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Sample records for magnetic resonance correlates

  1. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tumor Volume with Histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Wood, Bradford J.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. Materials and Methods We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm3) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. Results There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p=0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r2=0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm3 at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p=0.001) and 0.627 (p=0

  2. Middle cerebellar peduncles:Magnetic resonance imaging and pathophysiologic correlate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Humberto Morales; Thomas Tomsick

    2015-01-01

    We describe common and less common diseases that can cause magnetic resonance signal abnormalities of middle cerebellar peduncles(MCP), offering a systematicapproach correlating imaging findings with clinical clues and pathologic mechanisms. Myelin abnormalities, different types of edema or neurodegenerative processes, can cause areas of abnormal T2 signal, variable enhancement, and patterns of diffusivity of MCP. Pathologies such as demyelinating disorders or certain neurodegenerative entities(e.g., multiple system atrophy or fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome) appear to have predilection for MCP. Careful evaluation of concomitant imaging findings in the brain or brainstem; and focused correlation with key clinical findings such as immunosuppression for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopahty; hypertension, post-transplant status or high dose chemotherapy for posterior reversible encephalopathy; electrolyte disorders for myelinolysis or suspected toxic-drug related encephalopathy; would yield an appropriate and accurate differential diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  3. Atlantoaxial subluxation. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging correlated to myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, R.

    Twenty-nine patients with atlantoaxial subluxation (18 with rheumatoid arthritis, 2 due to trauma, 4 with os odontoideum, and one each with polyarteritis nodosa, rheumatic fever, Klippel-Feil syndrome, achondroplasia, and cause unknown) were evaluated using a 0.22 tesla resistive MRI unit. Cord compression was classified into four grades according to the degree on magnetic resonance imaging. There were 7 patients with no thecal sac compression (grade 0), 10 with a minimal degree of subarachnoid space compression without cord compression (grade 1), 7 with mild cord compression (grade 2), and 5 with severe cord compression or cord atrophy (grade 3). Although the severity of myelopathy showed poor correlation with the atlantodental interval on conventional radiography, high correlation was observed between MR grading and the degree of myelopathy. The high signal intensity foci were observed in 7 or 12 patients with cord compression (grades 2 and 3) on T2 weighted images. Other frequently observed findings in rheumatoid arthritis included soft tissue masses of low to intermediate signal intensity in the paraodontoid space, erosions of the odontoid processes, and atlanto-axial impaction on T1 and T2 weighted images.

  4. Posterolateral Complex Knee Injuries: Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Surgical Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodorou, D.J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Theodorou, S.J.; Fithian, D.C.; Garelick, D.H. [Southern California Permanente Medical Group, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Paxton, L.; Resnick, D. [Midwest Orthopedics, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of injuries of the posterolateral aspect of the knee and to evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of MRI in the assessment of these injuries. Material and Methods: The MRI studies of 14 patients (mean age 33 years) with trauma to the posterolateral aspect of the knee were retrospectively reviewed, and the imaging findings were correlated with those of surgery. Results: In all patients, MRI showed an intact iliotibial (ITB) band. MRI showed injury to the biceps tendon in 11 (79%), the gastrocnemius tendon in (7%), the popliteus tendon in 5 (36%), and the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) in 14 (100%) patients. Tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was seen in1 (79%) patients and tear of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in 4 (29%) patients. With routine MRI, visualization of the popliteofibular or fabellofibular ligaments was incomplete. On MRI, the lateral meniscus and the medial meniscus were torn with equal frequency ( n {approx} 4; 29%). Osteochondral defects were seen in 5 (36%) cases and joint effusion in all 14 (100%) cases on MRI. Using surgical findings as the standard for diagnosis, MRI proved 86% accurate in the detection of injury to the ITB band, the biceps tendon (93%),, the gastrocnemius tendon (100%), the popliteus tendon (86%), the LCL (100%), the ACL (79%), the PCL (86%), the lateral meniscus (90%), the medial meniscus (82%), and the osteochondral structures (79%). Surgical correlation confirmed the MRI findings of joint effusion in all cases. Conclusion: MRI is well suited for demonstrating the presence and extent of injuries of the major structures of the posterolateral complex of the knee, allowing characterization of the severity of injury.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology correlation in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masopust, Václav; Netuka, David; Beneš, Vladimír; Májovský, Martin; Belšán, Tomáš; Bradáč, Ondřej; Hořínek, Daniel; Kosák, Mikuláš; Hána, Václav; Kršek, Michal

    We continuously look for new techniques to improve the radicality of resection and to eliminate the negative effects of surgery. One of the methods that has been implemented in the perioperative management of Cushing's disease was the combination of three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences: SE, SPGR and fSPGR. We enrolled 41 patients (11 males, 30 females) diagnosed with Cushing's disease. A 3D tumour model with a navigation console was developed using each SPGR, fSPGR and SE sequence. The largest model was then used. In all cases, a standard four-handed, bi-nostril endoscopic endonasal technique was used. Endocrinological follow-up evaluation using morning cortisol sampling was performed for 6-34 months in our study. In total, 36 patients (88%) were disease-free following surgery. Our results indicate we achieved 100% sensitivity of MR. Overall, the conformity of at least one donor site, as compared with the places designated on MR, was in 78% of patients. We searched the place of compliance in individual locations. There is a consensus in individual locations in 63 of the 123 cases (or 56%). The correlation gamma function at a 5% significance level was then 0.27. The combination of MR sequences (SE, SPGR, fSPGR), neuronavigation system and iMRI led to increased sensitivity of up to 100%. Specificity reached 56% in our study. We found a high success rate in surgical procedure in terms of the correlation between MR findings and histology, which leads to remission of Cushing's disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  6. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  7. Myxoid Adrenocortical Adenoma: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathology correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Un [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Ha, Hong Koo; Park, Won Young [Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    We report a case of a 74-year-old female with myxoid adrenocortical adenoma which showed different magnetic resonance imaging findings compared to those of a typical adrenocortical adenoma. The myxoid change in the adrenocortical adenoma is a rare form of degeneration. It presents a considerable diagnostic challenge to both radiologists and clinicians because it can mimic other adrenal tumor types on imaging. The MRI findings of the presented case included a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images similar to that of fluid and delayed progressive enhancement.

  8. Mesenchymal hamartoma of liver: Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin-Bin Ye; Bing Hu; Li-Jun Wang; Hong-Sheng Liu; Yan Zou; Yu-Bin Zhou; Zhuang Kang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To describe the imaging features of hepatic mesenchymal hamartoma with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to histopathologic results.METHODS: Spin-echo sequence(SE),fast spin-echo sequence(FSE) were detected in 12 children (7 males, 5 females) with mesenchymal hamartoma of the liver (MHL), aged 1.2 months to 12 years,( mean age, 6.3 years) by axial, saggital, coronary plain imaging with an Elscint 2.0T MR equipment. Their main symptoms were abdominal mass (5 cases), enlarged liver (8 cases), abdominal pain (1 case) and anemia (2 cases),and negative alpha-fetoprotein. Dynamic enhancement examination was added in 2 cases.RESULTS: Six cases had single mass type of MHL, in which 3 cases had solid masses showing slight low-signal-intensity in T1WI, and irregular high-signal-intensity in T2WI, 1 case had a cystic-solid mixed mass showing several border-clear cysts in a solid mass, 2 cases had cystic masses with multi-septa. Five cases had diffuse and multifocal lesions type of MHL with its signal intensity being similar to that of the solid mass. One case had a combined diffuse and single cystic mass. In the early dynamic enhancement examination, the lesions were slightly circum-enhanced, and the center was enhanced in the later scan images. Inner hepatic vessels were compressed in 5 cases, vena cava and abdominal aortae were compressed in 3 cases. Pathological findings included fiber hyperplasia, hyaline degeneration, biliary duct hyperplasia, lobule-like array.CONCLUSION: MR imaging is a better way to differentiate and diagnose MHL. MHL may be recognized by its characteristic occurrence in infancy and MR imaging features.

  9. correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings with arthroscopy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinically diagnosed rotator cuff disease based upon the radiologist's interpretation with actual intra- operative arthroscopic ... invasively display high definition anatomy images ... surgical correlation (4) enough to guide on the treatment ..... Sex. Pearson. Correlation. 0.251. -0.182. -0.182. 0.156. -0.289. 0.061. 0.156. -0.052.

  10. Correlation between subcutaneous knee fat thickness and chondromalacia patellae on magnetic resonance imaging of the knee.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-08-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a common cause of anterior knee pain in young patients and can be detected noninvasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the correlation between subcutaneous fat thickness around the knee joint on axial MRIs as a surrogate marker of obesity, with the presence or absence of chondromalacia patellae.

  11. Correlating signs and symptoms with pubovisceral muscle avulsions on magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, K.; Futterer, J.J.; Hout, J. in't; Prokop, M.; Vierhout, M.E.; Kluivers, K.B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to correlate signs and symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) with pubovisceral muscle avulsions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). STUDY DESIGN: In this retrospective cohort study of 189 women with recurrent POP or unexplained symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction, we reviewe

  12. Correlative study of properties of water in biological systems using ultrasound and magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, C M; Greenleaf, J F

    1986-12-01

    Ultrasonic and nuclear magnetic resonance properties of media rich in water are investigated. The chemical shift of the water proton in pure water, aqueous solutions of tertiary butanol, and sodium chloride is shown to be linearly correlated to the reciprocal of sound speed in these media. A new method of determining the self-diffusion coefficient of water by using acoustic nonlinearity and sound speed is proposed. The method is tested on a variety of media that include pure water, aqueous solutions of glycerol, serum albumin, egg constituents, plant tissues, frog muscle and liver, and excised human tissues. In all the cases the results are found to compare closely to diffusion coefficients measured by magnetic resonance. The results presented here indicate that the acoustic and magnetic resonance modalities, though inherently different in their origin, can provide closely related information on the properties of water.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Aspergillosis: Imaging and Pathological Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabou, Marcela; Lannes, Béatrice; Cotton, François; Meyronet, David; Galanaud, Damien; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Grand, Sylvie; Desal, Hubert; Kreutz, Julie; Schenck, Maleka; Meyer, Nicolas; Schneider, Francis; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Koob, Meriam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality rate. The imaging data present different patterns and no full consensus exists on typical imaging characteristics of the cerebral lesions. We reviewed MRI findings in 21 patients with cerebral aspergillosis and correlated them to the immune status of the patients and to neuropathological findings when tissue was available. The lesions were characterized by their number, topography, and MRI signal. Dissemination to the brain resulted from direct spread from paranasal sinuses in 8 patients, 6 of them being immunocompetent. Hematogenous dissemination was observed in 13 patients, all were immunosuppressed. In this later group we identified a total of 329 parenchymal abscesses involving the whole brain with a predilection for the corticomedullary junction. More than half the patients had a corpus callosum lesion. Hemorrhagic lesions accounted for 13% and contrast enhancement was observed in 61% of the lesions. Patients with hematogenous dissemination were younger (p = 0.003), had more intracranial lesions (p = 0.0004) and had a higher 12-week mortality rate (p = 0.046) than patients with direct spread from paranasal sinuses. Analysis of 12 aneurysms allowed us to highlight two distinct situations. In case of direct spread from the paranasal sinuses, aneurysms are saccular and located on the proximal artery portions, while the hematogenous dissemination in immunocompromised patients is more frequently associated with distal and fusiform aneurysms. MRI is the exam of choice for cerebral aspergillosis. Number and type of lesions are different according to the mode of dissemination of the infection. PMID:27097323

  14. Soft x-ray resonant diffraction study of magnetic and orbital correlations in a manganite near half doping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, KJ; Grenier, S; Kim, YJ; Abbamonte, P; Rusydi, A; Tomioka, Y; Tokura, Y; McMorrow, DF; Sawatzky, G; van Veenendaal, M; Hill, J.P.; Venema, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    We have utilized resonant x-ray diffraction at the Mn L(II,III) edges in order to directly compare magnetic and orbital correlations in Pr(0.6)Ca(0.4)MnO(3). Comparing the widths of the magnetic and orbital diffraction peaks, we find that the magnetic correlation length exceeds that of the orbital o

  15. General and hybrid correlation nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of phosphorus in Phytophthora palmivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Gemma M; Fernandez, David I; Niere, Julie O; Adams, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Generalized two-dimensional (Gen2D) correlation analysis and hybrid correlation analysis have been applied to a series of dynamic (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra to monitor the in vivo metabolic changes of the plant pathogen Phytophthora palmivora in the presence and absence of phosphonate over an 18-h period. Results indicate that phosphonate exposure causes cleavage in organism polyphosphate chains as well as an increase in total sugar phosphates. In the presence of phosphonate, the NMR resonances attributed to terminal polyphosphate phosphorus reduced at a lower rate than those of middle polyphosphate phosphorus, indicating a change in average chain length and suggesting cleavage in the middle of the chain as well as at the ends. The correlation analysis techniques serve to identify and confirm spectral regions undergoing major change in the time-series data and facilitate the analysis of these dynamic changes.

  16. Lipofibromatosis: magnetic resonance imaging features and pathological correlation in three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Daniela; Righi, Alberto; Kreshak, Jennifer; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Merlino, Biagio [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Policlinico ' ' A. Gemelli' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Roma (Italy); Brunocilla, Eugenio [U.O. di UROLOGIA, Dipartimento di Medicina Specialistica, Diagnostica e Sperimentale, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, Daniel [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Anatomia Patologica, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Lipofibromatosis is a rare, benign, but infiltrative, soft tissue tumor seen in children. We present three cases of lipofibromatosis, each with different magnetic resonance imaging features and correlate this with the histological findings. The patients comprised two males and one female who presented in infancy; at birth, 5 months, and 7 months of age. Clinically, the masses were painless and slow-growing. The masses ranged in size from 2 to 6 cm and involved the distal extremities in two cases (one foot, one wrist) and the trunk. Magnetic resonance imaging showed lipomatous lesions with varying amounts of adipose and solid components in each case. There were no capsules at the periphery of the lesions. One case showed a fat-predominant lesion, another an equal mixture of fat and solid tissue, and the third was predominantly solid. This was reflected in the histology, which showed corresponding features. Radiological and histopathological differential diagnoses are reviewed. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging correlates of bee sting induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sushant; K; Das; Li-Chuan; Zeng; Bing; Li; Xiang-Ke; Niu; Jing-Liang; Wang; Anup; Bhetuwal; Han-Feng; Yang

    2014-01-01

    Occasionally systemic complications with high risk of death,such as multiple organ dysfunction syndrome(MODS),can occur following multiple bee stings.This case study reports a patient who presented with MODS,i.e.,acute kidney injury,hepatic and cardiac dysfunc-tion,after multiple bee stings.The standard clinical findings were then correlated with magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)findings,which demonstrates that MRI may be utilized as a simpler tool to use than other mul-tiple diagnostics.

  18. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Avcu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the pathological findings and the age and sex of the patients. Results: The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 74 years (mean: 43.3 years. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tears, medial collateral ligament degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. There was a significant correlation between male gender and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well as medial collateral ligament injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with medial collateral ligament injury, lateral collateral ligament injury, Baker′s cyst, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Chondromalacia patellae was significantly correlated with anterior cruciate ligament injury, patellae alta, and osteochondral lesion. Bursitis (in 53.2% of the patients followed by grade-II meniscal degeneration (in 43% of the patients were the most common knee pathologies observed by MRI. Conclusions: MRI findings of select knee pathologies are significantly correlated with each other and the age and sex of the patient.

  19. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Avcu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the pathological findings and the age and sex of the patients. Results: The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 74 years (mean: 43.3 years. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tears, medial collateral ligament degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. There was a significant correlation between male gender and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well as medial collateral ligament injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with medial collateral ligament injury, lateral collateral ligament injury, Baker’s cyst, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Chondromalacia patellae was significantly correlated with anterior cruciate ligament injury, patellae alta, and osteochondral lesion. Bursitis (in 53.2% of the patients followed by grade-II meniscal degeneration (in 43% of the patients were the most common knee pathologies observed by MRI. Conclusions: MRI findings of select knee pathologies are significantly correlated with each other and the age and sex of the patient.

  20. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  1. Visualizing functional pathways in the human brain using correlation tensors and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhaohua; Xu, Ran; Bailey, Stephen K; Wu, Tung-Lin; Morgan, Victoria L; Cutting, Laurie E; Anderson, Adam W; Gore, John C

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex which is irrigated by rich vasculature to meet high metabolic demands. We recently demonstrated that MRI signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions in a resting state exhibit structure-specific temporal correlations along white matter tracts. In this report we validate our preliminary findings and introduce spatio-temporal functional correlation tensors to characterize the directional preferences of temporal correlations in MRI signals acquired at rest. The results bear a remarkable similarity to data obtained by diffusion tensor imaging but without any diffusion-encoding gradients. Just as in gray matter, temporal correlations in resting state signals may reflect intrinsic synchronizations of neural activity in white matter. Here we demonstrate that functional correlation tensors are able to visualize long range white matter tracts as well as short range sub-cortical fibers imaged at rest, and that evoked functional activities alter these structures and enhance the visualization of relevant neural circuitry. Furthermore, we explore the biophysical mechanisms underlying these phenomena by comparing pulse sequences, which suggest that white matter signal variations are consistent with hemodynamic (BOLD) changes associated with neural activity. These results suggest new ways to evaluate MRI signal changes within white matter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Shale characteristics impact on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR fluid typing methods and correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mehana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of shale reservoirs has brought a paradigm shift in the worldwide energy equation. This entails developing robust techniques to properly evaluate and unlock the potential of those reservoirs. The application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance techniques in fluid typing and properties estimation is well-developed in conventional reservoirs. However, Shale reservoirs characteristics like pore size, organic matter, clay content, wettability, adsorption, and mineralogy would limit the applicability of the used interpretation methods and correlation. Some of these limitations include the inapplicability of the controlling equations that were derived assuming fast relaxation regime, the overlap of different fluids peaks and the lack of robust correlation to estimate fluid properties in shale. This study presents a state-of-the-art review of the main contributions presented on fluid typing methods and correlations in both experimental and theoretical side. The study involves Dual Tw, Dual Te, and doping agent's application, T1-T2, D-T2 and T2sec vs. T1/T2 methods. In addition, fluid properties estimation such as density, viscosity and the gas-oil ratio is discussed. This study investigates the applicability of these methods along with a study of the current fluid properties correlations and their limitations. Moreover, it recommends the appropriate method and correlation which are capable of tackling shale heterogeneity.

  3. Ultrahigh-Resolution Magnetic Resonance in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields: Two-Dimensional Long-Lived-Coherence Correlation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthalapalli, Srinivas; Bornet, Aurélien; Segawa, Takuya F.; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Jannin, Sami; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-07-01

    A half-century quest for improving resolution in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has enabled the study of molecular structures, biological interactions, and fine details of anatomy. This progress largely relied on the advent of sophisticated superconducting magnets that can provide stable and homogeneous fields with temporal and spatial variations below ΔB0/B0lungs, tissue-air interfaces, surgical implants, etc., lead to fluctuations and losses of local homogeneity. A new method dubbed “long-lived-coherence correlation spectroscopy” (LLC-COSY) opens the way to overcome both inhomogeneous and homogeneous broadening, which arise from local variations in static fields and fluctuating dipole-dipole interactions, respectively. LLC-COSY makes it possible to obtain ultrahigh resolution two-dimensional spectra, with linewidths on the order of Δν=0.1 to 1 Hz, even in very inhomogeneous fields (ΔB0/B0>10ppm or 5000 Hz at 9.7 T), and can improve resolution by a factor up to 9 when the homogeneous linewidths are determined by dipole-dipole interactions. The resulting LLC-COSY spectra display chemical shift differences and scalar couplings in two orthogonal dimensions, like in “J spectroscopy.” LLC-COSY does not require any sophisticated gradient switching or frequency-modulated pulses. Applications to in-cell NMR and to magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of selected volume elements in MRI appear promising, particularly when susceptibility variations tend to preclude high resolution.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging for extramammary Paget's disease: radiological and pathological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaike, Gensuke; Nozaki, Taiki; Matsusako, Masaki; Saida, Yukihisa [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Matsui, Mizuko; Ohtake, Naoyuki [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo (Japan); Eto, Hikaru [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Koyu [St. Luke' s International Hospital, Department of Pathology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous neoplasm that is thought to represent intraepithelial adenocarcinoma developing in an area rich in apocrine glands. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for this disease are not well established. We report three cases of pathologically confirmed EMPD in which MRI was performed before surgery. The lesions were widespread in the epidermis and the dermis. Lesions were sharply well enhanced on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and appeared hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging in all cases. Areas with enhancement in depth corresponded well with the pathological lesion. In addition, different malignant legions were found on the same images from MRI in two cases, indicating potential associations with other malignancies. We describe the MRI findings and their pathological correlation. MRI could be useful for preoperative evaluation of disease spread and detection of associated malignancies. (orig.)

  5. Cerebral tubercular thrombophlebitis presenting as venous infarct: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Mangalore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system involvement by tuberculosis to produce basal meningitis, hydrocephalus, arteritis and infarcts is well-known, the brunt of the pathology being borne by the arterial vasculature to produce neurological sequelae. However, tuberculous thrombophlebitis causing venous infarction is exceedingly rare. We present imaging and pathological features of two autopsy proven cases of tuberculous thrombophlebitis with venous infarcts involving superficial venous system in one and deep venous system in the other. This is the first study presenting radiopathologic correlation of this rare complication. Tuberculous thrombophlebitis should be suspected if basal exudates and multiple white matter T2 hyperintensities are seen on neuroimaging and the imaging protocol should include both magnetic resonance arteriogram and venogram.

  6. Lumbar alterations in magnetic resonance: correlation between Modic and Pfirrmann classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Miller Reis Rodrigues

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship of sex and age with Modic and Pfirrmann classifications and verify the relationship between the two classifications in the group of patients studied. METHODS: 300 magnetic resonance scans (MRI of the lumbar segment of the patients were evaluated; each lumbar segment (L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4, L4-L5 and L5-S1 was assessed according to Modic and Pfirrmann classifications. RESULTS: The type III of Pfirrmann was the most prevalent, whereas Modic was absent on most levels analyzed. The Modic signal was present mainly in the lower levels (L4-L5 and L5-S1 and in females. CONCLUSION: There is a strong correlation between the changes of the endplate and intervertebral discs, evidenced by changes in MRI. The relationship between Pfirrmann and Modic classifications is statistically higher the greater the disc degeneration.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Correlation with otitis media with effusion (OME)

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    Naito, Y.; Tamaki, S.; Kurata, K.; Honjo, I.; Nishimura, K.; Nakano, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasopharynx, the eustachian tube and the middle ear was performed in nine patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. MRI revealed the extent of the tumor more clearly than CT (computed tomography) when the tumor was situated in the parapharyngeal space. But when the tumor extended superficially in the nasopharyngeal mucosa, its margin could not be identified clearly by either MRI or CT because of hypervascularity and long T1 and T2 of the nasopharyngeal mucosa. Seven of the nine patients had unilateral otitis media with effusion. Their eustachian tube ventilation function was evaluated by an inflation-deflation technique. Failure of active equalization of negative pressure applied to the middle ear was found to be a characteristic disorder of their eustachian tube ventilation function. This dysfunction seemed to be correlated with the lateral dislocation of the eustachian tube cartilage caused by the tumor.

  8. Primary Leiomyosarcoma of the Oral Tongue: Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasonography Findings with Histopathologic Correlation

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    Castaldi, A.; Arcuri, T.; Carta, M.; Quilici, P.; Derchi, L.E. [Galliera Hospital, Genoa (Italy). Depts. of Neuroradiology, Maxillofacial Surgery, and Pathology

    2006-06-15

    Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant smooth muscle tumor that frequently occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and female genital tract. It is aggressive and tends to recur and metastasize. Clinical behavior is unpredictable, mostly influenced by a proper surgical approach. Oral leiomyosarcoma, in particular of the tongue, is extremely rare and poorly documented in the radiology literature. Diagnostic assessment of oral leiomyosarcoma is often challenging, mostly founded on its peculiar immunohistological features. However, imaging evaluation is essential in staging and for preoperative planning. We illustrate the case of a 52-year-old woman with 2-months history of a painless growing mass on the left hemitongue, with magnetic resonance and ultrasonographic features correlated to histopathologic examination.

  9. Correlating hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging with high-field intracranial vessel wall imaging in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J; van der Kolk, Anja G; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K

    2014-06-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct.

  10. Neural correlates underlying mental calculation in abacus experts: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Okada, Tomohisa; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    Experts of abacus operation demonstrate extraordinary ability in mental calculation. There is psychological evidence that abacus experts utilize a mental image of an abacus to remember and manipulate large numbers in solving problems; however, the neural correlates underlying this expertise are unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared the neural correlates associated with three mental-operation tasks (numeral, spatial, verbal) among six experts in abacus operations and eight nonexperts. In general, there was more involvement of neural correlates for visuospatial processing (e.g., right premotor and parietal areas) for abacus experts during the numeral mental-operation task. Activity of these areas and the fusiform cortex was correlated with the size of numerals used in the numeral mental-operation task. Particularly, the posterior superior parietal cortex revealed significantly enhanced activity for experts compared with controls during the numeral mental-operation task. Comparison with the other mental-operation tasks indicated that activity in the posterior superior parietal cortex was relatively specific to computation in 2-dimensional space. In conclusion, mental calculation of abacus experts is likely associated with enhanced involvement of the neural resources for visuospatial information processing in 2-dimensional space.

  11. Correlation between subjective and objective assessment of magnetic resonance (MR) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Li Sze; Rajagopal, Heshalini; Paramesran, Raveendran

    2016-07-01

    Medical Image Quality Assessment (IQA) plays an important role in assisting and evaluating the development of any new hardware, imaging sequences, pre-processing or post-processing algorithms. We have performed a quantitative analysis of the correlation between subjective and objective Full Reference - IQA (FR-IQA) on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human brain, spine, knee and abdomen. We have created a MR image database that consists of 25 original reference images and 750 distorted images. The reference images were distorted with six types of distortions: Rician Noise, Gaussian White Noise, Gaussian Blur, DCT compression, JPEG compression and JPEG2000 compression, at various levels of distortion. Twenty eight subjects were chosen to evaluate the images resulting in a total of 21,700 human evaluations. The raw scores were then converted to Difference Mean Opinion Score (DMOS). Thirteen objective FR-IQA metrics were used to determine the validity of the subjective DMOS. The results indicate a high correlation between the subjective and objective assessment of the MR images. The Noise Quality Measurement (NQM) has the highest correlation with DMOS, where the mean Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are 0.936 and 0.938 respectively. The Universal Quality Index (UQI) has the lowest correlation with DMOS, where the mean PLCC and SROCC are 0.807 and 0.815 respectively. Student's T-test was used to find the difference in performance of FR-IQA across different types of distortion. The superior IQAs tested statistically are UQI for Rician noise images, Visual Information Fidelity (VIF) for Gaussian blur images, NQM for both DCT and JPEG compressed images, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) for JPEG2000 compressed images.

  12. Magnetic resonance images of patients with temporomandibular disorders: Prevalence and correlation between disk morphology and displacement

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    Amaral, Ruana de Oliveira, E-mail: ruana.amaral@hotmail.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Damasceno, Naiana Nolasco de Lima, E-mail: naiananolasketi@yahoo.com.br [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Azevedo de Souza, Lílian, E-mail: lilianazevedo@msn.com [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Devito, Karina Lopes, E-mail: karina.devito@ufjf.edu.br [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), this study aimed to evaluate the morphology of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). There were 218 TMJ of 109 assessed patients; 88 were females and 21 males, and all were diagnosed as symptomatic for temporomandibular disorder. The articular disc positions were classified in the normal position and with anterior disc displacement with and without reduction. Regarding the morphology, the discs were classified as follows: biconcave (normal), biplanar, rounded, biconvex, folded, thickening in the posterior band, thickening in the anterior band and hemiconvex. The results indicated that females were the most affected by morphological changes of the articular disc (p = 0.008/Cramer's V = 0.295). There was no statistical significance when correlating the disc morphology with the sides (right and left). There was a significant correlation between the position and morphology of the articular disc (p < 0.001/Cramer's V = 0.609), and in the normal position of the discs presenting biplanar and biconcave morphologies. In TMJ with anterior displacement of the disc with reduction (ADDR), there was a greater correlation with rounded, hemiconvex and biconvex morphologies. Already in the TMJ with displacement without reduction (ADDWR), there was a higher prevalence of folded discs. It can be concluded that morphological changes in the disc are influenced by the type of displacement, and more serious deformations are associated with ADDWR cases.

  13. Removal of correlated noise online for in situ measurements by using multichannel magnetic resonance sounding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhang, Yang; Wan, Ling; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the other geophysical approaches, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) technique is direct and nondestructive in subsurface water exploration. It provides water content distribution and estimates hydrogeological properties. The biggest challenge is that MRS measurement always suffers bad signal-to-noise ratio, and it can be carried out only far from sources of noise. To solve this problem, a series of de-noising methods are developed. However, most of them are post-processing, leading the data quality uncontrolled for in situ measurements. In the present study, a new approach that removal of correlated noise online is found to overcome the restriction. Based on LabVIEW, a method is provided to enable online data quality control by the way of realizing signal acquisition and noise filtering simultaneously. Using one or more reference coils, adaptive noise cancellation based on LabVIEW to eliminate the correlated noise is available for in situ measurements. The approach was examined through numerical simulation and field measurements. The correlated noise is mitigated effectively and the application of MRS measurements is feasible in high-level noise environment. The method shortens the measurement time and improves the measurement efficiency.

  14. Iterative cross-correlation analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Yang

    Full Text Available Seed-based cross-correlation analysis (sCCA and independent component analysis have been widely employed to extract functional networks from the resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. However, the results of sCCA, in terms of both connectivity strength and network topology, can be sensitive to seed selection variations. ICA avoids the potential problems due to seed selection, but choosing which component(s to represent the network of interest could be subjective and problematic. In this study, we proposed a seed-based iterative cross-correlation analysis (siCCA method for resting state brain network analysis. The method was applied to extract default mode network (DMN and stable task control network (STCN in two independent datasets acquired from normal adults. Compared with the networks obtained by traditional sCCA and ICA, the resting state networks produced by siCCA were found to be highly stable and independent on seed selection. siCCA was used to analyze DMN in first-episode major depressive disorder (MDD patients. It was found that, in the MDD patients, the volume of DMN negatively correlated with the patients' social disability screening schedule scores.

  15. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy detection of neurotransmitters in dorsomedial medulla correlate with spontaneous baroreceptor reflex function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Espinosa, Maria A; Shaltout, Hossam A; Olson, John; Westwood, Brian M; Robbins, Mike E; Link, Kerry; Diz, Debra I

    2010-02-01

    Control of heart rate variability via modulation of sympathovagal balance is a key function of nucleus tractus solitarii and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus localized in the dorsomedial medulla oblongata. Normal blood pressure regulation involves precise balance of glutamate (Glu)-glutamine-gamma-aminobutyric acid transmitter systems, and angiotensin II modulates these transmitters to produce tonic suppression of reflex function. It is not known, however, whether other brain transmitters/metabolites are indicators of baroreflex function. This study establishes the concept that comprehensive baseline transmitter/metabolite profiles obtained using in vivo (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats with well-characterized differences in resting blood pressure and baroreflex function can be used as indices of autonomic balance or baroreflex sensitivity. Transgenic rats with over-expression of renin [m(Ren2)27] or under-expression of glial-angiotensinogen (ASrAogen) were compared with Sprague-Dawley rats. Glu concentration in the dorsal medulla is significantly higher in ASrAogen rats compared with either Sprague-Dawley or (mRen2)27 rats. Glu levels and the ratio of Glu:glutamine correlated positively with indices of higher vagal tone consistent with the importance of these neurotransmitters in baroreflex function. Interestingly, the levels of choline-containing metabolites showed a significant positive correlation with spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and a negative correlation with sympathetic tone. Thus, we demonstrate the concept that noninvasive assessment of neurochemical biomarkers may be used as an index of baroreflex sensitivity.

  16. Neural Correlates of Sevoflurane-induced Unconsciousness Identified by Simultaneous Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranft, Andreas; Golkowski, Daniel; Kiel, Tobias; Riedl, Valentin; Kohl, Philipp; Rohrer, Guido; Pientka, Joachim; Berger, Sebastian; Thul, Alexander; Maurer, Max; Preibisch, Christine; Zimmer, Claus; Mashour, George A; Kochs, Eberhard F; Jordan, Denis; Ilg, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    The neural correlates of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness have yet to be fully elucidated. Sedative and anesthetic states induced by propofol have been studied extensively, consistently revealing a decrease of frontoparietal and thalamocortical connectivity. There is, however, less understanding of the effects of halogenated ethers on functional brain networks. The authors recorded simultaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography in 16 artificially ventilated volunteers during sevoflurane anesthesia at burst suppression and 3 and 2 vol% steady-state concentrations for 700 s each to assess functional connectivity changes compared to wakefulness. Electroencephalographic data were analyzed using symbolic transfer entropy (surrogate of information transfer) and permutation entropy (surrogate of cortical information processing). Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed by an independent component analysis and a region-of-interest-based analysis. Electroencephalographic analysis showed a significant reduction of anterior-to-posterior symbolic transfer entropy and global permutation entropy. At 2 vol% sevoflurane concentrations, frontal and thalamic networks identified by independent component analysis showed significantly reduced within-network connectivity. Primary sensory networks did not show a significant change. At burst suppression, all cortical networks showed significantly reduced functional connectivity. Region-of-interest-based thalamic connectivity at 2 vol% was significantly reduced to frontoparietal and posterior cingulate cortices but not to sensory areas. Sevoflurane decreased frontal and thalamocortical connectivity. The changes in blood oxygenation level dependent connectivity were consistent with reduced anterior-to-posterior directed connectivity and reduced cortical information processing. These data advance the understanding of sevoflurane-induced unconsciousness and contribute to a

  17. Correlative magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of aortic and pulmonary artery abnormalities

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    Risius, B.; O' Donnell, J.K.; Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; George, C.R.; Graor, R.A.; Moodie, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields excellent quality images of the cardiovascular system utilizing the inherent natural contrast between flowing blood and the surrounding anatomic structures. To evaluate the clinical usefulness of MRI in the noninvasive diagnosis of large vessel disorders, the authors have performed MRI on 40 pts with either aortic or pulmonary artery abnormalities (18 thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, 8 aorto-occlusive disease, 6 dissecting aneurysms, 4 Marfan's syndrome, 2 pulmonary artery aneurysms 1 pulmonary artery occlusion, 1 aortic coarctation). Images were obtained in the transverse, coronal and sagital body planes utilizing a 0.6T superconductive magnet. Cardiac and/or respiratory gating was employed in most cases. Correlation was made for all studies with conventional or digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography, and/or ultrasound. The diagnostic information obtained by MRI equaled or exceeded that obtained by other imaging techniques except for the few cases where cardiac arrhythmias precluded adequate gated acquisition. All aneurysms and their relationships to adjacent structures were readily demonstrated as were the presence or absence of mural thrombi and dissecting intimal flaps. Angiographically demonstrated atherosclerotic plaques and luminal stenoses were seen by MRI in all patients without arrhythmias. The authors concluded that MRI is a powerful noninvasive diagnostic aid in the delineation of large vessel disorders, especially where knowledge of anatomic interrelationships can guide surgical or other interventional planning.

  18. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music. ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens. Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ correlates with both function (increased network centrality and structure (grey matter volume of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  19. ROLE OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN SPINAL TRAUMA WITH SURGICAL CORRELATION

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    Vijaya Kumari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal trauma is a common cause of disability. The common causes of spinal trauma are blunt injuries – motor vehicle accidents, falls, sport injuries, assaults. MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating and detecting spinal trauma specially subtle bone marrow, soft tissue and spinal cord abnormalities. Many advantages of MRI such as high contrast resolution, absence of bony artifacts, multiplanar capability and choice of various pulse sequences make it possible to diagnose spinal trauma more accurately. Information about neural and extra - neural injuries requiring surgical interventions can be obtained. AIMS: Role of MRI in spinal trauma with surgical correlation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective evaluation of 85 patients with history of spinal injury in hemodynamically stable patients on 1.5 Tesla MRI and surgical correlation. RESULTS: Age of patients ranged from 11 - 80 years with mean age 45 years. Cervical spine is most commonly involved and RTA being most common cause of spinal injury. Cord compression, haemorrhage are most common presentation in MRI. While MRI is less sensitive in detecting posterior element fractures, over estimates ligament injuries and shows highest sensitivity for intervertebral disc injury. In our study, we have seen one case of pseudomeningocele formation with brachial plexus injury and two cases of vertebral artery thrombosis. C ONCLUSION: Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the only tool available for depicting the changes within the cord, ligaments and paraspinal soft tissues which helps in the management of the patients and in predicting the prognosis of recovery.

  20. Correlation of Electromyography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Diagnosis of Suspected Radiculopathy

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    Yıldız Arslan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with pain or numbness without motor deficits are the most common group referred to electrophysiology laboratories as suspected radiculopathy. We wanted to investigate whether electromyography (EMG was useful for this group in the diagnosis or therapy of radiculopathy. Our aim was to investigate the correlation and classification of EMG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in the diagnosis of suspected radiculopathy. METHODS: We included 74 patients with a ≥2-month history of numbness and pain in the neck and back that radiated into the arm or leg. Patients with diabetes mellitus, previous disc or spine operation, polyneuropathy, spinal cord diseases (tumor, infection or syrinxs, motor deficits, and abnormal nerve conduction studies were excluded. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 51.58±11.53 years. In total, 41 (55.4% patients were women and 33 (44.6% were men; 48.8% (n=36 showed cervical radiculopathy and 51.2% (n=38 exhibited lumbosacral radiculopathy. The most common MRI finding was protrusion (37.8%, and the most common EMG finding was re-innervation (59.5%. The correlation of MRI and EMG findings was significant in lumbar radiculopathy (p=0.007, but not in the cervical radiculopathy results (p=0.976. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: EMG and MRI findings were compatible for lumbar radiculopathy, but not for cervical radiculopathy in mild to moderate grades.

  1. Correlation Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Arthroscopic Findings in the Knee Joint

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    Ahmad Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The knee joint is the largest and the most complex joint of the human body. It is not covered by any thick muscular covering anteriorly. Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore the diagnostic capabilities of clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and arthroscopy in traumatic disorders of the knee joint, to seek correlation between clinical findings, MRI findings and arthroscopic. Patients and Methods A total of 26 patients with a presentation suggestive of traumatic knee pathology were studied prospectively. A detailed history was taken and relevant clinical examination was done, which was followed by MRI of the knee. The patients were scheduled for arthroscopy under general/spinal anesthesia, whenever indicated. Results Keeping arthroscopic examination as standard, the correlation between clinical and arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86%, accuracy of 63.16%, negative predictive value of 93.48%; whereas MRI vs. arthroscopy showed a sensitivity of 74.42%, specificity of 93.10%, accuracy of 84.21%, and negative predictive value of 88.04%. Conclusions The clinical examination is an important and accurate diagnostic modality for evaluation of traumatic derangement of the knee joint. It is noninvasive, easy, available, and valuable diagnostic modality. The MRI is an accurate diagnostic modality. It can be used whenever there is an uncertain indication for arthroscopy. However, costs have to be kept in mind, especially in patients with low socio-economic status.

  2. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance-Verified Myocardial Fibrosis in Chagas Disease: Clinical Correlates and Risk Stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uellendahl, Marly; de Siqueira, Maria Eduarda Menezes; Calado, Eveline Barros; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Sobral, Dário; Ribeiro, Clébia; Oliveira, Wilson; Martins, Silvia; Narula, Jagat; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) is an important cause of heart failure and mortality, mainly in Latin America. This study evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the heart as well the extent of myocardial fibrosis (MF) in patients with CD by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The prognostic value of MF evaluated by myocardial-delayed enhancement (MDE) was compared with that via Rassi score. Methods This study assessed 39 patients divided into 2 groups: 28 asymptomatic patients as indeterminate form group (IND); and symptomatic patients as Chagas Heart Disease (CHD) group. All patients underwent CMR using the techniques of cine-MRI and MDE, and the amount of MF was compared with the Rassi score. Results Regarding the morphological and functional analysis, significant differences were observed between both groups (p < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between the extent of MF and the Rassi score (r = 0.76). Conclusions CMR is an important technique for evaluating patients with CD, stressing morphological and functional differences in all clinical presentations. The strong correlation with the Rassi score and the extent of MF detected by CMR emphasizes its role in the prognostic stratification of patients with CD. PMID:27982271

  3. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic findings

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    Kim, Yeo Ju; Park, In Suh; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Choi, Suk Jin; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Woo Chul; Han, Jun Gu; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas with pathologic correlation and to determine whether these schwannomas share the imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves. The MRIs of 17 cases of pathologically proven spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were reviewed retrospectively, and cystic changes, enhancement, and intratumoral hemorrhage of the tumors were evaluated. Imaging features known to be common findings of schwannoma in the peripheral nerves, such as encapsulation, the target sign, the fascicular sign, and visualization of entering or exiting nerve rootlets, were also evaluated. The histopathology of the tumors was correlated with the MRI findings. Cystic changes were detected in 14 cases by MRI and in 16 cases by pathology. The most common pattern of enhancement was a thick peripheral septal pattern (70.59%). Intratumoral hemorrhage was detected in four cases on MRI, but in all cases on pathology. Encapsulation was observed in all cases. The fascicular sign was seen in only four cases, and thickening of an exiting rootlet was visualized in one case. None of the cases showed the target sign. Spinal intradural extramedullary schwannomas were typical encapsulated cystic tumors and had few imaging features of schwannomas in the peripheral nerves.

  4. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF ACUTE CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME: CORRELATION WITH PROGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴力扬

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of acute cervical central cord syndrome and to determine their correlation with the prognosis. Methods. MRI findings of 35 patients with acute central cord syndrome were studied and compared with the recovery rate of ASIA score at presentation and in follow-up. Results. MRI data demonstrated spinal cord compression for 32 patients, spinal cord swelling for 16 patients,and abnormal signal intensity within the spinal cord for 19 patients, including 14 with edema and 3 with hematoma. No significant difference of the recovery rate was noted between the patients treated nonoperatively and operatively ( P > 0. 05). There was a significant inverse correlation between the recovery rate and the degree of spinal cord compression as shown in MRI scans ( P < 0.01 ). The presence of hematoma in MRI scans was associated with poor prognosis, as demonstrated by a significant difference of the recovery rate ( P < 0. 01) among the patients with normal intensity, edema and hematoma within the spinal cord. Conclusions. MRI scans provide an efficient assistance for decision-making and accurate prognostic information regarding neurological function, and therefore should routinely be performed within the early phase of acute central cord syndrome.

  5. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF ACUTE CENTRAL CORD SYNDROME: CORRELATION WITH PROGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of acute cervical central cord syndrome and to determine their correlation with the prognosis. Methods. MRI findings of 35 patients with acute central cord syndrome were studied and compared with the recovery rate of ASIA score at presentation and in follow-up. Results. MRI data demonstrated spinal cord compression for 32 patients, spinal cord swelling for 16 patients, and abnormal signal intensity within the spinal cord for 19 patients, including 14 with edema and 3 with hematoma. No significant difference of the recovery rate was noted between the patients treated nonoperatively and operatively (P >0.05). There was a significant inverse correlation between the recovery rate and the degree of spinal cord compression as shown in MRI scans (P<0.01). The presence of hematoma in MRI scans was associated with poor prognosis, as demonstrated by a significant difference of the recovery rate (P< 0.01) among the patients with normal intensity, edema and hematoma within the spinal cord. Conclusions. MRI scans provide an efficient assistance for decision-making and accurate prognostic information regarding neurological function, and therefore should routinely be performed within the early phase of acute central cord syndrome.

  6. Dissociating prefrontal circuitry in intelligence and memory: neuropsychological correlates of magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Paul G; Ohtani, Toshiyuki; Bouix, Sylvain; Hosokawa, Taiga; Saito, Yukiko; Newell, Dominick T; Kubicki, Marek

    2015-12-01

    We examined intelligence and memory in 25 healthy participants who had both prior magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of gray matter volumes of medial orbital frontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), along with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of posterior and anterior mOFC-rACC white matter microstructure, as assessed by fractional anisotropy (FA). Results showed distinct relationships between these basic structural brain parameters and higher cognition, highlighted by a highly significant correlation of left rACC gray matter volume with memory, and to a lesser extent, though still statistically significant, correlation of left posterior mOFC-rACC FA with intelligence. Regression analyses showed that left posterior mOFC-rACC connections and left rACC gray matter volume each contributed to intelligence, with left posterior mOFC-rACC FA uniquely accounting for between 20.43 and 24.99% of the variance in intelligence, in comparison to 13.54 to 17.98% uniquely explained by left rACC gray matter volume. For memory, only left rACC gray matter volume explained neuropsychological performance, uniquely accounting for a remarkably high portion of individual variation, ranging from 73.61 to 79.21%. These results pointed to differential contributions of white mater microstructure connections and gray matter volumes to individual differences in intelligence and memory, respectively.

  7. Scrotal collections: pictorial essay correlating sonographic with magnetic resonance imaging findings

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    Daniel de Almeida Queiroz Prata Resende

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at describing scrotal collections observed at ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The authors describe the main features of hydrocele, hematocele and pyocele, as well as the most common causes, clinical manifestations and associated diseases, with a brief review of the embryology and anatomy of the scrotum. Collections are frequently found in the evaluation of the scrotum, which is often performed on an emergency basis, and in most cases can be differentiated by means of imaging studies. With the consolidation of magnetic resonance imaging as the method of choice complementary with ultrasonography, the authors also describe magnetic resonance imaging findings of scrotal collections as well as the situations where such method is indicated.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Breast Cancer and Correlation with Prognostic Factors

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    Chang, Yun-Woo; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Lee, Dong Wha; Lee, Min Hyuk (College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea)); Lee, Hye Kyung (Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Bucheon Hospital, Kyonggi (Korea)); Yang, Seung Boo (Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Gumi Hospital, Kyungbook (Korea)); Kim, Yongbae (Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Soonchunhyang Univ., Chungnam (Korea)); Seo, Dae Young (Dept. of Computer Engineering (KO) Polytechnic Univ., Kyonggi (Korea))

    2009-11-15

    Background: Prognostic factors of breast cancer have been used for the prediction of clinical outcome or selection of patients for complementary treatment. Some of the imaging features of breast cancer, e.g. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are associated with these prognostic factors. Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between dynamic enhanced MR features and prognostic factors of clinical outcome of breast cancer. Material and Methods: A total of 136 patients with 151 breast cancers underwent 1.5T dynamic MR imaging with the use of a dynamic T1-weighted three-dimensional fast low-angle shot (FLASH) subtraction imaging technique. Morphological and kinetic analyses of MR features were evaluated using the American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) MRI lexicon. Pathological prognostic factors were correlated with MR imaging characteristics, including tumor size, histological grade, lymph node status, expression of estrogen receptor (ER), expression of progesterone receptor (PR), expression of c-erbB2, determination of Ki-67 index, and microvascular density (MVD), using univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. Results: Based on univariate and multivariate analyses, spiculated tumor margins correlated significantly with lower histological grade (I-II) and positive PR expression. Rim enhancement was significantly correlated with high histological grade, presence of axillary lymph node metastasis, large tumor size, increased Ki-67 index, and increased MVD. Early peak enhancement, as seen on the first scan after contrast medium injection, was correlated with negative ER expression. Conclusion: The presence of a lesion with a spiculated margin may predict a relatively good prognosis, and the presence of a lesion with rim enhancement may predict a relatively poor prognosis

  9. Correlation of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcome in acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Namik; Ozcam, Giray; Kosar, Pinar; Ozcan, Ayse; Basar, Hulya; Kaymak, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas for humans and is still a silent killer in both developed and developing countries. The aim of this case series was to evaluate early radiological images as a predictor of subsequent neuropsychological sequelae, following carbon monoxide poisoning. After carbon monoxide exposure, early computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 52-year-old woman showed bilateral lesions in the globus pallidus. This patient was discharged and followed for 90 days. The patient recovered without any neurological sequela. In a 58-year-old woman exposed to carbon monoxide, computed tomography showed lesions in bilateral globus pallidus and periventricular white matter. Early magnetic resonance imaging revealed changes similar to that like in early tomography images. The patient recovered and was discharged from hospital. On the 27th day of exposure, the patient developed disorientation and memory impairment. Late magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse hyperintensity in the cerebral white matter. White matter lesions which progress to demyelination and end up in neuropsychological sequelae cannot always be diagnosed by early computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in carbon monoxide poisoning. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. CORRELATION BETWEEN MAGNETIC-RESONANCE-IMAGING AND CLINICAL-PARAMETERS IN MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINNIGE, LGF; TEEUWISSEN, E; HEW, JM; MINDERHOUD, JM

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the course of 60 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients (relapsing-remitting (RR), relapsing-progressive (RP), primary-progressive (PP)) was compared with the number and mean size of the lesions as well as the total load of the lesions as shown on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Si

  11. Correlation of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and clinical outcome in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namik Ozcan

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas for humans and is still a silent killer in both developed and developing countries. The aim of this case series was to evaluate early radiological images as a predictor of subsequent neuropsychological sequelae, following carbon monoxide poisoning. Case 1: After carbon monoxide exposure, early computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 52-year-old woman showed bilateral lesions in the globus pallidus. This patient was discharged and followed for 90 days. The patient recovered without any neurological sequela. Case 2: In a 58-year-old woman exposed to carbon monoxide, computed tomography showed lesions in bilateral globus pallidus and periventricular white matter. Early magnetic resonance imaging revealed changes similar to that like in early tomography images. The patient recovered and was discharged from hospital. On the 27th day of exposure, the patient developed disorientation and memory impairment. Late magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse hyperintensity in the cerebral white matter. Conclusion: White matter lesions which progress to demyelination and end up in neuropsychological sequelae cannot always be diagnosed by early computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in carbon monoxide poisoning.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar disc herniation with special reference to the myelographic and anatomical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamura, Yuichi; Imamura, Kiyohiko; Uematsu, Hirokazu; Sakai, Naotaka; Yamashita, Hajime; Takemura, Kenji (Yokosuka Kyosai Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1992-08-01

    T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of 49 lumbar vertebrae from 44 patients were restrospectively reviewed, focusing on herniated material, low signal intensity zone and extradural fatty tissue in the posterior edge of intervertebral disc. Morphological MR appearance was correlated with myelograms and surgical findings to determine which morphology can be detected by MR imaging alone. The MR features of the posterior edge of intervertebral disc were morphologically divided into three main types: (I) massive, swollen herniation and clear low signal intensity zone, but little or no disruption of the extradual fatty tissue; (II) posterior protrusion of the segmental herniation, partial unclearness or lack of low signal intensity zone, and disrupted extradual fatty tissue; and (III) massive herniation, lack of low signal intensity zone, and widespread disruption of the extradual fatty tissue. Types I, II and, III were seen in 18, 19, and 12 vertebrae, respectively. Herniation was clearly visualized on T1-weighted images in 73% for Type II and 83% for Type III, compared to 28% for Type I. Herniated material was seen as isointensity in 18 vertebrae in Type II and as hyperintensity in 7 vertebrae in Type III. Fifteen vertebrae (79%) in Type II and 9 vertebrae (75%) in Type III were diagnosed by MR imaging alone, which is contrast with Type I in which 11 vertebrae required myelography for diagnosis. In evaluable 25 vertebrae, common surgical findings were bulging in Type I, prolaps in Type II, and extrusion or sequestration in Type III. (N.K.).

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of placental adhesive disorders: correlation with color Doppler ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masselli, Gabriele; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Gualdi, Gianfranco [Umberto I Hospital-La Sapienza University, Department of Radiology DEA, Rome (Italy); Brunelli, Roberto; Piccioni, Maria G.; Anceschi, Maurizio [Umberto I Hospital-La Sapienza University, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Rome (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the value of pelvic ultrasound with color Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in: (1) the diagnosis of placental adhesive disorders (PADs), (2) the definition of the degree of placenta invasiveness, (3) determining the topographic correlation between the diagnostic images and the surgical results. Fifty patients in the third trimester of pregnancy with a diagnosis of placenta previa and at least one previous caesarean section underwent color Doppler ultrasound (US) and MRI. The sonographic and MRI diagnoses were compared with the final pathologic or operative findings. Outcomes at delivery were as follows: normal placenta (n = 38) and PAD (n = 12). MR and US Doppler showed no statistically difference in identiyfing patients with PAD (P = 0.74), while MRI was statistically better than US Doppler in evaluating the depth of placenta infiltration (P < 0.001). MRI accurately characterized the topography of invasion in 12/12 (100%) of the cases, while US accurately characterized the topography of invasion in 9/12 (75%) of the cases. In conclusion, we confirmed that pelvic US is highly reliable to diagnose or exclude the presence of PAD and found MRI to be an excellent tool for the staging and topographic evaluation of PAD. (orig.)

  14. Spontaneous disc degeneration in the baboon model: magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platenberg, R C; Hubbard, G B; Ehler, W J; Hixson, C J

    2001-10-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of disability in humans. The baboon model is an excellent natural disease model to study comparable human disease, because baboons are relatively large (adult males 20-26 kg, adult females 12-17 kg), long-lived (30-45 years), well defined, easy to use, and closely related to humans. Published investigations with plain radiographs of disc degeneration in baboons indicated vertebral anatomy and changes that were remarkably similar to those seen in humans, and it would be valuable to determine if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathologic evaluation would be useful methods for studying the model, as MRI allows multi-planar visualization of tissues without the use of intravenous contrast and it is superior for evaluating disc hydration, annulus tears, and herniations. The thoracolumbar junctions from 47 randomly selected baboons, ranging in age from 2 weeks to 34 years, were evaluated with MRI and histopathology. Excellent correlation with MRI was observed for changes in disc desiccation, height, and age (P discs seen by MRI were in baboons 14 years of age or older.

  15. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging for the pedunculopontine nucleus: proof of concept and histological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, A T D L; Hamani, C; Alho, E J L; da Silva, R E; Santos, G A B; Neves, R C; Carreira, L L; Araújo, C M M; Magalhães, G; Coelho, D B; Alegro, M C; Martin, M G M; Grinberg, L T; Pasqualucci, C A; Heinsen, H; Fonoff, E T; Amaro, E

    2017-08-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been proposed as target for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with postural instability and gait disorders due to its involvement in muscle tonus adjustments and control of locomotion. However, it is a deep-seated brainstem nucleus without clear imaging or electrophysiological markers. Some studies suggested that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may help guiding electrode placement in the PPN by showing the surrounding fiber bundles, but none have provided a direct histological correlation. We investigated DTI fractional anisotropy (FA) maps from in vivo and in situ post-mortem magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared to histological evaluations for improving PPN targeting in humans. A post-mortem brain was scanned in a clinical 3T MR system in situ. Thereafter, the brain was processed with a special method ideally suited for cytoarchitectonic analyses. Also, nine volunteers had in vivo brain scanning using the same MRI protocol. Images from volunteers were compared to those obtained in the post-mortem study. FA values of the volunteers were obtained from PPN, inferior colliculus, cerebellar crossing fibers and medial lemniscus using histological data and atlas information. FA values in the PPN were significantly lower than in the surrounding white matter region and higher than in areas with predominantly gray matter. In Nissl-stained histologic sections, the PPN extended for more than 10 mm in the rostro-caudal axis being closely attached to the lateral parabrachial nucleus. Our DTI analyses and the spatial correlation with histological findings proposed a location for PPN that matched the position assigned to this nucleus in the literature. Coregistration of neuroimaging and cytoarchitectonic features can add value to help establishing functional architectonics of the PPN and facilitate neurosurgical targeting of this extended nucleus.

  16. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, Max, E-mail: max.seidensticker@med.ovgu.de [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Burak, Miroslaw [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Poland); Kalinski, Thomas [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Pathologie (Germany); Garlipp, Benjamin [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefäßchirurgie (Germany); Koelble, Konrad [Philipps Universität Marburg, Fachbereich Medizin der, Abteilung für Neuropathologie (Germany); Wust, Peter [Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie (Germany); Antweiler, Kai [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Institut für Biometrie und Medizinische Informatik (Germany); Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Universitätsklinik Magdeburg, Klinik für Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  17. The galenic venous system: Surgical anatomy and its angiographic and magnetic resonance venographic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, Tuerker [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey) and Marmara University, Department of Anatomy, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: turkilic@tnn.net; Ozduman, Koray [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey); Cavdar, Safiye [Marmara University, Department of Anatomy, Istanbul (Turkey); Oezek, M. Memet [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey); Pamir, M. Necmettin [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-11-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the adequacy of digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography in imaging of the galenic venous system for surgical planning of approaches to the pineal region. Anatomical dissections were carried out in 10 cadavers of several age groups and these were compared to imaging findings in 10 living subjects. Methods: The presence or absence of 10 predetermined veins or vein groupings belonging to the galenic venous system were prospectively analyzed in 10 cadaver dissections and imaging findings of 10 age matched human subjects. The studied vessels were the vein of galen, the internal cerebral veins, both basal vein of Rosenthals, internal occipital vein, occipitotemporal veins, precentral cerebellar veins, tectal veins, pineal veins, superior vermian veins (including superior cerebellar veins (SCVs)) and posterior pericallosal veins. Each of the subjects had both digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography studies performed. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography was performed using the transfemoral route and the venous phase was used for the study. Magnetic resonance venography was performed in 1.5 T MRI equipment using the 2D-TOF sequence. All studies were reported to be normal. Results: There was wide variation in the anatomy of the galenic venous system. There were interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related variations. Both the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography were efficient at demonstrating large veins. However, smaller veins were less readily demonstrated in either study. The general sensitivities of the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography for the galenic venous system were 45.5% and 32.5%, respectively. Surgically important veins were missed in most studies. Conclusions: Anatomically, the galenic venous system is highly variable. This variability is caused by interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of normal appearing white matter in early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: correlations between disability and spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foronda Jesus

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background What currently appears to be irreversible axonal loss in normal appearing white matter, measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy is of great interest in the study of Multiple Sclerosis. Our aim is to determine the axonal damage in normal appearing white matter measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and to correlate this with the functional disability measured by Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite scale, Neurological Rating Scale, Ambulation Index scale, and Expanded Disability Scale Score. Methods Thirty one patients (9 male and 22 female with relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis and a Kurtzke Expanded Disability Scale Score of 0–5.5 were recruited from four hospitals in Andalusia, Spain and included in the study. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans and neurological disability assessments were performed the same day. Results A statistically significant correlation was found (r = -0.38 p Conclusions There is correlation between disability (measured by Expanded Disability Scale Score and the NAA/Cr ratio in normal appearing white matter. The lack of correlation between the NAA/Cr ratio and the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite score indicates that the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite is not able to measure irreversible disability and would be more useful as a marker in stages where axonal damage is not a predominant factor.

  19. Pain and disability correlated with disc degeneration via magnetic resonance imaging in scoliosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Buttermann, Glenn R.; Mullin, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Prior imaging studies of scoliosis patients attempted to demonstrate a relationship between plain radiographic curve patterns and curve progression and pain, or used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to focus on spinal cord abnormalities. Pain in scoliosis patients may differ from nondeformity patients, yet may still be discogenic. The purpose of this study was to assess the possible relationship of degenerative disc findings on MRI to scoliosis patients’ pain. This prospective study enrolled ...

  20. Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: magnetic resonance imaging findings and correlation with clinical and immunological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Pilar; Sarbu, Nicolae; Espinosa, Gerard; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2013-10-01

    Neuropsychiatric (NP) syndromes are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aims of this work were to describe the brain abnormalities in a group of SLE patients during their first episode of NP manifestations using a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and to investigate the possible correlation between these findings and the clinical and immunological characteristics of these patients. We performed an observational retrospective cross-sectional study that included all patients with NP symptoms who underwent MRI at the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona between the years 2003 and 2012 because of suspecting NP syndromes due to SLE (NPSLE). We studied 43 patients in which 11 types of NPSLE were present, being headache the most frequent, followed by cerebrovascular disease, epileptic crises and cranial neuropathy. A statistically significant association was found between myelopathy and low complement (C4) levels (p=0.035) and disease activity measured as SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) >4 (p=0.00006). Eighteen (41.9%) patients presented MRI abnormalities. We found an association between myelopathy and the presence of inflammatory or mixed (vascular and inflammatory) type lesions (p=0.003). This pattern was also associated with a high SLEDAI score (p=0.002) and low complement (CH50) levels (p=0.032). We found no relationship between MRI changes and age, time of evolution, or the presence of antiphospholipid or anti-dsDNA antibodies. These results suggest that MRI, although it is the imaging modality of choice in the present moment, by itself does not establish or exclude the diagnosis of NPSLE. In addition, the presence of certain disease activity features (SLEDAI and low complement levels) seems to be associated with the presence of an inflammatory pattern on MRI. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlation between subcutaneous knee fat thickness and chondromalacia patellae on magnetic resonance imaging of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Hong Kuan; Donnellan, John; Ryan, Davinia; Torreggiani, William C

    2013-08-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a common cause of anterior knee pain in young patients and can be detected noninvasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of our study was to evaluate the correlation between subcutaneous fat thickness around the knee joint on axial MRIs as a surrogate marker of obesity, with the presence or absence of chondromalacia patellae. A retrospective review was conducted of knee MRIs in 170 patients who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Imaging was performed over a 12-month period on a 1.5T MRI system with a dedicated extremity coil. Two radiologists experienced in musculoskeletal imaging assessed each examination in consensus for the presence or absence of chondromalacia patellae and graded positive studies from 0 (absent) to 3 (full cartilage thickness defect). Measurement of subcutaneous knee fat thickness was obtained on the medial aspect of the knee. MRI findings of chondromalacia patellae were present in 33 patients (19.4%), of which, there were 11 grade 1 lesions (33.3%), 9 grade 2 lesions (27.3%), and 13 grade 3 lesions (39.4%). The mean subcutaneous knee fat thickness was significantly higher in the chondromalacia patellae group for all grades compared with the normal group (P chondromalacia patellae (R = 0.48 [95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.68]; P chondromalacia patellae. Subcutaneous knee fat thickness as a surrogate marker of obesity was positively associated with the presence and severity of chondromalacia patellae on MRI. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of new magnetic resonance imaging modalities in diagnosis of orbital masses: A clinicopathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshdy Nader

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in the diagnosis of different orbital masses and their advantages over conventional MRI. Materials and Methods: The study included 20 patients presenting with proptosis. Every patient was subjected to thorough clinical examination, conventional MRI "T1 weighted, T2 weighted, and postcontrast T1 weighted if needed," diffusion-weighted MRI, and proton MRS. Orbitotomy was performed, the orbital mass was excised, and histopathological examination was performed. Results: Diffusion-weighted MRI could differentiate between benign lesions and malignant tumors in 70% of cases; however, overlap occurred in 30% of cases with benign tumors showing restricted diffusion whereas proton MRS could differentiate between benign and malignant tumors in 90% of cases. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted MRI and proton MRS can potentially increase the accuracy of diagnosis of orbital masses through in vivo tissue characterization. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy seems to be the more accurate modality.

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging 3T and prostate cancer: correlation with transperineal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Roberto; Altieri, Vincenzo Maria; Marchioni, Michele; Castellan, Pietro; Pellegrini, Maurizio; Álvarez-Maestro, Mario; Sánchez-Gómez, Javier; De Francesco, Piergustavo; Ingrosso, Manuela; Tartaro, Armando; Tenaglia, Raffaele Lanfranco

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to correlate the results obtained by 3T Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI3T) with those obtained by histological examination of samples of the trans-perineal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TPUS-B). 34 patients were enrolled in the study. All patients had a clinical suspicion of cancer due to increased PSA and/or positive digital rectal examination. Patients were subjected to an MRSI 3T examination and subsequently to TPUS-B. Of the 22 (22/34) patients who presented abnormalities MRSI at 3T, 9 had a histological diagnosis of Prostate adenocarcinoma. Of the remaining 13 patients, 6 were found to be histologically positive for Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy and 7 Chronic Interstitial Inflammation or High Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia. 12 (12/34) patients found to have no peripheral alterations in their prostate on 3T MRSI, none were positive for ADK or inflammation on histology. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 100%, 48%, 40% and 100% respectively. In this study, we correlated the values obtained from 3T MRSI with the results of histologically examined prostate biopsies. Our work shows that 72.8% of the voxels in which there was a change in ratio of Cit/(Cho + Cr), corresponded to areas of prostate tissue disease. Of these, 73.2% were positive for ADK and 26.8% for CII or HG PIN. In literature, it is noted that PCa can be distinguished from areas of benign tissue, in the peripheral zone, on the basis of the values of the ratio Cit/(Cho + Cr) (17), although some benign conditions, such as prostatitis or PINHG, can alter these values (18-19). In conclusion, the use of MRSI 3T before performing prostate biopsies may represent a valid aid for the urologist in the diagnosis of PCa, allowing them to avoid unnecessary prostate biopsies that may be negative. Furthermore, it would also be possible to reduce the total number of biopsies, thus decreasing patient exposure

  4. Sonography of Abdominal Wall Masses and Masslike Lesions: Correlation With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sung Eun; Park, Seong Jin; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Lee, Dong Ho; Lim, Joo Won

    2016-01-01

    Sonography is usually regarded as a first-line imaging modality for masses and masslike lesions in the abdominal wall. A dynamic study focusing on a painful area or palpable mass and the possibility of ultrasound-guided aspiration or biopsy are the major advantages of sonography. On the other hand, cross-sectional imaging clearly shows anatomy of the abdominal wall; thereby, it is valuable for diagnosing and evaluating the extent of diseases. Cross-sectional imaging can help differentiate neoplastic lesions from non-neoplastic lesions. This pictorial essay focuses on sonographic findings of abdominal wall lesions compared with computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  5. The effect of musical training on the neural correlates of math processing: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmithorst, Vincent J; Holland, Scott K

    2004-01-16

    The neural correlates of the previously hypothesized link between formal musical training and mathematics performance are investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). FMRI was performed on fifteen normal adults, seven with musical training since early childhood, and eight without, while they mentally added and subtracted fractions. Musical training was associated with increased activation in the left fusiform gyrus and prefrontal cortex, and decreased activation in visual association areas and the left inferior parietal lobule during the mathematical task. We hypothesize that the correlation between musical training and math proficiency may be associated with improved working memory performance and an increased abstract representation of numerical quantities.

  6. Exploring Electrical and Magnetic Resonances from Coherently Correlated Long-Lived Radical Pairs towards Development of Negative Refractive-Index Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-03

    Resonances from Coherently Correlated Long-Lived Radical Pairs towards Development of Negative Refractive - Index materials Grant/Contract Number AFOSR... Refractive - Index Materials Subtitle: Task 1: Radicals Based Molecular Metamaterials Task 2: Thin-Film Based Polymer Thermoelectric Devices 5a...and Magnetic Resonances from Coherently Correlated Long-Lived Radical Pairs towards Development of Negative - Index Materials Principle Investigator

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in patients with spondyloarthritis: correlation with anatomy and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, K-G A; Bollow, M

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) has become established as a valuable modality for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis in patients with inconclusive radiographic findings. Positive MRI findings have the same significance as a positive test for HLA-B27. Sacroiliitis is one of the key features of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) in the classification proposed by the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) group. Early signs of sacroiliitis include enthesitis of articular fibrocartilage, capsulitis, and osteitis. In more advanced disease, structural (chronic) lesions will be visible, including periarticular fatty deposition, erosions, subchondral sclerosis, and transarticular bone buds and bridges. In this article we describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings and provide histologic biopsy specimens of the respective disease stages. The predominant histologic feature of early and active sacroiliitis is the destruction of cartilage and bone by proliferations consisting of fibroblasts and fibrocytes, T-cells, and macrophages. Advanced sacroiliitis is characterized by new bone formation with enclosed cartilaginous islands and residual cellular infiltrations, which may ultimately lead to complete ankylosis. Knowledge of the morphologic appearance of the sacroiliac joints and their abnormal microscopic and gross anatomy is helpful in correctly interpreting MR findings.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in patients with spondyloarthritis. Correlation with anatomy and histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, K.G.A. [Charite Medical School, Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Bollow, M. [Augusta Hospital, Bochum (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2014-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) has become established as a valuable modality for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis in patients with inconclusive radiographic findings. Positive MRI findings have the same significance as a positive test for HLA-B27. Sacroiliitis is one of the key features of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) in the classification proposed by the Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) group. Early signs of sacroiliitis include enthesitis of articular fibrocartilage, capsulitis, and osteitis. In more advanced disease, structural (chronic) lesions will be visible, including periarticular fatty deposition, erosions, subchondral sclerosis, and transarticular bone buds and bridges. In this article we describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings and provide histologic biopsy specimens of the respective disease stages. The predominant histologic feature of early and active sacroiliitis is the destruction of cartilage and bone by proliferations consisting of fibroblasts and fibrocytes, T-cells, and macrophages. Advanced sacroiliitis is characterized by new bone formation with enclosed cartilaginous islands and residual cellular infiltrations, which may ultimately lead to complete ankylosis. Knowledge of the morphologic appearance of the sacroiliac joints and their abnormal microscopic and gross anatomy is helpful in correctly interpreting MR findings. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of acute crush injury of rabbit sciatic nerve: correlation with histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou (China)], E-mail: xinchunli@163.com; Shen, J.; Chen, J.; Wang, X.; Liu, Q.; Liang, B. [Dept. of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Guangzhou (China)

    2008-06-15

    To investigate the relation between the quantitative assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and the correlation with histology and functional recovery by using the rabbit sciatic nerve crush model. In New Zealand, 32 rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups (group A and B); all rabbits underwent crushing injury of their left sciatic nerve. In group A (n = 16), the sciatic nerves were crushed by using microvessel clamps with a strength of 3.61 kg. In group B (n = 16), the sciatic nerves were crushed with a strength of 10.50 kg. Right sciatic nerves were served as controls. Serial MRI of both hind limbs in each rabbit was performed before and at the time point of 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after crushed injury. The MRI protocol included T1-weighted spin-echo (T1WI), 3 dimension turbo spin-echo T2-weighted (3DT2WI), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images with spectral presaturation with inversion recovery (T2WI/SPIR), balanced fast-field echo (B-FFE) and short-time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. The coronal image of the sciatic nerve was obtained. The nerve and muscle signal ratio (SIR) on each sequence was measured. The function recovery was observed and pathological examination was performed at each time point. A signal intensity increase of the distal segment of crushed sciatic nerves was found on 3DT2WI, T2WI/SP1R, B-FFE, and STIR, but not on T,WI images. Of 32 crushed nerves, 30 nerves showed high signal intensity. The correct diagnostic rate was 93.75% with false negative-positive of 6.25%. The SIR of the crushed sciatic nerve at distal portion was higher than those of the control nerves; there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). The SIR of the distal portion of crushed nerves was higher than that of the proximal nerve portion; there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). Whereas, the SIR at proximal nerve portions of crushed nerve was similar to control nerves (P > 0.05). The SIR between group A and group B

  11. Correlation between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Haeng Un; Choi, Sun Young; Koh, Kwang Joon [School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-15

    To evaluate the relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and six MR images of TMJs in 53 patients were evaluated. Disc displacements and osseous changes of the TMJs were assessed. Lateral and rotational disc displacements were also evaluated on coronal images. No significant differences in the frequency of osseous changes of the TMJs between disc displacement with reduction and disc displacement without reduction groups were found. The erosion of the condylar head and the sclerosis of the articular eminence were more frequent in the internal derangement group than in the no disc displacement group. The flattening was the most frequently observed osseous change of both the condylar head and articular eminence. The relationship between internal derangement and osteoarthrosis is obscure, but it is thought that both disorders adversely affect each other.

  12. High resolution surface coil magnetic resonance imaging of the joints: anatomic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, W D; Macrander, S; Lawson, T L; Kneeland, J B; Cates, J D; Kellman, G M; Carrera, G F; Foley, W D; Jesmanowicz, A; Hyde, J S

    1987-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging appears to be a particularly promising approach to the evaluation of articular and periarticular abnormalities. Its ability to produce images in multiple planes directly (without reconstruction) provides a unique advantage over CT for the radiologist when he attempts to interpret the complex three dimensional anatomy of most joints. The inherent contrast resolution of MR is excellent, and with the use of surface coils, spatial resolution is sufficient to permit the identification of the small soft tissue structures in and around joints. Artifacts generated by respiratory and cardiac motion are not a problem in MRI of the joints as they are in MR scanning of the body. Based on all these qualities, we believe that MRI will play an important role in the diagnosis of joint abnormalities.

  13. Visual object agnosia and pure word alexia: correlation of functional magnetic resonance imaging and lesion localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvan, Carmen V; Ulmer, John L; DeYoe, Edgar A; Wascher, Thomas; Mathews, Vincent P; Lewis, James W; Prost, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of a 64-year-old, right-handed female with a metastatic breast cancer lesion involving the left posterior inferior temporal lobe causing complete loss of the ability to recognize visually common objects and words. After her symptoms resolved on corticosteroid therapy, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) mapping demonstrated strong left-hemispheric dominance for word recognition and right-hemispheric dominance for object recognition. The case illustrates the relationships among ventral occipito-temporal cortical activation, lesion localization, and lesion-induced deficits of higher visual function. The relationship between hemispheric dominance determined by fMRI and risk of postoperative deficit depends on the specific visual function of interest.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic hydatid disease; Correlation with clinical findings, radiography, ultrasonography, CT and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Rifal, A.; Te Strake, L.; Sieck, J. (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Medicine Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thoracic manifestations of hydatid disease (HD) are discussed; one patient had recurrent HD of the chest wall and the other, intrapulmonary HD after rupture and intrathoracic extension of an infradiaphragmatic cyst. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the manifestations of HD in the thorax are similar to previously reported MR findings in HD in the liver. The presence of a low signal intensity rim on T2 weighted images representing the cyst wall was confirmed. On T1 weighted images cysts with heterogeneous low and intermediate signal intensity contents and a relatively high signal intensity wall were seen. ''Folded parasitic membranes'' previously not described on MR were noted. Daughter cysts may have a low or high signal intensity depending on contents. Reactive changes in the lung may be quite marked compared with the liver, due to reaction to the parasite or simply because the lung is more easily compressed leading to secondary atelectasis. (orig.).

  15. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging correlates of physical disability in relapse onset multiple sclerosis of long disease duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, MA; Valsasina, P; Balk, L; Sastre-Garriga, J; Reinhardt, J; Ruggieri, S; Rovira, A; Stippich, C; Kappos, L; Sprenger, T; Tortorella, P; Rovaris, M; Gasperini, C; Montalban, X; Geurts, JJG; Polman, CH; Barkhof, F; Filippi, M; Altmann, DR; Ciccarelli, O; Miller, DH; Chard, DT

    2014-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a key goal of research; it is relevant to how we monitor and treat the disease. Objectives: The Magnetic Imaging in MS (MAGNIMS) collaborative group sought to determine the relationship of brain lesion load, and brain and spinal cord atrophy, with physical disability in patients with long-established MS. Methods: Patients had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of their brain and spinal cord, from which we determined brain grey (GMF) and white matter (WMF) fractional volumes, upper cervical spinal cord cross-sectional area (UCCA) and brain T2-lesion volume (T2LV). We assessed patient disability using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). We analysed associations between EDSS and MRI measures, using two regression models (dividing cohort by EDSS into two and four sub-groups). Results: In the binary model, UCCA (p < 0.01) and T2LV (p = 0.02) were independently associated with the requirement of a walking aid. In the four-category model UCCA (p < 0.01), T2LV (p = 0.02) and GMF (p = 0.04) were independently associated with disability. Conclusions: Long-term physical disability was independently linked with atrophy of the spinal cord and brain T2 lesion load, and less consistently, with brain grey matter atrophy. Combinations of spinal cord and brain MRI measures may be required to capture clinically-relevant information in people with MS of long disease duration. PMID:23812283

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  18. Knee dislocations: a magnetic resonance imaging study correlated with clinical and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, Kimmie L. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, HB6, Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Parker, Richard D. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopaedics, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Our objectives were to determine retrospectively the prevalence, patients' demographics, mechanism of injury, combination of torn ligaments, associated intra-articular and extra-articular injuries, fractures, bone bruises, femoral-tibial alignment and neurovascular complications of knee dislocations as evaluated by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. From 17,698 consecutive knee examinations by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over a 6-year period, 20 patients with knee dislocations were identified. The medical records of these patients were subsequently reviewed for relevant clinical history, management and operative findings. The prevalence of knee dislocations was 0.11% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.06-0.16]. There were 16 male patients and four female patients, with ages ranging from 15 years to 76 years (mean 31 years). Fifteen patients had low-velocity injuries (75%), of which 11 were amateur sports related and four were from falls. Four patients (20%) had suffered high-velocity trauma (motor vehicle accidents). One patient had no history available. Anatomic alignment was present at imaging in 16 patients (80%). Eighteen patients had three-ligament tears, two had four-ligament tears. The four-ligament tears occurred with low-velocity injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) were torn in every patient; the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) was torn in 50%, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in 60%. Intra-articular injuries included meniscal tears (five in four patients), fractures (eight in seven patients), bone bruises (15 patients), and patellar retinaculum tears (eight partial, two complete). The most common extra-articular injury was a complete biceps femoris tendon tear (five, 25%). There were two popliteal tendon tears and one iliotibial band tear. One patient had received a vascular injury following a motor vehicle accident (MVA) and had been treated prior to undergoing MRI. Bone bruises

  19. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ...

  2. Radiographic Evaluation of Valvular Heart Disease With Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempel, Jason K; Bolen, Michael A; Renapurkar, Rahul D; Azok, Joseph T; White, Charles S

    2016-09-01

    Valvular heart disease is a group of complex entities with varying etiologies and clinical presentations. There are a number of imaging tools available to supplement clinical evaluation of suspected valvular heart disease, with echocardiography being the most common and clinically established, and more recent emergence of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging as additional supportive techniques. Yet even with these newer and more sophisticated modalities, chest radiography remains one of the earliest and most common diagnostic examinations performed during the triage of patients with suspected cardiac dysfunction. Recognizing the anatomic and pathologic features of cardiac radiography including the heart's adaptation to varying hemodynamic changes can provide clues to the radiologist regarding the underlying etiology. In this article, we will elucidate several principles relating to chamber modifications in response to pressure and volume overload as well as radiographic appearances associated with pulmonary fluid status and cardiac dysfunction. We will also present a pattern approach to optimize analysis of the chest radiograph for valvular heart disease, which will help guide the radiologist down a differential diagnostic pathway and create a more meaningful clinical report.

  3. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Ona, Ositadinma; Majors, Paul D.

    2008-02-18

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional, communities that are found nearly everywhere in nature1 and are being recognized as the cause of treatment-resistant infections1 2. Advanced methods are required to characterize their collective and spatial patterns of metabolism however most techniques are invasive or destructive. Here we describe the use of a combined confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy system to monitor structure, mass transport, and metabolism in active biofilms. Non-invasive NMR methods provide macroscopic structure along with spatially-resolved metabolite profiles and diffusion measurements. CLSM enables monitoring of cells by fluorescent protein reporters to investigate biofilm structure and gene expression concurrently. A planar sample chamber design facilitates depth-resolved measurements on 140 nL sample volumes under laminar flow conditions. The techniques and approaches described here are applicable to environmental and medically relevant microbial communities, thus providing key metabolic information for promoting beneficial biofilms and treating associated diseases.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumorCorrelation between structure and metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Min; Chen Niu; Netra Rana; Huanmei Ji; Ming Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging are non-invasive techniques used to detect metabolites and water diffusion in vivo. Previous studies have confirmed a positive correlation of individual fractional anisotropy values with N-acetylaspartate/creatine and N-acetylaspartate/choline ratios in tumors, edema, and normal white matter. This study divided the brain parenchyma into tumor, peritumoral edema, and normal-appearing white matter according to MRI data, and analyzed the correlation of metabolites with water molecular diffusion. Results demonstrated that in normal-appearing white matter, N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratios were positively correlated with fractional anisotropy values, negatively correlated with radial diffusivities, and positively correlated with maximum eigenvalues. Maximum eigenvalues and radial diffusivities in peritumoral edema showed a negative correlation with choline, N-acetylaspartate, and creatine. Radial diffusivities in tumor demonstrated a negative correlation with choline. These data suggest that the relationship between metabolism and structure is markedly changed from normal white matter to peritumoral edema and tumor. Neural metabolism in the peritumoral edema area decreased with expanding extracellular space. The normal relationship of neural function and microstructure disappeared in the tumor region.

  5. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth [Department of Behavioural Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Hollis, Sally [Medical Statistics Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Yates, David W. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  7. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pancreatic Cancer: Characteristics and Correlation With Histopathologic Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanling; Li, Na; Zhao, Weiwei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Mengqi; Yang, Yong; Wang, Yingmei; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Zhuoli; Larson, Andrew C; Huan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify diffusion and perfusion abnormalities and evaluate correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), MR perfusion and histopathologic parameters of pancreatic cancer (PC). Eighteen patients with PC underwent diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Parameters of DCE-MRI and ADC of cancer and non-cancerous tissue were compared. Correlation between the rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the arterial blood into the extravascular extracellular space (K, volume of the extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (Ve), and ADC of PC and histopathologic parameters were analyzed. The rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the extravascular extracellular space into blood plasma, K, tissue volume fraction occupied by vascular space, and ADC of PC were significantly lower than nontumoral pancreases. Ve of PC was significantly higher than that of nontumoral pancreas. Apparent diffusion coefficient and K values of PC were negatively correlated to fibrosis content and fibroblast activation protein staining score. Fibrosis content was positively correlated to Ve. Apparent diffusion coefficient values and parameters of DCE-MRI can differentiate PC from nontumoral pancreases. There are correlations between ADC, K, Ve, and fibrosis content of PC. Fibroblast activation protein staining score of PC is negatively correlated to ADC and K. Apparent diffusion coefficient, K, and Ve may be feasible to predict prognosis of PC.

  8. Remote viewing with the artist Ingo Swann: neuropsychological profile, electroencephalographic correlates, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A; Roll, W G; Tiller, S G; Koren, S A; Cook, C M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study, the artist Ingo Swann, who helped develop the process of remote viewing (awareness of distant objects or places without employing normal senses), was exposed during a single setting of 30 min. to specific patterns of circumcerebral magnetic fields that significantly altered his subjective experiences. Several times during subsequent days, he was asked to sit in a quiet chamber and to sketch and to describe verbally distant stimuli (pictures or places) beyond his normal senses. The proportions of unusual 7-Hz spike and slow wave activity over the occipital lobes per trial were moderately correlated (rho=.50) with the ratings of accuracy between these distal, hidden stimuli and his responses. A neuropsychological assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging indicated a different structural and functional organization within the parieto-occipital region of the subject's right hemisphere from organizations typically noted. The results suggest that this type of paranormal phenomenon, often dismissed as methodological artifact or accepted as proofs of spiritual existence, is correlated with neurophysiological processes and physical events. Remote viewing may be enhanced by complex experimentally generated magnetic fields designed to interact with the neuromagnetic "binding factor" of consciousness.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of adrenocortical adenomas in childhood: correlation with computed tomography and ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, J.A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Weber, A. [Division of Paediatric Endocrinology, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Reznek, R.H. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Cotterill, A.M. [Division of Paediatric Endocrinology, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Ross, R.J.M. [Department of Endocrinology, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Harris, R.J. [Department of Paediatrics, Royal London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Armstrong, P. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Savage, M.O. [Division of Paediatric Endocrinology, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    There are few descriptions of the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of hyperfunctioning adrenocortical tumours, particularly those occurring in childhood. We studied five patients, two girls and three boys, aged 6-14.3 years, presenting with clinical syndromes of adrenocortical hyperfunction. The diagnoses were Cushing`s syndrome (n = 2), virilisation (n = 2), and Conn`s syndrome (n = 1). Biochemical features suggested an adrenal lesion in each case. MR and ultrasound were performed in all five cases, with CT in four. Each patient had a functional adrenal tumour secreting either cortisol, androgens or aldosterone alone, or a combination of cortisol, androgens and oestradiol. The histological diagnosis was adenoma in four cases and tumour of indeterminate nature in one case. MR clearly showed the tumours (diameter 1.0-7.5 cm), all the lesions being of high signal intensity relative to liver on T2-weighted sequences. CT revealed an adrenal mass in each of the four patients scanned, three of which enhanced after intravenous contrast medium injection. The multiplanar imaging of MR allowed better distinction from adjacent structures and also demonstrated an unenlarged contralateral adrenal gland. In the patient with a 1-cm Conn`s adenoma the lesion was more easily seen on MR than CT. Ultrasound showed the four larger tumours but was unable to visualise the contralateral adrenal or the Conn`s adenoma. In conclusion, the MR appearances of four adrenocortical adenomas and one indeterminate tumour in children are described. MR has been found to be at least equal to CT in the detection of these tumours, with some possible advantages. Both techniques are superior to ultrasound. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  10. 3T magnetic resonance neurography of pudendal nerve with cadaveric dissection correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Avneesh; McKenna, Courtney A; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thawait, Gaurav K; Carrino, John A; Lees, Gary P; Dellon, A Lee

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the pudendal nerve segments that could be identified on magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) before and after surgical marking of different nerve segments. METHODS The hypothesis for this study was that pudendal nerve and its branches would be more easily seen after the surgical nerve marking. Institutional board approval was obtained. One male and one female cadaver pelvis were obtained from the anatomy board and were scanned using 3 Tesla MRI scanner using MR neurography sequences. All possible pudendal nerve branches were identified. The cadavers were then sent to the autopsy lab and were surgically dissected by a peripheral nerve surgeon and an anatomist to identify the pudendal nerve branches. Radiological markers were placed along the course of the pudendal nerve and its branches. The cadavers were then closed and rescanned using the same MRN protocol as the pre-marking scan. The remaining pudendal nerve branches were attempted to be identified using the radiological markers. All scans were read by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. RESULTS The pre-marking MR Neurography scans clearly showed the pudendal nerve at its exit from the lumbosacral plexus in the sciatic notch, at the level of the ischial spine and in the Alcock’s Canal in both cadavers. Additionally, the right hemorrhoidal branch could be identified in the male pelvis cadaver. The perineal and distal genital branches could not be identified. On post-marking scans, the markers were used as identifiable structures. The location of the perineal branch, the hemorroidal branch and the dorsal nerve to penis (in male cadaver)/clitoris (in female cadaver) could be seen. However, the visualization of these branches was suboptimal. The contralateral corresponding nerves were poorly seen despite marking on the surgical side. The nerve was best seen on axial T1W and T2W SPAIR images. The proximal segment could be seen well on 3D DW PSIF sequence. T2W SPACE was not very useful in

  11. 3T magnetic resonance neurography of pudendal nerve with cadaveric dissection correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Avneesh Chhabra; Courtney A McKenna; Vibhor Wadhwa; Gaurav K Thawait; John A Carrino; Gary P Lees; A Lee Dellon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the pudendal nerve segments that could be identified on magnetic resonance neurography(MRN) before and after surgical marking of different nerve segments.METHODS: The hypothesis for this study was that pudendal nerve and its branches would be more easily seen after the surgical nerve marking. Institutional board approval was obtained. One male and one female cadaver pelvis were obtained from the anatomy board and were scanned using 3 Tesla MRI scanner using MR neurography sequences. All possible pudendal nerve branches were identified. The cadavers were then sent to the autopsy lab and were surgically dissected by a peripheral nerve surgeon and an anatomist to identify the pudendal nerve branches. Radiological markers were placed along the course of the pudendal nerve and its branches. The cadavers were then closed and rescanned using the same MRN protocol as the premarking scan. The remaining pudendal nerve branches were attempted to be identified using the radiological markers. All scans were read by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist.RESULTS: The pre-marking MR Neurography scans clearly showed the pudendal nerve at its exit from the lumbosacral plexus in the sciatic notch, at the level of the ischial spine and in the Alcock’s Canal in both cadavers. Additionally, the right hemorrhoidal branch could be identified in the male pelvis cadaver. The perineal and distal genital branches could not be identified. On post-marking scans, the markers were used as identifiable structures. The location of the perineal branch, the hemorroidal branch and the dorsal nerve to penis(in male cadaver)/clitoris(in female cadaver) could be seen. However, the visualization of these branches was suboptimal. The contralateral corresponding nerves were poorly seen despite marking on the surgical side. The nerve was best seen on axial T1W and T2W SPAIR images. The proximal segment could be seen well on 3D DW PSIF sequence. T2W SPACE was not very useful in

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  15. Neural Correlates of Symptom Dimensions in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew R.; Akkal, Dalila; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Mataix-Cols, David; Kalas, Catherine; Devlin, Bernie; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging on a group of pediatric subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder reveals that this group has reduced activity in neural regions underlying emotional processing, cognitive processing, and motor performance as compared to control subjects.

  16. The correlation between magneto-optical response and magnetic dipole resonance excitation in subwavelength silicon-nickel nanogratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musorin, A. I.; Barsukova, M. G.; Shorokhov, A. S.; Neshev, D. N.; Kivshar, Y. S.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The advantages of gyrotopic materials are combined with the field of high-index metamaterials. The enhancement of the magneto-optical response in the spectral vicinity of the magnetic dipole resonance of a dielectric silicon nanodisks is numerically shown.

  17. Neural Correlates of Symptom Dimensions in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew R.; Akkal, Dalila; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Mataix-Cols, David; Kalas, Catherine; Devlin, Bernie; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging on a group of pediatric subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder reveals that this group has reduced activity in neural regions underlying emotional processing, cognitive processing, and motor performance as compared to control subjects.

  18. Hepatic magnetic resonance imaging with T2* mapping of ovariectomized rats: correlation between iron overload and postmenopausal osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lingshan; Peng, Xingui; Wang, Yuancheng; Wang, Yaling; Chen, Min; Wang, Qi; Jin, Jiyang [Zhongda Hospital of Southeast University, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Zhu, Zhengqiu [Zhongda Hospital of Southeast University, Department of Endocrinology, Nanjing (China)

    2014-07-15

    To explore the correlation between liver iron overload and bone mineral density (BMD) in an ovariectomy (OVX) rat model, using liver magnetic resonance (MR)-T2* and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Sprague-Dawley rats received deferoxamine (DFO) or phosphate-buffered saline 3 months after bilateral OVX. MRI and DEXA were performed pre- and postoperatively. Five rats per group were killed every month for micro-CT, histopathology and biochemical examinations. Statistical analysis was performed with independent-samples t tests, box plots and Pearson's correlation analysis. At 2 months postoperatively, BMD was significantly lower in the OVX group than in the control group (P < 0.01), corresponding to the increased serum ferritin concentration (SFC; P < 0.01) and liver iron concentration (LIC; P < 0.01). Liver T2* values significantly differed between the two groups at 1 month postoperatively (P < 0.001) and improved 1 month after DFO injection (P < 0.05). These values were significantly and positively correlated with BMD in the control (r = 0.527, P < 0.001) and OVX (r = 0.456, P < 0.001) groups. Liver MRI T2* changed markedly earlier than BMD, LIC and SFC, and correlated well with osteoporosis; it may thus be a valuable early indicator of osteoporosis. (orig.)

  19. Morphologic and functional abnormalities in patients with Ebstein's anomaly with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: Correlation with tricuspid regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Zhang, Qin; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Ying-Kun; Shi, Ke; Xu, Hua-Yan; Wen, Ling-Yi; Li, Rui; Chen, Jing

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlations of functional and dimensional parameters with the severity of tricuspid regurgitation in patients with Ebstein's anomaly (EA) by using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Thirty-three patients with EA without previous cardiac surgery and 25 normal individuals were recruited and underwent both cardiac MR imaging and preoperative transthoracic echocardiography. The left ventricular (LV) functional parameters and dimensions of the right ventricle (RV) and LV were measured using 3.0-T cardiac MR imaging. Tricuspid regurgitation severity grading was estimated by echocardiography. The functional and dimensional parameters were compared between EA patients and controls using independent sample t-tests. Spearman's rank correlation was used to determine the correlations between the functional and dimensional parameters and tricuspid regurgitation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to predict tricuspid regurgitation severity using individual functional and dimensional parameters. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in the functional and dimensional parameters between EA patients and controls. Within the EA group, tricuspid valve regurgitation negatively correlated well with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (r=-0.558, p=0.001). The ratio of the right ventricular (functional right ventricle) end-diastolic dimension to the left ventricle end-diastolic dimension (RVEDD/LVEDD) in EA patients also correlated well with the severity of tricuspid valve regurgitation (r=0.492, p=0.004). Moreover, ROC analysis revealed that high sensitivity and specificity were obtained for predicting the severity of tricuspid valve regurgitation with LVEF (78.3%, 90.0%) and RVEDD/LVEDD (78.3%, 94.3%). In EA patients, the left and right ventricular functional and dimensional parameters from MRI correlated well with tricuspid regurgitation, which helped predict the severity of EA. Copyright

  20. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuk, Guido M; Schaefer, Stephanie G; Fimmers, Rolf; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R; Ezziddin, Samer; Spengler, Ulrich; Schild, Hans H; Willinek, Winfried A

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a valuable biomarker for liver function. The strongest correlation with liver enhancement was found for the MELD Score. • Relative enhancement (RLE) of Gd-EOB-DTPA is related to biochemical liver function tests. • Correlation of RLE with bilirubin, ALT, AST, GGT, INR and MELD Score is reverse. • The correlation of relative liver enhancement with prothrombin time is positive. • AST, ALT, GLDH, prothrombin time, INR and MELD Score correlate with pre-contrast liver-spleen contrast ratio. • Such biomarkers may help to evaluate liver function.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Signal, Rather Than Tendon Volume, Correlates to Pain and Functional Impairment in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdin, A.; Bruno, J.; Movin, T.; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M.; Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Depts. of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To depict abnormal tendon matrix composition using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic Achilles tendinopathy, and correlate intratendinous signal alterations to pain and functional impairment. Material and Methods: MRI of the Achilles tendon was performed on 25 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (median age 50, range 37-71 years). All patients suffered from pain in the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon. Intratendinous signal was calculated from five different sagittal sequences, using a computerized 3D seed-growing technique. Pain and functional impairment were evaluated using a questionnaire completed by patients. Results: Severity of pain and functional impairment correlated to increased mean intratendinous signal in the painful tendon in all MR sequences (P 0.05). Difference in mean intratendinous signal between symptomatic and contralateral asymptomatic tendons was highly significant in all sequences (P <0.05) except on T2-weighted images (P = 0.6). Conclusion: Severity of pain and disability correlated to increased MR signal rather than to tendon volume in patients with unilateral mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  2. Clinico-radiological correlation of Wilson's disease by magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Ken; Sakata, Chigusa; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Fuji; Sunohara, Nobuhiko (National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan)); Iio, Masaaki

    1991-02-01

    Five patients with Wilson's disease received repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) examinations at intervals from 6 to 29 months. Four patients, except for asymptomatic one, also underwent positron emission tomography (PET). The significance and limitations of these imaging modalities were examined in the light of their correlation with clinical manifestations and their therapeutic evaluation. The following focal regions, detected on MRI, had a strong positive correlation with clinical manifestations: the lenticular nuclei for dystonia, the brain stem for abnormality of smooth persuit eye movements, and the caudate and lenticular nuclei for severe dysarthria/dysphagia. Follow-up MRI for 3 patients showed an improvement of findings in the lenticular nuclei, lateral part of the putamen, and brain stem, that was in accordance with improved clinical or neurologic manifestations, such as dystonia and cerebellar symptoms. Severe abnormality in the caudate nucleus was associated with poor prognosis. Repeated CT failed to show serial changes in any of the patients. Regional blood flow and oxygen metabolic rate, obtained by PET examinations, were slightly decreased in the thalamus that had normal findings on both MRI and CT, as well as in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. PET was, however, inferior to MRI in detecting fine foci within the basal ganglia. In conclusion, there was a good correlation between MRI findings, particularly foci of the caudate and lenticular nuclei, and clinical manifestations. Repeated MRI examinations were the most useful approach to the evaluation of therapeutic effects and prognosis. (N.K.).

  3. Adrenal glands in beta-thalassemia major: magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and correlation with iron stores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drakonaki, Eleni; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Maris, Thomas; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion (Greece); Vasiliadou, Artemis [Aghios Georgios Hospital of Chania, Thalassemia Unit, Chania (Greece); Papadakis, Alex [Venizelion Hospital of Heraklion, Thalassemia Unit, Heraklion (Greece)

    2005-12-01

    This study aimed at describing the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the adrenal glands in beta-thalassemic patients and at investigating the relation between adrenal and hepatic siderosis. Adrenal signal intensity (SI) was retrospectively assessed on abdominal MR studies of 35 patients with beta-thalassemia major undergoing quantification of hepatic siderosis and 12 healthy controls, using T1- (120/4/90), intermediate - (120/4/20), and T2*- (120/15/20) weighted GRE sequences. Adrenal SI was graded as grade 0 (normal SI on all sequences), grade 1 (hypointensity on T2* alone), or grade 2 (hypointensity on at least T2*). Adrenal size was measured in the thalassemic patients and compared with normative data. Liver-to-muscle (L/M) SI ratios, expressing hepatic siderosis, were estimated on each sequence. Serum ferritin levels were recorded. Adrenal hypointensity (grades 1 and 2) was noted in 24/35 (68.6%) patients. L/M ratios correlated significantly with adrenal SI in all sequences. Patients with grade 1 and grade 2 adrenal SI had significantly decreased L/M ratios compared with grade 0. Serum ferritin correlated significantly with L/M values but not with adrenal SI. Adrenal size was within normal limits. Diffuse hypointensity in normal-sized adrenals is a common MR finding in beta-thalassemic patients and correlates with the degree of hepatic siderosis. (orig.)

  4. CHBPR Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Detection of Neurotransmitters in Dorsomedial Medulla Correlate with Spontaneous Baroreceptor Reflex Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Espinosa, Maria A.; Shaltout, Hossam A.; Olson, John; Westwood, Brian M.; Robbins, Mike E.; Link, Kerry; Diz, Debra I.

    2010-01-01

    Control of heart rate variability (HRV) via modulation of sympathovagal balance is a key function of nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus localized in the dorsomedial medulla oblongata. Normal blood pressure regulation involves precise balance of glutamate-glutamine-GABA (Glu-Gln-GABA) transmitter systems, and angiotensin (Ang) II modulates these transmitters to produce tonic suppression of reflex function. It is not known, however, whether other brain transmitters/metabolites are indicators of baroreflex function. This study establishes the concept that comprehensive baseline transmitter/metabolite profiles obtained using in vivo 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H MRS) in rats with well characterized differences in resting blood pressure and baroreflex function can be used as indices of autonomic balance or baroreflex sensitivity. Glu concentration in dorsal medulla is significantly higher in ASrAogen rats compared to either SD and (mRen2)27. Glu levels and the ratio of Glu/Gln correlated positively with indices of higher vagal tone consistent with the importance of these neurotransmitters in baroreflex function. Interestingly, the levels of choline containing metabolites showed a significant positive correlation with spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and a negative correlation with sympathetic tone. Thus, we demonstrate the concept that non-invasive assessment of neurochemical biomarkers may be used as an index of baroreflex sensitivity. PMID:20065146

  5. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  6. Correlation of 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Clinical and Intraoperative Findings for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Arvind; Patil, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A single-center prospective study. Purpose A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is undeniably the gold standard for the diagnosis of a lumbar disc prolapse. Unfortunately it shares a strong association with incidental findings. In this study, we aimed to determine the extent to which a 1.5 Tesla MRI correlates with the clinical features and intraoperative findings in cases of lumbar disc prolapse. Overview of Literature Few studies have correlated MRI with clinical findings, and none have extended this correlation to intraoperative findings. Methods Over a 2-year period, 50 consecutive patients with lumbar disc herniation requiring discectomy were studied. The MRI findings we observed consisted of the prolapse level, type, position, migration, high-intensity zones (HIZ), lateral recess, and foraminal stenosis. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the significance for the various MRI findings. Finally, the MRI observations were confirmed with intraoperative findings and inferences were drawn. Results MRI scan sensitivity and specificity for determining surgically significant levels was 100% and 94.94%, respectively. Straight leg raising test was positive in 74% of patients, with 85%, 43%, and 75% for paracentral, central, and foraminal levels, respectively. A foraminal compromise was the only MRI parameter to share a significant association with neurological deficits. Patients with a HIZ on the MRI had a significant increase in back pain and 63% exhibited identifiable annular tears intraoperatively. The intraoperative anatomical findings correlated extensively with the MRI findings. Conclusions MRI findings strongly correlate with intraoperative features and can serve as a useful tool when planning surgery due to the accurate depiction of the morphometric features. However, the decision for surgery should be made only when detailed clinical findings in conjunction with MRI findings allow for an accurate identification of the

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates of Emotional Word Encoding and Recognition in Depression and Anxiety Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, Marie-Jose; Demenescu, Liliana R.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Kortekaas, Rudle; Nielen, Marjan M. A.; Den Boer, J. A.; Renken, Remco J.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Zitman, Frans G.; Aleman, Andre; Veltman, Dick J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder are among the most prevalent and frequently co-occurring psychiatric disorders in adults and may be characterized by a common deficiency in processing of emotional information. Methods: We used functional magnet

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Buff, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McCarthy, C. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); MacMathuana, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gilligan, P. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Ennis, J.T. [The Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Mater Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1994-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  10. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  12. Quantitative 3D breast magnetic resonance imaging fibroglandular tissue analysis and correlation with qualitative assessments: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Richard; Mema, Eralda; Guo, Xiaotao; Mango, Victoria; Desperito, Elise; Ha, Jason; Wynn, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng

    2016-04-01

    The amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) has been linked to breast cancer risk based on mammographic density studies. Currently, the qualitative assessment of FGT on mammogram (MG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is prone to intra and inter-observer variability. The purpose of this study is to develop an objective quantitative FGT measurement tool for breast MRI that could provide significant clinical value. An IRB approved study was performed. Sixty breast MRI cases with qualitative assessment of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT were randomly selected for quantitative analysis from routine breast MRIs performed at our institution from 1/2013 to 12/2014. Blinded to the qualitative data, whole breast and FGT contours were delineated on T1-weighted pre contrast sagittal images using an in-house, proprietary segmentation algorithm which combines the region-based active contours and a level set approach. FGT (%) was calculated by: [segmented volume of FGT (mm(3))/(segmented volume of whole breast (mm(3))] ×100. Statistical correlation analysis was performed between quantified FGT (%) on MRI and qualitative assessments of mammographic breast density and MRI FGT. There was a significant positive correlation between quantitative MRI FGT assessment and qualitative MRI FGT (r=0.809, n=60, Pqualitative MRI FGT assessment and mammographic density assessment (r=0.725, n=60, Pqualitative assessment categories of FGT correlated with the calculated mean quantitative FGT (%) of 4.61% (95% CI, 0-12.3%), 8.74% (7.3-10.2%), 18.1% (15.1-21.1%), 37.4% (29.5-45.3%). Quantitative measures of FGT (%) were computed with data derived from breast MRI and correlated significantly with conventional qualitative assessments. This quantitative technique may prove to be a valuable tool in clinical use by providing computer generated standardized measurements with limited intra or inter-observer variability.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in acute myocarditis and correlation with immunohistological parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettgen, Rainer; Christiani, Robert; Freyhardt, Patrick; Hamm, Bernd [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Gutberlet, Matthias [Herzzentrum Leipzig, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany); Schultheiss, Hans Peter; Kuehl, Uwe [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Klinik fuer Herz-, Kreislauf- und Gefaessmedizin, Campus Benjamin-Franklin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    To evaluate the role of MRI in diagnosing acute myocarditis by correlation with immunohistological parameters. A total of 131 patients (85 men, 46 women; mean age, 44.9 years) with suspected acute myocarditis were examined by MRI. The relative water content of the left ventricular myocardium as well as relative and late enhancement was correlated with the immunohistological results in biopsy specimens. Myocardial inflammation was confirmed by immunohistology in 82 of the 131 patients investigated and ruled out in 49 patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing myocarditis in patients with immunohistologically proven disease were 48.8%, 73.8% and 57.3%, respectively, for relative enhancement, 58.3%, 57.1% and 57.9% for relative water content, and 30.6%, 88.1% and 49.6% for late enhancement. A combination of all three parameters had 39,3% sensitivity and 91,3% specificity and 62,7% accuracy. Relative enhancement and late enhancement significantly correlated with the presence of myocarditis but relative oedema did not. Relative and late enhancement significantly correlate with the presence of myocarditis, while there is no significant correlation for relative oedema. Myocarditis cannot be reliably diagnosed using any of the three MRI parameters alone but combinations of parameters will improve specificity. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... to remain perfectly still and follow breath-holding instructions while the images are being recorded. If you ... Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  17. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  18. Neurohemodynamic correlates of ′OM′ chanting: A pilot functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangalore G Kalyani

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The neurohemodynamic correlates of ′OM′ chanting indicate limbic deactivation. As similar observations have been recorded with vagus nerve stimulation treatment used in depression and epilepsy, the study findings argue for a potential role of this ′OM′ chanting in clinical practice.

  19. Correlative investigations of craniospinal anatomy and pathology with computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cryomicrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, P

    1988-01-01

    A correlative computed tomographic-anatomic method was applied to multiplanar anatomic studies. The method was particularly valuable for comparative anatomic investigations of complex regions of the central nervous system. The description of CT and MR anatomy in this thesis is based either on direct CT-anatomic correlation of the same specimen, or on indirect MR-anatomic correlation with cryosectional images from cadavers. In sagittal partial saturation MR images with short repetition times, the pituitary fossa in 41 normal volunteers appeared inhomogeneous. A postero-inferiorly located high intensity signal correlated with an intrasellar fat pad in sagittal cryosectional images. The height of the pituitary gland in 38 normal volunteers was usually less than 8 mm and its upper surface was flat or concave. The cavernous sinus anatomy was studied in coronal and axial MR planes in seven normal volunteers and 15 patients in correlation with cryosectional images. The intracavernous cranial nerves were best shown in the coronal plane, in partial saturation and inversion recovery sequences and displayed as foci of high signals intensity. MR signs of a parasellar mass included obliteration of intracavernous venous spaces, displacement of the intracavernous portion of the internal carotid artery and bulging of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. The topographic anatomy of the cervical neuroforamina was investigated in axial, sagittal, coronal and oblique planes in a correlative CT-anatomic investigation in 19 specimens. In four normal volunteers, the surface coil MR images of the cervical neuroforamina were correlated with cryosectional images. Surface coil MR images in a plane perpendicular to the cervical nerve roots allowed to determine their relationship to intraforaminal structures and the boundaries of the foramen. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots were demonstrated with both CT and MRI. They were located in the lower half of the foramen at and below the

  20. Physiological Background of Differences in Quantitative Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Between Acute Malignant and Benign Vertebral Body Fractures: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient With Quantitative Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using the 2-Compartment Exchange Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Biffar, Andreas; Schmidt, Gerwin; Sourbron, Steven; Dietrich, Olaf; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vertebral bone marrow of benign and malignant fractures is related to the volume of the interstitial space, determined with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with acute benign (n = 24) and malignant (n = 19) vertebral body fractures were examined at 1.5 T. A diffusion-weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequence (b = 100 to 600 s/mm) and DCE turbo-FLASH sequence were evaluated. Regions of interest were manually selected for each fracture. Apparent diffusion coefficient was determined with a monoexponential decay model. The DCE magnetic resonance imaging concentration-time curves were analyzed using a 2-compartment tracer-kinetic model. Apparent diffusion coefficient showed a significant positive correlation with interstitial volume in the whole study population (Pearson r = 0.66, P correlation between ADC and the permeability-surface area product could be observed when analyzing the whole study population (Spearman rs = 0.40, P = 0.008), but not when separately examining the subgroups. Plasma flow showed a significant correlation with ADC in benign fractures (Pearson r = 0.23, P = 0.03). Plasma volume did not show significant correlations with ADC. The results support the hypothesis that the ADC of a lesion is inversely correlated to its cellularity. This explains previous observations that ADC is reduced in more malignant lesions.

  1. Cardiothoracic ratio on chest radiograph in pediatric heart disease: How does it correlate with heart volumes at magnetic resonance imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotenhuis, Heynric B. [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Zhou, Cheng; Isaac, Kathryn V. [The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Tomlinson, George [University of Toronto, Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital and Mt. Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon [The University of Toronto, Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, The Labatt Family Heart Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); The University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    The cardiothoracic ratio by chest radiograph is widely used as a marker of cardiac size. The purpose of this study is to correlate cardiothoracic ratio and cardiac volumes as measured by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (MR) in common structural and myopathic heart disease with increased cardiac size due to volume overload or hypertrophy. A retrospective single center study was performed in all patients between 2007 and 2013 with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), aortic regurgitation, isolated left-to-right shunt and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who underwent cardiovascular MR and chest radiograph within 6 months of each other. Cardiothoracic ratios by chest radiograph (frontal and lateral) were compared to cardiac volumes (indexed for body surface area) by cardiovascular MR. One hundred twenty-seven patients (mean age: 11.2 ± 5.5 years) were included in this study (76 with TOF, 23 with isolated left-to-right shunt, 16 with aortic regurgitation and 12 with HCM). Frontal cardiothoracic ratio of all groups correlated with indexed right ventricular (RV) end-diastolic volume (EDVI) (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) and indexed total heart volume (THVI) (r = 0.27, P < 0.01). In TOF patients, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with RVEDVI (r = 0.34, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 27.6%), indexed RV end-systolic volume (ESVI) (r = 0.44, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 33.3%) and THVI (r = 0.35, P < 0.01; coefficient of variation = 19.6%), although RV volumes and THVI showed widespread variation given the high coefficients of variation. In patients with aortic regurgitation, frontal cardiothoracic ratio correlated with left ventricular (LV) EDVI (r = 0.50, P = 0.047), but not with THVI and aortic regurgitant fraction, and widespread variation for LV EDVI (coefficient of variation = 19.2%), LV ESVI (coefficient of variation = 32.5%) and THVI (coefficient of variation = 13.6%) was also observed. Frontal cardiothoracic ratio was not correlated with cardiac volumes

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  7. Is there any Correlation between Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Breast Lesions of BIRADS Category 4 with Histopathologic Results?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Farghadani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of breast lesions of Breast Imaging Reporting and Database System (BI-RADS category 4 with histopathologic results. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study between December 2013 and April 2015, patients with suspicious mammographic and/or ultrasound findings referred for Breast MRI were evaluated. Patients with lesions of BI-RADS category 4 were enrolled with a written informed consent. In each patient, mass lesion (ML or nonmass lesion (NML was determined, and different characteristics of the lesions were recorded. A follow-up program was taken with mean 3–12 months. Patients who underwent core needle biopsy or open biopsy were summoned. Results: Seventy-eight females aged 24–67 years (mean 43.1 ± 8.8 met the inclusion criteria and had adequate samples for histopathologic study. Twenty-nine (37.2% patients had ML and 49 (62.8% patients had NML. Tissue sampling in 63 (80.7% patients was through core needle biopsy and in 15 (19.2% patients through surgery. A wide spectrum of benign and malignant pathologic diagnoses was seen. In statistical analysis, none of the MRI features has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis (P = 0.185. However, the relation between the MRI category (ML or NML and pathology results was significant at level of 0.1 (P = 0.06. Conclusion: This study showed that a wide spectrum of histopathologic results is seen in BI-RADS category 4. However, in this sample volume, none of the MRI features in this BI-RADS category has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis.

  8. Is there any Correlation between Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Breast Lesions of BIRADS Category 4 with Histopathologic Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farghadani, Maryam; Soofi, Ghazale Jamalipoor; Sarrami, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of breast lesions of Breast Imaging Reporting and Database System (BI-RADS) category 4 with histopathologic results. In a prospective study between December 2013 and April 2015, patients with suspicious mammographic and/or ultrasound findings referred for Breast MRI were evaluated. Patients with lesions of BI-RADS category 4 were enrolled with a written informed consent. In each patient, mass lesion (ML) or nonmass lesion (NML) was determined, and different characteristics of the lesions were recorded. A follow-up program was taken with mean 3-12 months. Patients who underwent core needle biopsy or open biopsy were summoned. Seventy-eight females aged 24-67 years (mean 43.1 ± 8.8) met the inclusion criteria and had adequate samples for histopathologic study. Twenty-nine (37.2%) patients had ML and 49 (62.8%) patients had NML. Tissue sampling in 63 (80.7%) patients was through core needle biopsy and in 15 (19.2%) patients through surgery. A wide spectrum of benign and malignant pathologic diagnoses was seen. In statistical analysis, none of the MRI features has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis (P = 0.185). However, the relation between the MRI category (ML or NML) and pathology results was significant at level of 0.1 (P = 0.06). This study showed that a wide spectrum of histopathologic results is seen in BI-RADS category 4. However, in this sample volume, none of the MRI features in this BI-RADS category has a significant correlation with any specific histopathologic diagnosis.

  9. Hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging in patients with liver disease: correlation of liver enhancement with biochemical liver function tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido M.; Schaefer, Stephanie G.; Hadizadeh, Dariusch R.; Schild, Hans H.; Willinek, Winfried A. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Spengler, Ulrich [Department of Internal Medicine I, Bonn (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate hepatobiliary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using Gd-EOB-DTPA in relation to various liver function tests in patients with liver disorders. Fifty-one patients with liver disease underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced liver MRI. Based on region-of-interest (ROI) analysis, liver signal intensity was calculated using the spleen as reference tissue. Liver-spleen contrast ratio (LSCR) and relative liver enhancement (RLE) were calculated. Serum levels of total bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum albumin level (AL), prothrombin time (PT), creatinine (CR) as well as international normalised ratio (INR) and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score were tested for correlation with LSCR and RLE. Pre-contrast LSCR values correlated with total bilirubin (r = -0.39; p = 0.005), GGT (r = -0.37; p = 0.009), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), ALT (r = -0.29; p = 0.046), PT (r = 0.52; p < 0.001), GLDH (r = -0.55; p = 0.044), INR (r = -0.42; p = 0.003), and MELD Score (r = -0.53; p < 0.001). After administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA bilirubin (r = -0.45; p = 0.001), GGT (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), PT (r = 0.54; p < 0.001), AST (r = -0.46; p = 0.002), ALT (r = -0.31; p = 0.030), INR (r = -0.45; p = 0.001) and MELD Score (r = -0.56; p < 0.001) significantly correlated with LSCR. RLE correlated with bilirubin (r = -0.40; p = 0.004), AST (r = -0.38; p = 0.013), PT (r = 0.42; p = 0.003), GGT (r = -0.33; p = 0.020), INR (r = -0.36; p = 0.011) and MELD Score (r = -0.43; p = 0.003). Liver-spleen contrast ratio and relative liver enhancement using Gd-EOB-DTPA correlate with a number of routinely used biochemical liver function tests, suggesting that hepatobiliary MRI may serve as a valuable biomarker for liver function. The strongest correlation with liver enhancement was found for the MELD Score. (orig.)

  10. Correlation between computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of parenchymal lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rafful, Patricia Piazza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rodrigues, Rosana Souza [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); D’Or Institute for Research and Education, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zanetti, Gláucia [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Souza, Arthur Soares [Department of Radiology, Medical School of Rio Preto (FAMERP) and Ultra X, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Guimarães, Marcos Duarte [Department of Imaging, Hospital AC Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the gold standard method for the assessment of morphological changes in the pulmonary parenchyma. Although its spatial resolution is lower than that of CT, MRI offers the advantage of characterizing different aspects of tissue based on the degree of contrast on T1-weighted image (WI) and T2-WI. In this article, we describe and correlate the MRI and CT features of several common patterns of parenchymal lung disease (air trapping, atelectasis, bronchiectasis, cavitation, consolidation, emphysema, ground-glass opacities, halo sign, interlobular septal thickening, masses, mycetoma, nodules, progressive massive fibrosis, reverse halo sign and tree-in-bud pattern). MRI may be an alternative modality for the collection of morphological and functional information useful for the management of parenchymal lung disease, which would help reduce the number of chest CT scans and radiation exposure required in patients with a variety of conditions.

  11. Neural correlates of post-error slowing during a stop signal task: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chiang-shan Ray; Huang, Cong; Yan, Peisi; Paliwal, Prashni; Constable, Robert Todd; Sinha, Rajita

    2008-06-01

    The ability to detect errors and adjust behavior accordingly is essential for maneuvering in an uncertain environment. Errors are particularly prone to occur when multiple, conflicting responses are registered in a situation that requires flexible behavioral outputs; for instance, when a go signal requires a response and a stop signal requires inhibition of the response during a stop signal task (SST). Previous studies employing the SST have provided ample evidence indicating the importance of the medial cortical brain regions in conflict/error processing. Other studies have also related these regional activations to postconflict/error behavioral adjustment. However, very few studies have directly explored the neural correlates of postconflict/error behavioral adjustment. Here we employed an SST to elicit errors in approximately half of the stop trials despite constant behavioral adjustment of the observers. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we showed that prefrontal loci including the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex are involved in post-error slowing in reaction time. These results delineate the neural circuitry specifically involved in error-associated behavioral modifications.

  12. Study of the correlation of brainstem auditory evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobe, Lisete Pessoa de Oliveira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina]. E-mail: lispessoa@yahoo.com

    1999-12-01

    Central auditory evaluation in 21 children with cerebral palsy was done with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) and correlated with brain magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI); 12 boys and 9 girls between 5 and 12 years old were studied. All children had follow-up at the Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology of Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo. The control group was done with 17 children, 10 boys and 7 girls (mean age 8.06 years, SD 2.27 years). The BAEP abnormalities were: decrease of latency of wave V; decrease of latency III-V and I-IV intervals at the right side. All patients has MRI supratentorial abnormalities and 11 had brainstem atrophy. The MRI pathologic findings were: ventricular enlargement (n=17 or 80.95%), cortical/subcortical atrophy (n=15 or 71.42%), left brainstem atrophy (n=11 or 52.38%), periventricular leukomalacia (n=10 or 47.61%), infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory (n=6 or 28.57%), and malformations such as schizencephaly and colpocephaly (n=5 or 23.80%). The findings of the decrease latencies in children with cerebral palsy suggest the contribution of decussating auditory fibers at the lower and upper pons and midbrain, the lack of homogeneity of the surrounding volume of the conductor fibres and the presence of several concurrently active potential generators sources, should be facilitating mechanisms for the nervous input to brainstem. (author)

  13. Metabolic atrophy and 3-T 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy correlation after radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Flavio; Musio, Daniela; Forte, Valerio; Pace, Alberto; De Felice, Francesca; Barchetti, Giovanni; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Catalano, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    To correlate 3-T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy to assess the potential advantages of MRSI. A total of 50 patients (age range 65-83 years) underwent PSA and MRSI surveillance before and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after radiotherapy. Of the 50 patients examined, 13 patients completely responded to therapy showing metabolic atrophy (MA), defined as a choline-plus-creatine/citrate (CC/C) ratio 0.8). Three of those patients with recurrence had a biochemical relapse at 18 months and the other two at 24 months. Two of the 50 patients did not respond to the treatment, showing persistent disease from the 3rd month (CC/C ratio >0.8); one patient had biochemical relapse at 6 and the other at 12 months. MRSI was shown to have a greater potential than PSA level in monitoring patients after radiotherapy, because it anticipates PSA nadir, and biochemical relapse in particular. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of cervical cord injury and its correlation with the patient's outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panggabean, F.; Nakamura, Tsutomu (Kanazawa Medical Univ., Uchinada, Ishikawa (Japan))

    1991-03-01

    Thirty four patients with cervical cord injuries were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with reference to neurological deficits. Studies in the acute or subacute stage were made in 25 patients, of whom 17 patients were studied consecutively up to the chronic stage. Chronic studies were made in 26 patients. In acute or subacute MRI studies 12 patients had an intramedullary high signal intensity (HSI) in the traumatized area on T2-weighted image (T2-WI). In consecutive studies HSI appeared persistently up to the chronic stage in four patients, and a low signal intensity (LSI) appeared a few months after the injury at T1-WI, to this point disclosing the area of iso-signal intensity. The HSI in the remaining eight patients disappeared at least in three months. The former MRI findings might suggest the development of myelomalacia from acute hemorrhagic necrosis while the latter might be edema of the traumatized spinal cord. Nine patients of chronic MRI studies showed myelomalacia in six, syringomyelia in two, and transection of the spinal cord in one patient respectively. Significant correlations between MRI findings and neurological deficits in acute and chronic stage were present. It was concluded that those who had no intramedullary abnormality in MRI showed less severe neurological deficits and better outcomes, while those who had intramedullary abnormality in MRI showed severe neurological deficits and poor outcomes. (author).

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging flow void changes after cerebrospinal fluid shunt in post-traumatic hydrocephalus: clinical correlations and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, Paolo; Miscusi, Massimo; Formisano, Rita; Peschillo, Simone; Polli, Filippo M; Melone, Antonio; Martini, Stefano; Paolini, Sergio; Delfini, Roberto

    2006-07-01

    The assessment of the flow-void in the cerebral aqueduct of patients with post-traumatic hydrocephalus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation could concur the right diagnosis and have a prognostic value. We analysed prospectively 28 patients after a severe head injury (GCScorrelated with a neurological improvement. In already shunted patients, a persistent fast flow-void is associated with a lack of or very slow clinical improvement and it should be considered indicative of under-drainage.

  16. Carotid plaque signal differences among four kinds of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques: A histopathological correlation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Ayumi; Narumi, Shinsuke; Ohba, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Mao; Terayama, Yasuo [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurology and Gerontology, Morioka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke [Iwate Medical University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Morioka (Japan); Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Hitomi, Jiro [Iwate Medical University, Department of Anatomy, Morioka (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Several magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used to examine atherosclerotic plaque of carotid arteries; however, the best technique for visualizing intraplaque characteristics has yet to be determined. Here, we directly compared four kinds of T1-weighted (T1W) imaging techniques with pathological findings in patients with carotid stenosis. A total of 31 patients who were candidates for carotid endarterectomy were prospectively examined using a 1.5-T MRI scanner, which produced four kinds of T1W images, including non-gated spin echo (SE), cardiac-gated black-blood (BB) fast-SE (FSE), magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (MPRAGE), and source image of three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (SI-MRA). The signal intensity of the carotid plaque was manually measured, and the contrast ratio (CR) against the adjacent muscle was calculated. CRs from the four imaging techniques were compared to each other and correlated with histopathological specimens. CRs of the carotid plaques mainly containing fibrous tissue, lipid/necrosis, and hemorrhage were significantly different with little overlaps (range: 0.92-1.15, 1.22-1.52, and 1.55-2.30, respectively) on non-gated SE. However, BB-FSE showed remarkable overlaps among the three groups (0.89-1.10, 1.07-1.23, and 1.01-1.42, respectively). MPRAGE could discriminate fibrous plaques from hemorrhagic plaques but not from lipid/necrosis-rich plaques: (0.77-1.07, 1.45-2.43, and 0.85-1.42, respectively). SI-MRA showed the same tendencies (1.01-1.39, 1.45-2.57, and 1.12-1.39, respectively). Among T1W MR imaging techniques, non-gated SE images can more accurately characterize intraplaque components in patients who underwent CEA when compared with cardiac-gated BB-FSE, MPRAGE, and SI-MRA images. (orig.)

  17. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  18. Neural correlates of consciousness during general anesthesia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, V; Boveroux, P; Brichant, J F; Laureys, S; Boly, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge about the mechanisms of anesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness. It is now evident that hypnotic anesthetic agents have specific brain targets whose function is hierarchically altered in a dose-dependent manner. Higher order networks, thought to be involved in mental content generation, as well as sub-cortical networks involved in thalamic activity regulation seems to be affected first by increasing concentrations of hypnotic agents that enhance inhibitory neurotransmission. Lower order sensory networks are preserved, including thalamo-cortical connectivity into those networks, even at concentrations that suppress responsiveness, but cross-modal sensory interactions are inhibited. Thalamo-cortical connectivity into the consciousness networks decreases with increasing concentrations of those agents, and is transformed into an anti-correlated activity between the thalamus and the cortex for the deepest levels of sedation, when the subject is non responsive. Future will tell us whether these brain function alterations are also observed with hypnotic agents that mainly inhibit excitatory neurotransmission. The link between the observations made using fMRI and the identified biochemical targets of hypnotic anesthetic agents still remains to be identified.

  19. Correlation of liver density by magnetic resonance imaging and hepatic iron levels. A noninvasive means to exclude homozygous hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, S P; Caminer, S J; Yavorski, R T; Borosky, B D; Rak, K M; Merenich, J A; McDermott, M T; McNally, P R

    1996-09-01

    The diagnosis of hemochromatosis requires liver biopsy and the quantification of hepatic iron. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver shows a characteristic decrease in tissue signal intensity in iron overload states, but its role in the diagnosis of hemochromatosis has not been fully delineated. Forty-three patients (31 men and 12 women) were referred for the evaluation of hemochromatosis based upon a fasting transferrin saturation > 55% and/or a serum ferritin > 400 ng/ml in males or > 300 ng/ml in females. Each patient prospectively underwent MRI of the liver prior to percutaneous liver biopsy and quantitative hepatic iron determination. Homozygous hemochromatosis was diagnosed in 10 patients based upon an hepatic iron/age index > or = 2. MRI was performed with a 1.5 Tesla system using standard spin-echo sequences (T1; TR = 300-500 ms, TE = 13-17 ms, PD; TR = 2,000-2,600 ms, TE = 30 ms). Signal intensity values were blindly determined for regions of interest in liver and skeletal muscle at T1 and proton density. Ratios of liver to muscle (LM) for T1 and proton density (PD) calculated from these values showed a significant correlation with quantitative iron by multiple regression analysis. The LMPD ratio provided the best correlation with hepatic iron (r = -0.6946; p 0.5 had hepatic iron/age indices of < 2.0, thereby excluding homozygous hemochromatosis. These results suggest that LMPD ratios derived from MRI of the liver can accurately predict hepatic iron content. These ratios can be clinically useful in the evaluation of hemochromatosis among patients who either refuse or have contraindications to liver biopsy.

  20. AQP4 expression and its correlation with the Lac and NAA using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy after rat cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ren-lan; XIE Peng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether AQP4 expression is associated with lactate (Lac) and Nacetyl aspartate (NAA) and with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) abnormality after rat cerebral ischemia. Methods: The time courses of ADC and lactate and NAA assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) were investigated at the time point of 6 h, and 1, 3, 7 d after rat cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Expression of AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis respectively. Results: Significant reductions of NAA concentration and increases of lactate concentration were found after rat cerebral ischemia. The expressions of AQP4 mRNA and protein were increased at 6 h, and reached the peak at 1-3 d, then began to decrease at 7 d after rat cerebral ischemia. The expression of AQP4 was significantly correlated with NAA (rRT =-0.856, rw =-0. 927, P<0. 01), and with lactate (rW=0. 473, rRT=0. 413, P<0. 05), and with ADC values during the period of 1-7 d after rat cerebral ischemia (rW=0. 984, rRT= -0. 925, P<0.05). In addition, correlations between Lac and the ADC values(r=-0. 677, P<0. 05)and between NAA and ADC values during the period of 1-7 d after rat cerebral ischemia (r= 0. 909, P<0.05) were also observed. Conclusion: The data suggest that AQP4 is involved in the transport of water when brain edema is formed and cell membrane integrity is lost.

  1. Neural correlates of stress and favorite-food cue exposure in adolescents: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommer, Rebecca E; Seo, Dongju; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Chaplin, Tara M; Mayes, Linda C; Sinha, Rajita; Potenza, Marc N

    2013-10-01

    Adolescence is a critical period of neurodevelopment for stress and appetitive processing, as well as a time of increased vulnerability to stress and engagement in risky behaviors. This study was conducted to examine brain activation patterns during stress and favorite-food-cue experiences relative to a neutral-relaxing condition in adolescents. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed using individualized script-driven guided imagery to compare brain responses with such experiences in 43 adolescents. Main effects of condition and gender were found, without a significant gender-by-condition interaction. Stress imagery, relative to neutral, was associated with activation in the caudate, thalamus, left hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus, midbrain, left superior/middle temporal gyrus, and right posterior cerebellum. Appetitive imagery of favorite food was associated with caudate, thalamus, and midbrain activation compared with the neutral-relaxing condition. To understand neural correlates of anxiety and craving, subjective (self-reported) measures of stress-induced anxiety and favorite-food-cue-induced craving were correlated with brain activity during stress and appetitive food-cue conditions, respectively. High self-reported stress-induced anxiety was associated with hypoactivity in the striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain. Self-reported favorite-food-cue-induced craving was associated with blunted activity in cortical-striatal regions, including the right dorsal and ventral striatum, medial prefrontal cortex, motor cortex, and left anterior cingulate cortex. These findings in adolescents indicate the activation of predominantly subcortical-striatal regions in the processing of stressful and appetitive experiences and link hypoactive striatal circuits to self-reported stress-induced anxiety and cue-induced favorite-food craving.

  2. Correlation between liver iron concentration determined by magnetic resonance imaging and serum ferritin in adolescents with thalassaemia disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Laothamathat, Jiraporn; Sirachainan, Nongnuch; Sungkarat, Witaya; Wongwerawattanakoon, Pakawan; Kumkrua, Patrapop

    2016-08-01

    MRI imaging is an alternative to serum ferritin for assessing iron overload in patients with thalassaemia disease. To correlate liver iron concentration (LIC) determined by MRI and clinical and biochemical parameters. An MRI study using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) tools to determine cardiac and liver iron was undertaken in adolescents with thalassaemia disease. Eighty-nine patients (48 males) with thalassaemia disease were enrolled. Seventy patients had been transfusion-dependent since a mean (SD) age of 3.8 (3.0) years, and 19 patients were not transfusiondependent. Mean (SD) haematocrit was 27.3 (2.9)%. Twenty-eight patients were splenectomized. Mean (SD) serum ferritin was 1673 (1506) μg/L. All transfusion-dependent patients received iron chelation at the mean (SD) age of 8.4 (3.5) years with either monotherapy of desferrioxamine, deferiprone, deferasirox or combined therapy of desferrioxamine and deferiprone, while only 5 of 19 patients who were not transfusion-dependent received oral chelation. The 89 patients underwent an MRI scan at the mean (SD) age of 14.8 (3.2) years. No patients had myocardial iron overload, but nine had severe liver iron overload, 27 had moderate liver iron overload, and 36 had mild liver iron overload. A significant correlation between liver T2* and serum ferritin was expressed as the equation: T2* (ms) = 28.080-7.629 log ferritin (μg/L) (r(2) 0.424, P = 0.0001). Patients with serum ferritin of >1000 to >2500 μg/L risked moderate and severe liver iron loading with the odds ratio ranging from 6.8 to 13.3 (95% CI 2.5-50.8). In thalassaemia, MRI is an alternative means of assessing iron stores, but when it is not available serum ferritin can be used to estimate liver T2*.

  3. Breast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with occult breast carcinoma: evaluation on feasibility and correlation with histopathological findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hong; XU Yi-lin; ZHANG Shu-ping; LANG Rong-gang; Chi S.Zee; LIU Pei-fang; FU Li

    2011-01-01

    Background As an uncommon presentation, occult primary breast cancer remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in clinical practice. This study aimed to retrospectively assess the feasibility of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with malignant axillary lymphadenopathy and unknown primary malignancy, and correlation with histopathological characteristics.Methods A total of 35 women with occult breast carcinoma were evaluated with dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. Whole seriate section was used in all cases. MRI performance was assessed and correlated with histopathological findings.Results Twenty-one of 35 patients were found to have primary breast carcinoma histologically. Twenty of the 21 patients had abnormal MR findings and 1 patient had a normal MRI study. Of the remaining 14 patients, 10 were negative on both MRI and surgery. Four had suspicious enhancement on MRI and no corresponding tumor was found. Lesions with mass enhancement were found in 55% (11/20) and ductual and segmental enhancement in 45%. The average diameter of the primary tumors was 15 mm. Invasive ductal carcinomas were found in 81% (17/21). One of 17 invasive ductual carcinomas was too small to be graded. Fourteen of the remaining 16 were classified as grade II and 2 as grade I. Thirty-two of the 35 patients had received estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 examinations and the 12 of 32 were triple-negative breast carcinoma.Conclusions Mass lesions with small size and lesions with ductal or segment enhancement are common MRI features in patients with occult breast cancer. The dominant types of primary tumors are invasive ductal carcinoma with moderate histopathological grade. The rate of triple-negative breast carcinoma may be higher in occult breast cancer.

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  5. Evaluation of invasiveness of astrocytoma using {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy: correlation with expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Li, Chuanfu; Ma, Xiangxing; Meng, Xiangshui; Feng, Dechao [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Qilu Hospital, Jinan (China); Liu, Ying [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Qilu Hospital, Jinan (China); Anhui Provincial Hospital, MRI Department, Hefei (China); Li, Li [Shandong University, Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital, Jinan (China)

    2007-11-15

    Even low-grade astrocytomas infiltrate the entire brain, a feature that precludes their successful therapy. So to assess the invasive potential of astrocytoma is very important. The aim of this study was determine whether there is a significant correlation between the results of {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) and tumor invasive potential of astrocytoma, which is reflected by expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The {sup 1}H-MRS spectra of 41 histologically verified astrocytomas were obtained on a 3-T MR scanner. According to the World Health Organization classification criteria for central nervous system tumors, there were 16 low-grade astrocytomas (2 pilocytic astrocytomas, 14 grade II astrocytomas) and 25 high-grade astrocytomas (5 anaplastic astrocytomas, 20 glioblastomas).The choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) and choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios were calculated. Of the 41 astrocytomas, 19 (8 low-grade and 11 high-grade) were analyzed immunohistochemically. Expression of MMP-2 was determined using streptavidin-peroxidase complex (SP) staining which was quantified by calculating its calibrated opacity density (COD) using an image analysis system. The correlations between metabolite ratios and the quantitative data from the immunohistochemical tests in the 19 astrocytomas were determined. The Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios of high-grade astrocytoma were both significantly greater than those of low-grade astrocytoma (t = -6.222, P = 0.000; t = -6.533, P = 0.000, respectively). MMP-2 COD values of high-grade astrocytomas were also significantly greater than those of low-grade astrocytomas (t = -5.892, P = 0.000). There were strong positive correlations between Cho/NAA ratio and MMP-2 COD (r = 0.669, P = 0.002), and between Cho/Cr ratio and MMP-2 COD (r = 0.689, P = 0.001). {sup 1}H-MRS is helpful in evaluating the invasiveness of astrocytomas and predicting prognosis preoperatively by determining the Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios

  6. Comparative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histopathological Correlates in Two SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Caron

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a progressive and fatal disease due to motoneuron degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is becoming a promising non-invasive approach to monitor the disease course but a direct correlation with neuropathology is not feasible in human. Therefore in this study we aimed to examine MRI changes in relation to histopathology in two mouse models of ALS (C57BL6/J and 129S2/SvHsd SOD1G93A mice with different disease onset and progression. A longitudinal in vivo analysis of T2 maps, compared to ex vivo histological changes, was performed on cranial motor nuclei. An increased T2 value was associated with a significant tissue vacuolization that occurred prior to motoneuron loss in the cranial nuclei of C57 SOD1G93A mice. Conversely, in 129Sv SOD1G93A mice, which exhibit a more severe phenotype, MRI detected a milder increase of T2 value, associated with a milder vacuolization. This suggests that alteration within brainstem nuclei is not predictive of a more severe phenotype in the SOD1G93A mouse model. Using an ex vivo paradigm, Diffusion Tensor Imaging was also applied to study white matter spinal cord degeneration. In contrast to degeneration of cranial nuclei, alterations in white matter and axons loss reflected the different disease phenotype of SOD1G93A mice. The correspondence between MRI and histology further highlights the potential of MRI to monitor progressive motoneuron and axonal degeneration non-invasively in vivo. The identification of prognostic markers of the disease nevertheless requires validation in multiple models of ALS to ensure that these are not merely model-specific. Eventually this approach has the potential to lead to the development of robust and validated non-invasive imaging biomarkers in ALS patients, which may help to monitor the efficacy of therapies.

  7. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of the olfactory system in Kallmann syndrome: correlation with a clinical smell test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Versiani, Beatriz R; Diniz, Paula Rejane B; Junior, Jorge Elias; de Castro, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    To measure olfactory bulbs and sulci using dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences and specific measurement tools in Kallmann syndrome (KS) patients with a well-established genotype and phenotype, as well as correlate MRI findings with a clinical smell test. MRI was performed in 21 patients with KS and 16 healthy volunteers; olfactory dysfunction was assessed using the Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), a qualitative suprathreshold olfaction test. Coronal turbo spin echo T2-weighted and volumetric T1-weighted gradient echo sequences were acquired in a 1.5T system. ImageJ software was used to obtain olfactory bulb volumes and olfactory sulcus depths and lengths. Data were analyzed with SPSS 15.0 and the Kappa index was used to evaluate the agreement between the UPSIT and MRI. The UPSIT showed 14 patients with anosmia and 6 with moderate hyposmia. Eighteen patients (85%) presented altered rhinencephalon structures in the MRI. Sixteen patients (76%) presented olfactory bulb aplasia (14/16 bilaterally), and these patients presented a total of 16 aplastic sulci. There was moderate agreement between the MRI quantitative evaluation and the UPSIT (overall Kappa = 0.55), but when considering the presence of aplastic bulbs and anosmia, we found almost perfect agreement (Kappa = 0.87). Three patients had normal rhinencephalon structures, including one with a KAL1 gene mutation. Olfactory bulb and sulcus aplasia were the most common findings in KS patients. We objectively demonstrated agreement between MRI findings and the smell test, especially the presence of bulb aplasia and anosmia. Therefore, our findings help ascertain MRI accuracy in the diagnosis of KS, differentiating patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with an apparently normal or difficult to evaluate sense of smell. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Blood Pool Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Correlation to Digital Subtraction Angiography: A Pictorial Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha-Grace Knuttinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA provides noninvasive visualization of the vascular supply of soft tissue masses and vascular pathology, without harmful radiation. This is important for planning an endovascular intervention, and helps to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the treatment. MRA with conventional extracellular contrast agents relies on accurate contrast bolus timing, limiting the imaging window to first-pass arterial phase. The recently introduced blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium, reversibly binds to human serum albumin, resulting in increased T1 relaxivity and prolonged intravascular retention time, permitting both first-pass and steady-state phase high-resolution imaging. In our practice, high-quality MRA serves as a detailed "roadmap" for the needed endovascular intervention. Cases of aortoiliac occlusive disease, inferior vena cava thrombus, pelvic congestion syndrome, and lower extremity arteriovenous malformation are discussed in this article. MRA was acquired at 1.5 T with an 8-channel phased array coil after intravenous administration of gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg body weight, at the first-pass phase. In the steady-state, serial T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient echo images were obtained with high resolution. All patients underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA and endovascular treatment. MRA and DSA findings of vascular anatomy and pathology are discussed and correlated. BPCA-enhanced MRA provides high-quality first-pass and steady-state vascular imaging. This could increase the diagnostic accuracy and create a detailed map for pre-intervention planning. Understanding the pharmacokinetics of BPCA and being familiar with the indications and technique of MRA are important for diagnosis and endovascular intervention.

  9. CSF Biomarkers of Monocyte Activation and Chemotaxis correlate with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Metabolites during Chronic HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Albert M.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Umlauf, Anya; Taylor, Michael J.; Clifford, David B.; Marra, Christina M.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McArthur, Justin C.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Simpson, David M.; Morgello, Susan; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), supporting the need to better understand HIV neuropathogenesis. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain has demonstrated abnormalities in HIV-infected individuals despite cART. We examined the associations between MRS metabolites and selected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers reflecting monocyte/macrophage activation and chemotaxis. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study involving five sites in the United States was conducted. The following CSF biomarkers were measured: soluble CD14 (sCD14), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interferon inducible protein 10 (IP-10), and stromal cell derived growth factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α). The following MRS metabolites were measured from basal ganglia (BG), frontal white matter (FWM) and frontal gray matter (FGM): N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), Myo-inositol (MI), Choline (Cho), and Creatine (Cr). CSF biomarkers were compared to absolute MRS metabolites as well as metabolite/Cr ratios using linear regression. Results 83 HIV-infected individuals were included, 78% on cART and 37% with HAND. The most robust positive correlations were between MCP-1 and Cho in BG (R2 0.179, p<0.001) as well as MCP-1 and MI in FWM (R2 0.137, p=0.002). Higher Cr levels in FWM were associated with MCP-1 (R2 0. 075, p=0.01) and IP-10 (R2 0.106, p=0.003). Comparing biomarkers to MRS metabolite/Cr ratios impacted some relationships, e.g., higher sCD14 levels were associated with lower Cho/Cr ratios in FGM (R2 0.224, p<0.001), although higher MCP-1 levels remained associated with Cho/Cr in BG. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that monocyte activation and chemotaxis continue to contribute to HIV-associated brain abnormalities in cART-treated individuals. PMID:26069183

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance ... if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Because they can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  12. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

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    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  14. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles ... Videos related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Sponsored ...

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  18. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  20. Correlation between Eminence Steepness and Condyle Disk Movements in Temporomandibular Joints Affected by Internal Derangements Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilofar Mofidi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Internal derangement of the Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is the most common form of Temporomandibular disorders, which represents an abnormal internal strucural and functional change of the disk, as well as an abnormal relationship of the disk to the condyle, glenoid fossa and articular eminence when the teeth are in the closed- mouth position. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between eminence steepness and condyle disk movements in TMJs affected by internal derangements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, digital MRI files of 90 joints belong to 45 patients in open and closed-mouth positions were evaluated. Patients were subdivided into two groups: 64 individuals with anterior diskdisplacement with reduction and 26 individuals with anterior disk displacement without reduction. Appropriate oblique sagittal sections were selected and printed. Outlines of the fossa, eminence, condyle and disk were traced on matte acetate sheets and evaluated by an oral and maxillofacial radiologist and a postgraduate student of oral and maxillofacial radiology. Disk rotation, condyle rotation, condyle translation and eminence steepness were measured.The data were analyzed using T-test.Results: In this study, no significant difference was found in measurements between the two groups, (for steepness P=0.64, for Disc rotation P=0.77, for condyle rotation P=0.28 and for condyle translation P=0.12. Disk rotation showed statistically significant correlation with eminence steepness in the anterior disk displacement with reduction group 34 .Although this correlation was weak (r=0.27 (P>0.05. No statistically significant correlations were found between other variables and eminence steepness in this group (for condyle rotation P=0.3 and for condyle translation P=0.98. Disk rotation and condyle translation had statistically significant relationship in the anterior disk

  1. Evaluation of epileptogenic focus in temporal lobe: correlation between ictal brain SPECT, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy; Avaliacao de foco epileptogenico do lobo temporal: correlacao entre SPECT ictal, ressonancia magnetica e ressonancia magnetica com espectroscopia de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diegues, Maria Elena Martins [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear]. E-mail: emartyns@terra.com.br; Pellini, Marcos Pinto; Alves-Leon, Soniza Vieira [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Domingues, Romeu Cortes [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of concordance between radiological and radioisotopic methods and, if positive, to evaluate the usefulness of ictal SPECT in the localization of the epileptogenic focus. Ictal brain SPECT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were performed on six patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT was performed after withdrawal of the anti-epileptogenic drugs during video-EEG monitoring, using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD, administered to patients at the time of the ictus. MRI was performed in T1, T2 and FLAIR sequences and MRS was obtained using the PRESS technique, with a single voxel positioned in both hippocampi. The statistical analysis included the determination of the values of Kappa (k), standard error (se) and significance level (p) for the lateralization of the ictal focus. The analysis of all findings was based on EEG localization of the ictal discharge, seizure duration (109-280 s; 152 s average) and time of radiotracer injection (30-262 s; 96 s average). We obtained correlated data in four patients (67 per cent) and values of k = 0.67, se = 0.38, and p 0.041. We concluded that there is a concordance between ictal SPECT, MRI and MRS data and the usefulness of the radioisotopic procedure is related to a non diagnostic EEG and when there is a discordant or misleading diagnosis after a comparative analysis of EEG and MRS. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyendecker, John R; Gianini, John W

    2009-07-01

    Excellent contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation make magnetic resonance urography (MRU) a promising technique for noninvasively evaluating the entire urinary tract. While MRU currently lags behind CT urography (CTU) in spatial resolution and efficiency, new hardware and sequence developments have contributed to a resurgence of interest in MRU techniques. By combining unenhanced sequences with multiphase contrast-enhanced and excretory phase imaging, a comprehensive assessment of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and surrounding structures is possible with image quality rivaling that obtained with other techniques. At the same time, formidable challenges remain to be overcome and further clinical validation is necessary before MRU can replace other forms of urography. In this article, we demonstrate the current potential of MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations and current status of this evolving technique.

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  5. Pediatric magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a powerful clinical tool that fuses anatomic information with functional data in a single test without the use of ionizing radiation. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects, as well as common clinical applications with an emphasis on the evaluation of hydronephrosis. A fluid challenge is an essential part of our MRU protocol and enables the definition of compensated or decompensated kidneys within the spectrum of hydronephrosis. This classification may have prognostic implications when surgery is being considered. In addition, underlying uropathy can be identified on the anatomical scans and renal scarring can be seen on both the anatomical and dynamic scans. MRU can identify and categorize dysmorphic kidneys in vivo and may provide insight into congenital abnormalities seen in conjunction with vesicoureteric reflux. MRU is still in its infancy and as the technique develops and becomes widely available, it seems likely that it will supplant renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of renal tract disorders in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metallic objects from being attracted by the powerful magnet of the MR system, you will typically receive ... teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i.e., transdermal patch) that contains ...

  8. The neuronal correlates of mirror illusion in children with spastic hemiparesis: a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisstanner, Christian; Saxer, Stefanie; Wiest, Roland; Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Newman, Christopher J; Steinlin, Maja; Grunt, Sebastian

    2017-03-21

    To investigate the neuronal activation pattern underlying the effects of mirror illusion in children/adolescents with normal motor development and in children/adolescents with hemiparesis and preserved contralateral corticospinal organisation. The type of cortical reorganisation was classified according to results of transcranial magnetic stimulation. Only subjects with congenital lesions and physiological contralateral cortical reorganisation were included. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed to investigate neuronal activation patterns with and without a mirror box. Each test consisted of a unimanual and a bimanual motor task. Seven children/adolescents with congenital hemiparesis (10-20 years old, three boys and four girls) and seven healthy subjects (8-17 years old, four boys and three girls) participated in this study. In the bimanual experiment, children with hemiparesis showed a significant effect of the mirror illusion (pmirror illusion were observed in unimanual experiments and in healthy participants. Mirror illusion in children/adolescents with hemiparesis leads to activation of brain areas involved in visual conflict detection and cognitive control to resolve this conflict. This effect is observed only in bimanual training. We consider that for mirror therapy in children and adolescents with hemiparesis a bimanual approach is more suitable than a unimanual approach.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with cardiac synchronization in chronic thrombosis of main pulmonary arteries. A case review with CT scan imaging correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulomb, M.; Wolf, J.E.; Rose-Pittet, L.; Le Bas, J.F.; Dalsoglio, S.; Paramelle, B.

    Results of nuclear magnetic resonance exploration in a patient with chronic thrombosis of main pulmonary arteries are used to outline an elementary semiology in agreement with current documented data. Signs observed relate to the thrombosis and showing of flow due to associated pulmonary artery hypertension. Cardiac synchronization is essential: obtaining 2 echos by the spin-echo technique allows differentiation of circulatory slowing phenomena, which provoke increased strength of 2nd echo, from the thrombus itself. Correlations established with V/Q scintigraphy, angiography and CT scan findings in this case provided preliminary evaluation of use of this imaging technique in this affection.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

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    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... the area being scanned include: Metallic spinal rod Plates, pins, screws, or metal mesh used to repair ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ... for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  3. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  5. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  7. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  8. Correlation between myocardial fibrosis and the occurrence of atrial fibrillation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujadas, S., E-mail: sandrapujadas@gmail.co [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Vidal-Perez, R. [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Hidalgo, A. [Radiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Leta, R.; Carreras, F.; Barros, A. [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Bayes-Genis, A. [Cardiomyopathy and Cardiac Transplant Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Subirana, M.T. [Congenital Heart Disease Unit, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Pons-Llado, Guillem [Cardiac Imaging Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Av. Pare M Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) often shows delayed contrast enhancement (DE) representing regions of focal myocardial fibrosis. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a commonly reported complication of HCM. We determined the relationship between the presence of left ventricular myocardial fibrosis (LVMF) detected by DE-CMR and the occurrence AF in a series of patients with HCM. 67 patients with HCM (47 males; mean age 50.1 {+-} 18.5 years) were studied by CMR measuring mass of LVMF, left ventricular mass, volume and function, and left atrial (LA) area. AF was present in 17 (25%) patients. LVMF was observed in 57% of patients. AF was significantly more frequent in patients who also showed LVMF, compared with the group without LVMF (42.1% vs. 3.4%, respectively; p < 0.0001). LA size was larger in patients showing DE (LA area: 37.4 {+-} 11.1 vs. 25.9 {+-} 6.8 cm{sup 2}; respectively, p = 0.0001). AF in HCM is related with myocardial fibrosis detected by DE-CMR and dilatation of the LA. This fact adds to the proven adverse prognostic value of myocardial fibrosis in HCM, thus, reinforcing the usefulness of this technique in the assessment of these patients.

  9. Identification of the pyramidal tract by neuronavigation based on intraoperative magnetic resonance tractography: correlation with subcortical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzao, Alessandro; Romano, Andrea; Calabria, Luigi Fausto; Coppola, Valeria; Fantozzi, Luigi Maria [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Neuroradiology, Rome (Italy); Angelini, Albina; D' Andrea, Giancarlo; Mastronardi, Luciano; Ferrante, Luigi [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    To demonstrate the accuracy of magnetic resonance tractography (MRT) in localizing the cortical spinal tract (CST) close to brain tumours by using intraoperative electric subcortical stimulation. Nine patients with intra-axial brain tumours underwent neurosurgery. Planning was based on analysis of the course of streamlines compatible with the CST. After tumour removal, intraoperative MRT was reacquired. Sites at various distance from the CST were repeatedly stimulated to assess whether registered motor evoked potential (MEP) could be elicited. All patients were assessed clinically both pre- and postoperatively. The motor function was preserved in all patients. In all patients intraoperative MRT demonstrated shift of the bundle position caused by the surgical procedure. The distance between the estimated intraoperative CST and the point of elicited MEP was 1 cm or less in all nine patients. At distances greater than 2 cm, no patient reported positive MEP. Intraoperative MRT is a reliable technique for localization of CST. In all patients MEP were elicited by direct subcortical electrical stimulation at a distance below 1 cm from the CST as represented by MRT. Brain shifting might impact this evaluation since CST position may change during surgery in the range of 8 mm. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Enterography Findings in Crohn's disease in the Pediatric Population and Correlation with Fluoroscopic and Multidetector Computed Tomographic Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parul; Ormanoski, Margaret; Hoadley, Kim M

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, fluoroscopic examinations such as enteroclysis, upper GI studies, and small bowel follow through exams have been the procedures of choice in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in pediatric populations. With the advent of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), it has subsequently become a complementary examination in imaging inflammatory bowel disease. A major advantage of MDCT over fluoroscopic examination is its ability to directly visualize bowel mucosa, as well as demonstrate extra-enteric complications of IBD such as abscesses, fistulae, and sinus tracts. The major disadvantage of CT however is exposure to ionizing radiation, especially in IBD patients of the pediatric age group who maybe repeatedly imaged due to exacerbations. As a result, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation and follow-up of pediatric patients with IBD. This pictorial essay will summarize the multi-modality imaging findings of IBD with emphasis on MRE including the imaging protocol and procedure. For the purposes of this article, patients less than 17 years of age have been considered to represent the pediatric population.

  11. Correlation between fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in 5 dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byeong-Teck; Kim, Seung-Gon; Lim, Chae-Young; Gu, Su-Hyun; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Kim, Young-Bo; Kim, Dae-Young; Woo, Eung-Je; Cho, Zang-Hee; Park, Hee-Myung

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the [18F]2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings of encephalitis in dogs and assessed the role of FDG-PET in the diagnosis of meningoencephalitis. The medical records, magnetic resonance (MR), and FDG-PET images of 3 dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME), 1 dog with granulomatous meningoencephalitis (GME), and 1 dog with meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology (MUE) were reviewed. On the FDG-PET, glucose hypometabolism was identified in the dog with NME, whereas hypermetabolism was noted in the dog with GME. The T2-weighted images (WI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were characterized by hyperintensity, whereas the signal intensity of the lesions on the T1-WI images was variable. The metabolic changes on the brain FDG-PET corresponded well to the hyper- and hypointense lesions seen on the MR imaging. This type of tomography (FDG-PET) aided in the differentiation of different types of inflammatory meningoencephalitis when the metabolic data was combined with clinical and MR findings. PMID:21119865

  12. Sb Magnetic Resonance as a Local Probe for the Gap Formation in the Correlated Semimetal FeSb2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gippius, A. A.; Baenitz, M.; Okhotnikov, K. S.;

    2014-01-01

    We report on a comparative study of the narrow-band semimetals FeSb2 and its structural homologue RuSb2 by means of Sb-121,Sb-123 nuclear quadrupole (NQR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. From NQR for both compounds two temperature regimes could be identified by use of (123)(1/T...... (1)) measurements. Above 40 K a conventional activated behavior (with Delta/k (B) a parts per thousand... 400 K for FeSb2) dominates in (123)(1/T (1)), whereas below 40 K in both systems an unconventional (123)(1/T (1)) behavior with a smooth maximum at around 10 K is observed. To analyze...... this behavior, we propose the presence of T-dependent in-gap states forming a narrow energy level of localized spins with S = A1/2 near the bottom of the conduction band. These states might have originated from an inherent Sb-deficiency in both compounds. This model enables us to fit the (123)(1/T (1)) data...

  13. Early post-operative magnetic resonance imaging in glioblastoma: correlation among radiological findings and overall survival in 60 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majos, Carles [IDI Centre Bellvitge, HU de Bellvitge, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); Hospital Duran i Reynals, IDI Centre Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Cos, Monica; Castaner, Sara [IDI Centre Bellvitge, HU de Bellvitge, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Gil, Miguel [ICO l' Hospitalet, HU de Bellvitge, Department of Medical Onclogy, Barcelona (Spain); Plans, Gerard [HU de Bellvitge, Department of Neurosurgery, Barcelona (Spain); Lucas, Anna [ICO l' Hospitalet, HU de Bellvitge, Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Bruna, Jordi [HU de Bellvitge, Department of Neurology, Barcelona (Spain); Aguilera, Carles [IDI Centre Bellvitge, HU de Bellvitge, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Centro de Investigacion en Red en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate early post-operative magnetic resonance (EPMR) as a prognostic tool after resection of glioblastoma. Sixty EPMR examinations were evaluated for perioperative infarct, tumour growth between diagnosis and EPMR, contrast enhancement pattern, and extent of resection (EOR). The EOR was approached with the subjective evaluation of radiologists and by quantifying volumes. These parameters were tested as predictors of survival using the Kaplan-Meier method. Contrast enhancement was found in 59 patients (59/60; 98 %). Showing a thin-linear pattern of enhancement was the most favourable finding. Patients with this pattern survived longer than patients with thick-linear (median overall survival (OS) thin-linear=609 days; thick-linear=432 days; P =.023) or nodular (median OS = 318 days; P =.001) enhancements. The subjective evaluation of the EOR performed better than its quantification. Patients survived longer when resection was total (median OS total resection=609 days; subtotal=371 days; P =.001). When resection was subtotal, patients survived longer if it was superior to 95 % (median OS resection superior to 95 %=559 days; inferior to 95 %=256 days; P =.034). EPMR provides valuable prognostic information after surgical resection of glioblastomas. A thin-linear pattern of contrast enhancement is the most favourable finding. Further prognostic stratification may be obtained by assessing the EOR. (orig.)

  14. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  15. Initial experience of correlating parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qian-Jun; Zhang, Shui-Xing; Chen, Wen-Bo; Liang, Long; Zhou, Zheng-Gen; Liu, Zai-Yi; Zeng, Qiong-Xin; Liang, Chang-Hong [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Qiu, Qian-Hui [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the correlation between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters. Thirty-eight newly diagnosed NPC patients were prospectively enrolled. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) at 13 b-values were acquired using a 3.0-T MRI system. IVIM parameters including the pure molecular diffusion (D), perfusion-related diffusion (D*), perfusion fraction (f), DCE-MRI parameters including maximum slope of increase (MSI), enhancement amplitude (EA) and enhancement ratio (ER) were calculated by two investigators independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement were evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Relationships between IVIM and DCE-MRI parameters were evaluated by calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficient. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility were excellent to relatively good (ICC = 0.887-0.997; narrow width of 95 % limits of agreement). The highest correlation was observed between f and EA (r = 0.633, P < 0.001), with a strong correlation between f and MSI (r = 0.598, P = 0.001). No correlation was observed between f and ER (r = -0.162; P = 0.421) or D* and DCE parameters (r = 0.125-0.307; P > 0.119). This study suggests IVIM perfusion imaging using 3.0-T MRI is feasible in NPC, and f correlates significantly with EA and MSI. (orig.)

  16. Breast magnetic resonance imaging guided biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Bo La; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Despite the high sensitivity of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathologic confirmation by biopsy is essential because of limited specificity. MRI-guided biopsy is required in patients with lesions only seen on MRI. We review preprocedural considerations and the technique of MRI-guided biopsy, challenging situations and trouble-shooting, and correlation of radiologic and pathologic findings.

  17. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  18. Coexistence of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic spin correlations in Ca (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 revealed by 75As nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Wiecki, P.; Ran, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements revealed the coexistence of stripe-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) and ferromagnetic (FM) spin correlations in both the hole- and electron-doped BaFe2As2 families of iron-pnictide superconductors by a Korringa ratio analysis. Motivated by the NMR work, we investigate the possible existence of FM fluctuations in another iron-pnictide superconducting family, Ca (Fe1-xCox) 2As2 . We reanalyzed our previously reported data in terms of the Korringa ratio and found clear evidence for the coexistence of stripe-type AFM and FM spin correlations in the electron-doped CaFe2As2 system. These NMR data indicate that FM fluctuations exist in general in iron-pnictide superconducting families and thus must be included to capture the phenomenology of the iron pnictides.

  19. Voxel-Based Correlation between Coregistered Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Suspected Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallin, L.; Axelsson, R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Svensson, L.; Juhlin, P.; Wiberg, M. Kristoffersen; Frank, A. [Division of Radiology, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Current diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is made by clinical, neuropsychologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be valuable in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, as well as in assessing prognosis. Purpose: To compare SPECT and MRI in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Material and Methods: 24 patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls, were investigated with SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO, Ceretec; GE Healthcare Ltd., Little Chalsont UK) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a contrast-enhancing gadobutrol formula (Gadovist; Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR images was calculated. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were then performed in 24 different brain areas using brain registration and analysis of SPECT studies (BRASS; Nuclear Diagnostics AB, Stockholm (SE)) on both SPECT and DSC-MRI. Results: Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR showed a high correlation, with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.94. ROI analyses of 24 regions showed significant differences between the control group and AD patients in 10 regions using SPECT and five regions in DSC-MR. Conclusion: SPECT remains superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological perfusion, and DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer disease.

  20. Voxel-Based Correlation between Coregistered Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Subjects with Suspected Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallin, L.; Axelsson, R.; Wahlund, L.O.; Oeksengard, A.R.; Svensson, L.; Juhlin, P.; Wiberg, M. Kristoffersen; Frank, A. (Division of Radiology, Karolinska Inst., Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Current diagnosis of Alzheimer disease is made by clinical, neuropsychologic, and neuroimaging assessments. Neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be valuable in the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer disease, as well as in assessing prognosis. Purpose: To compare SPECT and MRI in a cohort of patients examined for suspected dementia, including patients with no objective cognitive impairment (control group), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD). Material and Methods: 24 patients, eight with AD, 10 with MCI, and six controls, were investigated with SPECT using 99mTc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO, Ceretec; GE Healthcare Ltd., Little Chalsont UK) and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a contrast-enhancing gadobutrol formula (Gadovist; Bayer Schering Pharma, Berlin, Germany). Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR images was calculated. Region-of-interest (ROI) analyses were then performed in 24 different brain areas using brain registration and analysis of SPECT studies (BRASS; Nuclear Diagnostics AB, Stockholm (Sweden)) on both SPECT and DSC-MRI. Results: Voxel-based correlation between coregistered SPECT and DSC-MR showed a high correlation, with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.94. ROI analyses of 24 regions showed significant differences between the control group and AD patients in 10 regions using SPECT and five regions in DSC-MR. Conclusion: SPECT remains superior to DSC-MRI in differentiating normal from pathological perfusion, and DSC-MRI could not replace SPECT in the diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer disease

  1. Post-mortem magnetic resonance foetal imaging: a study of morphological correlation with conventional autopsy and histopathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Annamaria; Panebianco, Valeria; Cannavale, Giuseppe; Aromatario, Mariarosaria; Cipolloni, Luigi; Frati, Paola; Santurro, Alessandro; Vullo, Francesco; Catalano, Carlo; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study is to offer our experience concerning post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) in foetal death cases and an evaluation of the differences between the findings acquired by PMMR and by forensic autopsy. Fifteen foetuses were recruited from July 2014 to December 2015. These had suffered intrauterine death in women in the 21st to 38th week of gestation who were treated in the emergency department for non-perception of foetal movements. We performed a PMMR on foetuses, 3 ± 1 days on average from the time of death, and then a complete forensic autopsy was performed. All 15 foetuses were examined with a whole-body study protocol, starting from the skull, down to and including the lower limbs. The total time of examination ranged from 20 to 30 min in each case. The external evaluation and description of post-mortem phenomena (maceration), record of the weight and detection and the various measurements of foetal diameters were evaluated before performing autopsy. A complete histopathological study was performed in each case. Out of 15 cases examined, eight were negative for structural anatomical abnormalities and/or diseases, both in the preliminary radiological examination and the traditional autopsy. In the remaining seven cases, pathological findings were detected by PMMR with corresponding results at autopsy. PMMR can provide useful information on foetal medical conditions and result in improved diagnostic classification. It may enable the planning of a more suitable technique before proceeding to autopsy, including focusing on certain aspects of organ pathology otherwise not detectable. The association between PMMR, post-mortem examination and related histological study of the foetus-placenta unit could help reduce the percentage of cases in which the cause of foetal death remains unexplained. Lastly, it may allow a selective sampling of the organ in order to target histological investigations.

  2. Tears of the Supraspinatus Tendon: Assessment with Indirect Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in 67 Patients with Arthroscopic Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, P. van; Gielen, J.L.; Parizel, P.M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium)) (and others)

    2009-11-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is generally regarded as the gold standard for shoulder imaging. As an alternative to direct MR arthrography, the less invasive indirect MR arthrography technique was proposed, offering logistic advantages because fluoroscopic or ultrasonographic guidance for joint injection is not required. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic performance of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of full- and partial-thickness supraspinatus tears in a symptomatic population. Material and Methods: Two radiologists with different levels of experience independently and retrospectively interpreted indirect MR (1.5T) arthrograms of the shoulder obtained in 67 symptomatic patients who underwent subsequent arthroscopy. On MR, the supraspinatus tendon was evaluated for full- or partial-thickness tear. With arthroscopy as the standard of reference, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of indirect MR arthrography in the detection of full- and partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon was calculated. Kappa (kappa) statistics were used for the assessment of the agreement between arthroscopic and imaging findings and for the assessment of interobserver agreement. Results: For full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon, sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies exceeded 90% for both observers, with excellent interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.910). For partial-thickness tears, sensitivities (38-50%) and accuracies (76-78%) were poor for both reviewers, and interobserver agreement was moderate (kappa = 0.491). Discrepancies between MR diagnosis and arthroscopy were predominantly observed with small partial-thickness tears. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is highly accurate in the diagnosis of full-thickness rotator cuff tears. However, the diagnosis of partial-thickness tears with indirect MR arthrography remains faulty, because exact demarcation of degenerative change and partial rupture is difficult. On the

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  4. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  5. Discrimination between spin-dependent charge transport and spin-dependent recombination in π-conjugated polymers by correlated current and electroluminescence-detected magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavand, Marzieh; Baird, Douglas; van Schooten, Kipp; Malissa, Hans; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Spin-dependent processes play a crucial role in organic electronic devices. Spin coherence can give rise to spin mixing due to a number of processes such as hyperfine coupling, and leads to a range of magnetic field effects. However, it is not straightforward to differentiate between pure single-carrier spin-dependent transport processes which control the current and therefore the electroluminescence, and spin-dependent electron-hole recombination which determines the electroluminescence yield and in turn modulates the current. We therefore investigate the correlation between the dynamics of spin-dependent electric current and spin-dependent electroluminescence in two derivatives of the conjugated polymer poly(phenylene-vinylene) using simultaneously measured pulsed electrically detected (pEDMR) and optically detected (pODMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This experimental approach requires careful analysis of the transient response functions under optical and electrical detection. At room temperature and under bipolar charge-carrier injection conditions, a correlation of the pEDMR and the pODMR signals is observed, consistent with the hypothesis that the recombination currents involve spin-dependent electronic transitions. This observation is inconsistent with the hypothesis that these signals are caused by spin-dependent charge-carrier transport. These results therefore provide no evidence that supports earlier claims that spin-dependent transport plays a role for room-temperature magnetoresistance effects. At low temperatures, however, the correlation between pEDMR and pODMR is weakened, demonstrating that more than one spin-dependent process influences the optoelectronic materials' properties. This conclusion is consistent with prior studies of half-field resonances that were attributed to spin-dependent triplet exciton recombination, which becomes significant at low temperatures when the triplet lifetime increases.

  6. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  7. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 8

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 8 describes the magnetic resonance in spin polarization and saturation transfer. This book discusses the theory of chemically induced dynamic spin polarization; basic results for the radical-pair mechanism; and optical spin polarization in molecular crystals. The theory of optical electronic polarization (OEP); NMR in flowing systems; and applications of NMR in a flowing liquid are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the saturation transfer spectroscopy; studies of spin labels in the intermediate and fast motion regions; and spin-density matrix and

  9. Correlation between single-trial visual evoked potentials and the blood oxygenation level dependent response in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill

    2012-01-01

    To compare different electroencephalography (EEG)-based regressors and their ability to predict the simultaneously recorded blood oxygenation level dependent response during blocked visual stimulation, simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 healthy volunteers was performed...

  10. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Hasbak, Philip; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments not correlated with whiplash-associated disorders: A meta-analysis of case–control studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Quan; Shen, Hongxing; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    .... In recent years, with development of more detailed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, morphologic changes of the ligaments and membranes in the craniocervical junction, especially alar and transverse ligaments have been discussed...

  12. Neural correlates of clinical improvement after deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (DTMS) for treatment-resistant depression: a case report using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Philippe-Olivier; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Zangen, Abraham; Berlim, Marcelo T

    2015-02-01

    We report the effects of a 4-week trial of deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (DTMS) on depressive and anxious symptoms and brain activity in a patient (Mrs A) with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). The protocol involved a pre- and a post-functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan during which Mrs A had to perform a working memory task (i.e., n-back). Her baseline score on the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D21) was 24, indicating severe depressive symptoms. Immediately after 4 weeks of daily DTMS treatment applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), her HAM-D21 score decreased to 13 (a 46% reduction), and 1 month later, it was 12 (a 50% reduction). Moreover, Mrs A's accuracy scores on the n-back task (i.e., 2-back condition) improved from 79% (baseline) to 96% (after DTMS treatment). At the neural level, Mrs A showed significantly increased brain activity in the working memory network (e.g., DLPFC, parietal cortex) during the execution of the 2-back condition after DTMS treatment compared to baseline.

  13. High field magnetic resonance microscopy of the human hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease: quantitative imaging and correlation with iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antharam, Vijay; Collingwood, Joanna F; Bullivant, John-Paul; Davidson, Mark R; Chandra, Saurav; Mikhaylova, Albina; Finnegan, Mary E; Batich, Christopher; Forder, John R; Dobson, Jon

    2012-01-16

    We report R(2) and R(2) in human hippocampus from five unfixed post-mortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) and three age-matched control cases. Formalin-fixed tissues from opposing hemispheres in a matched AD and control were included for comparison. Imaging was performed in a 600MHz (14T) vertical bore magnet at MR microscopy resolution to obtain R(2) and R(2) (62 μm×62 μm in-plane, 80 μm slice thickness), and R(1) at 250 μm isotropic resolution. R(1), R(2) and R(2) maps were computed for individual slices in each case, and used to compare subfields between AD and controls. The magnitudes of R(2) and R(2) changed very little between AD and control, but their variances in the Cornu Ammonis and dentate gyrus were significantly higher in AD compared for controls (piron and MRI parameters, each tissue block was cryosectioned at 30 μm in the imaging plane, and iron distribution was mapped using synchrotron microfocus X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A positive correlation of R(2) and R(2)* with iron was demonstrated. While studies with fixed tissues are more straightforward to conduct, fixation can alter iron status in tissues, making measurement of unfixed tissue relevant. To our knowledge, these data represent an advance in quantitative imaging of hippocampal subfields in unfixed tissue, and the methods facilitate direct analysis of the relationship between MRI parameters and iron. The significantly increased variance in AD compared for controls warrants investigation at lower fields and in-vivo, to determine if this parameter is clinically relevant.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamentals and principles of MRI, its capabilities and various techniques of application. Appropriate background for MRI is provided, including basic nuclear magnetic phenomena, modifications required for imaging, the current state of clinical knowledge and a survey of the future potential for in vivo MRI.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this is the case, you will be given instructions for your child about not eating or drinking several hours prior ... MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ... ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance imaging ( ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full ... address): From (your name): Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  1. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance ... allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ...

  8. The Correlation between Left and Right Ventricular Ejection Fractions in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease, Documented by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eshraghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The correlation between right and left ventricular ejection fractions (RVEF and LVEF, respectively has been studied in only a small number of patients with a marked decrease in RVEF and LVEF. The aim of the present study was to compare LVEF and RVEF in patients with ischemic heart disease. RVEF and LVEF were measured by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR imaging. Materials and Methods: This observational study was done in Ghaem general hospital in 2014.  LVEF and RVEF were measured in a series of 33 patients with ischemic heart disease, undergoing CMR for the evaluation of myocardial viability. The correlation between RVEF and LVEF in patients with ischemic heart disease was studied, using Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient analysis.   This study was done in Ghaem general hospital in 2014 with simple sapling. Results: Right ventricular end diastolic volume (186.33±58.90 and left ventricular end diastolic volume (121.72±61.64 were significantly correlated (r=0.223, P=0.005. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between right ventricular end systolic volume (88.18±40.90 and left ventricular end systolic volume (140.96±35.33 (r=0.329, P=0.000. The most significant association was observed between RVEF and LVEF (r=0.913, P=0.000. Conclusion: Based on the findings, RVEF and LVEF were significantly correlated in patients with ischemic heart disease, although this association was not always present in all cardiac patients. The cause of this discrepancy is still unknown.

  9. Correlation Between Expression of High Temperature Requirement Serine Protease A1 (HtrA1) in Nucleus Pulposus and T2 Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Yue, Jiawei; Jiang, Lu; Huang, Yonghui; Sun, Jifu; Wu, Yan

    2017-04-22

    BACKGROUND Degrading enzymes play an important role in the process of disc degeneration. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between the expression of high temperature requirement serine protease A1 (HtrA1) in the nucleus pulposus and the T2 value of the nucleus pulposus region in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty-six patients who had undergone surgical excision of the nucleus pulposus were examined by MRI before surgery. Pfirrmann grading of the target intervertebral disc was performed according to the sagittal T2-weighted imaging, and the T2 value of the target nucleus pulposus was measured according to the median sagittal T2 mapping. The correlation between the Pfirrmann grade and the T2 value was analyzed. The expression of HtrA1 in the nucleus pulposus was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blot. The correlation between the expression of HtrA1 and the T2 value was analyzed. RESULTS The T2 value of the nucleus pulposus region was 33.11-167.91 ms, with an average of 86.64±38.73 ms. According to Spearman correlation analysis, there was a rank correlation between T2 value and Pfirrmann grade (Pcorrelation coefficient (rs)=-0.93617. There was a linear correlation between the mRNA level of HtrA1 and T2 value in nucleus pulposus tissues (a=3.88, b=-0.019, F=112.63, Pcorrelation between the expression level of HtrA1 protein and the T2 value in the nucleus pulposus tissues (a=3.30, b=-0.016, F=93.15, P<0.0001) and normalized regression coefficient=-0.86. CONCLUSIONS The expression of HtrA1 was strongly related to the T2 value, suggesting that HtrA1 plays an important role in the pathological process of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  10. Perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rectal cancer: Correlation with microvascular density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeo Eun [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; Choi, Jun Jeong [Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Hong [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Myoung, Sung Min [Dept. of Medical Information, Jungwon University, Goesan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To determine whether quantitative perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) correlate with immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in rectal cancer. Preoperative DCE-MRI was performed in 63 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. Transendothelial volume transfer (K{sup trans}) and fractional volume of the extravascular-extracellular space (Ve) were measured by Interactive Data Language software in rectal cancer. After surgery, microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression scores were determined using immunohistochemical staining of rectal cancer specimens. Perfusion parameters (K{sup trans}, Ve) of DCE-MRI in rectal cancer were found to be correlated with MVD and VEGF expression scores by Spearman's rank coefficient analysis. T stage and N stage (negative or positive) were correlated with perfusion parameters and MVD. Significant correlation was not found between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and MVD (rs = -0.056 and p 0.662 for K{sup trans}; rs = -0.103 and p = 0.416 for Ve), or between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and the VEGF expression score (rs = -0.042, p 0.741 for K{sup trans}; r = 0.086, p = 0.497 for Ve) in rectal cancer. TN stage showed no significant correlation with perfusion parameters or MVD (p > 0.05 for all). DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, K{sup trans} and Ve, correlated poorly with MVD and VEGF expression scores in rectal cancer, suggesting that these parameters do not simply denote static histological vascular properties.

  11. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  12. Evaluation of the correlation between disc displacements and degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joint by means of magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Isabela Maddalena; Coelho, Patrícia Rocha; Picorelli Assis, Neuza Maria Souza; Pereira Leite, Fabiola Pessôa; Devito, Karina Lopes

    2012-09-01

    The aim was to evaluate the correlation between disc displacements and degenerative bone changes in magnetic resonance images (MRI) of 112 patients of both genders, with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder. For this purpose, a calibrated examiner evaluated 224 MRI by assigning scores for the displacement of the disc and degenerative bone changes. Disc displacement was found in 58.42% of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) evaluated. Anterior displacement of the disc with reduction was the most common, occurring in 67.18% cases of joints with disc displacement. Degenerative bone changes were observed in 53.94% of the TMJs analysed. There was significant correlation between disc displacement with reduction and condylar flattening, disc displacement without reduction and condylar flattening, disc displacement without reduction, and associated degenerative bone changes (flattening and erosion, flattening, osteophyte and erosion; flattening and osteophytes, erosion and sclerosis, flattening and sclerosis, flattening, osteophytes and sclerosis). The correlation between advanced cases of disc displacement and the occurrence of degenerative bone changes emphasises the importance of MRI for an accurate diagnosis and development of an appropriate treatment plan and in cases in which clinical examination is not sufficient for these purposes.

  13. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters-shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  14. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yumin, E-mail: ymhou@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  15. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumin Hou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs, which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  16. Three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound score and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging score in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis: Correlation with biological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Wan-Ru, E-mail: jiawanru@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chai, Wei-Min, E-mail: chai_weimin@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Tang, Lei, E-mail: jessietang1003@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Yi, E-mail: xiatian.0602@163.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Fei, Xiao-Chun, E-mail: xcf0222@163.com [Department of Pathology, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Han, Bao-San, E-mail: hanbaosan@126.com [Department of Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Man, E-mail: lucyjia1370@126.com [Department of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Rui Jin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 197 Rui Jin 2nd Road, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of three-dimensional contrast enhanced ultrasound (3D-CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) score systems in evaluating breast tumor angiogenesis by comparing their diagnostic efficacy and correlation with biological factors. Methods: 3D-CEUS was performed in 183 patients with breast tumors by Esaote Mylab90 with SonoVue (Bracco, Italy), DCE-MRI was performed on a dedicated breast magnetic resonance imaging (DBMRI) system (Aurora Dedicated Breast MRI Systems, USA) with a dedicated breast coil. 3D-CEUS and DCE-MRI score systems were created based on tumor perfusion and vascular characteristics. Microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) expression were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pathological results showed 35 benign and 148 malignant breast tumors. MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.76), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.55), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.39) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.41) expression were all significantly different between benignity and malignancy. Regarding 3D-CEUS 4 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 85.1%, 94.3% and 86.9%, respectively, and correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.50), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.50) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.66). Taking DCE-MRI 5 points as cutoff value, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 86.5%, 94.3% and 88.0%, respectively and also correlated well with MVD (P = 0.000, r = 0.52), VEGF (P = 0.000, r = 0.44), MMP-2 (P = 0.000, r = 0.42) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000, r = 0.35). Conclusions: 3D-CEUS score system displays inspiring diagnostic performance and good agreement with DCE-MRI scoring. Moreover, both score systems correlate well with MVD, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, and thus have great potentials in tumor angiogenesis evaluation.

  17. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  18. Bone marrow edema pattern in advanced hip osteoarthritis: quantitative assessment with magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with clinical examination, radiographic findings, and histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Schwartz, Stephanie A. [The University of Arizona HSC, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Graham, Anna R. [The University of Arizona HSC, Department of Pathology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Benjamin, James B. [University Orthopaedic Specialists, Tucson, AZ (United States); Gmitro, Arthur F.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Hunter, Tim B. [The University of Arizona, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Resnick, Donald L. [University of California, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-05-15

    To correlate the amount of bone marrow edema (BME) calculated by magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) with clinical findings, histopathology, and radiographic findings, in patients with advanced hip osteoarthritis(OA). The study was approved by The Institutional Human Subject Protection Committee. Coronal MRI of hips was acquired in 19 patients who underwent hip replacement. A spin echo (SE) sequence with four echoes and separate fast spin echo (FSE) proton density (PD)-weighted SE sequences of fat (F) and water (W) were acquired with water and fat suppression, respectively. T2 and water:fat ratio calculations were made for the outlined regions of interest. The calculated MRI values were correlated with the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic findings. Analyses of variance were done on the MRI data for W/(W + F) and for T2 values (total and focal values) for the symptomatic and contralateral hips. The values were significantly higher in the study group. Statistically significant correlations were found between pain and total W/(W + F), pain and focal T2 values, and the number of microfractures and calculated BME for the focal W/(W + F) in the proximal femora. Statistically significant correlations were found between the radiographic findings and MRI values for total W/(W + F), focal W/(W + F) and focal T2 and among the radiographic findings, pain, and hip movement. On histopathology, only a small amount of BME was seen in eight proximal femora. The amount of BME in the OA hip, as measured by MRI, correlates with the severity of pain, radiographic findings, and number of microfractures. (orig.)

  19. The neuronal correlates of mirror illusion in children with spastic hemiparesis: a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    OpenAIRE

    Weisstanner, C.; Saxer, S; Wiest, R.; Kaelin-Lang, A.; Newman, C J; Steinlin, M.; Grunt, S

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the neuronal activation pattern underlying the effects of mirror illusion in children/adolescents with normal motor development and in children/adolescents with hemiparesis and preserved contralateral corticospinal organisation. METHOD The type of cortical reorganisation was classified according to results of transcranial magnetic stimulation. Only subjects with congenital lesions and physiological contralateral cortical reorganisation were included. Functional ...

  20. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  2. Reduced structural integrity and functional lateralization of the dorsal language pathway correlate with hallucinations in schizophrenia: a combined diffusion spectrum imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Hao; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Chen, Pin-Jane; Chou, Tai-Li; Hsu, Yung-Chin; Liu, Chih-Min; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Chen, Chung-Ming; Hua, Mau-Sun; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2014-12-30

    Recent studies suggest that structural and functional alterations of the language network are associated with auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) in schizophrenia. However, the ways in which the underlying structure and function of the network are altered and how these alterations are related to each other remain unclear. To elucidate this, we used diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) to reconstruct the dorsal and ventral pathways and employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a semantic task to obtain information about the functional activation in the corresponding regions in 18 patients with schizophrenia and 18 matched controls. The results demonstrated decreased structural integrity in the left ventral, right ventral and right dorsal tracts, and decreased functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway in schizophrenia. There was a positive correlation between the microstructural integrity of the right dorsal pathway and the functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway in patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, both functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway and microstructural integrity of the right dorsal pathway were negatively correlated with the scores of the delusion/hallucination symptom dimension. Our results suggest that impaired structural integrity of the right dorsal pathway is related to the reduction of functional lateralization of the dorsal pathway, and these alterations may aggravate AVHs in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bone marrow response in treated patients with Gaucher disease: evaluation by T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and correlation with reduction in liver and spleen volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terk, M.R. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; LAC/USC Imaging Science Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Dardashti, S. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Liebman, H.A. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Purpose. To determine whether T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images can demonstrate response in the marrow of patients with type 1 Gaucher disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and to determine whether a relationship exists between liver and spleen volume reductions and visible marrow changes.Patients. Forty-two patients with type 1 Gaucher disease were evaluated on at least two occasions. Thirty-two patients received ERT. Of these patients, 15 had a baseline examination prior to the initiation of ERT. The remaining 10 patients did not receive ERT.Design. T1-weighted and gradient recalled echo (GRE) coronal images of the femurs and hips were obtained. Concurrently, liver and spleen volumes were determined using contiguous breath-hold axial gradient-echo images. T1-weighted images of the hips and femurs were evaluated to determine change or lack of change in the yellow marrow.Results. Of the 32 patients receiving ERT, 14 (44%) demonstrated increased signal on T1-weighted images suggesting an increase in the amount of yellow marrow. If only the 15 patients with a baseline examination were considered, the response rate to ERT was 67%. Using Student's t-test a highly significant correlation (P<0.005) was found between marrow response and reduction in liver and spleen volume.Conclusions. Marrow changes in patients receiving ERT can be detected by T1-weighted images. This response correlated with reductions in visceral volumes (P<0.0005). (orig.)

  4. Visualizing the Acute Effects of Vascular-Targeted Therapy In Vivo Using Intravital Microscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Correlation with Endothelial Apoptosis, Cytokine Induction, and Treatment Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund Seshadri

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The acute effects of the vascular-disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA were investigated in vivo using intravital microscopy (IVM and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Changes in vascular permeability and blood flow of syngeneic CT-26 murine colon adenocarcinomas were assessed at 4 and 24 hours after DMXAA treatment (30 mg/kg, i.p. and correlated with induction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, endothelial damage [CD31/terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT], and treatment outcome. Intravital imaging revealed a marked increase in vascular permeability 4 hours after treatment, consistent with increases in intratumoral mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α. Parallel contrast-enhanced MRI studies showed a ~ 4-fold increase in longitudinal relaxation rates (ΔR1, indicative of increased contrast agent accumulation within the tumor. Dualimmunostained tumor sections (CD31/TdT revealed evidence of endothelial apoptosis at this time point. Twenty-four hours after treatment, extensive hemorrhage and complete disruption of vascular architecture were observed with IVM, along with a significant reduction in ΔR1 and virtual absence of CD31 immunostaining. DMXAA-induced tumor vascular damage resulted in significant long-term (60-day cures compared to untreated controls. Multimodality imaging approaches are useful in visualizing the effects of antivascular therapy in vivo. Such approaches allow cross validation and correlation of findings with underlying molecular changes contributing to treatment outcome.

  5. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Motte, Louise; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics...

  6. Quantification of myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging correlates significantly to rubidium-82 positron emission tomography in patients with severe coronary artery disease: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, Abbas A., E-mail: abbas.ali.qayyum@regionh.dk [Department of Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory 2014, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Hasbak, Philip, E-mail: philip.hasbak@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, Henrik B.W., E-mail: henrik.larsson@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Functional Imaging Unit, Diagnostic Department, Glostrup Hospital, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Ndr. Ringvej 57, 2600 Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.emil.christensen@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Ghotbi, Adam A., E-mail: adam.ali.ghotbi@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mathiasen, Anders B., E-mail: anders.b.mathiasen@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory 2014, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen and Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

    2014-07-15

    Introduction: Aim was to compare absolute myocardial perfusion using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution and rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (Rb-82 PET). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with coronary artery stenosis underwent rest and adenosine stress imaging by 1.5-Tesla MR Scanner and a mCT/PET 64-slice Scanner. CMRI were analyzed based on Tikhonov's procedure of deconvolution without specifying an explicit compartment model using our own software. PET images were analyzed using standard clinical software. CMRI and PET data was compared with Spearman's rho and Bland–Altman analysis. Results: CMRI results were strongly and significantly correlated with PET results for the absolute global myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.805, p = 0.001) and for global myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) (r = 0.886, p < 0.001). At vessel territorial level, CMRI results were also significantly correlated with absolute PET myocardial perfusion differences (r = 0.737, p < 0.001) and MPR (r = 0.818, p < 0.001). Each vessel territory had similar strong correlation for absolute myocardial perfusion differences (right coronary artery (RCA): r = 0.787, p = 0.001; left anterior descending artery (LAD): r = 0.796, p = 0.001; left circumflex artery (LCX): r = 0.880, p < 0.001) and for MPR (RCA: r = 0.895, p < 0.001; LAD: r = 0.886, p < 0.001; LCX: r = 0.886, p < 0.001). Conclusion: On a global and vessel territorial basis, CMRI-measured absolute myocardial perfusion differences and MPR were strongly and significantly correlated with the Rb-82 PET findings.

  7. Clinical correlation of magnetic resonance imaging with symptom complex in prolapsed intervertebral disc disease: A cross-sectional double blind analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeetendra Bajpai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low backache (LBA is one of the most common problems and herniated lumbar disc is one of the most commonly diagnosed abnormalities associated with LBA. Disc herniation of the same size may be asymptomatic in one patient and can lead to severe nerve root compromise in another patient. Objective: To evaluate correlation between the clinical features of disc collapse and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI finding to determine the clinical importance of anatomical abnormalities identified by MRI technique. Summary: From January 2010 to January 2012, 75 otherwise healthy patients (43 males 32 females between the age of 19 and 55 years (average age was 44.5 years with low back pain and predominant complaint of root pain who presented to our clinic were included in the study. Materials and Methods: Proper screening was done to rule out previous spine affection and subjected to MRI. Results: The results were analyzed under four headings viz. disc herniation, disc degeneration, thecal sac deformation and neural foramen effacement. All patients had a visual analog score (VAS score more than 6. The interrater correlation coefficient kappa was calculated to be k=0.51. There were total 44 patients with herniation, 25 patients had mild, one patient had moderate degree of thecal sac deformation, 21 patients had one or more levels of foraminal effacement by the herniated tissue, 100% of the patients had disc degeneration ranging from grade 1 to 3 at different levels; and 48 patients (64% had radiculopathy, six (8% patients had bilateral and others had ipsilateral affection. Conclusion: In our study, the correlation was made between clinical findings and MRI findings. It can safely be concluded that treating physician should put more emphasis on history, clinical examination, and make the inference by these and then should correlate the clinical findings with that of MRI to reach a final diagnosis.

  8. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  9. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  10. Quantification of synovistis by MRI: correlation between dynamic and static gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic and macroscopic signs of synovial inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P;

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic and static gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid(Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were evaluated as measures of joint inflammation in arthritis, by a comparison with macroscopic and microscopic signs of synovitis. Furthermore, the importance of the size of the ev......Dynamic and static gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid(Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were evaluated as measures of joint inflammation in arthritis, by a comparison with macroscopic and microscopic signs of synovitis. Furthermore, the importance of the size...

  11. Repair of distal biceps brachii tendon assessed with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with functional outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alemann, Guillaume; Dietsch, Emmanuel [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); Gallinet, David; Obert, Laurent [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Besancon (France); Kastler, Bruno; Aubry, Sebastien [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory-EA 4268-IFR 133, Besancon (France)

    2015-05-01

    Objectives were to study the MRI appearance of the repaired distal biceps tendon (DBT), anatomically reinserted, and to search for a correlation between tendon measurements and functional results. Twenty-five patients (mean age, 49 ± 4.9 years old) who benefited from 3-T MRI follow-up of the elbow after surgical reinsertion of the DBT were retrospectively included and compared to a control group (n = 25; mean age, 48 ± 10 years old). MRI was performed during the month of clinical follow-up and on average 22 months after surgery. Delayed complications (secondary avulsion, new rupture), intratendinous osteoma, tendinous signal on T1-weighted (T1{sub w}) and fat-suppressed proton density-weighted (FS-PD{sub w}) images as well as DBT measurements were recorded. The maximum isometric elbow flexion strength (MEFS) and range of motion of the elbow were assessed. Repaired DBT demonstrated a heterogeneous but normally fibrillar structure. Its low T1{sub w} signal was less pronounced than that of normal tendons, and the FS-PD{sub W} image signal was similar to that of T1{sub w} images. MRI detected seven osteomas (Se = 53 % vs. plain radiography), one textiloma and one secondary avulsion. Repaired DBT measurements were significantly correlated with MEFS (dominant arm R2: 0.38; nondominant arm R2: 0.54); this correlation involved the insertion surface (Δ = -75.7 mm{sup 2}, p = 0.046), transverse diameter (Δ = -2.6 mm, p = 0.018), anteroposterior diameter at the level of the radial head (Δ = -3.9 mm, p = 0.001) and DBT cross-sectional area (Δ = -50.2 mm{sup 2}, p = 0.003). The quality of functional outcome after anatomical elbow rehabilitation of DBT correlates with the extent of tendinous hypertrophy during the healing process. (orig.)

  12. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, A G; Bovens, S M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F L; de Borst, G J

    2011-02-01

    In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk.

  13. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mandl, Irena [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. {+-}0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 ({+-}23.90) for pain, 62.09 ({+-}14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 ({+-}21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 ({+-}28.77) for sport and 70.19 ({+-}22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue.

  14. Pathologic correlation of transperineal in-bore 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy samples with radical prostatectomy specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Erik; Fedorov, Andriy; Tuncali, Kemal; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Allard, Christopher B; Kibel, Adam S; Tempany, Clare M

    2017-08-01

    To determine the accuracy of in-bore transperineal 3-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided prostate biopsies for predicting final Gleason grades in patients who subsequently underwent radical prostatectomy (RP). A retrospective review of men who underwent transperineal MR imaging-guided prostate biopsy (tpMRGB) with subsequent radical prostatectomy within 1 year was conducted from 2010 to 2015. All patients underwent a baseline 3-T multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) with endorectal coil and were selected for biopsy based on MR findings of a suspicious prostate lesion and high degree of clinical suspicion for cancer. Spearman correlation was performed to assess concordance between tpMRGB and final RP pathology among patients with and without previous transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsies. A total of 24 men met all eligibility requirements, with a median age of 65 years (interquartile range [IQR] 11.7). The median time from biopsy to RP was 85 days (IQR 50.5). Final pathology revealed Gleason 3 + 4 = 7 in 12 patients, 4 + 3 = 7 in 10 patients, and 4 + 4 = 8 in 2 patients. A strong correlation (ρ: +0.75, p < 0.001) between tpMRGB and RP results was observed, with Gleason scores concordant in 17 cases (71%). 16 of the 24 patients underwent prior TRUS biopsies. Subsequent tpMRGB revealed Gleason upgrading in 88% of cases, which was concordant with RP Gleason scores in 69% of cases (ρ: +0.75, p < 0.001). Final Gleason scores diagnosed by tpMRGB at 3-T correlate strongly with final RP surgical pathology. This may facilitate prostate cancer diagnosis, particularly in patients with negative or low-grade TRUS biopsy results in whom clinically significant cancer is suspected or detected on mpMRI.

  15. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chen [Department of Ultrasound, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310022 (China); Lee, Dong-Hoon; Zhang, Kai; Li, Wenxiao; Zhou, Jinyuan [Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Su, Lin; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Ding, Kai, E-mail: kding1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Methods: Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Results: Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p < 0.05). The APTw signal was correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = − 0.527, p < 0.05), time to peak (r = − 0.501, p < 0.05), and perfusion index (r = 458, p < 0.05). Cerebral blood flow was correlated with rise time (r = − 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = − 0.543, p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  16. Quantitative correlational study of microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of glioma and early response to radiotherapy in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Mangraviti, Antonella; Su, Lin; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wenxiao; Tyler, Betty; Wong, John; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Velarde, Esteban; Zhou, Jinyuan; Ding, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Radiotherapy remains a major treatment method for malignant tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard modality for assessing glioma treatment response in the clinic. Compared to MRI, ultrasound imaging is low-cost and portable and can be used during intraoperative procedures. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and MRI of irradiated gliomas in rats and to determine which quantitative ultrasound imaging parameters can be used for the assessment of early response to radiation in glioma. Thirteen nude rats with U87 glioma were used. A small thinned skull window preparation was performed to facilitate ultrasound imaging and mimic intraoperative procedures. Both CEUS and MRI with structural, functional, and molecular imaging parameters were performed at preradiation and at 1 day and 4 days postradiation. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between MRI and CEUS parameters and the changes between pre- and postradiation imaging. Area under the curve (AUC) in CEUS showed significant difference between preradiation and 4 days postradiation, along with four MRI parameters, T2, apparent diffusion coefficient, cerebral blood flow, and amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) (all p correlated with three CEUS parameters, rise time (r = - 0.527, p correlated with rise time (r = - 0.589, p < 0.01) and time to peak (r = - 0.543, p < 0.05). MRI can be used for the assessment of radiotherapy treatment response and CEUS with AUC as a new technique and can also be one of the assessment methods for early response to radiation in glioma.

  17. Tumor segmentation of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1 patients: tumor burden correlates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heffler, Michael A.; Xi, Yin; Chhabra, Avneesh [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Le, Lu Q. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Segmentation of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to assess the feasibility, quantitate the total tumor volume (tumor burden) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and examine associations with demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features. A consecutive series of patients with NF1 underwent WBMRI and were reviewed for tumors. Tumors were segmented using a semiautomated software-based tool. Tumors were classified as superficial or deep and discrete or plexiform. Segmentation times were recorded. Segmentation yielded the quantity and tumor burden of superficial, internal and plexiform tumors. Correlations between segmentation data and demographic, disease-related and anthropomorphic features were examined. Fifteen patients were evaluated (42.3 ± 13.6 years, 10 female, 5 male). Segmentation times were a median of 30 min and yielded 2,328 tumors (1,582 superficial, 746 internal and 23 plexiform). One tumor was malignant. Tumor counts ranged from 14 to 397. Tumor burden ranged from 6.95 cm3 to 571 cm3. Individual tumor volume ranged from 0.0120 cm3 to 298 cm3. Significant correlation was found between the total volume of superficial tumors and height (ρ = 0.5966, p < 0.02). Male patients had higher overall tumor burdens (p < 0.05) and higher superficial tumor burden (p < 0.03). Patients with negative family history had more tumors (p < 0.05). Segmentation of WBMRI in patients with NF1 is feasible and elucidates meaningful relationships among disease phenotype, anthropomorphic and demographic features. (orig.)

  18. [Correlation between corticospinal tract degeneration through magnetic resonance imaging, and functional scale (ALSFRS) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Larissa Nery; Silva, Alexandre Vallota da; Carrete, Henrique; Favero, Francis Meire; Fontes, Sissy Veloso; Moneiro, Marcelo Tavares; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle de

    2007-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects the corticospinal tract. ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS) is a questionnaire that quantifies motor deficits, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) evaluates the integrity of fibers through the fractional anisotropy (FA). In the present study, seven ALS patients were evaluated by ALSFRS and immediately submitted to DTI, getting FA values in the following regions: cerebral peduncle (PC), internal capsule (CI) and the white matter under the primary motor cortex (M1), secondary motor cortex (M2) and somesthetic cortex (SI). A control group was constituted by twelve healthy individuals. FA values in patients were significantly lower when compared with controls, with a tendency to higher reductions in the right hemisphere and more inferior regions. Interestingly, FA values were reduced in somesthetic area. No correlation was observed between symptoms duration and FA values. Despite the correlation observed between ALSFRS scores and degeneration in PC and CI, our results suggest that this subjective scale is not a good parameter for the evaluation of the structural damage in encephalic portions of the corticospinal tract.

  19. Diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: correlation with clinical course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheolkyu [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Chang, YoungHee; Kim, SangYun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a fatal disease with variable clinical courses. The presence or absence of basal ganglia (BG) involvement has been reported to be associated with clinical course. We investigated the association of clinical course of sCJD with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) as well as BG involvement at early stage. DWI and single voxel proton MRS were performed in 14 patients with sCJD during the initial diagnostic workup. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and metabolites were measured in medial occipitoparietal cortices where large hyperintense DWI lesions were found in all patients. The presence or absence of BG involvement, ADC, N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) ratios, and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were correlated with disease duration (i.e., the time from the symptom onset to death). The disease duration ranged from 2 to 31 months (median, 16). Hyperintense DWI lesions were observed bilaterally in both cortices and basal ganglia in eight patients and in cortices alone in six patients. Patients with BG involvement had shorter disease duration (median, 6.8 versus 20.5; p = 0.039) than those without and lower NAA/Cr ratios (median, 1.41 versus 2.03; p = 0.001). ADC and Cho/Cr ratios were not significantly different between the patients with BG involvement and those without. By multiple regression analysis, NAA/Cr ratios had the greatest correlation with the disease duration (p = 0.029). The disease duration of sCJD was variable. NAA/Cr ratios of the affected brain at the early stage of sCJD can be used as a useful parameter in predicting the clinical course. (orig.)

  20. Correlations of Clusters of Non-Convulsive Seizure and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Case With GAD65-Positive Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Rachael; Rangaswamy, Rajesh; Peng, Yen-Yi

    2016-08-01

    With the increased availability of laboratory tests, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody-positive limbic encephalitis has become an emerging diagnosis. The myriad symptoms of limbic encephalitis make the diagnosis challenging. Symptoms range from seizures, memory loss, dementia, confusion, to psychosis. We present a case of a 21-year-old female with GAD65 antibody-positive limbic encephalitis. The case is unique because the clinical course suggests that non-convulsive seizures are the major cause of this patient's clinical manifestations. The following is the thesis: systemic autoimmune disease, associated with the GAD65 antibody, gives rise to seizures, in particular, non-convulsive seizures. Temporal lobes happen to be the most susceptible sites to develop seizures. The greater part of these seizures can be non-convulsive and hard to recognize without electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. The variable symptoms mirror the severity and locations of these seizures. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal abnormities in the bilateral hippocampus, fornix, and mammillary body correlate with the density of these seizures in the similar manner, which suggests it is secondary to post-ictal edema.

  1. Giant Choledochal Cyst Mimicking Massive Gallbladder Hydrops in an Adult Patient: Multi Detector Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Correlated to Gross and Histopathological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Il Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Choledochal cysts are uncommon congenital anomalies of the biliary tree, commonly presenting in infancy, generally in the 1 st year of life. Presentation in adult life is less common, accounting for 20% of cases. A 19-year-old female patient presented to the Emergency Department with severe abdominal distension, a palpable abdominal mass, mild jaundice and low grade fever. Ultrasound, computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen showed a massive septated cystic lesion filling the entire abdomen with a significant mass effect on surrounding structures. Origin of the lesion was unclear and diagnosis included a giant mesenteric or duplication cyst, massive gallbladder with hydrops, biliary cystadenoma and giant choledochal cyst, among others. Final diagnosis was a Type IA choledochal cyst with massive asymmetric cystic dilatation of the extra-hepatic segments of the left hepatic duct with asymmetric dilatation of the right hepatic duct. Patient had an uneventful recovery after resection of the entire extrahepatic cyst and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy at the level of the hilum. In this article, we correlate CT and MRI findings to gross and histopathological findings of this giant Todani′s Type IA choledochal cyst.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics reveals strong sex effect on plasma metabolism in 17-year-old Scandinavians and correlation to retrospective infant plasma parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Duus, Jens Ø; Petersen, Bent O; Hoppe, Camilla; Larnkjaer, Anni; Schack-Nielsen, Lene; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomics was carried out on plasma samples from a total of seventy-five 17-year-old Danes to investigate the impact of key parameters such as sex, height, weight, and body mass index on the plasma metabolite profile in a normal, healthy population. Principal component analysis identified sex to have a large impact on the NMR plasma metabolome, whereas no apparent effects of height, weight, and body mass index were found. Partial least square regression discriminant analysis and quantification of relative metabolite concentrations by integration of NMR signals revealed that the sex effect included differences in plasma lipoproteins (mainly high-density lipoprotein), glucose, choline, and amino acid content. Accordingly, the present study suggests a higher lipid synthesis in young women than young men and a higher protein turnover in young men compared with women. Data on plasma content of triglyceride, lipoprotein fractions, and cholesterol at an age of 9 months were available for selected individuals (n = 40); and partial least square regressions revealed correlations between these infant parameters and the NMR plasma metabolome at an age of 17 years. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the feasibility of NMR-based metabonomics for obtaining a deeper insight into interindividual differences in metabolism and for exploring relationships between parameters measured early in life and metabolic status at a later stage.

  3. Cerebral correlates of muscle tone fluctuations in restless legs syndrome: a pilot study with combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and anterior tibial muscle electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Feige, Bernd; Paul, Dominik; Riemann, Dieter; van Elst, Ludger Tebartz; Seifritz, Erich; Hennig, Jürgen; Hornyak, Magdolna

    2008-01-01

    The pathology of restless legs syndrome (RLS) is still not understood. To investigate the pathomechanism of the disorder further we recorded a surface electromyogram (EMG) of the anterior tibial muscle during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with idiopathic RLS. Seven subjects with moderate to severe RLS were investigated in the present pilot study. Patients were lying supine in the scanner for over 50 min and were instructed not to move voluntarily. Sensory leg discomfort (SLD) was evaluated on a 10-point Likert scale. For brain image analysis, an algorithm for the calculation of tonic EMG values was developed. We found a negative correlation of tonic EMG and SLD (p leg discomfort increases during muscle relaxation at rest. In the fMRI analysis, the tonic EMG was associated with activation in motor and somatosensory pathways and also in some regions that are not primarily related to motor or somatosensory functions. By using a newly developed algorithm for the investigation of muscle tone-related changes in cerebral activity, we identified structures that are potentially involved in RLS pathology. Our method, with some modification, may also be suitable for the investigation of phasic muscle activity that occurs during periodic leg movements.

  4. An experimental study on acute brain radiation injury: Dynamic changes in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the correlation with histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui, E-mail: lihui@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jian-peng, E-mail: lijp@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiology, Dongguan People' s Hospital, Dongguan City (China); Lin, Cheng-guang, E-mail: linchg@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Xue-wen, E-mail: liuxw@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Geng, Zhi-jun, E-mail: gengzhj@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mo, Yun-xian, E-mail: moyx@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rong, E-mail: zhangr@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Chuan-miao, E-mail: xchuanm@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between the alterations of single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS and the histopathological characteristics of radiation brain injury following radiation. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven rabbits were randomized into nine groups to receive radiation with a single dose of 25 Gy. The observation time points included a pre-radiation and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 wk following radiation. Each treatment group underwent conventional MRI and single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) were observed over the region of interest, and the presence or absence of lactate (Lac) and lipid (Lip) was detected. Histological specimens of each group were obtained after image acquisition. Results: The values of Cho were significantly increased in the first 3 wk, and decreased over the following 5 wk after radiation. Levels of NAA showed a trend toward a decrease 5 wk after radiation. The levels of Cr were not changed between before and after radiation. The Cho/NAA metabolic ratio was significantly increased in weeks 6, 7, and 8 following irradiation, compared to pre-radiation values. Vascular and glial injury appeared on 2 wk after RT in the histology samples, until 4 wk after RT, necrosis of the oligodendrocytes, neuronal degeneration and demyelination could be observed. Conclusions: MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes following radiation, and can be used in the early diagnosis of radiation brain injury.

  5. Correlation of sensorimotor activation with functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetoencephalography in presurgical functional imaging: a spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kober, H; Nimsky, C; Möller, M; Hastreiter, P; Fahlbusch, R; Ganslandt, O

    2001-11-01

    In this study we investigated the spatial heterotopy of MEG and fMRI localizations after sensory and motor stimulation tasks. Both methods are frequently used to study the topology of the primary and secondary motor cortex, as well as a tool for presurgical brain mapping. fMRI was performed with a 1.5T MR system, using echo-planar imaging with a motor and a sensory task. Somatosensory and motor evoked fields were recorded with a biomagnetometer. fMRI activation was determined with a cross-correlation analysis. MEG source localization was performed with a single equivalent current dipole model and a current density localization approach. Distances between MEG and fMRI activation sites were measured within the same anatomical 3-D-MR image set. The central region could be identified by MEG and fMRI in 33 of 34 cases. However, MEG and fMRI localization results showed significantly different activation sites for the motor and sensory task with a distance of 10 and 15 mm, respectively. This reflects the different neurophysiological mechanisms: direct neuronal current flow (MEG) and secondary changes in cerebral blood flow and oxygenation level of activated versus non activated brain structures (fMRI). The result of our study has clinical implications when MEG and fMRI localizations are used for pre- and intraoperative brain mapping. Although both modalities are useful for the estimation of the motor cortex, a single modality may err in the exact topographical labeling of the motor cortex. In some unclear cases a combination of both methods should be used in order to avoid neurological deficits.

  6. Physiological Uptake of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose in Uterine Endometrium and Myometrium: Correlation with Uterine Motility Evaluated by Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kido, A.; Nishizawa, S.; Okada, H. (Hamamatsu Medical Imaging Center, Hamamatsu Medical Photonics Foundation, Hamakita City, Shizuoka (Japan)); Nakamoto, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Togashi, K. Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyoto Univ. Hospital, Kyoto City, Kyoto (Japan))

    2009-05-15

    Background: Accumulation of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in the uterine endometrium and uterine motility are dependent on menstrual cycle. However, the relationship between them remains unknown. Purpose: To investigate the relationship between radiometabolic activity of 18F-FDG in the uterus and uterine motility observed by cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: The study population consisted of 65 healthy, fertile women, selected from 229 women who underwent positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), and MRI for cancer screening at our facility. They were divided into three groups according to their menstrual cycle phases: menstrual, follicular-periovulatory, and luteal. Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed over the endometrium and myometrium to calculate the standardized uptake value (SUV). Uterine peristalsis and contraction shown by cine MR imaging were evaluated visually, and the correlation between FDG uptake and uterine movements was assessed. Results: After excluding nine patients due to inadequate images, 56 patients (19 follicular-periovulatory, 27 luteal, and 10 menstrual) were analyzed. FDG uptake of the endometrium, frequency of peristalsis, and the presence of sustained contraction varied according to the menstruation cycle, with a tendency toward greater uptake in the menstrual phase, but there was little relationship between the frequency of uterine peristalsis and FDG accumulation in the uterus. Significantly higher FDG accumulation in the endometrium was observed in patients with sustained contractions (3.32+-1.47) than in those without contractions (2.45+-0.66). Conclusion: Our preliminary data suggest that FDG accumulation in the endometrium tends to be higher in patients with uterine contraction, although there was no significant correlation between uterine peristalsis and FDG uptake in the uterine myometrium or endometrium

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  8. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thyroid and Parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gonzalo-Domínguez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment of the thyroid and parathyroid pathology is usually achieved with ultrasounds. There are several systems of classification that are internationally accepted in neoplastic disease, such as TIRADS system, and there are well-defined patterns for ultrasound imaging in inflammatory disease. Material and methods: However, there are specific needs that require magnetic resonance imaging. We review the main indications of MRI in the evaluation of thyroid and parathyroid in 64 patients and determine which protocols are more appropriate and which sequences are better for a proper characterization. Results: Then we review the semiology obtained by this technique, making correlation with disease processes affecting these cervical structures.

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging and human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengstschlaeger, Markus [Medical Genetics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: markus.hengstschlaeger@meduniwien.ac.at

    2006-02-15

    The use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in addition to prenatal genetic testing and sonography, has the potential to improve prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders. MRI plays an important role in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities and malformations. Fetal MRI often enables a differential diagnosis, a determination of the extent of the disorder, the prognosis, and an improvement in therapeutic management. For counseling of parents, as well as to basically understand how genetic aberrations affect fetal development, it is of great importance to correlate different genotypes with fetal MRI data.

  11. Correlation between magnetic resonance T2 image signal intensity ratio and cell apoptosis in a rabbit spinal cord cervical myelopathy model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Lei; Zhang Di; Chen Wei; Shen Yong; Zhang Yingze; Ding Wenyuan; Zhang Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common cause of disability in elderly patients.Previous studies have shown that spinal cord cell apoptosis due to spinal cord compression plays an important role in the pathology of myelopathy.Although changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 signal intensity ratio (SIR) are considered to be an indicator of CSM,little information is published supporting the correlation between changes in MRI signal and pathological changes.This study aims to testify the correlation between MRI T2 SIR changes and cell apoptosis using a CSM animal model.Methods Forty-eight rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups:one control group and three experimental chronic compression groups,with each group containing 12 animals.Chronic compression of the cervical spinal cord was implemented in the experimental groups by implanting a screw in the C3 vertebra.The control group underwent sham surgery.Experimental groups were observed for 3,6,or 9 months after surgery.MRI T2-weighted SIR Tarlov motor scores and cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials (CSEPs) were periodically monitored.At each time point,rabbits from one group were sacrificed to determine the level of apoptosis by histology (n=6) and Western blotting (n=6).Results Tarlov motor scores in the compression groups were lower at all time points than the control group scores,with the lowest score at 9 months (P <0.001).Electrophysiological testing showed a significantly prolonged latency in CSEP in the compression groups compared with the control group.All rabbits in the compression groups showed higher MRI T2 SIR in the injury epicenter compared with controls,and higher SIR was also found at 9 months compared with 3 or 6 months.Histological analysis showed significant apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue in the compression groups,but not in the control group.There were significant differences in apoptosis degree over time (P <0.001),with the 9-month group displaying the

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of periosteal interposition in a distal tibial Salter-Harris type I fracture with surgical correlation: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nara; Jung, Jee Young; Kang, Ki Ser [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    The complication of growth disturbance after physeal fracture of the distal tibia has been well recognized. Although irreducible fractures of the physis due to trapped soft tissue, including periosteum, are not common, it could still cause growth disturbances. Therefore, the detection of periosteal interposition with physeal injury on imaging study is important. We present a case of a 10-year-old girl with surgically confirmed periosteal interposition in the distal tibial Salter-Harris type I fracture, through magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameters correlate with advanced revised-ISS and angiopoietin-1/angiopoietin-2 ratio in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpos, Evangelos; Matsaridis, Dimitris; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Zagouri, Flora; Christoulas, Dimitrios; Fontara, Sophia; Panourgias, Evangelia; Gavriatopoulou, Maria; Kastritis, Efstathios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Moulopoulos, Lia A

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) who were treated with novel anti-myeloma agents. We studied 60 previously untreated MM patients at diagnosis, 14 with smoldering MM (SMM) and 5 with MGUS. All patients underwent MRI of the thoracolumbar spine and pelvis before the administration of any kind of therapy, and DCE-MRI was performed. The MRI perfusion parameters evaluated were wash-in (WIN), washout (WOUT), time-to-peak (TTPK), time-to-maximum slope (TMSP), and the WIN/TMSP ratio. The following serum levels of angiogenic cytokines were measured on the day of MRI: VEGF, angiogenin (Ang), angiopoietin-1 (Angp-1), and -2 (Angp-2). Symptomatic MM patients had increased WIN compared to SMM (p ISS. Patients with R-ISS-3 had lower TTPK median value (23 s, range 18-29 s) compared to patients with R-ISS-2 (48 s, range 27-68 s) and patients with R-ISS-1 MM (54 s, range 42-76 s; p ANOVA = 0.01). A subset of patients with low TTPK (lower quartile) had shorter time to progression compared to all other patients. These data suggest that certain DCE-MRI parameters correlate with R-ISS and adverse prognostic features of angiogenesis, such as the ratio of Angp-1/Angp-2.

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging identifies focal regions of intramyocardial fibrosis in patients with severe aortic valve disease: Correlation with quantitative histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigri, Marcelo; Azevedo, Clerio F; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo; Schraibman, Vladimir; Tarasoutchi, Flavio; Pommerantzeff, Pablo M; Brandão, Carlos Manuel; Sampaio, Roney O; Parga, José R; Avila, Luiz F; Spina, Guilherme S; Grinberg, Max

    2009-02-01

    Chronic aortic valve disease (AVD) is characterized by progressive accumulation of interstitial myocardial fibrosis (MF). However, assessment of MF accumulation has only been possible through histologic analyses of endomyocardial biopsies. We sought to evaluate contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (ce-MRI) as a noninvasive method to identify the presence of increased MF in patients with severe AVD. Seventy patients scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement surgery were examined by cine and ce-MRI in a 1.5-T scanner. Cine images were used for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes, mass, and function. Delayed-enhancement images were used to characterize the regions of MF. In addition, histologic analyses of myocardial samples obtained during aortic valve replacement surgery were used for direct quantification of interstitial MF. Ten additional subjects who died of noncardiac causes served as controls for the quantitative histologic analyses. Interstitial MF determined by histopathologic analysis was higher in patients with AVD than in controls (2.7% +/- 2.0% vs 0.6% +/- 0.2%, P = .001). When compared with histopathologic results, ce-MRI demonstrated a sensitivity of 74%, a specificity of 81%, and an accuracy of 76% to identify AVD patients with increased interstitial MF. There was a significant inverse correlation between interstitial MF and LV ejection fraction (r = -0.67, P < .0001). Accordingly, patients with identifiable focal regions of MF by ce-MRI exhibited worse LV systolic function than those without MF (45% +/- 14% vs 65% +/- 14%, P < .0001). Contrast-enhanced MRI allows for the noninvasive detection of focal regions of MF in patients with severe AVD. Moreover, patients with identifiable MF by ce-MRI exhibited worse LV functional parameters.

  15. Comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance image in staging and grading of carcinoma bladder with histopathological correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neetika Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bladder cancer is the second most common neoplasm of the urinary tract worldwide. Dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI has been introduced in clinical MRI protocols of bladder cancer because of its accuracy in staging and grading. Aim: To evaluate and compare accuracy of Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE and Diffusion weighted (DW MRI for preoperative T staging of urinary bladder cancer and find correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC and maximum enhancement with histological grade. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with bladder cancer were included in study. All patients underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI on a 1.5-T scanner with a phased-array pelvic coil. MR images were evaluated and assigned a stage which was compared with the histolopathological staging. ADC value and maximum enhancement curve were used based on previous studies. Subsequently histological grade was compared with MR characteristics. Results: The extent of agreement between the radiologic staging and histopathological staging was relatively greater with the DW-MRI (κ=0.669 than DCE-MRI (κ=0.619. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy are maximum and similar for stage T4 tumors in both DCEMRI (100.0, 96.2 and 96.7 and DW-MRI (100.0, 96.2 and 96.7 while minimum for stage T2 tumors - DCEMRI (83.3, 72.2, and 76.7 and DWI-MRI (91.7, 72.2, and 80. Conclusion: MRI is an effective tool for determining T stage and histological grade of urinary bladder cancers. Stage T2a and T2b can be differentiated only by DCE-MRI. Results were more accurate when both ADC and DCE-MRI were used together and hence a combined approach is suggested.

  16. Abnormal Patella Height Based on Insall-Salvati Ratio and its Correlation with Patellar Cartilage Lesions: An Extremity-Dedicated Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of 1703 Chinese Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W; Yang, J; Chen, S; Zhu, Y; Zhu, C

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic performance of patellar position for patellar cartilage lesions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the abnormal patella height and its correlation with chondral lesions of the patellofemoral joint in China. A total of 1703 consecutive patients who performed knee joint examination using an extremity-dedicated low-field magnetic resonance imaging were enrolled in this study. Patellar cartilage lesions were diagnosed based on the result of magnetic resonance imaging and clinical data. Patella height was defined as the ratio of patellar tendon length to patellar length according to Insall-Salvati index. Patella alta and infera were defined as tendon length/patellar length >1.2 and patella alta and infera (p patella height had statistical significance in diagnosing cartilage lesions (p patella height is significantly correlated with chondral lesions and can be used as a potential diagnostic marker. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2015.

  17. Peritendinous calcinosis of calcaneus tendon associated with dermatomyositis: correlation between conventional radiograph, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and gross surgical pathology; Calcinose peritendinea do tendao calcaneo associada a dermatomiosite: correlacao entre radiografia convencional, ultra-sonografia, ressonancia magnetica e macroscopia cirurgica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Gomide, Lidyane Marques de Paula; Lemes, Marcella Stival [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiana, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Costa, Edegmar Nunes; Rocha, Valney Luiz da [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Ortopedia; Machado, Marcio Martins; Santos Junior, Rubens Carneiro dos; Barros, Nestor de; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Sernik, Renato Antonio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia; Nunes, Rodrigo Alvarenga [Universidade do Vale do Sapucai (UNIVAS), Pouso Alegre, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas; Albieri, Alexandre Daher [Hospital de Acidentados de Goiania, GO (Brazil)

    2006-01-15

    Interstitial calcinosis is an uncommon condition in which there is either localized or widely disseminated deposition of calcium in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, muscles, and tendons. Calcinosis is often associated with collagen diseases, scleroderma and dermatomyositis. The authors report a case of interstitial calcinosis associated with dermatomyositis studied with conventional radiograph, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, and correlate the imaging findings with the results of surgical pathology gross examination. (author)

  18. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  19. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  20. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, AJE; van den Berg, CAT; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  4. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled.

  5. Multimodal morphometry and functional magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations

    OpenAIRE

    García-Martí, Gracián; Aguilar, Eduardo Jesús; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Escartí, M José; Sanjuán, Julio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To validate a multimodal [structural and functional magnetic resonance (MR)] approach as coincidence brain clusters are hypothesized to correlate with clinical severity of auditory hallucinations.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  7. Magnetic resonance elastography of the lung parenchyma in an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver: correlation of shear stiffness with trans-respiratory system pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Kolipaka, Arunark; Manduca, Armando; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Ehman, Richard L; Araoz, Philip; McGee, Kiaran P

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of lung parenchyma is an active field of research due to the association of this metric with normal function, disease initiation and progression. A phase contrast MRI-based elasticity imaging technique known as magnetic resonance elastography is being investigated as a method for measuring the shear stiffness of lung parenchyma. Previous experiments performed with small animals using invasive drivers in direct contact with the lungs have indicated that the quantification of lung shear modulus with (1) H based magnetic resonance elastography is feasible. This technique has been extended to an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver placed on the chest wall. This approach was tested to measure the change in parenchymal stiffness as a function of airway opening pressure (P(ao) ) in 10 adult pigs. In all animals, shear stiffness was successfully quantified at four different P(ao) values. Mean (±STD error of mean) pulmonary parenchyma density corrected stiffness values were calculated to be 1.48 (±0.09), 1.68 (±0.10), 2.05 (±0.13), and 2.23 (±0.17) kPa for P(ao) values of 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm H2O, respectively. Shear stiffness increased with increasing P(ao) , in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that in an in situ porcine lung shear stiffness can be quantitated with (1) H magnetic resonance elastography using a noninvasive mechanical driver and that it is feasible to measure the change in shear stiffness due to change in P(ao) .

  8. Changes observed in multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging characteristics correlate with histopathological development of chronic granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jennifer K; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Merino, Maria J; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to cause granulomatous prostatitis, a rare inflammatory process that can be mistaken for prostate cancer. We present a case of a 78-year-old man on active surveillance for prostate cancer with a subsequent diagnosis of high-grade urothelial carcinoma. After intravesical BCG therapy, he developed chronic granulomatous prostatitis. We present serial magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy data demonstrating the time interval between BCG administration and the manifestation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis.

  9. Correlation between single-trial visual evoked potentials and the blood oxygenation level dependent response in simultaneously recorded electroencephalography-functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan; Pedersen, Henrik; Rostrup, Egill;

    2012-01-01

    To compare different electroencephalography (EEG)-based regressors and their ability to predict the simultaneously recorded blood oxygenation level dependent response during blocked visual stimulation, simultaneous EEG-functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 healthy volunteers was performed...... in different occipital and extraoccipital cortical areas not explained by the boxcar regressor. The results suggest that the P1-N2 regressor is the best EEG-based regressor to model the visual paradigm, but when looking for additional effects like habituation or attention modulation that cannot be modeled...

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Tomography of tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M. (Montreal Neurological Inst., Quebec (Canada))

    1983-10-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography.

  11. Using 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-operative evaluation of tongue carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, K F; Cornelius, R S; Lucas, F V; Meinzen-Derr, J; Patil, Y J

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging in predicting tongue tumour thickness via direct and reconstructed measures, and their correlations with corresponding histological measures, nodal metastasis and extracapsular spread. A prospective study was conducted of 25 patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and pre-operative 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging from 2009 to 2012. Correlations between 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histological measures of tongue tumour thickness were assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient: r values were 0.84 (p Tesla magnetic resonance imaging had 83 per cent sensitivity, 82 per cent specificity, 82 per cent accuracy and a 90 per cent negative predictive value for detecting cervical lymph node metastasis. In this cohort, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging measures of tumour thickness correlated highly with the corresponding histological measures. Further, 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was an effective method of detecting malignant adenopathy with extracapsular spread.

  12. The positive effects of high-frequency right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on memory, correlated with increases in brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jun Qiao,1,2 Guixing Jin,1,2 Licun Lei,3 Lan Wang,1,2 Yaqiang Du,3 Xueyi Wang1,2 1Institute of Mental Health, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Brain Ageing and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Hebei Medical University, 3Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS on memory, and its correlation with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and methods: In this randomized, double-blind sham-controlled trial, alcohol-dependent patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups: the experimental group (rTMS, 10 Hz, on right DLPFC, 20 sessions and the control group (sham stimulation. Memory function was assessed using Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R before and after treatment. 1H-MRS was used to detect the levels of N-acetyl aspartic acid (NAA, choline (Cho, and creatine (Cr in bilateral hippocampi before and after treatment. Results: Thirty-eight patients (18 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group were included in the analyses. The experimental group showed significantly greater changes in HVLT-R, BVMT-R, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr after rTMS from baseline than the control group. The percentage change in BVMT-R and HVLT-R correlated with the percentage change in NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr in the right brain. Conclusion: High-frequency right DLPFC rTMS was associated with improvement in memory dysfunction, which is correlated with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by 1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Keywords: alcohol dependence, memory, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, MR spectroscopy

  13. Use of magnetic resonance urography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, L T; Frager, D; Subramanium, A; Lowe, F C

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a new technique that uses heavily weighted T2 coronal images with fat suppression pulse. Urine appears white on MRU, resembling an intravenous urogram (IVU). Contrast agents are not necessary. This study describes the use of MRU in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hematuria. One hundred six patients with microscopic or gross hematuria and 6 normal volunteers underwent MRU between 1992 and 1995. A modified, heavily weighted T2 technique with intravenous administration of furosemide and ureteral compression was used. Thirty-two patients had other imaging techniques as well for comparison. MRU provided high-resolution images in almost all cases; 73 (69%) had a normal MRU. Significant findings in the 33 patients with abnormalities included renal cysts in 17 (51%), renal cell carcinoma in 6 (18%), transitional cell carcinoma in 5 (15%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 3 (9%), and stones causing obstruction in 6 (18%). Five patients with renal failure also had good visualization of the entire urinary tract. MRU was comparable to other imaging modalities except in identifying nonobstructing calculi. MRU provides an alternative to conventional imaging of the urinary tract, especially in those patients who have contraindications to ionizing radiation and contrast agents. Improvements in resolution, technique, and cost have to be addressed before it can be used regularly in urologic practice.

  14. Magnetic resonance images of hematospermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Norio; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Nobuki; Furuta, Nozomu; Ohishi, Yukihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Kondo, Naoya; Tashiro, Kazuya

    1998-12-01

    We performed MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in the pelvic region of 70 cases with hematospermia and conducted a study on the abnormal MRI findings to which hematospermia could be attributed. We conducted a study on the morphological anomaly and change in the signal intensity in the prostate gland and of the seminal vesicle as well as on the presence or absence of dilation in the plexus venous surrounding the deferent duct or the prostate gland out of the abnormal MRI findings. As for the seminal vesicle, the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in higher intensity than the prostate gland in T1 weighted images were diagnosed as having hemorrhagic focus and the patients whose seminal vesicle was seen in low intensity both in T1 and T2 weighted images were diagnosed as having fibrosis caused by chronic inflammation. Abnormal MRI findings were seen in 40 out of the 70 cases (57%). Anomaly in the prostate gland was indicated in 6 (9%) cases. Abnormality in the seminal vesicle was indicated in 30 cases (43%) including hemorrhage of seminal vesicle in 25 cases, chronic inflammation in five cases and cyst of seminal vesicle in one case. In conducting an examination of the patients with hematospermia, MRI is the nonivasive and reproducible method and it is possible to identify the hemorrhagic region. Therefore, MRI is thought to be useful to identify the causal organs of hematospermia. (author)

  15. Aortic dissection: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R

    1985-05-01

    Fifteen patients with suspected or known aortic dissection were imaged with magnetic resonance (MR). Thirteen of these patients were eventually shown to have dissection. In most instances the diagnosis was established by aortography and/or computed tomography (CT) prior to the MR study. Surgical proof (6/13) and/or aortographic proof (10/13) were available in 11/13 patients with aortic dissection. MR demonstrated the intimal flap and determined whether the dissection was type A or type B. In addition, MR: differentiated between the true and false lumens; determined the origins of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries from the true or false lumen in the cases where the dissection extended into the abdominal aorta (8/12); allowed post-surgical surveillance of the dissection; and identified aortoannular ectasia in the three patients who had Marfan syndrome. In addition to the 13 cases with dissection, there were two cases in whom the diagnosis of dissection was excluded by MR. Our early experience suggests that MR can serve as the initial imaging test in clinically suspected cases of aortic dissection and that the information provided by MR is sufficient to manage many cases. Additionally, MR obviates the use of iodinated contrast media.

  16. Magnetic resonance in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, G.; Scialfa, G.; Biondi, A.; Landoni, L.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres.

  17. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  18. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  19. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... I-131 Therapy Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  2. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- ..... this study, it is important to note that there were distinct differences in the .... Applications of MRS in the. 13. evaluation ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  5. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging: challenges of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Ronald; Fowler, Kathryn; Schmidt, Ryan; Ippolito, Joseph; Siegel, Cary; Narra, Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of cancer and cancer deaths in men. Screening methods and optimal treatments have become controversial in recent years. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity as a tool to assist diagnosis, risk assessment, and staging. However, implementation into clinical practice can be difficult, with many challenges associated with image acquisition, postprocessing, interpretation, reporting, and radiologic-pathologic correlation. Although state-of-the-art technology is available at select sites for targeting tissue biopsy and interpreting multiparametric prostate MRI, many institutions struggle with adapting this new technology into an efficient multidisciplinary model of patient care. This article reviews several of the challenges that radiologists should be aware of when integrating prostate MRI into their clinical practice.

  6. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  7. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  8. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  9. Correlation between the findings of magnetic resonance imaging and prognosis of patients with predisposing factors of aseptic necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatori, Yoshio; Nakamura, Shigeru; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ninomiya, Setsuo; Kokubo, Takashi (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Sugimoto, Hisayuki

    1991-08-01

    Eighteen patients with the predisposing factors for aseptic necrosis of the femoral head were followed up for more than two years after the initial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. At the time of the initial examination, 24 femoral heads showed abnormal low-intensity areas on MR images without abnormal findings on plain radiographs. Among them, six femoral heads collapsed in the follow-up period. The initial mid-coronal T{sub 1}-weighted MR images of these femoral heads had shown characteristic findings, that is, band-shaped low-intensity areas with the lateral end not covered by the acetabulum. Subchondral fracture of the femoral head occurred in the vicinity of the lateral end of the band. The findings of initial MR imaging seem to predict subsequent collapse of the femoral head. (author).

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of periosteal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Trad, Clovis Simao; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge; Simao, Marcelo Novelino, E-mail: marcello@fmrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica; Sa, Jose Luiz de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cecilio Vieira de [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem Tomoson, Aracatuba, SP (Brazil); Engel, Edgard Eduard [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Biomecanica, Medicina e Reabilitacao do Aparelho Locomotor

    2010-07-15

    The objective of the present essay was to encourage a careful evaluation of periosteal reactions on magnetic resonance images. The initial approach to bone lesions is made by conventional radiography and, based on the imaging findings, periosteal reactions are classified into classical subtypes. Although magnetic resonance imaging is considered as the gold standard for local staging of bone tumors, the utilization of such method in the study of periosteal reactions related to focal bone lesions has been poorly emphasized, with relatively few studies approaching this subject. The literature review revealed a study describing an experimental animal model of osteomyelitis suggesting that magnetic resonance imaging is superior to other imaging methods in the early identification of periosteal reactions. Another study has suggested a good correlation between conventional radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the identification and classification of periosteal reactions in cases of osteosarcoma. The present essay illustrates cases of periosteal reactions observed at magnetic resonance imaging in correlation with findings of conventional radiography or other imaging methods. (author)

  11. Resonance contributions to HBT correlation radii

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Heinz, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    We study the effect of resonance decays on intensity interferometry for heavy ion collisions. Collective expansion of the source leads to a dependence of the two-particle correlation function on the pair momentum K. This opens the possibility to reconstruct the dynamics of the source from the K-dependence of the measured ``HBT radii''. Here we address the question to what extent resonance decays can fake such a flow signal. Within a simple parametrization for the emission function we present a comprehensive analysis of the interplay of flow and resonance decays on the one- and two-particle spectra. We discuss in detail the non-Gaussian features of the correlation function introduced by long-lived resonances and the resulting problems in extracting meaningful HBT radii. We propose to define them in terms of the second order q-moments of the correlator C(q,K). We show that this yields a more reliable characterisation of the correlator in terms of its width and the correlation strength $\\lambda$ than other commo...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  20. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV- content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ~2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the characteristic hyperfine satellites in the

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  2. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Albert C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR examinations.

  3. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and MRI-Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Biopsy for Index Tumor Detection: Correlation with Radical Prostatectomy Specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Jan P; Schwab, Constantin; Wolf, Maya B; Freitag, Martin T; Alt, Celine D; Kesch, Claudia; Popeneciu, Ionel V; Huettenbrink, Clemens; Gasch, Claudia; Klein, Tilman; Bonekamp, David; Duensing, Stefan; Roth, Wilfried; Schueler, Svenja; Stock, Christian; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Roethke, Matthias; Hohenfellner, Markus; Hadaschik, Boris A

    2016-11-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and MRI fusion targeted biopsy (FTB) detect significant prostate cancer (sPCa) more accurately than conventional biopsies alone. To evaluate the detection accuracy of mpMRI and FTB on radical prostatectomy (RP) specimen. From a cohort of 755 men who underwent transperineal MRI and transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy under general anesthesia between 2012 and 2014, we retrospectively analyzed 120 consecutive patients who had subsequent RP. All received saturation biopsy (SB) in addition to FTB of lesions with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) score ≥2. The index lesion was defined as the lesion with extraprostatic extension, the highest Gleason score (GS), or the largest tumor volume (TV) if GS were the same, in order of priority. GS 3+3 and TV ≥1.3ml or GS ≥3+4 and TV ≥0.55ml were considered sPCa. We assessed the detection accuracy by mpMRI and different biopsy approaches and analyzed lesion agreement between mpMRI and RP specimen. Overall, 120 index and 71 nonindex lesions were detected. Overall, 107 (89%) index and 51 (72%) nonindex lesions harbored sPCa. MpMRI detected 110 of 120 (92%) index lesions, FTB (two cores per lesion) alone diagnosed 96 of 120 (80%) index lesions, and SB alone diagnosed 110 of 120 (92%) index lesions. Combined SB and FTB detected 115 of 120 (96%) index foci. FTB performed significantly less accurately compared with mpMRI (p=0.02) and the combination for index lesion detection (p=0.002). Combined FTB and SB detected 97% of all sPCa lesions and was superior to mpMRI (85%), FTB (79%), and SB (88%) alone (pcorrelation coefficient for index lesion agreement between mpMRI and RP was 0.87 (p<0.001). Limitations included the retrospective design, multiple operators, and nonblinding of radiologists. MpMRI identified 92% of index lesions compared with RP histopathology. The combination of FTB and SB was superior to both approaches alone, reliably detecting 97% of s

  4. Common carotid intima media thickness and ankle-brachial pressure index correlate with local but not global atheroma burden: a cross sectional study using whole body magnetic resonance angiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Weir-McCall

    Full Text Available Common carotid intima media thickness (CIMT and ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI are used as surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, and have been shown to correlate with arterial stiffness, however their correlation with global atherosclerotic burden has not been previously assessed. We compare CIMT and ABPI with atheroma burden as measured by whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA.50 patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease were recruited. CIMT was measured using ultrasound while rest and exercise ABPI were performed. WB-MRA was performed in a 1.5T MRI scanner using 4 volume acquisitions with a divided dose of intravenous gadolinium gadoterate meglumine (Dotarem, Guerbet, FR. The WB-MRA data was divided into 31 anatomical arterial segments with each scored according to degree of luminal narrowing: 0 = normal, 1 = <50%, 2 = 50-70%, 3 = 70-99%, 4 = vessel occlusion. The segment scores were summed and from this a standardized atheroma score was calculated.The atherosclerotic burden was high with a standardised atheroma score of 39.5±11. Common CIMT showed a positive correlation with the whole body atheroma score (β 0.32, p = 0.045, however this was due to its strong correlation with the neck and thoracic segments (β 0.42 p = 0.01 with no correlation with the rest of the body. ABPI correlated with the whole body atheroma score (β -0.39, p = 0.012, which was due to a strong correlation with the ilio-femoral vessels with no correlation with the thoracic or neck vessels. On multiple linear regression, no correlation between CIMT and global atheroma burden was present (β 0.13 p = 0.45, while the correlation between ABPI and atheroma burden persisted (β -0.45 p = 0.005.ABPI but not CIMT correlates with global atheroma burden as measured by whole body contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a population with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. However this is

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of Postpartum Depression: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiorelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum depression is a frequent and disabling condition whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In recent years, the study of the neural correlates of mental disorders has been increasingly approached using magnetic resonance techniques. In this review we synthesize the results from studies on postpartum depression in the context of structural, functional, and spectroscopic magnetic resonance studies of major depression as a whole. Compared to the relative wealth of data available for major depression, magnetic resonance studies of postpartum depression are limited in number and design. A systematic literature search yielded only eleven studies conducted on about one hundred mothers with postpartum depression overall. Brain magnetic resonance findings in postpartum depression appear to replicate those obtained in major depression, with minor deviations that are not sufficient to delineate a distinct neurobiological profile for this condition, due to the small samples used and the lack of direct comparisons with subjects with major depression. However, it seems reasonable to expect that studies conducted in larger populations, and using a larger variety of brain magnetic resonance techniques than has been done so far, might allow for the identification of neuroimaging signatures for postpartum depression.

  6. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Marrow adiposity assessed on transiliac crest biopsy samples correlates with noninvasive measurement of marrow adiposity by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at the spine but not the femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W.; Dempster, D. W.; Zhou, H.; Recker, R. R.; Lappe, J. M.; Kepley, A.; Kamanda-Kosseh, M.; Bucovsky, M.; Stein, E. M.; Nickolas, T. L.; Shane, E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Measurement of marrow fat (MF) is important to the study of bone fragility. We measured MF on iliac biopsies and by spine/hip magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the same subjects. Noninvasively assessed spine MF a nd histomorphometrically assessed MF correlated well. MF quantity and relationships with bone volume differed by measurement site. Introduction Excess marrow fat has been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in several populations. In the bone marrow, adipocytes and osteoblasts share a common precursor and are reciprocally regulated. In addition, adipocytes may secrete toxic fatty acids and adipokines that adversely affect osteoblasts. Measurement of marrow fat is important to the study of mechanisms of bone fragility. Marrow fat can be quantified on bone biopsy samples by histomorphometry and noninvasively by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). In this study, we evaluate relationships between marrow fat assessed using both methods in the same subjects for the first time. Methods Sixteen premenopausal women, nine with idiopathic osteoporosis and seven normal controls, had marrow fat measured at the iliac crest by bone biopsy and at the lumbar spine (L3) and proximal femur by 1H-MRS. Results At L3, fat fraction by 1H-MRS correlated directly and significantly with marrow fat variables on iliac crest biopsies (r=0.5–0.8). In contrast, there were no significant correlations between fat fraction at the femur and marrow fat on biopsies. Marrow fat quantity (%) was greater at the femur than at L3 and the iliac crest and correlated inversely with total hip and femoral neck BMD by DXA. Conclusions In summary, measurement of marrow fat in transiliac crest biopsies correlates with marrow fat at the spine but not the proximal femur by 1H-MRS. There were site-specific differences in marrow fat quantity and in the relationships between marrow fat and bone volume. PMID:25986383

  8. The neuronal correlates of mirror therapy: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on mirror-induced visual illusions of ankle movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Xu, Qun; Abo Salem, Hassan M; Yao, Yihao; Lou, Jicheng; Huang, Xiaolin

    2016-05-15

    Recovery in stroke is mediated by neural plasticity. Mirror therapy is an effective method in the rehabilitation of stroke patients, but the mechanism is still obscure. To identify the neural networks associated with the effect of lower-limbs mirror therapy, we investigated a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of mirror-induced visual illusion of ankle movements. Five healthy controls and five left hemiplegic stroke patients performed tasks related to mirror therapy in the fMRI study. Neural activation was compared in a no-mirror condition and a mirror condition. All subjects in the experiment performed the task of flexing and extending the right ankle. In a mirror condition, movement of the left ankle was simulated by mirror reflection of right ankle movement. Changes in neural activation in response to mirror therapy were assessed both in healthy controls and stroke patients. We found strong activation of the motor cortex bilaterally in healthy controls, as well as significant activation of the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, the occipital gyrus, and the anterior prefrontal gyrus in stroke patients with respect to the non-mirror condition. We concluded that mirror therapy of ankle movements may induce neural activation of the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex, and that cortical reorganization may be useful for motor rehabilitation in stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Enterography Findings in Crohn′s disease in the Pediatric Population and Correlation with Fluoroscopic and Multidetector Computed Tomographic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, fluoroscopic examinations such as enteroclysis, upper GI studies, and small bowel follow through exams have been the procedures of choice in evaluating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD in pediatric populations. With the advent of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT, it has subsequently become a complementary examination in imaging inflammatory bowel disease. A major advantage of MDCT over fluoroscopic examination is its ability to directly visualize bowel mucosa, as well as demonstrate extra-enteric complications of IBD such as abscesses, fistulae, and sinus tracts. The major disadvantage of CT however is exposure to ionizing radiation, especially in IBD patients of the pediatric age group who maybe repeatedly imaged due to exacerbations. As a result, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation and follow-up of pediatric patients with IBD. This pictorial essay will summarize the multi-modality imaging findings of IBD with emphasis on MRE including the imaging protocol and procedure. For the purposes of this article, patients less than 17 years of age have been considered to represent the pediatric population.

  10. Chiasma crurale: intersection of the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons above the ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging-anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Zurich (Switzerland); Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haghighi, Parviz [VA San Diego Medical Center, Department of Pathology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    To determine the precise anatomy and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of the chiasma crurale in cadavers, paying special attention to degenerative changes Twelve fresh human ankles were harvested from 11 nonembalmed cadavers (mean age at death 77 years) and used according to institutional guidelines. MR imaging and MR tenography were used to investigate the anatomy of the chiasma crurale using proton density-weighted sequences. The gross anatomy of the chiasma crurale was evaluated and compared to the MR imaging findings. Histology was used to elucidate further the structure of the chiasma crurale. Above the chiasma, five specimens had a small amount of fat tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendon. In all specimens both tendons had a sheath below the chiasma but not above it. At the central portion of the chiasma there was no soft tissue between the tendons, except in two specimens that showed an anatomic variant consisting of a thick septum connecting the tibial periosteum and the deep transverse fascia of the leg. In MR images, eight specimens showed what were believed to be degenerative changes in the tendons at the level of the chiasma. However, during gross inspection and histologic analysis of the specimens, there was no tendon degeneration visible. At the central portion of the chiasma, there is no tissue between the tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons unless there is an anatomic variant. At the chiasma crurale, areas with irregular tendon surfaces are normal findings and are not associated with tendon degeneration (fraying). (orig.)

  11. Correlation of X-ray computed tomography with quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance methods for pre-clinical measurement of adipose and lean tissues in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzinger, Matthew N; Miramontes, Bernadette; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yueying; Chapman, Sarah; Sun, Lucy; Sasser, Todd A; Duffield, Giles E; Stack, M Sharon; Leevy, W Matthew

    2014-10-08

    Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT) or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR). Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds) to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs) was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues.

  12. Magnetic resonance of magnetic fluid and magnetoliposome preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Paulo C. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil)]. E-mail: pcmor@unb.br; Santos, Judes G. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Skeff Neto, K. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Nucleo de Fisica Aplicada, 70919-970 Brasilia-DF (Brazil); Pelegrini, Fernando [Universidade Federal de Goias, Instituto de Fisica, 74001-970 Goiania-GO (Brazil); Cuyper, Marcel de [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Interdisciplinary Research Centre, B-8500 Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2005-05-15

    In this study, magnetic resonance was used to investigate lauric acid-coated magnetite-based magnetic fluid particles and particles which are surrounded by a double layer of phospholipid molecules (magnetoliposomes). The data reveal the presence of monomers and dimers in both samples. Whereas evidence for a thermally induced disruption of dimers is found in the magnetic fluid, apparently, the bilayer phospholipid envelop prevents the dissociation in the magnetoliposome samples.

  13. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and extremities. Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic ... the radiologist if your child has any serious health problems or has recently had surgery. Some conditions, ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other ... that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the patient. ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... of the body being studied. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or potentially pose a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many ... is positioned around the head. If a contrast material will be used in the MRI exam, a ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... the exam if your child has a known allergy to contrast material. Your child should wear loose, ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate infections assess blood flow to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... if your child has any implanted medical or electronic devices. Inform your doctor and the technologist prior ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is ... routine and have him/her take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require your ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... doctor about your child’s health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, ... to the heart muscle evaluate findings following cardiovascular surgery In the abdominal and pelvic region, MRI is ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... cord is needed, MRI is useful because of its ability to see through the skull and the ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most ... number of abrupt onset or long-standing symptoms. It can help diagnose conditions such as: brain tumors ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD or uploaded to ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ...

  5. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  6. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Fridjonsson, Einar Orn

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth\\'s magnetic field system.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  8. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did not undergo magnetically induced aggregation, and exhibited time independent values of T2. The rate of T2 change associated with magnetic micro-particle aggregation was used to determine the viscosity of liquid samples, providing a method that can be of particular advantage for determining the viscosity of small volumes of potentially biohazardous samples of blood or blood plasma. PMID:18306403

  9. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  10. Frequency and topography of small cerebrovascular lesions in vascular and in mixed dementia: a post-mortem 7-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Pasquier, Florence; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mixed dementia (MixD) refers to a combination of definite Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular encephalopathy. The existence of a "pure" type of vascular dementia (VaD) is controversial. There is a need to find magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics allowing the distinction between VaD and MixD. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla MRI compares the frequency or severity and the topography of the small cerebrovascular lesions in brains of patients with VaD and with MixD. Material and methods: Based on neuropathological criteria, 14 brains were classified as VaD, 24 as MixD and 11 as controls. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere and a horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere underwent T2 and T2* 7.0-tesla MRI examination. The mean values and topographic distribution of white matter changes (WMCs), lacunar infarcts (LIs), cortical microbleeds (CoMBs) and cortical microinfarcts (CoMIs) were determined and compared between the different groups. Results: Compared to the controls, both VaD and MixD brains had significantly more severe WMCs and increased numbers of CoMBs and CoMIs. Lacunar infarcts predominated only in the VaD cases. On mutual comparison of VaD and MixD brains, CoMBs and CoMIs predominated in the frontal lobe and the cerebellum of VaD, while were mainly present in the occipital lobe of MixD. White matter changes predominated in the temporal lobe of MixD cases. Lacunar infarcts were significantly increased in the corona radiata and putamen of VaD patients. Conclusions: The present post-mortem MRI study shows clear differences in the distribution and the types of cerebrovascular lesions on high-field MRI, confirming that VaD and MixD are different diseases. .

  11. A prospective study of magnetic resonance imaging patterns of central nervous system infections in pediatric age group and young adults and their clinico-biochemical correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamini Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections of the central nervous system (CNS are common and routinely encountered. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroimaging features of the various infections of the CNS so as to differentiate them from tumoral, vascular, and other entities that warrant a different line of therapy. Aims: Our aim was to analyze the biochemical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features in CNS infections. Settings and Design: This was a longitudinal, prospective study over a period of 1½ years. Subjects and Methods: We studied cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings and MRI patterns in 27 patients of 0–20 years age group with clinical features of CNS infections. MRI was performed on MAGNETOM Avanto 18 Channel 1.5 Tesla MR machine by Siemens India Ltd. The MRI protocol consisted of diffusion-weighted and apparent diffusion coefficient imaging, turbo spin echo T2-weighted, spin echo T1-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR, and gradient-echo in axial, FLAIR in coronal, and T2-weighted in sagittal plane. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequence and MR spectroscopy were done whenever indicated. Results and Conclusions: We found that most of the children belong to 1–10 years age group. Fungal infections were uncommon, mean CSF adenosine deaminase values specific for tuberculosis and mean CSF glucose-lowered in pyogenic. Hemorrhagic involvement of thalamus with/without basal ganglia and brainstem involvement may indicate Japanese encephalitis or dengue encephalitis. Diffusion restriction or hemorrhage in not expected in the brainstem afflicted lesions of rabies. Congenital cytomegalovirus can cause cortical malformations. T1 hyperintensities with diffusion restriction may represent viral encephalitis. Lesions of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM may mimic viral encephalitis. Leptomeningeal enhancement is predominant in pyogenic meningitis. Basilar meningitis in the presence of tuberculomas is highly sensitive and specific for

  12. Correlation of X-Ray Computed Tomography with Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods for Pre-Clinical Measurement of Adipose and Lean Tissues in Living Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N. Metzinger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous obesity studies have coupled murine models with non-invasive methods to quantify body composition in longitudinal experiments, including X-ray computed tomography (CT or quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QMR. Both microCT and QMR have been separately validated with invasive techniques of adipose tissue quantification, like post-mortem fat extraction and measurement. Here we report a head-to-head study of both protocols using oil phantoms and mouse populations to determine the parameters that best align CT data with that from QMR. First, an in vitro analysis of oil/water mixtures was used to calibrate and assess the overall accuracy of microCT vs. QMR data. Next, experiments were conducted with two cohorts of living mice (either homogenous or heterogeneous by sex, age and genetic backgrounds to assess the microCT imaging technique for adipose tissue segmentation and quantification relative to QMR. Adipose mass values were obtained from microCT data with three different resolutions, after which the data were analyzed with different filter and segmentation settings. Strong linearity was noted between the adipose mass values obtained with microCT and QMR, with optimal parameters and scan conditions reported herein. Lean tissue (muscle, internal organs was also segmented and quantified using the microCT method relative to the analogous QMR values. Overall, the rigorous calibration and validation of the microCT method for murine body composition, relative to QMR, ensures its validity for segmentation, quantification and visualization of both adipose and lean tissues.

  13. Coronary atherosclerosis and dilation in hyper IgE syndrome patients: Depiction by magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging and pathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z; Ramos, Nadine; Yazdani, Saami K; Ghanem, Ahmed M; Holland, Steven M; Freeman, Alexandra F; Gharib, Ahmed M

    2017-03-01

    Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE (AD-HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in STAT3. Elevated levels of IgE, an ineffective immune response, connective tissue abnormalities, and coronary arterial dilation and tortuosity characterize AD-HIES. To date, coronary artery evaluation in AD-HIES patients has been limited to lumenography measurements. Direct in vivo coronary vessel wall (VW) imaging may allow for better interrogation of coronary vessel abnormalities. The goal of this prospective study was to evaluate the coronary VW of AD-HIES patients using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and histology. VW image findings were compared in healthy subjects and subjects with coronary atherosclerotic disease (CAD). A total of 28 subjects (10 with AD-HIES, 8 healthy, 10 with CAD) were studied by coronary VW MRI imaging. Additionally, a post-mortem coronary artery from one VW imaged AD-HIES patient was examined. Coronary VW in AD-HIES was thicker than in healthy controls but not significantly different from VW thickness in CAD subjects. AD-HIES coronaries showed increased VW area compared to healthy controls and CAD subjects. On histology, the AD-HIES coronary artery had findings consistent with atherosclerotic plaque, but had minimal luminal narrowing, deficient adventitia thickening and absence of both internal and external elastic laminae. This is the first study to demonstrate subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in AD-HIES patients on VW imaging by MRI. Histologic evaluation confirmed the presence of atherosclerosis with lack of supportive adventitial thickening and elastic components. These findings suggest mechanisms for coronary dilation in AD-HIES and thereby help direct clinical management. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of lipids: Differential line broadening due to cross-correlation effects as a probe of membrane structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldfield, E.; Adebodun, F.; Chung, J.; Montez, B.; Ki Deok Park; Hongbiao Le; Phillips, B. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

    1991-11-19

    The authors have obtained proton-coupled carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of a variety of lipid-water and lipid-drug-water systems, at 11.7 T, as a function of temperature, using the 'magic-angle' sample-spinning (MAS) NMR technique. The resulting spectra show a wide range of line shapes, due to interferences between dipole-dipole and dipole-chemical shielding anisotropy interactions. The differential line-broadening effects observed are particularly large for aromatic and olefinic (sp{sup 2}) carbon atom sites. Coupled spectra of the tricyclic antidepressants desipramine and imipramine, in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-water mesophases, show well-resolved doublets having different line shapes for each of the four aromatic methine groups, due to selective averaging of the four C-H dipolar interactions due to rapid motion about the director (or drug C{sub 2}) axis. {sup 2}H NMR spectra of (2,4,6,8-{sup 2}H{sub 4})desipramine (and imipramine) in the same 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-water mesophase exhibit quadrupole splittings of {approximately}0-2 and {approximately}20 kHz, indicating an approximate magic-angle orientation of the C2-{sup 2}H({sup 1}H) and C8-{sup 2}H({sup 1}H) vectors with respect to an axis of motional averaging, in accord with the {sup 13}C NMR results. The good qualitative agreement between {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H NMR results suggests that useful orientational ({sup 2}H NMR like) information can be deduced from natural-abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectra of a variety of mobile solids.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments not correlated with whiplash-associated disorders: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Shen, Hongxing; Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hypothesis that loss of integrity of the membranes in the craniocervical junction might be the cause of neck pain in patients with whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) has been proposed. In recent years, with development of more detailed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, morphologic changes of the ligaments and membranes in the craniocervical junction, especially alar and transverse ligaments have been discussed. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship of MRI signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments and WADs. A systematic search of EMBASE, PUBMED, and Cochrane Library and references from eligible articles were conducted. Comparative studies reporting on evaluating the relationship between MRI high-signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments and WADs were regarded eligible. A pooled estimate of effect size was produced. Alar ligaments: Six studies (total n = 622) were included. MRI signal changes of alar ligaments did not appear to be related with WADs (P = 0.20, OR = 1.54, 95 % CI = 0.80-2.94). Heterogeneity was present (I (2) = 46 %, P = 0.10), which was eliminated upon sensitivity analysis bringing the OR to 1.27 (95 % CI = 0.87-1.86, I (2) = 0 %). Transverse ligaments: Four studies (total n = 489) were included. MRI signal changes of transverse ligament did not appear to be related with WADs (P = 0.51, OR = 1.44, 95 % CI = 0.49-4.21). Heterogeneity was present (I (2) = 77 %, P = 0.005), which was eliminated upon sensitivity analysis bringing the OR to 0.79 (95 % CI = 0.49-1.28, I (2) = 0 %). MRI signal changes of alar and transverse ligaments are not supposed to be caused by whiplash injury, and MRI examination of alar and transverse ligaments should not be used as the routine workup of patients with WADs.

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapy November 8 is the International Day of Radiology (IDoR) Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  17. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...

  18. Modelling Strategies for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    This thesis collects research done on several models for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging (fMRI) data. Several extensions for unsupervised factor analysis type decompositions including explicit delay modelling as well as handling of spatial and temporal smoothness...

  19. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  20. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  1. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute tendon ruptures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Dash, N.; Riemer, B.L.

    1986-11-01

    The diagnosis of acute tendon ruptures of the extensor mechanism of the knee or the Achilles tendon of the ankle may usually be made by clinical means. Massive soft tissue swelling accompanying these injuries often obscures the findings, however. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can rapidly demonstrate these tendon ruptures. Examples of the use of MRI for quadriceps tendon, and Achilles tendon rupture are presented.

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: physics and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Christopher T; Robson, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the branch of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) whose acquisition methods are adapted to surmount the particular challenges caused by motion of the heart and blood in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging is supremely flexible; it can produce images showing the spatial distribution of diverse tissue characteristics, for example, proton density, T(1), T(2), T(2)(⁎), fat concentration, flow rate, and diffusion parameters. The image contrast may usefully be modified by intravenous infusion of contrast agents. Magnetic resonance imaging permits 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional acquisitions with arbitrary slice orientation. Unfortunately, MRI's flexibility is matched by a remarkable complexity not only in its fundamental principles but also in the optimization of applications in the clinic. This article attempts to demystify the basic principles of CMR and provides a primer on the terminology used in CMR. Complete confidence in the principles of CMR is not essential to use the technology. Nevertheless, knowledge of the principal terminology of MRI is a valuable first step when seeking to understand and apply modern methods in a clinical or research setting. Thus, the article closes with a glossary of terminology and references to high-quality educational resources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Was magnetic resonance imaging scan contraindicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khizar

    2010-01-01

    An intravenous drug abuser with a retained needle posed a management problem at a neurosurgical unit, having declined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on safety grounds. However, later, having been assessed by the senior radiologist, she went though the MRI scan safely.

  5. Biliary ascariasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hashmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  6. Sports health magnetic resonance imaging challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gary A; Stadnick, Michael E; Awh, Mark H

    2010-11-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  9. Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Lara M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications. Carr J. C., Carroll T. J., Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg/New York, 2012. 412 pp. Price $179.00. ISBN 978-1-4419-1685-3 (hardcover). © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in syringomyelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.J. Tanghe (Hervé)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBased on an own material of 19 patients with syringomyelia and on the related literature a survey is given on the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, postoperative evaluation and the dynamics of CSF and cyst fluids, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The following conclusions can be

  11. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  12. Interactive Real-time Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau

    Real-time acquisition, reconstruction and interactively changing the slice position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been possible for years. However, the current clinical use of interactive real-time MRI is limited due to an inherent low spatial and temporal resolution. This PhD proje...

  13. Numerical methods in electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soernes, A.R

    1998-07-01

    The focal point of the thesis is the development and use of numerical methods in the analysis, simulation and interpretation of Electron Magnetic Resonance experiments on free radicals in solids to uncover the structure, the dynamics and the environment of the system.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaicher, Wibke; Brugger, Peter C; Mittermayer, Christoph; Schwindt, Jens; Deutinger, Josef; Bernaschek, Gerhard; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaicher, Wibke [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: wibke.blaicher@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Mittermayer, Christoph [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Schwindt, Jens [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology and Intensive Care, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Deutinger, Josef [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Bernaschek, Gerhard [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of cystic periventricular leukomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoi, Nobuaki; Nomura, Junko; Nowatari, Masahiko; Ohta, Takeo; Kamohara, Takashi; Yashiro, Kimio (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-08-01

    A study was performed to assess the values of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluation and the follow up of patients with cystic periventricular leukomalacia. Ten patients selected for MR imaging were diagnosed as having periventricular cystic lesions based on US scans. The range of gestational ages was 27 to 32 weeks, and the range of birth weights was 927 to 2,046 g. Twenty MR examinations were carried out using a 0.5 T superconducting system (Resona; Yokogawa). On the first MR examinations, taken by 6 months of age, low signal intensity lesions within the periventricular white matter, moderate ventriculomegaly with irregularity of the ventricular wall and delayed myelination were observed. These were the MR findings observed in the subacute stage of PVL. On the second or the third MR examinations, taken after 12 months of age, increased signal intensity in periventricular white matter on T{sub 2} weighted images decreased volume of periventricular white matter and centrum semiovale and the ventriculomagaly with irregularity of ventricular wall were observed. However, progressions of myelination were proved to be not delayed in comparison with age matched controls. These were thought to be the MR findings of late stage of PVL. As the US findings of PVL have good correlation with pathologic changes revealed at autopsy, MR imaging can depict myelination and detect PVL lesion beyond the neonatal period. These observations demonstrate the value of the MR imaging for the follow up of the patients with PVL beyond the time of fontanel closure. (author).

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in retropharyngeal tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekbon, K.; Annell, K.; Traeff, J.; Torhall, J. (Soeder Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1994-08-01

    Seven consecutive patients with acute retropharyngeal tendinitis underwent plain X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine. All seven had marked soft tissue swelling anterior to C1 and C2 on plain X-ray, and soft tissue calcification at this level was present in five of them. On MRI, there was markedly increased signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images in the acute phase and intermediate signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images, anterior to the level of CI and C2, often extending as far down as C6. These changes correlated well with the soft tissue swelling seen on conventional X-ray of the cervical spine. The maximum mid-sagittal thickness of the soft issues was significantly greater in the tendinitis patients than in 12 control subjects free of symptoms from the pharynx or the cervical spine. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs rapidly alleviated symptoms, and at follow-up MRI showed regression or complete restitution of the changes. In conclusion, MRI can visualize the edematous changes in the longus colli muscle and adds useful diagnostic information in suspected cases of acute retropharyngeal tendinitis. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Retrospective Analysis of the Effectiveness of Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy: Pretreatment and Posttreatment Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloff, Lawrence; Elmi, Eman; Nelson, Joseph; Crain, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been presented as a means of treating Achilles tendinopathy. Over the past dozen years, a plethora of medical articles have advocated this treatment, yet little evidentiary-based research exists in support of this approach. Treatment protocols with PRP have been performed in 2 ways during this time: administered adjunctively during tendon surgery and as a stand-alone injection. The senior author has utilized PRP by both methods to treat Achilles tendinopathy over the past 7 years; 26 patients so treated were able to be recalled, half having undergone Achilles tendon surgery in combination with PRP administration and the other half PRP alone. In this retrospective study, qualified patients had pretreatment and posttreatment magnetic imaging studies and completed a Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire. In this limited study, PRP showed promise in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy. Both the stand-alone injection group and surgical/injection groups had statistically significant degrees of improvement in pre-MRI and post-MRI imaging studies. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 treatment groups. Of interest, it appears that the difference between the MRI scoring correlates with the survey score. Therapeutic, Level, IV: Case series. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  1. The working principle of magnetic resonance therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Brizhik, Larissa; Fermi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe briefly the basic aspects of magnetic resonance therapy, registered as TMR therapy. Clinical studies have shown that application of this therapy significantly accelerates wound healing and, in particular, healing of the diabetic foot disease. To understand the working principle of this therapy, we analyze relevant to it biological effects produced by magnetic fields. Based on these data, we show that there is a hierarchy of the possible physical mechanisms, which can produce such effects. The mutual interplay between the mechanisms can lead to a synergetic outcome delayed in time, which can affect the physiological state of the organism. In particular, we show that soliton mediated charge transport during the redox processes in living organisms is sensitive to magnetic fields, so that such fields can facilitate redox processes in particular, and can stimulate the healing effect of the organism in general. This and other non-thermal resonant mechanisms of the biological effects of mag...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  3. Magnetic resonance of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzmann, D.R.; De La Paz, R.L.; Rubin, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Three chapters discuss principles of cerebrospinal fluid flow, spinal imaging techniques, and the physical basis and anatomic correlates of signal intensity in the spine. There are chapters on normal anatomy, congenital anomalies, trauma, tumors, infection, demyelinating disease, degenerative disease, vascular conditions, and syringomyelia.

  4. Can magnetic resonance spectroscopy differentiate endometrial cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Han, Xue; Liu, Qingwei; Xin, Yinghui [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Li, Changzhong; Yang, Chunrun [Shandong University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Sun, Xichao; Zong, Yuanyuan [Shandong University, Department of Pathology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Fu, Caixia [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Siemens MRI Center, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-10-15

    To investigate whether the choline-containing compounds (Cho) obtained from three-dimensional {sup 1}H magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy can differentiate endometrial cancer (ECa) from benign lesions in endometria or in submucosa (BLs-ESm) and is associated with the aggressiveness of ECa. Fifty-seven patients (ECa, 38; BLs-ESm, 19) underwent preoperative multi-voxel MR spectroscopy at 3.0 T. The ratio of the sum of the Cho peak integral to the sum of the unsuppressed water peak integral (Cho/water) and the coefficient of variation (CV) used to describe the variability of Cho/water in one lesion were calculated. Mean Cho/water (±standard deviation [SD]) was (3.02 ± 1.43) x 10{sup -3} for ECa and (1.68 ± 0.33) x 10{sup -3} for BLs-ESm (p < 0.001). Mean Cho/water was (4.42 ± 1.53) x 10{sup -3} for type II ECa and (2.65 ± 1.17) x 10{sup -3} for type I ECa (p = 0.001). There were no significant differences among different stages of ECa (p = 0.107) or different grades of ECa (p = 0.142). The Cho/water was positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.386, p = 0.017) and size (r = 0.333, p = 0.041). The CV was also positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.537, p = 0.001) and size (r = 0.34, p = 0.037). The Cho/water can differentiate ECa from BLs-ESm and differentiate type II from type I ECa, but cannot differentiate different stages of ECa or different grades of ECa. Cho/water increased with the increase of tumour stage and size. (orig.)

  5. Random matrix theory in biological nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacelle, S

    1984-01-01

    The statistical theory of energy levels or random matrix theory is presented in the context of the analysis of chemical shifts of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of large biological systems. Distribution functions for the spacing between nearest-neighbor energy levels are discussed for uncorrelated, correlated, and random superposition of correlated energy levels. Application of this approach to the NMR spectra of a vitamin, an antibiotic, and a protein demonstrates the state of correlation of an ensemble of energy levels that characterizes each system. The detection of coherent and dissipative structures in proteins becomes feasible with this statistical spectroscopic technique. PMID:6478032

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorramdin, A. [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Isapour, Gh. [Department of Materials and Engineering, Hakim Sabzevari University (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants. - Highlights: • This paper studies the physics of MRI as a powerful diagnostic technique. • MRI uses the differentiation between healthy and pathological tissues. • The relaxation times can be shortened by the use of a magnetic contrast agent. • The magnetic nanoparticles act as contrast agents, helping to increase the resolution. • Different synthesis methods can influence the magnetic resonance behavior.

  7. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy--a single centre, open-label study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-01

    With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent.

  8. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  9. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance contains three articles which review quite fundamentally different aspects of coherent spectroscopy. An enormous variety of effects can be observed when optical and spin resonances are coupled, usually by a combination of radio frequency and laser irradiation. The first article reviews these effects and pays particular attention to developing a theoretical framework which is as similar as possible for the optical and spin cases. Subsequent articles examine deuterium relaxation in molecular solids, and the spatiotemporal growth of multiple spin coheren

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and its applicability in veterinary cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, José Manuel de Seiça

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a technique whereby images are created by the manipulation of hydrogen atoms in magnetic fields; it is based on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (MR), which is non-invasive and non-ionising (Constantine, Shan, Flamm, & Sivananthan, 2004). Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) uses the same principle: application of magnetic-field gradients that are adjusted to highlight desired tissue characteristics, producing a variety of sequences that all...

  11. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  12. Sensorineural hearing loss after magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Atighechi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus)......). In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient's hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices produce noise, which may affect patient's or operators' hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus...

  13. High speed functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, A M

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated by reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to October 2001. This thesis documents the implementation and application of a novel high-speed imaging technique, the multi-slice, echo shifted, echo planar imaging technique. This was implemented on the Nottingham 3 T imaging system, for functional magnetic resonance imaging. The technique uses echo shifting over the slices in a multi-slice echo planar imaging acquisition scheme, making the echo time longer than the repetition time per slice. This allows for rapid volumar sampling of the blood oxygen level dependent effect in the human brain. The new high-speed technique was used to investigate the variability of measuring the timing differences between haemodynamic responses, at the same cortical location, to simple cued motor tasks. The technique was also used in an investigation into motor cortex functional connect...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  15. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.;

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper review...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8......Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...

  16. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: p.boraschi@do.med.unipi.it; Salemi, S. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F. [Univ. of Pisa, Liver Transplant Unit of the Dept. of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Falaschi, F. [Pisa Univ. Hospital, Second Dept. of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Bartolozzi, C. [Univ. of Pisa, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T{sub 2}w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T{sub 1}w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  17. Meduloblastoma: correlação entre ressonância magnética convencional, difusão e espectroscopia de prótons Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vieira de Melo da Fonte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Correlacionar os achados de ressonância magnética convencional, difusão e espectroscopia de prótons nos meduloblastomas, e compará-los aos dados da literatura. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Análise retrospectiva de exames de ressonância magnética pré-operatórios de nove pacientes na faixa pediátrica com diagnóstico histológico de meduloblastoma (oito desmoplásicos e um de células gigantes. Foram considerados dados demográficos e características do tumor como localização, característica morfológica, intensidade de sinal, realce, disseminação e achados na difusão e espectroscopia. RESULTADOS: Na maioria dos casos os tumores apresentaram epicentro no vermis cerebelar (77,8%, sendo predominantemente sólido (88,9%, com hipossinal nas seqüências ponderadas em T1 e iso/hipersinal nas seqüências ponderadas em T2 e FLAIR, realce heterogêneo (100%, sinais de disseminação/extensão tumoral (77,8% e restrição à movimentação das moléculas de água (100%. A espectroscopia de prótons pela técnica STEAM (n = 6 demonstrou redução da relação Naa/Cr (83,3% e aumento de Co/Cr (100% e mI/Cr (66,7%, e pela técnica PRESS (n = 7 evidenciou pico de lactato (57,1%. CONCLUSÃO: O conjunto dos achados macroscópicos obtidos pela ressonância magnética, somado às características bioquímicas dos meduloblastomas, têm sido úteis na tentativa de diferenciação entre os principais tumores da fossa posterior.OBJECTIVE: To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itabashi, Takashi; Shimizu, Kou; Yuyama, Takuo and others

    1988-02-01

    Forty-five patients with syringomyelia were studied with MR imaging. They were classified into four groups. Twenty-one patients were associated with Chiari malformation, and eight with intramedullary tumors. Nine patients had idiopathic syringomyelia, and seven had posttraumatic syringomyelia. Thirty-three of them were also studied with delayed CT myelography (DCTM). The results of DCTM had a good correlation with those of MR imaging except for five cases who did not show positive contrast accumulation in the cord. Fluid pulsation in the syrinx was shown with long-TR, long-TE pulse sequences as an area of signal void within the cord. These signs of signal void were visualized on sixteen out of twenty-one Chiari malformation associated cases, on four of nine idiopathic cases, on two of seven posttraumatic cases, and on none of eight tumor-associated cases. Cardiac gated multi-phase imaging was applied and reviewed on the cinemode display, and effects of CSF pulsatile motion were discussed. This technique clearly showed the fine changes of signal intensities from systolic phase to diastolic phase, and was expected to play a significant role on the investigation of CSF motion in syringomyelia.

  19. Comparison among T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Modified Dixon Method, and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Measuring Bone Marrow Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An increasing number of studies are utilizing different magnetic resonance (MR methods to quantify bone marrow fat due to its potential role in osteoporosis. Our aim is to compare the measurements of bone marrow fat among T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, modified Dixon method (also called fat fraction MRI (FFMRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Methods. Contiguous MRI scans were acquired in 27 Caucasian postmenopausal women with a modified Dixon method (i.e., FFMRI. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT of T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction of the L3 vertebra and femoral necks were quantified using SliceOmatic and Matlab. MRS was also acquired at the L3 vertebra. Results. Correlation among the three MR methods measured bone marrow fat fraction and BMAT ranges from 0.78 to 0.88 in the L3 vertebra. Correlation between BMAT measured by T1-weighted MRI and bone marrow fat fraction measured by modified FFMRI is 0.86 in femoral necks. Conclusion. There are good correlations among T1-weighted MRI, FFMRI, and MRS for bone marrow fat quantification. The inhomogeneous distribution of bone marrow fat, the threshold segmentation of the T1-weighted MRI, and the ambiguity of the FFMRI may partially explain the difference among the three methods.

  20. Measurement of myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz-Hansen, T.; Jensen, L.T.; Larsson, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved rapidly. Recent developments have made non-invasive quantitative myocardial perfusion measurements possible. MRI is particularly attractive due to its high spatial resolution and because it does not involve ionising radiation. This paper reviews...... myocardial perfusion imaging with MR contrast agents: methods, validation and experiences from clinical studies. Unresolved issues still restrict the use of these techniques to research although clinical applications are within reach Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12/8...

  1. Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    It is quite possible to acquire images with an MR scanner without understanding the principles behind it, but choosing the best parameters and methods, and interpreting images and artifacts, requires understanding. This text serves as an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging techniques. It is aimed at beginners in possession of only a minimal level of technical expertise, yet it introduces aspects of MR that are typically considered technically challenging. The notes were written in conn...

  2. Magnetic resonance in diagnosis of ureterocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Humberto do; Hachul, Mauricio; Macedo Junior, Antonio [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Div. de Urologia]. E-mail: humbertojr1@aol.com

    2003-05-15

    Ultrasonography is the main non-invasive technique for screening of ureterocele, but presents some difficulties for its diagnosis. Other supplementary diagnostic methods have the disadvantage of being invasive or using ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) has a high sensitivity for diagnosing urinary tract malformations in adults and children. We report one case of ureterocele in a 1-year old child with the purpose of presenting its diagnosis through MR. (author)

  3. "PALPATION BY IMAGING": MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Pei-yi Gao

    2006-01-01

    Elasticity is an important physical property of human tissues.There is a tremendous difference in elasticity between normal and pathological tissues.Noninvasive evaluation of the elasticity of human tissues would be valuable for clinical practice.Magnetic resonance elastography(MRE)is a recently developed noninvasive imaging technique that can directly visualize and quantitatively measure tissue elasticity.This article reviewed the MRE technique and its current status.

  4. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Choon; Hua; Thng; Tong; San; Koh; David; J; Collins; Dow; Mu; Koh

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies quantify the microcirculatory status of liver parenchyma and liver lesions, and can be used for the detection of liver metastases, assessing the effectiveness of antiangiogenic therapy, evaluating tumor viability after anticancer therapy or ablation, and diagnosis of liver cirrhosis and its severity. In this review, we discuss the basic concepts of perfusion MRI using tracer kinetic modeling, the common kinetic models applied for analyses, the MR scanning t...

  5. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography in determination of cardiac dimensions in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B J; Waters, J; Kwan, O L; DeMaria, A N

    1985-06-01

    No data exist regarding the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac size and performance in human beings. Therefore, measurements of cardiac dimensions by magnetic resonance imaging were compared with those obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography in 21 normal subjects. Magnetic resonance transverse cardiac sections were obtained during electrocardiographic gating using a spin echo pulse sequence. In normal subjects, magnetic resonance imaging yielded a range of values for cardiac dimensions having a similar standard deviation as that of two-dimensional echocardiography. Diastolic measurements of the aorta, left atrium, left ventricle and septum obtained by magnetic resonance imaging correlated well with those obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography (r = 0.82, 0.78, 0.81 and 0.75, respectively). The correlation coefficient of r = 0.35 observed for the posterior wall thickness was not surprising in view of the narrow range of normal values. Only a general correlation (r = 0.53) existed for the right ventricular diastolic dimension; this was probably related to the difficulty in obtaining representative measurements due to the complex geometry of this chamber. Failure of systolic dimension measurements by magnetic resonance imaging to correlate with those obtained by echocardiography is probably related to limitations of electrocardiographic gating, especially of determining the exact end-systolic frame. Although technically complex at present, magnetic resonance imaging does provide an additional noninvasive technique for measurement of cardiac size.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Minoru; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Satoru; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Nomura, Mikio; Saito, Hisatoshi.

    1988-04-01

    Nineteen patients with lumbosacral spina bifida were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and were divided into two groups: those with lumbosacral lipoma and those with meningomyelocele. All of the patients with meningomyelocele underwent surgery soon after birth for closure of the skin defect. Whenever possible, examination was not confined to the lumbosacral area but also included the brain and other portions of the spinal cord. Certain similarities and differences in pathology were ascertained in the two groups. The tethered cords were the same in both groups. However, Chiari malformations were observed only in patients with meningomyelocele, and hydrocephalus occurred only in patients with Chiari malformations. Syringomyelia and scoliosis were detected in both groups, but scoliosis was more prevalent in the meningomyelocele group. There appeared to be a correlation between scoliosis and syringomyelia; in five of the seven cases of syringomyelia, the locations of the scoliosis and syringomyelia were the same. With MRI, these complex pathologies, including tethered cord, syringomyelia, scoliosis, Chiari malformations, and hydrocephalus, were easily visualized. The superiority of MRI over conventional X-ray technology has been well established. First, a direct image of the spinal cord is obtained. Second, there is no necessity for injection of contrast material into the intrathecal space. Third, any scanning field is possible. There are also some disadvantages with MRI. First, the spatial resolution is inferior to that of high-resolution computed tomography. Second, MRI cannot provide information concerning bone cortex. Therefore, bone involvement cannot be accurately diagnosed. However, in the assessment of spinal dysraphism, MRI is an excellent diagnostic tool and should be the preferred method of diagnosing spinal dysraphism.

  7. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  8. Correlation of left ventricular wall thickness, heart mass, serological parameters and late gadolinium enhancement in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial inflammation in an experimental animal model of autoimmune myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromen, Wolfgang; Korkusuz, Huedayi; Korkusuz, Yuecel; Esters, Philip; Bauer, Ralf W; Huebner, Frank; Lindemayr, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    For a definitive diagnosis of myocarditis, different strategies like analysis of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) up to invasive endomyocardial biopsy have been applied. The objective of the study was to investigate inflammatory changes like left ventricular wall thickening and increase of ventricular mass and to quantitatively analyse their correlation with extent and localisation of myocardial damage in CMR and with subsequent changes of serological markers in an animal model of an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). In the current study, an EAM was induced in 10 male Lewis rats, 10 rats served as control. On day 21, animals were examined with four CMR protocols to assess the extent of LGE in a 12 segment model of the rat heart. Left myocardial wall thickness and mass and histological grade of inflammation were measured to determine localisation and severity of the induced myocarditis. Depending on the CMR sequence, LGE was mostly found in the left anterior (9.6%) and left lateral (8.7%) myocardial wall segments. Wall thickness correlated with the LGE area in CMR imaging and the histopathological severity of myocarditis for the left lateral myocardial wall segment. In a similar way, the heart mass correlated to the extent of LGE for the left lateral segment. We conclude that in our animal model left ventricular wall thickness and mass reflect the severity of myocardial changes in myocarditis and that the EAM rat model is well suited for further investigations of myocarditis.

  9. Chronic hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni: magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A.S.; D' Ippolito, G.; Caldana, R.P.; Cecin, A.O.; Ahmed, M.; Szejnfeld, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Federal Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the hepatosplenic manifestations and the portal venous system in patients with chronic infection by Schistosoma mansoni. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed in 28 patients with chronic hepatosplenic schistosomiasis submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the abdomen. Images were interpreted independently by two radiologists to determine the reproducibility of image interpretation and who evaluated the presence of morphological alterations in the liver and spleen, such as hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic fissure widening, periportal fibrosis, and the presence of siderotic nodules. Interobserver and intra-observer agreement were measured with the kappa and intraclass correlation tests. Evaluation of venous collateral pathways and portal and splenic veins was done in consensus by both examiners. Results: Observers identified enlargement of the left lobe (78.5-92.8%) and caudate-to-right-lobe ratio (78.5-92.8%), irregularity of hepatic contours (89.2-96.4%), fissure widening (89.2-100%), and splenic siderotic nodules (84.2%). Splenomegaly, heterogeneity of hepatic parenchyma, peripheral hepatic vessels, and periportal fibrosis were observed in 100% of patients. MRI findings presented almost perfect interobserver (kappa 0.65-1) and intra-observer (kappa = 0.73-1 for observer 1, and kappa = 0.65-1 for observer 2) agreement for the variables analyzed. MRA showed the presence of collateral pathways in the majority of patients (71.4%) along with widening of portal and splenic veins. Conclusion: Using MRI, hepatosplenic alterations in schistosomiasis are characterized by heterogeneity of hepatic parenchyma, presence of peripheral perihepatic vessels, periportal fibrosis, splenomegaly, siderotic nodules, and the presence of venous collateral pathways.

  10. Severity of symptoms and signs in relation to magnetic resonance imaging findings among sciatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, J; Malmivaara, A; Tervonen, O; Pääkkö, E; Kurunlahti, M; Syrjälä, P; Vasari, P; Vanharanta, H

    2001-04-01

    A cross-sectional study in sciatic population. To evaluate the separate roles of nerve root entrapment-based on magnetic resonance imaging-and other discogenic pain mechanisms on disability and physical signs among symptomatic sciatic patients. Data symptoms of sciatica are generally understood to be generated by nerve root compression, but other pain mechanisms of sciatica have been suggested. The authors obtained magnetic resonance scans from 160 patients with unilateral sciatic pain. The patients reported the intensity of their back and leg pain and their back-specific disability. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (1.5 T) was performed on every patient. The degree of disc displacement, neural enhancement, and nerve root compression was evaluated from magnetic resonance scans. The correlations of symptoms and signs with magnetic resonance imaging findings were calculated. The degree of disc displacement in magnetic resonance imaging did not correlate with any subjective symptoms, nor did nerve root enhancement or nerve compression. Magnetic resonance imaging classification was associated, however, with straight leg raising restriction. In regression analysis, straight leg raising restriction was best explained with a simple classification of nonherniations versus herniations. The results suggest that a discogenic pain mechanism other than the nerve root entrapment generates the subjective symptoms among sciatic patients. The findings of this study thus indicate that magnetic resonance imaging is unable to distinguish sciatic patients in terms of the severity of their symptoms.

  11. T2-weighted hypointense lesions within prostate gland: Differential diagnosis using wash-in rate parameter on the basis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging-Hystopatology correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Anna Lia, E-mail: alvalentini@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Gui, Benedetta, E-mail: bgui@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Cina, Alessandro, E-mail: acina@sirm.org [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Pinto, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.pinto@libero.it [Department of Surgical Sciences, Institute of Urology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Totaro, Angelo, E-mail: dr.atotaro@gmail.com [Department of Surgical Sciences, Institute of Urology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Pierconti, Francesco, E-mail: francescopierconti@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Pathology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Bassi, Pier Francesco, E-mail: bassipf@gmail.com [Department of Surgical Sciences, Institute of Urology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo, E-mail: lbonomo@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, Policlinico A Gemelli, Lgo A Gemelli n 8, 00168 Rome (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Background and aims: Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance improves prostate cancer detection. The aims of this paper are to verify whether wash-in-rate parameter (speed of contrast uptake in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance) can help to differentiate prostate cancer from non-neoplastic T2-weighted hypointense lesions within prostate gland and to assess a cut-off for prostate cancer diagnosis. Methods: Prospective, monocentric, multi-departmental study. Thirty consecutive patients underwent T2-weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance, and re-biopsy. T2-weighted hypointense lesions, >5 mm in size, were noted. Lesions were assessed as cancerous (showing mass effect, or no defined margin within transitional zone) and non cancerous (no mass effect) and were compared with histopathology by 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 tables. Wash-in-rate of each lesion was calculated and was correlated with histopathology. Student's t-test was adopted to assess significant differences. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was employed to identify the best cut-off for wash-in-rate in detecting prostate cancer. Results: At re-biopsy, cancer was proven in 43% of patients. On T2-weighted MRI, 111 hypointense lesions {>=}5 mm in size were found. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of T2-weighted MRI were 80% ({+-}12.4 CI 95%), 74.6% ({+-}10.1 CI 95%), and 76.5% ({+-}7.9 CI 95%), respectively. Mean WR was 5.8 {+-} 1.9/s for PCa zones and 2.96 {+-} 1.44/s for non-PCa zones (p < 0.00000001). At ROC analysis, the best area under curve (AUC) for wash-in-rate parameter was associated to 4.2/s threshold with 82.5% sensitivity (CI {+-} 7.07), 97.2% specificity (CI {+-} 4.99) and 91.2% accuracy (CI {+-} 5.27). Eighteen false positive lesions on T2-weighted MRI showed low wash-in-rate values suggesting non-cancer lesions, while in 5/8 false negative cases high wash-in-rate values correctly suggested prostate cancer. Nine lesions with surgically proven

  12. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motte, Louise de la, E-mail: louise.de.la.motte@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Pedersen, Mads Møller, E-mail: phd@medit.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogt, Katja, E-mail: Vogt@dadlnet.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: Torben.Veith.schroeder@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lonn, Lars, E-mail: lonn.lars@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery and Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r{sub s} 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling.

  13. Magnetic resonance as a technique to magnetic biosensors characterization in Neocapritermes opacus termites

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, J. F.; Wajnberg, E.; Esquivel, D. M. S.; Alves, O. C.

    2005-07-01

    This experimental study quantitatively correlates the saturation magnetization obtained from hysteresis curves (SQUID measurements) to the second integral of the magnetic resonance (MR) spectra of Neocapritermes opacus termites. Termites were submitted to an iron private diet, feeding them with pure cellulose for up to four days. This diet cleans their guts of ingested detrital material, eliminating non-biogenic soil-derived magnetite from the ensuing analyses. A clear relation between total magnetic moment (emu) from SQUID measurements and the signal intensity (absorption area) from MR is given.

  14. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  15. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance studies of the stripes materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, H.-J., E-mail: h.grafe@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Solid State Research, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic and Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) is a powerful tool to probe electronic inhomogeneities in correlated electron systems. Its local character allows for probing different environments due to spin density modulations or inhomogeneous doping distributions emerging from the correlations in these systems. In fact, NMR/NQR is not only sensitive to magnetic properties through interaction of the nuclear spin, but also allows to probe the symmetry of the charge distribution and its homogeneity, as well as structural modulations, through sensitivity to the electric field gradient (EFG). We review the results of NMR and NQR in the cuprates from intrinsic spatial variations of the hole concentration in the normal state to stripe order at low temperatures, thereby keeping in mind the influence of doping induced disorder and inhomogeneities. Finally, we briefly discuss NQR evidence for local electronic inhomogeneities in the recently discovered iron pnictides, suggesting that electronic inhomogeneities are a common feature of correlated electron systems.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography as indexes of muscle function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Duvoisin, Marc R.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis is tested that exercise-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast shifts would relate to electromyography (EMG) amplitude if both measures reflect muscle use during exercise. Both magnetic resonance images (MRI) and EMG data were obtained for separate eccentric (ECC) and cocentric (CON) exercise of increasing intensity for seven subjects 30-32 yr old. CON and ECC actions caused increased integrated EMG (IEMG) and T2 values which were strongly related with relative resistance. The rate of increase and absolute value of both T2 and IEMG were found to be greater for CON than for ECC actions. For both actions IEMG and T2 were correlated. Data obtained suggest that surface IEMG accurately reflects the contractile behavior of muscle and exercise-induced increases in MRI T2 values reflect certain processes that scale with muscle use.

  17. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  18. Magnetic and topographic correlations in Co nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciria, M. [Departamento de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departmento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: ciria@unizar.es; Arnaudas, J.I. [Departamento de Magnetismo de Solidos, Departmento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza and Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Zaragoza (Spain); Huttel, Y. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Gomez, H. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Cebollada, A. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Armelles, G. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    We present a study of the magnetic domains structure in Co films grown on AlN composed of particles with nominal thicknesses between 3 and 15 nm. The images taken by using a scanning force microscope show that as the film thickness increases the domains have the magnetization vector pointing out of the plane, and that the magnetization in the particle tends to be in a single domain state with the particle boundaries being the main source for domains boundaries. The variation of the magnetic and topographic correlation functions in terms of the particle thickness suggests that the magnetic state is formed by a correlated super-spin glass structure.

  19. Measuring magnetic correlations in nanoparticle assemblies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2014-01-01

    We illustrate how to extract correlations between magnetic moments in assemblies of nanoparticles from, e.g., electron holography data providing the combined knowledge of particle size distribution, inter-particle distances, and magnitude and orientation of each magnetic moment within...... a nanoparticle superstructure, We show, based on simulated data, how to build a radial/angular pair distribution function f(r,θ) encoding the spatial and angular difference between every pair of magnetic moments. A scatter-plot of f(r,θ) reveals the degree of structural and magnetic order present, and hence...... provides a measure of the strength and range of magnetic correlations....

  20. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. PMID:25216728

  1. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  2. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization-magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  3. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haesung Yoon

    Full Text Available Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters.Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1 were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US, 2 were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB 3 underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT, and 4 had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER, maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters.In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites

  4. Quantification of synovistis by MRI: correlation between dynamic and static gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic and macroscopic signs of synovial inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1998-01-01

    injection, as the highest correlation coefficients to histologic inflammation were observed in this interval. Dynamic MRI can be used to determine synovial inflammation. Evaluation of large synovial areas one-half to one minute after Gd injection best reflects joint inflammation....... as at the four biopsy sites, and compared to synovial pathology. The rate of early enhancement of the total synovial membrane of the preselected slice, determined by dynamic MRI, was highly correlated with microscopic evidence of active inflammation (Spearman p = 0.73; p ... knees with and without synovial inflammation with a high predictive value (0.81-0.90). Moderate and severe inflammation could not be differentiated. The early enhancement rate was correlated with histologic features of active inflammation, particularly vessel proliferation and mononuclear leucocyte...

  5. Study of local cerebral hemodynamics by frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy and correlation with simultaneously acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toronov, Vladislav; Webb, Andrew; Choi, Jee Hyun; Wolf, Martin; Safonova, Larisa; Wolf, Ursula; Gratton, Enrico

    2001-10-01

    The aim of our study was to explore the possibility of detecting hemodynamic changes in the brain using the phase of the intensity modulated optical signal. To obtain optical signals with the highest possible signal-to-noise ratio, we performed a series of simultaneous NIRS-fMRI measurements, with subsequent correlation of the time courses of both measurements. The cognitive paradigm used arithmetic calculations, with optical signals acquired with sensors placed on the forehead. Measurements were done on seven healthy subjects. In five subjects we demonstrated correlation between the hemodynamic signals obtained using NIRS and BOLD fMRI. In four subjects correlation was found for the hemodynamic signal obtained using the phase of the intensity modulated signal.

  6. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) treatment for adult unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the ankle: correlations with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Hongyue; Lu, Rong; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shang, Xiliang; Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui [Fudan University, Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-08-15

    To quantitatively evaluate cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) for ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) using MRI and analyse correlations between MRI and clinical outcome. Forty-eight patients were recruited and underwent MR imaging, including 3D-DESS, T2-mapping and T2-STIR sequences, and completed American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. Thickness index, T2 index of repair tissue (RT) and volume of subchondral bone marrow oedema (BME) were calculated. Subjects were divided into two groups: group A (3-12 months post-op), and group B (12-24 months post-op). Student's t test was used to compare the MRI and AOFAS score between two groups and Pearson's correlation coefficient to analyse correlations between them. Thickness index and AOFAS score of group B were higher than group A (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). T2 index and BME of group B were lower than group A (P < 0.001, P = 0.012). Thickness index, T2 index and BME were all correlated with AOFAS score (r = 0.416, r = -0.475, r = -0.353), but BME was correlated with neither thickness index nor T2 index. Significant improvement from MF can be expected on the basis of the outcomes of quantitative MRI and AOFAS score. MRI was correlated with AOFAS score. BME is insufficient as an independent predictor to evaluate repair quality, but reduction of BME can improve the patient's clinical outcome. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  8. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop AGENCY... the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is...: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Magnetic...

  9. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  10. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  11. An Evolutionary Algorithm for Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Murunya

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an image classification method for retrieval of images from a multi-varied MRI database. With the development of sophisticated medical imaging technology which helps doctors in diagnosis, medical image databases contain a huge amount of digital images. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is a widely used imaging technique which picks signals from a body's magnetic particles spinning to magnetic tune and through a computer converts scanned data into pictures of internal organs. Image processing techniques are required to analyze medical images and retrieve it from database. The proposed framework extracts features using Moment Invariants (MI and Wavelet Packet Tree (WPT. Extracted features are reduced using Correlation based Feature Selection (CFS and a CFS with cuckoo search algorithm is proposed. Naïve Bayes and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN classify the selected features. National Biomedical Imaging Archive (NBIA dataset including colon, brain and chest is used to evaluate the framework.

  12. Magnetic resonance in hearing loss and vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ángel MARTÍN-PÉREZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Hearing loss and vertiginous syndrome represent an important part of the otorhinolaryngology clinic. The role of the radiologist plays in their workup become fundamental. Studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are essential to guide or give the diagnosis in these cases. Method: After performing a retrospective analysis of 456 MRI studies of patients with these symptoms, we conducted a review of the main pathologies recorded that can cause these symptoms. Results: We classify into vascular disorders and other variants, tumor pathology, malformations and inflammatory pathology; We also describe the most relevant findings on MRI and illustrated with examples of our center.

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  15. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  16. Magnetic resonance images of chronic patellar tendinitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodne, D.; Quinn, S.F.; Murray, W.T.; Cochran, C.; Bolton, T.; Rudd, S.; Lewis, K.; Daines, P.; Bishop, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendinitis can be a frustrating diagnostic and therapeutic problem. This report evaluates seven tendons in five patients with chronic patellar tendinitis. The etiologies included 'jumper's knee' and Osgood-Schlatter disease. In all cases magnetic resonance images (MRI) showed thickening of the tendon. Some of the tendons had focal areas of thickening which helped establish the etiology. All cases had intratendinous areas of increased signal which, in four cases, proved to be chronic tendon tears. MRI is useful in evaluating chronic patellar tendinitis because it establishes the diagnosis, detects associated chronic tears, and may help determine appropriate rehabilitation. (orig.)

  17. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawnaur, J.M.; Jenkins, J.P.R.; Isherwood, I. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1990-10-01

    Musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis can be mistaken for soft-tissue sarcoma both clinically and on X-ray computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three patients with this condition enabled the correct diagnosis to be made prospectively in two. The appearance on MRI of a heterogeneous mass with well-defined, predominantly peripheral areas of very low signal intensity due to dense fibrous tissue and areas of medium to high signal intensity corresponding to a more cellular stroma should raise the suspicion of musculoaponeurotic fibromatosis. Cellular areas within the tumour showed moderate enhancement after gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid administration. (orig.).

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of rat fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, Yo; Kawanishi, Hiroaki (Imamichi Institute for Animal Reproduction, Ibaraki (Japan)); Hasegawa, Kenichi; Otsu, Shinichi

    1993-06-01

    The internal structures of rat fetuses on day 18.0 of pregnancy were studied by magnetic resonance imaging in 1-mm sagittal slices. Each organ was represented as white to gray images different in tone according to the [sup 1]H proton content and the relaxation time. In solid organs, portions with high cell density were seen as white areas and those with low cell density as gray areas. In the tubular organs, the margins were imaged as white and the lumina as gray. (author).

  20. Sciatic neuropathy: findings on magnetic resonance neurography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Injuries of the sciatic nerve are common causes of pain and limitation in the lower limbs. Due to its particular anatomy and its long course, the sciatic nerve is often involved in diseases of the pelvis or leg. In recent years, magnetic resonance neurography has become established as an important tool for the study of peripheral nerves and can be widely applied to the study of the sciatic nerve. Therefore, detailed knowledge of its anatomy and of the most prevalent diseases affecting it is essential to maximizing the accuracy of diagnostic imaging. PMID:28670031

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  2. Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mollasadeghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices produce noise, which may affect patient’s or operators’ hearing. Some cases of hearing impairment after MRI procedure have been reported with different patterns (temporary or permanent, unilateral or bilateral, with or without other symptoms like tinnitus. In this report, a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in an otherwise healthy patient underwent brain MRI was described. The patient’s hearing loss was accompanied with tinnitus and was not improved after 3 months of followup.

  3. Monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, David Alberg

    2008-01-01

    and the involved signaling molecules. Subsequently, a short review of contrast agents and perfusion measurements is given. Finally, methods for monitoring angiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed. A method for monitoring early stages of angiogenesis as well as the effect of anti......-angiogenic treatment is presented in the first manuscript. In the second and third manuscript, two separate methods of quantifying perfusion, blood volume and vessel permeability are presented. The methods are used to show that drug delivery to a xenografted tumor is plausible and to show possible vascular maturation...

  4. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatology. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, M A; Adamis, M K

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized the assessment of pathology involving the musculoskeletal system. The soft tissue contrast, superb resolution, multiplanar acquisition potential, and the ability to monitor physiologic processes combine the best features of other imaging modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for a wide range of disease processes matches or supersedes conventional radiology, nuclear medicine, and clinical examination. This article provides a brief overview of the use of MR imaging for some of the more common clinical situations confronting the rheumatologist.

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjoerstad, K.; Kaass, B.; Svihus, R.

    1987-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical region was carried out on 139 patients in a ten-month period. 64 patients came from Rogaland Central Hospital and 75 from the rest of Norway. A retrospective questionnaire was filled in by the referring physicians. MRI seems to be of great value in the diagnosis of cervical vertebrogenic myelopathy, multiple sclerosis, syringomyelia, and intraspinal tumors. Besides its diagnostic superiority, at least in patients with cervical myelopathy, MRI has definite economic advantages compared to CT and myelography.

  8. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  9. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  10. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  11. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, Micah; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with non-trivial spectra.

  12. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Theis, T; Blanchard, J W; Ring, H; Ganssle, P; Appelt, S; Blümich, B; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2011-09-02

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  13. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  14. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  15. Enhancement of magnetic resonance imaging with metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Slobozhanyuk, A P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Berg, C A T van den; Kozachenko, A V; Dubrovina, I A; Melchakova, I V; Kivshar, Yu S; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the cornerstone technique for diagnostic medicine, biology, and neuroscience. This imaging method is highly innovative, noninvasive and its impact continues to grow. It can be used for measuring changes in the brain after enhanced neural activity, detecting early cancerous cells in tissue, as well as for imaging nanoscale biological structures, and controlling fluid dynamics, and it can be beneficial for cardiovascular imaging. The MRI performance is characterized by a signal-to-noise ratio, however the spatial resolution and image contrast depend strongly on the scanner design. Here, we reveal how to exploit effectively the unique properties of metasurfaces for the substantial improvement of MRI efficiency. We employ a metasurface created by an array of wires placed inside the MRI scanner under an object, and demonstrate a giant enhancement of the magnetic field by means of subwavelength near-field manipulation with the metasurface, thus strongly increasing the scanner sen...

  16. Plasmon coupling of magnetic resonances in an asymmetric gold semishell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Kong, Yan; Liu, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The generation of magnetic dipole resonances in metallic nanostructures is of great importance for constructing near-zero or even negative refractive index metamaterials. Commonly, planar two-dimensional (2D) split-ring resonators or relevant structures are basic elements of metamaterials. In this work, we introduce a three-dimensional (3D) asymmetric Au semishell composed of two nanocups with a face-to-face geometry and demonstrate two distinct magnetic resonances spontaneously in the visible-near infrared optical wavelength regime. These two magnetic resonances are from constructive and destructive hybridization of magnetic dipoles of individual nanocups in the asymmetric semishell. In contrast, complete cancellation of magnetic dipoles in the symmetric semishell leads to only a pronounced electric mode with near-zero magnetic dipole moment. These 3D asymmetric resonators provide new ways for engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-field enhancement for the design of 3D metamaterials.

  17. Magnetic resonance studies of solid polymers; Etude des polymeres solides par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenk, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    This paper is a review of the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to solid polymers. In the first, theoretical part, the elements of the theory of NMR, which are necessary for the study of the properties of solid polymers are discussed: the moments method, nuclear relaxation and the distribution of correlation times. In the second part the experimental results are presented. (author) [French] Cette etude est une recherche bibliographique sur l'application de la resonance magnetique nucleaire (RMN) aux polymeres solides. Dans la premiere partie theorique on discute les elements de la theorie de RMN, necessaires pour l'etude des proprietes des polymeres solides: la methode des moments, la relaxation nucleaire et la distribution des temps de correlation. La deuxieme partie presente les resultats des experiences. (auteur)

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, K., E-mail: tsukada@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T. [The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tsushima-Naka, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Bito, Y. [Central Research Lab., Hitachi. Ltd., 1-280 Higashi-Koigakubo, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8601 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  19. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in high-risk smokers and smoking-related COPD: correlations with pulmonary function tests and quantitative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; Guan, Yu; Fan, Li; Liu, Shi-Yuan; Yu, Hong; Zhao, Li-Ming; Li, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The study aimed to prospectively evaluate correlations between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR perfusion imaging, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and volume quantitative CT in smokers with or without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to determine the value of DCE-MR perfusion imaging and CT volumetric imaging on the assessment of smokers. According to the ATS/ERS guidelines, 51 male smokers were categorized into five groups: At risk for COPD (n = 8), mild COPD (n = 9), moderate COPD (n = 12), severe COPD (n = 10), and very severe COPD (n = 12). Maximum slope of increase (MSI), positive enhancement integral (PEI), etc. were obtained from MR perfusion data. The signal intensity ratio (RSI) of the PDs and normal lung was calculated (RSI = SIPD/SInormal). Total lung volume (TLV), total emphysema volume (TEV) and emphysema index (EI) were obtained from volumetric CT data. For "at risk for COPD," the positive rate of PDs on MR perfusion images was higher than that of abnormal changes on non-enhanced CT images (p < 0.05). Moderate-to-strong positive correlations were found between all the PFT parameters and SIPD, or RSI (r range 0.445∼0.683, p ≤ 0.001). TEV and EI were negatively correlated better with FEV1/FVC than other PFT parameters (r range -0.48 --0.63, p < 0.001). There were significant differences in RSI and SIPD between "at risk for COPD" and "very severe COPD," and between "mild COPD" and "very severe COPD". Thus, MR perfusion imaging may be a good approach to identify early evidence of COPD and may have potential to assist in classification of COPD.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: radiologic-pathologic correlation of the response and disease-free survival depending on molecular subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Ciria, S; Jiménez Aragón, F; García Mur, C; Esteban Cuesta, H; Gros Bañeres, B

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the radiologic and pathologic responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their correlation in the molecular subtypes of breast cancer and to analyze their impact in disease-free survival. We included 205 patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We evaluated the radiologic response by comparing MRI images acquired before and after chemotherapy. The pathologic response was classified on the Miller and Payne scale. For each subtype (HER2+, TN, luminal A, luminal B HER2-, and luminal B HER2+), we used the χ(2) test, Student's t-test, ANOVA, and Kendall's Tau-b to evaluate the radiologic response and the pathologic response, the radiologic-pathologic correlation, and the disease-free survival. The subtypes HER2+ (62.1%) and TN (45.2%) had higher rates of complete radiologic response. The pathologic response was 65.5% in the HER2+ subtype, 38.1% in the TN subtype, 2.6% in the luminal A subtype, 8.2% in the luminal B HER2- subtype, and 31% in the luminal B HER2+ subtype. The rate of radiologic-pathologic correlation was significant in all subtypes, higher in TN and HER2 (Tau-b coefficients 0.805 and 0.717, respectively). Disease-free survival was higher in HER2+ (91.9±3.3 months) and lower in TN (69.5±6.3 months), with significant differences between the cases with poor and good radiologic responses (P=.040). Survival was greater in cases with good radiologic response, except in cases with luminal A subtype. MRI can be a useful tool that provides information about the evolution of breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, which varies with the immunohistochemical subtype. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in syringomyelia - follow-up studies after syringosubarachnoidal shunting with clinical correlation. MRT bei Syringomyelie - Verlaufskontrollen nach syringosubarachnoidalen Shuntoperationen mit klinischer Korrelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, T.; Moedder, U. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie); Roosen, N.; Lumenta, C.B.; Bock, W.J. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik); Steinmetz, H. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Neurologische Klinik)

    1991-11-01

    In 8 patients with syringomyelia, MR long-term follow-ups (observation period 25-46 months) were done after syringosubrachnoidal shunt operations. MR showed directly after surgery in 6 cases an extensive collapse of the syringomyelias and in 2 cases a lesser reduction of the diameter of the syrinx. During the subsequent course the size of the cavities increased again in 3 cases. The size of the syrinx visualised by MR did not correlate with the clinical status during the follow-up studies. This seems to point to an insufficient representation of the disease process by the morphological visualisation of the size of the syrinx. (orig.).

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in adnexial torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Ronald Meira Castro; Quadros, Marianne Siquara de [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa], e-mail: rtrindade@einstein.br; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Rosemberg, Michelle; Racy, Marcelo de Castro Jorge; Tachibana, Adriano [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Imaging Service

    2010-01-15

    Adnexial torsion is an unusual event, but a major cause of abdominal pain in women. It is often associated with ovarian tumor or cyst, but can occur in normal ovaries, especially in children. The twisting of adnexial structures may involve the ovary or tube, but frequently affects both. In most cases, it is unilateral, with slight predilection for the right size. In imaging findings, increased ovarian volume and adnexial masses are observed, with reduced or absent vascularisation. In cases of undiagnosed or untreated complete twist, hemorrhagic necrosis may occur leading to complications; in that, peritonitis is the most frequent. Early diagnosis helps preventing irreversible damage with conservative treatment, thereby saving the ovary. Limitations in performing physical examination, possible inconclusive results in ultrasound and exposure to radiation in computed tomography makes magnetic resonance imaging a valuable tool in emergency assessment of gynecological diseases. The objective of this study was to report two confirmed cases of adnexial twist, emphasizing the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of this condition. (author)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods in Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Blümler, P.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique to study water content, dynamics and transport in natural porous media. However, MRI systems and protocols have been developed mainly for medical purposes, i.e. for media with comparably high water contents and long relaxation times. In contrast, natural porous media like soils and rocks are characterized by much lower water contents, typically 0 benefit. Three strategies can be applied for the monitoring of water contents and dynamics in natural porous media: i) Dedicated high-field scanners (with vertical bore) allowing stronger gradients and faster switching so that shorter echo times can be realized. ii) Special measurement sequences using ultrashort rf- and gradient-pulses like single point imaging derivates (SPI, SPRITE)(1) and multi-echo methods, which monitor series of echoes and allow for extrapolation to zero time(2). Hence, the loss of signal during the first echo period may be compensated to determine the initial magnetization (= water content) as well as relaxation time maps simultaneously. iii) Finally low field( strategies will be given. References 1) Pohlmeier et al. Vadose Zone J. 7, 1010-1017 (2008) 2) Edzes et al., Magn. Res. Imag. 16, 185-196 (1998) 3) Raich H, and Blümler P, Concepts in Magn. Reson. B 23B, 16-25 (2004) 4) Pohlmeier et al. Magn. Res. Imag. doi:10.1016/j.mri.2008.06.007 (2008)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  6. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important tools to screen humans in medicine; virtually every modern hospital is equipped with a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tomograph. The potential of NMR in 3D imaging tasks is by far greater, but there is only "a handful" of MRI studies of particulate matter. The method is expensive, time-consuming, and requires a deep understanding of pulse sequences, signal acquisition, and processing. We give a short introduction into the physical principles of this imaging technique, describe its advantages and limitations for the screening of granular matter, and present a number of examples of different application purposes, from the exploration of granular packing, via the detection of flow and particle diffusion, to real dynamic measurements. Probably, X-ray computed tomography is preferable in most applications, but fast imaging of single slices with modern MRI techniques is unmatched, and the additional opportunity to retrieve spatially resolved flow and diffusion profiles without particle tracking is a unique feature.

  8. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration.

  10. Evaluation of lumbar disc lesions in teen-agers using magnetic resonance imaging; A correlative study between peridiscal signal intensity and nuclear signal intensity in 500 discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakado, Misao; Naruo, Masakuni; Koyanagi, Eiichi; Taoka, Yuuji; Shiiba, Mutuo; Ryouki, Yoshihiro; Kitazono, Tooru; Kato, Yoshiyuki (Naruo Orthopedic Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The peridiscal and nuclear (nucleus pulposus and inner layer of annulus fibrosus) signal intensities in 500 discs of teen-age patients were compared with common degenerative lumbar disc disease. Images were taken with a 7 mm slice thickness and T[sub 2] weighted (TE 80[approx]90 mS, TR 2000[approx]2200 mS) midsagittal imaging. Clear correlation between these intensities was found. The signal intensity primarily decreased in the peridiscal tissues and secondarily decreased in the nucleus pulposus and inner layer of annulus fibrosus. These findings suggest that peridiscal disorders cause degenerative changes of the nucleus pulposus. Additionally, in the early degenerative stage of the teen-age lumbar disc, a decrease of nuclear signal intensity indicated that degenerative changes originated from the anterior portion and extended posteriorly. (author).

  11. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the initial characterization of non-fatty soft tissue tumors: correlation between T2 signal intensity and ADC values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto [Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Nancy, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Gay, Frederique; Blum, Alain [Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, CHU Nancy, Nancy (France); Chen, Bailiang; Felblinger, Jacques [Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Zins, Marie [University Versailles St-Quentin, Versailles (France); Inserm, Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Villejuif (France); Sirveaux, Francois [Centre Chirurgical Emile Galle, Service de Chirurgie Traumatologique et Orthopedique, Nancy (France)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the performance of quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) correlated with T2 signal in differentiating non-fatty benign from malignant tumors. A total of 76 patients with a histologically confirmed non-fatty soft tissue tumors (46 benign and 30 malignant) were prospectively included in this ethics committee approved study. All patients signed an informed consent and underwent MRI with DWI with two b values (0 and 600). ADC values from the solid components of these tumors were obtained and were correlated with the lesion's signal intensity on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences. ADC values were obtained from adjacent normal muscle to allow calculation of tumor/muscle ADC ratios. There were 58 hyperintense and 18 iso or hypointense lesions. All hypointense lesions were benign. The mean ADC values for benign and malignant tumors were 1.47 ± 0.54 x 10{sup -3} and 1.17 ± 0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s respectively (p < 0.005). The mean ADC ratio in benign iso or hypointense tumors was significantly lower than that of hyperintense ones (0.76 ± 0.21 versus 1.58 ± 0.82 - p < 0.0001). An ADC ratio lower than 0.915 was highly specific for malignancy (96.4 %), whereas an ADC ratio higher than 1.32 was highly sensitive for benign lesions (90 %). ADC analysis can be useful in the initial characterization of T2 hyperintense non-fatty soft tissue masses, although this technique alone is not likely to change patient management. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology in the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatori, Yoshio; Kamogawa, Morihide; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ninomiya, Setsuo; Kokubo, Takashi

    1989-05-01

    To correlate the magnetic resonance (MR) images with the histopathological findings in the femoral head, the histopathology of 24 femoral heads, 15 with osteonecrosis, five with osteoarthritis and four with other hip disorders were subjected to preoperative MR imaging which demonstrated low intensity areas due to long T1 relaxation time in the femoral head. The MR signal was low where fibrovascular tissue, disintegrated fibrovascular tissue, amorphous necrotic material, bone, or cartilagenous tissue occupied the medullary space. From this study, it seems possible to predict the histopathologic changes in the femoral head using MR images. (author).

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-cast Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckman, S. L.; Balss, K. M.; Waterfield, L. G.; Jendrzejczyk, J. A.; Raptis, A. C.

    1997-01-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid in the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was performed to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N.N`-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. Studies were performed on several specimens as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.

  14. Selective One-Dimensional Total Correlation Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments for a Rapid Identification of Minor Components in the Lipid Fraction of Milk and Dairy Products: Toward Spin Chromatography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanouil, Christina; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos G; Alivertis, Dimitrios; Tzamaloukas, Ouranios; Miltiadou, Despoina; Tzakos, Andreas G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2015-06-10

    We report a rapid, direct, and unequivocal spin-chromatographic separation and identification of minor components in the lipid fraction of milk and common dairy products with the use of selective one-dimensional (1D) total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The method allows for the complete backbone spin-coupling network to be elucidated even in strongly overlapped regions and in the presence of major components from 4 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3) stronger NMR signal intensities. The proposed spin-chromatography method does not require any derivatization steps for the lipid fraction, is selective with excellent resolution, is sensitive with quantitation capability, and compares favorably to two-dimensional (2D) TOCSY and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods of analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that the 1D TOCSY NMR spin-chromatography method can become a procedure of primary interest in food analysis and generally in complex mixture analysis.

  15. Parry-Romberg syndrome: findings in advanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences - case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Rafael Alfenas de; Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas, E-mail: alfenas85@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de radiologia; Ribeiro, Renato Niemeyer de Freitas [Hospital de Clinica de Jacarepagua, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Lais Balbi de [Universidade Presidente Antonio Carlos (Unipac), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare disease characterized by progressive hemifacial atrophy associated with other systemic changes, including neurological symptoms. Currently, there are few studies exploring the utilization of advanced magnetic resonance sequences in the investigation of this disease. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old patient and describe the findings at structural magnetic resonance imaging and at advanced sequences, correlating them with pathophysiological data. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of trilucent TM breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elson, Elspeth M.; Jones, Annette; King, Rebecca; Chapman, P.; Stanek, Jan; Irvine, Allan T.; Bingham, John B

    2002-04-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of intact and ruptured Trilucent TM implants with imaging and surgical correlation. The appearances of the implant transponder artefact are also described MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the MRI findings in 34 patients with bilateral subpectoral Trilucent TM breast implants (Lipomatrix, Inc./Collagen Aesthetics International Inc., Neuchatel, Switzerland) was performed. Patients under implant surveillance and those with suspected implant rupture formed the study group. Imaging findings were correlated with surgical appearances. RESULTS: Surgical correlation was available in 53% of patients. Fifty per cent (18/36) of implants were intact at surgery, 50% (18/36) of implants were ruptured. Of the 18 ruptured implants, 17 were intracapsular ruptures and one an extracapsular rupture. The sensitivity of MRI for detection of intracapsular rupture in Trilucent TM breast implants was 82% specificity 76%, positive predictive value 78%, negative predictive value 81% and accuracy 79% in this study group. No case of implant rupture was obscured by the transponder artefact. Four implants were found to have 'pseudocapsules' at surgery (5{center_dot}9%), the implants were intact with fluid present between the implant and capsule. Only one pseudocapsule was demonstrated on MRI. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most accurate technique for diagnosis of implant rupture in Trilucent TM breast implants. Transponder artefact does not appear to interfere with the assessment of implant rupture. Elson, E. M. et al. (2002)

  17. Biological effects of exposure to magnetic resonance imaging: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Formica Domenico; Silvestri Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The literature on biological effects of magnetic and electromagnetic fields commonly utilized in magnetic resonance imaging systems is surveyed here. After an introduction on the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging and the electric and magnetic properties of biological tissues, the basic phenomena to understand the bio-effects are described in classical terms. Values of field strengths and frequencies commonly utilized in these diagnostic systems are reported in order to a...

  18. Ferromagnetic resonance of particulate magnetic recording tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzelmann, U.

    1990-08-01

    The room-temperature ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of γ-Fe2O3, CrO2, and barium ferrite particulate magnetic recording tapes have been measured at microwave frequencies of 9.35 and 35 GHz for various orientations of the static and high-frequency magnetic fields with respect to the tape. For CrO2 tapes, the influence of the width of the angular distribution of the particle orientations on the FMR spectra has been studied from the nearly isotropic case up to the highly oriented case. Hysteretic behavior for a CrO2 tape as well as the effect of tape calendering for a γ-Fe2O3 tape has been observed by FMR. Experimental results are found to be in reasonable agreement with results of theoretical calculations based on a model of an ellipsoidal single-domain particle with both shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Magnetostatic interaction inside the magnetic film has been introduced by expressing the total magnetostatic energy as a combination of a part dependent on particle shape and a part dependent on the shape of the tape. As a result of a comparison of experimental data with calculated data from the model, the magnetocrystalline easy axis of the CrO2 particles is found to be parallel with the particle axis.

  19. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  20. Multidataset Refinement Resonant Diffraction, and Magnetic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attfield, J Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scope of Rietveld and other powder diffraction refinements continues to expand, driven by improvements in instrumentation, methodology and software. This will be illustrated by examples from our research in recent years. Multidataset refinement is now commonplace; the datasets may be from different detectors, e.g., in a time-of-flight experiment, or from separate experiments, such as at several x-ray energies giving resonant information. The complementary use of x rays and neutrons is exemplified by a recent combined refinement of the monoclinic superstructure of magnetite, Fe3O4, below the 122 K Verwey transition, which reveals evidence for Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) charge ordering. Powder neutron diffraction data continue to be used for the solution and Rietveld refinement of magnetic structures. Time-of-flight instruments on cold neutron sources can produce data that have a high intensity and good resolution at high d-spacings. Such profiles have been used to study incommensurate magnetic structures such as FeAsO4 and β-CrPO4. A multiphase, multidataset refinement of the phase-separated perovskite (Pr0.35Y0.07Th0.04Ca0.04Sr0.5)MnO3 has been used to fit three components with different crystal and magnetic structures at low temperatures.