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Sample records for magnetic resonance scanner

  1. Simple Methods for Scanner Drift Normalization Validated for Automatic Segmentation of Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Erik Bjørnager

    2018-01-01

    Scanner drift is a well-known magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) artifact characterized by gradual signal degradation and scan intensity changes over time. In addition, hardware and software updates may imply abrupt changes in signal. The combined effects are particularly challenging for automatic...... image analysis methods used in longitudinal studies. The implication is increased measurement variation and a risk of bias in the estimations (e.g. in the volume change for a structure). We proposed two quite different approaches for scanner drift normalization and demonstrated the performance...... for segmentation of knee MRI using the fully automatic KneeIQ framework. The validation included a total of 1975 scans from both high-field and low-field MRI. The results demonstrated that the pre-processing method denoted Atlas Affine Normalization significantly removed scanner drift effects and ensured...

  2. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Conditional External Cardiac Defibrillator for Resuscitation Within the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner Bore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Watkins, Ronald D; Zviman, Menekhem M; Guttman, Michael A; Wang, Wei; Halperin, Henry A

    2016-10-01

    Subjects undergoing cardiac arrest within a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner are currently removed from the bore and then from the MRI suite, before the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, potentially increasing the risk of mortality. This precludes many higher-risk (acute ischemic and acute stroke) patients from undergoing MRI and MRI-guided intervention. An MRI-conditional cardiac defibrillator should enable scanning with defibrillation pads attached and the generator ON, enabling application of defibrillation within the seconds of MRI after a cardiac event. An MRI-conditional external defibrillator may improve patient acceptance for MRI procedures. A commercial external defibrillator was rendered 1.5 Tesla MRI-conditional by the addition of novel radiofrequency filters between the generator and commercial disposable surface pads. The radiofrequency filters reduced emission into the MRI scanner and prevented cable/surface pad heating during imaging, while preserving all the defibrillator monitoring and delivery functions. Human volunteers were imaged using high specific absorption rate sequences to validate MRI image quality and lack of heating. Swine were electrically fibrillated (n=4) and thereafter defibrillated both outside and inside the MRI bore. MRI image quality was reduced by 0.8 or 1.6 dB, with the generator in monitoring mode and operating on battery or AC power, respectively. Commercial surface pads did not create artifacts deeper than 6 mm below the skin surface. Radiofrequency heating was within US Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Defibrillation was completely successful inside and outside the MRI bore. A prototype MRI-conditional defibrillation system successfully defibrillated in the MRI without degrading the image quality or increasing the time needed for defibrillation. It can increase patient acceptance for MRI procedures. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography of patients using a standard clinical scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Tomas; Wikstroem, Johan; Eriksson, Mats-Ola; Lundberg, Anders; Ahlstroem, Haakan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Lars [Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Ljungman, Christer [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden); Hoogeven, Romhild [Philips Medical Systems, MR Clinical Science, Best (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technique of whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of patients with a standard clinical scanner. Thirty-three patients referred for stenoses, occlusions, aneurysms, assessment of patency of vascular grafts, vasculitis and vascular aplasia were examined in a 1.5-T scanner using its standard body coil. Three-dimensional sequences were acquired in four stations after administration of one intravenous injection of 40 ml conventional gadolinium contrast agent. Different vessel segments were evaluated as either diagnostic or nondiagnostic and regarding the presence of stenoses with more than 50% diameter reduction, occlusions or aneurysms. Of 923 vessel segments, 67 were not evaluable because of poor contrast filling (n=31), motion artefacts (n=20), venous overlap (n=12) and other reasons (n=4). Stenoses of more than 50%, occlusions or aneurysms were observed in 26 patients (129 segments). In nine patients additional unsuspected pathology was found. In 10 out of 14 patients (71/79 segments) there was conformity between MRA and digital subtraction angiography regarding the grade of stenosis. This study shows that whole-body MRA with a standard clinical scanner is feasible. Motion artefacts and the timing of the contrast agent through the different segments are still problems to be solved. (orig.)

  4. Computer simulation of a clinical magnet resonance tomography scanner for training purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacklaender, T.; Mertens, H.; Cramer, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The idea for this project was born by the necessity to offer medical students an easy approach to the theoretical basics of magnetic resonance imaging. The aim was to simulate the features and functions of such a scanner on a commercially available computer by means of a computer program. Materials and Methods: The simulation was programmed in pure Java under the GNU General Public License and is freely available for a commercially available computer with Windows, Macintosh or Linux operating system. The graphic user interface is oriented to a real scanner. In an external program parameter, images for the proton density and the relaxation times T1 and T2 are calculated on the basis of clinical examinations. From this, the image calculation is carried out in the simulation program pixel by pixel on the basis of a pulse sequence chosen and modified by the user. The images can be stored and printed. In addition, it is possible to display and modify k-space images. Results: Seven classes of pulse sequences are implemented and up to 14 relevant sequence parameters, such as repetition time and echo time, can be altered. Aliasing and motion artifacts can be simulated. As the image calculation only takes a few seconds, interactive working is possible. (orig.)

  5. [Computer simulation of a clinical magnet resonance tomography scanner for training purposes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackländer, T; Mertens, H; Cramer, B M

    2004-08-01

    The idea for this project was born by the necessity to offer medical students an easy approach to the theoretical basics of magnetic resonance imaging. The aim was to simulate the features and functions of such a scanner on a commercially available computer by means of a computer program. The simulation was programmed in pure Java under the GNU General Public License and is freely available for a commercially available computer with Windows, Macintosh or Linux operating system. The graphic user interface is oriented to a real scanner. In an external program parameter, images for the proton density and the relaxation times T1 and T2 are calculated on the basis of clinical examinations. From this, the image calculation is carried out in the simulation program pixel by pixel on the basis of a pulse sequence chosen and modified by the user. The images can be stored and printed. In addition, it is possible to display and modify k-space images. Seven classes of pulse sequences are implemented and up to 14 relevant sequence parameters, such as repetition time and echo time, can be altered. Aliasing and motion artifacts can be simulated. As the image calculation only takes a few seconds, interactive working is possible. The simulation has been used in the university education for more than 1 year, successfully illustrating the dependence of the MR images on the measuring parameters. This should facititate the approach of students to the understanding MR imaging in the future.

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in a low-field intraoperative scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulder, Michael; Azmi, Hooman; Biswal, Bharat

    2003-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used for preoperative planning and intraoperative surgical navigation. However, most experience to date has been with preoperative images acquired on high-field echoplanar MRI units. We explored the feasibility of acquiring fMRI of the motor cortex with a dedicated low-field intraoperative MRI (iMRI). Five healthy volunteers were scanned with the 0.12-tesla PoleStar N-10 iMRI (Odin Medical Technologies, Israel). A finger-tapping motor paradigm was performed with sequential scans, acquired alternately at rest and during activity. In addition, scans were obtained during breath holding alternating with normal breathing. The same paradigms were repeated using a 3-tesla MRI (Siemens Corp., Allandale, N.J., USA). Statistical analysis was performed offline using cross-correlation and cluster techniques. Data were resampled using the 'jackknife' process. The location, number of activated voxels and degrees of statistical significance between the two scanners were compared. With both the 0.12- and 3-tesla imagers, motor cortex activation was seen in all subjects to a significance of p < 0.02 or greater. No clustered pixels were seen outside the sensorimotor cortex. The resampled correlation coefficients were normally distributed, with a mean of 0.56 for both the 0.12- and 3-tesla scanners (standard deviations 0.11 and 0.08, respectively). The breath holding paradigm confirmed that the expected diffuse activation was seen on 0.12- and 3-tesla scans. Accurate fMRI with a low-field iMRI is feasible. Such data could be acquired immediately before or even during surgery. This would increase the utility of iMRI and allow for updated intraoperative functional imaging, free of the limitations of brain shift. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Needles and Interactive Sequences for Musculoskeletal Interventions Using an Open High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wonneberger, Uta; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Rump, Jens; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we study in vitro evaluation of needle artefacts and image quality for musculoskeletal laser-interventions in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at 1.0T with vertical field orientation. Five commercially available MRI-compatible puncture needles were assessed based on artefact characteristics in a CuSO4 phantom (0.1%) and in human cadaveric lumbar spines. First, six different interventional sequences were evaluated with varying needle orientation to the main magnetic field B0 (0 o to 90 o ) in a sequence test. Artefact width, needle-tip error, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Second, a gradient-echo sequence used for thermometric monitoring was assessed and in varying echo times, artefact width, tip error, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured. Artefact width and needle-tip error correlated with needle material, instrument orientation to B0, and sequence type. Fast spin-echo sequences produced the smallest needle artefacts for all needles, except for the carbon fibre needle (width o to B0. Overall, the proton density-weighted spin-echo sequences had the best CNR (CNR Muscle/Needle >16.8). Concerning the thermometric gradient echo sequence, artefacts remained <5 mm, and the SNR reached its maximum at an echo time of 15 ms. If needle materials and sequences are accordingly combined, guidance and monitoring of musculoskeletal laser interventions may be feasible in a vertical magnetic field at 1.0T.

  8. [Patient exposure to electromagnetic fields in magnetic resonance scanners: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibelalde del Castillo, E

    2013-12-01

    The use of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in the low frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum and static fields, radiofrequencies (RF), and microwaves is fundamental both in modern communication systems and in diagnostic medical imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The proliferation of these applications in recent decades has led to intense activity in developing regulations to guarantee their safety and to the establishment of guidelines and legal recommendations for the public, workers, and patients. In April 2012 it was foreseen that the European Parliament and Council would approve and publish a directive on the minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields, which would modify Directive 2004/40/EC. New studies related to the exposure to electromagnetic radiation and its impact on health published in recent years have led to a new postponement, and it is now foreseen that the directive will come into effect in October 2013. One of the most noteworthy aspects of the new version of the directive is the exclusion of the limits of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in the clinical use of MRI. In exchange for this exception, physicians and experts in protection against non-ionizing radiation are asked to make additional efforts to train workers exposed to non-ionizing radiation and to establish mechanisms to guarantee the correct application of non-ionizing electromagnetic fields in patients, along similar lines to the principles of justification and optimization established for ionizing radiation. On the basis of the most recently published studies, this article reviews some safety-related aspects to take into account when examining patients with MRI with high magnetic fields. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurements of the ripple effect and geometric distribution of switched gradient fields inside a magnetic resonance scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Henrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson; Wilén, Jonna

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of patient exposure during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures is limited, and the need for such knowledge has been demonstrated in recent in vitro and in vivo studies of the genotoxic effects of MRI. This study focuses on the dB/dt of the switched gradient field (SGF) and its geometric distribution. These values were characterized by measuring the peak dB/dt generated by a programmed gradient current of alternating triangles inside a 1.5T MR scanner. The maximum dB/dt exposure to the gradient field was 6-14 T/s, and this occurred at the edges of the field of view (FOV) 20-25 cm from the isocenter in the longitudinal direction. The dB/dt exposure dropped off to roughly half the maximum (3-7 T/s) at the edge of the bore. It was found that the dB/dt of the SGF was distorted by a 200 kHz ripple arising from the amplifier. The ripple is small in terms of B-field, but the high frequency content contributes to a peak dB/dt up to 18 times larger than that predicted by the slew rate (4 T/s m) and the distance from the isocenter. Measurements on a 3 T MRI scanner, however, revealed a much smaller filtered ripple of 100 kHz in dB/dt. These findings suggest that the gradient current to each coil together with information on the geometrical distribution of the gradient field and ripple effects could be used to assess the SGF exposure within an MRI bore. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  11. Plantar fascia evaluation with a dedicated magnetic resonance scanner in weight-bearing position: our experience in patients with plantar fasciitis and in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutera, R; Iovane, A; Sorrentino, F; Candela, F; Mularo, V; La Tona, G; Midiri, M

    2010-03-01

    This study assessed the usefulness of upright weight-bearing examination of the ankle/hind foot performed with a dedicated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner in the evaluation of the plantar fascia in healthy volunteers and in patients with clinical evidence of plantar fasciitis. Between January and March 2009, 20 patients with clinical evidence of plantar fasciitis (group A) and a similar number of healthy volunteers (group B) underwent MR imaging of the ankle/hind foot in the upright weight-bearing and conventional supine position. A 0.25-Tesla MR scanner (G-Scan, Esaote SpA, Genoa, Italy) was used with a dedicated receiving coil for the ankle/hind foot. Three radiologists, blinded to patients' history and clinical findings, assessed in consensus morphological and dimensional changes and signal intensity alterations on images acquired in both positions, in different sequences and in different planes. In group A, MR imaging confirmed the diagnosis in 15/20 cases; in 4/15 cases, a partial tear of the plantar fascia was identified in the upright weight-bearing position alone. In the remaining 5/20 cases in group A and in all cases in group B, the plantar fascia showed no abnormal signal intensity. Because of the increased stretching of the plantar fascia, in all cases in group A and B, thickness in the proximal third was significantly reduced (pplantar fascia, which could be overlooked in the supine position.

  12. Evaluation of low back pain with low field open magnetic resonance imaging scanner in rural hospital of Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanandham Shrinuvasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain (LBP is the most common symptom which is associated with limitation of normal activities and work-related disability. Imaging techniques are often essential in making the correct diagnosis for prompt management. Plain Radiography though remain a first imaging modality, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI due to its inherent softtissue contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation remains invaluable modality in the evaluation of LBP. Aim: To find the common causes of LBP in different age groups and the role of MRI in detecting the spectrum of various pathological findings. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study done in the Department of Radiodiagnosis during a period of 2 years from July 2013 to July 2015. The study population includes all the cases referred to our department with complaints of LBP. Patients with ferromagnetic metallic implants and uncooperative cases were excluded. HITACHI 0.4 Tesla open MRI machine was used for imaging. Results and Conclusion: This study involved a total of 235 cases. There were 121 males and 114 females. The age of the patient ranged from 21 to 68 years with an average of 41.3 years. Back pain was commonly observed in the third to fifth decade. The common causes for back pain are disc herniations (disc bulge - 35.3%, disc protrusion - 39.6%, disc extrusion - 7.2% accounting to 82.1%, followed by normal study (10.2%, vertebral collapse (traumatic - 2.1%, osteoporotic - 1.7%, infections (2.1%, and neoplasm (1.7%. MRI provides valuable information regarding the underlying causes of LBP, especially in disc and marrow pathology.

  13. Investigating the capability to resolve complex white matter structures with high b-value diffusion magnetic resonance imaging on the MGH-USC Connectom scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiuyun; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Witzel, Thomas; Zanzonico, Roberta; Keil, Boris; Cauley, Stephen; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Tisdall, Dylan; Van Dijk, Koene R A; Buckner, Randy L; Wedeen, Van J; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    One of the major goals of the NIH Blueprint Human Connectome Project was to map and quantify the white matter connections in the brain using diffusion tractography. Given the prevalence of complex white matter structures, the capability of resolving local white matter geometries with multiple crossings in the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data is critical. Increasing b-value has been suggested for delineation of the finer details of the orientation distribution function (ODF). Although increased gradient strength and duration increase sensitivity to highly restricted intra-axonal water, gradient strength limitations require longer echo times (TE) to accommodate the increased diffusion encoding times needed to achieve a higher b-value, exponentially lowering the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquisition. To mitigate this effect, the MGH-USC Connectom scanner was built with 300 mT/m gradients, which can significantly reduce the TE of high b-value diffusion imaging. Here we report comparisons performed across b-values based on q-ball ODF metrics to investigate whether high b-value diffusion imaging on the Connectom scanner can improve resolving complex white matter structures. The q-ball ODF features became sharper as the b-value increased, with increased power fraction in higher order spherical harmonic series of the ODF and increased peak heights relative to the overall size of the ODF. Crossing structures were detected in an increasingly larger fraction of white matter voxels and the spatial distribution of two-way and three-way crossing structures was largely consistent with known anatomy. Results indicate that dMRI with high diffusion encoding on the Connectom system is a promising tool to better characterize, and ultimately understand, the underlying structural organization and motifs in the human brain.

  14. Symptoms and Cognitive Effects of Exposure to Magnetic Stray Fields of MRI Scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vocht, Frank Gérard de

    2006-01-01

    People working routinely with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems report a number of symptoms related to their presence in the inhomogeneous static magnetic fields (the stray field) surrounding these scanners. Experienced symptoms and neurobehavioral performance among engineers manufacturing

  15. Automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) in assessing breast cancer size. A comparison with conventional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girometti, Rossano; Zanotel, Martina; Londero, Viviana; Linda, Anna; Lorenzon, Michele; Zuiani, Chiara [University of Udine, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Integrata di Udine, Institute of Radiology, Department of Medicine, Udine (Italy)

    2018-03-15

    To compare automated breast volume scanner (ABVS), ultrasound (US) and MRI in measuring breast cancer size, and evaluate the agreement between ABVS and US in assessing lesion location and sonographic features. We retrospectively included 98 women with 100 index cancers who had undergone US and ABVS followed by 1.5T MRI. Images were interpreted by a pool of readers reporting lesion size, location and breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) features. Bland-Altman analysis (with logarithmic data transformation), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cohen's kappa statistic were used for statistical analysis. MRI showed the best absolute agreement with histology in measuring cancer size (ICC 0.93), with LOA comparable to those of ABVS (0.63-1.99 vs. 0.52-1.73, respectively). Though ABVS and US had highly concordant measurements (ICC 0.95), ABVS showed better agreement with histology (LOA 0.52-1.73 vs. 0.45-1.86, respectively), corresponding to a higher ICC (0.85 vs. 0.75, respectively). Except for posterior features (k=0.39), the agreement between US and ABVS in attributing site and BI-RADS features ranged from substantial to almost perfect (k=0.68-0.85). ABVS performs better than US and approaches MRI in predicting breast cancer size. ABVS performs comparably to US in sonographic assessment of lesions. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  17. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  19. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  20. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  2. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  3. Tolerance of magnetic resonance imaging in children and adolescents performed in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an open design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, B.; Cavallaro, A.; Radkow, T.; Alibek, S.; Bautz, W.A.; Holter, W.; Staatz, G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tolerance of MR examinations in children and adolescents performed in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an expanded bore diameter. Method and Materials: 163 patients, ages 4 to 25, underwent MR examinations in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an open design (MAGNETOM Espree, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), characterized by a compact length of 125 cm and an expanded 70 cm bore diameter. MR imaging of the brain was carried out in most cases (78.5 %), followed by examinations of the spinal canal (9.8 %), the extremities (9.2 %) and the neck (2.5 %). The patients were divided into four age groups and the success rate, motion artifacts and diagnostic quality of the MR examinations were assessed using a 3-grade scale. Results: In 119 of 163 patients (73.0 %), MR examination was possible without any motion artifacts. With respect to the different age groups, 41.7 % of the 4 - 7-year-old children, 67.6 % of the 8 - 10-year-old children, 84.1 % of the 11 - 16-year-old children and 95.8 % of the patients older than 17 showed tolerance grade I without motion artifacts and excellent diagnostic image quality. In 39 of 163 children (23.9 %), the MR images showed moderate motion artifacts but had sufficient diagnostic quality. With regard to the different age groups, 52.8 % of the 4 - 7-year-old children, 26.5 % of the 8 - 10-year-old children, 15.9 % of the 11 - 16-year-old children and none of the patients older than 17 showed tolerance grade II with moderate motion artifacts and sufficient diagnostic image quality. In only 4 of 124 children 10 years old, the MR examination was not feasible and had to be repeated under sedation. Conclusion: Pediatric MR imaging using a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an open design can be conducted in children and adolescents with excellent acceptance. The failure rate of 3.0 % of cases for pediatric MR imaging is comparable to that of a conventional low-field open MR scanner. (orig.)

  4. USPIO-labeling in M1 and M2-polarized macrophages: An in vitro study using a clinical magnetic resonance scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Chiara; Venneri, Mary A; Miglietta, Selenia; Caruso, Damiano; Porta, Natale; Isidori, Andrea M; Fiore, Daniela; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Laghi, Andrea

    2018-08-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate USPIO labeling in different macrophage populations using a clinical 3.0T MR unit with optical and electron microscopy as the gold standard. Human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells were differentiated into macrophages. Afterwards, M0 macrophages were incubated with IL-4 and IL-13 in order to obtain M2 polarized macrophages or with IFN-gamma and LPS for classical macrophage activation (M1). These groups were incubated with USPIO-MR contrast agent (P904) for 36 hr; M0, M0 + P904, M1 +  P904, and M2 + P904 were analyzed in gel phantoms with a 3.0T MR scanner. m-RNA of M1 and M2 markers confirmed the polarization of THP-1-derived macrophages. M2 + P904 showed a much higher T1 signal (p <  0.0001), a significantly lower (p < 0.0001) T2* signal, and significantly higher R* (p < 0.0001) compared to the other populations. Hystological analysis confirmed higher iron content in the M2-polarized population compared to both M1-polarized (p = 0.04) and M0-P904 (p = 0.003). Ultrastructure analysis demonstrated ubiquitous localization of P904 within the cellular compartments. Our results demonstrate that a selective USPIO-labeling of different macrophage populations can be detected in vitro using the 3.0T clinical scanner. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  6. Comparison between automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) versus hand-held ultrasound as a second look procedure after magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girometti, Rossano; Zanotel, Martina; Londero, Viviana; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara [University of Udine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, ' S. Maria della Misericordia' , Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, Udine (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the agreement between automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and conventional ultrasound (US) as a second-look (SL) tool for assessing additional findings found on MRI. Over a 7-month period, we prospectively assigned to SL-US and SL-ABVS all patients undergoing 1.5 T breast MRI in whom additional findings were found. Five experienced breast radiologists independently interpreted SL-US and SL-ABVS in blinded sessions to evaluate the detection rate of MRI findings and assign them to BI-RADS categories. We calculated the agreement between the two methods in assessing MRI findings as significant (BI-RADS 3-5) versus not significant (BI-RADS 1-2), as well as their cancer detection rate. In a population of 131 patients, SL-ABVS and SL-US showed a comparable detection rate of MRI findings (69.3 vs. 71.5%) (p > 0.05; McNemar test), with an almost perfect agreement in assessing them as significant or not (k = 0.94). This translated into a comparably high cancer detection rate (83.8% for SL-ABVS vs. 87.0% for SL-US). Only 1/31 cancers was missed by SL-ABVS. SL-ABVS and SL-US are nearly equivalent in assessing the significance of MRI findings, leading to a comparable cancer detection rate. SL-ABVS has the potential to replace SL-US in the SL scenario. (orig.)

  7. Minimally invasive neurosurgery within a 0.5 tesla intraoperative magnetic resonance scanner using an off-line neuro-navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursch, K; Gotthardt, T; Kröger, R; Bublat, M; Behnke-Mursch, J

    2005-08-01

    We evaluated an advanced concept for patient-based navigation during minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures. An infrared-based, off-line neuro-navigation system (LOCALITE, Bonn, Germany) was applied during operations within a 0.5 T intraoperative MRI scanner (iMRI) (Signa SF, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) in addition to the conventional real-time system. The three-dimensional (3D) data set was acquired intraoperatively and up-dated when brain-shift was suspected. Twenty-three patients with subcortical lesions were operated upon with the aim to minimise the operative trauma. Small craniotomies (median diameter 30 mm, mean diameter 27 mm) could be placed exactly. In all cases, the primary goal of the operation (total resection or biopsy) was achieved in a straightforward procedure without permanent morbidity. The navigation system could be easily used without technical problems. In contrast to the real-time navigation mode of the MR system, the higher quality as well as the real-time display of the MR images reconstructed from the 3D reference data provided sufficient visual-manual coordination. The system combines the advantages of conventional neuro-navigation with the ability to adapt intraoperatively to the continuously changing anatomy. Thus, small and/or deep lesions can be operated upon in straightforward minimally invasive operations.

  8. Comparison between automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) versus hand-held ultrasound as a second look procedure after magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girometti, Rossano; Zanotel, Martina; Londero, Viviana; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the agreement between automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and conventional ultrasound (US) as a second-look (SL) tool for assessing additional findings found on MRI. Over a 7-month period, we prospectively assigned to SL-US and SL-ABVS all patients undergoing 1.5 T breast MRI in whom additional findings were found. Five experienced breast radiologists independently interpreted SL-US and SL-ABVS in blinded sessions to evaluate the detection rate of MRI findings and assign them to BI-RADS categories. We calculated the agreement between the two methods in assessing MRI findings as significant (BI-RADS 3-5) versus not significant (BI-RADS 1-2), as well as their cancer detection rate. In a population of 131 patients, SL-ABVS and SL-US showed a comparable detection rate of MRI findings (69.3 vs. 71.5%) (p > 0.05; McNemar test), with an almost perfect agreement in assessing them as significant or not (k = 0.94). This translated into a comparably high cancer detection rate (83.8% for SL-ABVS vs. 87.0% for SL-US). Only 1/31 cancers was missed by SL-ABVS. SL-ABVS and SL-US are nearly equivalent in assessing the significance of MRI findings, leading to a comparable cancer detection rate. SL-ABVS has the potential to replace SL-US in the SL scenario. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  11. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  12. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  13. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  15. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  19. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  4. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  6. Occupational exposure measurements of static and pulsed gradient magnetic fields in the vicinity of MRI scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaennaelae, Sami; Toivo, Tim; Jokela, Kari [STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, PO Box 14, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Alanko, Tommi [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, New Technologies and Risks, Topeliuksenkatu 41a A, 00250 Helsinki (Finland)], E-mail: sami.kannala@stuk.fi

    2009-04-07

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have increased occupational exposure to magnetic fields. In this study, we examined the assessment of occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields and time-varying magnetic fields generated by motion in non-homogeneous static magnetic fields of MRI scanners. These magnetic field components can be measured simultaneously with an induction coil setup that detects the time rate of change of magnetic flux density (dB/dt). The setup developed was used to measure the field components around two MRI units (1 T open and 3 T conventional). The measured values can be compared with dB/dt reference levels derived from magnetic flux density reference levels given by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The measured motion-induced dB/dt values were above the dB/dt reference levels for both MRI units. The measured values for the gradient fields (echo planar imaging (EPI) and fast field echo (FFE) sequences) also exceeded the dB/dt reference levels in positions where the medical staff may have access during interventional procedures. The highest motion-induced dB/dt values were 0.7 T s{sup -1} for the 1 T scanner and 3 T s{sup -1} for the 3 T scanner when only the static field was present. Even higher values (6.5 T s{sup -1}) were measured for simultaneous exposure to motion-induced and gradient fields in the vicinity of the 3 T scanner.

  7. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  8. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  15. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  16. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia Martins; Setti, Marcela; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Meohas, Walter; Rezende, Jose Francisco; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  8. Obtaining Magnetic Properties of Meteorites Using Magnetic Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Nabelek, L.; Mazanec, M.; Simon, K.; Hruba, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic images of Murchison meteorite's and Chelyabinsk meteorite's thin section have been obtained from magnetic scanning system from Youngwood Science and Engineering (YSE) capable of resolving magnetic anomalies down to 10-3 mT range from about 0.3 mm distance between the probe and meteorite surface (resolution about 0.15 mm). Anomalies were produced repeatedly, each time after application of magnetic field pulse of varying amplitude and constant, normal or reversed, direction. This process resulted in both magnetizing and demagnetizing of the meteorite thin section, while keeping the magnetization vector in the plane of the thin section. Analysis of the magnetic data allows determination of coercivity of remanence (Bcr) for the magnetic sources in situ. Value of Bcr is critical for calculating magnetic forces applicable during missions to asteroids where gravity is compromised. Bcr was estimated by two methods. First method measured varying dipole magnetic field strength produced by each anomaly in the direction of magnetic pulses. Second method measured deflections of the dipole direction from the direction of magnetic pulses (Nabelek et al., 2015). Nabelek, L., Mazanec, M., Kdyr, S., and Kletetschka, G., 2015, Magnetic, in situ, mineral characterization of Chelyabinsk meteorite thin section: Meteoritics & Planetary Science.

  9. An industrial design solution for integrating NMR magnetic field sensors into an MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael; Lee, Yoojin; Nagy, Zoltan

    2018-08-01

    Neuroimaging research relies on the skills of increasingly multidisciplinary individuals and often requires the installation and use of additional home-built or third-party equipment. The purpose of the present work was the safe, ergonomic, durable, and aesthetically pleasing installation of magnetic field monitoring equipment into a scanner, while keeping the setup compatible with standard operating procedures. An extensive set of steps was required to design a 3D printed solution to install a magnetic field camera into the eight-channel head coil of a 3T MRI scanner. First, the outer surface of the plastic coil housing was recreated into a 3D model, and the installation of the magnetic field sensors around this 3D model was performed in a virtual environment. The 3D printed solution was then assembled and tested for safety, reproducible performance, and image quality. The 3D printed solution holds the probes in stable positions and guides the necessary cables in an organized fashion and away from the volunteer. Assembly is easy and the solution is ergonomic, durable, and safe. We did not find excessive heating in the 3D printed parts, nor in the electronics, that they help to incorporate. The material used interferes minimally with transmit B1+ field. The design met all of the boundary conditions for a durable, safe, cost-effective, attractive, and functional installation. This work will provide the basis for installing the magnetic field sensors into other available head coils, and for designing the experimental setup for projects with varying experimental requirements. Magn Reson Med 80:833-839, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  11. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  12. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  13. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalpe, I.O.

    1984-01-01

    A brief survey of the working principle of the NMR technique in diagnostical medicine is given. Its clinical usefulness for locating tumors, diagnosing various other diseases, such as some mental illnesses and multiple sclerosis, and its possibilities for studying biochemical processes in vivo are mentioned. The price of NMR image scanners and the problems of the strong magnetic field around the machines are mentioned

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  2. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  7. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  8. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  12. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  14. Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection Scanner for Imaging Magnetic Particles in Planar Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyobong; Lim, Eul-Gyoon; Jeong, Jae-Chan; Chang, Jiho; Shin, Sung-Woong; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-09

    The setup of a planar Frequency Mixing Magnetic Detection (p-FMMD) scanner for performing Magnetic Particles Imaging (MPI) of flat samples is presented. It consists of two magnetic measurement heads on both sides of the sample mounted on the legs of a u-shaped support. The sample is locally exposed to a magnetic excitation field consisting of two distinct frequencies, a stronger component at about 77 kHz and a weaker field at 61 Hz. The nonlinear magnetization characteristics of superparamagnetic particles give rise to the generation of intermodulation products. A selected sum-frequency component of the high and low frequency magnetic field incident on the magnetically nonlinear particles is recorded by a demodulation electronics. In contrast to a conventional MPI scanner, p-FMMD does not require the application of a strong magnetic field to the whole sample because mixing of the two frequencies occurs locally. Thus, the lateral dimensions of the sample are just limited by the scanning range and the supports. However, the sample height determines the spatial resolution. In the current setup it is limited to 2 mm. As examples, we present two 20 mm × 25 mm p-FMMD images acquired from samples with 1 µm diameter maghemite particles in silanol matrix and with 50 nm magnetite particles in aminosilane matrix. The results show that the novel MPI scanner can be applied for analysis of thin biological samples and for medical diagnostic purposes.

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  17. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  18. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  19. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  3. Parasellar meningiomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alair Augusto S.M.D. dos; Fontes, Cristina Asvolinsque P.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed 22 cases of patients with parasellar meningiomas evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in private clinics of the cities of Niteroi and Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Our aim was to characterize the imaging findings in this type of tumor. MRI scanners with 0.5 and 1.0 Tesla magnets were used for the acquisition of multiplanar T1-weighted (pre-and post-gadolinium administration) and T2-weighted images. The main symptoms observed were headache and visual disturbances. Hyperprolactinaemia was observed in only one patient. The most frequent imaging finding was a parasellar mass which appeared hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and enhanced intensively after gadolinium administration. MRI is useful to demonstrate the lesion and to asses the damage to adjacent structures, particularly when the patient presents visual disturbances due to involvement of the cavernous sinuses. (author)

  4. Indirect identification and compensation of lateral scanner resonances in atomic force microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D J; Youcef-Toumi, K; Fantner, G E

    2011-01-01

    Improving the imaging speed of atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires accurate nanopositioning at high speeds. However, high speed operation excites resonances in the AFM's mechanical scanner that can distort the image, and therefore typical users of commercial AFMs elect to operate microscopes at speeds below which scanner resonances are observed. Although traditional robust feedforward controllers and input shaping have proven effective at minimizing the influence of scanner distortions, the lack of direct measurement and use of model-based controllers have required disassembling the microscope to access lateral scanner motion with external sensors in order to perform a full system identification experiment, which places excessive demands on routine microscope operators. Further, since the lightly damped instrument dynamics often change from experiment to experiment, model-based controllers designed from offline system identification experiments must trade off high speed performance for robustness to modeling errors. This work represents a new way to automatically characterize the lateral scanner dynamics without addition of lateral sensors, and shape the commanded input signals in such a way that disturbing dynamics are not excited. Scanner coupling between the lateral and out-of-plane directions is exploited and used to build a minimal model of the scanner that is also sufficient to describe the nature of the distorting resonances. This model informs the design of an online input shaper used to suppress spectral components of the high speed command signals. The method presented is distinct from alternative approaches in that neither an information-complete system identification experiment nor microscope modification are required. Because the system identification is performed online immediately before imaging, no tradeoff of performance is required. This approach has enabled an increase in the scan rates of unmodified commercial AFMs from 1-4 lines s -1 to over

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  17. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  2. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool for extravehicular activity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, R.; Lorenz, C.; Peterson, S.; Strauss, A.; Main, J.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a means of conducting kinematic studies of the hand for the purpose of EVA capability enhancement. After imaging the subject hand using a magnetic resonance scanner, the resulting 2D slices were reconstructed into a 3D model of the proximal phalanx of the left hand. Using the coordinates of several landmark positions, one is then able to decompose the motion of the rigid body. MRI offers highly accurate measurements due to its tomographic nature without the problems associated with other imaging modalities for in vivo studies.

  4. Improved reliability in skeletal age assessment using a pediatric hand MR scanner with a 0.3T permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Yasuhiko; Kono, Saki; Uchiumi, Tomomi; Kose, Katsumi; Miyagi, Ryo; Yamabe, Eiko; Fujinaga, Yasunari; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the reliability and validity of skeletal age assessment using an open and compact pediatric hand magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scanner. We used such a scanner with 0.3-tesla permanent magnet to image the left hands of 88 healthy children (aged 3.4 to 15.7 years, mean 8.8 years), and 3 raters (2 orthopedic specialists and a radiologist) assessed skeletal age using those images. We measured the strength of agreement in ratings by values of weighted Cohen's κ and the proportion of cases excluded from rating because of motion artifact and inappropriate positioning. We compared the current results with those of a previous study in which 93 healthy children (aged 4.1 to 16.4 years, mean 9.7 years) were examined with an adult hand scanner. The κ values between raters exceeded 0.80, which indicates almost perfect agreement, and most were higher than those of the previous study. The proportion of cases excluded from rating because of motion artifact or inappropriate positioning was also reduced. The results indicate that use of the compact pediatric hand scanner improved the reliability and validity of skeletal age assessments.

  5. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic cervical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, S. K.; Lee, K. S.; Sohn, K. J.; Choi, S. S.; Won, J. J. [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iri (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of cevical injuries. MRI studies of 34 patients with cervical spinal injuries were analyzed retrospectively. All MRI scans were obtained with an 1.0T superconductive MRI scanner (Siemens Magnetom 42SPE) and their findings were analyzed regarding the spinal cord, bony spine, ligaments, and intervertebral disks. A variety of abnormal findings were detected: 25 cord abnormalities including cord compression (15 cases), cord edema (4 cases), syringomyelia (4 cases), myelomalacia (1 case), and hemorrhagic contusion (1 case), 18 ligamentous injuries, 22 disk herniations (9 post-traumatic, 13 chronic degenerative), 11 spine fractures, and 4 subluxations. MRI is useful in evaluating the spinal cord itself, in depicting ligamentous injuries, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in assessing the alignment of cervical spine.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strake, L. te; Persijn van Meerten, E.L. van; Trimbos, J.B.M.Z.; Paul, L.C.; Langeveld, J.W.; Bloem, J.L.; Bluemm, R.G.; Doornbos, J.

    1986-01-01

    This is an overview of the current applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the genitourinary tract based on the experience with the 0.5-Tesla MR scanner (Gyroscan, Philips) at the Leiden University Hospital and on reports in the literature. MRI appears to share some of the limitations of CT. MRI cannot reliably differentiate between a malignant and a benign tumor. In the staging of ovarian malignancies by means of MRI, bowel preparation would be desirable. On the other hand, the soft-tissue contrast resolution of MRI is superior to that of CT and images can be obtained in any plane. Thus MRI promises to be an accurate method for staging malignancies. The results in the examination of transplant kidneys are encouraging. It is expected that there will be a place for MRI as a complementary technique to ultrasonography in the diagnosis of scrotal disease. (Auth.)

  9. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  10. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  11. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  12. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the internal auditory canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, D.L.; Herfkins, R.; Koehler, P.R.; Millen, S.J.; Shaffer, K.A.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three patients with exclusively or predominantly intracanalicular neuromas and 5 with presumably normal internal auditory canals were examined with prototype 1.4- or 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. MR images showed the 7th and 8th cranial nerves in the internal auditory canal. The intracanalicular neuromas had larger diameter and slightly greater signal strength than the nerves. Early results suggest that minimal enlargement of the nerves can be detected even in the internal auditory canal

  14. Design of a synthesizer for magnetic resonance equipment using FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonora A

    2006-01-01

    This paper exposes the design of a direct digital synthesizer in FPGA. This desing can generate a sine wave output up to 4MHZ with 3,33 mHz of precision. The frequency is set by 32bit word of phase increment in 350ns. The desing was made for Magnetic Resonance scanners and uses a 97% of logic resources of device. Functions for the synthesizer control are implemented in the same chip

  15. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  16. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  17. [Surface coils for magnetic-resonance images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Alfredo Odón; Amador-Baheza, Ricardo; Rojas-Jasso, Rafael; Barrios-Alvarez, Fernando Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico, the development of this important medical imaging technology has been almost non-existing in our country. The very first surface coil prototypes for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging has been developed at the Center of Research in Medical Imaging and Instrumentation of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Iztapalapa). Two surface coil prototypes were built: a) a circular-shaped coil and b) a square-shaped coil for multiple regions of the body, such as heart, brain, knee, hands, and ankles. These coils were tested on the 1.5T imager of the ABC Hospital-Tacubaya, located in Mexico City. Brain images of healthy volunteers were obtained in different orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Since images showed a good-enough clinical quality for diagnosis, it is fair to say that these coil prototypes can be used in the clinical environment, and with small modifications, they can be made compatible with almost any commercial scanner. This type of development can offer new alternatives for further collaboration between the research centers and the radiology community, in the search of new applications and developments of this imaging technique.

  18. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  7. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  8. Magnetic resonance for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SYR

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance has been a cornerstone of nonradiative wireless power transfer (WPT) since the late 19th century. However, some researchers have the misconception that magnetic resonance for WPT was developed recently. This article traces some early work of Tesla and other researchers related to the use of magnetic resonance in WPT. Included are some examples of magnetic resonance-based WPT projects conducted by researchers in the biomedical and power electronics communities over the last ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Medical Imaging (MRI)-from the inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Paul

    There are about 36,000 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners in the world, with annual sales of 2500. In the USA about 34 million MRI studies are done annually, and 60-70% of all scanners operate at 1.5 Tesla (T). In 1982 there were none. How MRI got to be-and how it got to1.5T is the subject of this talk. Its an insider's view-mine-as a physics PhD student at Nottingham University when MRI (almost) began, through to the invention of the 1.5T clinical MRI scanner at GE's research center in Schenectady NY.Before 1977 all MRI was done on laboratory nuclear magnetic resonance instruments used for analyzing small specimens via chemical shift spectroscopy (MRS). It began with Lauterbur's 1973 observation that turning up the spectrometer's linear gradient magnetic field, generated a spectrum that was a 1D projection of the sample in the direction of the gradient. What followed in the 70's was the development of 3 key methods of 3D spatial localization that remain fundamental to MRI today.As the 1980's began, the once unimaginable prospect of upscaling from 2cm test-tubes to human body-sized magnets, gradient and RF transmit/receive systems, was well underway, evolving from arm-sized, to whole-body electromagnet-based systems operating at plan was to drop the field to 0.3T. We opted to make MRI work at 1.5T instead. The result was a scanner that could study both anatomy and metabolism with a SNR way beyond its lower field rivals. MRI's success truly reflects the team efforts of many: from the NMR physics to the engineering of magnets, gradient and RF systems.

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help your child pass the time. Some scanners are equipped with video monitors so ...

  13. Safety aspects in high-field magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlenweg, M.; Trattnig, S.; Schaefers, G.

    2008-01-01

    With more and more 3 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance (MR) scanners entering clinical routine, the safety notion in MR imaging has also reached a new dimension. The first part of this paper deals with the three most important sources of physical interaction (static magnetic field, gradient and HF fields). The paper discusses the differences compared with the traditional clinical 1.5 T standard scanners, the impact on human beings, the interactions with metallic objects and the relevant safety standards. The second part of the paper examines the issue of MR safety as seen in clinical practice and tries to demonstrate optimization potentials. This includes structural optimization in information distribution and hospital organization as well as test standards and labeling guidelines. (orig.) [de

  14. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.; Staedtisches Rudolf-Virchow Krankenhaus, Berlin

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness. (orig.) [de

  15. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  16. Italian registry of cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francone, Marco [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Cliniche Applicate e Biotecnologie, Università di L’Aquila (Italy); Cademartiri, Filippo [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pontone, Gianluca [IRCCS Centro Cardiologico Monzino (Italy); Lovato, Luigi [Policlinico S. Orsola Bologna (Italy); Matta, Gildo [Azienda ospedaliera G Brotzu Cagliari (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Maffei, Erica [Cardio-Vascular Imaging Unit, Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Monastier di Treviso, TV (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center University, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Pradella, Silvia [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi (Italy); Carbone, Iacopo [Department of Radiological, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Marano, Riccardo [Policlinico Gemelli, Università Cattolica Roma (Italy); Bacigalupo, Lorenzo [Ospedale Galliera, Genova (Italy); Chiodi, Elisabetta [Ospedale S. Anna Ferrara (Italy); Donato, Rocco [Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria G. Martino, Me (Italy); Sbarbati, Stefano [Ospedale Madre Giuseppina Vannini, Roma (Italy); De Cobelli, Francesco [IRCCS S. Raffaele, Università Vita Salute, Milano (Italy); Di Renzi, Paolo [Fate Bene Fratelli Isola tiberina, Roma (Italy); Ligabue, Guido; Mancini, Andrea [Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria Policlinico di Modena (Italy); Palmieri, Francesco [Diparimento di Diagnostica per immagini e radiologia interventistica, Ospedale S. Maria delle Grazie, Pozzuoli, Napoli (Italy); and others

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: Forty sites were involved in this multicenter and multivendor registry, which sought to evaluate indications, spectrum of protocols, impact on clinical decision making and safety profile of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and methods: Data were prospectively collected on a 6-month period and included 3376 patients (47.2 ± 19 years; range 1–92 years). Recruited centers were asked to complete a preliminary general report followed by a single form/patient. Referral physicians were not required to exhibit any specific certificate of competency in CMR imaging. Results: Exams were performed with 1.5 T scanners in 96% of cases followed by 3 T (3%) and 1 T (1%) magnets and contrast was administered in 84% of cases. The majority of cases were performed for the workup of inflammatory heart disease/cardiomyopathies representing overall 55.7% of exams followed by the assessment of myocardial viability and acute infarction (respectively 6.9% and 5.9% of patients). In 49% of cases the final diagnosis provided was considered relevant and with impact on patient's clinical/therapeutic management. Safety evaluation revealed 30 (0.88%) clinical events, most of which due to patient's preexisting conditions. Radiological reporting was recorded in 73% of exams. Conclusions: CMR is performed in a large number of centers in Italy with relevant impact on clinical decision making and high safety profile.

  17. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  18. A Rare Complication of Cochlear Implantation After Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Reversion of the Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Erkan; Doruk, Can; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Çelik, Mehmet; Polat, Beldan; Güldiken, Yahya

    2017-06-01

    Cochlear implants are mechanical devices used for patients with severe sensory-neural hearing loss, which has an inner magnet. It is proven that 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are safe to use in patients with cochlear implant. In our patient, the authors aim to introduce a rare complication caused after a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning and the management of this situation; the reversion of the magnet of the implant without displacement and significance of surgery in management.

  19. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  3. Resonant and nonresonant magnetic scattering (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open up new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and they fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin-polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging without contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martirosian, Petros; Graf, Hansjoerg; Schick, Fritz; Boss, Andreas; Schraml, Christina; Schwenzer, Nina F.; Claussen, Claus D.

    2010-01-01

    Principles of magnetic resonance imaging techniques providing perfusion-related contrast weighting without administration of contrast media are reported and analysed systematically. Especially common approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion imaging allowing quantitative assessment of specific perfusion rates are described in detail. The potential of ASL for perfusion imaging was tested in several types of tissue. After a systematic comparison of technical aspects of continuous and pulsed ASL techniques the standard kinetic model and tissue properties of influence to quantitative measurements of perfusion are reported. For the applications demonstrated in this paper a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) ASL perfusion preparation approach followed by true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP) data recording was developed and implemented on whole-body scanners operating at 0.2, 1.5 and 3 T for quantitative perfusion measurement in various types of tissue. ASL imaging provides a non-invasive tool for assessment of tissue perfusion rates in vivo. Images recorded from kidney, lung, brain, salivary gland and thyroid gland provide a spatial resolution of a few millimetres and sufficient signal to noise ratio in perfusion maps after 2-5 min of examination time. Newly developed ASL techniques provide especially high image quality and quantitative perfusion maps in tissues with relatively high perfusion rates (as also present in many tumours). Averaging of acquisitions and image subtraction procedures are mandatory, leading to the necessity of synchronization of data recording to breathing in abdominal and thoracic organs. (orig.)

  6. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner.

  7. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  10. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  12. Loop radiofrequency coils for clinical magnetic resonance imaging at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraff, O.

    2011-01-01

    To date, the 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner remains a pure research system and there is still a long way ahead till full clinical integration. Key challenges are the absence of a body transmit radiofrequency (RF) coil as well as of dedicated RF coils in general, short RF wavelengths of

  13. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tissue from which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the ... imaging based on the electrical activity of the heart, such as electrocardiography (EKG). MRI generally is not ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... tissue from which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the ... tissue structures of the body—such as the heart, liver and many other organs—is more likely ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... technologist through the two-way intercom. It is important that your child remain perfectly still while the ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local pain. Very rarely, patients are allergic to the ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... processes the imaging information is located in a separate room from the scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... processes the imaging information is located in a separate room from the scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ... may cause you and/or others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... radiologist and technologist will perform the examination while working at a computer outside of the room. If ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms return ... examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... you are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms ... MR spectroscopy, which provides additional information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... you are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms ... MR spectroscopy, which provides additional information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... is because traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... a parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Screening for adequate kidney function before considering a ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... The solution will drip through the IV to prevent blockage of the IV catheter until the contrast ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... The solution will drip through the IV to prevent blockage of the IV catheter until the contrast ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in ...

  20. A combined positron emission tomography (PET)- electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) system: initial evaluation of a prototype scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Mark; Stolin, Alexander V; Guggilapu, Priyaankadevi; Bobko, Andrey A; Khramtsov, Valery V; Tseytlin, Oxana; Raylman, Raymond R

    2018-04-20

    The advent of hybrid scanners, combining complementary modalities, has revolutionized imaging; enhancing clinical practice and biomedical research. In this project, we investigated the melding of two complementary, functional imaging methods: positron emission tomography (PET) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). The PET radiotracers can provide important information about cellular parameters, such as glucose metabolism. While EPR probes can provide assessment of tissue microenvironment, measuring parameters such as oxygenation and pH, for example. A combined PET/EPRI scanner has the promise to provide new insights not attainable with current imagers by simultaneous acquisition of multiple components of tissue microenvironments. In this investigation, a prototype system was created by combing two existing scanners, modified for simultaneous imaging. Specifically, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based PET scanner ring designed as a portable scanner was combined with an EPRI scanner designed for the imaging of small animals. The ability of the system to obtain simultaneous images was assessed with a small phantom consisting of four cylinders containing both PET and EPR tracers. The resulting images demonstrated the ability to obtain contemporaneous PET and ERP images without cross-modality interference. The next step in this project is the construction of pre-clinical PET/EPRI scanner for multi-parametric assessment of physiologically important parameters of tissue microenvironments. . © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  1. A combined positron emission tomography (PET)-electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) system: initial evaluation of a prototype scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Mark; Stolin, Alexander V.; Guggilapu, Priyaankadevi; Bobko, Andrey A.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Tseytlin, Oxana; Raylman, Raymond R.

    2018-05-01

    The advent of hybrid scanners, combining complementary modalities, has revolutionized the application of advanced imaging technology to clinical practice and biomedical research. In this project, we investigated the melding of two complementary, functional imaging methods: positron emission tomography (PET) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). PET radiotracers can provide important information about cellular parameters, such as glucose metabolism. While EPR probes can provide assessment of tissue microenvironment, measuring oxygenation and pH, for example. Therefore, a combined PET/EPRI scanner promises to provide new insights not attainable with current imagers by simultaneous acquisition of multiple components of tissue microenvironments. To explore the simultaneous acquisition of PET and EPR images, a prototype system was created by combining two existing scanners. Specifically, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based PET scanner ring designed as a portable scanner was combined with an EPRI scanner designed for the imaging of small animals. The ability of the system to obtain simultaneous images was assessed with a small phantom consisting of four cylinders containing both a PET tracer and EPR spin probe. The resulting images demonstrated the ability to obtain contemporaneous PET and EPR images without cross-modality interference. Given the promising results from this initial investigation, the next step in this project is the construction of the next generation pre-clinical PET/EPRI scanner for multi-parametric assessment of physiologically-important parameters of tissue microenvironments.

  2. Transition metal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregosin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Transition metal NMR spectroscopy has progressed enormously in recent years. New methods, and specifically solid-state methods and new pulse sequences, have allowed access to data from nuclei with relatively low receptivities with the result that chemists have begun to consider old and new problems, previously unapproachable. Moreover, theory, computational science in particular, now permits the calculation of not just 13 C, 15 N and other light nuclei chemical shifts, but heavy main-group element and transition metals as well. These two points, combined with increasing access to high field pulsed spectrometer has produced a wealth of new data on the NMR transition metals. A new series of articles concerned with measuring, understanding and using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the metals of Group 3-12 is presented. (author)

  3. Gaucher's disease: Magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Gomez-Pereda, R.; Blasco, A.; Ros, L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is to assess the role of magnetic resonance (MR) in determining the initial extension of Gaucher's disease and its complications. A retrospective study of eight patients diagnosed as having Gaucher's disease was carried out using MR. The study focused on pelvis, hip, femur, spine, liver parenchyma and splenic parenchyma. Infiltration of the cancellous portion of the vertebral bodies was observed in all but one of the patients. Three patients presented small hemangiomas in dorsal and lumbar vertebral bodies. Pelvic bone involvement was homogeneous in four cases and spotty in two, while the pelvic marrow was normal in the two patients with no vertebral infiltration. A vascular necrosis of the femoral head was detected in two cases. MR is very useful in determining the initial extension, in the early diagnosis of complications and in managing the posttreatment marrow response to assess the therapeutic efficacy. 16 refs

  4. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  5. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Lotx, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now accepted as an effective method of investigating a wide range of disorders, especially of the brain and spine. A short introduction on image contrast in MRI is given and the advantages and disadvantages for the different diseases of the brain is discussed. Excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capabilities and lack of ionising radiation are conspicuous advantages, and it is now established as the investigation of choice in a large number of clinical conditions, especially when the central nervous system is involved. However, it remains only one of a series of imaging modalities. A confident provisional clinical diagnosis is essential for establishing an imaging protocol and the intention should always be to reach a definitive diagnosis in the least invasive and most cost-effective way. 7 figs., 19 refs

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  9. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  11. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  12. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary diseases represent with wide variety of symptoms in regard with changes in the endocrine function. Magnetic resonance imaging has a crucial role in detecting the morphologic appearance in physiologic conditions, malformative diseases and acquired pathologies. The MR-imaging is established as the method of choice in assessing the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The pituitary gland is a complex structure with an important role in the homeostasis of the organism even though it is so small? It is surrounded by bony structures, vessels, nerves and the brain parenchyma. It consists of three parts - anterior called - adenohypophysis, posterior - neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. The anterior part comprises about 75% of the gland. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in detecting the pituitary gland. It is mainly used in cases of elevated intracranial pressure due to suspected apoplexy. The gland's small size, relation to other structures and its soft tissue characteristic make it an accessible region of interest for detecting with MR-imaging. The lack of ionizing energy and the technical advances in the MR-methods are responsible for the creating images with better spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. The examination is carried out on a standard protocol. It is important that thin slices are executed in sagittal and coronal planes. Performing a sequence, regarding the brain parenchyma is essential, since many malformations of the pituitary gland are associated with other congenital conditions. The examination starts with a T1W sequence to assess the normal anatomic condition of the gland. The intensity of the adenohypophysis is compared to the one in the pons. It is hypointense, whereas the neurohypophysis is hyperintense, due to the lipid neurosecretory granules transported along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. T2W-images in coronal plane are used to evaluate the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, olfactory

  15. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Mediated Radio Frequency Coagulation for Vascular Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming

    Purpose. Magnetic Resonance Mediated Radiofrequency Coagulation employs the RF heating effect of MRI scanning to coagulate biomaterials for repair of vascular defects. Coagulation of a protein biomaterial by MR-induced RF heating is a novel means to effect repair of defects such as aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. Our novel method is to coagulate a thermosetting material (such as egg white, which can be used for investigating heat coagulation behavior and MR relaxation properties) delivered endovascularly by catheter and coagulated by RF-induced heating of an intracatheter resonant wire antenna in the scanner. Methods. Experiments were performed on a Siemens 1.5 T MRI scanner and a Bruker 14T NMR spectrometer. Egg white was brought to equilibrium at seven temperatures (20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 37 °C) in sequence. Measurement of the water spin-lattice relaxation time Ti, spin-spin relaxation time T2, spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame T1p, or full width at half maximum of the MT spectrum were performed at each temperature. Relaxation parameters of raw egg white and egg white after coagulation at 70 °C were measured in the scanner at 20 °C to determine optimum inversion time, echo time and offset frequency for good image contrast between coagulated and uncoagulated protein. Finally, coagulation of egg white within a glass aneurysm phantom by RF heating in the scanner was performed to demonstrate the MR coagulation methodology and the ability to achieve image contrast between coagulated and uncoagulated biomaterial. Results. Water T2, T1p and MT gave the most definitive indication of the change from uncoagulated at low temperature to fully coagulated at 60 °C, while water T1 showed only the expected gradual increase with temperature, and no response to coagulation. MT weighted imaging is expected to be the optimum method to establish the coagulation condition of the biomaterial.

  17. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? High-quality images are assured only if your child is ...

  19. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  20. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  1. [Factors for Degaussing of a Cochlear Implant Magnet in the MR Scanner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koganezawa, Takumi; Uchiyama, Naoko; Teshigawara, Mai; Ogura, Akio

    This study examined the conditions influencing degauss of the magnet using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used to fix the measurement magnets to the MRI bed at angles from 0° to 180° for the magnetic flux vector of static magnetic field. The PMMA was moved in the MRI magnetic field. Magnetic flux density was measured before and after bed movement, and the rate of degauss was calculated. The contents examined are as follows: (1) the angle of the magnetic flux vector of the measurement magnets for the magnetic flux vector of the static magnetic field, (2) the number of movements, (3) moving velocity, and (4) the movement on the spatial gradient of magnetic field. Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical analysis of the data. In conclusion, the effect of the angle of the magnetic flux vector of the implant magnet was high under the conditions of degauss in this study. Therefore, during the MRI examination of a patient with a cochlear implant magnet, the operators identified the directions of the magnetic flux vector and static magnetic field of the implant magnet.

  2. Magnetic resonance in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jena, A.; Khushu, S.; Kakar, A.K.; Mishra, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of obstructive jaundice in whom ultrasound failed to demonstrate the site and/or the cause of obstruction of the biliary tract were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correctly diagnosing the site and cause of obstruction in 10 of 12 surgically proven cases. In one case of cholangiocarcinoma, the site of obstruction was well shown on MR but a definite cause could not be ascertained. In another patient who developed intermittent jaundice following surgery for choledochal cyst, MR demonstrated a solitary stone in the common hepatic duct. Surgical confirmation could not be achieved as the patient was lost to follow up. There were 6 cases of choledocholithiasis, 3 cases of gall bladder carcinoma and one case each of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. It is believed that MRI will provide obstructive jaundice and will be able to minimize the use of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in view of its ability to perform multiplanar imaging in multiple sequences. 11 refs., figs., 1 tab

  3. Low rank magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Gal; Weizman, Lior; Tal, Assaf; Eldar, Yonina C

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) is a relatively new approach that provides quantitative MRI using randomized acquisition. Extraction of physical quantitative tissue values is preformed off-line, based on acquisition with varying parameters and a dictionary generated according to the Bloch equations. MRF uses hundreds of radio frequency (RF) excitation pulses for acquisition, and therefore high under-sampling ratio in the sampling domain (k-space) is required. This under-sampling causes spatial artifacts that hamper the ability to accurately estimate the quantitative tissue values. In this work, we introduce a new approach for quantitative MRI using MRF, called Low Rank MRF. We exploit the low rank property of the temporal domain, on top of the well-known sparsity of the MRF signal in the generated dictionary domain. We present an iterative scheme that consists of a gradient step followed by a low rank projection using the singular value decomposition. Experiments on real MRI data demonstrate superior results compared to conventional implementation of compressed sensing for MRF at 15% sampling ratio.

  4. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  5. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  6. Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2003-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed. (topical review)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  8. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  9. Myositis ossificans: magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, R.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Concepcion, L.; Galant, J.

    1999-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is characterized by a benign, self-limiting, ossifying mass of the white tissue. In the present report, we describe the magnetic resonance (MR) images in three cases of myositis ossificans in pediatric patients, correlating the MR findings with those obtained with other radiological studies. The lesions were detected in three patients, two boys and one girl, ranging in age between 10 and 14 years. The nature of the lesion was confirmed histologically in all three cases. The MR images were obtained using superconductive units at 0.5 Teslas, with T1 and T2-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences. In two patients, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were also obtained. As in any process of maturation, the proliferation/maturation ratio depends on the moment in the course of the lesion, which affects its MR features,. In acute phases, the soft tissue mass with an intraosseous, perilesional adematous reaction predominates, while annular calcification and lesser edema are characteristic of subacute episode. Myositis ossificans is very rare in children. The inflammatory response may present a radiological pattern difficult to distinguish from that of aggressive tumor or infection, especially in the acute phase. (Author) 7 refs

  10. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  12. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  13. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  14. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  15. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  17. Fifty years of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Valderrama, Juan Crisostomo

    1997-01-01

    Short information about the main developments of nuclear magnetic resonance during their fifty existence years is presented. Beside two examples of application (HETCOR and INADEQUATE) to the structural determination of organic compounds are described

  18. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Newhouse, J.H.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Kistler, J.P.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The physical principles which underlie the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are presented in this primer. The major scanning methods are reviewed, and the principles of technique are discussed. A glossary of NMR terms is included

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  20. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  3. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  5. Combined preclinical magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. Initial results in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, M.G.; Mummert, T.; Jung, C.; Raabe, N.; Ittrich, H.; Adam, G.; Heinen, U.; Reitmeier, A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new radiologic imaging modality. For the first time, a commercial preclinical scanner is installed. The goal of this study was to establish a workflow between MPI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners for a complete in vivo examination of a mouse and to generate the first co-registered in vivo MR-MP images. The in vivo examination of five mice were performed on a preclinical MPI scanner and a 7 Tesla preclinical MRI system. MRI measurements were used for anatomical referencing and validation of the injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles during a dynamic MPI scan. We extracted MPI data of the injection phase and co-registered it with MRI data. A workflow process for a combined in vivo MRI and MPI examination was established. A successful injection of ferucarbotran was proven in MPI and MRI. MR-MPI co-registration allocated the SPIOs in the inferior vena cava and the heart during and shortly after the injection. The acquisition of preclinical MPI and MRI data is feasible and allows the combined analysis of MR-MPI information.

  6. Combined preclinical magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. Initial results in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, M.G.; Mummert, T.; Jung, C.; Raabe, N.; Ittrich, H.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Weber, O. [Philips Medical Systems DMC GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Heinen, U. [Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen (Germany); Reitmeier, A. [Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Animal Facility; Knopp, T. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new radiologic imaging modality. For the first time, a commercial preclinical scanner is installed. The goal of this study was to establish a workflow between MPI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners for a complete in vivo examination of a mouse and to generate the first co-registered in vivo MR-MP images. The in vivo examination of five mice were performed on a preclinical MPI scanner and a 7 Tesla preclinical MRI system. MRI measurements were used for anatomical referencing and validation of the injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles during a dynamic MPI scan. We extracted MPI data of the injection phase and co-registered it with MRI data. A workflow process for a combined in vivo MRI and MPI examination was established. A successful injection of ferucarbotran was proven in MPI and MRI. MR-MPI co-registration allocated the SPIOs in the inferior vena cava and the heart during and shortly after the injection. The acquisition of preclinical MPI and MRI data is feasible and allows the combined analysis of MR-MPI information.

  7. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  9. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo Viera, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis [es

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of muscle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Heiner, J.P.; Keene, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance scans were obtained on 17 patients with acute, subacute, or chronic muscle tears. These patients presented with complaints of persistent pain or a palpable mass. Magnetic resonance findings were characterized according to alterations in muscle shape and the presence of abnormal high signal within the injured muscle. These areas of high signal were noted on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans and were presumed to represent areas of intramuscular hemorrhage. (orig.)

  11. Clinical magnetic resonance: imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Bydder, Graeme; Griffiths, John; Iles, Richard; Styles, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This book begins with a readable, comprehensive but non-mathematical introduction to the basic underlying principles of magnetic resonance. Further chapters include information on the theory and principles of MRI and MRS, the interpretation of MR images, the clinical applications and scope of MRI and MRS, practical aspects of spectroscopy and magnetic resonance, and also the practical problems associated with the siting, safety and operation of large MRI and MRS equipment. (author)

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burl, M.; Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the rate of flow of a liquid in a selected region of a body by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are described. The method includes a sequence of applying a first magnetic pulse effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of a chosen nucleus within the liquid preferentially in a slice of the body which includes the selected region. A period of time (tsub(D)) is waited and then a second magnetic pulse is applied which is effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of the nuclei preferentially in the slice, and the free induction decay signal is measured. The whole sequence is repeated for different values of the period of time (tsub(D)). The variation in the value of the measured signal with tsub(D) is then related to the rate of flow of the liquid through the slice. (author)

  13. Extrusion of the medial meniscus in knee osteoarthritis assessed with a rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Piccazzo, Riccardo; Astengo, Davide; Camellino, Dario; Puntoni, Matteo; Muda, Alessandro; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the influence of weight-bearing on tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, including medial meniscal extrusion, by using a low-field (0.25 T) rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, and to analyse correlations of medial meniscal extrusion with the patient's Kellgren-Lawrence score, body mass index, and all the osteoarthritis features of the WORMS scoring system. Twenty-six patients (69.2% women and 30.8% men; mean age 67 ± 9.7 years) with medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were prospectively enrolled and MR sequences were acquired in both clino- and orthostatic position. MR images were assessed by two independent radiologists, according to the WORMS scale. Medial meniscal extrusion was measured and its clino-orthostatic difference (∆MME) was calculated. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of the WORMS Global Score readings was high by Cohen's K test (>0.81). No significant clino-orthostatic changes in the scoring parameters of the medial tibiofemoral joint were shown by Wilcoxon's test. Medial meniscal extrusion measured on orthostatic images was significantly higher than that measured in clinostatic position (p < 0.0001). At univariate analysis, the Kellgren-Lawrence score, WORMS Global Score, cartilage loss, meniscal damage, and osteophytes were significantly correlated to ∆MME (p < 0.005). Using a multiple regression model, tibiofemoral cartilage loss was found to correlate independently with ∆MME (p = 0.0499). Medial meniscal extrusion, evaluated with an open-configuration, rotating MR scanner, increased from the clinostatic to the orthostatic position. ∆MME, a new meniscal parameter, correlated with several important features of medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis.

  14. A haptic unit designed for magnetic-resonance-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Z T H; Elhawary, H; Rea, M; Young, I; Davis, B L; Lamperth, M

    2009-02-01

    The magnetic fields present in the magnetic resonance (MR) environment impose severe constraints on any mechatronic device present in its midst, requiring alternative actuators, sensors, and materials to those conventionally used in traditional system engineering. In addition the spatial constraints of closed-bore scanners require a physical separation between the radiologist and the imaged region of the patient. This configuration produces a loss of the sense of touch from the target anatomy for the clinician, which often provides useful information. To recover the force feedback from the tissue, an MR-compatible haptic unit, designed to be integrated with a five-degrees-of-freedom mechatronic system for MR-guided prostate biopsy, has been developed which incorporates position control and force feedback to the operator. The haptic unit is designed to be located inside the scanner isocentre with the master console in the control room. MR compatibility of the device has been demonstrated, showing a negligible degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio and virtually no geometric distortion. By combining information from the position encoder and force sensor, tissue stiffness measurement along the needle trajectory is demonstrated in a lamb liver to aid diagnosis of suspected cancerous tissue.

  15. Resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, P.I.; Kholodov, R.I.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in the approximation of weakly excited electron states in a strong external magnetic field is analyzed. The differential probability of this process in the Breit-Wigner form is obtained. The probability of double magnetic bremsstrahlung (second-order process of perturbation theory) is compared with the probability of magnetic bremsstrahlung (first-order process of perturbation theory)

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  2. Ultra-low power transmitter for encoding non-MR signals in Magnetic Resonance (MR) recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jan Raagaard; Pedersen, Jan Ole; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    collection of data from non-MRI sensors. The transmitter consumes only 1.3mW while transmitting 2.7µW at 120MHz with high frequency stability. The presented design is useful in low power applications requiring high frequency stability and is intended for wireless transmission of non-MR signal recordings......Advancing Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology requires integration of the MRI scanners with sensors and systems for monitoring various non-MRI signals. In this paper, we present design and integration of a low power AM radio transmitter into a 3T MRI scanner, which can be used for efficient...

  3. Magnetic islands created by resonant helical windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Heller, M.V.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-01-01

    The triggering of disruptive instabilities by resonant helical windings in large aspect-ratio tokamaks is associated to destruction of magnetic surfaces. The Chirikov condition is applied to estimate analytically the helical winding current thresholds for ergodization of the magnetic field lines. (Autor) [pt

  4. Topical questions in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines a number of practical questions concerning magnetic resonance imaging. These include the choice of operating magnetic field strength, the problem of siting and screening, a procedure for securing precise slice selection and the use of paramagnetic contrast agents. (author). 5 refs

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisvieux, A.

    1987-01-01

    Patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy and normal subjects were investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. To evaluate the NMR scanner possibilities, the results were compared with the echocardiographic investigation of the same patients. The capabilities of NMR imaging to provide information about intracardiac anatomy are emphasized. This study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of the techniques used to obtain NMR images and a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging for cardiac diagnosis [fr

  6. Basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahceli, S.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this book which is translated from English language is to explain the physical and mathematical basis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are nine chapters covering different aspects of NMR. In the firs chapter fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics are given at a level suitable for readers to understand NMR fully. The remaining chapters discuss the magnetic properties of nucleus, the interactions between atoms and molecules, continuous wave NMR, pulsed NMR, nuclear magnetic relaxation and NMR of liquids

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields

  10. Radiation dosimetry using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    A new dosimetry system for 3D dose distribution measurements based on the Fricke dosimeter and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed. The dosimeter consists of a ferrous sulphate solution incorporated in an agarose gel, which together constitute the dosimeter gel. The absorbed dose to the gel is measured by means of the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1 in an MR scanner. The dose distribution to an arbitrary slice within a dosimeter gel phantom can thus be determined. The chemical yield of the dosimeter gel is significantly higher than that of the for Fricke solution, and is strongly dependent of the initial ferrous sulphate concentration, assuming that the gel is bubbled with oxygen during preparation. A gel of 1.5 mM [Fe 2+ ] and 50 mM [H 2 SO 4 ] has a sensitivity of 0.108 s -1 Gy -1 and is linear up to 50 Gy. The dosimeter gel has uniform dose response over large volumes. Above 50 mM[H 2 SO 4 ] the yield increases only slightly, but the gel strength decreases and results in gel phantoms with non-uniform dose response. Below 50 mM[H 2 SO 4 ] the sensitivity of the dosimeter falls rapidly due to the decreased relaxivity of the ferric ions. The high chemical yield can be explained by a chain reaction and a reaction scheme is accordingly proposed. The dosimeter gel shows no dependence on dose rate or radiation quality and can be regarded as water-equivalent with respect to the interaction of the radiation. The diffusion coefficient of the ferric ions in the agarose gel is 1.19x10 -2 cm 2 /h. The diffusion blurs the dosimeteric image, but poses only a minor problem if the MR measurements are completed within the first two hours after irradiation. Dose distribution data from external radiation therapy units have been determined using the dosimeter gel and MRI with good accuracy, but the precision is poor, about 5-10%. (au) (84 refs.)

  11. Diagnostic apparatus employing nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, K.; Yamada, N.; Yoshitome, E.; Matsuura, H.

    1987-01-01

    An NMR diagnostic apparatus is described comprising means for applying a primary magnetic field to a subject; means for applying RF pulses to the subject to give nuclear magnetic resonance to the nuclei of atoms in the subject; means for applying gradient magnetic fields to project an NMR signal of the nuclei at least in one direction; means for observing the NMR signal projected by the gradient magnetic fields applying means; and arithmetic means for constructing a distribution of information on resonance energy as an image from an output signal from the observing means; wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means comprises means for applying the gradient magnetic fields at a predetermined time and for not applying the gradient magnetic fields at another predetermined time, during the time period of one view; and wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means further comprises means for measuring the NMR signal during the predetermined time when the gradient magnetic fields are applied, and means for measuring the intensity of the primary magnetic field during the other predetermined time when no gradient magnetic fields are applied

  12. A review of magnetic resonance imaging compatible manipulators in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhawary, H; Zivanovic, A; Davies, B; Lampérth, M

    2006-04-01

    Developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coupled with parallel progress in the field of computer-assisted surgery, mean that an ideal environment has been created for the development of MRI-compatible robotic systems and manipulators, capable of enhancing many types of surgical procedure. However, MRI does impose severe restrictions on mechatronic devices to be used in or around the scanners. In this article a review of the developments in the field of MRI-compatible surgical manipulators over the last decade is presented. The manipulators developed make use of different methods of actuation, but they can be reduced to four main groups: actuation transmitted through hydraulics, pneumatic actuators, ultrasonic motors based on the piezoceramic principle and remote manual actuation. Progress has been made concerning material selection, position sensing, and different actuation techniques, and design strategies have been implemented to overcome the multiple restrictions imposed by the MRI environment. Most systems lack the clinical validation needed to continue on to commercial products.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia: a morphometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 normal subjects were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging studies using a 1.5 T scanner. Axial and coronal T 2-weighted images were obtained. The volumes of the brain, intracranial, supratentorial, infratentorial and the total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometric methods. The volumes of the amygdala-hippocampus complex, para hippocampal gyrus cortex, putamen, globus pallidus, temporal lobe, gray and white matter of temporal lobe were also measured. These volumes were normalized using the intracranial volume as reference. The most relevant findings observed were reduced brain volume and increased total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes in patients with schizophrenia when compared to the controls. Patients with schizophrenia had also smaller amygdala-hippocampus complexes, temporal lobes and temporal lobe white matter than the controls, as well as increased putamen volumes. (author)

  14. Determination of cerebral perfusion using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ropele, S.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis deals with various magnetic resonance imaging methods to quantify cerebral blood flow. Special attention has been drawn to noninvasive methods. A new method based on the T1-shortening due to perfusion was developed using a multipoint inversion recovery sequence with alternating slice selective and non selective preparation. To study the influence of errors arising from partial volume effects with cerebrospinal fluid and from brain motion, numerous investigations have been performed on a clinical 1.5 Tesla scanner. In a second approach, the IVIM-method, which treats isotropic movement in the capillary network like diffusion, has been investigated. Since artifacts in phase encoding direction caused by brain motion are a common problem to most diffusion imaging techniques, a significant improvement has been achieved by the development and optimization of a single shot STEAM-sequence. This sequence proved to be less sensitive for motion artifacts, although a high signal to noise ratio has been preserved. (author)

  15. Optical Pumping Spin Exchange 3He Gas Cells for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Kim, A.; Jung, Y.; Woo, S.; Yurov, M.; Jang, J.

    2009-08-01

    We present a device for spin-exchange optical pumping system to produce large quantities of polarized noble gases for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). A method and design of apparatus for pumping the polarization of noble gases is described. The method and apparatus enable production, storage and usage of hyperpolarized noble gases for different purposes, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging of human and animal subjects. Magnetic imaging agents breathed into lungs can be observed by the radio waves of the MRI scanner and report back physical and functional information about lung's health and desease. The technique known as spin exchange optical pumping is used. Nuclear magnetic resonance is implemented to measure the polarization of hyperpolarized gas. The cells prepared and sealed under high vacuum after handling Alkali metals into the cell and filling with the 3He-N2 mixture. The cells could be refilled. The 3He reaches around 50% polarization in 5-15 hours.

  16. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vision or seizures help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... moveable examination table that slides into the center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  18. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn; Creber, Sarah A.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S.; Johns, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  20. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  1. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, N.X.

    1986-01-01

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  2. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... material called gadolinium, which is less likely to cause an allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell ... magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist know about them. ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be aware of them. Parents ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... the MRI equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... lodged in the eyes are particularly important. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so the radiologist should be ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will ... skin irritation at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... regular daily routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... fluid spaces within the brain (ventricles) causes of epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mala; Tanna, Neil; Margolies, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Silicone breast implants have significantly evolved since their introduction half a century ago, yet implant rupture remains a common and expected complication, especially in patients with earlier-generation implants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the primary modality for assessing the integrity of silicone implants and has excellent sensitivity and specificity, and the Food and Drug Administration currently recommends periodic magnetic resonance imaging screening for silent silicone breast implant rupture. Familiarity with the types of silicone implants and potential complications is essential for the radiologist. Signs of intracapsular rupture include the noose, droplet, subcapsular line, and linguine signs. Signs of extracapsular rupture include herniation of silicone with a capsular defect and extruded silicone material. Specific sequences including water and silicone suppression are essential for distinguishing rupture from other pathologies and artifacts. Magnetic resonance imaging provides valuable information about the integrity of silicone implants and associated complications.

  17. Numerical study of remote detection outside the magnet with travelling wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, M; Vázquez, F; Solís-Nájera, S; Rodriguez, A O

    2015-01-01

    The use of the travelling wave approach for high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging has been used recently with very promising results. This approach offer images one with greater field-of-view and a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio using a circular waveguide. This scheme has been proved to be successful at 7 T and 9.4 T with whole-body imager. Images have also been acquired with clinical magnetic resonance imaging systems whose resonant frequencies were 64 MHz and 128 MHz. These results motivated the use of remote detection of the magnetic resonance signal using a parallel-plate waveguide together with 3 T clinical scanners, to acquired human leg images. The cut-off frequency of this waveguide is zero for the principal mode, allowing us to overcome the barrier of transmitting waves at lower frequency than 300 MHz or 7 T for protons. These motivated the study of remote detection outside the actual magnet. We performed electromagnetic field simulations of a parallel-plate waveguide and a phantom. The signal transmission was done at 128 MHz and using a circular surface coil located almost 200 cm away for the magnet isocentre. Numerical simulations demonstrated that the magnetic field of the principal mode propagate inside a waveguide outside the magnet. Numerical results were compared with previous experimental-acquired image data under similar conditions

  18. Magnetic resonance enterography in pediatric celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Gonca; Doganay, Selim; Sevinc, Eylem; Deniz, Kemal; Chavhan, Govind; Gorkem, Sureyya B; Karacabey, Neslihan; Dogan, Mehmet S; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Aslan, Duran

    To assess if magnetic resonance enterography is capable of showing evidence/extent of disease in pediatric patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease by comparing with a control group, and to correlate the magnetic resonance enterography findings with anti-endomysial antibody level, which is an indicator of gluten-free dietary compliance. Thirty-one pediatric patients (mean age 11.7±3.1 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease and 40 pediatric patients as a control group were recruited in the study. The magnetic resonance enterography images of both patients with celiac disease and those of the control group were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists in a blinded manner for the mucosal pattern, presence of wall thickening, luminal distention of the small bowel, and extra-intestinal findings. Patient charts were reviewed to note clinical features and laboratory findings. The histopathologic review of the duodenal biopsies was re-conducted. The mean duration of the disease was 5.6±1.8 years (range: 3-7.2 years). In 24 (77%) of the patients, anti-endomysial antibody levels were elevated (mean 119.2±66.6RU/mL). Magnetic resonance enterography revealed normal fold pattern in all the patients. Ten (32%) patients had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes. Although a majority of the patients had elevated anti-endomysial antibody levels indicating poor dietary compliance, magnetic resonance enterography did not show any mucosal abnormality associated with the inability of magnetic resonance enterography to detect mild/early changes of celiac disease in children. Therefore, it may not be useful for the follow-up of pediatric celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Jaeckel, Maria [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging.

  20. Artifacts by dental materials on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a valuable method for evaluation of the head and neck. Unfortunately, metallic devices associated with certain dental fillings and appliances often cause variable artifacts that can obscure normal or pathologic conditions on MR and computed tomography. In this work, we assessed the MR appearance of dental prosthetic materials in vitro and in vivo including precious alloys, nonprecions alloys, resin, amalgam and titanium alloy. For in vivo studies, these materials were placed in healthy volunteer's mouths and then images were assessed. Analysis of the appearance of shape and extent of artifact, and observed influence of these artifacts on the image interpretation at 0.2 Tesla permanent type MR scanner were valuated. Material used as temporary or permanent filling of crowns such as amalgam, precious alloy and, microfilled resin did not cause artifact on the image. The size of the artifact produced by the nonprecious alloys was influenced by the ferromagnetism of the object and the volume prosthesis, and was related to the scanning sequence. Nonprecious alloys produced minimal local signal distortion, where precious alloys, and dental resin had no effect on the MR images in vivo. These results were mainly from a low field strength MR scanner used in this study

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  3. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sentman, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours. 16 references

  4. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, W.A. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Depts. of Neurosurgery; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; University of Minnesota Medical Center (MMC), Minneapolis, MN (United States); Truwit, C.L. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Neurology; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  5. Efficient bias correction for magnetic resonance image denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Qiu, Peihua

    2013-05-30

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a popular radiology technique that is used for visualizing detailed internal structure of the body. Observed MRI images are generated by the inverse Fourier transformation from received frequency signals of a magnetic resonance scanner system. Previous research has demonstrated that random noise involved in the observed MRI images can be described adequately by the so-called Rician noise model. Under that model, the observed image intensity at a given pixel is a nonlinear function of the true image intensity and of two independent zero-mean random variables with the same normal distribution. Because of such a complicated noise structure in the observed MRI images, denoised images by conventional denoising methods are usually biased, and the bias could reduce image contrast and negatively affect subsequent image analysis. Therefore, it is important to address the bias issue properly. To this end, several bias-correction procedures have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, we study the Rician noise model and the corresponding bias-correction problem systematically and propose a new and more effective bias-correction formula based on the regression analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. Numerical studies show that our proposed method works well in various applications. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. A compatible electrocutaneous display for functional magnetic resonance imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, V; Cappelli, C; Vanello, N; Ricciardi, E; Scilingo, E P; Giovannetti, G; Santarelli, M F; Positano, V; Pietrini, P; Landini, L; Bicchi, A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose an MR (magnetic resonance) compatible electrocutaneous stimulator able to inject an electric current, variable in amplitude and frequency, into the fingertips in order to elicit tactile skin receptors (mechanoreceptors). The desired goal is to evoke specific tactile sensations selectively stimulating skin receptors by means of an electric current in place of mechanical stimuli. The field of application ranges from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tactile studies to augmented reality technology. The device here proposed is designed using safety criteria in order to comply with the threshold of voltage and current permitted by regulations. Moreover, MR safety and compatibility criteria were considered in order to perform experiments inside the MR scanner during an fMRI acquisition for functional brain activation analysis. Psychophysical laboratory tests are performed in order to define the different evoked tactile sensation. After verifying the device MR safety and compatibility on a phantom, a test on a human subject during fMRI acquisition is performed to visualize the brain areas activated by the simulated tactile sensation.

  7. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.A.; Truwit, C.L.; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ill effects on pregnant women or their unborn babies. However, because the unborn baby will be in a strong magnetic field, pregnant ... intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 hours after contrast medium is ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... epilepsy (seizure) hemorrhage in selected trauma patients certain chronic conditions, such as multiple sclerosis disorders of the ... a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some ... Images related to Magnetic ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... MRI equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the ... use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to see, hear and speak with your child at all times using a two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... able to see, hear and speak with you at all times using a two-way intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and other cranial structures that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation and may require an injection of a ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensing device based on a piezoelectric array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Abbi; Masamune, Ken; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Lamperth, Michael; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a widely used medical technique, one of the drawbacks of which is the loss of direct sense of touch during the operation. Palpation is the use of fingertips to explore and make fast assessments of tissue morphology. Although technologies are developed to equip minimally invasive surgery tools with haptic feedback capabilities, the majority focus on tissue stiffness profiling and tool-tissue interaction force measurement. For greatly increased diagnostic capability, a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensor design is proposed, which allows minimally invasive surgery to be performed under image guidance, combining the strong capability of magnetic resonance imaging soft tissue and intuitive palpation. The sensing unit is based on a piezoelectric sensor methodology, which conforms to the stringent mechanical and electrical design requirements imposed by the magnetic resonance environment The sensor mechanical design and the device integration to a 0.2 Tesla open magnetic resonance imaging scanner are described, together with the device's magnetic resonance compatibility testing. Its design limitations and potential future improvements are also discussed. A tactile sensing unit based on a piezoelectric sensor principle is proposed, which is designed for magnetic resonance imaging guided interventions.

  18. Visual activation in infants and young children studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Leth, H; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether visual stimulation in sleeping infants and young children can be examined by functional magnetic resonance imaging. We studied 17 children, aged 3 d to 48 mo, and three healthy adults. Visual stimulation was performed with 8-Hz flickering light...... through the sleeping childs' closed eyelids. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed with a gradient echoplanar sequence in a l.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Six subjects were excluded because of movement artifacts; the youngest infant showed no response. In 10 children, we could demonstrate...... flow during activation. The different response patterns in young children and adults can reflect developmental or behavioral differences. Localization of the activation seemed to be age-dependent. In the older children and the adults, it encompassed the whole length of the calcarine sulcus, whereas...

  19. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy Morais, J.P.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Silva, L.P.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Bao, S.N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall

  20. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  1. resonant inverter supplied interior permanent magnet (ipm)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    [5] Zhenyue Hong, “DC-voltage link resonant inverters”, Department of Electrical and. Electronic Engineering University of. Canterbury, New Zealand. [6] Kalyan Kumar Halder, Naruttam Kumar Roy and B.C. Ghosh, “Position Sensorless. Control for an Interior Permanent Magnet. Synchronous Motor SVM Drive with ANN.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    1996-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing

  3. Pharyngeal branchial cyst: magnetic resonance findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerezal, L.; Canga, A. [Department of Radiology of the ' Santa Cruz' Hospital Liencres, Cantabria (Spain); Morales, C. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the ' Sierrallana' Hospital Torrelavega, Cantabria (Spain); Abascal, F.; Usamentiaga, E.; Bustamante, M. [Department of Radiology of the University Hospital ' Marques de Valdecilla' , Av. de Valdecilla s/n Santander 39008 (Spain); Olcinas, O. [Department of Pathology of the University Hospital ' Marques de Valdecilla' , Av. de Valdecilla s/n Santander 39008 (Spain)

    1998-11-01

    An unusual case of pharyngeal cyst in a 25-year-old man studied by Magnetic Resonance (MR) is described. Anatomic location and pathological findings indicated the second branchial pouch origin. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Pharyngeal branchial cyst: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezal, L.; Canga, A.; Morales, C.; Abascal, F.; Usamentiaga, E.; Bustamante, M.; Olcinas, O.

    1998-01-01

    An unusual case of pharyngeal cyst in a 25-year-old man studied by Magnetic Resonance (MR) is described. Anatomic location and pathological findings indicated the second branchial pouch origin. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soernes, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system

  6. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  7. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Soriano, G [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Zubieta, J L [Servicio de Neuroradiologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Delgado, G [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Villanueva, J A [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain)

    1994-04-01

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  8. Cryogenic Preamplifiers for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Daniel H.; Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Petersen, Jan R.

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing the ultimate limit of detection in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires cryogenics to decrease the thermal noise of the electronic circuits. As cryogenic coils for MRI are slowly emerging cryogenic preamplifiers are required to fully exploit their potential. A cryogenic preamplifier...

  9. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of xanthomatous meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Y.; Tsubokawa, T.; Tanaka, A.; Koshinaga, M.; Nemoto, N.

    1993-01-01

    A case of meningioma with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia occurring in the left frontal convexity of a 37-year-old woman is reported. The tumour was demonstrated as a hypodense mass with minimal enhancement on CT. Our findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging may provide a clue to the diagnosis of meningiomas with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia when CT is less specific. (orig.)

  11. Vascular anatomy in angiography for magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charry Lopez, Marco Luciano; Rivera Gomez, Juan Enrique

    1998-01-01

    A review of basic anatomical concepts and main variants, as well as some anatomical anomalies of the central nervous system vascularity, these concepts are considered essential for the interpretation of magnetic resonance angiography with time-of-flight (TOF) and phase-contrast (PC) methods

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, J C; Lowe, T W; Santos-Ramos, R; Cunningham, F G; Parkey, R

    1985-01-01

    Five patients with abnormal pregnancies were examined with ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR). Three had a malformed fetus, 1 had a molar pregnancy, and 1 had an ovarian mass. Both maternal and fetal structures were clearly shown, although fetal motion may have resulted in image degradation in some cases. The authors suggest that MR may be useful in obstetric diagnosis.

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive ... possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, it’s ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in sudden deafness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Hugo Valter Lisboa; Barros, Flavia Alencar; Penido, Norma de Oliveira; Souza, Ana Claudia Valerio de; Yamaoka, Wellington Yugo; Yamashita, Helio

    2005-01-01

    The etiology of sudden deafness can remain undetermined despite extensive investigation. This study addresses the value of magnetic resonance imaging in the analysis of sudden deafness patients.Study Design: transversal cohort.Material And Method: In a prospective study, 49 patients attended at otolaryngology emergency room of Federal University of Sao Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina, from April 2001 to May 2003, were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging.Results: Magnetic Resonance abnormalities were seen in 23 (46.9%) patients and revealed two tumors suggestive of meningioma, three vestibular schwannomas, thirteen microangiopathic changes of the brain and five (21.7%) pathological conditions of the labyrinth.Conclusion: Sudden deafness should be approached as a symptom common to different diseases. The presence of cerebellopontine angle tumors in 10.2% of our cases, among other treatable causes, justifies the recommendation of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance use, not only to study the auditory peripheral pathway, but to study the whole auditory pathway including the brain. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance studies of solid polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, R.

    1969-01-01

    This paper is a review of the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to solid polymers. In the first, theoretical part, the elements of the theory of NMR, which are necessary for the study of the properties of solid polymers are discussed: the moments method, nuclear relaxation and the distribution of correlation times. In the second part the experimental results are presented. (author) [fr

  16. Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are an essential part of modern healthcare. Marked increases in clinical demand for these imaging modalities are straining healthcare expenditure and threatening health system sustainability. The number of CT and MRI scans requested in ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederveen, D.; Bakker, C.J.G.; Scholten, F.G.; Feldberg, N.A.M.; Postma, J.H.; Vis, H. van der

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients suspected of having meniscal lesions, were examined bt magnetic resonance (MR) and arthroscopy, MR and arthroscopy corelate well for meniscal and cruciate ligament lesions. Damage of the articular cartilage was, however, not detected by MR (author). 15 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, S.R.; Birzgalis, A.R.; Ramsden, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Menieres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  20. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, I.

    1958-01-01

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D 2 O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10 -5 on the D 2 O concentration. (author) [fr

  1. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, J.; Soriano, G.; Zubieta, J.L.; Delgado, G.; Villanueva, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  2. Nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurgaliev, T.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of nonlinear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been studied theoretically by taking into account the interaction between NMR and FMR in the ferromagnets. The Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equations, describing the electron and nuclear magnetization behaviour in ferromagnets are presented in an integral form for a weakly excited electronic system. The stationary solution of these equations has been analysed in the case of equal NMR and FMR frequencies: the criteria for the appearance of two stable dynamic states is found and the high-frequency magnetic susceptibility for these systems is investigated. 2 figs., 8 refs

  3. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  4. Magnetic resonance study of maghemite-based magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, L.C.; Lacava, B.M.; Skeff Neto, K.; Pelegrini, F.; Morais, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the magnetic resonance (MR) data (X-band experiment) of 10.2 nm average diameter maghemite nanoparticle in the temperature range of 100-230 K. Maghemite nanoparticles were suspended as low-pH ionic magnetic fluid containing 2.3x10 17 particles/cm 3 . The temperature dependence of both resonance linewidth and resonance field of the zero-field-cooled sample as well as the resonance field of the field-cooled sample (angular variation experiment) was analyzed using well-established methodology. Information regarding particle size, particle clusterization and surface magnetic anisotropy were obtained from the analysis of the MR data. The number of magnetic sites per particle from the MR data is in excellent agreement with the number provided by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data. The demagnetizing field value obtained from the MR data indicates cluster of particles containing on average 1.42 particles. The MR angular variation data suggest that magnetoelastic effect accounts for the non-linearity observed for the surface component of the magnetic anisotropy

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  7. Magnetic resonance: safety measures and biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, I.; Lafuente, J.; Fernandez, C.; Barbero, M.J.; Cascon, E.

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of electromagnetic fields is currently a subject of great controversy. For this reason, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy are constantly under investigation. The source of the risk in MRI is associated with the three types of electromagnetic radiation to which the patient is exposed: the static magnetic field, variable (gradient) magnetic fields and radiofrequency fields. Each is capable of producing significant biological effects when employed at sufficient intensity. Patients exposed to risk sources are those situated within the lines of force of the magnetic field, ellipsoid lines that are arranged around the magnet, representing the strength of the surrounding field. To date, at the intensity normally utilized in MRI(<2T) and respecting the field limit recommendations established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use of this technique no adverse secondary biological effects have been reported. The known biological effects and other possible secondary effects are reviewed, and the recommended safety measures are discussed. (Author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author)

  9. The market for magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, L.

    1990-01-01

    The medical market is, at present, the most dominant market for low T c superconductors. Indeed, without magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there would hardly be a low T c superconductor market at all. According to the author, any development that can expand the medical market for MRI machines would be a welcome one. This paper reports how the recent advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are such a development. While the principle of MRS has bee around as long as MRI, only recently have advances in technique, computer programming and magnet technology allowed MRS to advance to a point where it may become an important technology-one that could increase the medical market for superconductors. The author discussed how MRS can be used to analyze oil core samples for their oil content, oil/water ratios, how the oil is bound and how to extract it

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.; Paprzycki, W.

    1993-01-01

    In the paper authors describe fundamental physical properties of a phenomenon of the radio-frequency excitation and relaxation of nuclei ordered in a strong magnetic field and the usefulness of MRI in medical diagnostic procedures. Basic interpretations principles of MR imaging due to signal intensity differences between organs and tissues in T 1 - and T 2 - weighted sequences and proton density are presented. Both, literature review and experience of authors suggest application of MRI in otolaryngology, it is illustrated by a lot of examples. The MR imaging studies were compared with results obtained from CT in otolaryngology field. (author)

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  15. Musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging: Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Fisher, C.F.; Fulmer, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior contrast, resolution, and multiplanar imaging capability, allowing excellent definition of soft-tissue and bone marrow abnormalities. For these reasons, magnetic resonance imaging has become a major diagnostic imaging method for the evaluation of many musculoskeletal disorders. The applications of magnetic resonance imaging for musculoskeletal diagnosis are summarized and examples of common clinical situations are given. General guidelines are suggested for the musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quibilan, E.I.

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  17. Physics of Magnetic Resonance. Chapter 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hee Kwon [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a property of nuclei in a magnetic field where they are able to absorb applied radiofrequency (RF) energy and subsequently release it at a specific frequency, goes back many decades to the early 1900s. Physicist Isidor I. Rabi, fascinated by the work of Otto Stern and Walther Gerlach which demonstrated that particles have intrinsic quantum properties, delved into the magnetic properties of nuclei, and in 1938 Rabi discovered the phenomenon of NMR. Several years later, in 1946, Felix Bloch and Edward Purcell refined the methods and successfully measured the NMR signal from liquids and solids. For their discoveries, Rabi received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1944 and Bloch and Purcell in 1952. While Rabi, Bloch, Purcell and other physicists working in this field had laid the foundations, a major discovery that transformed the NMR phenomenon for imaging was not made until 1973, when Paul Lauterbur developed a method for spatially encoding the NMR signal by utilizing linear magnetic field gradients. About the same time, Peter Mansfield had also discovered a means of determining the spatial structure of solids by introducing a linear gradient across the object. The idea of applying magnetic field gradients to induce spatially varying resonance frequencies to resolve the spatial distribution of magnetization was a major milestone and the beginning of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For their work, Lauterbur and Mansfield were awarded the Nobel Prize for medicine in 2003. Since its discovery, MRI has quickly become one of the most important medical imaging devices available to physicians today. Unlike other imaging modalities, such as X ray and computed tomography, MRI does not involve ionizing radiation. MRI also offers superior soft tissue contrast that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Furthermore, in MRI, the desired level of image contrast among different tissues can often be precisely controlled

  18. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...] Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Public Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to discuss factors affecting the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging...

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance in ferromagnetic terbium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, C.L.T.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic properties of terbium were studied by the method of zero field nuclear magnetic resonance at 1.5 to 4 and 85 to 160 0 K. Two unconventional experimental techniques have been employed: the swept frequency and the swept temperature technique. Near 4 0 K, triplet resonance line structures were found and interpreted in terms of the magnetic domain and wall structures of ferromagnetic terbium. In the higher temperature range, temperature dependence of the resonance frequency and the quadrupole splitting were measured. The former provides a measurement of the temperature dependence of the magnetization M, and it agrees with bulk M measurements as well as the latest spin wave theory of M(T) (Brooks 1968). The latter agrees well with a calculation using a very general single ion density matrix for collective excitations (Callen and Shtrikman 1965). In addition, the small temperature-independent contribution to the electric field gradient at the nucleus due to the lattice and conduction electrons was untangled from the P(T) data. Also an anomalous and unexplained relaxation phenomenon was also observed

  1. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  2. Investigations of functional and structural changes in migraine with aura by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    technology to study these features of migraine with aura (MA) is functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has the potential not only to detect, but also to localize hypersensitive cortex. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the cortical responsivity of patients with MA during.......e. ≥= 90% of auras occurring in the same visual hemifield (study II). To circumvent bias relating to differences between right and left hemispheres (e.g. caused by physiological left/right bias, asymmetry of the visual stimulation or magnetic field inhomogeneity of the scanner), we included an equal number...

  3. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  4. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in malformations of cortical development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celi Santos Andrade

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Malformations of cortical development (MCD result from disruptions in the dynamic process of cerebral corticogenesis and are important causes of epilepsy, motor deficits and cognitive impairment. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate phospholipids metabolism in vivo in a series of patients with epilepsy and MCD. Methods Thirty-seven patients with MCD and 31 control subjects were studied using three-dimensional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS at a 3.0 T scanner. Quantification methods were applied to the following resonances: phosphoethanolamine (PE, phosphocholine (PC, glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, inorganic phosphate (Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr, and a-, b-, and g-adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The magnesium (Mg2+ levels and pH were calculated based on PCr, Pi and b-ATP chemical shifts. Results Compared to controls, the MCD lesions exhibited lower pH values and higher Mg2+ levels (p<0.05. The lesions also presented significant reduction of GPC and PDE, and an increased PME/PDE ratio. The otherwise normal appearing parenchyma also demonstrated lower pH values in the frontoparietal cortex and bilateral centrum semiovale. Conclusions Our data support the idea that metabolic impairments occur in the lesions of MCD, with propagation to remote normal appearing parenchyma. The results also suggest that there are membrane turnover disturbances in MCD lesions.

  5. Real time magnetic resonance guided endomyocardial local delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, R; Badimon, J; Mizsei, G; Macaluso, F; Lee, M; Licato, P; Viles-Gonzalez, J F; Fuster, V; Sherman, W

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of targeting various areas of left ventricle myocardium under real time magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a customised injection catheter equipped with a miniaturised coil. Design: A needle injection catheter with a mounted resonant solenoid circuit (coil) at its tip was designed and constructed. A 1.5 T MR scanner with customised real time sequence combined with in-room scan running capabilities was used. With this system, various myocardial areas within the left ventricle were targeted and injected with a gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Indian ink mixture. Results: Real time sequencing at 10 frames/s allowed clear visualisation of the moving catheter and its transit through the aorta into the ventricle, as well as targeting of all ventricle wall segments without further image enhancement techniques. All injections were visualised by real time MR imaging and verified by gross pathology. Conclusion: The tracking device allowed real time in vivo visualisation of catheters in the aorta and left ventricle as well as precise targeting of myocardial areas. The use of this real time catheter tracking may enable precise and adequate delivery of agents for tissue regeneration. PMID:15710717

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has important applications in pharmaceutical research since it allows specific tissue and disease characterization in animal models noninvasively with excellent anatomical resolution and therefore provides improved ability to monitor the efficacy of novel drugs. The utility of NMR imaging in renal studies to monitor the mechanism of drug action and renal function in rats is described. The extension of the resolution of an NMR image to microscopic domain at higher magnetic field strengths and the utility of NMR microimaging in cerebrovascular and tumour metastasis studies in mice are discussed. (author). 40 refs., 14 figs

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1983-01-01

    In a method of investigating the distribution of a quantity in a chosen region of a body (E) by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques movement of the body during the investigation is monitored by probes (A, B C) (C extends orthogonally to A and B) attached to the body and responsive to magnetic fields applied to the body during the investigation. An apparatus for carrying out the method is also described. If movement is detected, due compensation may be made during processing of the collected data, or the latter may be re-ascertained after appropriate adjustment e.g. a change in the RF excitation frequency. (author)

  8. submitter A High Precision 3D Magnetic Field Scanner for Small to Medium Size Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bergsma, F; Garnier, F; Giudici, P A

    2016-01-01

    A bench to measure the magnetic field of small to-medium-sized magnets with high precision was built. It uses a small-sized head with three orthogonal Hall probes, supported on a long pole at continuous movement during measurement. The head is calibrated in three dimensions by rotation over the full solid angle in a special device. From 0 to 2.5 T, the precision is ±0.2 mT in all components. The spatial range is 1 × 1 × 2 m with precision of ±0.02 mm. The bench and its controls are lightweight and easy to transport. The head can penetrate through small apertures and measure as close as 0.5 mm from the surface of a magnet. The bench can scan complicated grids in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates, steered by a simple text file on an accompanying PC. The raw data is online converted to magnetic units and stored in a text file.

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lisa; Damodaram, Mellisa S; Allsop, Joanna M; McGuinness, Amy; Wylezinska, Marzena; Kumar, Sailesh; Rutherford, Mary A

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become an established technique in fetal medicine, providing complementary information to ultrasound in studies of the brain. MRI can provide detailed structural information irrespective of the position of the fetal head or maternal habitus. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) is based on the same physical principles as MRI but data are collected as a spectrum, allowing the biochemical and metabolic status of in vivo tissue to be studied in a non-invasive manner. (1)HMRS has been used to assess metabolic function in the neonatal brain but fetal studies have been limited, primarily due to fetal motion. This review will assess the technique and findings from fetal studies to date. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance studies of intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the last three or four years, nearly tow hundred papers have been published that used NMR or ESR spectroscopy to study compounds formed by the intercalation of molecules or ions into the van der Waals gap of a layered hast compound. The host lattices have ranged from the simple, such as graphite, to the complex, such as clay. In many cases, magnetic resonance techniques now enable one to obtain quite detailed information on even fairly complex intercalated species, on the nature of the changes in the host lattice accompanying intercalation, and on the nature of the interactions between the intercalant species and the host lattice. Magnetic resonance is used in conunction with many other techniques to obtain a fuller picture of these interesting systems, but this review will limit its focus to the use of NMR and ESR techniques. (author). 51 refs

  11. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  13. Classifying magnetic resonance image modalities with convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Samuel; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.; Roy, Snehashis

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging allows the acquisition of images with different contrast properties depending on the acquisition protocol and the magnetic properties of tissues. Many MR brain image processing techniques, such as tissue segmentation, require multiple MR contrasts as inputs, and each contrast is treated differently. Thus it is advantageous to automate the identification of image contrasts for various purposes, such as facilitating image processing pipelines, and managing and maintaining large databases via content-based image retrieval (CBIR). Most automated CBIR techniques focus on a two-step process: extracting features from data and classifying the image based on these features. We present a novel 3D deep convolutional neural network (CNN)- based method for MR image contrast classification. The proposed CNN automatically identifies the MR contrast of an input brain image volume. Specifically, we explored three classification problems: (1) identify T1-weighted (T1-w), T2-weighted (T2-w), and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) contrasts, (2) identify pre vs postcontrast T1, (3) identify pre vs post-contrast FLAIR. A total of 3418 image volumes acquired from multiple sites and multiple scanners were used. To evaluate each task, the proposed model was trained on 2137 images and tested on the remaining 1281 images. Results showed that image volumes were correctly classified with 97.57% accuracy.

  14. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bax, A.; Lerner, L.

    1986-01-01

    Great spectral simplification can be obtained by spreading the conventional one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum in two independent frequency dimensions. This so-called two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy removes spectral overlap, facilitates spectral assignment, and provides a wealth of additional information. For example, conformational information related to interproton distances is available from resonance intensities in certain types of two-dimensional experiments. Another method generates 1 H NMR spectra of a preselected fragment of the molecule, suppressing resonances from other regions and greatly simplifying spectral appearance. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy can also be applied to the study of 13 C and 15 N, not only providing valuable connectivity information but also improving sensitivity of 13 C and 15 N detection by up to two orders of magnitude. 45 references, 10 figures

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance - from molecules to man

    OpenAIRE

    Wüthrich, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Initial observations of the physical phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) date back to the late 1940s. In the following two decades high-resolution NMR in solution became an indispensible analytical tool in chemistry, and solid state NMR had an increasingly important role in physics. Some of the potentialities of the method for investigations of complex biological systems had also long been anticipated, and initial experiments with biological specimens were described already 30 year...

  16. OPTIMAL EXPERIMENT DESIGN FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE FINGERPRINTING

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Bo; Haldar, Justin P.; Setsompop, Kawin; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting is an emerging quantitative MR imaging technique that simultaneously acquires multiple tissue parameters in an efficient experiment. In this work, we present an estimation-theoretic framework to evaluate and design MR fingerprinting experiments. More specifically, we derive the Cram��r-Rao bound (CRB), a lower bound on the covariance of any unbiased estimator, to characterize parameter estimation for MR fingerprinting. We then formulate an optimal experi...

  17. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerose twins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polman, C.H.; UitdeHaag, B.M.J.; Koetsier, C.J.; Valk, J.; Lucas, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) examinations were performed in a series of 7 twin sets (4 monozygotic and 3 dizygotic) and one triplet set who were clinically discordant for multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI abnormalities were detected in a number of the unaffected members of the nonzygotic twin pairs. The authors discuss the possible implications of their findings for the present view on the aetiology of MS. (author). 3 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  18. Basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; MacLean, C.; Algra, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The intent of this book is to help clinicians understand the basic physical principles of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The book consists of the following: a discussion of elementary considerations; pulse sequencing; localization of MR signals in space; MR equipment; MR contrast agents; clinical applications; MR spectroscopy; and biological effects of MR imaging; a set of appendixes; and a bibliography. Illustrations and images are included

  19. BOLD magnetic resonance imaging in nephrology

    OpenAIRE

    Hall ME; Jordan JH; Juncos LA; Hundley WG; Hall JE

    2018-01-01

    Michael E Hall,1,2 Jennifer H Jordan,3 Luis A Juncos,1,2 W Gregory Hundley,3 John E Hall2 1Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Section on Cardiovascular Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a non-invasive modality that provides ana...

  20. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  1. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup....

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in MELAS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.; Phillips, S.; Enzmann, D.

    1990-01-01

    MELAS syndrome is a distinct clinical entity belonging to a group of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies characterized by the tetrad of myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings are reviewed in a patient with MELAS. Serial CT studies demonstrated multiple 'migrating' infarcts in various stages of evolution involving primarily the posterior temporal and occipital regions. MR was more sensitive than CT in demonstrating the number and extent of cortical lesions in this disease entity. (orig.)

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Dias Barranhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate and describe indications, mainly diagnoses and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings observed in clinical practice. Materials and Methods Retrospective and descriptive study of cardiac magnetic resonance performed at a private hospital and clinic in the city of Niterói, RJ, Brazil, in the period from May 2007 to April 2011. Results The sample included a total of 1000 studies performed in patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.2 years and predominance for male gender (57.2%. The majority of indications were related to assessment of myocardial perfusion at rest and under pharmacological stress (507/1000; 51%, with positive results in 36.2% of them. Suspected myocarditis was the second most frequent indication (140/1000; 14%, with positive results in 63.4% of cases. These two indications were followed by study of arrhythmias (116/1000; 12%, myocardial viability (69/1000; 7% and evaluation of cardiomyopathies (47/1000; 5%. In a subanalysis, it was possible to identify that most patients were assessed on an outpatient basis (58.42%. Conclusion Cardiac magnetic resonance has been routinely performed in clinical practice, either on an outpatient or emergency/inpatient basis, and myocardial ischemia represented the main indication, followed by investigation of myocarditis, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and myocardial viability.

  4. Image production by magnetic resonance: transparency via the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanel, A.

    1984-01-01

    The author gives a general description of the nuclear magnetic resonance technique to study the human body. The use of superconducting magnets to generate the required magnetic field is discussed. (G.T.H.)

  5. Clinical safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL infusion pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehn, Felix E.; Wood, Christopher P.; Watson, Robert E.; Hunt, Christopher H.; Mauck, William D.; Burke, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with implanted SynchroMed spinal infusion pumps (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) routinely undergo magnetic resonance imaging at our institution. In August 2008, Medtronic issued an urgent medical device correction report regarding several pumps. Because of the rare potential ''for a delay in the return of proper drug infusion'' and ''for a delay in the logging of motor stall events,'' ''a patient's pump must be interrogated after MRI exposure in order to confirm proper pump functionality.'' This is particularly important in patients receiving intrathecal baclofen, for whom a delay in return of proper pump infusion could lead to life-threatening baclofen withdrawal syndrome. The objective of this report is to present our experience and protocol of performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL pumps. We retrospectively reviewed records of 86 patients with implanted SynchroMed EL spinal infusion pumps who underwent 112 examinations on 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging scanners from September 1, 1998 to July 7, 2004. No SynchroMed EL pumps were damaged by magnetic resonance imaging, and the programmable settings remained unchanged in all patients. Our data suggest that SynchroMed EL pump malfunction is indeed rare after routine clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging examinations. However, based on the Medtronic correction report, we perform pump interrogation before and after imaging. (orig.)

  6. Clinical safety of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL infusion pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehn, Felix E.; Wood, Christopher P.; Watson, Robert E.; Hunt, Christopher H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mauck, William D. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Anesthesiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Burke, Michelle M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Patients with implanted SynchroMed spinal infusion pumps (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) routinely undergo magnetic resonance imaging at our institution. In August 2008, Medtronic issued an urgent medical device correction report regarding several pumps. Because of the rare potential ''for a delay in the return of proper drug infusion'' and ''for a delay in the logging of motor stall events,'' ''a patient's pump must be interrogated after MRI exposure in order to confirm proper pump functionality.'' This is particularly important in patients receiving intrathecal baclofen, for whom a delay in return of proper pump infusion could lead to life-threatening baclofen withdrawal syndrome. The objective of this report is to present our experience and protocol of performing magnetic resonance imaging in patients with implanted SynchroMed EL pumps. We retrospectively reviewed records of 86 patients with implanted SynchroMed EL spinal infusion pumps who underwent 112 examinations on 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging scanners from September 1, 1998 to July 7, 2004. No SynchroMed EL pumps were damaged by magnetic resonance imaging, and the programmable settings remained unchanged in all patients. Our data suggest that SynchroMed EL pump malfunction is indeed rare after routine clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging examinations. However, based on the Medtronic correction report, we perform pump interrogation before and after imaging. (orig.)

  7. Magnetically coupled Fano resonance of dielectric pentamer oligomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fuli; Li, Chang; He, Xuan; Chen, Lei; Fan, Yuancheng; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Weihong; Zhou, Ji

    2017-01-01

    We present magnetically induced Fano resonance inside a dielectric metamaterial pentamer composed of ceramic bricks. Unlike previous reports where different sizes of dielectric resonators were essential to produce Fano resonance, under external magnetic field excitation, central and outer dielectric bricks with identical sizes exhibit in-phase and out-of-phase magnetic Mie oscillations. An asymmetric line shape of Fano resonance along with enhanced group delay is observed due to the interference between the magnetic resonance of the central brick and the symmetric magnetic resonance of outer bricks. Besides, Fano resonance blueshifts with the increasing resonance of the smaller central brick. The thermal-dependent permittivity of ceramics allows Fano resonance to be reversibly tuned by 300 MHz when temperature varies by 60 °C. (paper)

  8. SQUID-detected magnetic resonance imaging in microtesla magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, Robert; Kelso, Nathan; Lee, SeungKyun; Moessle, Michael; Mueck, Michael; Myers, Whittier; Haken, Bernard ten; Seton, H.C.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Pines, Alex; Clarke, John

    2003-01-01

    We describe studies of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liquid samples at room temperature in microtesla magnetic fields. The nuclear spins are prepolarized in a strong transient field. The magnetic signals generated by the precessing spins, which range in frequency from tens of Hz to several kHz, are detected by a low-transition temperature dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) coupled to an untuned, superconducting flux transformer configured as an axial gradiometer. The combination of prepolarization and frequency-independent detector sensitivity results in a high signal-to-noise ratio and high spectral resolution (∼1 Hz) even in grossly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the NMR experiments, the high spectral resolution enables us to detect the 10-Hz splitting of the spectrum of protons due to their scalar coupling to a 31P nucleus. Furthermore, the broadband detection scheme combined with a non-resonant field-reversal spin echo allows the simultaneous observation of signals from protons and 31P nuclei, even though their NMR resonance frequencies differ by a factor of 2.5. We extend our methodology to MRI in microtesla fields, where the high spectral resolution translates into high spatial resolution. We demonstrate two-dimensional images of a mineral oil phantom and slices of peppers, with a spatial resolution of about 1 mm. We also image an intact pepper using slice selection, again with 1-mm resolution. In further experiments we demonstrate T1-contrast imaging of a water phantom, some parts of which were doped with a paramagnetic salt to reduce the longitudinal relaxation time T1. Possible applications of this MRI technique include screening for tumors and integration with existing multichannel SQUID systems for brain imaging

  9. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of tablet dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for measuring hydration, and its effects, during dissolution of tablets since it non-invasively maps (1)H nuclei associated with 'mobile' water. Although most studies have used MRI systems with high-field superconducting magnets, low-field laboratory-based instruments based on permanent magnet technology are being developed that provide key data for the formulation scientist. Incorporation of dissolution hardware, in particular the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus 4 flow-through cell, allows measurements under controlled conditions for comparison against other dissolution methods. Furthermore, simultaneous image acquisition and measurement of drug concentration allow direct comparison of the drug release throughout the hydration process. The combination of low-field MRI with USP-4 apparatus provides another tool to aid tablet formulation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.A.; Morrisett, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Several nuclei in lipoproteins are magnetically active and are thus potential NMR probes of lipoprotein structure. Table I lists the magnetic isotopes preset in the covalent structures of the molecular constituents of lipoproteins: lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Every type of nucleus that is part of the endogenous structure of these molecules has at least one magnetic isotope. Each magnetic nucleus represents an intrinsic and completely nonperturbing probe (when at the natural abundance level) of local molecular motion and magnetic environment. The NMR experiment itself is also nonperturbing and nondestructive. Table I also lists for each nucleus its nuclear spin, its natural isotopic abundance, its sensitivity, and its resonance frequency at two commonly employed magnetic in the low field range (21.14 kG or 2.11 Tesla) and the other in the high field range (47.0 kG or 4.70 Tesla). Of the nuclei listed in Table I, /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 31/P have been the primary ones studied in lipoproteins. The general advantages and disadvantages afforded by these and other nuclei as probes of lipoprotein structure are discussed. /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy, the method which has had the most extensive application (and probably has the greatest future potential) to lipoproteins, is treated in greatest detail, but many of the principles described apply to other nuclei as well

  12. Magnetic resonance phenomena in dynamics of relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternov, I.M.; Bordovitsyn, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    A relativistic generalization of Rabi's formula for magnetic resonance is given. On this basis, we consider fast and slow passage through resonance. We define a magnetic resonance exterior field as usual, using unit vectors of a Cartesian coordinate system, a homogeneous magnetic field, and the amplitude of a rotating magnetic field. For the description of spin dynamics we use the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation

  13. Nuclear resonance apparatus including means for rotating a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus including magnet apparatus for generating a homogeneous static magnetic field between its magnetic poles, shims of a magnetic substance mounted on the magnetic poles to apply a first gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in a direction orthogonal as to the direction of line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field, gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus for generating a second gradient magnetic field having a gradient magnetic field intensity distribution in superimposition with the static magnetic field and for changing the magnetic field gradient of the first gradient magnetic field, an oscillator for generating an oscillating output having a frequency corresponding to the nuclear magnetic resonance condition of an atomic nucleus to be measured, a coil wound around a body to be examined for applying the output of said oscillator as electromagnetic waves upon the body, a receiver for detecting the nuclear magnetic resonance signals received by the coil, a gradient magnetic field controller making a magnetic field line equivalent to the combined gradient magnetic fields and for rotating the line along the section of the body to be examined by controlling said gradient magnetic field generating electromagnetic apparatus and devices for recording the nuclear magnetic resonance signals, for reconstructing the concentration distribution of the specific atomic nuclei in the section of the body, and a display unit for depicting the result of reconstruction

  14. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was use...

  15. First national meeting of magnetic resonance and hyperfine interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    Works performed at CNEA's: Magnetic Resonance Division; Moessbauer Spectroscopy; Solid State Physics Division; Nuclear magnetic Resonance Laboratory and Theoretical Physics Group; Mossbauer Spectroscopy Group; Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance; Physics and Materials Group; Perturbed Angular Correlation and Moessbauer Spectroscopy and Physics Department. (M.E.L.) [es

  16. The particle concentration effect on magnetic resonance linewidth for magnetic liquids with chain aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, C.N.

    2002-01-01

    Based on the assumption of particle chains formation within a magnetic liquid, computer simulation of the magnetic resonance line is presented. The dependence on particle concentration within a magnetic liquid of magnetic resonance linewidth is analyzed. The computer simulation demonstrates that the particles chaining has an important effect on the enlargement of the magnetic resonance line. Increasing the particle concentration within magnetic liquid leads to an increase in the linewidth. The agreement with some experimental findings is discussed

  17. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  18. Symmetry adaptation, operator equivalents and magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibler, M.; Chatterjee, R.

    1977-12-01

    Basic quantities for symmetry adaptation are discussed in connection with molecular and solid state physics. This gives rise to a formalism whose the central elements are operator equivalents adapted to a point group. Such symmetry adapted operator equivalents are defined in terms of Schwinger operators so that they cover the off-diagonal and diagonal cases. Special emphasis is put on the applications of the formalism to magnetic resonance. More specifically, it is shown how to apply the formalism to the construction, the study of the transformation properties, and the determination of the eigenstates of a generalized spin hamiltonian. Numerous examples are given as well as key tables relative to the chain SO(3) for making easy the application of the formalism to electron paramagnetic resonance [fr

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  20. Nanodiamond graphitization: a magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panich, A M; Shames, A I; Sergeev, N A; Olszewski, M; McDonough, J K; Mochalin, V N; Gogotsi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the high-temperature nanodiamond-to-onion transformation. 1 H, 13 C NMR and EPR spectra of the initial nanodiamond samples and those annealed at 600, 700, 800 and 1800 ° C were measured. For the samples annealed at 600 to 800 ° C, our NMR data reveal the early stages of the surface modification, as well as a progressive increase in sp 2 carbon content with increased annealing temperature. Such quantitative experimental data were recorded for the first time. These findings correlate with EPR data on the sensitivity of the dangling bond EPR line width to air content, progressing with rising annealing temperature, that evidences consequent graphitization of the external layers of the diamond core. The sample annealed at 1800 ° C shows complete conversion of nanodiamond particles into carbon onions. (paper)

  1. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging

  2. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the characteristic hyperfine satellites in the spectra of the P1 centers. We discuss the mechanisms that cause both the strong reduction of the peak intensity of the ‘allowed’ lines in EPR spectra of triplet defects and the transformation of the P1 spectra.

  3. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Yasushi; Tasaka, Yasuyuki; Honjo, Iwao; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    1987-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx and the eustachian tube was performed in five patients with cleft palate and compared with the results of those without this anomaly. Various degrees of deformity of the eustachian tube cartilage were found in cleft palate patients. The levator veli palatini muscles were situated more laterally in cleft palate patients than in normal subjects. Also, changes in the position of these muscles after palatoplasty were clearly depicted by MRI. Besides several autopsy reports, this is the first demonstration of the characteristic anomaly around the eustachian tube by a non-invasive method.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckel, C.G.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Wicks, J.D.; Stevens, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    How does magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) currently contribute in the evaluation of patients with suspected heart disease? What role will MRI play in the future in evaluation of cardiovascular disease? To understand better where MRI fits into the diagnostic algorithm of cardiovascular disease the authors first consider the characteristics that they would like to see in the ideal diagnostic test and then survey the available cardiac diagnostic tests to note the characteristics that limit or recommend a test. In the final analysis, the justification for expensive diagnostic tests such as MRI must be an overall improvement in survival or quality of life in those patients treated after diagnosis

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, G.P.; Martin, B.; Tubiana, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-five magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies were performed in 18 patients with proven endometriosis. MRI findings were analyzed and compared with laparoscopic or surgical findings; MRI accurately demonstrated ovarian endometrial cysts as well as ectopic foci of endometriosis. Adhesions may be also suggested. Contrary to laparoscopy, MRI easily depicts both deep lesions and endometrial implants under the peritoneum. Consequently, MRI appears as an useful adjunct to laparoscopy for initial diagnosis before starting a medical treatment and above all as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of the answer to treatment, avoiding iterative and often adhesions limited laparoscopies. (author). 7 refs.; 9 figs

  8. New magnetic resonance imaging methods in nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morrell, Glen; Rusinek, Henry; Sigmund, Eric; Chandarana, Hersh; Lerman, Lilach O.; Prasad, Pottumarthi Vara; Niles, David; Artz, Nathan; Fain, Sean; Vivier, Pierre H.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Established as a method to study anatomic changes, such as renal tumors or atherosclerotic vascular disease, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to interrogate renal function has only recently begun to come of age. In this review, we briefly introduce some of the most important MRI techniques for renal functional imaging, and then review current findings on their use for diagnosis and monitoring of major kidney diseases. Specific applications include renovascular disease, diabetic nephropathy, renal transplants, renal masses, acute kidney injury and pediatric anomalies. With this review, we hope to encourage more collaboration between nephrologists and radiologists to accelerate the development and application of modern MRI tools in nephrology clinics. PMID:24067433

  9. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  11. Magnetic resonance in hearing loss and vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ángel MARTÍN-PÉREZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Hearing loss and vertiginous syndrome represent an important part of the otorhinolaryngology clinic. The role of the radiologist plays in their workup become fundamental. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are essential to guide or give the diagnosis in these cases. Method: After performing a retrospective analysis of 456 MRI studies of patients with these symptoms, we conducted a review of the main pathologies recorded that can cause these symptoms. Results: We classify into vascular disorders and other variants, tumor pathology, malformations and inflammatory pathology; We also describe the most relevant findings on MRI and illustrated with examples of our center.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yoshiaki; Imai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Sigeru; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Tateno, Yukio; Ikehira, Hiroo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive technique for visualization of the cardiovascular system, and is used to evaluate tissue characteristics, cardiac function and blood flow abnormalities, as well as to obtain morphological information. In this paper we presented results of clinical and laboratory research obtained using conventional spin echo MRI with regard to cardiovascular anatomy, tissue characterization and physiology. Furthermore, experience with two new techniques, cine-MRI and volume-selected MR spectroscopy, and their potential clinical usefulness in detecting cardiovascular diseases are documented. (author)

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance applications in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ling; Liu Maili

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a state-of-the-art technology which has been widely applied in biological systems over the past decades. It is a powerful tool for macromolecular structure determination in solution, and has the unique advantage of being capable of elucidating the structure and dynamic behavior of proteins during vital biomedical processes. In this review, we introduce the recent progress in NMR techniques for studying the structure, interaction and dynamics of proteins. The methods for NMR based drug discovery and metabonomics are also briefly introduced. (authors)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the male pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarque, J.L.; Rouanet, J.P.; Pujol, J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present their preliminary results in the investigation of the male pelvis by means of a 0.35 Tesla superconductor apparatus. They present the different sequences used. The signal of the various pelvic organs in man is analysed together with the different anatomical possibilities. Magnetic resonance imaging appears to present very important advantages. The authors consider that the major limitations involve the prostate: new sequences of investigation, in particular a long TR, should be used for the purposes of tissue differentiation [fr

  16. Resonant magnetic pumping at very low frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, Ernesto

    1978-01-01

    We propose to exploit for plasma heating purposes the very low frequency limit of the Alfven wave resonance condition, which reduces essentially to safety factor q=m/n, a rational number. It is shown that a substantial fraction of the total RF-energy can be absorbed by the plasma. The lowest possible frequency value is determined by the maximum tolerable width of the RF-magnetic islands which develop near the singular surface. The obvious interest of the proposed scheme is the low frequency value (f<=10 KHz) which allows the RF-coils to be protected by stainless steel or even to be put outside the liner

  17. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Alessandro; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has become an important tool to study in vivo certain biochemical aspects of brain disorders. In the last decade this technique has been applied to the in vivo investigation of pathophysiological aspects of psychiatric disorders, extending knowledge of the related brain alterations. This review will focus on providing some background to clarify technical and biochemical issues and it will describe the studies that have been performed in schizophrenia. The results will be framed in a more general context to highlight what we have learned and what remains to be understood from the application of this technique to schizophrenia

  18. Lateral patellar luxation: magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armesto, V.; Pulpeiro, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present the magnetic resonance (MR) findings associated with lateral patellar luxation. The series consisted of eight patients, all of whom presented joint effusion, damage to the medical retinaculum and cortical contusion or fracture of medical aspect of the patella or of anterolateral surface of the outer condyle. Five patients also presented patellar sub luxation. Diagnosis depends on the technique employed, with axial planes being very useful. Thus, it is recommended that they be used as the standard plane, especially in pathologies that are clinically unsuspicious as in this case. MR can also provide information that leads to surgical treatment rather than the standard conservative treatment. (Author)

  19. Indications for fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.

    2006-01-01

    Indications to perform fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are composed of common ones related to methodological problems of ultrasound (US) assessment (such as for instance hydramnios) and special ones. The latter are related to MR capability of high-resolution soft tissue contrast and an extended field of view that allows visualization of the whole fetus, even in later stages of pregnancy. The most important indications include confirmation of US findings, work-up of malformations with respect to individual prognosis and genetic background, differentiation between acquired conditions and malformations, visualization of pathologies that have to be treated surgically immediately after birth, and morphological changes of the placenta. (orig.) [de

  20. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic floor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Neeraj; Moshiri, Mariam; Lee, Jean H; Bhargava, Puneet; Dighe, Manjiri K

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction is largely a complex problem of multiparous and postmenopausal women and is associated with pelvic floor or organ descent. Physical examination can underestimate the extent of the dysfunction and misdiagnose the disorders. Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as a promising tool to evaluate the dynamics of the pelvic floor and use for surgical triage and operative planning. This article reviews the anatomy and pathology of pelvic floor dysfunction, typical imaging findings, and the current role of functional MR imaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deblaere, Karel; Achten, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of glenohumeral joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Rozing, P.; Doornbos, J.

    1987-01-01

    Through the application of oblique planes and flexible surface coil techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to be of great clinical value in the evaluation of a variety of pathologic conditions affecting the shoulder. In patients with joint effusions, the tendinous portion of the rotator cuff, glenoid labrum, and bicipital tendon can be readily visualized. This capability has particular relevance in patients with inflammatory disease and traumatic conditions. Rotator cuff atrophy and impingement of the coracoacromial arc upon the supraspinatus muscle and tendon can also be demonstrated. MRI is also useful in the evaluation of shoulder instability. (orig.)

  5. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, Karel [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital, MR Department - 1K12, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-01-15

    Because of its sensitivity and high tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for structural imaging in epilepsy. In this review the effect of using optimised scanning protocols and the use of high field MR systems on detection sensitivity is discussed. Also, the clinical relevance of adequate imaging in patients with focal epilepsy is highlighted. The most frequently encountered MRI findings in epilepsy are reported and their imaging characteristics depicted. Imaging focus will be on the diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis and malformations of cortical development, two major causes of medically intractable focal epilepsy. (orig.)

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance assessment of takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.; Sonnex, E.; Pereira, R.S.; Coulden, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an important condition that can be difficult to differentiate from acute coronary syndrome on the basis of clinical, electrocardiogram, and cardiac enzyme assessment alone. Although coronary angiography remains important in the acute assessment of patients with suspected takotsubo cardiomyopathy, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged over the last decade as an important non-invasive imaging tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of this condition. We present a review highlighting the CMR features of takotsubo cardiomyopathy and its complications with particular focus on differentiating this condition from acute myocardial infarction and myocarditis.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Mariko; Sekiya, Toru; Harada, Junta; Kawakami, Kenji; Tada, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the spinal disease. Using different pulse sequences T 1 value was obtained from 38 spines; the result showed that increased T 1 value indicated spinal marrow abnormalities. A comparative study of MRI and bone scintigraphy was performed in 18 patients. Although it was not feasible to evaluate effect of therapy in metastatic disease by MRI, diffuse bone marrow disease, such as diffuse bone marrow metastases and blood dyscrasia could be detected by MRI. This limited study will suggest applicability of MRI in the spinal disease. (author)

  8. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mollasadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices produce noise, which may affect patient’s or operators’ hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus. In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient’s hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  9. Nanoplatforms for magnetic resonance imaging of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cywinska, M. A.; Grudzinski, I. P.; Cieszanowski, A.; Bystrzejewski, M.; Poplawska, M.

    2011-01-01

    The application of biomedical nanotechnology in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is expect to have a major impact leading to the development of new contrast drug candidates on the nanoscale (1 - 100 nm) that are able to react with specific biological targets at a molecular level. One of the major challenges in this regard is the construction of nanomaterials, especially used in molecular MRI diagnostics of cancer in vivo, specialized antitumor drug delivery or real-time evaluation of the efficacy of the implemented cancer treatment. In this paper, we tried to gain further insights into current trends of nanomedicine, with special focus on preclinical MRI studies in translation cancer research. (authors)

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine. Present applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    At the workshop on nuclear magnetic resonance and medicine held at Saclay, the following topics were presented: physical principles of NMR; NMR spectroscopy signal to noise ratio; principles of NMR imaging; methods of NMR imaging; image options in NMR; biological significance of contrast in proton NMR imaging; measurement and significance of relaxation times in cancers; NMR contrast agents; NMR for in-vivo biochemistry; potential effects and hazards of NMR applications in Medicine; difficulties of NMR implantation in Hospitals; NMR imaging of brain tumors and diseases of the spinal cord; NMR and Nuclear Medicine in brain diseases [fr

  11. Cerebral fat embolism: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, A.; Barrena, R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Tejada, A.

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of 26-year-old man who presented clinical evidence of fat embolism following a traffic accident. Although computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed no abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed several scattered points of high intensity on T2-weighted and proton density (PD) images, with complete resolution of the lesions on follow-up scan. MRI is considered more sensitive than computed tomography in detecting these lesions, and may be useful for their diagnosis, correlating well with the clinical course. (Author) 10 refs

  12. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pediatric airway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auringer, S.T.; Bisset, G.S. III; Myer, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of the pediatric airway is often complex and may require multiple imaging techniques and invasive procedures. We performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the airway in 34 children with clinical evidence of chronic airway obstruction and compared MR findings with those obtained by surgery and/or endoscopy. MR diagnoses included vascular compression in 15 patients, primary tracheomalacic states in 12 patients, and mediastinal masses in 4 patients. Findings were normal for 3 patients. The MR findings were in agreement with the endoscopic findings in 25 to 28 cases and in agreement with the surgical findings in 21 to 21 cases. (orig./GDG)

  14. Magnetic resonance of the renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauquil, P.; Hiesse, C.; Say, C.; Verdier, J.P.; Cauquil, M.; Brunet, A.M.; Galindo, R.; Tessier, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for renal insufficiency. Progress of surgical techniques and immuno-suppression have lead to better results. One year graft survival rate are 80% in most series. In this article, the role of imaging in renal transplantation, is defined. In surgical complications (fluid collections, obstruction, vascular insufficiency) non invasive radiology and interventionnal radiologic procedures have a great impact. Despite the perspectives of duplex and magnetic resonance, sensibility and specificity are not yet specified in medical complications: rejection, acute tubular necrosis, infection, drug toxicity. Association of these lesions is frequent and complicate analysis of results. Finally, transplant biopsy is still necessary to confirm the diagnosis [fr

  15. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of parotid tumors, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akihiko; Yamashita, Toshio; Inoue, Toshiya; Kumazawa, Tadami; Kato, Tsutomu; Sawada, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1987-01-01

    We compared the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with that of X-ray computed tomography in the preoperative diagnosis of parotid tumors. We performed in 13 patients with parotid tumors and 10 of them were operated. The MRI equipment had a magnetic fild of 0.15 Tesla. We used the spine echo acquisition technique and a repetition time of 600, 1000 and 2000 milli-seconds, and echo time of 40 and 80 milli-seconds. We found that the T 1 weighted image well visualized the duct of the parotid gland, the T 2 weighted image provided fine pictures of the parotid tumor. The facial nerve of normal parotid glands could not be visualized by MRI. (author)

  17. Contrast Agent in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu-Quang, Hieu

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been employed as contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to improve sensitivity and accuracy in diagnosis. In addition, these contrast agents are potentially combined with other therapeutic compounds or near infrared bio-imaging (NIR) fluorophores to obtain...... theranostic or dual imaging purposes, respectively. There were two main types of MRI contrast agent that were synthesized during this PhD project including fluorine containing nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles. In regard of fluorine containing nanoparticles, there were two types contrast agent...... cancer cells for cancer diagnosis in MRI. F127-Folate coated SPION were stable in various types of suspension medium for over six months. They could specifically target folate receptor of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo thus enhancing the contrast in MRI T2/T2* weighted images. These are preliminary...

  18. Shimadzu magnetic resonance imaging system, SMT-50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Shiro; Nishida, Takayuki; Fujio, Yasuo

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, as a new modality of medical imaging, has already been put to practical applications on many clinical sites, through which a lot of clinical data has been accumulated. It can offer a powerful new probe of internal anatomy of the human body and its functions. Now that the MRI has established its effectiveness in diagnosis, a really practical MRI system which features high efficiency and economical design with high patient throughput is strongly called for. Introduced in this article is a superconductive magnet MRI system, SMT-50, operating at 5000 Gauss. It has realized an excellent diagnostic capability with such functions as multi-slice multi-echo imaging, high sensitive, surface coil technique and so on. High resolution image display (1024 x 1024 pixcel) unit and separate console system (viewing console and scanning console) will assist high patient throughput. The outline of the SMT-50 and its clinical data are reported here. (author)

  19. Degeneration of pyramidal tract of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Harada, Noboru; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Kinuta, Yuji; Okumura, Teizo; Niijima, Kyo; Taki, Waro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1988-01-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) examinaion was performed on cases of hemiplegia and hemiparesis. These included seven cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, four cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of cerebral infarct, and two cases of head trauma. The pyramidal tract in the brain stem was studied in five patients with complete hemiplegia and in nine with incomplete hemiparesis. The scanner of the MRI was a resistive type operating at a field of 0.2 Tesla. The inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) techniques were utilized. The pyramidal tract at the level of the midbrain and the pons was recognized as a low intensity area on the T 1 image (IR 1500/43) in the cases of complete hemiplegia. However, it was recognized as a high intensity area on the SR image (SR 1000/60) and the T 2 image (SR 2000/100). No abnormal signal intensity was found in the cases of incomplete hemiparesis. A low intensity area on the T 1 image and a high intensity area on the T 2 image were recognized in the ventral portion of the midbrain and the pons on the affected side. These findings indicate a degeneration of the pyramidal tract at the level of the brain stem in patients with complete hemiplegia. (author)

  20. Pituitary disease in childhood: utility of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela, A. C.; Oleaga, L.; Ibanez, A. M.; Campo, M.; Grande, D.

    2000-01-01

    To assess the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the study of pediatric patients with clinical suspicion of pituitary disease. We studied 18 patients aged 7 to 18 years.Fifteen had hormonal disturbances, two presented amenorrhea and 1 complained of headache, fever and symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia. All the patients were examined using a Siemens SP 42 1-Tesla MRI scanner. Sagittal and coronal T1-weighted spin-echo images were obtained; in addition T2-weighted spin-echo or fast spin-echo imaging was performed in ten cases and intravenous gadolinium was administered in nine. We found 9 patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesis, 2 with germinoma, 2 cases of pituitary hemosiderosis in patients with thalassemia, 2 cases of microadenoma, one abscess, one case of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus and one of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. MR enabled us to assess pituitary structural alterations in children with hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies. In our series of patients, hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesiss was the most frequent cause of adenohypophyseal deficiencies, and most cases of central diabetes insipidus were secondary to masses in the sellar and suprasellar region. In patients with thalassemia, T2-weighted MR images showed the amount of iron deposited in adenophypophysis. Gadolinium-enhanced studies were useful in the study of masses and when the presence of microadenoma was suspected. (Author) 26 refs

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torriani, Martin; Ouellette, Hugue; Etchebehere, Mauricio; Amstalden, Eliane M.I.

    2006-01-01

    Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) is a rare soft-tissue tumor with a deceptively benign histologic appearance affecting predominantly young adults during the fourth decade of life. (MR) imaging features of a surgically confirmed case of LGFMS, affecting the shoulder is presented. A 30-year-old man presented with a 20-year history of a painless slow-growing mass in the right shoulder. Magnetic resonance images were obtained on a 2.0T scanner (Elscint, Haifa, Israel), demonstrating a well-defined soft tissue mass measuring 12.0 x 7.0 x 9.0 cm located between the deltoid muscle, rotator-cuff muscles, and proximal humerus. The differential diagnosis of LGFMS includes several benign and malignant neoplasms containing variable amounts of myxoid and fibrous tissue. Histologically, the most important differential diagnosis is with myxofibrosarcoma. Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma is a rare soft tissue tumor with slow growth and deceptively benign histologic appearance. The possibility of LGFMS must be considered when elaborating differential diagnostic possibilities for young adults with a large soft tissue mass exhibiting MR imaging characteristics of intermixed fibrous and myxoid tissue

  2. Importance of magnetic resonance imaging in patients with fibrocystic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, G; Asik, E; Yazgan, A

    2011-01-01

    A proper detection of atypical epithelial hyperplasia (component of FCC) without missing the coexistent malign disease is the main problem in evaluating the FCC-affected patients. For some patients, it is not enough to use only mammography and ultrasonography in pursuit or decision biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be important in these patients. Nevertheless, the MRI features of FCC are not clearly known because there are very few studies specifically focused on FCC. Studies reporting on MRI of breast fibrocystic changes are very scarce and their MRI findings are not clearly known. The aim of this study was to determine the MRI characteristics of fibrocystic changes. Twenty-six patients with pathologically proven fibrocystic changes of the breast were retrospectively reviewed. The MRI study was performed using 1.5 T MR scanner with a phase array bilateral breast coil. The imaging protocol consisted of pre-contrast T1-weighted imaging and bilateral dynamic 3D contrast-enhanced imaging. The morphologic and kinetic features of fibrocystic changes on MRI were evaluated. Twenty-four patients showed benign enhancement kinetics (type 1), while 2 patients showed malignant enhancement kinetics (type 2). To our knowledge, the analysis of enhancement kinetics may be more useful in identifying atypical epithelial hyperplasia and cancer from other breast lesions provided that corrections are made for the true phase of menstrual cycle (Tab. 1, Fig. 1, Ref. 10).

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torriani, Martin; Ouellette, Hugue [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology. Div. of Musculoskeletal Radiology; Etchebehere, Mauricio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Ortopedia; Amstalden, Eliane M.I. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2006-06-15

    Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) is a rare soft-tissue tumor with a deceptively benign histologic appearance affecting predominantly young adults during the fourth decade of life. (MR) imaging features of a surgically confirmed case of LGFMS, affecting the shoulder is presented. A 30-year-old man presented with a 20-year history of a painless slow-growing mass in the right shoulder. Magnetic resonance images were obtained on a 2.0T scanner (Elscint, Haifa, Israel), demonstrating a well-defined soft tissue mass measuring 12.0 x 7.0 x 9.0 cm located between the deltoid muscle, rotator-cuff muscles, and proximal humerus. The differential diagnosis of LGFMS includes several benign and malignant neoplasms containing variable amounts of myxoid and fibrous tissue. Histologically, the most important differential diagnosis is with myxofibrosarcoma. Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma is a rare soft tissue tumor with slow growth and deceptively benign histologic appearance. The possibility of LGFMS must be considered when elaborating differential diagnostic possibilities for young adults with a large soft tissue mass exhibiting MR imaging characteristics of intermixed fibrous and myxoid tissue.

  4. Assessment of the sinus lift operation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, Figen Cizmeci; Duran, Serpil; Icten, Onur; Izbudak, Izlem; Cizmeci, Fulya

    2006-12-01

    Vertical bone loss in edentulous maxillary alveolar processes may necessitate a sinus lift before the placement of dental implants. We have measured and assessed maxillary sinuses meticulously before the operation and evaluated the postoperative results of the operation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen edentulous maxillary regions in eight patients were included in the study. The patients were examined 1 week before and 3 months after the sinus lift operations using a 1.5 T superconductive MR imager that gave oblique sagittal T2-weighted images with slices 2 mm thick without a gap. The images that were obtained 3 months after the sinus lift operations confirmed that vertical height had increased. We obtained high quality images without any artefacts during a short examination period with a high-resolution scanner. The results showed that it is possible to assess the maxillary sinus before the sinus lift and to evaluate the postoperative results using MRI accurately in three dimensions without the risk of radiation. This makes MRI a suitable alternative to computed tomography (CT).

  5. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  6. Deep-level defects in semiconductors: studies by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerlaan, C.A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This work is divided into two parts. In the first one, the following topics are discussed: paramagnetic centers in semiconductors, principles of magnetic resonance, spin-Hamiltonian, g-tensor, hyperfine interaction, magnetic resonance spectrometer. In the second part it is dicussed defects studied by magnetic resonance including vacancy and divacancy in silicon, iron in silicon, nitrogen in diamond and antisite defects in III-V compounds. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging

  8. Suppressing magnetic island growth by resonant magnetic perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q.; Günter, S.; Lackner, K.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the growth of magnetic islands is investigated based on two-fluid equations. It is found that if the local bi-normal electron fluid velocity at the resonant surface is sufficiently large, static RMPs of the same helicity and of moderate amplitude can suppress the growth of magnetic islands in high-temperature plasmas. These islands will otherwise grow, driven by an unfavorable plasma current density profile and bootstrap current perturbation. These results indicate that the error field can stabilize island growth, if the error field amplitude is not too large and the local bi-normal electron fluid velocity is not too low. They also indicate that applied rotating RMPs with an appropriate frequency can be utilized to suppress island growth in high-temperature plasmas, even for a low bi-normal electron fluid velocity. A significant change in the local equilibrium plasma current density gradient by small amplitude RMPs is found for realistic plasma parameters, which are important for the island stability and are expected to be more important for fusion reactors with low plasma resistivity.

  9. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Assmentment of myocardial perfusion by magnetic resonance imaging: on the way to clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.E.; Lorenz, C.H.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging detects the flow of contrast - enhanced blood and even allows the quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion. The clinical application of this method is being held back by the difficulties in image evaluation and the limitation of standard techniques to the acquisition of a single slice per heart beat cycle. Recent developments in scanner hardware as well as in image acquisition techniques open up the possibility of assessing myocardial perfusion over the entire heart with a spatial resolution in the range of 2 mm. As an example of such a new scanning strategy, a segmented gradient-echo recalled echo planar imaging sequence with preceding saturation is discussed and results in a patient with an infarction are presented. The clinical use of perfusion assessment covering the entire heart for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease is enhanced by the flexibility of magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of functional cardiac parameters. (orig.) [de

  11. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. II. The heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messner, Nadja M.; Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    One third of all deaths worldwide in 2008 were caused by cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and the incidence of CVD related deaths rises ever more. Thus, improved imaging techniques and modalities are needed for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is a minimally invasive technique that is increasingly important due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, its high soft tissue contrast and its ability of functional and quantitative imaging. It is widely accepted as the gold standard of cardiac functional analysis. In the short period of small animal MRI, remarkable progress has been achieved concerning new, fast imaging schemes as well as purpose-built equipment. Dedicated small animal scanners allow for tapping the full potential of recently developed animal models of cardiac disease. In this paper, we review state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques and applications in small animals at ultra-high fields (UHF).

  12. A 2-in-1 single-element coil design for transcranial magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai; Wang, Shumin

    2018-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of turning transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil for MRI signal reception. A critically coupled network was formed by using a resonated turn of TMS coil as the secondary and a regular radiofrequency (RF) coil as the primary. A third coil was positioned between the two coils for detuning during RF transmission. Bench measurement, numerical simulation, and MRI experiment were performed for validation. The signal-to-noise ratio of the proposed 2-in-1 coil is 35% higher in its field of view, compared with a MRI-only reference coil of the same size, made by the same material, and backed up by an untuned TMS coil, but lower than a RF surface coil of the same size without any TMS coil nearby. Spin-echo images of the human brain further validated its performance. The proposed method can transform TMS coil for MRI signal acquisition with virtually no modifications on the TMS side. It not only enables flexible and close positioning of TMS coil inside MRI scanner, but also improves the signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional implementations. It can be applied as a building block for developing advanced concurrent TMS/MRI hardware. Magn Reson Med 79:582-587, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance in cardiology: cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Claudio C.

    2003-01-01

    As a new gold standard for mass, volume and flow, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is probably the most rapidly evolving technique in the cardiovascular diagnosis. An integrated cardiac MRI examination allows the evaluation of morphology, global and regional function, coronary anatomy, perfusion, viability and myocardial metabolism, all of them in only one diagnostic test and in a totally noninvasive manner. The surgeons can obtain relevant information on all aspects of diseases of the heart and great vessels, which include anatomical details and relationships with the greatest field of view, and may help to reduce the number of invasive procedures required in pre and postoperative evaluation. However, despite these excellent advantages the present clinical utilization of MRI is still too often restricted to few pathologies or case studies in which other techniques fail to identify the cardiac or cardiovascular abnormalities. If magnetic resonance is an excellent method for diagnosing so many different cardiac conditions, why is so little it used in routine cardiac practice? Cardiologists are still not very familiar with the huge possibilities or cardiovascular MRI utilities. Our intention is to give a comprehensive survey of many of the clinical applications of this challenger technique in the study of the heart and great vessels. Those who continue to ignore this important and mature imaging technique will rightly fail to benefit. (author) [es

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Ozmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Akata, Deniz; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2016-12-01

    Liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the gold standard in liver metastasis detection and treatment response assessment. The most sensitive magnetic resonance sequences are diffusion-weighted images and hepatobiliary phase images after Gd-EOB-DTPA. Peripheral ring enhancement, diffusion restriction, and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images are hallmarks of liver metastases. In patients with normal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT findings and high clinical suspicion of metastasis, MRI should be performed for diagnosis of unseen metastasis. In melanoma, colon cancer, and neuroendocrine tumor metastases, MRI allows confident diagnosis of treatment-related changes in liver and enables differential diagnosis from primary liver tumors. Focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules in patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, hypersteatosis, and focal fat can mimic metastasis. In cancer patients with fatty liver, MRI should be preferred to CT. Although the first-line imaging for metastases is CT, MRI can be used as a problem-solving method. MRI may be used as the first-line method in patients who would undergo curative surgery or metastatectomy. Current limitation of MRI is low sensitivity for metastasis smaller than 3mm. MRI fingerprinting, glucoCEST MRI, and PET-MRI may allow simpler and more sensitive diagnosis of liver metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Smart Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Célia S; Tóth, Éva

    2016-01-01

    By visualizing bioactive molecules or biological parameters in vivo, molecular imaging is searching for information at the molecular level in living organisms. In addition to contributing to earlier and more personalized diagnosis in medicine, it also helps understand and rationalize the molecular factors underlying physiological and pathological processes. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), complexes of paramagnetic metal ions, mostly lanthanides, are commonly used to enhance the intrinsic image contrast. They rely either on the relaxation effect of these metal chelates (T(1) agents), or on the phenomenon of paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST agents). In both cases, responsive molecular magnetic resonance imaging probes can be designed to report on various biomarkers of biological interest. In this context, we review recent work in the literature and from our group on responsive T(1) and PARACEST MRI agents for the detection of biogenic metal ions (such as calcium or zinc), enzymatic activities, or neurotransmitter release. These examples illustrate the general strategies that can be applied to create molecular imaging agents with an MRI detectable response to biologically relevant parameters.

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, L.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1 H, 31 P, 13 C, 23 Na, 7 Li, 19 F, 14 N, 15 N, 17 O, 39 K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1 H and 31 P. This lecture is focused on Proton ( 1 H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility

  20. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomsdorf, H.; Imme, M.; Jensen, D.; Kunz, D.; Menhardt, W.; Ottenberg, K.; Roeschmann, P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Tschendel, O.; Wieland, J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental Magnetic Resonance (MR) system with 4 tesla flux density was set up. For that purpose a data acquisition system and RF coils for resonance frequencies up to 170 MHz were developed. Methods for image guided spectroscopy as well as spectroscopic imaging focussing on the nuclei 1 H and 13 C were developed and tested on volunteers and selected patients. The advantages of the high field strength with respect to spectroscopic studies were demonstrated. Developments of a new fast imaging technique for the acquisition of scout images as well as a method for mapping and displaying the magnetic field inhomogeneity in-vivo represent contributions to the optimisation of the experimental procedure in spectroscopic studies. Investigations on the interaction of RF radiation with the exposed tissue allowed conclusions regarding the applicability of MR methods at high field strengths. Methods for display and processing of multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging data sets were developed and existing methods for real-time image synthesis were extended. Results achieved in the field of computer aided analysis of MR images comprised new techniques for image background detection, contour detection and automatic image interpretation as well as knowledge bases for textural representation of medical knowledge for diagnosis. (orig.) With 82 refs., 3 tabs., 75 figs [de