ particles with a general biaxial anisotropy in the presence of an external magnetic field at T=0 and with no dissipation. Collective quantum tunneling of the magnetization is demonstrated

  9. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  10. Doxorubicin-modified magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for magnetic resonance imaging-monitoring magnet-enhancing tumor chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Po-Chin; Chen, Yung-Chu; Chiang, Chi-Feng; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wei, Shwu-Yuan; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Win-Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles consisting of a magnetic Fe3O4 core and a shell of aqueous stable polyethylene glycol (PEG) conjugated with doxorubicin (Dox) (SPIO-PEG-D) for tumor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement and chemotherapy. The size of SPIO nanoparticles was ~10 nm, which was visualized by transmission electron microscope. The hysteresis curve, generated with vibrating-sample magnetometer, showed that SPIO-PEG-D was superparamagnetic with an insignificant hysteresis. The transverse relaxivity (r 2) for SPIO-PEG-D was significantly higher than the longitudinal relaxivity (r 1) (r 2/r 1 >10). The half-life of Dox in blood circulation was prolonged by conjugating Dox on the surface of SPIO with PEG to reduce its degradation. The in vitro experiment showed that SPIO-PEG-D could cause DNA crosslink more serious, resulting in a lower DNA expression and a higher cell apoptosis for HT-29 cancer cells. The Prussian blue staining study showed that the tumors treated with SPIO-PEG-D under a magnetic field had a much higher intratumoral iron density than the tumors treated with SPIO-PEG-D alone. The in vivo MRI study showed that the T2-weighted signal enhancement was stronger for the group under a magnetic field, indicating that it had a better accumulation of SPIO-PEG-D in tumor tissues. In the anticancer efficiency study for SPIO-PEG-D, the results showed that there was a significantly smaller tumor size for the group with a magnetic field than the group without. The in vivo experiments also showed that this drug delivery system combined with a local magnetic field could reduce the side effects of cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. The results showed that the developed SPIO-PEG-D nanoparticles own a great potential for MRI-monitoring magnet-enhancing tumor chemotherapy.

  11. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies on π-conjugated semiconductor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) techniques were used to investigate the dynamics of excitons and charge carriers in π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Degradation behavior of the negative spin-1/2 electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (ELDMR) was observed in Alq3 devices. The increase in the resonance amplitude implies an increasing bipolaron formation during degradation, which might be the result of growth of charge traps in the device. The same behavior of the negative spin-1/2 ELDMR was observed in 2wt% Rubrene doped Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminium (Alq3) devices. However, with increasing injection current, a positive spin-1/2 ELDMR, together with positive spin 1 triplet powder patterns at ΔmS=±1 and ΔmS=±2, emerges. Due to the similarities in the frequency dependences of single and double modulated ELDMR and the photoluminescence-detected magnetic resonance (PLDMR) results in poly[2-methoxy-5-(2 -ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenyl ene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, the mechanism for this positive spin-1/2 ELDMR was assigned to enhanced triplet-polaron quenching under resonance conditions. The ELDMR in rubrene doped Alq3 devices provides a path to investigate charge distribution in the device under operational conditions. Combining the results of several devices with different carrier blocking properties and the results from transient EL, it was concluded trions not only exist near buffer layer but also exist in the electron transport layer. This TPQ model can also be used to explain the positive spin-1/2 PLDMR in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films at low temperature and in MEH-PPV films at various temperatures up to room temperature. Through quantitative analysis, TE-polaron quenching (TPQ) model is shown having the ability to explain most behaviors of the positive spin-1/2 resonance. Photocurrent detected magnetic resonance (PCDMR) studies on MEH-PPV devices revealed a novel transient resonance signal. The signal

  12. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian Zhi [Richland, WA; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W [Richland, WA; Wind, Robert A [Kennewick, WA

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system: present state of the art and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generates high-resolution images of the cardiovascular system. Conventional MRI techniques provide images in six to ten minutes per tomographic slice. New strategies have substantially improved the speed of imaging. The technology is relatively expensive, and its cost-effectiveness remains to be defined in relation to other effective, less expensive, and noninvasive technologies, such as echocardiography and nuclear medicine. The ultimate role of MRI will depend on several factors, including the development of specific applications such as (1) noninvasive angiography, especially of the coronary arteries;(2) noninvasive, high-resolution assessment of regional myocardial blood flow distribution (e.g., using paramagnetic contrast agents); (3) characterization of myocardial diseases using proton-relaxation property changes; and (4) evaluation of in vivo myocardial biochemistry. The three-dimensional imaging capability and the ability to image cardiovascular structures without contrast material give MRI a potential advantage over existing noninvasive diagnostic imaging techniques. This report analyzes current applications of MRI to the cardiovascular system and speculates on their future

  14. Creatine in the central nervous system: From magnetic resonance spectroscopy to creatine deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackayova, Veronika; Cudalbu, Cristina; Pouwels, Petra J W; Braissant, Olivier

    2017-07-15

    Creatine (Cr) is an important organic compound acting as intracellular high-energy phosphate shuttle and in energy storage. While located in most cells where it plays its main roles in energy metabolism and cytoprotection, Cr is highly concentrated in muscle and brain tissues, in which Cr also appears to act in osmoregulation and neurotransmission. This review discusses the basis of Cr metabolism, synthesis and transport within brain cells. The importance of Cr in brain function and the consequences of its impaired metabolism in primary and secondary Cr deficiencies are also discussed. Cr and phosphocreatine (PCr) in living systems can be well characterized using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). This review describes how 1 H MRS allows the measurement of Cr and PCr, and how 31 P MRS makes it possible to estimate the creatine kinase (CK) rate constant and so detect dynamic changes in the Cr/PCr/CK system. Absolute quantification by MRS using creatine as internal reference is also debated. The use of in vivo MRS to study brain Cr in a non-invasive way is presented, as well as its use in clinical and preclinical studies, including diagnosis and treatment follow-up in patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Fat ViP MRI: Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging of water-fat systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Roberto; Hitti, Eric; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Gambarota, Giulio

    2016-06-01

    Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI) is a method to generate reference signals on MR images, using external radiofrequency (RF) signals. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of ViP MRI to generate complex-data images of phantoms mimicking water-fat systems. Various numerical phantoms with a given fat fraction, T2* and field map were designed. The k-space of numerical phantoms was converted into RF signals to generate virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were performed at 4.7T using a multi-gradient-echo sequence on virtual and physical phantoms. The data acquisition of virtual and physical phantoms was simultaneous. Decomposition of the water and fat signals was performed using a complex-based water-fat separation algorithm. Overall, a good agreement was observed between the fat fraction, T2* and phase map values of the virtual and numerical phantoms. In particular, fat fractions of 10.5±0.1 (vs 10% of the numerical phantom), 20.3±0.1 (vs 20%) and 30.4±0.1 (vs 30%) were obtained in virtual phantoms. The ViP MRI method allows for generating imaging phantoms that i) mimic water-fat systems and ii) can be analyzed with water-fat separation algorithms based on complex data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Utilization of polymeric micelle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent for theranostic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    We applied a polymeric micelle carrier system for the targeting of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Prepared polymeric micelle MRI contrast agent exhibited a long circulation characteristic in blood, and considerable amount of the contrast agent was found to accumulate in colon 26 solid tumor by the EPR effect. The signal intensities of tumor area showed 2-folds increase in T1-weighted images at 24 h after i.v. injection. To observe enhancement of the EPR effect by Cderiv pretreatment on tumor targeting, we used the contrast agent for the evaluation by means of MRI. Cderiv pretreatment significantly enhanced tumor accumulation of the contrast agent. Interestingly, very high signal intensity in tumor region was found at 24 h after the contrast agent injection in Cderiv pretreated mice. The contrast agent visualized a microenvironmental change in tumor. These results indicate that the contrast agent exhibits potential use for tumor diagnostic agent. To combine with a polymeric micelle carrier system for therapeutic agent, the usage of the combination makes a new concept of "theranostic" for a better cancer treatment.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  10. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  12. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: wwang21@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion [Department of Engineering, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Pan, Li [Siemens Healthcare USA, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Seethamraju, Ravi T. [Siemens Healthcare USA, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Dumoulin, Charles L. [Radiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  13. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Chen, Yue; Tse, Zion; Pan, Li; Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  16. Role of magnetic resonance urography in diagnosis of duplex renal system: Our initial experience at a tertiary care institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind P Joshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine diagnostic value of magnetic resonance urography in cases of duplex renal system. Method: Twenty cases between five month to nine years with suspected or known duplex renal system were evaluated by ultrasound (USG, micturating cystourethrography (MCU, intravenous urography (IVU and magnetic resonance urography (MRU. The findings of these diagnostic imaging studies were then compared with each other and against the results of final diagnosis established at surgery. Results: Duplex renal system could be identified in two of these cases on USG, was diagnosed in four in IVU and could be diagnosed in all cases with MRU. Conclusion: MRU is superior and far accurate than IVU, MCU and USG in diagnosing duplex renal system.

  17. Parameters and definitions in applied technique quality test for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system (NMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhikai; Zhao Lancai

    1999-08-01

    During the past two decades, medical diagnostic imaging technique has achieved dramatic development such as CT, MRI, PET, DSA and so on. The most striking examples of them are the application of X ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of medical diagnosis. It can be predicted that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will definitely have more widespread prospects of applications and play more and more important role in clinical diagnosis looking forward to the development of image diagnostic technique for 21 st century. The authors also present the measuring methods for some parameters. The parameters described can be used for reference by clinical diagnosticians, operators on MRI and medical physicists who engages in image quality assurance (QA) and control (QC) in performing MRI acceptance test and routine test

  18. Electronic paramagnetic resonance in the Mn In X (X:Te,S) diluted magnetic semiconductor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, Bernardo; Betancourt, Luis; Sagredo, Vicente; Alcala, Rafael

    1996-01-01

    Semiconductor compounds wit the II-III-VI stoichiometry are very interesting materials since they present very good semiconducting characteristics and, along with strong magnetic properties, these II Mn In VI compounds have a great potential as opt and magneto-electronic devices. Among the possible magnetic properties of the materials is the presence of the spin-glass phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance is one of the techniques used to confirm this phase. The chosen crystals were chosen by chemical vapor transport. The absorption lines of these two families with 0.1 x 1 were all Lorentzian in shape and centred at g=2. A large broadening of the resonance line width was observed when lowering the temperature to below 80 K. This behaviour was fitted to the known existing models, and good values of the calculated parameters were obtained (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance sialography for investigating major salivary gland duct system after intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Dan; He Xiayun; Zhang Yunyan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the value of magnetic resonance sialography for evaluating xerostomia induced by intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Fourteen patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Salivary function was assessed by magnetic resonance sialography and subjective evaluation criteria pre-treatment, 1 week and 1 year post-radiotherapy. A magnetic resonance sialography categorical scoring system was used to compare the visibility of salivary ducts. The average mean dose was 38.93 Gy to the parotid glands and 59.34 Gy to the submandibular glands. Before radiotherapy, the visibility scores of both the parotid and submandibular ducts increased after secretion stimulation. The scores decreased and the response to stimulation was attenuated 1 week post-radiotherapy. For most of the parotid ducts, the visibility score improved at 1 year post-radiotherapy both at rest and under stimulation, but not for the submandibular ducts. With a median follow-up of 12.3 months, 8/12 patients had grade 1 xerostomia and 4/12 had grade 2 xerostomia. Magnetic resonance sialography allows non-invasive evaluation of radiation-induced ductal changes in the major salivary glands and enables reliable prediction of radiation-induced xerostomia. (author)

  20. Changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging patterns for preterm infants after introduction of a magnetic resonance-compatible incubator coil system: 5-year experience at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Hae; Kim, In-One; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Choi, Young Hun; Lee, So Mi; Kim, Woo Sun

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the changes in using patterns of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in preterm infants after introduction of a MR-compatible incubator coil system. Brain MRIs for preterm infants with the MR-compatible incubator coil from March 2010 to July 2014 (n=154, group A) were compared with MRIs prior to the introduction of the incubator coil, from March 2005 to February 2010 (n=65, group B). Clinical data, MRI findings, acquisition time, and incidence of adverse events during the study were retrospectively reviewed. For the qualitative analysis of the examinations, the presence of motion artefact, spatial resolution, and overall image quality were assessed. Signal uniformity of each sequence was evaluated for a quantitative comparison. Comparing with group B, Group A was significantly younger (36+3 vs. 38+3 weeks, pimage acquisition time was significantly shorter in group A (21.4±4.5 vs. 25.4±5.5min, pimage quality with decreased signal variation than group B (all pimage quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A logic programming and statistical systems approach for tissue characterization in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.C.; Dudewicz, E.J.; Harner, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    The main research goal has been to evalute significant factors affecting the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters R 1 , T 2 , and 1 H density. This approach differs significantly from other such projects in that the experimental data analysis is being performed while concurrently developing automated, computer-aided analysis software for such MRI tissue parameters. In the experimental portion of the project, statistical analyses, and a heuristic minimum/maximum discriminant analysis algorithm have been explored. Both methods have been used to classify tissue types from 1.5 Tesla transaxial MR images of the human brain. The developing program, written in the logic programming language Prolog, similar in a number of ways to many existing expert systems now in use for other medical applications; inclusion of the underlying statistical data base and advanced statistical analyses is the main differentiating feature of the current approach. First results indicate promising classification accuracy of various brain tissues such as gray and white matter, as well as differentiation of different types of gray matter and white matter (e.g.: caudate-nucleus vs. thalamus, both representatives of gray matter; and, cortical white matter vs. internal capsule as representative of white matter). Taking all four tissue types together, the percentage of correct classifications ranges from 73 to 87%. (author)

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural studies of peptides and proteins from the vaso-regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizun, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show how Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) allows to determine the 3D structure of peptides and proteins in solution. A comparative study of peptides involved in the vaso-regulatory System (form small hormonal peptide to the 65 amido-acid protein hirudin) has allowed to design most efficient NMR 1D and 2D strategies. It rapidly appeared that the size of the peptide plays a key role in the structuration of the molecule, smallest peptides being weakly structured owing to the lack of cooperative effects. As the molecular size increases or if conformational locks are present (disulfide bridges) the probability of stable secondary structure increases. For the protein hirudin, a combination of ail available NMR parameters deduced form dedicated experiments (chemical shifts, coupling constants, overhauser effects, accessibility of amide protons) and molecular modelling under constraints allows a clear 3D structure to be proposed for this protein in solution. Finally, a comparative study of the experimental structures and of those deduced form prediction rules has shed light on the concept of structural predisposition, the latter being of high value for a better understanding of structure-activity relationships. (author) [fr

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging: early detection of central nervous system involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotot, P.M.; Sansonetti, P.J.; Levillain, R.; Cabanis, E.A.; Lavayssiere, R.; Sandoz-Tronca, C.

    1988-01-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement, whether primary by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus - HIV - itself, or secondary (toxoplasmosis or lymphoma) is remarkably frequent in AIDS, in 40 to 70% of cases, depending upon the author. In order to study the natural history of this illness, a cohort of 25 asymptomatic seropositive patients have been established. Every 6 months these patients undergo biological and clinical examinations, as well as Magnetic Resonance brain scans. After two examinations at a 6 month's interval, the first results are reported. Out of these 25 cases, 9 present anomalies: One patient with diffuse cerebral atrophy and 8 others with high signal intensity areas on T2 weighted sequences, like those of the Multiple Sclerosis. No relationship could be demonstrated between the existence of these lesions and various criteria such as age, sex, risk factors and T4 cells count. The nature of these lesions is not lear. They certainly indicate early involvement of the CNS after primary infection by the HIV virus. They may either represent scars of the primary infection or early alterations announcing developing encephalopathy [fr

  4. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging in prenatal diagnosis of central nervous system abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Takato; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Kawamura, Tadao; Mihara, Futoshi; Hikino, Shunji; Nagata, Hideaki; Iwaki, Toru; Sasaki, Tomio

    2005-01-01

    The diagnostic value of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed in 42 pregnant women whose fetuses had structural abnormalities of the central nervous system identified with transabdominal ultrasonography from 1995 through 2002, was analyzed retrospectively. Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) T 2 -weighted imaging clearly delineated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space and the malformed brain and spinal cord and provided valuable information for the diagnosis of structural abnormalities related to the CSF space, such as spina bifida with Chiari type II malformation (7 cases), colpocephaly with agenesis of the corpus callosum (7 cases), holoprosencephaly (6 cases), porencephaly (2 cases), lissencephaly with hydrocephalus (2 cases), and middle fossa arachnoid cyst (1 case). However, some difficulty was encountered in the diagnosis of rare pathologic conditions that were not related to the CSF space, such as epignathus, multiple arteriovenous fistulae, trapped suboccipital meningocele, and Turner syndrome. We conclude that HASTE T 2 -weighted imaging, which provides useful diagnostic images in a reasonable time, is a useful adjunct to ultrasonography to confirm or exclude certain abnormalities related to the CSF space. (author)

  5. Cognitive dysfunction and functional magnetic resonance imaging in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraclough, M; Elliott, R; McKie, S; Parker, B; Bruce, I N

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common aspect of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is increasingly reported as a problem by patients. In many cases the exact cause is unclear. Limited correlations between specific autoantibodies or structural brain abnormalities and cognitive dysfunction in SLE have been reported. It may be that the most appropriate biomarkers have yet to be found. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique used in many other conditions and provides sensitive measures of brain functionality during cognitive tasks. It is now beginning to be employed in SLE studies. These studies have shown that patients with SLE often perform similarly to healthy controls in terms of behavioural measures on cognitive tasks. However, SLE patients appear to employ compensatory brain mechanisms, such as increased response in fronto-parietal regions, to maintain adequate cognitive performance. As there have been only a few studies using fMRI in SLE to investigate cognitive dysfunction, many questions remain unanswered. Further research could, however, help to identify biomarkers for cognitive dysfunction in SLE. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Contactless respiratory monitoring system for magnetic resonance imaging applications using a laser range sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krug Johannes W.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI exam, a respiratory signal can be required for different purposes, e.g. for patient monitoring, motion compensation or for research studies such as in functional MRI. In addition, respiratory information can be used as a biofeedback for the patient in order to control breath holds or shallow breathing. To reduce patient preparation time or distortions of the MR imaging system, we propose the use of a contactless approach for gathering information about the respiratory activity. An experimental setup based on a commercially available laser range sensor was used to detect respiratory induced motion of the chest or abdomen. This setup was tested using a motion phantom and different human subjects in an MRI scanner. A nasal airflow sensor served as a reference. For both, the phantom as well as the different human subjects, the motion frequency was precisely measured. These results show that a low cost, contactless, laser-based approach can be used to obtain information about the respiratory motion during an MRI exam.

  7. Preclinical magnetic resonance imaging and systems biology in cancer research: current applications and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Chris; Rodriguez, Olga C; VanMeter, John; Fricke, Stanley T; Rood, Brian R; Lee, YiChien; Wang, Sean S; Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Wang, Yue

    2013-02-01

    Biologically accurate mouse models of human cancer have become important tools for the study of human disease. The anatomical location of various target organs, such as brain, pancreas, and prostate, makes determination of disease status difficult. Imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, can greatly enhance diagnosis, and longitudinal imaging of tumor progression is an important source of experimental data. Even in models where the tumors arise in areas that permit visual determination of tumorigenesis, longitudinal anatomical and functional imaging can enhance the scope of studies by facilitating the assessment of biological alterations, (such as changes in angiogenesis, metabolism, cellular invasion) as well as tissue perfusion and diffusion. One of the challenges in preclinical imaging is the development of infrastructural platforms required for integrating in vivo imaging and therapeutic response data with ex vivo pathological and molecular data using a more systems-based multiscale modeling approach. Further challenges exist in integrating these data for computational modeling to better understand the pathobiology of cancer and to better affect its cure. We review the current applications of preclinical imaging and discuss the implications of applying functional imaging to visualize cancer progression and treatment. Finally, we provide new data from an ongoing preclinical drug study demonstrating how multiscale modeling can lead to a more comprehensive understanding of cancer biology and therapy. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  9. Fourier-based linear systems description of free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, D. P. I.; Svenningsen, S.; Cunningham, I. A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Fourier-decomposition of free-breathing pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (FDMRI) was recently piloted as a way to provide rapid quantitative pulmonary maps of ventilation and perfusion without the use of exogenous contrast agents. This method exploits fast pulmonary MRI acquisition of free-breathing proton (1H) pulmonary images and non-rigid registration to compensate for changes in position and shape of the thorax associated with breathing. In this way, ventilation imaging using conventional MRI systems can be undertaken but there has been no systematic evaluation of fundamental image quality measurements based on linear systems theory. We investigated the performance of free-breathing pulmonary ventilation imaging using a Fourier-based linear system description of each operation required to generate FDMRI ventilation maps. Twelve subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis underwent pulmonary function tests and MRI. Non-rigid registration was used to co-register the temporal series of pulmonary images. Pulmonary voxel intensities were aligned along a time axis and discrete Fourier transforms were performed on the periodic signal intensity pattern to generate frequency spectra. We determined the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the FDMRI ventilation maps using a conventional approach (SNRC) and using the Fourier-based description (SNRF). Mean SNR was 4.7 ± 1.3 for subjects with bronchiectasis and 3.4 ± 1.8, for COPD subjects (p>.05). SNRF was significantly different than SNRC (p<.01). SNRF was approximately 50% of SNRC suggesting that the linear system model well-estimates the current approach.

  10. Histomorphology of canine urethral sphincter systems, including three-dimensional reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen; Liatsikos, Evangelos N; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Ludewig, Eberhard; Ganzer, Roman

    2006-03-01

    To present a detailed anatomic description and comparison of the smooth and striated urethral sphincter in male and female dogs. We performed a thorough histologic evaluation, three-dimensional reconstruction, and magnetic resonance imaging of the lower urinary tract of male and female dogs. The lower urinary tract anatomy was investigated in 16 male and 18 female dogs by serial sectioning, including immunohistochemical staining and three-dimensional reconstruction. Magnetic resonance imaging performed in 5 male and 5 female dogs before histologic investigation helped to demonstrate the anatomy in vivo. A urethral sphincter muscle in both sexes existed without muscular connection to the pelvic floor. It ran circularly and consisted of an inner smooth and outer striated muscular part. In the female dog, the striated muscle encircled the urethra and vagina in the caudal third of the membranous urethra (musculus urethrovaginalis). A urinary diaphragm (diaphragma urogenitale) could not be found histologically or by magnetic resonance imaging. The dog is a suitable animal model for investigations of the urethral sphincter. In the female dog, attention should be given to the special topography of the musculus urethrovaginalis.

  11. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields

  14. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  15. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  16. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  17. Design of the power system for dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation coils on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, B. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Ding, Y.H., E-mail: yhding@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, M.; Rao, B.; Nan, J.Y.; Zeng, W.B.; Zheng, M.Y.; Xu, H.Y.; Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We introduce the dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation coils system on J-TEXT. ► Details of the design of the power supply system have been presented. ► At DC mode, two antiparallel 6-pulse phase thyristor rectifiers were chosen. ► An AC–DC–AC converter including a series resonant inverter was adopted for AC mode. ► Some engineering testing result was given in this paper. -- Abstract: A set of in-vessel saddle coils has been installed on J-TEXT tokamak. They are proposed for further researches on controlling tearing modes and driving plasma rotation by static and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). The saddle coils will be energized by DC with the amplitude up to 10 kA, or AC with maximum amplitude up to 5 kA within the frequency range of 1–5 kHz. At DC mode two antiparallel 6-pulse phase thyristor rectifiers are chosen to obtain bidirectional current, while at AC mode an AC–DC–AC converter including a series resonant inverter can generate current of various amplitudes and frequencies. The paper presents the design of the power supply system, based on the definition of the power supply requirements and the feasibility of implementation of the topology and control strategy. Some simulation and experimental results are given in the end.

  18. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  19. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  20. A 99%-efficiency GaN converter for 6.78 MHz magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Akuzawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors developed a high-efficiency gallium-nitride (GaN Class-E converter for a 6.78 MHz magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system. A negative-bias gate driver circuit made it possible to use a depletion mode GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT, and simplified the converter circuit. As the depletion mode GaN HEMT with very small gate–source capacitance provided almost ideal zero-voltage switching, the authors attained a drain efficiency of 98.8% and a total efficiency of 97.7%, including power consumption of a gate driver circuit, at a power output of 33 W. In addition, the authors demonstrated a 6.78 MHz magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system that consisted of the GaN Class-E converter, a pair of magnetic resonant coils 150 mm in diameter with an air-gap distance of 40 mm, and a full-bridge rectifier using Si Schottky barrier diodes. The system achieved a dc–dc efficiency of 82.8% at a power output of 25 W. The efficiencies of coil coupling and the rectifier were estimated to be ∼ 94 and 90%, respectively.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Nigrostriatal System: Biomarkers of Parkinson’s Disease Stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopes, Lucie; Grolez, Guillaume; Moreau, Caroline; Lopes, Renaud; Ryckewaert, Gilles; Carrière, Nicolas; Auger, Florent; Laloux, Charlotte; Petrault, Maud; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Bordet, Regis; Defebvre, Luc; Jissendi, Patrice; Delmaire, Christine; Devos, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to identify biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease (PD); R2* values reflect iron content related to high levels of oxidative stress, whereas volume and/or shape changes reflect neuronal death. We sought to assess iron overload in the nigrostriatal system and characterize its relationship with focal and overall atrophy of the striatum in the pivotal stages of PD. Methods Twenty controls and 70 PD patients at different disease stages (untreated de novo patients, treated early-stage patients and advanced-stage patients with L-dopa-related motor complications) were included in the study. We determined the R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus, together with striatal volume and shape analysis. We also measured R2* in an acute MPTP mouse model and in a longitudinal follow-up two years later in the early-stage PD patients. Results The R2* values in the substantia nigra, putamen and caudate nucleus were significantly higher in de novo PD patients than in controls. Early-stage patients displayed significantly higher R2* values in the substantia nigra (with changes in striatal shape), relative to de novo patients. Measurements after a two-year follow-up in early-stage patients and characterization of the acute MPTP mouse model confirmed that R2* changed rapidly with disease progression. Advanced-stage patients displayed significant atrophy of striatum, relative to earlier disease stages. Conclusion Each pivotal stage in PD appears to be characterized by putative nigrostriatal MRI biomarkers: iron overload at the de novo stage, striatal shape changes at early-stage disease and generalized striatal atrophy at advanced disease. PMID:27035571

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Lotx, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now accepted as an effective method of investigating a wide range of disorders, especially of the brain and spine. A short introduction on image contrast in MRI is given and the advantages and disadvantages for the different diseases of the brain is discussed. Excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capabilities and lack of ionising radiation are conspicuous advantages, and it is now established as the investigation of choice in a large number of clinical conditions, especially when the central nervous system is involved. However, it remains only one of a series of imaging modalities. A confident provisional clinical diagnosis is essential for establishing an imaging protocol and the intention should always be to reach a definitive diagnosis in the least invasive and most cost-effective way. 7 figs., 19 refs

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  4. Analysis and optimization of coupled windings in magnetic resonant wireless power transfer systems with orthogonal experiment method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yudi, Xiao; Xingkui, Mao; Mao, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The coupled magnetic resonant unit (CMRU) has great effect on the transmitting power capability and efficiency of magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system. The key objective i.e. the efficiency coefficient kQ is introduced in the design of CMRU or the coupled windings based on the mutual...... inductance model. Then the design method with orthogonal experiments and finite element method simulation is proposed to maximize the kQ due to low precise analytical model of AC resistance and inductance for PCB windings at high- frequency. The method can reduce the design iterations and thereby can get...... more optimal design results. The experiments verified the design objective of kQ as well as the design method effectively. In the optimal PCB windings prototype at operating frequency of 4 MHz, the kQ and the maximum efficiency are increased by about 12% and 4% respectively....

  5. Analysis and optimisation of coupled winding in magnetic resonant wireless power transfer systems with orthogonal experiment results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yudi, Xiao; Xingkui, Mao; Mao, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The coupled magnetic resonant unit (CMRU) has great effect on the transmitting power capability and efficiency of magnetic resonant wireless power transfer system. The key objective i.e. the efficiency coefficient kQ is introduced in the design of CMRU or the coupled windings based on the mutual...... inductance model. Then the design method with orthogonal experiments and finite element method simulation is proposed to maximize the kQ due to low precise analytical model of AC resistance and inductance for PCB windings at high- frequency. The method can reduce the design iterations and thereby can get...... more optimal design results. The experiments verified the design objective of kQ as well as the design method effectively. In the optimal PCB windings prototype at operating frequency of 4 MHz, the kQ and the maximum efficiency are increased by about 12% and 4% respectively....

  6. Magnetic resonance-compatible robotic and mechatronics systems for image-guided interventions and rehabilitation: a review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekos, Nikolaos V; Khanicheh, Azadeh; Christoforou, Eftychios; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    The continuous technological progress of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as its widespread clinical use as a highly sensitive tool in diagnostics and advanced brain research, has brought a high demand for the development of magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible robotic/mechatronic systems. Revolutionary robots guided by real-time three-dimensional (3-D)-MRI allow reliable and precise minimally invasive interventions with relatively short recovery times. Dedicated robotic interfaces used in conjunction with fMRI allow neuroscientists to investigate the brain mechanisms of manipulation and motor learning, as well as to improve rehabilitation therapies. This paper gives an overview of the motivation, advantages, technical challenges, and existing prototypes for MR-compatible robotic/mechatronic devices.

  7. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  8. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  9. Remote Cherenkov imaging-based quality assurance of a magnetic resonance image-guided radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M; Mooney, Karen E; Brůža, Petr; Curcuru, Austen; Gladstone, David J; Pogue, Brian W; Green, Olga

    2018-06-01

    Tools to perform regular quality assurance of magnetic resonance image-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) systems should ideally be independent of interference from the magnetic fields. Remotely acquired optical Cherenkov imaging-based dosimetry measurements in water were investigated for this purpose, comparing measures of dose accuracy, temporal dynamics, and overall integrated IMRT delivery. A 40 × 30.5 × 37.5 cm 3 water tank doped with 1 g/L of quinine sulfate was imaged using an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) to capture the Cherenkov emission while being irradiated by a commercial MRIgRT system (ViewRay™). The ICCD was placed down-bore at the end of the couch, 4 m from treatment isocenter and behind the 5-Gauss line of the 0.35-T MRI. After establishing optimal camera acquisition settings, square beams of increasing size (4.2 × 4.2 cm 2 , 10.5 × 10.5 cm 2 , and 14.7 × 14.7 cm 2 ) were imaged at 0.93 frames per second, from an individual cobalt-60 treatment head, to develop projection measures related to percent depth dose (PDD) curves and cross beam profiles (CPB). These Cherenkov-derived measurements were compared to ionization chamber (IC) and radiographic film dosimetry data, as well as simulation data from the treatment planning system (TPS). An intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) commissioning plan from AAPM TG-119 (C4:C-Shape) was also imaged at 2.1 frames per second, and the single linear sum image from 509 s of plan delivery was compared to the dose volume prediction generated by the TPS using gamma index analysis. Analysis of standardized test target images (1024 × 1024 pixels) yielded a pixel resolution of 0.37 mm/pixel. The beam width measured from the Cherenkov image-generated projection CBPs was within 1 mm accuracy when compared to film measurements for all beams. The 502 point measurements (i.e., pixels) of the Cherenkov image-based projection percent depth dose curves (pPDDs) were compared to p

  10. Nonlinear dynamics near resonances of a rotor-active magnetic bearings system with 16-pole legs and time varying stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R. Q.; Zhang, W.; Yao, M. H.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze the complicated nonlinear dynamics of rotor-active magnetic bearings (rotor-AMB) with 16-pole legs and the time varying stiffness. The magnetic force with 16-pole legs is obtained by applying the electromagnetic theory. The governing equation of motion for rotor-active magnetic bearings is derived by using the Newton's second law. The resulting dimensionless equation of motion for the rotor-AMB system is expressed as a two-degree-of-freedom nonlinear system including the parametric excitation, quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. The averaged equation of the rotor-AMB system is obtained by using the method of multiple scales when the primary parametric resonance and 1/2 subharmonic resonance are taken into account. From the frequency-response curves, it is found that there exist the phenomena of the soft-spring type nonlinearity and the hardening-spring type nonlinearity in the rotor-AMB system. The effects of different parameters on the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of the rotor-AMB system are investigated. The numerical results indicate that the periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic motions occur alternately in the rotor-AMB system.

  11. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Magnetic resonance phenomena in dynamics of relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternov, I.M.; Bordovitsyn, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    A relativistic generalization of Rabi's formula for magnetic resonance is given. On this basis, we consider fast and slow passage through resonance. We define a magnetic resonance exterior field as usual, using unit vectors of a Cartesian coordinate system, a homogeneous magnetic field, and the amplitude of a rotating magnetic field. For the description of spin dynamics we use the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation

  13. Beginnings and early history of the International Conferences on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems: development of the basic ideas in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardetzky, Oleg

    2010-09-01

    The early history of the principal meeting in the field of biological NMR spectroscopy, the International Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems (ICMRBS), is presented from the perspective of one of the founders. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn; Creber, Sarah A.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Johns, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  15. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  16. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  6. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  7. A high temperature superconductor tape RF receiver coil for a low field magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M C; Yan, B P; Lee, K H; Ma, Q Y; Yang, E S

    2005-01-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) thin films have been applied in making a low loss RF receiver coil for improving magnetic resonance imaging image quality. However, the application of these coils is severely limited by their limited field of view (FOV). Stringent fabrication environment requirements and high cost are further limitations. In this paper, we propose a simpler method for designing and fabricating HTS coils. Using industrial silver alloy sheathed Bi (2-x) Pb x Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) HTS tapes, a five-inch single-turn HTS solenoid coil has been developed, and human wrist images have been acquired with this coil. The HTS tape coil has demonstrated an enhanced FOV over a six-inch YBCO thin film surface coil at 77 K with comparable signal-to-noise ratio

  8. Nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurgaliev, T.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been studied theoretically by taking into account the interaction between NMR and FMR in the ferromagnets. The Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equations, describing the electron and nuclear magnetization behaviour in ferromagnets are presented in an integral form for a weakly excited electronic system. The stationary solution of these equations has been analysed in the case of equal NMR and FMR frequencies: the criteria for the appearance of two stable dynamic states is found and the high-frequency magnetic susceptibility for these systems is investigated. 2 figs., 8 refs

  9. Magnetic resonance for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SYR

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance has been a cornerstone of nonradiative wireless power transfer (WPT) since the late 19th century. However, some researchers have the misconception that magnetic resonance for WPT was developed recently. This article traces some early work of Tesla and other researchers related to the use of magnetic resonance in WPT. Included are some examples of magnetic resonance-based WPT projects conducted by researchers in the biomedical and power electronics communities over the last ...

  10. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soernes, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system

  11. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  12. Vascular anatomy in angiography for magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charry Lopez, Marco Luciano; Rivera Gomez, Juan Enrique

    1998-01-01

    A review of basic anatomical concepts and main variants, as well as some anatomical anomalies of the central nervous system vascularity, these concepts are considered essential for the interpretation of magnetic resonance angiography with time-of-flight (TOF) and phase-contrast (PC) methods

  13. Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are an essential part of modern healthcare. Marked increases in clinical demand for these imaging modalities are straining healthcare expenditure and threatening health system sustainability. The number of CT and MRI scans requested in ...

  14. A Web-based searchable system to confirm magnetic resonance compatibility of implantable medical devices in Japan: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Fujioka, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Tomoko; Sekiguchi, Maiko; Murakami, Ryuji

    2017-09-01

    Confirmation of the magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of implanted medical devices (IMDs) is mandatory before conducting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. In Japan, few such confirmation methods are in use, and they are time-consuming. This study aimed to develop a Web-based searchable MR safety information system to confirm IMD compatibility and to evaluate the usefulness of the system. First, MR safety information for intravascular stents and stent grafts sold in Japan was gathered by interviewing 20 manufacturers. These IMDs were categorized based on the descriptions available on medical package inserts as: "MR Safe," "MR Conditional," "MR Unsafe," "Unknown," and "No Medical Package Insert Available". An MR safety information database for implants was created based on previously proposed item lists. Finally, a Web-based searchable system was developed using this database. A questionnaire was given to health-care personnel in Japan to evaluate the usefulness of this system. Seventy-nine datasets were collected using information provided by 12 manufacturers and by investigating the medical packaging of the IMDs. Although the datasets must be updated by collecting data from other manufacturers, this system facilitates the easy and rapid acquisition of MR safety information for IMDs, thereby improving the safety of MRI examinations.

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasson, J.R.; Salinas, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Of the thousands of publications available for the period from July 1977 to July 1979, only a few were selected for this review. Approximately 130 review sources are summarized in tabular form as to topic(s) covered in the review. Other parts of the review article deal with apparatus and techniques, spectral analysis, computer applications, analytical applications, selected organic systems, and selected inorganic systems. A total of 257 references are cited

  17. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.; Staedtisches Rudolf-Virchow Krankenhaus, Berlin

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness. (orig.) [de

  18. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  19. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations

  20. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  1. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  2. Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2003-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed. (topical review)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the heavy fermion system Ce2CoAl7Ge4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, A. P.; Guzman, P.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Ghimire, N. J.; Eley, S.; Brown, S. E.; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, E. D.; Ronning, F.

    2017-12-01

    We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements performed on single crystalline Ce2CoAl7Ge4 , a member of a recently discovered family of heavy fermion materials Ce2M Al7Ge4 (M =Co , Ir, Ni, or Pd). Previous measurements indicated a strong Kondo interaction as well as magnetic order below TM=1.8 K . Our NMR spectral measurements show that the Knight shift K is proportional to the bulk magnetic susceptibility χ at high temperatures. A clear Knight shift anomaly (K ¬∝χ ) is observed at coherence temperatures T*˜17.5 K for H0∥c ̂ and 10 K for H0∥a ̂ at the 59Co site, and T*˜12.5 K at the 27Al(3) site for H0∥a ̂ characteristic of the heavy fermion nature of this compound. At high temperatures, the 59Co NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 is dominated by spin fluctuations of the 4 f local moments with a weak metallic background. The spin fluctuations probed by 59Co NMR are anisotropic and larger in the basal plane than in the c direction. Furthermore, we find (T1T K ) -1∝T-1 /2 at the 59Co site as expected for a Kondo system for T >T* and T >TK . 59Co NQR T1-1 measurements at low temperatures indicate slowing down of spin fluctuations above the magnetic ordering temperature TM˜1.8 K . A weak ferromagnetic character of fluctuations around q =0 is evidenced by an increase of χ T versus T above the magnetic ordering temperature. We also find good agreement between the observed and calculated electric field gradients at all observed sites.

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vision or seizures help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... moveable examination table that slides into the center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  5. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debatin, J.F.; Adam, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of open configuration MR imaging systems, the vision of MRI-based guidance, control, and monitoring of minimally invasive interventions has evolved from a hypothetical concept to a practical possibility. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the very exciting emerging field of interventional MRI. The international authorship provides firsthand experience of all relevant topics. This book will familiarize the reader with the basic principles underlying currently available hardware and software configurations. In addition, technical aspects of thermosensitive imaging, techniques for instrument visualization, and safety aspects are covered. Finally, the book emphasizes both existing and future clinical applications. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance system with continuous flow of polarized water to obtain the traceability to static magnetic fields; Sistema de ressonancia magnetica nuclear com fluxo continuo de agua polarizada para obtencao da rastreabilidade para campos magneticos estaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ramon Valls; Nazarre, Diego Joriro, E-mail: ramon@ipt.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a system to obtain the traceability of field or magnetic induction intensity in the range of 2 μT up to 2 T, even in the presence of magnetic field gradients or noisy environments. The system is based on a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer, built in streaming water. The calibration procedure of a coil for magnetic field generation is described, as well as the results obtained and the estimated uncertainty (author)

  7. Development and initial characterization of a nuclear magnetic resonance dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    A novel high dose radiation dosimeter was developed employing NMR spectroscopic quantitation of the radiolytic products of methanol. Chemical shifts of product resonances relative to the solvent allow quantification using NMR techniques. Due to expected dynamic range limitations of NMR instrumentation, deuterated methanol is used with a presaturation suppression sequence to reduce the solvent proton signals. Methanol's 13 C-coupled proton resonances is used as an internal reference to normalize product signals otherwise subject to spectrometer variability. Data on reproducibility, dose response, and temporal stability were acquired. System reproducibility for a sample at 1 kGy is ∼10%. The dose response is linear in the range between 200 Gy and 50 kGy. No significant signal degradation was observed during a six month period. Advantages of this type dosimeter system include ease of use, large dynamic range, and temporal stability. An additional characteristic of a methanol based system is the LET dependent response in the chemical yields of formaldehyde and ethylene glycol. 70 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs

  8. A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Study in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a 3-Tesla Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) System: The Anterior Cingulate Cortex and the Left Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromichi; Mori, Kenji; Harada, Masafumi; Hisaoka, Sonoka; Toda, Yoshihiro; Mori, Tatsuo; Goji, Aya; Abe, Yoko; Miyazaki, Masahito; Kagami, Shoji

    2017-07-01

    The pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not fully understood. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate metabolite concentration ratios in the anterior cingulate cortex and left cerebellum in ASD. In the ACC and left cerebellum studies, the ASD group and intelligence quotient- and age-matched control group consisted of 112 and 114 subjects and 65 and 45 subjects, respectively. In the ASD group, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)+/ creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr) was significantly decreased in the anterior cingulate cortex, and glutamate (Glu)/Cr was significantly increased and GABA+/Cr was significantly decreased in the left cerebellum compared to those in the control group. In addition, both groups showed negative correlations between Glu/Cr and GABA+/Cr in the left cerebellum, and positive correlations between GABA+/Cr in the anterior cingulate cortex and left cerebellum. ASD subjects have hypoGABAergic alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex and hyperglutamatergic/hypoGABAergic alterations in the left cerebellum.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment-related central nervous system damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, R.J.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1986-01-01

    Neurologic and neuropsychologic treatment related sequelae are increasingly encountered in children with cancer, but conventional means of neurologic investigation are insensitive to the presence and extent of damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown brain damage not demonstrable by other means of investigation. For this reason, 11 children with cancer and with nontumor-related neurologic dysfunction were studied on a 1.5 Tesla MRI unit. All had concurrent computed tomography (CT). MRI abnormalities were seen in all (100%) patients. In 10 of 11 patients, abnormalities were of greater extent on MRI than on CT. White matter changes were frequently seen on MRI without corresponding CT abnormality. Those patients with the most severe forms of neurologic compromise had the most extensive changes on MRI. Focal neurologic findings correlated well with regions of focal signal change. Milder forms of neurologic compromise occurred in patients with definite, but less extensive, periventricular and/or subcortical change on MRI. MRI is more sensitive than CT in demonstrating treatment-related neurologic damage in children with cancer, and the type of change seen on MRI seems to correlate well with the type and severity of neurologic dysfunction present

  10. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging: ischemic and traumatic injury of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huisman, T.A.G.M.; Sorensen, A.G.; Hawighorst, H.; Benoit, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) represents a recent development that extends imaging from the depiction of the neuroanatomy into the field of functional and physiologic processes. DWI measures a fundamentally different physiologic parameter than conventional MRI. Image contrast is related to differences in the microscopic motion (diffusion) of water molecules within brain tissue rather than a change in total tissue water. Consequently, DWI can reveal pathology where conventional T1- and T2-weighted MR images are negative. DWI has clinically proven its value in the assessment of acute cerebral stroke and trauma by showing cerebral injury early due to its ability to discriminate between lesions with cytotoxic edema (decreased diffusion) from lesions with vasogenic edema (increased diffusion). Full tensor DWI allows to calculate a variety of functional maps, the most widely used maps include maps of apparent diffusion coefficients and isotropic diffusion. In addition maps of anisotropic diffusion can be calculated which are believed to give information about the integrity and location of fiber tracts. This functional-anatomical information will most probably play an increasingly important role in the early detection of primary and secondary tissue injury from various reasons and could guide and validate current and future neuroprotective treatments. (orig.) [de

  11. Evaluation of the SLAP lesion using a low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of the low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance (MR) system in the detection of the superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. One hundred fifty patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder over a 7-month period. Forty-six patients underwent arthroscopic surgery, and the surgical results were correlated with the findings of the MR imaging. Arthroscopic procedures were performed within a mean of 8 days after MR imaging. MR imaging of the shoulder was conducted as follows: shoulder coil; T1-weighted spin echo, coronal-oblique images; T2-weighted gradient echo, coronal-oblique and axial images; and T2-weighted spin echo, coronal oblique and sagittal-oblique images. Prospectively, one radiologist interpreted the MR images. The results of surgery were as follow: SLAP II in 26 shoulders, SLAP III in 1 shoulder, SLAP IV in 1 shoulder, normal labrum in 6 shoulder. For SLAP lesions with a higher grade than type 2, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the low-field MRI were 85.7%, 55.5%. 75%, 71%, and 74%, respectively. There was relatively good agreement for the comparison of the MR results obtained using a low-field MR system with the surgical findings for identifying SLAP lesions

  12. Repeatability of magnetic resonance fingerprinting T1 and T2 estimates assessed using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Keenan, Kathryn E; Stupic, Karl F; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate accuracy and repeatability of T 1 and T 2 estimates of a MR fingerprinting (MRF) method using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom. The ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom contains multiple compartments with standardized T 1 , T 2 , and proton density values. Conventional inversion-recovery spin echo and spin echo methods were used to characterize the T 1 and T 2 values in the phantom. The phantom was scanned using the MRF-FISP method over 34 consecutive days. The mean T 1 and T 2 values were compared with the values from the spin echo methods. The repeatability was characterized as the coefficient of variation of the measurements over 34 days. T 1 and T 2 values from MRF-FISP over 34 days showed a strong linear correlation with the measurements from the spin echo methods (R 2  = 0.999 for T 1 ; R 2  = 0.996 for T 2 ). The MRF estimates over the wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values have less than 5% variation, except for the shortest T 2 relaxation times where the method still maintains less than 8% variation. MRF measurements of T 1 and T 2 are highly repeatable over time and across wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values. Magn Reson Med 78:1452-1457, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Resonance of magnetization excited by voltage in magnetoelectric heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guoliang; Zhang, Huaiwu; Li, Yuanxun; Li, Jie; Zhang, Dainan; Sun, Nian

    2018-04-01

    Manipulation of magnetization dynamics is critical for spin-based devices. Voltage driven magnetization resonance is promising for realizing low-power information processing systems. Here, we show through Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations that magnetization resonance in nanoscale magnetic elements can be generated by a radio frequency (rf) voltage via the converse magnetoelectric (ME) effect. The magnetization dynamics induced by voltage in a ME heterostructures is simulated by taking into account the magnetoelastic and piezoelectric coupling mechanisms among magnetization, strain and voltage. The frequency of the excited magnetization resonance is equal to the driving rf voltage frequency. The proposed voltage driven magnetization resonance excitation mechanism opens a way toward energy-efficient spin based device applications.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  16. Molecular imaging of in vivo redox dynamics using magnetic resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hideo; Yasukawa, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    Homeostatic failure through redox systems in vivo results in abnormality in mitochondrial function, protein expression and metabolism leading to many diseases like lifestyle related ones and cancer. It is therefore important to see redox dynamics for early prevention of the diseases. This paper describes development of machines for electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging of the redox state, for Overhauser Effect MRI (OMRI), application of nitroxyl-probes and state of redox project by authors. They have developed the ESR equipments hitherto, including the latest 300 MHz one, with which images of a mouse given carbamoyl-PROXYL probe are obtained and fused with MRI images for anatomical positioning: resonator for both ESR and MRI coils has been developed for animal images. Philips OMRI machine has been able to give separate images of reduction and oxidation in animals given appropriate probe compounds, which lead to molecular imaging of redox using such probes as 14 N- and 15 N-nitroxyl radicals with different membrane permeability. Application of nitroxyl-radicals like hydroxyl-TEMPO has made it possible for the animal diseases caused by oxidative stress to be analyzed by ESR/spin probe method, and derivatization of the probe results in detection of its distribution in various cell and body areas even in nanometer-space. Authors' project concerns the development of the processing system of redox dynamics/OMRI-integrated images, of better probe complexes and application of these to actual model animals. The techniques are thought to be important in the fields of medicare and new drug development in future. (R.T.)

  17. Damping System for Torsional Resonances in Generator Shafts Using a Feedback Controlled Buffer Storage of Magnetic Energy at ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaesemann, C.-P.; Huart, M.; Mueller, P.; Sigalov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The electrical power and energy for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is provided by three separate pulsed networks based on flywheel generators. Major damages at couplings of the shaft of the synchronous generator EZ4 (220 MVA / 600 MWs) were discovered during a routine check. The damage can only be explained by torsional resonances in the generator shaft which are excited by active power transients from the converter loads. For generator protection, torque sensors were installed near the coupling between the flywheel and the rotor. They cause an early termination of plasma experiments if a predefined torque level is exceeded. These terminations limited the achievable plasma current flattop time of AUG significantly. Since a low natural damping of the torsional resonances was identified as a major cause of the phenomena observed, novel feedback controlled DC circuits were developed providing electromagnetic damping for the generator shafts in case of excitation. Each damping circuit consists of a DC choke, acting as a buffer storage of magnetic energy, fed by a thyristor converter. The current reference for the converter is derived from the torque sensor signals. This enables the choke current to alternate with the measured natural frequency of the shaft assembly. Thus, with proper phasing, torsional resonances in generator shaft systems weighing more than 100 tons can be damped with little additional power. Since April 2003, the damping circuits have been routinely operated during all plasma experiments. Despite the low damping power used, torsional resonances could be reduced to a value that avoids a trip signal from the torque sensors. This paper describes the results from analysing, designing and testing of the feedback controlled buffer storage of magnetic energy, representing an effective and low cost solution for damping torsional resonances in electric power systems. It will present the layout, analyse the results of measurements obtained during commissioning and

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist know about them. ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be aware of them. Parents ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  20. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  3. Resonant and nonresonant magnetic scattering (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open up new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and they fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin-polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation

  4. Positivity of magnetic resonance imaging the GIROIMAG-01: Diagnostic tools in injuries of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda Guerra, Manuel Ernesto; Corujo Torres, Pedro A.; Gonzalez Ferro, Idalia; Daudinot Gomez, Barbara; Montoya Pedron, Arquimedes

    2001-01-01

    A study was made to compare the positivity of magnetic resonance imaging with that of other imaging and neuropsychological diagnostic tools in injuries of the central nervous system in order to determine the sensitivity, specificity, strength and the test error with the GIROIMAG-01 Cuban tomograph in the diagnostic of these injuries. An intentional sample of 398 patients was selected. Only those patients who had undergone computed axial tomography, electroencephalogram or evoked multimodal potentials or both, whose results were registered in the study requests, could be selected. The most representative injuries among the diagnoses made were the degenerative diseases, the brain and cerebellar tumors, the cerebrovascular accidents, the demyelinizating diseases and hydrocephalous. It was demonstrated that this tomograph has an elevated sensitivity and specificity for the detection of injuries of the central nervous system

  5. Benchtop-magnetic resonance imaging (BT-MRI) characterization of push-pull osmotic controlled release systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaterre, Vincent; Metz, Hendrik; Ogorka, Joerg; Gurny, Robert; Loggia, Nicoletta; Mäder, Karsten

    2009-01-05

    The mechanism of drug release from push-pull osmotic systems (PPOS) has been investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) using a new benchtop apparatus. The signal intensity profiles of both PPOS layers were monitored non-invasively over time to characterize the hydration and swelling kinetics. The drug release performance was well-correlated to the hydration kinetics. The results show that (i) hydration and swelling critically depend on the tablet core composition, (ii) high osmotic pressure developed by the push layer may lead to bypassing the drug layer and incomplete drug release and (iii) the hydration of both the drug and the push layers needs to be properly balanced to efficiently deliver the drug. MRI is therefore a powerful tool to get insights on the drug delivery mechanism of push-pull osmotic systems, which enable a more efficient optimization of such formulations.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance - from molecules to man

    OpenAIRE

    Wüthrich, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Initial observations of the physical phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) date back to the late 1940s. In the following two decades high-resolution NMR in solution became an indispensible analytical tool in chemistry, and solid state NMR had an increasingly important role in physics. Some of the potentialities of the method for investigations of complex biological systems had also long been anticipated, and initial experiments with biological specimens were described already 30 year...

  7. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...... pathologies in peripheral PsA and suggestions concerning appropriate MRI sequences for use in PsA hands are also provided....

  8. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  9. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  10. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  11. 'Magnetic Resonance Motion Imaging' for functional diagnosis of the musculo-skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, K.M.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: radiological studies of joint and spine function are an important part of the diagnosis and therapy management for musculo-skeletal diseases affecting range-of-motion. The objective of this study was to investigate the integration and developement of the clinical application of currently available MR-tomographic techniques, which can be summarized as 'Magnetic Resonance Motion Imaging (MRMI)'. Material and methods: five healthy volunteers (three women and two men; mean age 21.8?4.4) and ten patients (eight women and two men; mean age 31.4?12.6) took part in the study. A total of 21 examinations with real-time motion-MRI were performed on selected peripheric joints (seven patellofemoral joints, six femorotibial joints, one cervical spine, two wrists, three ankles and two temporomandibular joints) with a 1.0T unit (Philips Intera T10) using T1-weighted gradient-echo and opposed-phase imaging sequences. For the examination of the patellofemoral joint, the femorotibial joint, the wrist and the tmj a dedicated positioning-device was used. Results were correlated with static MR-Images. Results: the quickly parcticable sequence of the examinations was not straining for the patients. The quality of imaging was only insignificantly lower as compared with static gradient-echo sequences. No artifacts were seen which could influence the evaluation. The visualisation of motions was very good. The quantification of the maximum extent of dysfunctions could be judged better with a higher sensitivity in real-time-mode than in static images. Conclusion: from the results of this study a three-step-plan for the radiodiagnostic procedure in cases of functional disorders of selected joints and the spine can be deduced, which uses static MR-imaging as first step. In case of unsolved questions MRMI is done (step 2). To obtain measurements, static MR-Images at different points of the motion range(kinematic MR-Imaging) should be done (step 3). This plan of 'motion-MRI' is well

  12. Open-source, small-animal magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Megan E; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Wilkens, Ken; Dockery, Mary D; Giorgio, Todd D; Grissom, William A; Caskey, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound or high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS/MRgHIFU) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality with many potential applications in areas such as cancer therapy, drug delivery, and blood-brain barrier opening. However, the large financial costs involved in developing preclinical MRgFUS systems represent a barrier to research groups interested in developing new techniques and applications. We aim to mitigate these challenges by detailing a validated, open-source preclinical MRgFUS system capable of delivering thermal and mechanical FUS in a quantifiable and repeatable manner under real-time MRI guidance. A hardware and software package was developed that includes closed-loop feedback controlled thermometry code and CAD drawings for a therapy table designed for a preclinical MRI scanner. For thermal treatments, the modular software uses a proportional integral derivative controller to maintain a precise focal temperature rise in the target given input from MR phase images obtained concurrently. The software computes the required voltage output and transmits it to a FUS transducer that is embedded in the delivery table within the magnet bore. The delivery table holds the FUS transducer, a small animal and its monitoring equipment, and a transmit/receive RF coil. The transducer is coupled to the animal via a water bath and is translatable in two dimensions from outside the magnet. The transducer is driven by a waveform generator and amplifier controlled by real-time software in Matlab. MR acoustic radiation force imaging is also implemented to confirm the position of the focus for mechanical and thermal treatments. The system was validated in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in vivo during murine tumor hyperthermia treatments. Sonications were successfully controlled over a range of temperatures and thermal doses for up to 20 min with minimal temperature overshoot. MR thermometry was validated with an optical temperature probe, and focus

  13. Central nervous system abnormalities on midline facial defects with hypertelorism detected by magnetic resonance image and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Vera Lucia Gil da Silva; Giffoni, Silvio David Araujo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study were to describe and to compare structural central nervous system (CNS) anomalies detected by magnetic resonance image (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in individuals affected by midline facial defects with hypertelorism (MFDH) isolated or associated with multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The investigation protocol included dysmorphological examination, skull and facial X-rays, brain CT and/or MRI. We studied 24 individuals, 12 of them had an isolated form (Group I) and the others, MCA with unknown etiology (Group II). There was no significant difference between Group I and II and the results are presented in set. In addition to the several CNS anomalies previously described, MRI (n=18) was useful for detection of neuronal migration errors. These data suggested that structural CNS anomalies and MFDH seem to have an intrinsic embryological relationship, which should be taken in account during the clinical follow-up. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance studies of intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last three or four years, nearly tow hundred papers have been published that used NMR or ESR spectroscopy to study compounds formed by the intercalation of molecules or ions into the van der Waals gap of a layered hast compound. The host lattices have ranged from the simple, such as graphite, to the complex, such as clay. In many cases, magnetic resonance techniques now enable one to obtain quite detailed information on even fairly complex intercalated species, on the nature of the changes in the host lattice accompanying intercalation, and on the nature of the interactions between the intercalant species and the host lattice. Magnetic resonance is used in conunction with many other techniques to obtain a fuller picture of these interesting systems, but this review will limit its focus to the use of NMR and ESR techniques. (author). 51 refs

  15. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  18. A superconducting magnet for whole-body magnetic-resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Hisao; Watanabe, Tsugio; Takechi, Moriaki; Ogino, Osamu; Yamada, Tadatoshi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic-resonance imaging is a promising new clinical diagnosis system that employs magnetic resonance to generate cross-sectional images of the object under examination. A large magnet plays a critical role in this system-it must supply a high-strength magnetic field that meets rigid standards of space and time uniformity. Mitsubishi Electric has developed a superconducting magnet that not only offers excellent magnetic characteristics but also features reduced helium consumption and a horizontal service port, and permits direct mounting of a magnetic shield. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Kakar, Arun K.; Chowdhury, Veena; Gulati, Praveen; Shankar, L. Ravi; Vindal, Anubhav

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

  20. Clinical use of intravenous gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bydder, G.M.; Niendorf, H.P.; Young, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    Following extensive pharmacological and animal studies clinical trials with intravenous gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) were begun at the end of 1983. During 1984 one group in Berlin and another in London conducted clinical trials. During 1985 Gd-DTPA was released more widely and now over 20 groups in Europe and four in the United States are involved in clinical evaluation programmes. Gd-DTPA is the first parenteral magnetic contrast agent available for clinical use and the results of these clinical trials have been followed with considerable interest. In general terms the clinical results with Gd-DTPA parallel those seen with iodinated contrast agents used in X-ray computed tomography (CT) but there are important differences, particularly in relation to the use of pulse sequences and effects due to increased concentration of Gd-DTPA. In this chapter the mode of action of Gd-DTPA is reviewed and the clinical results in the central nervous system are summarised

  1. The magnetization transfer effect in brain studies by 1.5 T magnetic resonance system. When the radiographer should apply it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M. Margarida; Farinha, Sara; Costa, Joana; Mauricio, J. Cruz; O' Neill, J. Goyri

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Magnetization Transfer (MT) obtained by applying a pre-saturation pulse is, in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), a technique that allows for additional enhancement of lesions on conventional T1 images after contrast administration. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of the technique measuring how MT could improve image quality and diagnostic values through the enhancement of lesions. Methods: Thirteen T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences, obtained by the 1.5 T system after contrast media injection, were analyzed with and without MT. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), as well as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variables were compared in all sequences, according to the reference structures: lateral ventricles, white matter, gray matter, caudate nucleus and internal capsule. The MT ratio average was calculated using the ANOVA scale in order to assess the CNR and the magnetization transfer effect (MTE) for the different lesions and for both sequences (with and without MT). For the assessment of the flow artifact, clinical experts applied a Likert scale with 5 points. Results: For CNR values, the differences between conventional and MT-pulsed images were significant (Student t testp 0,05). Conclusion: In identical conditions of acquisition, the MT does not produce significant differences in the enhancement of lesions, however, it allows a greater capacity to detect the multiple sclerosis plaques, comparing structures around basal nucleus versus gray and white matter.

  2. Transition metal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregosin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Transition metal NMR spectroscopy has progressed enormously in recent years. New methods, and specifically solid-state methods and new pulse sequences, have allowed access to data from nuclei with relatively low receptivities with the result that chemists have begun to consider old and new problems, previously unapproachable. Moreover, theory, computational science in particular, now permits the calculation of not just 13 C, 15 N and other light nuclei chemical shifts, but heavy main-group element and transition metals as well. These two points, combined with increasing access to high field pulsed spectrometer has produced a wealth of new data on the NMR transition metals. A new series of articles concerned with measuring, understanding and using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the metals of Group 3-12 is presented. (author)

  3. Gaucher's disease: Magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Gomez-Pereda, R.; Blasco, A.; Ros, L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is to assess the role of magnetic resonance (MR) in determining the initial extension of Gaucher's disease and its complications. A retrospective study of eight patients diagnosed as having Gaucher's disease was carried out using MR. The study focused on pelvis, hip, femur, spine, liver parenchyma and splenic parenchyma. Infiltration of the cancellous portion of the vertebral bodies was observed in all but one of the patients. Three patients presented small hemangiomas in dorsal and lumbar vertebral bodies. Pelvic bone involvement was homogeneous in four cases and spotty in two, while the pelvic marrow was normal in the two patients with no vertebral infiltration. A vascular necrosis of the femoral head was detected in two cases. MR is very useful in determining the initial extension, in the early diagnosis of complications and in managing the posttreatment marrow response to assess the therapeutic efficacy. 16 refs

  4. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  5. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  6. SQUID-detected magnetic resonance imaging in microtesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Robert; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Mueck, Michael; Myers, Whittier; Haken, Bernard ten; Seton, H.C.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alex; Clarke, John

    2003-01-01

    We describe studies of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liquid samples at room temperature in microtesla magnetic fields. The nuclear spins are prepolarized in a strong transient field. The magnetic signals generated by the precessing spins, which range in frequency from tens of Hz to several kHz, are detected by a low-transition temperature dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) coupled to an untuned, superconducting flux transformer configured as an axial gradiometer. The combination of prepolarization and frequency-independent detector sensitivity results in a high signal-to-noise ratio and high spectral resolution (∼1 Hz) even in grossly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the NMR experiments, the high spectral resolution enables us to detect the 10-Hz splitting of the spectrum of protons due to their scalar coupling to a 31P nucleus. Furthermore, the broadband detection scheme combined with a non-resonant field-reversal spin echo allows the simultaneous observation of signals from protons and 31P nuclei, even though their NMR resonance frequencies differ by a factor of 2.5. We extend our methodology to MRI in microtesla fields, where the high spectral resolution translates into high spatial resolution. We demonstrate two-dimensional images of a mineral oil phantom and slices of peppers, with a spatial resolution of about 1 mm. We also image an intact pepper using slice selection, again with 1-mm resolution. In further experiments we demonstrate T1-contrast imaging of a water phantom, some parts of which were doped with a paramagnetic salt to reduce the longitudinal relaxation time T1. Possible applications of this MRI technique include screening for tumors and integration with existing multichannel SQUID systems for brain imaging

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  9. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  11. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  12. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary diseases represent with wide variety of symptoms in regard with changes in the endocrine function. Magnetic resonance imaging has a crucial role in detecting the morphologic appearance in physiologic conditions, malformative diseases and acquired pathologies. The MR-imaging is established as the method of choice in assessing the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The pituitary gland is a complex structure with an important role in the homeostasis of the organism even though it is so small? It is surrounded by bony structures, vessels, nerves and the brain parenchyma. It consists of three parts - anterior called - adenohypophysis, posterior - neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. The anterior part comprises about 75% of the gland. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in detecting the pituitary gland. It is mainly used in cases of elevated intracranial pressure due to suspected apoplexy. The gland's small size, relation to other structures and its soft tissue characteristic make it an accessible region of interest for detecting with MR-imaging. The lack of ionizing energy and the technical advances in the MR-methods are responsible for the creating images with better spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. The examination is carried out on a standard protocol. It is important that thin slices are executed in sagittal and coronal planes. Performing a sequence, regarding the brain parenchyma is essential, since many malformations of the pituitary gland are associated with other congenital conditions. The examination starts with a T1W sequence to assess the normal anatomic condition of the gland. The intensity of the adenohypophysis is compared to the one in the pons. It is hypointense, whereas the neurohypophysis is hyperintense, due to the lipid neurosecretory granules transported along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. T2W-images in coronal plane are used to evaluate the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, olfactory

  15. High magnetic field MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hideaki; Urata, Masami; Satoh, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    A high field superconducting magnet, 4-5 T in central magnetic field, is required for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) on 31 P, essential nuclei for energy metabolism of human body. This paper reviews superconducting magnets for high field MRSI systems. Examples of the cross-sectional image and the spectrum of living animals are shown in the paper. (author)

  16. Assessment of the systemic distribution of a bioconjugated anti-Her2 magnetic nanoparticle in a breast cancer model by means of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta-Núñez, L. F. E., E-mail: lidi-huerta@hotmail.com [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico); Villanueva-Lopez, G. Cleva, E-mail: villanuevacleva3@gmail.com [Instituto Politécnico Nacional-Escuela Superior de Medicina-Sección Investigación y Posgrado (Mexico); Morales-Guadarrama, A., E-mail: amorales@ci3m.mx [Centro Nacional de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica-Universidad Autónoma (Mexico); Soto, S., E-mail: cuadrosdobles@hotmail.com; López, J., E-mail: jaimelocr@hotmail.com; Silva, J. G., E-mail: gabrielsilva173@gmail.com [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico); Perez-Vielma, N., E-mail: nadiampv@gmail.com [Instituto Politécnico Nacional - Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias de la Salud Unidad Santo Tomás (CICS-UST) (Mexico); Sacristán, E., E-mail: esacristan@ci3m.mx [Centro Nacional de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica-Universidad Autónoma (Mexico); Gudiño-Zayas, Marco E., E-mail: gudino@unam.mx [UNAM, Departamento de Medicina Experimental, Facultad de Medicina (Mexico); González, C. A., E-mail: cgonzalezd@ipn.mx [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the systemic distribution of magnetic nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter (MNPs) coupled to a specific monoclonal antibody anti-Her2 in an experimental breast cancer (BC) model. The study was performed in two groups of Sprague–Dawley rats: control (n = 6) and BC chemically induced (n = 3). Bioconjugated “anti-Her2-MNPs” were intravenously administered, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored its systemic distribution at seven times after administration. Non-heme iron presence associated with the location of the bioconjugated anti-Her2-MNPs in splenic, hepatic, cardiac and tumor tissues was detected by Perl’s Prussian blue (PPB) stain. Optical density measurements were used to semiquantitatively determine the iron presence in tissues on the basis of a grayscale values integration of T1 and T2 MRI sequence images. The results indicated a delayed systemic distribution of MNPs in cancer compared to healthy conditions with a maximum concentration of MNPs in cancer tissue at 24 h post-infusion.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of tablet dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for measuring hydration, and its effects, during dissolution of tablets since it non-invasively maps (1)H nuclei associated with 'mobile' water. Although most studies have used MRI systems with high-field superconducting magnets, low-field laboratory-based instruments based on permanent magnet technology are being developed that provide key data for the formulation scientist. Incorporation of dissolution hardware, in particular the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus 4 flow-through cell, allows measurements under controlled conditions for comparison against other dissolution methods. Furthermore, simultaneous image acquisition and measurement of drug concentration allow direct comparison of the drug release throughout the hydration process. The combination of low-field MRI with USP-4 apparatus provides another tool to aid tablet formulation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Uncommon evolution of probable central nervous system histoplasmosis: from leptomeningitis to posterior fossa granuloma. A case report with magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrilho, Paulo Eduardo Mestrinelli; Alves, Orival

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of a young immunocompetent patient with probable central nervous system histoplasmosis with evolutive peculiar findings seen on magnetic resonance imaging. Leptomeningeal thickening was initially observed which subsequently became a posterior fossa granuloma. The diagnosis of fungal infection was only reached by histopathological study and the treatment was based on long term therapy with fluconazole wth good initial response. (author)

  19. MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING USING A CLINICAL WHOLE-BODY SYSTEM - AN INTRODUCTION TO A USEFUL TECHNIQUE IN SMALL ANIMAL-EXPERIMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; LAM, KH; MOOYAART, EL; BLEICHRODT, RP; NIEUWENHUIS, P; SCHAKENRAAD, JM

    A clinical whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with high resolution coils was used to obtain non-invasive images of the living rat. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the set-up and the advantages of this new imaging technique: detailed information, no extra costs,

  20. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  1. Application of Al techniques to a voice actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherley, P.L.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Meadow, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that to provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures, languages, and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users, research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study, an artificial intelligence (AI) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user, the AI control strategy determines the user's intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid, the control strategy queries the user for additional informaiton. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AI techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure

  2. Involvement of the Extrageniculate System in the Perception of Optical Illusions: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Tabei

    Full Text Available Research on the neural processing of optical illusions can provide clues for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception. Previous studies have shown that some visual areas contribute to the perception of optical illusions such as the Kanizsa triangle and Müller-Lyer figure; however, the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of these and other optical illusions have not been clearly identified. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we determined which brain regions are active during the perception of optical illusions. For our study, we enrolled 18 participants. The illusory optical stimuli consisted of many kana letters, which are Japanese phonograms. During the shape task, participants stated aloud whether they perceived the shapes of two optical illusions as being the same or not. During the word task, participants read aloud the kana letters in the stimuli. A direct comparison between the shape and word tasks showed activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus, and right pulvinar. It is well known that there are two visual pathways, the geniculate and extrageniculate systems, which belong to the higher-level and primary visual systems, respectively. The pulvinar belongs to the latter system, and the findings of the present study suggest that the extrageniculate system is involved in the cognitive processing of optical illusions.

  3. Involvement of the Extrageniculate System in the Perception of Optical Illusions: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Ken-Ichi; Satoh, Masayuki; Kida, Hirotaka; Kizaki, Moeni; Sakuma, Haruno; Sakuma, Hajime; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Research on the neural processing of optical illusions can provide clues for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception. Previous studies have shown that some visual areas contribute to the perception of optical illusions such as the Kanizsa triangle and Müller-Lyer figure; however, the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of these and other optical illusions have not been clearly identified. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we determined which brain regions are active during the perception of optical illusions. For our study, we enrolled 18 participants. The illusory optical stimuli consisted of many kana letters, which are Japanese phonograms. During the shape task, participants stated aloud whether they perceived the shapes of two optical illusions as being the same or not. During the word task, participants read aloud the kana letters in the stimuli. A direct comparison between the shape and word tasks showed activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus, and right pulvinar. It is well known that there are two visual pathways, the geniculate and extrageniculate systems, which belong to the higher-level and primary visual systems, respectively. The pulvinar belongs to the latter system, and the findings of the present study suggest that the extrageniculate system is involved in the cognitive processing of optical illusions.

  4. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its utilization in image formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonagamba, T.J.; Tannus, A.; Panepucci, H.

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects about Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (as Larmor Theorem, radio frequency pulse, relaxation of spins system) and its utilization in two dimensional image processing with the necessity of a tomography plane are studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Enhancing contrast of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DTPA), a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, in hepatobiliary system of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: Liver cirrhosis patients that underwent contrast MRI examination at Renai Hospital, Taipei City, Taiwan were ...

  6. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  7. Characterization of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yanle, E-mail: Hu.Yanle@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona 85054 (United States); Rankine, Leith; Green, Olga L.; Kashani, Rojano; Li, H. Harold; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Santanam, Lakshmi; Wooten, H. Omar; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Nana, Roger; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James F. [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, Ohio 44146 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods: The imaging performance characterization included four components: ACR (the American College of Radiology) phantom test, spatial integrity, coil signal to noise ratio (SNR) and uniformity, and magnetic field homogeneity. The ACR phantom test was performed in accordance with the ACR phantom test guidance. The spatial integrity test was evaluated using a 40.8 × 40.8 × 40.8 cm{sup 3} spatial integrity phantom. MR and computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired and coregistered. Objects were identified around the surfaces of 20 and 35 cm diameters of spherical volume (DSVs) on both the MR and CT images. Geometric distortion was quantified using deviation in object location between the MR and CT images. The coil SNR test was performed according to the national electrical manufacturers association (NEMA) standards MS-1 and MS-9. The magnetic field homogeneity test was measured using field camera and spectral peak methods. Results: For the ACR tests, the slice position error was less than 0.10 cm, the slice thickness error was less than 0.05 cm, the resolved high-contrast spatial resolution was 0.09 cm, the resolved low-contrast spokes were more than 25, the image intensity uniformity was above 93%, and the percentage ghosting was less than 0.22%. All were within the ACR recommended specifications. The maximum geometric distortions within the 20 and 35 cm DSVs were 0.10 and 0.18 cm for high spatial resolution three-dimensional images and 0.08 and 0.20 cm for high temporal resolution two dimensional cine images based on the distance-to-phantom-center method. The average SNR was 12.0 for the body coil, 42.9 for the combined torso coil, and 44.0 for the combined head and neck coil. Magnetic field homogeneities at gantry angles of 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° were 23.55, 20.43, 18.76, 19

  8. Characterization of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yanle; Rankine, Leith; Green, Olga L.; Kashani, Rojano; Li, H. Harold; Li, Hua; Rodriguez, Vivian; Santanam, Lakshmi; Wooten, H. Omar; Mutic, Sasa; Nana, Roger; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Victoria, James; Dempsey, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the performance of the onboard imaging unit for the first clinical magnetic resonance image guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods: The imaging performance characterization included four components: ACR (the American College of Radiology) phantom test, spatial integrity, coil signal to noise ratio (SNR) and uniformity, and magnetic field homogeneity. The ACR phantom test was performed in accordance with the ACR phantom test guidance. The spatial integrity test was evaluated using a 40.8 × 40.8 × 40.8 cm 3 spatial integrity phantom. MR and computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired and coregistered. Objects were identified around the surfaces of 20 and 35 cm diameters of spherical volume (DSVs) on both the MR and CT images. Geometric distortion was quantified using deviation in object location between the MR and CT images. The coil SNR test was performed according to the national electrical manufacturers association (NEMA) standards MS-1 and MS-9. The magnetic field homogeneity test was measured using field camera and spectral peak methods. Results: For the ACR tests, the slice position error was less than 0.10 cm, the slice thickness error was less than 0.05 cm, the resolved high-contrast spatial resolution was 0.09 cm, the resolved low-contrast spokes were more than 25, the image intensity uniformity was above 93%, and the percentage ghosting was less than 0.22%. All were within the ACR recommended specifications. The maximum geometric distortions within the 20 and 35 cm DSVs were 0.10 and 0.18 cm for high spatial resolution three-dimensional images and 0.08 and 0.20 cm for high temporal resolution two dimensional cine images based on the distance-to-phantom-center method. The average SNR was 12.0 for the body coil, 42.9 for the combined torso coil, and 44.0 for the combined head and neck coil. Magnetic field homogeneities at gantry angles of 0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° were 23.55, 20.43, 18.76, 19

  9. 'Blocking' effects in magnetic resonance? The ferromagnetic nanowires case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, C.A.; De Biasi, E.; Zysler, R.D.; Vassallo Brigneti, E.; Vazquez, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present magnetic resonance results obtained at L, X, and Q bands (1.2, 9.4 and 34GHz, respectively) on ferromagnetic nanowires with a hysteresis cycle characterized by a remanent magnetization M r /M s ∼0.92 and a coercive field H c =1.0kOe. The hysteretic response of the ferromagnetic resonance spectra is discussed in terms of independent contributions of the nanowires aligned along and opposite to the applied field. We will discuss the implications of this study on the magnetic resonance in nanoparticles and other systems with large anisotropy

  10. Rotational characteristics in the resonance state of the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morii, Y.; Sukedai, M. [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Ohashi, S., E-mail: ohashi@kansai-u.ac.jp [Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    The hybrid magnetic bearing has been developed. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller. Influence of the vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state is large. The resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system. The hybrid magnetic bearing using permanent magnets and the high-Tc bulk superconductor (HTSC) has been developed. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is introduced to increase the load weight of the magnetic bearing. Effect of the hybrid system has been shown. In this paper, influence of the hybrid system on the dynamic characteristics of the rotor is studied. The rotational characteristics in the mechanical resonance state are studied, and the equivalent magnetic spring coefficient is estimated from the experimental results of the load weight. The resonance frequency is measured by the rotation experiments. The rotor achieves stable levitation even in the resonance state. In the hybrid system, effect of the pinning force becomes smaller than that of the lateral force generated by the repulsive force between the two permanent magnets at the smaller air gap. Thus influence of the lateral vibration and the gradient angle in the resonance state becomes larger at a smaller air gap. The equivalent magnetic spring coefficient becomes also small, and the resonance frequency becomes small in the hybrid bearing system.

  11. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  12. The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Scoring System: Updated Recommendations by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Glinatsi, Daniel; Eshed, Iris; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ejbjerg, Bo; Foltz, Violaine; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-11-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables to have face, construct, and criterion validity; high reliability and sensitivity to change; and the ability to discriminate between therapies. This has enabled RAMRIS to demonstrate inhibition of structural damage progression with fewer patients and shorter followup times than has been possible with conventional radiography. Technical improvements, including higher field strengths and improved pulse sequences, allow higher image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio. These have facilitated development and validation of scoring methods of new pathologies: joint space narrowing and tenosynovitis. These have high reproducibility and moderate sensitivity to change, and can be added to RAMRIS. Combined scores of inflammation or joint damage may increase sensitivity to change and discriminative power. However, this requires further research. Updated 2016 RAMRIS recommendations and a research agenda were developed.

  13. Dynamic Measurement of Tumor Vascular Permeability and Perfusion using a Hybrid System for Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wuwei; Elmer, Andreas; Buehlmann, David; Augath, Mark-Aurel; Vats, Divya; Ripoll, Jorge; Rudin, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Assessing tumor vascular features including permeability and perfusion is essential for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The aim of this study was to compare fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based vascular readouts in subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice by simultaneous dynamic measurement of tracer uptake using a hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT)/MRI system. Vascular permeability was measured using a mixture of extravascular imaging agents, GdDOTA and the dye Cy5.5, and perfusion using a mixture of intravascular agents, Endorem and a fluorescent probe (Angiosense). Dynamic fluorescence reflectance imaging (dFRI) was integrated into the hybrid system for high temporal resolution. Excellent correspondence between uptake curves of Cy5.5/GdDOTA and Endorem/Angiosense has been found with correlation coefficients R > 0.98. The two modalities revealed good agreement regarding permeability coefficients and centers-of-gravity of the imaging agent distribution. The FMT/dFRI protocol presented is able to accurately map physiological processes and poses an attractive alternative to MRI for characterizing tumor neoangiogenesis.

  14. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of visuomotor processing in a virtual reality-based paradigm: Rehabilitation Gaming System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, D; Bermúdez i Badia, S; Schmidt, J; Duff, A; Brunheim, S; Kleiser, R; Seitz, R J; Verschure, P F M J

    2013-05-01

    The Rehabilitation Gaming System (RGS) has been designed as a flexible, virtual-reality (VR)-based device for rehabilitation of neurological patients. Recently, training of visuomotor processing with the RGS was shown to effectively improve arm function in acute and chronic stroke patients. It is assumed that the VR-based training protocol related to RGS creates conditions that aid recovery by virtue of the human mirror neuron system. Here, we provide evidence for this assumption by identifying the brain areas involved in controlling the catching of approaching colored balls in the virtual environment of the RGS. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of 18 right-handed healthy subjects (24 ± 3 years) in both active and imagination conditions. We observed that the imagery of target catching was related to activation of frontal, parietal, temporal, cingulate and cerebellar regions. We interpret these activations in relation to object processing, attention, mirror mechanisms, and motor intention. Active catching followed an anticipatory mode, and resulted in significantly less activity in the motor control areas. Our results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis underlying RGS that this novel neurorehabilitation approach engages human mirror mechanisms that can be employed for visuomotor training. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  16. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  17. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jena, A.; Khushu, S.; Kakar, A.K.; Mishra, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of obstructive jaundice in whom ultrasound failed to demonstrate the site and/or the cause of obstruction of the biliary tract were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correctly diagnosing the site and cause of obstruction in 10 of 12 surgically proven cases. In one case of cholangiocarcinoma, the site of obstruction was well shown on MR but a definite cause could not be ascertained. In another patient who developed intermittent jaundice following surgery for choledochal cyst, MR demonstrated a solitary stone in the common hepatic duct. Surgical confirmation could not be achieved as the patient was lost to follow up. There were 6 cases of choledocholithiasis, 3 cases of gall bladder carcinoma and one case each of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. It is believed that MRI will provide obstructive jaundice and will be able to minimize the use of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in view of its ability to perform multiplanar imaging in multiple sequences. 11 refs., figs., 1 tab

  19. Low rank magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Gal; Weizman, Lior; Tal, Assaf; Eldar, Yonina C

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) is a relatively new approach that provides quantitative MRI using randomized acquisition. Extraction of physical quantitative tissue values is preformed off-line, based on acquisition with varying parameters and a dictionary generated according to the Bloch equations. MRF uses hundreds of radio frequency (RF) excitation pulses for acquisition, and therefore high under-sampling ratio in the sampling domain (k-space) is required. This under-sampling causes spatial artifacts that hamper the ability to accurately estimate the quantitative tissue values. In this work, we introduce a new approach for quantitative MRI using MRF, called Low Rank MRF. We exploit the low rank property of the temporal domain, on top of the well-known sparsity of the MRF signal in the generated dictionary domain. We present an iterative scheme that consists of a gradient step followed by a low rank projection using the singular value decomposition. Experiments on real MRI data demonstrate superior results compared to conventional implementation of compressed sensing for MRF at 15% sampling ratio.

  20. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  2. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  3. Myositis ossificans: magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, R.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Concepcion, L.; Galant, J.

    1999-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is characterized by a benign, self-limiting, ossifying mass of the white tissue. In the present report, we describe the magnetic resonance (MR) images in three cases of myositis ossificans in pediatric patients, correlating the MR findings with those obtained with other radiological studies. The lesions were detected in three patients, two boys and one girl, ranging in age between 10 and 14 years. The nature of the lesion was confirmed histologically in all three cases. The MR images were obtained using superconductive units at 0.5 Teslas, with T1 and T2-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences. In two patients, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were also obtained. As in any process of maturation, the proliferation/maturation ratio depends on the moment in the course of the lesion, which affects its MR features,. In acute phases, the soft tissue mass with an intraosseous, perilesional adematous reaction predominates, while annular calcification and lesser edema are characteristic of subacute episode. Myositis ossificans is very rare in children. The inflammatory response may present a radiological pattern difficult to distinguish from that of aggressive tumor or infection, especially in the acute phase. (Author) 7 refs

  4. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  5. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  6. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  7. Imaging diagnostics in ovarian cancer: magnetic resonance imaging and a scoring system guiding choice of primary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Sigrid M; Dueholm, Margit; Marinovskij, Edvard; Blaakær, Jan

    2017-03-01

    To analyze the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and systematic evaluation at surgery to predict optimal cytoreduction in primary advanced ovarian cancer and to develop a preoperative scoring system for cancer staging. Preoperative MRI and standard laparotomy were performed in 99 women with either ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer. Using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis of a systematic description of the tumor in nine abdominal compartments obtained by MRI and during surgery plus clinical parameters, a scoring system was designed that predicted non-optimal cytoreduction. Non-optimal cytoreduction at operation was predicted by the following: (A) presence of comorbidities group 3 or 4 (ASA); (B) tumor presence in multiple numbers of different compartments, and (C) numbers of specified sites of organ involvement. The score includes: number of compartments involved (1-9 points), >1 subdiaphragmal location with presence of tumor (1 point); deep organ involvement of liver (1 point), porta hepatis (1 point), spleen (1 point), mesentery/vessel (1 point), cecum/ileocecal (1 point), rectum/vessels (1 point): ASA groups 3 and 4 (2 points). Use of the scoring system based on operative findings gave an area under the curve (AUC) of 91% (85-98%) for patients in whom optimal cytoreduction could not be achieved. The score AUC obtained by MRI was 84% (76-92%), and 43% of non-optimal cytoreduction patients were identified, with only 8% of potentially operable patients being falsely evaluated as suitable for non-optimal cytoreduction at the most optimal cut-off value. Tumor in individual locations did not predict operability. This systematic scoring system based on operative findings and MRI may predict non-optimal cytoreduction. MRI is able to assess ovarian cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis with satisfactory concordance with laparotomic findings. This scoring system could be useful as a clinical guideline and should be evaluated and

  8. Quality of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans Using a 60Co Magnetic Resonance Image Guidance Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooten, H. Omar; Green, Olga; Yang, Min; DeWees, Todd; Kashani, Rojano; Olsen, Jeff; Michalski, Jeff; Yang, Deshan; Tanderup, Kari; Hu, Yanle; Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This work describes a commercial treatment planning system, its technical features, and its capabilities for creating 60 Co intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for a magnetic resonance image guidance radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) system. Methods and Materials: The ViewRay treatment planning system (Oakwood Village, OH) was used to create 60 Co IMRT treatment plans for 33 cancer patients with disease in the abdominal, pelvic, thorax, and head and neck regions using physician-specified patient-specific target coverage and organ at risk (OAR) objectives. Backup plans using a third-party linear accelerator (linac)-based planning system were also created. Plans were evaluated by attending physicians and approved for treatment. The 60 Co and linac plans were compared by evaluating conformity numbers (CN) with 100% and 95% of prescription reference doses and heterogeneity indices (HI) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and maximum, mean, and dose-volume histogram (DVH) values for OARs. Results: All 60 Co IMRT plans achieved PTV coverage and OAR sparing that were similar to linac plans. PTV conformity for 60 Co was within <1% and 3% of linac plans for 100% and 95% prescription reference isodoses, respectively, and heterogeneity was on average 4% greater. Comparisons of OAR mean dose showed generally better sparing with linac plans in the low-dose range <20 Gy, but comparable sparing for organs with mean doses >20 Gy. The mean doses for all 60 Co plan OARs were within clinical tolerances. Conclusions: A commercial 60 Co MR-IGRT device can produce highly conformal IMRT treatment plans similar in quality to linac IMRT for a variety of disease sites. Additional work is in progress to evaluate the clinical benefit of other novel features of this MR-IGRT system

  9. Ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lethimonnier, F.; Vedrine, P.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding human brain function, brain development and brain dysfunction is one of the great challenges of the twenty first century. Biomedical imaging has now run up against a number of technical constraints that are exposing limits to its potential. In order to overcome the current limits to high-field magnetic resonance cerebral imaging (MRI) and unleash its fullest potential, the Cea has built NeuroSpin, an ultra-high-field neuroimaging facility at its Saclay centre (in the Essonne). NeuroSpin already boasts three fully operational MRI systems. The first is a 3-tesla high-field system and the second is a very-high-field 7-tesla system, both of which are dedicated to clinical studies and investigations in humans, while the third is an ultra-high-field 17.65-tesla system designed for studies on small animals. In 2011, NeuroSpin will be commissioning an 11.7-tesla ultra-high-field system of unprecedented power that is designed for research on human subjects. The level of the magnetic field and the scale required will make this joint French-German project to build the magnet a breakthrough in the international arena. (authors)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in food applications: a critical appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divakar, S.

    1998-01-01

    Usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in food applications is presented in this review. Some of the basic concepts of NMR pertaining to one-dimensional and two-dimensional techniques, solid-state NMR and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are discussed. Food applications dealt with encompass such diverse areas like nature and state of water in foods, detection and quantitation of important constituents of foods, intact food systems and NMR related to food biology. (author)

  11. Neurobehavioral effects among subjects exposed to high static and gradient magnetic fields from a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system--a case-crossover pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vocht, Frank; van-Wendel-de-Joode, Berna; Engels, Hans; Kromhout, Hans

    2003-10-01

    The interactive use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques is increasing in operating theaters. A study was performed on 17 male company volunteers to assess the neurobehavioral effects of exposure to magnetic fields from a 1.5 Tesla MRI system. The subjects' neurobehavioral performances on a neurobehavioral test battery were compared in four 1-hr sessions with and without exposure to magnetic fields, and with and without additional movements. Adverse effects were found for hand coordination (-4%, P Tesla MRI system may lead to neurobehavioral effects. Further research is recommended, especially in members of operating teams using interactive MRI systems. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. A method to measure internal contact angle in opaque systems by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiqin; Tian, Ye; Gao, Xuefeng; Jiang, Lei

    2013-07-23

    Internal contact angle is an important parameter for internal wettability characterization. However, due to the limitation of optical imaging, methods available for contact angle measurement are only suitable for transparent or open systems. For most of the practical situations that require contact angle measurement in opaque or enclosed systems, the traditional methods are not effective. Based upon the requirement, a method suitable for contact angle measurement in nontransparent systems is developed by employing MRI technology. In the Article, the method is demonstrated by measuring internal contact angles in opaque cylindrical tubes. It proves that the method also shows great feasibility in transparent situations and opaque capillary systems. By using the method, contact angle in opaque systems could be measured successfully, which is significant in understanding the wetting behaviors in nontransparent systems and calculating interfacial parameters in enclosed systems.

  13. Asymptomatic cerebrovascular lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus lacking a history of neuropsychiatric events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Kumiko; Yamano, Shigeru; Ikeda, Yukiko [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-10-01

    To clarify the extent of asymptomatic cerebrovascular involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and ultrasonography findings of 100 patients with SLE lacking present or past clinical neurologic deficits were compared with 66 age-matched volunteers to determine the combined intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery, and tests for anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL). Thirty-eight patients, but only 2 controls, showed imaging abnormalities. Among 23 SLE patients with cerebrovascular lesions by MRI who underwent single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), 14 showed hypoperfusion of the lesion. The IMT value and prevalence of aCL did not differ between the 55 SLE patients tested and controls. SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) as assessed by a quantitative clinical index was significantly greater in patients with brain lesions than in those without. The prevalence of asymptomatic brain lesions in SLE patients is high, and shows a relationship to disease activity. (author)

  14. Effectiveness of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in the treatment of adenomyosis diagnosed and monitored by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragheto, Aristides M; Caserta, Nelson; Bahamondes, Luis; Petta, Carlos A

    2007-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on adenomyotic lesions diagnosed and monitored by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). LNG-IUS was inserted during menstrual bleeding in 29 women, 24 to 46 years of age, with MRI-diagnosed adenomyosis associated with menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea. Clinical evaluations were carried out at baseline and at 3 and 6 months postinsertion. MRI was performed at baseline and at 6 months postinsertion and was used to calculate junctional zone thickness (in mm), to define the junctional zone borders, to identify the presence of high-signal foci on T(2)-weighted images and to calculate uterine volume (in mL). A significant reduction of 24.2% in junctional zone thickness was observed (puterine volume was observed (142.6 mL vs. 136.4 mL; p=.2077) between baseline and the 6-month evaluation. A significant decrease in pain score was observed at 3 and 6 months after insertion (p3 at 6 months of observation. At 3 months of use, the most common bleeding pattern was spotting, and at 6 months of observation, oligomenorrhea was the most common pattern observed, although spotting was present in one third of the women. The insertion of an LNG-IUS led to a reduction in pain and abnormal bleeding associated with adenomyosis. MRI was useful for monitoring response of adenomyotic lesions to the LNG-IUS.

  15. Development and Validation of the OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Tenosynovitis Scoring System in a Multireader Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Peterfy, Charles G; Vital, Edward M; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2017-11-01

    To develop and validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tenosynovitis (TS) score for tendons at the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Axial T1-weighted precontrast and postcontrast fat-saturated MR image sets of the hands of 43 patients with RA initiating rituximab therapy were obtained at baseline and after 14, 26, 38, or 52 weeks. The MR images were scored twice by 4 readers. Nine tendon compartments of the wrist and 4 flexor tendon compartments at the MCP joints were assessed. Tenosynovitis was scored as follows: 0: No; 1: The overall PEA/PCA intrareader and interreader agreements for change scores in all tendons were 73.8%/97.6% and 47.9%/85.0%, respectively. Average SRM was moderate for total scores and 60.5% of the patients had a tenosynovitis change score ≥ SDC. The TS score showed high intrareader and interreader agreement for wrist and finger tendons, with moderate responsiveness, and the majority of the patients showed a change above the SDC. This scoring system may be included as a component of the RAMRIS.

  16. Development of a System for Rapid Detection of Contaminants in Water Supplies Using Magnetic Resonance and Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowery, Thomas J; Neely, Lori; Chepin, James; Wellman, Parris; Toso, Ken; Murray, Paul; Audeh, Mark; Demas, Vasiliki; Palazzolo, Robert; Min, Michael; Phung, Nu; Blanco, Matt; Raphel, Jordan; O' Neil, Troy

    2010-09-14

    To keep the water supply safe and to ensure a swift and accurate response to a water supply contamination event, rapid and robust methods for microbial testing are necessary. Current technologies are complex, lengthy and costly and there is a need for rapid, reliable, and precise approaches that can readily address this fundamental security and safety issue. T2 Biosystems is focused on providing solutions to this problem by making breakthroughs in nanotechnology and biosensor techniques that address the current technical restrictions facing rapid, molecular analysis in complex samples. In order to apply the T2 Biosystems nucleic acid detection procedure to the analysis of nucleic acid targets in unprocessed water samples, Bacillus thuringeinsis was selected as a model organism and local river water was selected as the sample matrix. The initial assay reagent formulation was conceived with a manual magnetic resonance reader, was optimized using a high throughput system, and transferred back to the MR reader for potential field use. The final assay employing the designed and manufactured instruments was capable of detecting 10 CFU/mL of B. thuringiensis directly within the environmental water sample within 90 minutes. Further, discrimination of two closely related species of Bacilli was accomplished using the methods of this project; greater than 3-fold discrimination between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis at a concentrations spanning 10 CFU/mL to 10{sup 5} CFU/mL was observed.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging and relaxometry to study water transport mechanisms in a commercially available gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Amber L; Fell, Rob J; Codd, Sarah L; Lightley, Kim A; Konagurthu, Sanjay; Koehler-King, Dory G; Seymour, Joseph D

    2010-09-15

    The hydration of 4 mg Cardura XL (Pfizer), a commercially available gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) tablet, was investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A short echo time (T(e)=2.81 ms) technique for MRI of the hydration of a GITS tablet was implemented. From the MR images, signal intensity profiles were generated and interpreted in the context of diffusive and osmotic transport mechanisms. A distinct transition from diffusive to osmotic transport was measured at a timescale relevant to the measured drug release time. Diffusion and osmotic rate coefficients for water in the drug and polymer sweller layers of the tablet were quantified. Spin-lattice T(1) and spin-spin T(2) relaxation times of the water signal from within the tablet were measured as a function of hydration time in order to incorporate the effects of relaxation into interpretation of signal intensity and provide unique information on the distribution of water in different physical and chemical environments within the tablet. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis Risk After Liver Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gadoxetate Disodium in Patients With Moderate to Severe Renal Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Thomas; Ramirez-Garrido, Francisco; Kim, Young Hoon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ricke, Jens; Phongkitkarun, Sith; Boettcher, Joachim; Gupta, Rajan T.; Korpraphong, Pornpim; Tanomkiat, Wiwatana; Furtner, Julia; Liu, Peter S.; Henry, Maren; Endrikat, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the risk of gadoxetate disodium in liver imaging for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized, open-label phase 4 study in 35 centers from May 2009 to July 2013. The study population consisted of patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for liver imaging with gadoxetate disodium. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of 0.025-mmol/kg body weight of liver-specific gadoxetate disodium. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 357 patients were included, with 85 patients with severe and 193 patients with moderate renal impairment, which were the clinically most relevant groups. The mean time period from diagnosis of renal disease to liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 1.53 and 5.46 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 101 patients (28%) underwent additional contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents within 12 months before the start of the study or in the follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF within the 2-year follow-up. Conclusions Gadoxetate disodium in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment did not raise any clinically significant safety concern. No NSF cases were observed. PMID:25756684

  19. Preliminary validation of 2 magnetic resonance image scoring systems for osteoarthritis of the hip according to the OMERACT filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Cibere, Jolanda; Loeuille, Damien; Weber, Ulrich; Zubler, Veronika; Roemer, Frank W; Jaremko, Jacob L; Sayre, Eric C; Lambert, Robert G W

    2014-02-01

    Development of a validated magnetic resonance image (MRI) scoring system is essential in hip OA because radiographs are insensitive to change. We assessed the feasibility and reliability of 2 previously developed scoring methods: (1) the Hip Inflammation MRI Scoring System (HIMRISS) and (2) the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring System (HOAMS). Six readers (3 radiologists, 3 rheumatologists) participated in 2 reading exercises. In Reading Exercise 1, MRI of the hip of 20 subjects were read at a single time point followed by further standardization of methodology. In Reading Exercise 2, MRI of the hip of 18 subjects from a randomized controlled trial, assessed at 2 timepoints, and 27 subjects from a cross-sectional study were read for HIMRISS and HOAMS bone marrow lesions (BML) and synovitis. Reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and kappa statistics. Both methods were considered feasible. For Reading 1, HIMRISS ICC were 0.52, 0.61, 0.70, and 0.58 for femoral BML, acetabular BML, effusion, and total scores, respectively; and for HOAMS, summed BML and synovitis ICC were 0.52 and 0.46, respectively. For Reading 2, HIMRISS and HOAMS ICC for BML and synovitis-effusion improved substantially. Interobserver reliability for change scores was 0.81 and 0.71 for HIMRISS femoral and HOAMS summed BML, respectively. Responsiveness and discrimination was moderate to high for synovitis-effusion. Significant associations were noted between BML or synovitis scores and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain scores for baseline values (p ≤ 0.001). The BML and synovitis-effusion components of both HIMRISS and HOAMS scoring systems are feasible and reliable, and should be validated further.

  20. Prognostic value of left atrial function in systemic light-chain amyloidosis: a cardiac magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohty, Dania; Boulogne, Cyrille; Magne, Julien; Varroud-Vial, Nicolas; Martin, Sylvain; Ettaif, Hind; Fadel, Bahaa M; Bridoux, Frank; Aboyans, Victor; Damy, Thibaud; Jaccard, Arnaud

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light-chain amyloidosis (AL) imparts an adverse impact on outcome. The left atrium (LA), by virtue of its anatomical location and muscular wall, is commonly affected by the amyloid process. Although LA infiltration by amyloid fibrils leads to a reduction in its pump function, the infiltration of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium results in diastolic dysfunction with subsequent increase in filling pressures and LA enlargement. Even though left atrial volume (LAV) is an independent prognostic marker in many cardiomyopathies, its value in amyloid heart disease remains to be determined. In addition, few data are available as to the prognostic value of LA function in systemic AL. Using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), the current study aims to assess the prognostic significance of the maximal LAV and total LA emptying fraction (LAEF) in patients with AL. Fifty-four consecutive patients (age 66 ± 10 years, 59% males) with confirmed systemic AL and mean LV ejection fraction of 60 ± 12% underwent CMR. As compared with patients with no or minimal cardiac involvement (Mayo Clinic [MC] stage I), those at moderate and high risk (MC stages II and III) had significantly larger indexed maximal LAV (36 ± 15 vs. 46 ± 13 vs. 52 ± 19 mL/m(2), P = 0.03) and indexed minimal LAV (20 ± 6 vs. 34 ± 11 vs. 44 ± 17 mL/m(2), P 16% (37 ± 11 vs. 94 ± 4%, P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, lower LAEF remained independently associated with a higher risk of 2-year mortality (HR = 1.08 per 1% decrease, 95% CI: 1.02-1.15, P = 0.003). In patients with systemic AL, LAEF as assessed by CMR is associated with NYHA functional class, MC stage, myocardial LGE and 2-year mortality. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Glutamatergic system dysfunction in schizophrenia. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szulc, A.; Galinska, B.; Czernikiewicz, A.; Tarasow, E.; Kubas, B.; Dzienis, W.; Walecki, J.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether there are any differences in metabolite levels as measured by 1 H MRS between chronic and first-episode schizophrenic patients. 17 patients with the diagnosis of chronic schizophrenia and 31 patients with first-episode schizophrenia (ICD-10) were included into the study. The patients were assessed by means of PANSS, CGI and Calgary scales.We also examined 13 healthy persons as control group. MRI and MRS procedures: Proton resonance spectroscopy was performed on a 1,5 MR scanner, PRESS sequence, TR=1500 ms, TE=35 ms, number of repetition=192 and included suppression of water by MOIST sequence. Each volume element (voxel) had dimension of 2x2x2 cm and was localised in the left frontal lobe, in the left temporal lobe and in left thalamus. Complex containing glutamine (Gln), glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was measured. Ratios of metabolite to creatine and unsuppressed water signal were analysed. We didn't find any significant differences in Glx levels between chronic and first-episode patients and between chronic patients and controls in all studied regions.In the left temporal lobe Glx/Cr ratio was significantly higher in first-episode patients in comparison to controls.We observed significant positive correlation between Glx/Cr level in the left temporal lobe and CGI and PANSS-Negative scores, and negative correlation between Glx/H 2 0 level in the left temporal lobe and PANSS-Positive score. Increased Glx level in the left temporal lobe in first-episode patients suggest that altered glutamatergic activity in this region is present at the onset of disease and doesn't progress over time. (author)

  2. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  4. Fifty years of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Valderrama, Juan Crisostomo

    1997-01-01

    Short information about the main developments of nuclear magnetic resonance during their fifty existence years is presented. Beside two examples of application (HETCOR and INADEQUATE) to the structural determination of organic compounds are described

  5. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Newhouse, J.H.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Kistler, J.P.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The physical principles which underlie the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are presented in this primer. The major scanning methods are reviewed, and the principles of technique are discussed. A glossary of NMR terms is included

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  7. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  10. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  11. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the characteristic hyperfine satellites in the spectra of the P1 centers. We discuss the mechanisms that cause both the strong reduction of the peak intensity of the ‘allowed’ lines in EPR spectra of triplet defects and the transformation of the P1 spectra.

  12. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  13. State of the art magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    In less than a decade Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has evolved from a laboratory demonstration to a safe and effective technique for clinical diagnosis. This evolutionary process continues. At this time 2-D and 3-D imaging of the head and body is firmly established in clinical use. Surface coil imaging, two-component chemical shift imaging, in-vivo spectroscopy and flow imaging are currently in various stages of development. The present state of the art of MRI is a function of an array of technologies: magnet, Rf coil, Rf pulse amplifier, gradient coil and driver, pulse programmer, A/D converter, computer system architecture, array processors and mass storage (both magnetic and optical). The overall product design is the result of a complex process which balances the advantages and disadvantages of each component for optimal system performance and flexibility. The author discusses the organization of a state-of-the-art MRI system. Several examples of the kinds of system interactions affecting design choices are given. (Auth.)

  14. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  16. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo Viera, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis [es

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of muscle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Heiner, J.P.; Keene, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance scans were obtained on 17 patients with acute, subacute, or chronic muscle tears. These patients presented with complaints of persistent pain or a palpable mass. Magnetic resonance findings were characterized according to alterations in muscle shape and the presence of abnormal high signal within the injured muscle. These areas of high signal were noted on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans and were presumed to represent areas of intramuscular hemorrhage. (orig.)

  18. Clinical magnetic resonance: imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Bydder, Graeme; Griffiths, John; Iles, Richard; Styles, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This book begins with a readable, comprehensive but non-mathematical introduction to the basic underlying principles of magnetic resonance. Further chapters include information on the theory and principles of MRI and MRS, the interpretation of MR images, the clinical applications and scope of MRI and MRS, practical aspects of spectroscopy and magnetic resonance, and also the practical problems associated with the siting, safety and operation of large MRI and MRS equipment. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomsdorf, H.; Imme, M.; Jensen, D.; Kunz, D.; Menhardt, W.; Ottenberg, K.; Roeschmann, P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Tschendel, O.; Wieland, J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental Magnetic Resonance (MR) system with 4 tesla flux density was set up. For that purpose a data acquisition system and RF coils for resonance frequencies up to 170 MHz were developed. Methods for image guided spectroscopy as well as spectroscopic imaging focussing on the nuclei 1 H and 13 C were developed and tested on volunteers and selected patients. The advantages of the high field strength with respect to spectroscopic studies were demonstrated. Developments of a new fast imaging technique for the acquisition of scout images as well as a method for mapping and displaying the magnetic field inhomogeneity in-vivo represent contributions to the optimisation of the experimental procedure in spectroscopic studies. Investigations on the interaction of RF radiation with the exposed tissue allowed conclusions regarding the applicability of MR methods at high field strengths. Methods for display and processing of multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging data sets were developed and existing methods for real-time image synthesis were extended. Results achieved in the field of computer aided analysis of MR images comprised new techniques for image background detection, contour detection and automatic image interpretation as well as knowledge bases for textural representation of medical knowledge for diagnosis. (orig.) With 82 refs., 3 tabs., 75 figs [de

  20. Effect of propofol on the medial temporal lobe emotional memory system: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, K O; Root, J C; Mehta, M; Stern, E; Pan, H; Veselis, R A; Silbersweig, D A

    2015-07-01

    Subclinical doses of propofol produce anterograde amnesia, characterized by an early failure of memory consolidation. It is unknown how propofol affects the amygdala-dependent emotional memory system, which modulates consolidation in the hippocampus in response to emotional arousal and neurohumoral stress. We present an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the effects of propofol on the emotional memory system in human subjects. Thirty-five healthy subjects were randomized to receive propofol, at an estimated brain concentration of 0.90 μg ml(-1), or placebo. During drug infusion, emotionally arousing and neutral images were presented in a continuous recognition task, while blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation responses were acquired. After a drug-free interval of 2 h, subsequent memory for successfully encoded items was assessed. Imaging analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping and behavioural analysis using signal detection models. Propofol had no effect on the stereotypical amygdalar response to emotional arousal, but caused marked suppression of the hippocampal response. Propofol caused memory performance to become uncoupled from amygdalar activation, but it remained correlated with activation in the posterior hippocampus, which decreased in proportion to amnesia. Propofol is relatively ineffective at suppressing amygdalar activation at sedative doses, but abolishes emotional modulation and causes amnesia via mechanisms that commonly involve hyporesponsiveness of the hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that amygdala-dependent fear systems may remain intact even when a patient has diminished memory of events. This may be of clinical importance in the perioperative development of fear-based psychopathologies, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. NCT00504894. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burl, M.; Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the rate of flow of a liquid in a selected region of a body by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are described. The method includes a sequence of applying a first magnetic pulse effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of a chosen nucleus within the liquid preferentially in a slice of the body which includes the selected region. A period of time (tsub(D)) is waited and then a second magnetic pulse is applied which is effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of the nuclei preferentially in the slice, and the free induction decay signal is measured. The whole sequence is repeated for different values of the period of time (tsub(D)). The variation in the value of the measured signal with tsub(D) is then related to the rate of flow of the liquid through the slice. (author)

  2. Soft X-ray resonant scattering from magnetic heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabis, J.

    2005-01-01

    Heterogenous magnetic multilayers are of great interest both because of their relevance for technological applications and since they provide model systems to understand magnetic behavior and interactions. Soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) allows to determine element-specific and depth-resolving information of the local magnetic order of such systems. Within the framework of the present thesis the diffractometer ALICE for soft XRMS has been constructed. XRMS measurements of two different physical systems are presented in this thesis: The antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic order in interlayer exchange-coupled Fe/Cr(001) superlattices are studied as a function of the applied field by measuring the reflected intensity at different positions in reciprocal space. Thin films and multilayers of the Heusler compound Co 2 MnGe are studied by means of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, magnetic circular dichroism and resonant magnetic scattering

  3. Freezing-thawing hysteresis phenomena of biological systems by the new method of proton magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Eiichiro; Nagashima, Nobuya (Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    an automatic recording system was developed for unfrozen water content and spin-spin relaxation time measurements as continuous functions of temperature, by using a broad-line pulsed NMR spectrometer and a minicomputer. The advantages of this system are that the exact quantitative measurements can be done by calibrating the nonlinearity of the NMR sensitivity, and that for high sensitivity temperature measurement the thermocouple with special device is directly immersed in a sample. Three types of freezing-thawing hysteresis phenomena, (1) recrystallization of solute (hydroxy-L-proline, D-mannitol) and refreezing of released hydrated water molecules in frozen aqueous solutions, and (2) hysteresis as the characteristic feature of gels (gelatin, alpha sub(sl)-casein), and (3) supercooling of capillary water in water-insoluble materials (zein, yeast RNA, cellulose) were analysed. The usefulness of this system as an analytical instrument of hydration properties of biological materials is emphasized.

  4. Freezing-thawing hysteresis phenomena of biological systems by the new method of proton magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, E.; Nagashima, N.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic recording system was developed for unfrozen water content and spin-spin relaxation time measurements as continuous functions of temperature, by using a broad-line pulsed NMR spectrometer and a mini-computer. The advantages of this system are that the exact quantitative measurements can be done by calibrating the nonlinearity of the NMR sensitivity, and that for high sensitivity temperature measurement the thermocouple with special device is directly immersed in a sample. Three types of freezing-thawing hysteresis phenomena, (1) recrystallization of solute(hydroxy-L-proline, D-mannitol) and refreezing of released hydrated water molecules in frozen aqueous solutions, and (2) hysteresis as the characteristic feature of gels(gelatin, J/sub s1/-casein), and (3) supercooling of capillary water in water-insoluble materials(zein, yeast RNA, cellulose) were analysed. The usefulness of this system as an analytical instrument of hydration properties of biological materials is emphasized.

  5. Freezing-thawing hysteresis phenomena of biological systems by the new method of proton magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Eiichiro; Nagashima, Nobuya

    1982-01-01

    an automatic recording system was developed for unfrozen water content and spin-spin relaxation time measurements as continuous functions of temperature, by using a broad-line pulsed NMR spectrometer and a minicomputer. The advantages of this system are that the exact quantitative measurements can be done by calibrating the nonlinearity of the NMR sensitivity, and that for high sensitivity temperature measurement the thermocouple with special device is directly immersed in a sample. Three types of freezing-thawing hysteresis phenomena, (1) recrystallization of solute (hydroxy-L-proline, D-mannitol) and refreezing of released hydrated water molecules in frozen aqueous solutions, and (2) hysteresis as the characteristic feature of gels(gelatin, alpha sub(sl)-casein), and (3) supercooling of capillary water in water-insoluble materials(zein, yeast RNA, cellulose) were analysed. The usefulness of this system as an analytical instrument of hydration properties of biological materials is emphasized. (author)

  6. An embedded optical tracking system for motion-corrected magnetic resonance imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jessica; Siegert, Thomas; Reimer, Enrico; Labadie, Christian; Maclaren, Julian; Herbst, Michael; Zaitsev, Maxim; Turner, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Prospective motion correction using data from optical tracking systems has been previously shown to reduce motion artifacts in MR imaging of the head. We evaluate a novel optical embedded tracking system. The home-built optical embedded tracking system performs image processing within a 7 T scanner bore, enabling high speed tracking. Corrected and uncorrected in vivo MR volumes are acquired interleaved using a modified 3D FLASH sequence, and their image quality is assessed and compared. The latency between motion and correction of the slice position was measured to be (19 ± 5) ms, and the tracking noise has a standard deviation no greater than 10 μm/0.005° during conventional MR scanning. Prospective motion correction improved the edge strength by 16 % on average, even though the volunteers were asked to remain motionless during the acquisitions. Using a novel method for validating the effectiveness of in vivo prospective motion correction, we have demonstrated that prospective motion correction using motion data from the embedded tracking system considerably improved image quality.

  7. Stormram 3: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Robotic System for Breast Biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenhuis, Vincent; Veltman, Jeroen; Siepel, Françoise Jeanette; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Stormram 3 is an MRI-compatible robotic system that can perform MR guided breast biopsies of suspicious lesions. The base of the robot measures 160x180x90 mm and it is actuated by five custom pneumatic linear stepper motors, driven by a valve manifold outside the Faraday cage of the MRI scanner. All

  8. Resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, P.I.; Kholodov, R.I.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in the approximation of weakly excited electron states in a strong external magnetic field is analyzed. The differential probability of this process in the Breit-Wigner form is obtained. The probability of double magnetic bremsstrahlung (second-order process of perturbation theory) is compared with the probability of magnetic bremsstrahlung (first-order process of perturbation theory)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Surgical Implants Made from Weak Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogola, D.; Krafčík, A.; Štrbák, O.; Frollo, I.

    2013-08-01

    Materials with high magnetic susceptibility cause local inhomogeneities in the main field of the magnetic resonance (MR) tomograph. These inhomogeneities lead to loss of phase coherence, and thus to a rapid loss of signal in the image. In our research we investigated inhomogeneous field of magnetic implants such as magnetic fibers, designed for inner suture during surgery. The magnetic field inhomogeneities were studied at low magnetic planar phantom, which was made from four thin strips of magnetic tape, arranged grid-wise. We optimized the properties of imaging sequences with the aim to find the best setup for magnetic fiber visualization. These fibers can be potentially exploited in surgery for internal stitches. Stitches can be visualized by the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method after surgery. This study shows that the imaging of magnetic implants is possible by using the low field MRI systems, without the use of complicated post processing techniques (e.g., IDEAL).

  10. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the dipalmitoyl lecithin--cholesterol--water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberkorn, R.A.; Griffin, R.G.; Meadows, M.D.; Oldfield, E.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the systematic study of the 2 H NMR spectra of the dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)--cholesterol and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC)--cholesterol systems in excess water. Significant changes were detected in the NMR spectra at cholesterol mol fractions of approximately equal to 0.2 and 0.33. Possible explanations as to some of the molecular changes occurring at these compositions are offered

  11. Analytical applications of a recycled flow nuclear magnetic resonance system: quantitative analysis of slowly relaxing nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude, D.A. Jr.; Lee, R.W.K.; Wilkins, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of a recycled flow system for the efficient quantitative analysis of NMR spectra is demonstrated. Requisite conditions are first established for the quantitative flow experiment and then applied to a variety of compounds. An application of the technique to determination of the average polymer chain length for a silicone polymer by quantitative flow 29 Si NMR is also presented. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  17. Magnetic resonance arthrography assessment of the superior labrum using the BLC system: age-related changes mimicking SLAP-2 lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziak, Adrian; Chuang, Michael J.; Jancosko, Jason J.; Nottage, Wesley M.; Burnett, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of the superior labrum with increasing age by assessing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms. Inclusion criteria were used to include only the MR arthrograms of patients devoid of clinical labral pathology. Two hundred thiry-six MR arthrograms were blindly assessed for biceps-labral complex (BLC) type 1-3 and sublabral recess size by a musculoskeletal radiologist. We have chosen the BLC system, which defines normal superior labral variants, since it is established in the literature and is used by reporting musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists. The MR arthrograms demonstrated that the majority of patients <40 years old were BLC type 1 and showed a steady increase in BLC types 2 and 3 with increasing age. Assessments demonstrated significantly greater (p < 0.01) mean BLC types (1.62 vs 1.29) and recess size (1.35 vs 0.66 mm) in those over 40 compared with those less than 40 years of age. Furthermore, significant differences (p < 0.05) were noted between mean BLC assessments between different decades of age. There appears to be a physiologic deepening of the superior labrum sulcus with age, which becomes significant after the age of 40. These findings can contribute to whether the superior labrum is considered abnormal when assessed radiographically. The differentiation of normal age-related changes in the shoulder, from those of a type 2 SLAP tear can reduce the rates of unnecessary SLAP-2 repairs. This is the first reported series to use the BLC system; we believe it provides a common nomenclature to allow clear communication between specialists. (orig.)

  18. Reproducibility of small animal cine and scar cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using a clinical 3.0 tesla system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manka, Robert; Jahnke, Cosima; Hucko, Thomas; Dietrich, Thore; Gebker, Rolf; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Graf, Kristof; Paetsch, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inter-study, inter-reader and intra-reader reproducibility of cardiac cine and scar imaging in rats using a clinical 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) system. Thirty-three adult rats (Sprague–Dawley) were imaged 24 hours after surgical occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery using a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) equipped with a dedicated 70 mm solenoid receive-only coil. Left-ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, ejection fraction and amount of myocardial scar tissue were measured. Intra-and inter-observer reproducibility was assessed in all animals. In addition, repeat MR exams were performed in 6 randomly chosen rats within 24 hours to assess inter-study reproducibility. The MR imaging protocol was successfully completed in 32 (97%) animals. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated high intra-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), -1.7%; LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), -2.2%; LV ejection fraction (LVEF), 1.0%; LV mass, -2.7%; and scar mass, -1.2%) and high inter-reader reproducibility (mean bias%: LVEDV, 3.3%; LVESV, 6.2%; LVEF, -4.8%; LV mass, -1.9%; and scar mass, -1.8%). In addition, a high inter-study reproducibility was found (mean bias%: LVEDV, 0.1%; LVESV, -1.8%; LVEF, 1.0%; LV mass, -4.6%; and scar mass, -6.2%). Cardiac MR imaging of rats yielded highly reproducible measurements of cardiac volumes/function and myocardial infarct size on a clinical 3.0 Tesla MR scanner system. Consequently, more widely available high field clinical MR scanners can be employed for small animal imaging of the heart e.g. when aiming at serial assessments during therapeutic intervention studies

  19. Magnetic resonance arthrography assessment of the superior labrum using the BLC system: age-related changes mimicking SLAP-2 lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koziak, Adrian [Queen' s School of Medicine, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Chuang, Michael J.; Jancosko, Jason J.; Nottage, Wesley M. [The Sport Clinic Orthopedic Medical Associates, Inc., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Burnett, Keith R. [Saddleback Valley Radiology, Laguna Hills, CA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of the superior labrum with increasing age by assessing magnetic resonance (MR) arthrograms. Inclusion criteria were used to include only the MR arthrograms of patients devoid of clinical labral pathology. Two hundred thiry-six MR arthrograms were blindly assessed for biceps-labral complex (BLC) type 1-3 and sublabral recess size by a musculoskeletal radiologist. We have chosen the BLC system, which defines normal superior labral variants, since it is established in the literature and is used by reporting musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists. The MR arthrograms demonstrated that the majority of patients <40 years old were BLC type 1 and showed a steady increase in BLC types 2 and 3 with increasing age. Assessments demonstrated significantly greater (p < 0.01) mean BLC types (1.62 vs 1.29) and recess size (1.35 vs 0.66 mm) in those over 40 compared with those less than 40 years of age. Furthermore, significant differences (p < 0.05) were noted between mean BLC assessments between different decades of age. There appears to be a physiologic deepening of the superior labrum sulcus with age, which becomes significant after the age of 40. These findings can contribute to whether the superior labrum is considered abnormal when assessed radiographically. The differentiation of normal age-related changes in the shoulder, from those of a type 2 SLAP tear can reduce the rates of unnecessary SLAP-2 repairs. This is the first reported series to use the BLC system; we believe it provides a common nomenclature to allow clear communication between specialists. (orig.)

  20. Development of a system for measuring wall shear stress in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Keita; Nagao, Taisuke; Okada, Kouji; Miyazaki, Shohei; Yang, Xiaomei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    We developed a system for measuring the wall shear stress (WSS) in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The time-dependent velocity at the center of the blood vessel was measured by phase-contrast MRI and was approximated by finite Fourier series, which was used for generating the velocity profile at the inlet for the boundary condition to the CFD method. To validate the CFD method, we compared the WSS obtained by the CFD method with the theoretical value in a straight cylinder with various radii for both steady and pulsatile flows. We also investigated the dependence of the WSS on the inlet velocity profile incorporated into the CFD method. For steady flow, there was a good agreement between the WSS obtained by the CFD method and the theoretical value. For pulsatile flow, there was a relatively good agreement between them when the radius of the cylinder was 2.5 mm and the inlet velocity profile was given by the Womersley solution for fully developed pulsatile flow in a straight circular cylinder. When the radius of the cylinder was 5 mm and/or the inlet velocity profile was assumed to be parabolic, large differences were observed between them, suggesting that the assumption of fully developed flow does not hold true in these cases. In human studies, the vortex due to the secondary blood flow in the carotid arterial sinus was clearly observed. The WSS in the bifurcation was the highest, while that in the carotid arterial sinus was the smallest. In conclusion, the system presented here appears to be useful for measuring the WSS in blood vessels and for analyzing the cause and/or extent of atherosclerosis, and our results suggest that the inlet velocity profile should be carefully considered. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of central nervous system in lysosomal storage diseases: A pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Nathan; Alexander, Allen; Irani, Neville; Saade, Charbel; Naffaa, Lena

    2017-06-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are a complex group of genetic disorders that are a result of inborn errors of metabolism. These errors result in a variety of metabolic dysfunction and build-up certain molecules within the tissues of the central nervous system (CNS). Although, they have discrete enzymatic deficiencies, symptomology and CNS imaging findings can overlap with each other, which can become challenging to radiologists. The purpose of this paper is to review the most common CNS imaging findings in LSD in order to familiarize the radiologist with their imaging findings and help narrow down the differential diagnosis. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  2. Development and Reliability of the OMERACT Thumb Base Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Féline P B; Conaghan, Philip G; Foltz, Violaine

    2017-01-01

    : The TOMS assessed the first carpometacarpal (CMC-1) and scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joints for synovitis, subchondral bone defects (including erosions, cysts, and bone attrition), osteophytes, cartilage, and bone marrow lesions on a 0-3 scale (normal to severe). Subluxation was evaluated only in the CMC......, with better performance for subchondral bone defects, subluxation, and bone marrow lesions. CONCLUSION: A thumb base OA MRI scoring system has been developed. The OMERACT TOMS demonstrated good intrareader and interreader reliability. Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate reliability of change...

  3. A system dedicated to the viewing and handling of tomographic images obtained by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaets, Joan F.W.; Almeida, Lirio O.B.; Traina, Agma J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present work describes the development of a dedicated system to be used in visualization and manipulation of a MR images. The graphics environment as well as the tool kit were developed for the dedicated TMS34010 based hardware. The developed software offers a compact kernel with primitives to support the creation and manipulation windows and menus directly in 'C' language. This work is fundamental for the implementation of a user friendly interface build to operate and visualize tomographic images. This tools are essential for the selection an archiving of images planes as used in clinical applications. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance features of primary central nervous system lymphoma in the immunocompetent patient: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, Kelvin K.; Sutherland, Tom; Liew, Elain; Tartaglia, Con J.; Trost, Nick; Pang, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an uncommon but important variant of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and represents up to 6% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) malignancies. Recognition of this entity by radiologist on MRI may avoid unnecessary neurosurgical resection and redirect to biopsy. The pretreatment MRI of patients with biopsy proven PCNSL from the last 5 years at our institution was reviewed. Selected examples were used to construct a pictorial essay to illustrate some of the typical and atypical MR features of PCNSL. MRI of other CNS conditions with imaging similarities to PCNSL was included to demonstrate possible mimics. The typical features of PCNSL lymphoma are intra-axial homogenous single or multiple contrast enhancing lesions, with marked surrounding oedema and restricted diffusion, usually contacting a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surface. Necrosis, peripheral enhancement, haemorrhage or calcification are unusual and other diagnoses should be considered if any of these features are present. Potential mimics include high grade glioma, infarcts, metastatic disease, demyelination, abscess and secondary lymphoma. Careful assessment of the MR features and correlation with the clinical findings should enable the radiologists to raise the possibility of PCNSL and minimise the risk of unnecessary resection.

  5. Magnetic islands created by resonant helical windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Heller, M.V.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-01-01

    The triggering of disruptive instabilities by resonant helical windings in large aspect-ratio tokamaks is associated to destruction of magnetic surfaces. The Chirikov condition is applied to estimate analytically the helical winding current thresholds for ergodization of the magnetic field lines. (Autor) [pt

  6. Topical questions in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines a number of practical questions concerning magnetic resonance imaging. These include the choice of operating magnetic field strength, the problem of siting and screening, a procedure for securing precise slice selection and the use of paramagnetic contrast agents. (author). 5 refs

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance titration studies of simple host-guest amine-carboxylic acid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahinay, Myrna S.; Lindoy, Leonard F.

    1999-01-01

    Adduct formation for the open-chain 1,2-diaminoethane and its N-methyl derivatives [N,N-dimethyl-ethylenediamine (N,N-DMEN),N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine (N,N'-DMEN);N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-ethylenediamine (N,N,N',N'-TMEN)]; 1,4-diaminobutane; diethylenetriamine (DIEN); triethylenetramine (TRIEN); and the carboxylic acid systems in polar CD 3 OH and nonpolar CDCl 3 solvents were elucidated by nmr titration. The stoichiometries of the adducts were found to correspond to the number of nitrogen present in the amine species with the exception of ligand incorporating N-donors of low basicity; that is, whose log K values for the protonated species in water were less than approximately 6 to 7.(Author)

  8. Abnormal findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus involving the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Jun; Kondo, Hirobumi (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine); Kashiwazaki, Sadao

    1992-06-01

    To elucidate the clinical significance of MRI on central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus (CNS-SLE), MRI and CT scans were performed in 35 patients with SLE, of 18 patients who had CNS manifestations at the time of MRI examinations. The investigations were also carried out in 17 patients without CNS-SLE. The rate of detection of abnormal findings on MRI in patients with CNS-SLE was 77.2% (14/18), which was high, as compared with the rate of those on CT scans (50%: 9/18). Especially, all of 4 patients with seizure and 3 patients with encephalopathy showed abnormal MRI findings, although respectively 50% and 33.3% of them had abnormal CT scan findings. MRI findings were classified into 4 groups below: (1) Large focal are as increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 2 of 4 patients with seizure and 1 of 3 patients with encephalopathy, which were completely resolved after treatment. (2) Patchy subcortical foci of increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 11 of 18 CNS-SLE and 7 of 17 without CNS-SLE, which were not detected by CT scan. (3) All of six patients with cerebral infarctions showed high signal intensity areas at T2 weighted image and low signal intensity areas at T1 weighted image. (4) Normal findings were observed in 4 of 18 CNS-SLE (22.2%). We concluded that MRI is useful for the evaluation of CNS-SLE and provides more information than CT scan. (author).

  9. Abnormal findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus involving the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Jun; Kondo, Hirobumi; Kashiwazaki, Sadao.

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the clinical significance of MRI on central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus (CNS-SLE), MRI and CT scans were performed in 35 patients with SLE, of 18 patients who had CNS manifestations at the time of MRI examinations. The investigations were also carried out in 17 patients without CNS-SLE. The rate of detection of abnormal findings on MRI in patients with CNS-SLE was 77.2% (14/18), which was high, as compared with the rate of those on CT scans (50%: 9/18). Especially, all of 4 patients with seizure and 3 patients with encephalopathy showed abnormal MRI findings, although respectively 50% and 33.3% of them had abnormal CT scan findings. MRI findings were classified into 4 groups below: 1) Large focal are as increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 2 of 4 patients with seizure and 1 of 3 patients with encephalopathy, which were completely resolved after treatment. 2) Patchy subcortical foci of increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 11 of 18 CNS-SLE and 7 of 17 without CNS-SLE, which were not detected by CT scan. 3) All of six patients with cerebral infarctions showed high signal intensity areas at T2 weighted image and low signal intensity areas at T1 weighted image. 4) Normal findings were observed in 4 of 18 CNS-SLE (22.2%). We concluded that MRI is useful for the evaluation of CNS-SLE and provides more information than CT scan. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance findings in 32 tumors of the nerve sheaths of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galant, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.M.; Soler, R.; Saez, F.

    1996-01-01

    To define the MR features of nerve sheath tumors (NST) located in soft tissue and to evaluate the parameters that aid in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. We have studied retrospectively the clinical features and MR images corresponding to 32 NST of the musculoskeletal system detected in 22 patients. Among the 32 NST, there were 12 neurofibromas, 11 neurilemmonas, 8 malignant tumors and 1 neuropithelioma. All the patients presented palpable mass, with neurological symptoms as the most common accompanying sign. Pain was most frequent in the malignant lesions. Seven lesions were located in subcutis. MR revealed the relationship between tumor and nerve in 11 cases (7 neurilemmomas and 4 neurofibromas). Most of the neurilemmomas were round-shaped tumors that were extrinsic to the nerve, displacing it. The neurofibromas were usually oval or irregularly-shaped and expanded the nerve. NST were generally found to have well-defined margins. They were isointense or slightly hyperintense with respect to muscle in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2 images, with heterogeneous frequency. A target-like aspect was observed in 11 lesions, all benign. NST present a number of common features. The presence of pain, the site of the nerve upon which they depend and the target-like appearance are characteristics that help to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions. 19 refs

  11. Structural magnetic resonance imaging can identify trigeminal system abnormalities in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle DeSouza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one ofthe most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of miliary tuberculosis of the central nervous system in children with tuberculous meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janse van Rensburg, Pieter; Andronikou, Savvas; Pienaar, Manana [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tygerberg (South Africa); Toorn, Ronald van [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tygerberg (South Africa)

    2008-12-15

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is closely associated with miliary tuberculosis and a pathogenetic relationship is suspected, although it has been proposed that the two processes are unrelated. To describe miliary tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS) on MRI in children with TBM. A retrospective descriptive study of 32 paediatric TBM patients referred for MRI. The presence of miliary nodules in the CNS was recorded. Lesions were categorized according to their distribution, enhancement pattern, size and signal characteristics. A miliary distribution of nodules was present in 88% of patients. All patients with a miliary distribution had leptomeningeal nodules and 18% of these patients had deep parenchymal nodules in addition. At least one tuberculoma with central T2 hypointensity was identified in 39% of patients. The high prevalence of miliary leptomeningeal nodules in the CNS of children with TBM is significant because it points to a pathogenetic relationship that has long been suspected on epidemiological grounds. Our findings challenge the concept that miliary tuberculosis is only an incidental finding in TBM patients and suggest that it plays an integral part in the pathogenesis. (orig.)

  13. Basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahceli, S.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this book which is translated from English language is to explain the physical and mathematical basis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are nine chapters covering different aspects of NMR. In the firs chapter fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics are given at a level suitable for readers to understand NMR fully. The remaining chapters discuss the magnetic properties of nucleus, the interactions between atoms and molecules, continuous wave NMR, pulsed NMR, nuclear magnetic relaxation and NMR of liquids

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  16. A system for the registration of arthroscopic images to magnetic resonance images of the knee: for improved virtual knee arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengliang; Amati, Giancarlo; Gullick, Nicola; Oakley, Stephen; Hurmusiadis, Vassilios; Schaeffter, Tobias; Penney, Graeme; Rhode, Kawal

    2009-02-01

    Knee arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that is routinely carried out for the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies of the knee joint. A high level of expertise is required to carry out this procedure and therefore the clinical training is extensive. There are several reasons for this that include the small field of view seen by the arthroscope and the high degree of distortion in the video images. Several virtual arthroscopy simulators have been proposed to augment the learning process. One of the limitations of these simulators is the generic models that are used. We propose to develop a new virtual arthroscopy simulator that will allow the use of pathology-specific models with an increased level of photo-realism. In order to generate these models we propose to use registered magnetic resonance images (MRI) and arthroscopic video images collected from patients with a variety of knee pathologies. We present a method to perform this registration based on the use of a combined X-ray and MR imaging system (XMR). In order to validate our technique we carried out MR imaging and arthroscopy of a custom-made acrylic phantom in the XMR environment. The registration between the two modalities was computed using a combination of XMR and camera calibration, and optical tracking. Both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) registration errors were computed and shown to be approximately 0.8 and 3 mm, respectively. Further to this, we qualitatively tested our approach using a more realistic plastic knee model that is used for the arthroscopy training.

  17. Pharmaceutical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J Craig; Bowtell, Richard W; Mäder, Karsten; Melia, Colin D

    2005-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that provides internal images of materials and living organisms on a microscopic and macroscopic scale. It is non-invasive and non-destructive, and one of very few techniques that can observe internal events inside undisturbed specimens in situ. It is versatile, as a wide range of NMR modalities can be accessed, and 2D and 3D imaging can be undertaken. Despite widespread use and major advances in clinical MRI, it has seen limited application in the pharmaceutical sciences. In vitro studies have focussed on drug release mechanisms in polymeric delivery systems, but isolated studies of bioadhesion, tablet properties, and extrusion and mixing processes illustrate the wider potential. Perhaps the greatest potential however, lies in investigations of pharmaceuticals in vivo, where pilot human and animal studies have demonstrated we can obtain unique insights into the behaviour of gastrointestinal, topical, colloidal, and targeted drug delivery systems.

  18. Development and validation of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance tenosynovitis scoring system in a multireader exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop and validate a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tenosynovitis (TS) score for tendons at the wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Axial T1-weighted precontrast and postcontrast fat-saturated MR image sets...... of the hands of 43 patients with RA initiating rituximab therapy were obtained at baseline and after 14, 26, 38, or 52 weeks. The MR images were scored twice by 4 readers. Nine tendon compartments of the wrist and 4 flexor tendon compartments at the MCP joints were assessed. Tenosynovitis was scored as follows...

  19. Diagnostic apparatus employing nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, K.; Yamada, N.; Yoshitome, E.; Matsuura, H.

    1987-01-01

    An NMR diagnostic apparatus is described comprising means for applying a primary magnetic field to a subject; means for applying RF pulses to the subject to give nuclear magnetic resonance to the nuclei of atoms in the subject; means for applying gradient magnetic fields to project an NMR signal of the nuclei at least in one direction; means for observing the NMR signal projected by the gradient magnetic fields applying means; and arithmetic means for constructing a distribution of information on resonance energy as an image from an output signal from the observing means; wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means comprises means for applying the gradient magnetic fields at a predetermined time and for not applying the gradient magnetic fields at another predetermined time, during the time period of one view; and wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means further comprises means for measuring the NMR signal during the predetermined time when the gradient magnetic fields are applied, and means for measuring the intensity of the primary magnetic field during the other predetermined time when no gradient magnetic fields are applied

  20. Development of a Support Vector Machine - Based Image Analysis System for Focal Liver Lesions Classification in Magnetic Resonance Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatos, I; Tsantis, S; Kagadis, G; Karamesini, M; Skouroliakou, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The design and implementation of a computer-based image analysis system employing the support vector machine (SVM) classifier system for the classification of Focal Liver Lesions (FLLs) on routine non-enhanced, T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Materials and Methods: The study comprised 92 patients; each one of them has undergone MRI performed on a Magnetom Concerto (Siemens). Typical signs on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and biopsies were employed towards a three class categorization of the 92 cases: 40-benign FLLs, 25-Hepatocellular Carcinomas (HCC) within Cirrhotic liver parenchyma and 27-liver metastases from Non-Cirrhotic liver. Prior to FLLs classification an automated lesion segmentation algorithm based on Marcov Random Fields was employed in order to acquire each FLL Region of Interest. 42 texture features derived from the gray-level histogram, co-occurrence and run-length matrices and 12 morphological features were obtained from each lesion. Stepwise multi-linear regression analysis was utilized to avoid feature redundancy leading to a feature subset that fed the multiclass SVM classifier designed for lesion classification. SVM System evaluation was performed by means of leave-one-out method and ROC analysis. Results: Maximum accuracy for all three classes (90.0%) was obtained by means of the Radial Basis Kernel Function and three textural features (Inverse- Different-Moment, Sum-Variance and Long-Run-Emphasis) that describe lesion's contrast, variability and shape complexity. Sensitivity values for the three classes were 92.5%, 81.5% and 96.2% respectively, whereas specificity values were 94.2%, 95.3% and 95.5%. The AUC value achieved for the selected subset was 0.89 with 0.81 - 0.94 confidence interval. Conclusion: The proposed SVM system exhibit promising results that could be utilized as a second opinion tool to the radiologist in order to decrease the time/cost of diagnosis and the need for patients to undergo invasive

  1. Nanoparticulated magnetic drug delivery systems: Preparation and magnetic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, P C, E-mail: pcmor@unb.b [Universidade de BrasIlia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, Brasilia DF 70910-900 (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes how magnetic resonance can be successfully used as a tool to help customize and quantify nanosized magnetic particles while labeling cells and administered in animals for targeting different biological sites. Customization of magnetic nanoparticles is addressed here in terms of production of complex magnetic drug delivery systems whereas quantification of magnetic nanoparticle in different biological compartments emerges as a key experimental information to assess time-dependent magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution profiles. Examples of using magnetic resonance in unfolding information regarding the pharmacokinetics of intravenously-injected surface-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in animals are included in the paper.

  2. Comparison of Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Targeting Accuracy and Procedure Duration between 1.5- and 3-Tesla Interventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems: An Initial 12-Month Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Derek G; Narvid, Jared A; Martin, Alastair J; Qasim, Salman E; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) allows deep brain stimulator lead placement under general anesthesia. While the accuracy of lead targeting has been described for iMRI systems utilizing 1.5-tesla magnets, a similar assessment of 3-tesla iMRI procedures has not been performed. To compare targeting accuracy, the number of lead targeting attempts, and surgical duration between procedures performed on 1.5- and 3-tesla iMRI systems. Radial targeting error, the number of targeting attempts, and procedure duration were compared between surgeries performed on 1.5- and 3-tesla iMRI systems (SmartFrame and ClearPoint systems). During the first year of operation of each system, 26 consecutive leads were implanted using the 1.5-tesla system, and 23 consecutive leads were implanted using the 3-tesla system. There was no significant difference in radial error (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.26), number of lead placements that required multiple targeting attempts (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.59), or bilateral procedure durations between surgeries performed with the two systems (p = 0.15). Accurate DBS lead targeting can be achieved with iMRI systems utilizing either 1.5- or 3-tesla magnets. The use of a 3-tesla magnet, however, offers improved visualization of the target structures and allows comparable accuracy and efficiency of placement at the selected targets. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible

  4. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Warren Sloan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  5. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  6. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  7. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging for cardiac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Tashima, Kazuyuki; Okajima, Yoshitomo; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Terai, Masaru; Nakajima, Hironori; Harada, Tsutomu; Ishida, Yoshikazu.

    1988-01-01

    We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 4 patients with cardiac tumor (1 with rhabdomyoma, 1 with left atrial myxoma, and 2 with tumor of the left ventricular wall) for morphological evaluation of the tumor. ECG-gated MRI was performed by the spin echo imaging technique using a superconducting MRI system operating at 0.5 tesla. Spatial extension of the tumor was clearly demonstrated in all the patients. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA), was used in the 2 patients with tumor of the left ventricular myocardium to enhance the contrast, and allowed clear visualization of the tumor. These findings show the usefulness of MRI and MRI with Gd-DTPA for morphological evaluation of cardiac tumor. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance tomography and ultrasound in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Czerny, C.; Trattnig, S.; Lack, W.; Machold, K.; Graninger, W.

    1996-01-01

    Technical innovations and software improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution sonography (US) have definitely influenced the diagnostic imaging of rheumatic diseases. For MRI, improvements in surface coils, dedicated low-field systems (0.2 T), and software improvements (shorter acquisition times and refinements of fat suppressing techniques) must be mentioned. For sonography, the main innovations concern the development of higher transducer frequencies (7-15 Mhz) and power Doppler imaging. Clinical evaluations have shown that MRI and US are most useful in cases of suspected rheumatic disease with negative plain film radiographs and for documenting the course of the disease, diagnosing of early rheumatoid arthritis, making a differential diagnosis in clinically unclear rheumatic diseases, investigating vascularization, and quantifying pannus formation. In order to improve diagnostic efficacy the role of MRI and US in the management of patients with rheumatic disease should be reconsidered. (orig.) [de

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... lodged in the eyes are particularly important. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  2. Vaginal distribution and retention of a multiparticulate drug delivery system, assessed by gamma scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Samata; Verstraelen, Hans; Peremans, Kathelijne; Villeirs, Geert; Vermeire, Simon; De Vos, Filip; Mehuys, Els; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris

    2012-04-15

    For any new vaginal dosage form, the distribution and retention in the vagina has to be assessed by in vivo evaluation. We evaluated the vaginal distribution and retention of starch-based pellets in sheep as live animal model by gamma scintigraphy (using Indium-111 DTPA as radiolabel) and in women via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, using a gadolinium chelate as contrast agent). A conventional cream formulation was used as reference in both studies. Cream and pellets were administered to sheep (n=6) in a two period-two treatment study and to healthy female volunteers (n=6) via a randomized crossover trial. Pellets (filled into hard gelatin capsule) and cetomacrogol cream, both labeled with Indium-111 DTPA (for gamma scintigraphy) or with gadolinium chelate (for MRI) were evaluated for their intravaginal distribution and retention over a 24h period. Spreading in the vagina was assessed based on the part of the vagina covered with formulation (expressed in relation to the total vaginal length). Vaginal retention of the formulation was quantified based on the radioactivity remaining in the vaginal area (sheep study), or qualitatively evaluated (women study). Both trials indicated a rapid distribution of the cream within the vagina as complete coverage of the vaginal mucosa was seen 1h after dose administration. Clearance of the cream was rapid: about 10% activity remained in the vaginal area of the sheep 12h post-administration, while after 8h only a thin layer of cream was detected on the vaginal mucosa of women. After disintegration of the hard gelatin capsule, the pellet formulation gradually distributed over the entire vaginal mucosa. Residence time of the pellets in the vagina was longer compared to the semi-solid formulation: after 24h 23 ± 7% radioactivity was detected in the vaginal area of the sheep, while in women the pellet formulation was still detected throughout the vagina. A multi-particulate system containing starch-based pellets was identified as a

  3. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G.; Schulze, D.; Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F z (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle β [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F rot was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. β was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F z exceeded gravitational force F g on the particular object [F z 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F z was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F g at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F rot on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths (≥ +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles rot was found to be ≥ +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, β was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F z . The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Orthodontic springs and auxiliary appliances: assessment of magnetic field interactions associated with 1.5 T and 3 T magnetic resonance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, J.; Priest, A.N.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Clinic of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Schulze, D. [University Hospital of Freiburg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Kahl-Nieke, B.; Klocke, A. [University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Orthodontics, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate magnetic field interactions at 1.5 and 3 T for 20 orthodontic devices used for fixed orthodontic therapy. Twenty springs and auxiliary parts made from varying ferromagnetic alloys were tested for magnetic field interactions in the static magnetic field at 1.5 and 3 T. Magnetic translational force F{sub z} (in millinewtons) was evaluated by determining the deflection angle {beta} [American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standard test method)]. Magnetic-field-induced rotational force F{sub rot} was qualitatively determined using a five-point scale. {beta} was found to be >45 in 13(15) devices at 1.5(3) T and translational force F{sub z} exceeded gravitational force F{sub g} on the particular object [F{sub z} 10.17-261.4 mN (10.72-566.4 mN) at 1.5(3) T]. F{sub z} was found to be up to 24.1(47.5)-fold higher than F{sub g} at 1.5(3) T. Corresponding to this, F{sub rot} on the objects was shown to be high at both field strengths ({>=} +3). Three objects (at 1.5 T) and one object (at 3 T) showed deflection angles <45 , but F{sub rot} was found to be {>=} +3 at both field strengths. For the remaining objects, {beta} was below 45 and torque measurements ranged from 0 to +2. Of 20 objects investigated for magnetic field interactions at 1.5(3) T, 13(15) were unsafe in magnetic resonance (MR), based on the ASTM criteria of F{sub z}. The implications of these results for orthodontic patients undergoing MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shames, A I; Panich, A M; Osipov, V Yu; Vul’, A Ya; Boudou, J P; Treussart, F; Von Bardeleben, H J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ∼5  ×  10 18  spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp 3 C–C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (∼5  ×  10 17  spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV − ). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV − defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size <20 nm), which are contained in the dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV − content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ∼2  ×  10 19  spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV − centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  9. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentman, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours. 16 references

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia Martins; Setti, Marcela; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Meohas, Walter; Rezende, Jose Francisco; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  11. The deleterious effects of arteriovenous fistula-creation on the cardiovascular system: a longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dundon BK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Benjamin K Dundon,1–3 Kim Torpey,3 Adam J Nelson,1 Dennis TL Wong,1,2 Rae F Duncan,1 Ian T Meredith,2 Randall J Faull,1,3 Stephen G Worthley,1,4 Matthew I Worthley1,4 1Cardiology Department, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 2Monash Cardiovascular Research Centre, MonashHEART, Monash Health, Melbourne, Vic, Australia; 3Central Northern Renal and Transplantation Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Central Adelaide Local Health Network, Adelaide, SA, Australia; 4South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, SA, Australia Aim: Arteriovenous fistula-formation remains critical for the provision of hemodialysis in end-stage renal failure patients. Its creation results in a significant increase in cardiac output, with resultant alterations in cardiac stroke volume, systemic blood flow, and vascular resistance. The impact of fistula-formation on cardiac and vascular structure and function has not yet been evaluated via "gold standard" imaging techniques in the modern era of end-stage renal failure care. Methods: A total of 24 patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease undergoing fistula-creation were studied in a single-arm pilot study. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was undertaken at baseline, and prior to and 6 months following fistula-creation. This gold standard imaging modality was used to evaluate, via standard brachial flow-mediated techniques, cardiac structure and function, aortic distensibility, and endothelial function. Results: At follow up, left ventricular ejection fraction remained unchanged, while mean cardiac output increased by 25.0% (P<0.0001. Significant increases in left and right ventricular end-systolic volumes (21% [P=0.014] and 18% [P<0.01], left and right atrial area (11% [P<0.01] and 9% [P<0.01], and left ventricular mass were observed (12.7% increase (P<0.01. Endothelial

  12. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography; Vias colaterais porto-sistemicas exuberantes em portadores de hipertensao portal: demonstracao pela angiografia por ressonancia magnetica com gadolinio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: rogercal@uol.com.br

    2003-03-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  13. Magnetic structure and resonance properties of hexagonal antidot lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, A.I.; Krivoruchko, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    Static and resonance properties of ferromagnetic films with an antidot lattice (pores in the film) are studied. The description of the system is based on micromagnetic modeling and analytical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation. The dependences of ferromagnetic resonance spectra on the in-plane direction of applied magnetic field and on the lattice parameters are investigated. The dependences of a dynamic system response on frequency at fixed magnetic field and on field at fixed frequency, when the field changes cause the static magnetic order to change are explored. It is found that the specific peculiarities of the system dynamics leave unchange for both of these experimental conditions. Namely, for low damping the resonance spectra contain three quasi-homogeneous modes which are due to the resonance of different regions (domains) of the antidot lattice cell. It is shown the angular field dependences of each mode are characterized by a twofold symmetry and the related easy axes are mutually rotated by 60 degrees. As the result, a hexagonal symmetry of the system static and dynamic magnetic characteristics is realized. The existence in the resonance spectrum of several quasi-homogeneous modes related to different regions of the unit cell could be fundamental for working elements of magnonic devices.

  14. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Franck, John; Demas, Vasiliki; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2008-01-01

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum in a cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16,100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32,200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable 'sensitive volumes'

  15. Optimal sequence for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Akata, Soichi; Ozuki, Taizo; Abe, Kimihiko [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has attracted attention as a useful examination for abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, because it is a simple procedure. Since there are few detailed reports on optimal sequences for MRCP, we attempted to clarify the topic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment we used was a 1.0 Tesla super-conductive type. A fast spin echo (16 echo train) was used, and the echo space was set at 17 msec. TE was changed from 17 msec to 272 msec in 17 msec increments. TR was changed from 1,000 msec to 9,000 msec by 1,000 msec increments. Bile juice which had been collected from the PTCD tube of a patient with common bile duct cancer, was put in a test tube of 10 mm internal diameter. Saline was used as a substitute for pancreatic juice, because collection of pancreatic juice was difficult. Fat was used for contrast. Each signal intensity inside the test tube was measured and evaluated. We attempted to evaluate the signal of gastric juice by adding blueberry juice, making use of its manganese ion (Mn{sup ++}). With longer TR, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice increased. As TE became longer, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice decreased slightly, while that of fat decreased much more. In MRCP, it is necessary to set up a long TE to increase the relative signal intensity difference of fat in bile and pancreas juice. The signal intensity of gastric juice was made to disappear by the addition of blueberry juice diluted to a ratio of 1:3. (author)

  16. Optimal sequence for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Akata, Soichi; Ozuki, Taizo; Abe, Kimihiko

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has attracted attention as a useful examination for abnormalities of the pancreaticobiliary system, because it is a simple procedure. Since there are few detailed reports on optimal sequences for MRCP, we attempted to clarify the topic. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment we used was a 1.0 Tesla super-conductive type. A fast spin echo (16 echo train) was used, and the echo space was set at 17 msec. TE was changed from 17 msec to 272 msec in 17 msec increments. TR was changed from 1,000 msec to 9,000 msec by 1,000 msec increments. Bile juice which had been collected from the PTCD tube of a patient with common bile duct cancer, was put in a test tube of 10 mm internal diameter. Saline was used as a substitute for pancreatic juice, because collection of pancreatic juice was difficult. Fat was used for contrast. Each signal intensity inside the test tube was measured and evaluated. We attempted to evaluate the signal of gastric juice by adding blueberry juice, making use of its manganese ion (Mn ++ ). With longer TR, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice increased. As TE became longer, the signal intensities of bile and pancreas juice decreased slightly, while that of fat decreased much more. In MRCP, it is necessary to set up a long TE to increase the relative signal intensity difference of fat in bile and pancreas juice. The signal intensity of gastric juice was made to disappear by the addition of blueberry juice diluted to a ratio of 1:3. (author)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic conditions, such as multiple sclerosis disorders of the ... a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some ... Images related to Magnetic ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...