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Sample records for magnetic resonance angiography

  1. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  3. Magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Gamroth, A.H.; Schad, L.R.; Semmler, W.; Kaick, G. van; Tuengerthal, S.J.; Hausmann, R.

    1992-01-01

    MR angiography (MRA) proved to be promising combined to MR-Imaging (MRI) in the assessment of intrathoracic masses. Sequential FLASH 2D-angiograms were acquired in breathhold technique using the following parameters: TR=30 ms, TE=10 ms, FA=30deg. Section thickness was 5 mm with 1 mm overlap between sequential sections. Individual conditions of the examination were achieved by an automatised control procedure. Targeted MIP-postprocessing resulted in 3D-reconstructions illustrating vascular anatomy and avoiding superimposition. Presentation should be done by cine-mode for better spatial impression. This method was evaluated in a prospective study of 21 patients with malignant pulmonary and mediastinal masses in addition to spin-echo imaging. The diagnostic contribution concerning the relationship between the mass and the vasculature like displacement, stenosis, and poststenotic perfusion defect were assessed. (orig.) [de

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test ... of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast material ...

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... posted: How to Obtain and Share Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  9. Magnetic resonance angiography vs. angiography in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Uppalapati Venkateswara; Vanajakshamma, Velam; Rajasekhar, Durgaprasad; Lakshmi, Amancharla Yadagiri; Reddy, Reddivari Niranjan

    2013-08-01

    : To determine whether gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can provide a noninvasive alternative to diagnostic catheterization for evaluation of pulmonary artery anatomy in tetralogy of Fallot. Thirty-five consecutive patients with tetralogy of Fallot, who attended the cardiology outpatient department between January 2008 and December 2009, were included in the study. There were 21 males and 14 females, with a mean age of 9 ± 4.15 years (range, 3-21 years). Thirty-two patients had tetralogy of Fallot with varying severities of valvular and infundibular stenosis. Three patients had tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia. All patients underwent both cardiac catheterization with X-ray angiography and 3-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography within one month. Measurements of right and left pulmonary arteries and aortopulmonary collaterals were equal by both methods. There was a good correlation between magnetic resonance angiography and catheterization measurements of branch pulmonary arteries. Gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can be used as a reliable noninvasive alternative to X-ray cineangiography for delineation of pulmonary arterial anatomy in sick infants and young children, obviating the need for catheterization.

  10. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallego, J [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Soriano, G [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Zubieta, J L [Servicio de Neuroradiologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Delgado, G [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain); Villanueva, J A [Servicio de Neurologia, Hospital de Navarra and Pamplona Univ. Hospital (Spain)

    1994-04-01

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  11. Vascular anatomy in angiography for magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charry Lopez, Marco Luciano; Rivera Gomez, Juan Enrique

    1998-01-01

    A review of basic anatomical concepts and main variants, as well as some anatomical anomalies of the central nervous system vascularity, these concepts are considered essential for the interpretation of magnetic resonance angiography with time-of-flight (TOF) and phase-contrast (PC) methods

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive ... possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, it’s ...

  13. Magnetic resonance angiography in meningovascular syphilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, J.; Soriano, G.; Zubieta, J.L.; Delgado, G.; Villanueva, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Meningovascular neurosyphilis (MN) is an unusual cause of stroke in young adults. The clinical manifestations include prodromal symptoms weeks or months before definitive stroke. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings and examination of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. We report a case of MN with basilar artery irregularities demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance angiography of arteriovenous malformation in the brainstem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kida, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Takayuki; Iwakoshi, Takayasu; Kai, Osamu; Hirose, Mitsuhiko [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    1993-11-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) angiography appearance of arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in the tegmentum and pons is described. The interpeduncular perforating branches of the posterior cerebral artery and median pontine branches of the basilar artery were seen more clearly by MR angiography than by conventional angiography. MR angiography was very useful for the follow-up of AVM after stereotactic radiosurgery. (author).

  15. Clinical application of magnetic resonance coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Akihiko; Onoe, Teruyuki; Kodera, Akifumi; Ohtsuki, Tetsuya; Shiomi, Akio; Ida, Masaaki; Sawada, Takahisa

    1999-01-01

    We performed the magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) in the cases which underwent coronary angiography (CAG) and obtained images were compared. Lesion with significant constriction more than 75% on CAG were determined as abnormal findings on MRCA, however, lesions with about 50% constriction were as the normal findings. On the assessment of the re-constriction after PTCA, the changes in signal were found in about half of cases. This may come from the contribution of flexion lesions, the difficulty to assess moderate constriction after PTCA, etc. For the anomalous aortic origin of coronary artery, peripheral large vessels could be simultaneously imaged by MRCA and be also assessed among their clear spatial relationship. Although MRCA has some problems on the assessment for flexion or moderate constriction, these results suggested that MRCA is useful to clinical application as the non-invasive examination. (K.H.)

  16. Magnetic resonance angiography for the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschenbach, R.; Esser, D.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography is a noninvasive method in vascular imaging using noncontrast- enhanced and contrast-enhanced techniques. The contrast media used in contrast- enhanced magnetic resonance angiography are different from the X-ray contrast media and do not affect the thyroid gland or renal function. In detecting hypervascularized lesions in the head and neck, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is the method of choice, which provides an acceptable quality in comparison to digital subtraction angiography. Future developments in magnetic resonance imaging techniques will cause a wider use of magnetic resonance angiography, especially in head and neck imaging. Digital subtraction angiography should therefore only be used in problem cases and for preoperative embolization [de

  17. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido; Maes, Frederik; Velghe, Beatrijs

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance angiography of the cerebral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, P.E.; Bongartz, G.; Drews, C.

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective study involving 52 patients, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was compared with arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA). MRA was performed within three days of the IA-DSA. It was carried out without knowledge of the findings on IA-DSA. Of 38 stenoses of the carotid arteries or their branches, demonstrated by IA-DSA, 33 could be seen on MRA; in four cases the stenosis was outside the imaging area of the coil. Sixteen out of 17 carotid occlusions were diagnosed by MRA. There was one false positive. In the vertebral artery territory, eleven out of 13 stenoses and three out of four occlusions were diagnosed by MRA. In evaluating the degree of stenosis, there was agreement in only 16 out of 33 cases. MRA over-estimated the severity of stenoses in 15 cases and underestimated it in two. MRA is a new non-invasive method in the diagnosis of cerebro-vascular disease which must be evaluated by further studies. (orig.) [de

  19. Magnetic resonance angiography in suspected cerebral vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe; De Ruyter, Nele; Wilms, Guido [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [Department of Medical Imaging Computing, Universitair Ziekenhuis, KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven (Belgium); Velghe, Beatrijs [Department of Radiology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Schiepse Bos 6, 3600, Genk (Belgium)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the technical capacity and diagnostic accuracy of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in suspected cerebral vasculitis in a retrospective analysis of MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in 14 young patients with clinical and/or radiological suspicion of cerebral vasculitis. A total of nine arteries were evaluated in each patient. Consensus review of DSA by three observers was the reference standard. The sensitivity for detecting a stenosis varied from 62 to 79% for MRA and from 76 to 94% for DSA, depending on the observer. The specificity for detecting a stenosis varied from 83 to 87% for MRA and from 83 to 97% for DSA. Using the criterion ''more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions'' to consider the examination as being true positive, the false-positive rates for MRA and DSA were comparable. MRA plays a role as the first angiographical examination in the diagnostic work-up of suspected cerebral vasculitis. When more than two stenoses in at least two separate vascular distributions are depicted on MRA, DSA is not expected to add a significant diagnostic contribution in a patient with suspected cerebral vasculitis. DSA remains necessary when MRA is normal or when less than three stenoses are seen. (orig.)

  20. Bolus characteristics based on Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Xiaoming

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed contrast bolus propagation model is essential for optimizing bolus-chasing Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA. Bolus characteristics were studied using bolus-timing datasets from Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA for adaptive controller design and validation. Methods MRA bolus-timing datasets of the aorta in thirty patients were analyzed by a program developed with MATLAB. Bolus characteristics, such as peak position, dispersion and bolus velocity, were studied. The bolus profile was fit to a convolution function, which would serve as a mathematical model of bolus propagation in future controller design. Results The maximum speed of the bolus in the aorta ranged from 5–13 cm/s and the dwell time ranged from 7–13 seconds. Bolus characteristics were well described by the proposed propagation model, which included the exact functional relationships between the parameters and aortic location. Conclusion The convolution function describes bolus dynamics reasonably well and could be used to implement the adaptive controller design.

  1. Localization strategy for magnetic resonance coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Liuquan; Gao Yuangui; Sun Wei; Sheng Fugeng; Cai Youquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a localization strategy for magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA). Methods: In 89 subjects, the standard 4-chamber view and long-axis view of left and right ventricle were acquired using Fast-Imaging-Employing-Steady-State-Acquisition (FIESTA) sequence in CINE mode, and the trigger-delay time for mid-diastolic phase was determined. Coronary vessels including right coronary artery (RCA), left main (LM), left anterior descending (LAD), and left circumflex (LCX) were localized and imaged using 3- dimensional fat-suppressed FIESTA sequence during end-expiration. The reproducibility of the localization strategy was evaluated by taking the standard of coronary segmentation system recommended by American Heart Association. Results: Eighty-six subjects completed the examination with full respiratory co-operation and the indication ratio was 96.63%. Nine planes were optimized as the standard to target the main branches of coronary arteries, and a comprehensive reproducibility reached 100% in demonstrating the proximal and middle segment of RCA (AHA-18, 19), LM (AHA-1, 2), proximal and middle segment of LAD (AHA-3, 5, 7), and proximal LCX (AHA-10). The reproducibility for the demonstration of distal segments of LAD, LCX, and RCA (AHA-9, 14, 21) was 94.19%, 72.09%, and 96.51%, respectively. Conclusion: This is a simple and practical localization strategy for MRCA. It could image the proximal and middle segments of the coronary arteries with good reproducibility, which indicates the potential for clinical application

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography: infrequent anatomic variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trejo, Mariano; Meli, Francisco; Lambre, Hector; Blessing, Ricardo; Gigy Traynor, Ignacio; Miguez, Victor

    2002-01-01

    We studied through RM angiography (3D TOF) with high magnetic field equipment (1.5 T) different infrequent intracerebral vascular anatomic variants. For their detection we emphasise the value of post-processed images obtained after conventional angiographic sequences. These post-processed images should be included in routine protocols for evaluation of the intracerebral vascular structures. (author)

  3. Radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations based on magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Minesh; Kubsad, Shrikant; Petereit, Daniel; Turski, Patrick; Levin, Allan; Kinsella, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) was performed to establish its feasibility, compare it with standard angiography (SA), employ MRA in follow-up and semiquantify AVM flow velocity (FV). A correlative evaluation between flow velocity and response to stereotactic radiosurgery was also attempted. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab

  4. Magnetic resonance angiography of arteriovenous malformation in the thalamus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kida, Yoshihisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Takayuki; Iwakoshi, Takayasu; Kai, Osamu; Hirose, Mitsuhiko [Komaki City Hospital, Aichi (Japan)

    1993-11-01

    A comparative study of magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography of arteriovenous malformation in the thalamus showed that both methods clearly visualized the feeding arteries: perforating branches of the posterior cerebral artery, posterior choroidal artery and lenticulostriate artery. Draining veins such as the internal cerebral vein were also demonstrated well. (author).

  5. Clinical experience of magnetic resonance angiography in hand surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Hidehiko; Yasui, Natsuo; Kitano, Motohiro; Sai, Eikoh

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography was performed in fourteen patients with congenital hand abnormalities. A two-dimentional time-of-flight imaging clearly demonstrated presence or absence of the radial, ulnar, and anterior interosseous arteires at forearm. However, smaller arteries such as digital arteries were depressed sometimes. This fact makes clinical application of the method somewhat limited. At present. appropriate applications in orthopaedic fields are evaluation of run-off of the major vessels after trauma or atherosclerotic diseases, venous vascular problems such as thrombophlebitis and aneurysm, and preoperative and post operative evaluation in microsurgery. If more detailed information is required, for example, in differential diagnosis of tumors conventional angiography or digital subtraction angiography is recommended. Because magnetic resonance angiography is non-invasive and does not need anesthesia, it is suitable especially for children. No requirement of contrast medium makes it easy to apply angiography to high risk patients and allergic patients to iodine. Technical advancement in near future will rise up magnetic resonance angiography to a standard evaluation method for vascular problems in orthopaedic fields very soon. (author)

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot Fishman, a radiologist ... question you might have, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time and for your ...

  7. Magnetic resonance angiography: Physical principles and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmann, R.; Mueller, E.

    1992-01-01

    Within the last four years magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) developed very rapidly towards a well accepted screening technique for vascular examinations as a fast add-on to conventional MR. This review describes the basic physical principles as well as the different methods like time-of-flight and phase-sensitive MRA for visualization of blood vessels. Different applications of 3D, 2D sequential and 3D multivolume MRA are shown from various regions of the head and body. A short outlock to quantitative flow measurments is given in the last chapter including some interesting applications of these techniques which show the still expanding potential of magnetic resonance. (orig.) [de

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography for patients with positional vertigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Fujiki, Hiroya; Kumoi, Takeo.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) can image the blood vessels without invasion. Using MRA, we studied the vascular morphology of the vertebral artery in patients with positional nystagmus and vertigo. Fifteen patients without vestibular disorder such as benign positional vertigo were examined. Six cases underwent conventional vertebral angiography, including digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for comparison with MRA. In all cases. we observed the vertebral artery from the bifurcation to the basilar artery with MRA. In 12 cases, abnormal findings of elongation, bending, narrowing or obstruction of the vertebral artery were found. In five cases, arterial compression and elongation increased in association with head rotation. A difference in the vessel diameter on each side was observed in 4 cases. Accordingly, some abnormal vessels were found in 14 of 15 cases in our study. This rate was very close to previous results obtained with conventional angiography. In two cases, MRA findings differed from conventional angiography due to peculiar artifacts of MRA. Therefore, MRA may be the first choice for the patients with vertigo, followed by conventional angiography, if necessary. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance angiography for patients with positional vertigo

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    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Fujiki, Hiroya (Takarazuka City Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Kumoi, Takeo

    1993-11-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) can image the blood vessels without invasion. Using MRA, we studied the vascular morphology of the vertebral artery in patients with positional nystagmus and vertigo. Fifteen patients without vestibular disorder such as benign positional vertigo were examined. Six cases underwent conventional vertebral angiography, including digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for comparison with MRA. In all cases. we observed the vertebral artery from the bifurcation to the basilar artery with MRA. In 12 cases, abnormal findings of elongation, bending, narrowing or obstruction of the vertebral artery were found. In five cases, arterial compression and elongation increased in association with head rotation. A difference in the vessel diameter on each side was observed in 4 cases. Accordingly, some abnormal vessels were found in 14 of 15 cases in our study. This rate was very close to previous results obtained with conventional angiography. In two cases, MRA findings differed from conventional angiography due to peculiar artifacts of MRA. Therefore, MRA may be the first choice for the patients with vertigo, followed by conventional angiography, if necessary. (author).

  10. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... comfortable clothing and leave any jewelry at home. Tell the radiologic technologist if you have medical devices implanted in your body as these can interfere with the magnetic field ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... an MRA scan, there are several things you can do to prepare for the examination. First of ... medical devices implanted in your body as these can interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... that uses a powerful magnetic field and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the major blood ... Your Medical Images Movement Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by ...

  13. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test that uses a powerful magnetic field and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Pig using Hyperpolarized Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Bowen, Sean; Laustsen, Christoffer

    , the magnetization achievable with hyperpolarized water is superior to other nuclei. Methods A 1 mL sample of 50% water and 50% glycerol with 30 mM TEMPO is polarized in a Spinlab (GE Healthcare) at 5 T, 0.9 K, 139.9 GHz for an hour. The sample is rapidly dissolved in 16 mL deoxygenized dissolution medium (DM......Introduction Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) is an important tool in diagnostics of medical conditions such as emboli, stenosis and aneurysms. Sub-millimetre resolution can be obtained with proton imaging, and further optimization can be obtained with Gd-based blood pool agents1. However......, the acquisition time is several minutes, and conventional MRA methods thus fail to image within a single respiration or heartbeat and therefore suffers from motion artefacts. We demonstrate that hyperpolarized (HP) water can be used as an imaging agent to provide subsecond angiographies in pigs. Previous work...

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA is a noninvasive test that uses a powerful magnetic field and a ...

  16. Atherosclerosis of the carotid artery: evaluation by magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, K S; Yuan, C; Tsuruda, J S; Ferguson, M S; Wen, N; Subramaniam, D S; Strandness, D E

    1996-01-01

    Carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques (APs) can lead to brain ischemia, an event shown to correlate with both the degree of stenosis and the composition of the AP. Currently, accurate estimates of stenosis can be obtained by either x-ray angiography or three-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Our purpose was to determine whether three-dimensional TOF MRA images could also provide information on plaque location, morphology, and composition. Seven pre-endarterectomy patients underwent three-dimensional TOF MRA. After endarterectomy, plaque histology was evaluated. Three-dimensional TOF MRA images contained sufficient soft tissue contrast to differentiate the plaques from the surrounding tissues in all cases. Estimation of plaque morphology had 80% correlation with histology. Finally, intraplaque hemorrhage and calcification were deplicted as regions of moderately high and very low intensity, respectively. These preliminary results suggest that three-dimensional TOF MRA may be useful in studying the development and progression of carotid atherosclerosis.

  17. Comparison of magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography in sickle cell disease: clinical significance and realibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandeel, A.Y.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Ohene-Frempong, K.

    1996-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and conventional angiograms of 21 patients with known sickle cell disease, who underwent a total of 50 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) studies. MRA and conventional angiography were assessed separately for evidence of stenosis or occulusion. Follow up MRI/MRA studies were also assessed for evidence of progression, regression or stability of the disease in these patients. In the carotid circulation, MRA made the correct diagnosis in 85% of the vessels evaluated with a sensitivity of 80.5% and a specificity of 94%. MRA was also found to show evidence of disease progression, more often than did MRI or the clinical condition of the patients. (orig.)

  18. Parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis: findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Clecia Santos; Pellini, Marcos; Boasquevisque, Edson; Souza, Luis Alberto M. de

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to determine the frequency and localization of parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography as well as their correlation with the territory and affected venous drainage. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis (1996 to 2004) of 21 patients (3 male and 18 female) age range between 3 and 82 years (mean 40 years, median 36 years) with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography in 2D PC, 3D PC and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF sequences. The statistical analysis was performed with the qui-square test. Four patients had follow-up exams and three patients underwent digital subtraction angiography. Results: main predisposing factors were: infection, use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and collagenosis. Predominant symptoms included: focal deficit, headache, alteration of consciousness level and seizures. Most frequent parenchymal manifestations were: cortical/subcortical edema or infarct, venous congestion and collateral circulation, meningeal enhancement and thalamic and basal ganglia edema or infarct. Occlusion occurred mainly in superior sagittal, left transverse, left sigmoid and straight sinuses. Cavernous sinus and cortical veins thrombosis are uncommon events. Conclusion: cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke, with favorable prognosis because of its reversibility. Diagnosis is highly dependent on the radiologist capacity to recognize the presentations of this disease, principally in cases where the diagnosis is suggested by parenchymal abnormalities rather than necessarily by visualization of the thrombus itself. An accurate and rapid diagnosis allows an immediate treatment, reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance angiography of fetal vasculature at 3.0 T

    OpenAIRE

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar; Krishnamurthy, Uday; Jella, Pavan K.; Mody, Swati S.; Yadav, Brijesh K.; Hendershot, Kelly; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Cabrera, Maria D.; Haacke, Ewart M.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Romero, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography has not been used much previously for visualizing fetal vessels in utero for reasons that include a contraindication for the use of exogenous contrast agents, maternal respiratory motion and fetal motion. In this work, we report the feasibility of using an appropriately modified clinical time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging sequence for non-contrast angiography of human fetal and placental vessels at 3.0 T. Using this 2D angiography technique, it is possibl...

  20. Magnetic resonance angiography of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimura, Tatsuo; Saito, Kenichi; Nakayama, Hisato; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Kato, Shoichi; Ito, Haruhide.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the screening study of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries using the conventional head and neck coils, 500 consecutive MRAs of the cervical vessels were performed using 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance unit with circularly polarized head coil. The 5 cm-thick imaging plane was placed in coronal fashion including both carotid and vertebral arteries. The imaging sequence was three-dimensional (3D) fast imaging with steady precession (FISP). In 10 patients with failed head coil examination, 10 patients with possible carotid and vertebral diseases and 10 volunteers, the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries were examined with the Helmholtz neck coil. Both 3D- and 2D-FISP were performed in each case. The imaging plane was placed in oblique sagittal fashion. In 458 out of 500 cases (91.6%), the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries were successfully depicted using head coil. In 20 patients with high shoulders, the carotid bifurcations were out of range of the head coil. In these cases, carotid bifurcations and the origins of the carotid and vertebral arteries were successfully revealed using a neck coil. To evaluate the stenotic lesions and tortuous vessels, 2D-FISP sequence seemed to be more suitable than 3D-FISP. Compared with conventional angiography, MRA caused overestimation of the degree of stenotic lesions. For screening examination of the extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries, most cases can be evaluated only with the conventional head coil. If depiction of the carotid bifurcation fails and the examination of carotids or vertebrals down to the aortic arch is needed, neck coil examination is required. (author)

  1. Recent advances in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, J.F.M.; Goyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) provides a means of visualizing vascular structures noninvasively and is increasingly replacing conventional X-ray angiography in routine use. Contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), in which gadolinium contrast agents are used to shorten the T1 relaxation, offers increased resolution and higher signal-to-noise ratio compared with earlier flow-dependent [time-of-flight (TOF) or phase-contrast (PC)] techniques. Currently available contrast agents differ in their ability to lower T1 values, and hence the choice of contrast agent is an important consideration in the successful use of CE-MRA. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first of a new class of intravascular contrast agents. This agent is extensively (approximately 85%) and reversibly bound to human serum albumin and is retained within the vasculature thus allowing steady-state imaging to be perform-ed. An additional benefit is that gado0fosveset offers higher relaxivity compared with other contrast agents, thus giving a lower blood T1 values which also makes it ideal for first-pass imaging. Clinical trials have consistently shown that gadofosveset enhanced MRA is more sensitive, specific and accurate than time-of-flight MRA, gives fewer uninterpretable scans and affords greater diagnostic confidence. Intravascular contrast agents such as gadofosveset, therefore, offer the potential for improved vascular imaging. (orig.)

  2. Fusion of magnetic resonance angiography and magnetic resonance imaging for surgical planning for meningioma. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimura, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Arai, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    A fusion technique for magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and MR imaging was developed to help assess the peritumoral angioarchitecture during surgical planning for meningioma. Three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D-TOF) and 3D-spoiled gradient recalled (SPGR) datasets were obtained from 10 patients with intracranial meningioma, and fused using newly developed volume registration and visualization software. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images from 3D-TOF MR angiography and axial SPGR MR imaging were displayed at the same time on the monitor. Selecting a vessel on the real-time MIP image indicated the corresponding points on the axial image automatically. Fusion images showed displacement of the anterior cerebral or middle cerebral artery in 7 patients and encasement of the anterior cerebral arteries in I patient, with no relationship between the main arterial trunk and tumor in 2 patients. Fusion of MR angiography and MR imaging can clarify relationships between the intracranial vasculature and meningioma, and may be helpful for surgical planning for meningioma. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance angiography in 12 patients with Wallenberg's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Takahashi, Akira; Hashizume, Yoshio; Motegi, Yoshimasa; Furuse, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed in 12 patients with Wallenberg's syndrome (WS) in chronic stage to investigate the lesion of the vertebral artery (VA). The laterality of infarction in the medulla oblongata was confirmed with MRI; the right in four patients and the left in eight. In this study, time-of-flight MRA was evaluated. Coronal and OM sections in MRA were examined, because the former is useful to observe asymmetry and curve of the cervical VA, and the latter is useful to observe asymmetry and stenosis of the intracranial VA. In nine out of 12 patients, the ipsilateral VA was rather hypoplastic compared to the contralateral VA, and the flow of the hypoplastic VA stopped before and after entering the intracranial region. The contralateral VA of the hypoplastic cases showed curve in the neck in five patients and stenosis in the intracranial portion in one patient. A comparative study was conducted between vertebral angiogram (VAG) and MRA in four patients. Both VAG and MRA were useful in detecting hypoplasia and stoppage of the flow. It was considered that VA hypoplasia is frequently responsible for WS, and that MRA is useful in screening the vascular lesion as a non-invasive procedure to reveal changes of the bilateral VA. (author)

  4. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance coronary angiography using a new blood pool contrast agent : Initial experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedaux, WLF; Hofman, MBM; Wielopolski, PA; de Cock, CC; Hoffmann, [No Value; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, PJ; van Rossum, AC

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this feasibility study was to assess the effect of a new blood pool contrast agent on magnetic resonance coronary angiography (MRCA) in patients suspected of having coronary artery disease. Methods: Nine patients referred for diagnostic x-ray coronary, angiography in the

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography compared to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouliamos, A.; Gotsis, E.; Vlahos, L.; Samara, C.; Kapsalaki, E.; Rologis, D.; Kapsalakis, Z.; Papavasiliou, C.

    1992-01-01

    In order to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage, 14 patients with recent haemorrhage verified by CT or lumbar puncture were investigated with both selective intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA) and MRA by two independent teams, each having the same preangiographic information. The results were compared with each other and whenever possible (all positive cases except one) with those of surgical intervention. Seven patients were identified by MRA and IA-DSA as having a single aneurysm on the circle of Willis, 1 an aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery 1 an aneurysm of the internal carotid artery (siphon) and 2 patients with two aneurysms on the circle of Willis. MRA and IA-DSA both failed to demonstrate aneurysms in 2 cases. Three patients had negative results on both methods and no surgical intervention was attempted. The aneurysms ranged from 0.3 to 1.5 cm in size. In most cases there was agreement between MRA and DSA, leading us to believe that, if the proper protocols are followed, MRA is a powerful alternative to other established methods in the detection of intracranial aneurysms. At this stage it will not replace IA-DSA prior to surgery, but the ability to obtain various projections using 3D MRA may improve surgical planning. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance angiography compared to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouliamos, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Athens Univ. (Greece)); Gotsis, E. (Diagnostic and Research Inst. Encephalos, Athens (Greece)); Vlahos, L. (Dept. of Radiology, Athens Univ. (Greece)); Samara, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Athens Univ. (Greece)); Kapsalaki, E. (Diagnostic and Research Inst. Encephalos, Athens (Greece)); Rologis, D. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Athens General Hospital (Greece)); Kapsalakis, Z. (Diagnostic and Research Inst. Encephalos, Athens (Greece)); Papavasiliou, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Athens Univ. (Greece))

    1992-12-01

    In order to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage, 14 patients with recent haemorrhage verified by CT or lumbar puncture were investigated with both selective intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA) and MRA by two independent teams, each having the same preangiographic information. The results were compared with each other and whenever possible (all positive cases except one) with those of surgical intervention. Seven patients were identified by MRA and IA-DSA as having a single aneurysm on the circle of Willis, 1 an aneurysm of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery 1 an aneurysm of the internal carotid artery (siphon) and 2 patients with two aneurysms on the circle of Willis. MRA and IA-DSA both failed to demonstrate aneurysms in 2 cases. Three patients had negative results on both methods and no surgical intervention was attempted. The aneurysms ranged from 0.3 to 1.5 cm in size. In most cases there was agreement between MRA and DSA, leading us to believe that, if the proper protocols are followed, MRA is a powerful alternative to other established methods in the detection of intracranial aneurysms. At this stage it will not replace IA-DSA prior to surgery, but the ability to obtain various projections using 3D MRA may improve surgical planning. (orig.)

  7. Detection and characterization of intracranial aneurysms: magnetic resonance angiography versus digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzad, R.; Younas, F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA) in detection and characterization of intracranial aneurysms. Study Design: Comparative cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Lahore General Hospital, Lahore, from January to June 2007. Methodology: Thirty patients presented with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and focal neurological signs were selected by convenience sampling. Three dimensional time of flight (3D TOF) MRA using maximum intensity projection (MIP) was performed on all patients along with DSA. Results of 3D TOF MRA were compared with those of IA-DSA taking IA-DSA as Gold standard. Results: Out of 30 patients 14 (46.7%) were males and 16 (53.3%) were females with mean age of 41+-14.1 years. MRA detected 29 out of 30 aneurysmal lesions with sensitivity of 96.7%. Regarding characterization of aneurysms results of MRA were comparable to those of IA-DSA. Conclusion: 3D TOF MRA technique showed a high sensitivity in this study. This technique can be used as a non-invasive screening test for intracranial aneurysms and as a suitable alternative primary examination to IA-DSA prior to aneurysmal surgery. (author)

  8. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE ANGIOGRAPHY FOR UNRUPTURED CEREBRAL ANEURYSMS IN CORRELATION WITH DIGITAL SUBTRACTION ANGIOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Aracki-Trenkić

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial aneurysm is a focal, abnormal dilation of an artery of the brain. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA is a non-invasive technique for vascular imaging and is thus widely used for screening for intracranial vascular lesions. The aim of the study was to show the diagnostic accuracy of 3D Time-of-Flight (3D TOF MRA in the detection of unruptured cerebral aneurysms with the use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA as the gold standard. A total of 2.612 consecutive patients underwent 3DTOF MRA. It showed unruptured aneurysms in 94 (3.6% patients. They included 68 women and 26 men ranging in age from 29 to 76 years (mean, 52.5 years. Twenty-six of them, 20 women and 6 men, underwent DSA. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for the correlation of size. Fisher’s test was used for the correlation of location. The statistical level of significance was set at p0.05 of aneurysms between TOF MRA and DSA. MRA is an accurate and non-invasive method for diagnosis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms. The results of study show the compatibility of MRA findings, the location and the size of an aneurysm in comparison with the “gold standard” – cerebral DSA.

  9. Abnormal pulmonary vein drainage in upper right lobe associated with double aortic arch : magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busto, M.; Dolz, J.L.; Capdevilla, A.; Castanon, M.; Mulet, J.

    1997-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) findings in a case of abnormal pulmonary vein drainage from upper right lobe to superior vena cava, associated with double aortic arch, in a six-month-old boy. (Author) 9 refs

  10. Magnetic resonance angiography of fetal vasculature at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar; Krishnamurthy, Uday; Yadav, Brijesh K.; Haacke, Ewart M. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Wayne State University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Detroit, MI (United States); Jella, Pavan K.; Hendershot, Kelly; Cabrera, Maria D. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Mody, Swati S. [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S. [Wayne State University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Detroit, MI (United States); Perinatology Research Branch, NICHD/NIH/DHHS, Bethesda, MD, and Detroit, MI (United States); Romero, Roberto [Perinatology Research Branch, NICHD/NIH/DHHS, Bethesda, MD, and Detroit, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, East Lansing, MI (United States); Wayne State University, Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Magnetic resonance angiography has not been used much previously for visualizing fetal vessels in utero for reasons that include a contraindication for the use of exogenous contrast agents, maternal respiratory motion and fetal motion. In this work, we report the feasibility of using an appropriately modified clinical time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging sequence for non-contrast angiography of human fetal and placental vessels at 3.0 T. Using this 2D angiography technique, it is possible to visualize fetal vascular networks in late pregnancy. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance angiography of fetal vasculature at 3.0 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Uday; Jella, Pavan K.; Mody, Swati S.; Yadav, Brijesh K.; Hendershot, Kelly; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Cabrera, Maria D.; Haacke, Ewart M.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Romero, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography has not been used much previously for visualizing fetal vessels in utero for reasons that include a contraindication for the use of exogenous contrast agents, maternal respiratory motion and fetal motion. In this work, we report the feasibility of using an appropriately modified clinical time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging sequence for non-contrast angiography of human fetal and placental vessels at 3.0 T. Using this 2D angiography technique, it is possible to visualize fetal vascular networks in late pregnancy. PMID:27189488

  12. Magnetic resonance angiography of fetal vasculature at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar; Krishnamurthy, Uday; Yadav, Brijesh K.; Haacke, Ewart M.; Jella, Pavan K.; Hendershot, Kelly; Cabrera, Maria D.; Mody, Swati S.; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S.; Romero, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography has not been used much previously for visualizing fetal vessels in utero for reasons that include a contraindication for the use of exogenous contrast agents, maternal respiratory motion and fetal motion. In this work, we report the feasibility of using an appropriately modified clinical time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging sequence for non-contrast angiography of human fetal and placental vessels at 3.0 T. Using this 2D angiography technique, it is possible to visualize fetal vascular networks in late pregnancy. (orig.)

  13. Treatment of arteriovenous malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery employing both magnetic resonance angiography and standard angiography as a database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petereit, D.; Mehta, M.; Turski, P.; Levin, A.; Strother, C.; Mistretta, C.; Mackie, R.; Gehring, M.; Kubsad, S.; Kinsella, T.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-one arteriovenous malformations were prospectively evaluated using magnetic resonance angiography, compare it to stereotactic angiography, employ magnetic resonance angiography in follow-up, and semiquanitfy flow. A correlative evaluation between flow and response to stereotactic radiosurgery was carried out. Phase contrast angiograms were obtained at flow velocities of 400, 200, 100, 60 and 20 cm/sec. The fractionated velocities provided images that selectively demonstrated the arterial and venous components of the arteriovenous malformations. Qualitative assessment of the velocity within the arteriovenous malformations and the presence of fistulae were also determined by multiple velocity images. In addition, 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiograms were obtained to define the exact size and shape of the nidus. This technique also permitted evaluation of the nidus and feeding arteries for the the presence of low flow aneurysms. Correlation between the two imaging modalities was carried out by subjective and semiquantitative estimation of flow velocity and estimation of nidus size. The following velocity parameters were employed: fast, intermediate, slow, and none. Early analysis suggests that slower flowing arteriovenous malformations may obliterate faster after stereotactic radiosurgery an flow parameters should be employed to predict response. In conclusion, magnetic resonance angiography permits semiquantitative flow velocity assessment and may therefore be superior to stereotactic angiography. An additional advantage of magnetic resonance angiography is the generation of serial transverse images which can replace the conventional CT scan employed for stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning. A single diagnostic test may therefore be used for diagnosis, radiosurgical treatment planning, follow-up, and treatment selection by identifying patients likely to respond early to radiosurgical management

  14. Prospective Heart Tracking for Whole-heart Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H.; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a prospective respiratory-gating technique (Heart-NAV) for use with contrast-enhanced 3D inversion recovery (IR) whole-heart magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) acquisitions that directly tracks heart motion without creating image inflow artifact. Methods With Heart-NAV, 1 of the startup pulses for the whole-heart steady-state free precession MRA sequence is used to collect the centerline of k-space, and its 1-dimensional reconstruction is fed into the standard diaphragm-navigator (NAV) signal analysis process to prospectively gate and track respiratory-induced heart displacement. Ten healthy volunteers underwent non-contrast whole-heart MRA acquisitions using the conventional diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with 5 and 10 mm acceptance windows in a 1.5T scanner. Five patients underwent contrast-enhanced IR whole-heart MRA using a diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with a 5 mm acceptance window. Results For non-contrast whole-heart MRA with both the 5 and 10 mm acceptance windows, Heart-NAV yielded coronary artery vessel sharpness and subjective visual scores that were not significantly different than those using a conventional diaphragm-NAV. Scan time for Heart-NAV was 10% shorter (p<0.05). In patients undergoing contrast-enhanced IR whole-heart MRA, inflow artifact was seen with the diaphragm-NAV but not with Heart-NAV. Conclusion Compared to a conventional diaphragm-NAV, Heart-NAV achieves similar image quality in a slightly shorter scan time and eliminates inflow artifact. PMID:26843458

  15. Magnetic resonance angiography of the neck vessels: technique and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriero, A.; Salute, L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors identified the standard projections for studying neck vessels with magnetic resonance angiography. Sixty volunteers underwent angio-MR of the arterial neck vessels with FISP 3D FT sequences obtained on the coronal and sagittal planes. The gradient-echo sequence (FISP 3D FT) was acquired with TR=0.04-0.08 s and TE=15 ms, with 25 grade flip angle. Single excitated slices of thickness ranging from 1-2 mm were included in the acquisition volume. Theses sequences were subsequently processed by the maximum intensity projection method. Two radiologist examined our results to choose the optimal projections. We used a semi-quantitative scale which allowed us to distinguish 3 different diagnostic levels for each projection: well-visualized vessels, poorly-visualized, and non-visualized ones. For each section axial rotations were performed ranging from 0 grade to 180 grade, with 15 grade i ntervals. On the coronal plane, rotations from 45 grade to 45 grade were the optimal ones to visualize the studied vessels. The 0 grade- 15 grade- 30 grade- 45 grade- 135 grade- 165 grade- 180 grade projections allowed the common carotids to be clearly demonstrated together with the verterbal arteries. The other projections appeared to be useless for diagnostic purposes. On the saggittal plane, rotations from 60 grade to 120 grade were the optimal ones. The 90 grade projection allowed the demonstration of all the big arterial vessel of the neck, including carotid bifurcation and internal and external carotids. The assessment of the optimal diagnostic projections for angio-MR of the neck vessels is helpful to reduce post-processing time. As a matter of fact, the immediate visualization, during the examination, of the standard projections allows further acquisitions to be obtained- if needed- to try to solve specific diagnostic doubts

  16. Chronic hepatosplenic schistosomiasis mansoni: magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, A.S.; D'Ippolito, G.; Caldana, R.P.; Cecin, A.O.; Ahmed, M.; Szejnfeld, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the hepatosplenic manifestations and the portal venous system in patients with chronic infection by Schistosoma mansoni. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was performed in 28 patients with chronic hepatosplenic schistosomiasis submitted to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the abdomen. Images were interpreted independently by two radiologists to determine the reproducibility of image interpretation and who evaluated the presence of morphological alterations in the liver and spleen, such as hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic fissure widening, periportal fibrosis, and the presence of siderotic nodules. Interobserver and intra-observer agreement were measured with the kappa and intraclass correlation tests. Evaluation of venous collateral pathways and portal and splenic veins was done in consensus by both examiners. Results: Observers identified enlargement of the left lobe (78.5-92.8%) and caudate-to-right-lobe ratio (78.5-92.8%), irregularity of hepatic contours (89.2-96.4%), fissure widening (89.2-100%), and splenic siderotic nodules (84.2%). Splenomegaly, heterogeneity of hepatic parenchyma, peripheral hepatic vessels, and periportal fibrosis were observed in 100% of patients. MRI findings presented almost perfect interobserver (kappa 0.65-1) and intra-observer (kappa = 0.73-1 for observer 1, and kappa = 0.65-1 for observer 2) agreement for the variables analyzed. MRA showed the presence of collateral pathways in the majority of patients (71.4%) along with widening of portal and splenic veins. Conclusion: Using MRI, hepatosplenic alterations in schistosomiasis are characterized by heterogeneity of hepatic parenchyma, presence of peripheral perihepatic vessels, periportal fibrosis, splenomegaly, siderotic nodules, and the presence of venous collateral pathways

  17. Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in candidates for kidney transplantation: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ginnerup-Pedersen, Bodil; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Haislund, Margit; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Detailed knowledge of vessel status in potential candidates for kidney transplantation is essential for the surgeon. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has previously been used intensively for assessing this, but the discovery that use of gadolinium based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging can cause Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in patients suffering from severe kidney disease has lead to renewed interest in non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The aim of this study was to find a non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography method for preoperative evaluation of the pelvic vessels prior to kidney transplantation, providing a sufficient image quality. Method: In a prospective study we consecutively included 54 patients undergoing examinations prior to kidney transplantation. The patients were examined with the following magnetic resonance angiography sequences: A 2D Time of flight (n = 54), 3D Time of flight (n = 52) patients, 3D Phase Contrast (n = 54), 3D Balanced Steady State Free Precession (n = 52) and a 2D TRiggered Angiography Non-Contrast Enhanced (TRANCE) (a Spin Echo sequence with subtraction) (n = 48). The sequences were evaluated with respect to contrast, diagnostic performance and artefact burden. Results: Evaluating contrast, 3D Phase Contrast was significantly better than 2D Time of flight (p 0.2). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. The artefact score was lowest for the Phase Contrast images and significantly superior to the 2D Time of flight (p < 0.005). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the three other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. Conclusion: Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography offers a safe preoperative examination for assessment of vessel status before kidney transplantation. A combination of 2D Time of flight and 3D Phase Contrast acquisitions is recommended and can be performed within a

  18. An investigation of cerebral magnetic resonance angiography, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Sadanori; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Todo, Hirooki; Sakaki, Saburo.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies of MR angiography (MRA) as a noninvasive screening method for vascular diseases have been reported recently. Almost all of them were investigated using high tesla magnets (1.5 tesla). We have been investigating three-dimensional MRA using a medium tesla (0.5 tesla) system (HITACHI G-50). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of 3-D MRA for the screening of cerebral aneurysms. Twenty patients with 25 cerebral aneurysms were included in this study. The sizes of the aneurysms ranged from 2 to 35 mm. Twenty-three aneurysms were located on the anterior circulation, and 2 on the posterior circulation. MR angiography was performed with a gradient-echo sequence at a TR of 50 msec, a TE of 16 msec, and a flip angle of 25 degrees. The imaging volumes ranged in thickness from 48 to 64 mm, with 32 partitions. We used a sequence-subtraction technique composed of rephased and dephased sequences; it provides a good visualization of the main cerebral arteries. Cerebral aneurysms were detected on 3-D MRA in 23 lesions (92%). We consider that 0.5 tesla 3-D MRA could be useful for the screening of nonruptured aneurysms. (author)

  19. Magnetic resonance angiography of the pediatric abdomen and pelvis: techniques and imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, David M; Vellody, Ranjith; Liu, Peter S

    2013-11-01

    Although traditional catheter-based angiography has been the gold standard for pediatric abdominal and pelvic vascular imaging for the past several decades, advances in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have made it a viable alternative. MRA offers several advantages in that it is noninvasive, can be performed without ionizing radiation, and does not necessarily rely on contrast administration. The ability of modern MRA techniques to define variant vascular anatomy and detect vascular disease may obviate traditional angiography in some patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison between digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance angiography in investigation of nonlacunar ischemic stroke in young patients: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Fregni, Felipe; Puglia, Paulo; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Yamamoto, Fabio Iuji; Coracini, Karen F; Scaff, Milberto

    2006-06-01

    We preliminarily investigated the relevance of performing digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in addition to magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in definition of ischemic stroke etiology in young patients. DSAs and MRAs from 17 young patients with nonlacunar ischemic stroke were blindly analyzed and their impact on stroke management was evaluated. Etiologies were the same considering results of either DSA or MRA in 12/17 cases. In 15/17 patients no changes would have been made in treatment, regardless of the modality of angiography considered. These preliminary results suggest that DSA may be redundant in two thirds of ischemic strokes in young patients. Further larger prospective studies are necessary to determine indications of DSA in this age group.

  1. Magnetic resonance angiography of fetal vasculature at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar; Krishnamurthy, Uday; Jella, Pavan K; Mody, Swati S; Yadav, Brijesh K; Hendershot, Kelly; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Yeo, Lami; Cabrera, Maria D; Haacke, Ewart M; Hassan, Sonia S; Romero, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography has not been used much previously for visualizing fetal vessels in utero for reasons that include a contraindication for the use of exogenous contrast agents, maternal respiratory motion and fetal motion. In this work, we report the feasibility of using an appropriately modified clinical time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging sequence for non-contrast angiography of human fetal and placental vessels at 3.0 T. Using this 2D angiography technique, it is possible to visualize fetal vascular networks in late pregnancy. • 3D-visualization of fetal vasculature is feasible using non-contrast MRA at 3.0 T. • Visualization of placental vasculature is also possible with this method. • Fetal MRA can serve as a vascular localizer for quantitative MRI studies. • This method can be extended to 1.5 T.

  2. An investigation of cerebral magnetic resonance angiography, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Sadanori; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Todo, Hirooki; Sakaki, Saburo.

    1991-01-01

    We have been studying MR angiography using the 0.5 tesla system. Recently we developed three-dimensional MR angiography on the 0.5 tesla system using the gradient-echo technique. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical ability of this newly developed 3-D MR angiography to detect intracranial vascular diseases in comparison with SE or 2-D MR angiography. Twenty-eight patients (15 cerebral aneurysms, 8 arteriovenous malformations, and 5 others) were examined. Three-dimensional MR angiography was performed with TRs of from 60 to 90 msec, TEs of from 16 to 22 msec, flip angls of from 15 to 45 degrees, and a 256x256x16 or 32 matrix. The imaging volumes ranged in thickness from 48 to 64 mm. In our study, a subtraction technique composed of rephased and dephased sequences was applied. As the result of utilizing 0.5 tesla 3-D MR angiography with optimal parameters, good visualization of main cerebral arteries such as second-order branches was obtained. Cerebral aneurysms, AVMs, and arterial occlusions were also well demonstrated, but some of the giant aneurysms were displayed insufficiently for the various flows to be determined. We concluded that 3-D MR angiography on the 0.5 tesla system has the ability to detect intracranial vascular lesions and should be the method for the screening and follow-up of intracranial vascular diseases. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance angiography of cerebral developmental venous anomalies: its role in differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostertun, B.; Solymosi, L.

    1993-01-01

    CT, MRI and contrast angiography of 20 patients with 21 developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), so-called venous angiomas, were compared with magnetic resonance angiography employing a two-dimensional time-of-flight technique (2D-MRA). MRA was diagnostic in 17 DVAs, when both the primary 2D slices and the maximum-intensity-protection images were read. Contrast angiography still provides the best visualization of both DVA components: dilated medullary veins and transcerebral draining vein; however, it is an invasive procedure and delivers no information about brain parenchyma. We regard MRI as necessary in cases with a suspected DVA because of the high rate of association with cavernomas: 33% in this study. Acute neurological symptoms were caused by haemorrhage from an associated cavernoma and not from the DVA in 4 such cases. Thus MRA combined with MRI obviates angiography in most cases and offers a noninvasive diagnostic strategy adequate for DVAs. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and conventional pulmonary angiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudkerk, M; van Beek, EJR; Wielopolski, P; van Ooijen, PMA; Brouwers-Kuyper, EMJ; Bongaerts, AHH; Berghout, A

    2002-01-01

    Background Diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism are complex and consist of non-invasive diagnostic tests done to avoid conventional pulmonary angiography as much as possible. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the circle of Willis: a prospective comparison with conventional angiography in 54 subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrux, B.; Laissy, J.P.; Jouini, S.; Kawiecki, W.; Coty, P.; Thiebot, J.

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively correlated the findings of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with those of transfemoral four-vessel angiography in 54 patients to investigate the direction of flow within the circle of Willis. Our primary goal was to assess the direction of flow using the size of the vessel and signal intensity, without saturation techniques. Analysis of the circle of Willis, especially the communicating arteries, was performed double-blind by two groups of two radiologists. Three types of arteries were identified: high flow or cross-cerebral circulation, patent and nonvisualised arteries. Cerebral angiography was the standard for comparison between the two methods. MRA did not reveal any arteries invisible on angiography, thus providing a specificity of 100%. The sensitivity of MRA was 89.2% for the anterior and 81.3% for the posterior communicating arteries, and 100% for the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. MRA was shown to be a useful technique for the assessment of patency of the circle of Willis. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the circle of Willis: a prospective comparison with conventional angiography in 54 subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrux, B. (Neuroradiology, CHU Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France)); Laissy, J.P. (Neuroradiology, CHU Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France) Dept. of Radiology, CHU Bichat, Paris (France)); Jouini, S. (Neuroradiology, CHU Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France)); Kawiecki, W. (Siemens Medical Systems, Saint-Denis (France)); Coty, P. (Neuroradiology, CHU Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France)); Thiebot, J. (Neuroradiology, CHU Charles Nicolle, Rouen (France))

    1994-04-01

    We prospectively correlated the findings of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with those of transfemoral four-vessel angiography in 54 patients to investigate the direction of flow within the circle of Willis. Our primary goal was to assess the direction of flow using the size of the vessel and signal intensity, without saturation techniques. Analysis of the circle of Willis, especially the communicating arteries, was performed double-blind by two groups of two radiologists. Three types of arteries were identified: high flow or cross-cerebral circulation, patent and nonvisualised arteries. Cerebral angiography was the standard for comparison between the two methods. MRA did not reveal any arteries invisible on angiography, thus providing a specificity of 100%. The sensitivity of MRA was 89.2% for the anterior and 81.3% for the posterior communicating arteries, and 100% for the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. MRA was shown to be a useful technique for the assessment of patency of the circle of Willis. (orig.)

  7. The Role of Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance in STEMI Patients with Normal Coronary Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beganu Elena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the diagnosis of myocardial infarction based on patient symptoms, electrocardiogram (ECG changes, and cardiac enzymes, is not a challenge for cardiologists. The correlation between coronary anatomy and the ECG territories that present ischemic changes can help the clinician to estimate which coronary artery presents lesions upon performing a coronary angiogram. In certain situations, the diagnosis of myocardial infarction can be difficult due to the lack of correlations between the clinical and paraclinical examinations and the coronary angiogram. In some cases, patients with chest pain and ST-segment elevation on the ECG tracing present with a normal coronary angiography. In other cases, patients without important changes on the ECG can present critical lesions or even occlusions upon angiographic examination. The aim of this article is to highlight the role of noninvasive coronary magnetic resonance and multi-slice computed tomography in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and normal coronary angiography.

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Angiography for the Prerupture Diagnosis of Rudimentary Uterine Horn Pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeren, S.; Caliskan, E.; Corakci, A.; Ozkan, S.; Demirci, A. [Kocaeli Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli (Turkey). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR angiography were used for the differential diagnosis and preoperative planning of a 17 weeks of age rudimentary horn pregnancy. A 26-year-old primigravida was referred to our hospital with a preliminary diagnosis of abdominal pregnancy. After an inconclusive ultrasound evaluation we were able to identify a rudimentary horn pregnancy, extent of the placental invasion, and the vascular supply via MR imaging and time of flight sequence MR angiography. The obtained data were also used for preoperative planning, which resulted in an uncomplicated, prerupture laparotomy for pregnancy termination and a healthy female.

  10. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-10-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors.

  11. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of persistent fifth aortic arch in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yumin; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Jaffe, Richard B.; Gao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Cine angiography and echocardiography have been utilized to diagnose congenital aortic arch anomalies. However, the visualization of great vessels by echocardiography is limited, while cine angiography requires cardiac catheterization with ionizing radiation. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive modality suitable for visualization of congenital aortic arch anomalies. To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch, a rare congenital aortic arch anomaly, and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRA with that of echocardiography and cine angiography. In four pediatric patients, contrast-enhanced MRA studies were performed for diagnosing persistent fifth aortic arch. The findings of MRA were compared with echocardiographic findings and confirmed by cine angiography and operation. Transthoracic surface echocardiography noted an aberrant vessel arising from the ascending aorta in two of four patients; the etiology of this vessel was uncertain. In the other two patients a diagnosis of coarctation was made. Of the four patients, only one was diagnosed with interruption of the aortic arch. Contrast-enhanced MRA clarified uncertain echocardiographic findings, enabling the correct diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch with fourth aortic arch interruption in all four patients. Contrast-enhanced MRA is a safe, accurate, and fast imaging technique for the evaluation of persistent fifth aortic arch and may obviate the need for conventional cine angiography. Cardiac catheterization may be reserved for some types of complicated congenital heart disease and for obtaining hemodynamic information. (orig.)

  12. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  13. Gas enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the cerebrum using carbon dioxide and oxygen - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Ohlhues, Anders

    Purpose/introduction Standard imaging of the cerebral arteries is performed using intravenous contrast in CT angiography and x-ray angiography. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the cerebral arteries using intravenous contrast media does not perform well. Contrast in the venous bed...... and Methods Two healthy volunteers were scanned during inhalation of three different gas mixtures: Gas I (air), Gas II (5% CO2, 21 % O2, 74 % N2), Gas III (5% CO2, 95% O2). For each gas mixture a time of flight (TOF) series on the cerebral arteries was performed. Following each TOF series an ECG-gated phase...... contrast sequence was performed to calculate volume flow in the common carotid arteries. MRA data was acquired with a 1.5 T Siemens VISION MR-system (SIEMENS Medical Systems, Germany) using a standard circularly polarized head coil. Reconstructed images of TOF series and volume flow measurements were...

  14. Comparison of digital subtraction angiography with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, J.; O'Callaghan, J.; Varghese, J.C.; Lee, M.J.; Walshe, J.; O'Brien, E.

    1999-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a treatable cause of hypertension and renal failure for which no ideal screening technique is currently available. We evaluated the use of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of RAS. Sixty-two patients with secondary hypertension were enrolled in the study. All patients had conventional renal angiography and gadolinium enhanced MRA. The sequence used was a 3D FMP SPGR sequence with the following parameters (TR: 26 ms, TE: 6.9 ms, flip angle 40 , field of view 36 x 36 cm, matrix 246 x 256, 1 excitation). Gadolinium 0.3 mmol/kg was administered and 60 1.5-mm-thick partitions were obtained over a duration of 3.5 min. The MRA images were then compared with conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. Conventional DSA demonstrated 138 renal arteries, whereas gadolinium-enhanced MRA demonstrated 129 (93 %). Twenty-one renal artery stenoses and four occluded arteries were seen at conventional DSA. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA had a sensitivity of 88 %, specificity of 98 %, accuracy of 96 %, positive predictive value of 92 % and negative predictive value of 97 % when compared with conventional DSA. Gadolinium-enhanced MRA is an accurate technique for identifying patients with RAS. It is less sensitive in picking up accessory renal arteries. (orig.)

  15. Symptomatic middle cerebral artery stenosis and occlusion. Comparison of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography with conventional angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Motoshi; Yano, Hirohito; Shinoda, Jun; Funakoshi, Takashi [Daiyukai General Hospital, Ichinomiya, Aichi (Japan); Kumagai, Morio

    1994-10-01

    The usefulness of magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using the three-dimensional time-of-flight method for the characterization of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusive lesions was evaluated in 10 patients with MCA occlusion and 10 with MCA stenosis. All lesions were symptomatic and documented by conventional angiography. There was no false-negative MR angiogram that failed to demonstrate the MCA occlusive lesion. MR angiography correctly evaluated the location of lesions and the difference between stenosis and occlusion. Stenosis appeared as a focal signal loss (<1.0cm) of the MCA at the site of stenosis, and occlusion as a complete signal loss of the MCA distal to the site of occlusion. However, MR angiography could not distinguish diffuse stenosis and one point stenosis demonstrated by conventional angiography. MR angiography is a useful noninvasive diagnostic method for evaluating occlusive lesions of the MCA in symptomatic patients. (author).

  16. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  17. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography of vascular lesions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, H; Shimizu, T; Tanaka, Y; Narabayashi, I; Tamai, H

    2000-01-01

    We applied three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography to vascular lesions in children and evaluated the clinical usefulness of this technique. Ten patients, whose ages ranged from 1 month to 16 years, underwent 3D MR angiography for 12 vascular lesions, including lesions in seven pulmonary arteries, two thoracic aortae, a pair of renal arteries, and one iliac artery. Three-dimensional MR angiography was performed with body-or pelvic-phased array coils on a 1.5-T scanner using fast spoiled gradient echo sequence. Data were acquired with the following parameters: TE, 1.9 ms; TR, 10.1 ms; flip angle, 20-60 degrees ; 1 or 2 NEX; field of view, 24-48 x 18-40 cm; matrix, 256 or 512 x 128 or 256; slice thickness, 1.2-7.5 mm; and 12, 28, or 60 partitions. Vascular imaging was enhanced with 20% gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The examination was performed under breath-holding in six patients and with shallow breathing in four patients. In a comparative study with other noninvasive methods, 3D MR angiography was superior in seven of nine cases to other noninvasive examinations and in two cases, all methods evaluated the lesions. Furthermore, six cases were compared with conventional angiography. In five of the six cases, both methods depicted the lesions similarly, and in one case, MR angiography was more effective. A quantitative comparison of vascular diameter in the MR image was made with that in the conventional angiographic image. The correlation between them was excellent: y = 1.145x-2.090 (r = 0.987; P children.

  18. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Nakiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. INTRODUCTION: Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. METHODS: Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1. Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1 and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1. Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%, which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between

  19. Magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography of persistent primitive olfactory artery: Incidence and association rate with aneurysm in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Bo Ra; Yeo, Soo Hyun; Chang, Hyuk Won; Kim, Mi Jeong; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Ealmaan; Kim, Mi Kyung; Cho, Ho Chan; Kim, Hye Soon [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Japanese data indicates an incidence of persistent primitive olfactory artery (PPOA) of 0.14%. We studied the incidence of PPOA and associated cerebral vascular variation or anomalies in Korea. We retrospectively reviewed cranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of a total of 9841 patients of our institution. The diagnostic criterion of PPOA is extreme anterioinferior course of the proximal anterior cerebral artery, with a hairpin turn of the lateral projection. We found 29 cases (0.29%) with PPOA. The PPOA location was on the left in 19 cases, bilateral in 3 cases, and on the right in 7 cases. An aneurysm was found at the hairpin turn in 2 patients. There were aneurysms in other sites in 3 cases. There were hypoplasia of anterior cerebral artery in 3 cases, and fenestration of intracranial artery in 1 case. In Korean populations, the incidence of PPOA found in MRA and CTA was twice as high as that shown in the previous Japanese data. Within Korea, left side laterality is more common than right side or bilalterality. Aneurysmal dilatations at the hairpin turning point and aneurysms at other sites were found, and other vascular variations were observed in several cases.

  20. High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance angiography: a feasibility study on biological and medical tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel Lene WT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In biomedical sciences, ex vivo angiography is a practical mean to elucidate vascular structures three-dimensionally with simultaneous estimation of intravascular volume. The objectives of this study were to develop a magnetic resonance (MR method for ex vivo angiography and to compare the findings with computed tomography (CT. To demonstrate the usefulness of this method, examples are provided from four different tissues and species: the human placenta, a rice field eel, a porcine heart and a turtle. Results The optimal solution for ex vivo MR angiography (MRA was a compound containing gelatine (0.05 g/mL, the CT contrast agent barium sulphate (0.43 mol/L and the MR contrast agent gadoteric acid (2.5 mmol/L. It was possible to perform angiography on all specimens. We found that ex vivo MRA could only be performed on fresh tissue because formalin fixation makes the blood vessels permeable to the MR contrast agent. Conclusions Ex vivo MRA provides high-resolution images of fresh tissue and delineates fine structures that we were unable to visualise by CT. We found that MRA provided detailed information similar to or better than conventional CTA in its ability to visualize vessel configuration while avoiding interfering signals from adjacent bones. Interestingly, we found that vascular tissue becomes leaky when formalin-fixed, leading to increased permeability and extravascular leakage of MR contrast agent.

  1. Diagnostic role of magnetic resonance angiography in Swyer James syndrome: Case series of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parashari Umesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Swyer James syndrome is a rare syndrome which occurs due to viral illness in early childhood. The post infective obliterative bronchiolitis results in arrest of lung growth and alveolarization with reduced vascularity resulting in classical radiological features. We describe two cases of patients fulfilling all the criteria of the syndrome - 1 Unilateral hyperlucent small lung in chest radiograph with air trapping on expiration, small ipsilateral hila and pulmonary artery. 2 Diffuse decrease in attenuation of lung parenchyma with bronchiectasis and reduction in vascularity. 3 Unilateral pruned tree appearance on angiography (MRA. The clinical presentation was recurrent chest infection in a child and infrequent bouts of hemoptysis in a middle aged female. The study demonstrates the role of magnetic resonance angiography in diagnosing the condition.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography of the brain in embolic left atrial myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marazuela, M.; Yebra, M.; Diego, J.; Durantez, A.; Garcia-Merino, A.; Brasa, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A case of left atrial myxoma presenting exclusively with neurological symptoms, studies with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with cerebral angiography and computed tomography (CT) is reported. Typical angiographic findings suggested the diagnosis of myxoma. MRI showed multiple ischemic lesions disseminated throughout the entire brain, some of which had been clinically asymptomatic. Because of its sensitivity in identifying small cerebral infarcts, MRI should prove in the future to be a first-choice technique in the evaluation of the presence of an extent of cerebral involvement in embolic left atrial myxoma. (orig.)

  3. Duplicate origin of the posterior communicating artery diagnosed by magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Akira; Kamiya, Kouhei; Suzuki, Chihiro

    2013-10-01

    Extremely rarely, a posterior communicating artery (PCoA) of "duplicate origin" occurs when two branches of the PCoA arise separately from the supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and quickly fuse to form an arterial ring. Three such cases previously reported were described as "fenestration." We report the case of this rare variation diagnosed by magnetic resonance angiography and discuss the differentiation of PCoA of duplicate origin from PCoA fenestration, supraclinoid ICA fenestration, and hyperplastic anterior choroidal artery.

  4. Technical requirements, biophysical considerations and protocol optimization with magnetic resonance angiography using blood-pool agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, M.; Geerts-Ossevoort, L.; Laub, G.

    2007-01-01

    In order to maximize the potential benefits of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, careful attention must be paid to the choice of hardware, data acquisition and processing, and to the choice of contrast agent. Typically, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography uses parallel-imaging techniques, which shorten the acquisition time, enhance spatial resolution and reduce artefacts. The timing of data acquisition is crucial for maximal enhancement of the arteries: for optimal arterial depiction, the centre of k-space should be acquired at the time of peak concentration of contrast agent in the arterial bed being investigated, and a number of k-space acquisition techniques are available to achieve this. SENSE or GRAPPA techniques can be used to facilitate parallel-imaging reconstruction of either the image data or k-space data, respectively. Gadolinium contrast agents shorten the proton relaxation times (most importantly T1) of blood, thereby increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and enhancing differentiation between blood vessels and other tissues. The blood-pool (intravascular) contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is reversibly protein-bound in human plasma. This results in a marked increase in relaxivity, and hence a strong T1 shortening effect compared with other gadolinium-based contrast agents. Furthermore, the blood retention time of gadofosveset trisodium is substantially prolonged compared with conventional contrast agents. As a result, gadofosveset trisodium permits both first-pass and steady-state imaging. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography in infrapopliteal arterial disease: prospective comparison of 1.5 and 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehm, Nicolas; Kickuth, Ralph; Baumgartner, Iris; Srivastav, Sudesh K; Gretener, Silvia; Husmann, Marc J; Jaccard, Yves; Do, Do Dai; Triller, Juergen; Bonel, Harald M

    2007-06-01

    To prospectively determine the accuracy of 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3 T magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) versus digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the depiction of infrageniculate arteries in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. A prospective 1.5 T, 3 T MRA, and DSA comparison was used to evaluate 360 vessel segments in 10 patients (15 limbs) with chronic symptomatic peripheral arterial disease. Selective DSA was performed within 30 days before both MRAs. The accuracy of 1.5 T and 3 T MRA was compared with DSA as the standard of reference by consensus agreement of 2 experienced readers. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs) were quantified. No significant difference in overall image quality, sufficiency for diagnosis, depiction of arterial anatomy, motion artifacts, and venous overlap was found comparing 1.5 T with 3 T MRA (P > 0.05 by Wilcoxon signed rank and as by Cohen k test). Overall sensitivity of 1.5 and 3 T MRA for detection of significant arterial stenosis was 79% and 82%, and specificity was 87% and 87% for both modalities, respectively. Interobserver agreement was excellent k > 0.8, P < 0.05) for 1.5 T as well as for 3 T MRA. SNR and SDNR were significantly increased using the 3 T system (average increase: 36.5%, P < 0.032 by t test, and 38.5%, P < 0.037 respectively). Despite marked improvement of SDNR, 3 T MRA does not yet provide a significantly higher accuracy in diagnostic imaging of atherosclerotic lesions below the knee joint as compared with 1.5 T MRA.

  6. Can carotid stenosis be operated without arteriography? Contribution of magnetic resonance and helical computerized tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffrau-Calvier, E.; Kersaint-Gilly, A. de; Desal, H.A.; Viarouge, M.P.; Havet, T.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to ascertain the role of the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and to compare it with the Doppler effect, the X-ray angiography and the new method of helical computerized tomography. Seventy one carotid bifurcations in 37 patients with suspected cerebral vascular events has been evaluated with the MRA and digitalized angiography, the reference method. The obtained data corroborate the good results proposed by other authors reporting in the literature and allow to propose this examination as a new means of investigating carotid bifurcations. Work with the helical computerized tomography appears to be promising too but there are few reported series. Therefore, there appears to be two interesting points: the reliability of distinguishing between very severe stenosis and occlusion, and the fine-tuned analysis of the plaque with detection of ulcerations. When a consistent approach is used to the evaluation of the carotid bifurcation, the Willis circle and the cerebral parenchyma, the MRA can complete the Doppler echo data and the preoperative arteriography can only be used in patients when the MRA and the Doppler echo results disagree. (authors)

  7. The efficiency of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the diagnosis vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Ura, Masaharu; Ganaha, Akira; Yasuda, Shinobu; Noda, Yutaka

    2000-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) is found in many cases of vertigo in patients who visit otolaryngology clinics. But its symptoms tend to be transitory, and since objective findings cannot be obtained at the first examination it is difficult to diagnose. As a result, it is tentatively diagnosed based only on the past history or the outcome of an equilibrium test. It is useful to diagnose circulation insufficiency, the stenotic position or the degree of the vessels based on the angiography findings. However, an operation is dangerous and overly invasive and therefore surgery is often not performed in many cases. We performed magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and found it to be easy to perform, safe, it required a short examination time and was not invasive. A total of 12 cases suspected to have VBI based on the findings of an equilibrium test, MRA was performed. We could identify the stenotic or obstructive position of the vessels in the vertebrobasilar system in six of the cases. In conclusion, MRA was found to have many advantages over angiography and thus was considered to be useful in making a definite diagnosis of VBI. (author)

  8. The efficiency of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the diagnosis vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Ura, Masaharu; Ganaha, Akira; Yasuda, Shinobu; Noda, Yutaka [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2000-09-01

    Vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) is found in many cases of vertigo in patients who visit otolaryngology clinics. But its symptoms tend to be transitory, and since objective findings cannot be obtained at the first examination it is difficult to diagnose. As a result, it is tentatively diagnosed based only on the past history or the outcome of an equilibrium test. It is useful to diagnose circulation insufficiency, the stenotic position or the degree of the vessels based on the angiography findings. However, an operation is dangerous and overly invasive and therefore surgery is often not performed in many cases. We performed magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and found it to be easy to perform, safe, it required a short examination time and was not invasive. A total of 12 cases suspected to have VBI based on the findings of an equilibrium test, MRA was performed. We could identify the stenotic or obstructive position of the vessels in the vertebrobasilar system in six of the cases. In conclusion, MRA was found to have many advantages over angiography and thus was considered to be useful in making a definite diagnosis of VBI. (author)

  9. Comparison of gadofosveset-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography with digital subtraction angiography for lower-extremity peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grijalba, Fermin Urtasun; Esandi, Mercedes Ciriza

    2010-01-01

    Background: Minimally invasive imaging techniques are increasingly used for clinical decision making in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Purpose: To assess whether gadofosveset-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography could replace digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the evaluation of lower-extremity PAOD. Material and Methods: Thirty patients with symptomatic PAOD underwent prospectively both MR angiography and DSA. Gadofosveset-enhanced 3D MR angiography was performed on a 1.5T system equipped with a peripheral angio matrix coil. Four blinded observers independently analyzed MR angiograms and DSA images. The lower arterial vascular system was divided into three anatomic segments (aortoiliac, femoropopliteal, infrapopliteal) for review. The status of each segment was graded as normal, stenosis less than 50%, stenosis greater than 50%, or occluded and/or aneurismatic. Principal and secondary lesions were reported. Results: Although interobserver agreement for both was excellent, it was higher for DSA (?=0.92) than for MR angiography (?=0.86) for reporting the principal and secondary lesions in all segments. For different anatomic locations, the interobserver agreement of MR angiography and DSA was as follows: aortoiliac (?=0.93, k=0.95), femoropopliteal (?=0.86, k=0.90), and infrapopliteal (?=0.78, k=0.85). The lowest agreement was found for MR angiography on infrapopliteal segments (?=0.78). In four (13.3%) cases, MR angiography showed lesions that were not found by DSA. Five (16.6%) aneurysm cases, not observed by DSA, were shown by MR angiography. Conclusion: Gadofosveset-enhanced 3D MR angiography can be proposed for first-line imaging in the management of lower-limb PAOD patients and permits the selective use of DSA as a second-line examination when MR angiography fails or in an endovascular approach

  10. Blood Pool Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Correlation to Digital Subtraction Angiography: A Pictorial Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha-Grace Knuttinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA provides noninvasive visualization of the vascular supply of soft tissue masses and vascular pathology, without harmful radiation. This is important for planning an endovascular intervention, and helps to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the treatment. MRA with conventional extracellular contrast agents relies on accurate contrast bolus timing, limiting the imaging window to first-pass arterial phase. The recently introduced blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium, reversibly binds to human serum albumin, resulting in increased T1 relaxivity and prolonged intravascular retention time, permitting both first-pass and steady-state phase high-resolution imaging. In our practice, high-quality MRA serves as a detailed "roadmap" for the needed endovascular intervention. Cases of aortoiliac occlusive disease, inferior vena cava thrombus, pelvic congestion syndrome, and lower extremity arteriovenous malformation are discussed in this article. MRA was acquired at 1.5 T with an 8-channel phased array coil after intravenous administration of gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg body weight, at the first-pass phase. In the steady-state, serial T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient echo images were obtained with high resolution. All patients underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA and endovascular treatment. MRA and DSA findings of vascular anatomy and pathology are discussed and correlated. BPCA-enhanced MRA provides high-quality first-pass and steady-state vascular imaging. This could increase the diagnostic accuracy and create a detailed map for pre-intervention planning. Understanding the pharmacokinetics of BPCA and being familiar with the indications and technique of MRA are important for diagnosis and endovascular intervention.

  11. Algorithms for the Analysis of 3D Magnetic Resonance Angiography Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tizon, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of the arterial wall, progressively impairing blood flow as it spreads throughout the body. The heart attacks and strokes that result of this condition cause more deaths than cancer in industrial countries. Angiography refers to the group of imaging techniques used through the diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of atherosclerosis. In recent years, Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) has shown promising abilities to supplant conventional, invasive, X-ray-based angiography. In order to fully benefit from this modality, there is a need for more objective and reproducible methods. This thesis shows, in two applications, how computerized image analysis can help define and implement these methods. First, by using segmentation to improve visualization of blood-pool contrast enhanced (CE)-MRA, with an additional application in coronary Computerized Tomographic Angiography. We show that, using a limited amount of user interaction and an algorithmic framework borrowed from graph theory and fuzzy logic theory, we can simplify the display of complex 3D structures like vessels. Second, by proposing a methodology to analyze the geometry of arteries in whole-body CE-MRA. The vessel centreline is extracted, and geometrical properties of this 3D curve are measured, to improve interpretation of the angiograms. It represents a more global approach than the conventional evaluation of atherosclerosis, as a first step towards screening for vascular diseases. We have developed the methods presented in this thesis with clinical practice in mind. However, they have the potential to be useful to other applications of computerized image analysis

  12. Measurement precision and biological variation of cranial arteries using automated analysis of 3 T magnetic resonance angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Lundholm, Elisabet; Hougaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has facilitated repeated measurements of human cranial arteries in several headache and migraine studies. To ensure comparability across studies the same automated analysis software has been used, but the intra- and interobserver, day-...

  13. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography at 3 tesla using a hybrid protocol in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Eiberg, Jonas P; Logager, Vibeke B

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3T whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) using a hybrid protocol in comparison with a standard protocol in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). In 26 consecutive patients with PAD two different proto...

  14. Usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography in diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuga, Takayuki; Akiyama, Norio; Takenaka, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Kentaro; Zempo, Noriya; Esato, Kensuke

    1992-01-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was evaluated in 19 patients with peripheral vascular disease. It takes thirty minutes or less to perform this test, without any complications. The percent of correct diagnosis on obstructive and stenotic region was 75% in cases of deep vein thrombosis. In addition, it was easy to diagnose an existence of a graft patent. However, it was unsatisfactory to understand morphologic changes of an iliac artery and to determine the position of grafting. The position and size of dilatation and existence of thrombus were easily evaluated in patients with venous aneurysm and varicose vein. MRA was a non-invasive, short spending time imaging. It was available for pregnant women and people with drug allergy, heart failure or renal failure. We believe that MRA can be used in the preoperative examination and the evaluation of the postoperative complications in the peripheral vascular diseases. (J.P.N.)

  15. Clinical role of non-contrast magnetic resonance angiography for evaluation of renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nomitsu, Yohei; Komeda, Yosuke; Okigawa, Takashi; Urata, Joji; Miyazaki, Mitsue; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    The association between a gadolinium-based contrast material and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis has been discussed. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) might provide sufficient information of renal artery stenosis. The non-contrast MRA of 26 patients with hypertension was retrospectively reviewed in the present study. The significant renal artery stenosis was visually evaluated by comparing non-contrast MRA with computed tomography or conventional angiographic finding. Difference of the intensities between the proximal and distal aorta was quantitatively evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of non-contrast MRA in the evaluation of the renal artery stenosis was 78%, 91%, 64% and 96%, respectively. The distal abdominal aorta showed less signal intensity than the proximal aorta by 16.9±12.2%. Non-contrast MRA is a non-invasive and effective method that allows evaluation of the renal artery stenosis. (author)

  16. Hemodynamic Change in Pulmonary Vein Stenosis after Radiofrequency Ablation: Assessment with Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Doyoung; Jung, Jung Im; Oh, Yong Seog; Youn, Ho Joong [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    We present a case of pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis after radio-frequency (RF) ablation, in which a hemodynamic change in the pulmonary artery was similar to that of congenital PV atresia on time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (TR-MRA). A 48-year-old man underwent RF ablation due to atrial fibrillation. The patient subsequently complained of hemoptysis, dyspnea on exertion, and right chest pain. Right PV stenosis after catheter ablation was diagnosed through chest computed tomography and lung perfusion scan. Pulmonary TR-MRA revealed the pulmonary artery via systemic arterial collaterals and draining systemic collateral veins. On a velocity-encoded cine image, the flow direction of the right pulmonary artery was reversed in the diastolic phase and the left pulmonary artery demonstrated continuous forward flow throughout the cardiac cycle. These hemodynamic changes were similar to those seen in congenital unilateral PV atresia.

  17. Usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography in diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuga, Takayuki; Akiyama, Norio; Takenaka, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Kentaro; Zempo, Noriya; Esato, Kensuke (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-03-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was evaluated in 19 patients with peripheral vascular disease. It takes thirty minutes or less to perform this test, without any complications. The percent of correct diagnosis on obstructive and stenotic region was 75% in cases of deep vein thrombosis. In addition, it was easy to diagnose an existence of a graft patent. However, it was unsatisfactory to understand morphologic changes of an iliac artery and to determine the position of grafting. The position and size of dilatation and existence of thrombus were easily evaluated in patients with venous aneurysm and varicose vein. MRA was a non-invasive, short spending time imaging. It was available for pregnant women and people with drug allergy, heart failure or renal failure. We believe that MRA can be used in the preoperative examination and the evaluation of the postoperative complications in the peripheral vascular diseases. (J.P.N.).

  18. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography of patients using a standard clinical scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Tomas; Wikstroem, Johan; Eriksson, Mats-Ola; Lundberg, Anders; Ahlstroem, Haakan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Lars [Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Ljungman, Christer [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden); Hoogeven, Romhild [Philips Medical Systems, MR Clinical Science, Best (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technique of whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of patients with a standard clinical scanner. Thirty-three patients referred for stenoses, occlusions, aneurysms, assessment of patency of vascular grafts, vasculitis and vascular aplasia were examined in a 1.5-T scanner using its standard body coil. Three-dimensional sequences were acquired in four stations after administration of one intravenous injection of 40 ml conventional gadolinium contrast agent. Different vessel segments were evaluated as either diagnostic or nondiagnostic and regarding the presence of stenoses with more than 50% diameter reduction, occlusions or aneurysms. Of 923 vessel segments, 67 were not evaluable because of poor contrast filling (n=31), motion artefacts (n=20), venous overlap (n=12) and other reasons (n=4). Stenoses of more than 50%, occlusions or aneurysms were observed in 26 patients (129 segments). In nine patients additional unsuspected pathology was found. In 10 out of 14 patients (71/79 segments) there was conformity between MRA and digital subtraction angiography regarding the grade of stenosis. This study shows that whole-body MRA with a standard clinical scanner is feasible. Motion artefacts and the timing of the contrast agent through the different segments are still problems to be solved. (orig.)

  19. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, S. Bruce; Bhutta, Sadaf T.; Buchmann, Robert F. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)is a well-established technique in older children and adults. No studies have focused on its use in neonates and small infants. Our objective was to study the use of gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis. Materials and Methods:Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography was performed on seven neonates and small infants for the evaluation of caval or aortic thrombosis. Gadolinium-DTPA at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg (minimum dose 1 ml) was injected using a power injector (0.2 ml/s). Contrast-enhanced MRA was performed using a 3-D, fast, radiofrequency spoiled gradient-echo sequence (TR/TE: 4.8/1.1, flip angle 45 , matrix 256 x 128, slice thickness 2.6 mm interpolated to 1.3 mm, FOV variable, NEX=1.0). Diagnostic-quality angiograms were obtained in all seven neonates. Superior vena cava thrombosis was identified in two neonates, and abdominal aortic thrombosis was present in one neonate. It is practical to perform gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates weighing as little as 600 g for the detection of caval or aortic thrombosis. (orig.)

  20. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, H.; Morana, G.

    2007-01-01

    Although often asymptomatic, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with significant morbidity in a large proportion of patients. Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology in many instances, involving the whole arterial tree. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) permits rapid, non-invasive and accurate evaluation of the entire vascular system and can be used for both diagnostic purposes and monitoring of vascular involvement in diseases such as diabetes, Marfan's syndrome and Takayasu arteritis. MRA has been used successfully in the identification of high-grade stenosis in PAD, abnormalities of the ileocaval veins and carotid plaque imaging. Carotid disease is significantly correlated with severe coronary artery disease and renal artery atherosclerosis. Symptomatic lesions in one vascular bed are often related to additional asymptomatic atherosclerotic lesions in other vascular regions. MRA may be advantageous over computed tomographic angiography because it can be performed with contrast media virtually devoid of serious toxicity and without utilization of ionizing radiation. Display of the entire arterial vasculature can be achieved in < 90 s, with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Recent technological advances, such as parallel imaging and the implementation of dedicated matrix coils, have further increased image quality, and in combination with the blood-pool contrast agents, such as gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany), extended imaging time, higher spatial resolution and larger anatomical coverage can be achieved. (orig.)

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, S. Bruce; Bhutta, Sadaf T.; Buchmann, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)is a well-established technique in older children and adults. No studies have focused on its use in neonates and small infants. Our objective was to study the use of gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates and infants suspected of caval or aortic thrombosis. Materials and Methods:Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography was performed on seven neonates and small infants for the evaluation of caval or aortic thrombosis. Gadolinium-DTPA at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg (minimum dose 1 ml) was injected using a power injector (0.2 ml/s). Contrast-enhanced MRA was performed using a 3-D, fast, radiofrequency spoiled gradient-echo sequence (TR/TE: 4.8/1.1, flip angle 45 , matrix 256 x 128, slice thickness 2.6 mm interpolated to 1.3 mm, FOV variable, NEX=1.0). Diagnostic-quality angiograms were obtained in all seven neonates. Superior vena cava thrombosis was identified in two neonates, and abdominal aortic thrombosis was present in one neonate. It is practical to perform gadolinium-enhanced MRA in neonates weighing as little as 600 g for the detection of caval or aortic thrombosis. (orig.)

  2. Renal artery and parenchymal changes after renal denervation: assessment by magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Margreet F.; Vink, Eva E.; Blankestijn, Peter J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Doormaal, Pieter Jan van; Habets, Jesse; Vonken, Evert-Jan; Leiner, Tim [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Beeftink, Martine M.A.; Verloop, Willemien L.; Voskuil, Michiel [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bots, Michiel L. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula M. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine and Department of Cardiology, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway); Hammer, Frank [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Hoffmann, Pavel [Oslo University Hospital, Section for Interventional Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Ullevaal, Oslo (Norway); Jacobs, Lotte; Staessen, Jan A. [University of Leuven, Studies Coordinating Centre, Research Unit Hypertension and Cardiovascular Epidemiology, KU Leuven Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leuven (Belgium); Mark, Patrick B.; Taylor, Alison H. [University of Glasgow, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Persu, Alexandre; Renkin, Jean [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Pole of Cardiovascular Research, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique, Brussels (Belgium); Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cardiology Department, Brussels (Belgium); Roditi, Giles [Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Spiering, Wilko [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Vascular Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the European Network COordinating research on Renal Denervation (ENCOReD) Consortium

    2017-09-15

    Relatively little is known about the incidence of long-term renal damage after renal denervation (RDN), a potential new treatment for hypertension. In this study the incidence of renal artery and parenchymal changes, assessed with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) after RDN, is investigated. This study is an initiative of ENCOReD, a collaboration of hypertension expert centres. Patients in whom an MRA was performed before and after RDN were included. Scans were evaluated by two independent, blinded radiologists. Primary outcome was the change in renal artery morphology and parenchyma. MRAs from 96 patients were analysed. Before RDN, 41 renal anomalies were observed, of which 29 mostly mild renal artery stenoses. After a median time of 366 days post RDN, MRA showed a new stenosis (25-49% lumen reduction) in two patients and progression of pre-existing lumen reduction in a single patient. No other renal changes were observed and renal function remained stable. We observed new or progressed renal artery stenosis in three out of 96 patients, after a median time of 12 months post RDN (3.1%). Procedural angiographies showed that ablations were applied near the observed stenosis in only one of the three patients. (orig.)

  3. Three-dimensional dynamic magnetic resonance angiography for the evaluation of radiosurgically treated cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Oppenheim, Catherine; Naggara, Olivier; Trystram, Denis; Fredy, Daniel; Meder, Jean-Francois; Nataf, Francois; Roux, Francois-Xavier; Munier, Thierry; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the value of three-dimensional (3D) dynamic magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the follow-up of patients with radiosurgically treated cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Fifty-four patients with cerebral AVMs treated by radiosurgery (RS) were monitored using conventional catheter angiography (CCA) and 3D dynamic MRA with sensitivity encoding based on the parallel imaging. Cerebral AVM was qualitatively classified by two radiologists into one of five categories in terms of residual nidus size and persistence of early draining vein (I, >6 cm; II, 3-6 cm; III, <3 cm; IV, isolated early draining vein; V, complete obliteration). 3D MRA findings showed a good agreement with CCA in 40 cases (κ=0.62). Of 23 nidus detected on CCA, 3D dynamic MRA showed 14 residual nidus. Of 28 occluded nidus on 3D dynamic MRA, 22 nidus were occluded on CCA. The sensitivity and specificity of 3D dynamic MRA for the detection of residual AVM were 81% and 100%. 3D dynamic MRA after RS may therefore be useful in association with MRI and can be repeated as long as opacification of the nidus or early venous drainage persists, one CCA remaining indispensable to affirm the complete occlusion at the end of follow-up. (orig.)

  4. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, H. [Inst. for Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital Munich, Munich (Germany); Morana, G. [Radiological Dept., Hospital Ca' Foncello, Treviso (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    Although often asymptomatic, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with significant morbidity in a large proportion of patients. Atherosclerosis is the underlying pathology in many instances, involving the whole arterial tree. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) permits rapid, non-invasive and accurate evaluation of the entire vascular system and can be used for both diagnostic purposes and monitoring of vascular involvement in diseases such as diabetes, Marfan's syndrome and Takayasu arteritis. MRA has been used successfully in the identification of high-grade stenosis in PAD, abnormalities of the ileocaval veins and carotid plaque imaging. Carotid disease is significantly correlated with severe coronary artery disease and renal artery atherosclerosis. Symptomatic lesions in one vascular bed are often related to additional asymptomatic atherosclerotic lesions in other vascular regions. MRA may be advantageous over computed tomographic angiography because it can be performed with contrast media virtually devoid of serious toxicity and without utilization of ionizing radiation. Display of the entire arterial vasculature can be achieved in < 90 s, with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Recent technological advances, such as parallel imaging and the implementation of dedicated matrix coils, have further increased image quality, and in combination with the blood-pool contrast agents, such as gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany), extended imaging time, higher spatial resolution and larger anatomical coverage can be achieved. (orig.)

  5. The optimization of scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Chang, Yong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Tirman, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the optimal scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and to evaluate a new timing method based on the arteriovenous circulation time. Eighty-nine contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiographic examinations were performed mainly in the extremities. A 1.5T scanner with a 3-D turbo-FLASH sequence was used, and during each study, two consecutive arterial phases and one venous phase were acquired. Scan delay time was calculated from the time-intensity curve by the traditional (n = 48) and/or the new (n = 41) method. This latter was based on arteriovenous circulation time rather than peak arterial enhancement time, as used in the traditional method. The numbers of first-phase images showing a properly enhanced arterial phase were compared between the two methods. Mean scan delay time was 5.4 sec longer with the new method than with the traditional. Properly enhanced first-phase images were found in 65% of cases (31/48) using the traditional timing method, and 95% (39/41) using the new method. When cases in which there was mismatch between the target vessel and the Time-intensity curve acquisition site are excluded, erroneous acquisition occurred in seven cases with the traditional method, but in none with the new method. The calculation of scan delay time on the basis of arteriovenous circulation time provides better timing for arterial phase acquisition than the traditional method

  6. Ferumoxytol-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the assessment of potential kidney transplant recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoumpos, Sokratis; Mark, Patrick B. [Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Renal and Transplant Unit, Glasgow (United Kingdom); University of Glasgow, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hennessy, Martin; Kasthuri, Ram; Roditi, Giles [Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vesey, Alex T.; Kingsmore, David B. [Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Renal and Transplant Unit, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Radjenovic, Aleksandra [University of Glasgow, Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2018-01-15

    Traditional contrast-enhanced methods for scanning blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT carry potential risks for patients with advanced kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle preparation that has potential as an MRI contrast agent in assessing the vasculature. Twenty patients with advanced kidney disease requiring aorto-iliac vascular imaging as part of pre-operative kidney transplant candidacy assessment underwent ferumoxytol-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (FeMRA) between December 2015 and August 2016. All scans were performed for clinical indications where standard imaging techniques were deemed potentially harmful or inconclusive. Image quality was evaluated for both arterial and venous compartments. First-pass and steady-state FeMRA using incremental doses of up to 4 mg/kg body weight of ferumoxytol as intravenous contrast agent for vascular enhancement was performed. Good arterial and venous enhancements were achieved, and FeMRA was not limited by calcification in assessing the arterial lumen. The scans were diagnostic and all patients completed their studies without adverse events. Our preliminary experience supports the feasibility and utility of FeMRA for vascular imaging in patients with advanced kidney disease due for transplant listing, which has the advantages of obtaining both arteriography and venography using a single test without nephrotoxicity. (orig.)

  7. Optimization of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography of the intracranial arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Kuniaki; Honmou, Osamu; Odawara, Yoshihiro; Bando, Michio; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2006-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio obtained from arteries in three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance (MR) angiography is often too low to allow clinical diagnosis because the radiofrequency pulse decreases the magnetization of protons in the blood and suppresses the in-flow effect in the slab. The present study adjusted the position of the head coil to boost arterial signal intensity. Ten healthy volunteers, eight men and two women aged 24-78 years, underwent 3D TOF MR angiography of the intracranial arteries with the same standard GE transmit-receive birdcage head coil using both normal and half position (lower edge of the coil level with the mouth) methods. Our subjects were divided into Group 1 consisted of five relatively young volunteers aged 24-42 years (mean 31.2 years), and Group 2 consisted of five older volunteers aged 70-78 years (mean 73 years). The following four arteries were chosen for analysis: the internal carotid artery (ICA), the proximal middle cerebral artery segment (M 1 ), and the two distal middle cerebral artery segments (M 2 , M 3 ). The half position method increased the signal-to-noise ratio in the ICA, M 1 , M 2 , and M 3 by 15%, 25%, 36%, and 44%, respectively. In general, this method resulted in the generation of stronger signals in the M 2 and M 3 in younger subjects and in all arteries examined in older subjects. The half position method can provide better MR angiograms in certain brain regions of younger people, and in all brain regions in older patients. (author)

  8. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the pulmonary veins: TOF 3D versus 2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriero, Alessandro; Magarelli, Nicola; Gatta, Stefania; Pinto, Dario; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Baratto, Michele; Scapati, Carmelo

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique for the selective study of the pulmonary veins. Twenty patients (13 men and 7 women; mean age: 30.5 years) were examined. MRA was performed with a 1 T superconductive magnet and the 3D time of flight (TOF) technique. Fast sequences (3D FISP : TR 58 ms, TE 6 ms, FA 20 deg, matrix 192 x 256; and 2D FLASH: TR 44 ms, TE 10 ms, FA 30 deg, matrix 192 x 256) were used. Coronal and sagittal images were submitted to MIP processing; presaturation pulses for the pulmonary arteries were located in the mediastinal region. In the right lung 3D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 124 veins, while sagittal images showed 106 veins. In the left lung, 3D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 96 vessels, while sagittal images showed 44 vessels. In the right lung, 2D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 54 veins, while sagittal images showed 36 vessels. In the left lung, 2D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 22 vessels, while sagittal images showed 21 vessels. Therefore 3D TOF yielded better than 2D TOF (p<0.05). To conclude, 3D TOF with contrast agent administration is a useful tool to study the pulmonary veins; those with a larger caliber are better depicted and the integration of coronal and sagittal images depicts more veins

  9. Parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis: findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography; Alteracoes parenquimatosas na trombose venosa cerebral: aspectos da ressonancia magnetica e da angiorressonancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Clecia Santos; Pellini, Marcos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: csferreira@superig.com.br; Boasquevisque, Edson [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia; Souza, Luis Alberto M. de [Hospital da Beneficencia Portuguesa do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Imagem. Setor de Ressonancia Magnetica

    2006-09-15

    Objective: to determine the frequency and localization of parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography as well as their correlation with the territory and affected venous drainage. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis (1996 to 2004) of 21 patients (3 male and 18 female) age range between 3 and 82 years (mean 40 years, median 36 years) with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography in 2D PC, 3D PC and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF sequences. The statistical analysis was performed with the qui-square test. Four patients had follow-up exams and three patients underwent digital subtraction angiography. Results: main predisposing factors were: infection, use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and collagenosis. Predominant symptoms included: focal deficit, headache, alteration of consciousness level and seizures. Most frequent parenchymal manifestations were: cortical/subcortical edema or infarct, venous congestion and collateral circulation, meningeal enhancement and thalamic and basal ganglia edema or infarct. Occlusion occurred mainly in superior sagittal, left transverse, left sigmoid and straight sinuses. Cavernous sinus and cortical veins thrombosis are uncommon events. Conclusion: cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke, with favorable prognosis because of its reversibility. Diagnosis is highly dependent on the radiologist capacity to recognize the presentations of this disease, principally in cases where the diagnosis is suggested by parenchymal abnormalities rather than necessarily by visualization of the thrombus itself. An accurate and rapid diagnosis allows an immediate treatment, reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  10. Magnetic Resonance angiography with bolus contrast agent in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Cesare, E.; Cerone, G.; Giordano, A.V.; Marsili, L.; Barile, A.; Michelini, O.; Masciocchi, C.; Spartera, C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose of this paper is to investigate the potentials of 3D breath-hold contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) in the diagnosis, follow-up and treatment planning of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Twenty-four patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysm underwent MRA. It was used a 1.5 T unit (GE Horizon, Echospeed 8.2), a phased array surface coil and 3D Fast SPGR T1-weighted sequences acquired on the coronal plane during patient breath-hold and after contrast agent i.v. administration. A bolus-test was done before angiography to optimize imaging delay time. After 3D MRA a Fast-SPGR T1-weighted sequence was acquired on the axial plane. The 3D MRA source images were processed with the MIP algorithm. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out. Helical CT was performed in 6 cases and DSA in 7 cases. Surgery was the reference standard in 15 patients. MRA depicted aneurysm thrombosis in 22 cases, carrefour involvement in 18 cases and iliac arteries involvement in 3 cases. Accessory renal arteries were shown in 4 cases; iliac artery stenosis was associated in 5 cases. There was agreement between MR and Helical CT and DSA findings: surgery confirmed MRA results in 15/15 cases. 3D contrast-enhanced MRA can be considered the method of choice in the follow-up and treatment planning of abdominal aortic aneurysms, because it provides both angiographic and tomographic images: this allows to obtain more information, noninvasively and without the use of ionizing radiations [it

  11. Evaluation of the patency of an extracranial-intracranial bypass using magnetic resonance angiography with selective presaturation of bypass vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabuchi, Shoji; Nakayama, Naoki; Isu, Toyohiko; Harata, Tatsuo; Nanbu, Toshikazu [Kushiro Rousai Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using radiofrequency presaturation pulses was used to evaluate the patency of extracranial-intracranial (EC/IC) bypass in 11 patients. Presaturation causes signal loss in the vascular territory supplied by the presaturated EC/IC bypass graft. In all patients with a patent EC/IC bypass graft confirmed on conventional angiography, disappearance of the signal of the middle cerebral artery receiving blood flow from the bypass graft was clearly observed on MR angiograms with presaturation, indicating patency of the EC/IC bypass graft. MR angiography with presaturation pulses is a noninvasive and repeatable method for evaluation of the function of an EC/IC bypass graft. (author).

  12. Magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool contrast agents: future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Univ. Hospitals, Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Goyen, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Lotz, J. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Blood pool agents remain in the intravascular space for a longer time period. Therefore the optimal imaging window for vascular structures is widened to about 30 minutes. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first blood-pool contrast agent approved in Europe for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of vessels in the abdomen, pelvis and lower extremity in adults. Other possible applications of blood-pool agents are now being considered, such as assessment of venous thromboembolism, coronary artery disease or sinus venous thrombosis. Perfusion MR imaging holds promise for detecting lung perfusion defects with higher spatial resolution and reduced scan time compared with radionuclide scintigraphy. In coronary artery disease, blood-pool agents enable a substantial increase in the quality of coronary artery imaging. Quantitative myocardial perfusion and myocardial viability seem to be possible, although modifications in protocols and sequence design are necessary for optimal results. Other novel applications of blood-pool agents include monitoring of inflammatory changes in systemic lupus erythematosus and evaluation of tumour invasion into lymph nodes and more reliable assessment of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance angiography with blood-pool contrast agents: future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Goyen, M.; Lotz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Blood pool agents remain in the intravascular space for a longer time period. Therefore the optimal imaging window for vascular structures is widened to about 30 minutes. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first blood-pool contrast agent approved in Europe for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of vessels in the abdomen, pelvis and lower extremity in adults. Other possible applications of blood-pool agents are now being considered, such as assessment of venous thromboembolism, coronary artery disease or sinus venous thrombosis. Perfusion MR imaging holds promise for detecting lung perfusion defects with higher spatial resolution and reduced scan time compared with radionuclide scintigraphy. In coronary artery disease, blood-pool agents enable a substantial increase in the quality of coronary artery imaging. Quantitative myocardial perfusion and myocardial viability seem to be possible, although modifications in protocols and sequence design are necessary for optimal results. Other novel applications of blood-pool agents include monitoring of inflammatory changes in systemic lupus erythematosus and evaluation of tumour invasion into lymph nodes and more reliable assessment of cerebral venous and sinus thrombosis. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance angiography in 12 patients with Wallenberg's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masaki; Takahashi, Akira; Hashizume, Yoshio (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Motegi, Yoshimasa; Furuse, Masahiro

    1992-11-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed in 12 patients with Wallenberg's syndrome (WS) in chronic stage to investigate the lesion of the vertebral artery (VA). The laterality of infarction in the medulla oblongata was confirmed with MRI; the right in four patients and the left in eight. In this study, time-of-flight MRA was evaluated. Coronal and OM sections in MRA were examined, because the former is useful to observe asymmetry and curve of the cervical VA, and the latter is useful to observe asymmetry and stenosis of the intracranial VA. In nine out of 12 patients, the ipsilateral VA was rather hypoplastic compared to the contralateral VA, and the flow of the hypoplastic VA stopped before and after entering the intracranial region. The contralateral VA of the hypoplastic cases showed curve in the neck in five patients and stenosis in the intracranial portion in one patient. A comparative study was conducted between vertebral angiogram (VAG) and MRA in four patients. Both VAG and MRA were useful in detecting hypoplasia and stoppage of the flow. It was considered that VA hypoplasia is frequently responsible for WS, and that MRA is useful in screening the vascular lesion as a non-invasive procedure to reveal changes of the bilateral VA. (author).

  15. Vertebral artery variations at the C1-2 level diagnosed by magnetic resonance angiography

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    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Watadani, Takeyuki; Okada, Yoshitaka; Kozawa, Eito; Nishi, Naoko; Mizukoshi, Waka; Inoue, Kaiji; Nakajima, Reiko; Takahashi, Masahiro [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The craniovertebral junction is clinically important. The vertebral artery (VA) in its several variations runs within this area. We report the prevalence of these VA variations on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We retrospectively reviewed MRA images, obtained using two 1.5-T imagers, of 2,739 patients, and paid special attention to the course and branching of the VA at the level of the C1-2 vertebral bodies. There were three types of VA variation at the C1-2 level: (1) persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA), (2) VA fenestration, and (3) posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) originating from the C1/2 level. The overall prevalence of these three variations was 5.0%. There was no laterality in frequency, but we found female predominance (P < 0.05). We most frequently observed the persistent FIA (3.2%), which was sometimes bilateral. We found VA fenestration (0.9%) and PICA of C1/2 origin (1.1%) with almost equal frequency. Two PICAs of C1/2 origin had no normal VA branch. We frequently observed VA variations at the C1-2 level and with female predominance. The persistent FIA was most prevalent and sometimes seen bilaterally. Preoperative identification of these variations in VA is necessary to avoid complications during surgery at the craniovertebral junction. (orig.)

  16. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja; Bae, Jong Myon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image

  17. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Myon [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image.

  18. Toward comparability of coronary magnetic resonance angiography: proposal for a standardized quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirksen, Martijn S.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Geest, Rob van der; Roos, Albert de

    2003-01-01

    A method is proposed for the quantitative assessment of coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) acquisitions. The method is based on four parameters: signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); vessel length; and vessel-edge definition. A pig model (n=7) was used to illustrate the proposed quantitative analysis method. Three-dimensional gradient-echo coronary MRA was performed with and without exogenous contrast enhancement using a gadolinium-based blood-pool contrast agent (Vistarem, Guerbet, Aulnay-Sous-Bois, France). The acquired images could be well differentiated based on the four parameters. The SNR was calculated as 9.0±1.4 vs 10.4±2.1, the CNR as 6.2±0.8 vs 8.2±0.9, the vessel length as 48.2±11.6 vs 86.5±13.8 mm, and the vessel-edge definition as 4.9±1.5 vs 7.7±3.4. Different coronary MRA techniques can be evaluated objectively with the combined use of SNR, CNR, vessel length, and vessel-edge parameters. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance angiography of peripheral arteries of the hand and its clinical usefulness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikawa, Kouzou

    1996-01-01

    We established requirements for display of peripheral arteries and veins of the hand on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in normal adults. We performed MRA in 20 normal adult volunteers and 3 patients using the same method and parameters and obtained useful clinical examinations. Few studies have evaluated the use of MRA in the hand, especially for peripheral arteries and veins, because of problems of vessel diameter, velocity blood flow, and computer memory capacity. The diagnostic accuracy of MRA is largely dependent on the MR equipment, MR technique, ray-tracing technique, film reading system, and the skill of the MRA film reader. Because MRA methods are not standardized, optimal methods must be determined that produce the accurate information needed for diagnosis of disease. In 20 normal adults, the following MRA parameters allowed us to consistently visualize the peripheral arteries and veins: flip angle, 90deg; TR, 35; TE, 16; slice thickness, 2 mm; FOV, 170; NSA, 2; acquisition matrix, 141 x 256; and room temperature, 22degC. We were able to obtain clear MRA images by the multiple slide slice method, which corrects a weakness of usual methods of display. Results of MRA examinations with our methods and parameters in 20 normal adult volunteers and 3 patients suggest that MRA is safe and useful for clinical examination of the hand. (author)

  20. Comparison of 3D magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography for intracranial artery stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Eun; Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong-Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Deok Hee [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hun; Kwon, Sun U.; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kim, Jong S. [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ji Young [Gachon University, Department of Radiology, Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Ye [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon-Ok [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To compare three-dimensional high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (3D HR-MRI) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for diagnosing and evaluating stenosis in the entire circle of Willis. The study included 516 intracranial arteries from 43 patients with intracranial artery stenosis (ICAS) who underwent both 3D HR-MRI and DSA within 1 month. Two readers independently diagnosed atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease and vasculitis, rated their diagnostic confidence for each vessel and measured the luminal diameters. Reference standard was made from clinico-radiologic diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic confidence, the degree of stenosis and luminal diameter were assessed and compared between both modalities. For atherosclerosis, 3D HR-MRI showed better diagnostic accuracy (P =.03-.003), sensitivity (P =.006-.01) and positive predictive value (P ≤.001-.006) compared to DSA. Overall, the readers were more confident of their diagnosis of ICAS when using 3D HR-MRI (reader 1, P ≤.001-.007; reader 2, P ≤.001-.015). 3D HR-MRI showed similar degree of stenosis (P >.05) and higher luminal diameter (P <.05) compared to DSA. 3D HR-MRI might be useful to evaluate atherosclerosis, with better diagnostic confidence and comparable stenosis measurement compared to DSA in the entire circle of Willis. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance angiography with ultrashort echo times reduces the artefact of aneurysm clips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goenner, F.; Heid, O.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G.; Loevblad, K.O.; Guzman, R.; Barth, A.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of an ultrashort echo time (TE) three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) sequence to reduce the metal artefact of intracranial aneurysm clips and to display adjacent cerebral arteries. In five patients (aged 8-72 years) treated with Elgiloy or Phynox aneurysm clips we prospectively performed a conventional (TE 6.0 ms) and a new ultrashort TE (TE 2.4 ms) 3D TOF MRA. We compared the diameter of the clip-induced susceptibility artefact and the detectability of flow in adjacent vessels. The mean artefact diameter was 22.3±6.4 mm (range 14-38 mm) with the ultrashort TE and 27.7±6.4 mm (range 19-45 mm) with the conventional MRA (P<0.0001). This corresponded to a diameter reduction of 19.5±9.2%. More parts of adjacent vessels were detected, but with less intense flow signal. The aneurysm dome and neck remained within the area of signal loss and were therefore not displayed. Ultrashort TE MRA is a noninvasive and fast method for improving detection of vessels adjacent to clipped intracranial aneurysms, by reducing clip-induced susceptibility artefact. The method cannot, however, be used to show remnants of the aneurysm neck or sac as a result of imperfect clipping. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography in renal grafts. Comparison with color Doppler echography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Takayoshi; Otsubo, Osamu; Nozaki, Harushige

    1995-01-01

    We studied relationship between magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of renal graft and renal graft function in 14 renal transplantations (10 from living donors, 4 from cadaveric donors). MRA was performed on 0.3-T permanent magnet system (MRP 7000, HITACHI, JAPAN) using 2 dimensional time of flight technique (FOV: 350 mm 2 , RT: 60 msec, ET: 10 msec, FA: 90deg, Slice: volumes 60, thickness 4 mm, overlap 1 mm). As for parameters of renal graft function, we evaluated color doppler echography (CD) of transplanted renal artery, renal blood flow (RBF), velocity of interlobar artery (ILA) and serum creatinine level (S-Cr). CD, RBF and velocity of ILA were visualized and measured by duplex color doppler echosystem (EUB-565A, HITACHI, JAPAN). Depending on visualization of transplanted renal artery, MRA was graded into 3 groups (MA Grade 3: visualization of ILA, MA Grade 2: visualization of segmental artery and the first branch but no visualization of ILA, MA Grade 1: visualization of main renal artery only). Likewise, visualization of CD was graded into 3 groups (CD Grade 3: good visualization of arcuate artery (AA) and ILA, CD Grade 2: poor visualization of AA but good visualization of ILA, CD Grade 1: poor visualization of ILA). The MRA grading had a very significant correlation (r=0.79, p<0.001) with the CD grading. As for RBF and velocity of ILA, the RBF of MA Grade 3 group (n=8) was significantly (p<0.05) higher than the MA Grade 2 group (n=4) and the MA Grade 1 group (n=2), and the velocity of ILA of MA Grade 3 group was also higher than the above groups but not significantly. Furthermore, the S-Cr of MA Grade 3 was significantly (p<0.05) lower than the others. These results showed that MRA of renal graft had a qualitative index of renal graft function. (author)

  3. Pulmonary embolism and pelvic-lower limb deep venous thrombosis: initial experience with magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Tao; Qiu Chuanya; Jiang Hua

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of combined three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) for checking the thrombus embolism of different positions within single examination on the pulmonary artery and pelvic-lower limb deep veins. Methods: Fifteen patients with suspected pulmonary embolism and pelvic-lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) were evaluate with combined 3D MRA and 2D CE-MRA. 3D spoiled gradient-recalled-echo bolus chase MR angiograms were obtained in four stations from the pulmonary artery to the ankle. Thereafter, 3D CE MRA was reversely scanned from the ankle to the pelvic. 2D contrast-enhanced MRI was obtained in pelvis, thigh, and calf. Pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) and/or DSA were performed in 15 patients, and duplex ultrasonography of lower-limb vein was performed in 12 patients. Results: Of the 15 cases, acceptable imaging of pulmonary vessel was acquired with 3D CE-MRA in 12 cases. The signal intensity was lower in the deep iliac vein and lower extremities than that in the artery, but vein frame was distinct after post processing. The artery and deep vein were clearly revealed with contrast enhanced FSPGR sequence in 15 cases. 3D CD-MRA imaging disclosed pulmonary embolism in fourteen patients and pelvis-lower limb DVT with multi-place involvement in nine patients. 2D contrast-enhanced MR imaging proved DVT in pelvis-lower limb. 2D contrast-enhanced FSPGR sequence was a complementation of 3D CE-MRA and it had larger scan field. Thrombus presented as low signals and eccentral or intraluminal filling defect. Local caliber of vein thrombus in 6 cases was evidently broadened. Conclusion: Within only one MR examination procedure, it is capable of examining the pulmonary embolism and DVT of pelvis-lower limb with combined 3D MRA and 2D contrast enhanced MR. The results are promising as a non-invasion 'on-stop shopping' tool in the evaluation of thromboembolic disease

  4. Clinical findings of intracranial vertebral artery disease using magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-Han; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Chang, Ming-Hong

    2004-09-01

    The vertebral artery lesion has a variety of clinical characteristics. We sought to clarify the clinical patterns and the location of the intracranial vertebral artery (ICVA) diseases according to analyses of images obtained using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We studied vascular lesions, risk factors, symptoms, signs, and outcomes in 35 patients with ICVA disease (3 had bilateral occlusion; 9, unilateral occlusion; 6, bilateral stenosis; and 17, unilateral stenosis). The most common site of unilateral and bilateral lesions was the distal ICVA after the origin of posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). We found accompanying basilar artery disease in 28.6% of patients with unilateral and bilateral ICVA disease. The majority of the ICVA lesions were associated with internal carotid arteries disease (48.8%). The common vascular risk factors were hypertension (71%), diabetes mellitus (34%), hyperlipidemia (31%), smoking (29%), and coronary artery disease (23%). Eighteen patients (51.4%) had transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) only, 10 patients (28.6%) had TIAs before stroke, and 5 patients (14.3%) had strokes without TIAs. Most patients (80%) with TIAs, with or without stroke, had multiple episodes. Vertigo or dizziness, ataxia, limbs weakness and abnormal gait were the common symptoms and signs. At 6 months follow-up, 66.7% patients had no symptoms or only slight symptoms that caused no disability. Our data showed (1) the usual location of ICVA disease (occlusion or severe stenosis) was distal to PICA, especially near the vertebrobasilar junction; (2) the risk factors were hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and coronary artery disease; (3) patients with ICVA disease had a high frequency of accompanying internal carotid, middle cerebral, or basilar artery disease; (4) vertigo or dizziness, and ataxia were the common symptoms and signs; (5) TIA was the most common clinical pattern; (6) the outcome was favorable, except in cases with

  5. Magnetic resonance angiography signal intensity as a marker of hemodynamic impairment in intracranial arterial stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyi Leng

    Full Text Available Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS is the predominant cause of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in Asia. Change of signal intensities (SI across an ICAS on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA may reflect its hemodynamic severity.In-patients with a symptomatic single ICAS detected on 3D time-of-flight MRA were recruited from 2 hospitals. Baseline and 1-year follow-up data were collected. Signal intensity ratio (SIR [ =  (mean post-stenotic SI -mean background SI/(mean pre-stenotic SI - mean background SI] was evaluated on baseline MRA to represent change of SIs across an ICAS. Acute infarct volume was measured on baseline diffusion-weighted images (DWI. Relationships between SIR and baseline characteristics as well as 1y outcomes were evaluated.Thirty-six subjects (86.1% males, mean age 55.0 were recruited. Overall, mean SIR was 0.84±0.23. Mean SIRs were not significantly different between the 23 (63.9% anatomically severe stenoses and the 13 (36.1% anatomically moderate stenoses (0.80±0.23 versus 0.92±0.21, p = 0.126. SIR was significantly, linearly and negatively correlated to acute infarct volume on DWI (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.471, p = 0.011. Two patients (5.6% had recurrent ischemic strokes at 1y, not related to SIR values.Change of signal intensities across an ICAS on MRA may reflect its hemodynamic and functional severity. Future studies are warranted to further verify the relationships between this index and prognosis of patients with symptomatic ICAS.

  6. Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the left atrium-A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: moritz.wagner@charite.d [Department of Radiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Rief, Matthias; Asbach, Patrick [Department of Radiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vogtmann, Thomas [Department of Cardioloy and Angiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander [Imaging Science Institute Charite Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Beling, Mark [Department of Cardioloy and Angiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Butler, Craig [Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Laule, Michael [Department of Cardioloy and Angiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Warmuth, Carsten; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Lembcke, Alexander [Department of Radiology, Charite - University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: Imaging of the left atrium is regularly performed prior to pulmonary vein isolation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the left atrium using the blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium in comparison to noncontrast MRA. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were examined by free-breathing electrocardiogram-gated whole-heart MRA (reconstructed spatial resolution, 0.7 mm x 0.6 mm x 0.8 mm) with a noncontrast T2-prepared steady state free precession sequence (T2-prep SSFP) and a gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced inversion-recovery SSFP sequence (CE IR-SSFP). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of blood in the left atrium was determined. Depiction of the left atrium was rated by two radiologists in consensus. A cardiologist segmented the MR data sets and rated depiction of the left atrium. Results: Five of 20 patients had irregular breathing patterns with navigator efficiency less than 35% and were excluded from evaluation. CNR was significantly higher for CE IR-SSFP compared with T2-prep SSFP (18.4 {+-} 5.3 vs. 11.7 {+-} 3.5, p < 0.01). Depiction of the left atrium by T2-prep SSFP was rated as good in four patients, moderate in ten patients, and poor in one patient, whereas depiction of the left atrium by CE IR-SSFP was rated as excellent in nine patients, good in four patients, and moderate in two patients. CE IR-SSFP allowed for semiautomated segmentation of the left atrium in 15 patients, whereas T2-prep SSFP allowed for segmentation only in ten patients. Conclusion: Gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced MRA of the left atrium is feasible with significantly improved image quality compared to noncontrast MRA.

  7. Gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography as a means of evaluating pulmonary arteriovenous malformation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressacco, Josephine; Papas, Konstantin

    2012-07-01

    This case report is a unique presentation of a new potential indication for Gadofosvest (Ablavar), a blood pool contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Ablavar is an excellent MRA contrast agent because it provides optimal contrast opacification of both the arterial and venous system, unlike the conventional extracellular agents that are used for arterial imaging only. The present case report demonstrates the ability of Ablavar to demonstrate pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM), showing both its arterial feeders as well as its venous drainage tract. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The increased use of computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography as the sole imaging modalities prior to infrainguinal bypass has had no effect on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, Bing; Damle, Rachelle N; Flahive, Julie; Kalish, Jeffrey A; Stone, David H; Patel, Virendra I; Schanzer, Andres; Baril, Donald T

    2015-08-01

    Angiography remains the gold standard imaging modality before infrainguinal bypass. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have emerged as noninvasive alternatives for preoperative imaging. We sought to examine contemporary trends in the utilization of CTA and MRA as isolated imaging modalities before infrainguinal bypass and to compare outcomes following infrainguinal bypass in patients who underwent CTA or MRA versus those who underwent conventional arteriography. Patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass within the Vascular Study Group of New England were identified (2003-2012). Patients were stratified by preoperative imaging modality: CTA/MRA alone or conventional angiography. Trends in utilization of these modalities were examined and demographics of these groups were compared. Primary end points included primary patency, secondary patency, and major adverse limb events (MALE) at 1 year as determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to evaluate the effect of imaging modality on primary patency, secondary patency, and MALE after adjusting for confounders. In 3123 infrainguinal bypasses, CTA/MRA alone was used in 462 cases (15%) and angiography was used in 2661 cases (85%). Use of CTA/MRA alone increased over time, with 52 (11%) bypasses performed between 2003 and 2005, 189 (41%) bypasses performed between 2006 and 2009, and 221 (48%) bypasses performed between 2010 and 2012 (P < 0.001). Patients with CTA/MRA alone, compared with patients with angiography, more frequently underwent bypass for claudication (33% vs. 26%, P = 0.001) or acute limb ischemia (13% vs. 5%, P < 0.0001), more frequently had prosthetic conduits (39% vs. 30%, P = 0.001), and less frequently had tibial/pedal targets (32% vs. 40%, P = 0.002). After adjusting for these and other confounders, multivariable analysis demonstrated that the use of CTA/MRA alone was not associated with a significant

  9. Fluorine cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography in vivo at 1.5 T with perfluorocarbon nanoparticle contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Anne M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Hockett, Franklin D; Cyrus, Tillman; Robertson, J David; Allen, J Stacy; Williams, Todd D; Fuhrhop, Ralph W; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2007-01-01

    While the current gold standard for coronary imaging is X-ray angiography, evidence is accumulating that it may not be the most sensitive technique for detecting unstable plaque. Other imaging modalities, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), can be used for plaque characterization, but suffer from long scan and reconstruction times for determining regions of stenosis. We have developed an intravascular fluorinated contrast agent that can be used for angiography with cardiovascular magnetic resosnace at clinical field strengths (1.5 T). This liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticle contains a high concentration of fluorine atoms that can be used to generate contrast on 19F MR images without any competing background signal from surrounding tissues. By using a perfluorocarbon with 20 equivalent fluorine molecules, custom-built RF coils, a modified clinical scanner, and an efficient steady-state free procession sequence, we demonstrate the use of this agent for angiography of small vessels in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. The surprisingly high signal generated with very short scan times and low doses of perfluorocarbon indicates that this technique may be useful in clinical settings when coupled with advanced imaging strategies.

  10. Noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography of the hand: improved arterial conspicuity by multidirectional flow-sensitive dephasing magnetization preparation in 3D balanced steady-state free precession imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhaoyang; Hodnett, Philip A; Davarpanah, Amir H; Scanlon, Timothy G; Sheehan, John J; Varga, John; Carr, James C; Li, Debiao

    2011-08-01

    : To develop a flow-sensitive dephasing (FSD) preparative scheme to facilitate multidirectional flow-signal suppression in 3-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession imaging and to validate the feasibility of the refined sequence for noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography (NC-MRA) of the hand. : A new FSD preparative scheme was developed that combines 2 conventional FSD modules. Studies using a flow phantom (gadolinium-doped water 15 cm/s) and the hands of 11 healthy volunteers (6 males and 5 females) were performed to compare the proposed FSD scheme with its conventional counterpart with respect to the signal suppression of multidirectional flow. In 9 of the 11 healthy subjects and 2 patients with suspected vasculitis and documented Raynaud phenomenon, respectively, 3-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession imaging coupled with the new FSD scheme was compared with spatial-resolution-matched (0.94 × 0.94 × 0.94 mm) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine) in terms of overall image quality, venous contamination, motion degradation, and arterial conspicuity. : The proposed FSD scheme was able to suppress 2-dimensional flow signal in the flow phantom and hands and yielded significantly higher arterial conspicuity scores than the conventional scheme did on NC-MRA at the regions of common digitals and proper digitals. Compared with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, the refined NC-MRA technique yielded comparable overall image quality and motion degradation, significantly less venous contamination, and significantly higher arterial conspicuity score at digital arteries. : The FSD-based NC-MRA technique is improved in the depiction of multidirectional flow by applying a 2-module FSD preparation, which enhances its potential to serve as an alternative magnetic resonance angiography technique for the assessment of hand vascular abnormalities.

  11. Assessment of left ventricular volumes by magnetic resonance in comparison with radionuclide angiography, contrast angiography and echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Stokholm, K H; Saunamäki, K

    1992-01-01

    The present study shows that for assessment of LVEF, MRI and the standard methods seem to provide information of similar value. For absolute volume measurements, MRI and RNA are superior to single plane angiography and 2 DE using the modified Simpson-rule. The time consuming transversal MRI method...... quality, which is crucial especially in dilated ventricles containing stagnant or slowly moving blood....

  12. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in carotid artery disease: does automated image registration improve image quality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, Jan; Larsen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive imaging alternative to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for patients with carotid artery disease. In DSA, image quality can be improved by shifting the mask image if the patient has moved during angiography. This study investigated whether such image registration may also help to improve the image quality of carotid MRA. Data from 370 carotid MRA examinations of patients likely to have carotid artery disease were prospectively collected. The standard nonregistered MRAs were compared to automatically linear, affine and warp registered MRA by using three image quality parameters: the vessel detection probability (VDP) in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in MIP images, and contrast-to-noise ratio in three-dimensional image volumes. A body shift of less than 1 mm occurred in 96.2% of cases. Analysis of variance revealed no significant influence of image registration and body shift on image quality (p > 0.05). In conclusion, standard contrast-enhanced carotid MRA usually requires no image registration to improve image quality and is generally robust against any naturally occurring body shift. (orig.)

  13. Conventional digital subtraction x-ray angiography versus magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of carotid disease: patient satisfaction and preferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U-King-Im, J.M. E-mail: jhg21@cam.ac.uk; Trivedi, R.; Cross, J.; Higgins, N.; Graves, M.; Kirkpatrick, P.; Antoun, N.; Gillard, J.H

    2004-04-01

    AIM: To compare conventional digital subtraction x-ray angiography (DSA) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the carotid arteries in terms of patient satisfaction and preferences. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-seven patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease, who underwent both DSA and MRA, were prospectively recruited in this study. Patients' perceptions of each method were assessed by the use of a questionnaire after each procedure. Main outcome measures were anxiety, pain, satisfaction rate and patient preferences. RESULTS: DSA generated more anxiety and pain during the procedure, but the severity of these ill-effects was mild. Satisfaction rates for each method were similar. More patients were, however, willing to have a repeat MRA compared with DSA (67 versus 41%). The majority of patients (62%) preferred MRA over DSA (31%). The shorter MRA imaging time was found to be a significant factor in patients' acceptance of the technique. The main reasons cited by patients for their dislike of a particular procedure was noise and claustrophobia for MRA and invasiveness, pain and post-procedural bed rest for DSA. CONCLUSIONS: MRA is the method that is preferred by the majority of patients, although the actual disutility of DSA may be small. Assuming equal diagnostic accuracy, our data supports replacement of DSA by MRA for routine carotid imaging.

  14. Conventional digital subtraction x-ray angiography versus magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of carotid disease: patient satisfaction and preferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U-King-Im, J.M.; Trivedi, R.; Cross, J.; Higgins, N.; Graves, M.; Kirkpatrick, P.; Antoun, N.; Gillard, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare conventional digital subtraction x-ray angiography (DSA) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the carotid arteries in terms of patient satisfaction and preferences. METHODS: One hundred and sixty-seven patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease, who underwent both DSA and MRA, were prospectively recruited in this study. Patients' perceptions of each method were assessed by the use of a questionnaire after each procedure. Main outcome measures were anxiety, pain, satisfaction rate and patient preferences. RESULTS: DSA generated more anxiety and pain during the procedure, but the severity of these ill-effects was mild. Satisfaction rates for each method were similar. More patients were, however, willing to have a repeat MRA compared with DSA (67 versus 41%). The majority of patients (62%) preferred MRA over DSA (31%). The shorter MRA imaging time was found to be a significant factor in patients' acceptance of the technique. The main reasons cited by patients for their dislike of a particular procedure was noise and claustrophobia for MRA and invasiveness, pain and post-procedural bed rest for DSA. CONCLUSIONS: MRA is the method that is preferred by the majority of patients, although the actual disutility of DSA may be small. Assuming equal diagnostic accuracy, our data supports replacement of DSA by MRA for routine carotid imaging

  15. Evaluation of the vascular anatomy in potential living kidney donors with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: comparison with digital subtraction angiography and intraoperative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Majid A; Dadkhah, Farid; Ghadian, Ali R; Razzaghi, Mohammad R; Noorbala, Mohammad H; Amini, Erfan

    2011-01-01

    X-ray contrast arteriography has traditionally been used for pre-operative evaluation in living kidney donors. However, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) offers a non-invasive alternative, which has been considered to be less accurate. This study was performed to determine whether MRA in the pre-operative investigation of living kidney donors provides sufficient information. From December 2005 to December 2007, 173 potential live donors were evaluated in this study. Donors performed digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and those with one or more accessory arteries at least on one side recruited for further evaluation with three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced MRA. A total of 30 donors constituted the study population. When compared with DSA as the reference method, MRA detected 20 of 36 renal accessory arteries which indicates a sensitivity of 55.6%. The difference between MRA and DSA in identifying accessory renal arteries was significant (p-value kidneys. MRA has the advantage of avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation and is non-invasive. These are important considerations in pre-operative evaluation of a generally healthy donor population. However, MRA provides suboptimal accuracy in detecting small accessory arteries. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of computer tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography in the stenosis detection of autologuous hemodialysis access: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the diagnostic performances of computer tomography angiography (CTA and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA for detection and assessment of stenosis in patients with autologuous hemodialysis access. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Search of PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library database from January 1984 to May 2013 for studies comparing CTA or MRA with DSA or surgery for autologuous hemodialysis access. Eligible studies were in English language, aimed to detect more than 50% stenosis or occlusion of autologuous vascular access in hemodialysis patients with CTA and MRA technology and provided sufficient data about diagnosis performance. Methodological quality was assessed by the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Studies (QUADAS instrument. Sensitivities (SEN, specificities (SPE, positive likelihood ratio (PLR, negative likelihood values (NLR, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR and areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC were pooled statistically. Potential threshold effect, heterogeneity and publication bias was evaluated. The clinical utility of CTA and MRA in detection of stenosis was also investigated. RESULT: Sixteen eligible studies were included, with a total of 500 patients. Both CTA and MRA were accurate modality (sensitivity, 96.2% and 95.4%, respectively; specificity, 97.1 and 96.1%, respectively; DOR [diagnostic odds ratio], 393.69 and 211.47, respectively for hemodialysis vascular access. No significant difference was detected between the diagnostic performance of CTA (AUC, 0.988 and MRA (AUC, 0.982. Meta-regression analyses and subgroup analyses revealed no statistical difference. The Deek's funnel plots suggested a publication bias. CONCLUSION: Diagnostic performance of CTA and MRA for detecting stenosis of hemodialysis vascular access had no statistical difference. Both techniques may function as an alternative or an important complement to conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA and may be

  17. A quantitative study of ramped radio frequency, magnetization transfer, and slab thickness in three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography in a patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, K C; Blatter, D D; Parker, D L; Du, Y P; Meyer, K J; Bernstein, M A

    1996-06-01

    The authors compare the effectiveness of various magnetic resonance (MR) angiography acquisition strategies in enhancing the visibility of small intracranial vessels. Blood vessel contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in time-of-flight MR angiography was studied as a function of vessel size and several selectable imaging parameters. Contrast-to-noise measurements were made on 257 vessel segments ranging in size from 0.3 mm to 4.2 mm in patients who recently had undergone intraarterial cerebral angiography. Imaging parameters studied included magnetization transfer, spatially variable radio frequency (RF) pulse profile (ramped RF), and imaging slab thickness. The combination of thin slabs (16 slices/slab), ramped RF, and magnetization transfer resulted in the highest CNR for all but the smallest vessel sizes. The smallest vessels (slab (64 slices/slab) with ramped RF and magnetization transfer. Magnetization transfer always improved vessel CNR, but the improvement diminished as the slab thickness was reduced. The CNR increased with a decrease in slab thickness for all but the smallest vessel sizes. Overall, the results provide a quantitative demonstration that inflow enhancement of blood is reduced for small vessels. Thus, whereas magnetization transfer is important at all vessel sizes, it becomes the primary factor in improving the visibility of the smallest vessels.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  19. Fat-Suppressed Gadolinium-Enhanced Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography Adequately Depicts the Status of Iliac Arteries Following Atherectomy and Stent Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Gemma, Kazuhito; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    Fat-suppressed, three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) was performed on nine patients with 11 iliac artery stenoses following atherectomy or stent placement. The MRA accurately depicted continued patency, restenosis, or aneurysm formation when compared with immediate posttreatment conventional arteriography. Therefore MRA is accurate and can be used independently for clinical decision making

  20. The Impact of Injector-Based Contrast Agent Administration on Bolus Shape and Magnetic Resonance Angiography Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Gregor; Endrikat, Jan; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2017-01-01

    To compare injector-based contrast agent (CA) administration with hand injection in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Gadobutrol was administered in 6 minipigs with 3 protocols: (a) hand injection (one senior technician), (b) hand injection (6 less-experienced technicians), and (c) power injector administration. The arterial bolus shape was quantified by test bolus measurements. A head and neck MRA was performed for quantitative and qualitative comparison of signal enhancement. A significantly shorter time to peak was observed for protocol C, whereas no significant differences between protocols were found for peak height and bolus width. However, for protocol C, these parameters showed a much lower variation. The MRA revealed a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio for injector-based administration. A superimposed strong contrast of the jugular vein was found in 50% of the hand injections. Injector-based CA administration results in a more standardized bolus shape, a higher vascular contrast, and a more robust visualization of target vessels.

  1. Value of Single-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography Versus Intraarterial Digital Subtraction Angiography in Therapy Indications in Abdominal and Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Philipp J.; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Both, Markus; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to prove the value of single-dose contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography [three-dimensional (3D) ceMRA] in abdominal and iliac arteries versus the reference standard intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (i.a.DSA) when indicating a therapy. Patients suspected of having abdominal or iliac artery stenosis were included in this study. A positive vote of the local Ethics Committee was given. After written informed consent was obtained, 37 patients were enrolled, of which 34 were available for image evaluation. Both 3D ceMRA and i.a. DSA were performed for each patient. The dosage for 3D ceMRA was 0.1 mmol/kg body weight in a 1.5-T scanner with a phased-array coil. The parameters of the 3D-FLASH sequence were as follows: TR/TE 4.6/1.8 ms, effective thickness 3.5 mm, matrix 512 x 200, flip angle 30 o , field of view 420 mm, TA 23 s, coronal scan orientation. Totally, 476 vessel segments were evaluated for stenosis degree by two radiologists in a consensus fashion in a blinded read. For each patient, a therapy was proposed, if clinically indicated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for stenoses ≥50% were 68%, 92%, 44%, 97%, and 90%, respectively. In 13/34 patients, a discrepancy was found concerning therapy decisions based on MRA findings versus therapy decisions based on the reference standard DSA. The results showed that the used MRA imaging technique of abdominal and iliac arteries is not competitive to i.a. DSA, with a high rate of misinterpretation of the MRAs resulting in incorrect therapies

  2. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, ... tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a ... tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic ... called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes it ...

  5. Ultrasonography, angiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance in nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarche, C.; Pelletier, G.; Attali, P.; Ladouch-Badre, A.; Fabre, M.; Roche, A.; Etienne, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and angiographic abnormalities of nodular regenerative hyperplasia have been described in very few cases. We report here the case of a 50-year-old man with round, well-limited hypoechogenic lesions involving the two lobes of the liver, and hypervascular, poorly delineated angiographic lesions. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance of the liver were normal. Histological examination of large liver specimens provided by intraoperative biopsy allowed the diagnosis of nodular regenerative hyperplasia. Such a pseudo-tumoral ultrasonographic and angiographic pattern must be recognized in order to avoid diagnostic and therapeutic mistakes, especially since percutaneous liver biopsy usually fails to diagnose this disease. (author)

  6. Aortic Volumetry at Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Feasibility as a Sensitive Method for Monitoring Bicuspid Aortic Valve Aortopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Brian; Dubin, Iram; Rahman, Ozair; Ferreira Botelho, Marcos P; Naro, Nicholas; Carr, James C; Collins, Jeremy D; Barker, Alex J

    2017-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve patients can develop thoracic aortic aneurysms and therefore require serial imaging to monitor aortic growth. This study investigates the reliability of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) volumetry compared with 2-dimensional diameter measurements to identify thoracic aortic aneurysm growth. A retrospective, institutional review board-approved, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study was conducted on 20 bicuspid aortic valve patients (45 ± 8.9 years, 20% women) who underwent serial CEMRA with a minimum imaging follow-up of 11 months. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 1.5 T with electrocardiogram-gated, time-resolved CEMRA. Independent observers measured the diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva (SOVs) and mid ascending aorta (MAA) as well as ascending aorta volume between the aortic valve annulus and innominate branch. Intraobserver/interobserver coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were computed to assess reliability. Growth rates were calculated and assessed by Student t test (P volumetry. Three-dimensional CEMRA volumetry exhibited a larger effect when examining percentage growth, a better ICC, and a marginally lower COV. Volumetry may be more sensitive to growth and possibly less affected by error than diameter measurements.

  7. Feasibility of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) follow-up as the primary imaging modality after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Metzemaekers, Jan D. M.; Dijk, J. Marc C. van; Mooij, Jan Jakob A.; Groen, Rob J. M.; Westerlaan, Henriette E.; Eshghi, Omid S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is still regarded as the gold standard for detecting residual flow in treated aneurysms. Recent reports have also shown excellent results from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) imaging. This is an important observation, since DSA is associated with a risk of medical complications, is time consuming, and is more expensive. Purpose: To determine whether MRA could replace conventional DSA and serve as the primary postinterventional imaging modality in patients with coiled intracranial aneurysms. Material and Methods: We studied a prospectively enrolled cohort of 190 patients treated endovascularly for a first-ruptured and/or unruptured intracranial aneurysm between January 2004 and December 2008. The imaging protocol included a 1.5T time-of-flight (TOF) MRA and a DSA at 3 months (on the same day) and, depending on comparability, a 1.5T TOF-MRA or DSA 1 year after treatment. All images were evaluated by a multidisciplinary panel. Results: In 141/190 patients, both an MRA and DSA were performed after 3-month follow-up. In 2/141 patients (1.4%), (small) neck remnants gave false-negative MRA results. In one patient (0.7%), this led to additional neurosurgical clipping of the aneurysm. In 25/141 patients, future follow-up (>3 months) consisted of DSA because of various reasons. In 24/25 of these patients, primary MRA images alone would invariably have led to additional DSA imaging. Conclusion: The present study shows that 1.5T TOF-MRA is a feasible primary follow-up modality after coiling of intracranial aneurysms. Given our data, we now suggest that, in every patient with a coiled intracranial aneurysm, the first follow-up, 3 months after coiling, should be an MRA study. Only when this MRA is inconclusive (e.g., because of coil artifacts), or in the case of suspicion of recanalization, should DSA be performed additionally

  8. High-resolution magnetic resonance angiography of the lower extremities with a dedicated 36-element matrix coil at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Harald; Michaely, Henrik J; Matschl, Volker; Schmitt, Peter; Reiser, Maximilian F; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2007-06-01

    Recent developments in hard- and software help to significantly increase image quality of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Parallel acquisition techniques (PAT) help to increase spatial resolution and to decrease acquisition time but also suffer from a decrease in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The movement to higher field strength and the use of dedicated angiography coils can further increase spatial resolution while decreasing acquisition times at the same SNR as it is known from contemporary exams. The goal of our study was to compare the image quality of MRA datasets acquired with a standard matrix coil in comparison to MRA datasets acquired with a dedicated peripheral angio matrix coil and higher factors of parallel imaging. Before the first volunteer examination, unaccelerated phantom measurements were performed with the different coils. After institutional review board approval, 15 healthy volunteers underwent MRA of the lower extremity on a 32 channel 3.0 Tesla MR System. In 5 of them MRA of the calves was performed with a PAT acceleration factor of 2 and a standard body-matrix surface coil placed at the legs. Ten volunteers underwent MRA of the calves with a dedicated 36-element angiography matrix coil: 5 with a PAT acceleration of 3 and 5 with a PAT acceleration factor of 4, respectively. The acquired volume and acquisition time was approximately the same in all examinations, only the spatial resolution was increased with the acceleration factor. The acquisition time per voxel was calculated. Image quality was rated independently by 2 readers in terms of vessel conspicuity, venous overlay, and occurrence of artifacts. The inter-reader agreement was calculated by the kappa-statistics. SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios from the different examinations were evaluated. All 15 volunteers completed the examination, no adverse events occurred. None of the examinations showed venous overlay; 70% of the examinations showed an excellent vessel conspicuity

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  11. Magnetic resonance angiography and tomography of vertebrobasilar dissections; Magnetresonanzangiographie und Magnetresonanztomographie bei Dissektionen der A. vertebralis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felber, S. [Inst. fuer Magnetresonanztomographie und Spektroskopie, Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria)]|[Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinische Abt. 2, Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria); Auer, A. [Inst. fuer Magnetresonanztomographie und Spektroskopie, Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria); Schmidauer, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie, Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria); Waldenberger, P. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie, Klinische Abt. 1, Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria); Aichner, F. [Inst. fuer Magnetresonanztomographie und Spektroskopie, Universitaetskliniken Innsbruck (Austria)

    1996-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the role of MRT and MR angiography (MRA) in the detection of dissections of the vertebral artery. Between 1989 and 1995 we identified 24 patients with a vertebral artery dissection and 1 patient with a basilar artery dissection. The diagnosis of VAD was established by specific arteriographical findings (DSA) or clinical and neuroradiological course. All patients underwent a combined MRT/MRA examination protocol at 1.5 T that consisted of spin-echo imaging and time of flight MRA of the intra- and extracranial arteries using 2D Flash and 3D Fisp sequences. The MRT/MRA findings were correlated to DSA and ultrasound results. During the acute and subacute stage, MRT/MRA revealed abnormal findings in 21 of 22 dissected vessels (95.5%). There was one false-negative MRT/MRA in a patient with a V1 dissection. In 7/22 VAD the MRT/MRA findings were rated specific. DAS was sensitivie in 100% and ultrasound in 77.3%. Specific results were obtained by DSA in 8/22 VAD (36.4%) and in 7/22 VAD (30.4%) by MRT/MRA. When MRT/MRA and DSA results were combined, the specific findings increased to 43.5%. Follow-up examinations revealed recanalization in 52% of initially stenosed or occluded vertebral arteries. With this retrospective approach, we were able to show a high sensitivity of MRT/MRA for the presence of disturbed flow in the dissected vertebral artery. The MRA projections tended to overestimate stenosis and were inferior to DSA in the appreciation of irregularities of the vessel wall. Identification of high-grade stenosis, especially in the presence of distal occlusion, was improved on the MRA source images. The differentiation between luminal thrombus and mural hematoma requires interpretation of MRA source images, together with flow compensated spinecho images. There is a complementary role of MRT/MRA and DSA for an improved overall specificity for vertebral artery dissection. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Dissektionen der hirnversorgenden Arterien sind eine

  12. Prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways in patients with portal hypertension: demonstration by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography; Vias colaterais porto-sistemicas exuberantes em portadores de hipertensao portal: demonstracao pela angiografia por ressonancia magnetica com gadolinio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldana, Rogerio Pedreschi; Bezerra, Alexandre Araujo Sergio; Cecin, Alexnadre Oliveira; Souza, Luis Ronan Marques Ferreira de; Goldman, Susan Menasce; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: rogercal@uol.com.br

    2003-03-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in the evaluation of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. We reviewed the images from 40 patients with portal hypertension studied with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and selected illustrative cases of prominent porto-systemic collateral pathways. The scans were performed using high field equipment (1.5 Tesla) and a 3 D volume technique. Image were obtained after intravenous injection of paramagnetic contrast media using a power injector. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated with precision the porto-systemic collateral pathways, particularly when investigating extensive territories or large vessels. The cases presented show the potential of this method in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is a useful method for the evaluation of patients with portal hypertension and prominent collateral pathways. (author)

  13. Rest period duration of the coronary arteries: Implications for magnetic resonance coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shechter, Guy; Resar, Jon R.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography coronary imaging is susceptible to artifacts caused by motion of the heart. The presence of rest periods during the cardiac and respiratory cycles suggests that images free of motion artifacts could be acquired. In this paper, we studied the rest period (RP) duration of the coronary arteries during a cardiac contraction and a tidal respiratory cycle. We also studied whether three MR motion correction methods could be used to increase the respiratory RP duration. Free breathing x-ray coronary angiograms were acquired in ten patients. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of the coronary arteries was reconstructed from a biplane acquisition using stereo reconstruction methods. The 3D motion of the arterial model was then recovered using an automatic motion tracking algorithm. The motion field was then decomposed into separate cardiac and respiratory components using a cardiac respiratory parametric model. For the proximal-to-middle segments of the right coronary artery (RCA), a cardiac RP (<1 mm 3D displacement) of 76±34 ms was measured at end systole (ES), and 65±42 ms in mid-diastole (MD). The cardiac RP was 80±25 ms at ES and 112±42 ms at MD for the proximal 5 cm of the left coronary tree. At end expiration, the respiratory RP (in percent of the respiratory period) was 26±8% for the RCA and 27±17% for the left coronary tree. Left coronary respiratory RP (<0.5 mm 3D displacement) increased with translation (32% of the respiratory period), rigid body (51%), and affine (79%) motion correction. The RCA respiratory RP using translational (27%) and rigid body (33%) motion correction were not statistically different from each other. Measurements of the cardiac and respiratory rest periods will improve our understanding of the temporal and spatial resolution constraints for coronary imaging

  14. Experimental study on representation of flow on the bifurcated carotid arterial phantoms using magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Rhim, Yoon Chul; Kim, Kyung Oh; Suh, Sang Ho; Jin, En Hao

    1995-01-01

    A common finding of carotid artery on magnetic resonance angiograms(MRAs) is a signal dropout along the posterior wall of carotid bulb due to reverse flow. The purpose of this study is to evaluate variable flow patterns on bifurcated carotid arterial phantoms using steady-state flow. We designed phantoms of a bifurcated carotid artery with acrylic materials. Flow patterns were evaluated with axial and coronal imaging of MRA(2D-TOF, 3D-TOF), color Doppler imaging, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) within the phantoms constructed of an automated closed-type circulatory system filled with 4% sugar solution. These findings were compared with findings obtained from normal volunteers. Axial 3D-TOF MRA images exhibited closer resemblance to the contour of the inner wall of phantoms when compared to coronal 2D-TOF MRA imaging. However, 2D-TOF MRA showed good contrast difference of signal intensities between forward flow area and reverse flow area. Dark zones with reduced signal intensities due to reversed flow were separated from the outer wall of the internal and external carotid arteries by a thin layer of forward flow along the wall on the source slice image of MRA. The general hemodynamics of the phantoms on MRA were identical to hemodynamics on color Doppler imaging and CFD. The results obtained with the phantoms matched the findings on normal volunteers. Although representations of bifurcated carotid arterial phantoms on axial 3D-TOF MRA were excellent if ideally designed, the zone of reversed flow could be a significant factor in creating distorted image when the zone of reversed flow contacted directly with curved or deformed arterial wall

  15. Magnetic resonance angiography virtual endoscopy in the assessment of pulmonary veins before radiofrequency ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirillo, S.; Tosetti, Irene; Giuseppe, M.De; Longo, M.; Regge, D. [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Unit of Radiology, Candiolo (Torino) (Italy); Bonamini, R. [University of Torino, Department of Cardiology, Torino (Italy); Gaita, F.; Bianchi, F.; Vivalda, L. [Ospedale Mauriziano Umberto I, Department of Cardiology, Torino (Italy)

    2004-11-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a safe and non-invasive imaging method that can readily depict the pulmonary veins (PV), whose imaging has acquired momentum with the advent of new techniques for radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). We evaluated whether virtual endoscopy from 3D MRA images (MRA-VE) is feasible in studying the morphology of PV. Fifty patients with AF underwent pre-ablative MRA (1.5 T). Images were acquired with axial T-2 weighted and 3D-SPGR sequences after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA and automatic triggering. Postprocessing was performed by an experienced radiologist with maximum intensity projection (MIP) and virtual endoscopy software (Navigator, GEMS). The venoatrial junction was visualized with MRA-VE in 49 of 50 patients (98.0%). Twenty-seven patients (55.1%) had two ostia on both sides, 13 patients (26.5%) had two ostia on the right and a single common ostium on the left, 5 patients (10.2%) had accessory PV and 4 patients (8.2%) had both an accessory right PV and a single common ostium on the left. Flythrough navigation showed the number and spatial disposition of second-order PV branches in 48 out of 49 patients (98.0%). MRA-VE is an excellent tool for at-a-glance visualization of ostia morphology, navigation of second-generation PV branches and easy endoluminal assessment of left atrial structures in pre-ablative imaging. (orig.)

  16. Rapid time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography via a multiecho radial trajectory and GraDeS reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory R; Seiberlich, Nicole; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Carroll, Timothy J; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is challenging due to the need for both high spatial and temporal resolution. A multishot trajectory composed of pseudo-random rotations of a single multiecho radial readout was developed. The trajectory is designed to give incoherent aliasing artifacts and a relatively uniform distribution of projections over all time scales. A field map (computed from the same data set) is used to avoid signal dropout in regions of substantial field inhomogeneity. A compressed sensing reconstruction using the GraDeS algorithm was used. Whole brain angiograms were reconstructed at 1-mm isotropic resolution and a 1.1-s frame rate (corresponding to an acceleration factor > 100). The only parameter which must be chosen is the number of iterations of the GraDeS algorithm. A larger number of iterations improves the temporal behavior at cost of decreased image signal-to-noise ratio. The resulting images provide a good depiction of the cerebral vasculature and have excellent arterial/venous separation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. High-resolution 3D Magnetic Resonance angiography in the evaluation of neck vessels and intracranial circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, A.; Di Guglielmo, L.; Campani, R.; Nicolato, A.; D'Amato, M.; Rodriguez y Balena, R.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) is a modern vascular imaging technique which allows the non-invasive and direct imaging of vessels. The authors aimed at evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of MRA in the study of pathologic conditions in the neck and intracranial vessels; spatial resolution of the technique was also investigated. Twenty-four healthy volunteers and 82 patients suffering from various diseases of the head and neck vessels were included in the study. First of all, MRA capabilities ware investigated in visualizing normal vessels of both neck and intracranial circle. The diagnostic accuracy of the method was then evaluated in the study of vascular diseases, and the results compared with conventional/digital angiographic findings. The comparison demonstrated how stenoses and atherosclerotic plaques tend to be overestimated by MRA because of technical artifacts inherent to the technique itself, whereas vascular ulcerations and aneurysms are frequently underestimated. However, this data was steady and therefore evaluable- the exact knowledge of the artifacts making diagnosis reliable. The diagnostic and technical problems relative to the various vascular diseases are discussed. Finally, several hypotheses of diagnostic iter are suggested

  18. The Impact of Injector-Based Contrast Agent Administration on Bolus Shape and Magnetic Resonance Angiography Image Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Jost

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare injector-based contrast agent (CA administration with hand injection in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA. Methods: Gadobutrol was administered in 6 minipigs with 3 protocols: (a hand injection (one senior technician, (b hand injection (6 less-experienced technicians, and (c power injector administration. The arterial bolus shape was quantified by test bolus measurements. A head and neck MRA was performed for quantitative and qualitative comparison of signal enhancement. Results: A significantly shorter time to peak was observed for protocol C, whereas no significant differences between protocols were found for peak height and bolus width. However, for protocol C, these parameters showed a much lower variation. The MRA revealed a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio for injector-based administration. A superimposed strong contrast of the jugular vein was found in 50% of the hand injections. Conclusions: Injector-based CA administration results in a more standardized bolus shape, a higher vascular contrast, and a more robust visualization of target vessels.

  19. Dynamic magnetic resonance angiography of the arteries of the hand. A comparison between an extracellular and an intravascular contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisinger, Clemens; Gluecker, Thomas; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Bongartz, Georg; Bilecen, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of the intravascular contrast agent gadofosveset with the extracellular contrast agent gadoterate meglumine in time-resolved three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) angiography of the human arteries of the hand. The value of cuff compression technique for suppression of venous enhancement for both contrast agents was also investigated. Three-dimensional MR angiograms of both hands of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired for each contrast agent at 1.5-T, while subsystolic cuff compression was applied at one side. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation were performed and analyzed with Student's t-test. Visualization of vessels was superior in the images acquired with gadofosveset, especially in the late phases. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation showed significantly higher values for gadofosveset. The cuff compression at the lower arm proved to be an effective method to enhance arterial vessels. In conclusion the blood pool agent gadofosveset is superior for the dynamic imaging of the vessels of the hand when compared with the extracellular contrast agent gadoterate meglumine. To fully utilize the advantages of intravascular contrast agents, venous overlay has to be delayed or reduced, which can be achieved effectively by subsystolic lower arm cuff compression. (orig.)

  20. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography for presurgical planning of free-flap head and neck reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Manuel; Nkenke, Emeka; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Schwab, Siegfried A.; Janka, Rolf; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Aim of the study was to evaluate if a whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) protocol meets the requirements to evaluate the donor and host site target vessels for planning of microvascular head and neck reconstructions. Patients and methods: In 20 patients, scheduled for reconstruction of the mandible with fibular free flaps, contrast-enhanced whole-body MRA was performed prior to surgery. 32-Channel 1.5-T MR angiograms were acquired using a 2-step contrast (gadobutrol) injection scheme to visualize the arterial vasculature from head to feet. Maximum intensity projection and multiplanar reconstruction technique was employed to visualize MRA data. For image evaluation the arterial tree was divided into 51 segments. The presence of artefacts impairing diagnostic quality was noted. Evaluable segments were assessed regarding the presence of stenoses >50% diameter reduction, occlusions or aneurysms. Results: No adverse reactions or complications occurred. Of 1020 vessel segments 1003 (98.3%) were evaluable. 36 stenoses >50%, 50 occlusions and one aneurysm were observed. In 21 of 40 lower limbs relevant atherosclerotic changes were depicted. Conclusion: Whole-body MRA proved to be a suitable three-dimensional, noninvasive, nonionising modality for preoperative evaluation of the entire arterial vasculature.

  1. The role of preoperative cerebral magnetic resonance angiography in the prevention of cerebral complications following cardiovascular surgery

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    Abe, Masakazu; Sakai, Akira; Kodera, Koujirou; Sudo, Kyouichi; Oosawa, Mikio [Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Screening of carotid and intracranial artery diseases by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed in forty-one adult patients prior to elective cardiovascular surgery. In twenty patients (48.8%), MRA demonstrated significant cerebrovascular lesions: carotid or main cerebral artery stenosis in 7, diffuse cerebral arteriosclerotic change in 6, vertebral artery lesion in 5 and berry aneurysm in 2. Advanced age (over 70 years) and previous cerebrovascular events increased the incidence of cerebrovascular lesions on MRA. Forty patients underwent scheduled surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass, and pulsatile flow perfusion was used in patients in whom significant cerebrovascular lesions were demonstrated on MRA. One patient with aortic arch aneurysm was judged to be an unacceptable candidate for surgery in light of his marked diffuse arteriosclerotic lesions on MRA. In five patients, staged operation was performed from 10 to 30 days after cerebrovascular surgery (bypass surgery for internal carotid occlusion in 2, aneurysm clipping in 2, carotid endarterectomy in 1). Postoperative neurological complications occurred in one patient (2.5%). In conclusion, screening of carotid and intracranial artery diseases by MRA is a safe and useful method for evaluation of cerebrovascular lesions in patients with advanced age, previous cerebrovascular events and/or arteriosclerotic diseases. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography virtual endoscopy in the assessment of pulmonary veins before radiofrequency ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirillo, S.; Tosetti, Irene; Giuseppe, M.De; Longo, M.; Regge, D.; Bonamini, R.; Gaita, F.; Bianchi, F.; Vivalda, L.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a safe and non-invasive imaging method that can readily depict the pulmonary veins (PV), whose imaging has acquired momentum with the advent of new techniques for radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF). We evaluated whether virtual endoscopy from 3D MRA images (MRA-VE) is feasible in studying the morphology of PV. Fifty patients with AF underwent pre-ablative MRA (1.5 T). Images were acquired with axial T-2 weighted and 3D-SPGR sequences after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA and automatic triggering. Postprocessing was performed by an experienced radiologist with maximum intensity projection (MIP) and virtual endoscopy software (Navigator, GEMS). The venoatrial junction was visualized with MRA-VE in 49 of 50 patients (98.0%). Twenty-seven patients (55.1%) had two ostia on both sides, 13 patients (26.5%) had two ostia on the right and a single common ostium on the left, 5 patients (10.2%) had accessory PV and 4 patients (8.2%) had both an accessory right PV and a single common ostium on the left. Flythrough navigation showed the number and spatial disposition of second-order PV branches in 48 out of 49 patients (98.0%). MRA-VE is an excellent tool for at-a-glance visualization of ostia morphology, navigation of second-generation PV branches and easy endoluminal assessment of left atrial structures in pre-ablative imaging. (orig.)

  3. Prevalence of fenestrated basilar artery with magnetic resonance angiography: a transversal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arráez-Aybar, L A; Villar-Martin, A; Poyatos-Ruiperez, C; Rodriguez-Boto, G; Arrazola-Garcia, J

    2013-08-01

    Fenestration of the basilar artery (BA) is a rare anatomical variation in comparison to those of the other intracranial arteries constituting the cerebral arterial circle. The incidence is difficult to ascertain and data vary according to type of series and modalities of detection. Basilar artery fenestration (BAF) has been reported in association with arteriovenous malformations, vascular variants, other developmental anomalies and neurovascular conflicts as a consequence of relations between the arterial branches of the BA and the nerves and other structures in the posterior cranial fossa. However, the real clinical interest of BAF is due to the possible formation of an aneurysm at the junction of the fenestrated segment and less frequently to the thrombosis of the vessels. With the aim to establish the prevalence of BAF in our population, we made a transversal pilot study of the first 200 MR angiographies performed on patients attending for the first time to control their base pathology (vascular or not). We have described three patients with this condition (representing a prevalence of 1.5 % on MR angiography) to shed additional light on this anomaly, two cases located at 1/3 proximal end (type 1-BAF) and one case located at joint 1/3 medium-1/3 distal end, locating distal to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (type 4-BAF). In neither case was any other lesion found (i.e. aneurysm, infarctions, ischemia or thromboembolism). The pertinent clinical anatomy and embryological basis for this variation are reviewed, and the possible clinical implications and associated findings are discussed.

  4. Follow-up after embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms: a prospective comparison of two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Strześniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Władysław; Beuth, Wojciech

    2012-11-01

    To prospectively compare of the diagnostic value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) in the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Seventy-two consecutive patients were examined 3 months after the embolization. The index tests included: two-dimensional DSA (2D-DSA), three-dimensional DSA (3D-DSA), and TOF-MRA. The reference test was a retrospective consensus between 2D-DSA images, 3D-DSA images, and source rotational DSA images. The evaluation included: detection of the residual flow, quantification of the flow, and validity of the decision regarding retreatment. Intraobserver agreement and interobserver agreement were determined. The sensitivity and specificity of residual flow detection ranged from 84.6 % (2D-DSA and TOF-MRA) to 92.3 % (3D-DSA) and from 91.3 % (TOF-MRA) to 97.8 % (3D-DSA), respectively. The accuracy of occlusion degree evaluation ranged from 0.78 (2D-DSA) to 0.92 (3D-DSA, Cohen's kappa). The 2D-DSA method presented lower performance in the decision on retreatment than 3D-DSA (P < 0.05, ROC analysis). The intraobserver agreement was very good for all techniques (κ = 0.80-0.97). The interobserver agreement was moderate for TOF-MRA and very good for 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA (κ = 0.72-0.94). Considering the invasiveness of DSA and the minor difference in the diagnostic performance between 3D-DSA and TOF-MRA, the latter method should be the first-line modality for follow-up after aneurysm embolization.

  5. Follow-up after embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms: A prospective comparison of two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Strzesniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Wladyslaw; Beuth, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively compare of the diagnostic value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) in the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Seventy-two consecutive patients were examined 3 months after the embolization. The index tests included: two-dimensional DSA (2D-DSA), three-dimensional DSA (3D-DSA), and TOF-MRA. The reference test was a retrospective consensus between 2D-DSA images, 3D-DSA images, and source rotational DSA images. The evaluation included: detection of the residual flow, quantification of the flow, and validity of the decision regarding retreatment. Intraobserver agreement and interobserver agreement were determined. The sensitivity and specificity of residual flow detection ranged from 84.6 % (2D-DSA and TOF-MRA) to 92.3 % (3D-DSA) and from 91.3 % (TOF-MRA) to 97.8 % (3D-DSA), respectively. The accuracy of occlusion degree evaluation ranged from 0.78 (2D-DSA) to 0.92 (3D-DSA, Cohen's kappa). The 2D-DSA method presented lower performance in the decision on retreatment than 3D-DSA (P < 0.05, ROC analysis). The intraobserver agreement was very good for all techniques (κ = 0.80-0.97). The interobserver agreement was moderate for TOF-MRA and very good for 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA (κ = 0.72-0.94). Considering the invasiveness of DSA and the minor difference in the diagnostic performance between 3D-DSA and TOF-MRA, the latter method should be the first-line modality for follow-up after aneurysm embolization. (orig.)

  6. Follow-up after embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms: A prospective comparison of two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Strzesniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Wladyslaw [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Bydgoszcz (Poland); Beuth, Wojciech [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurotraumatology, Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    To prospectively compare of the diagnostic value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) in the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Seventy-two consecutive patients were examined 3 months after the embolization. The index tests included: two-dimensional DSA (2D-DSA), three-dimensional DSA (3D-DSA), and TOF-MRA. The reference test was a retrospective consensus between 2D-DSA images, 3D-DSA images, and source rotational DSA images. The evaluation included: detection of the residual flow, quantification of the flow, and validity of the decision regarding retreatment. Intraobserver agreement and interobserver agreement were determined. The sensitivity and specificity of residual flow detection ranged from 84.6 % (2D-DSA and TOF-MRA) to 92.3 % (3D-DSA) and from 91.3 % (TOF-MRA) to 97.8 % (3D-DSA), respectively. The accuracy of occlusion degree evaluation ranged from 0.78 (2D-DSA) to 0.92 (3D-DSA, Cohen's kappa). The 2D-DSA method presented lower performance in the decision on retreatment than 3D-DSA (P < 0.05, ROC analysis). The intraobserver agreement was very good for all techniques ({kappa} = 0.80-0.97). The interobserver agreement was moderate for TOF-MRA and very good for 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA ({kappa} = 0.72-0.94). Considering the invasiveness of DSA and the minor difference in the diagnostic performance between 3D-DSA and TOF-MRA, the latter method should be the first-line modality for follow-up after aneurysm embolization. (orig.)

  7. Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 3 Tesla Using a Hybrid Protocol in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Yousef W.; Eiberg, Jonas P.; Logager, Vibeke B.; Schroeder, Torben V.; Just, Sven; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of 3T whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA) using a hybrid protocol in comparison with a standard protocol in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). In 26 consecutive patients with PAD two different protocols were used for WB-MRA: a standard sequential protocol (n = 13) and a hybrid protocol (n = 13). WB-MRA was performed using a gradient echo sequence, body coil for signal reception, and gadoterate meglumine as contrast agent (0.3 mmol/kg body weight). Two blinded observers evaluated all WB-MRA examinations with regard to presence of stenoses, as well as diagnostic quality and degree of venous contamination in each of the four stations used in WB-MRA. Digital subtraction angiography served as the method of reference. Sensitivity for detecting significant arterial disease (luminal narrowing ≥ 50%) using standard-protocol WB-MRA for the two observers was 0.63 (95%CI: 0.51-0.73) and 0.66 (0.58-0.78). Specificities were 0.94 (0.91-0.97) and 0.96 (0.92-0.98), respectively. In the hybrid protocol WB-MRA sensitivities were 0.75 (0.64-0.84) and 0.70 (0.58-0.8), respectively. Specificities were 0.93 (0.88-0.96) and 0.95 (0.91-0.97). Interobserver agreement was good using both the standard and the hybrid protocol, with κ = 0.62 (0.44-0.67) and κ = 0.70 (0.59-0.79), respectively. WB-MRA quality scores were significantly higher in the lower leg using the hybrid protocol compared to standard protocol (p = 0.003 and p = 0.03, observers 1 and 2). Distal venous contamination scores were significantly lower with the hybrid protocol (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, observers 1 and 2). In conclusion, hybrid-protocol WB-MRA shows a better diagnostic performance than standard protocol WB-MRA at 3 T in patients with PAD.

  8. Evaluation of the restenosis of coronary artery after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty by three-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arisaka, Hiraku

    2000-01-01

    Coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has been recently brought into clinical use, however, there has not been reports on the comparison with MRA and conventional contrast coronary angiography (CAG) in the detection of the localization and characteristics of coronary restenosis after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). To assess the restenosis of coronary artery after PTCA, this study compared three-dimensional (3D) coronary MRA and CAG. One hundred three patients (76 males and 27 females, average age of 64.6±9.3 years old) were performed coronary MRA at 3-6 months after PTCA. The right coronary artery (RCA) group consist of 21 patients, the left anterior descending branch (LAD) 63 patients and the left circumflex branch (LCX) 19 patients. Coronary MRA was performed with the patients in supine position on a 1.5 T whole body scanner (MAGNETOM VISION, Siemens AG, Germany) using body array coil. The imaging technique used a 3-D gradient echo sequence with respiratory gating and fat suppression. The slice thickness was 2 mm, slab thickness 32 mm, a field of view of 300 mm and a matrix of 128 x 256. Other parameters were an echo time of 2.7 ms and a repetition time of 600 to 1100 msec. The measurement time of 1 imaging slab took 15 to 20 minutes depending on the patient's heart rate. The coronary arteries were reconstructed from the 3-D data set using a multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) technique. According to previous coronary MRA studies, a significant stenosis with a luminal reduction of ≥50% was assumed if a marked signal reduction or signal loss of a vessel segment was visible. In CAG, 57 of 103 patients showed restenosis. In coronary MRA, 37 of 103 patients demonstrated restenosis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 64.9%, 100%, 100% and 69.6%, respectively. Predictive accuracy was 79.6%. Three-dimensional coronary MRA is useful in a noninvasive diagnostic method to evaluate the coronary

  9. Exploiting magnetic resonance angiography imaging improves model estimation of BOLD signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghui Hu

    Full Text Available The change of BOLD signal relies heavily upon the resting blood volume fraction ([Formula: see text] associated with regional vasculature. However, existing hemodynamic data assimilation studies pretermit such concern. They simply assign the value in a physiologically plausible range to get over ill-conditioning of the assimilation problem and fail to explore actual [Formula: see text]. Such performance might lead to unreliable model estimation. In this work, we present the first exploration of the influence of [Formula: see text] on fMRI data assimilation, where actual [Formula: see text] within a given cortical area was calibrated by an MR angiography experiment and then was augmented into the assimilation scheme. We have investigated the impact of [Formula: see text] on single-region data assimilation and multi-region data assimilation (dynamic cause modeling, DCM in a classical flashing checkerboard experiment. Results show that the employment of an assumed [Formula: see text] in fMRI data assimilation is only suitable for fMRI signal reconstruction and activation detection grounded on this signal, and not suitable for estimation of unobserved states and effective connectivity study. We thereby argue that introducing physically realistic [Formula: see text] in the assimilation process may provide more reliable estimation of physiological information, which contributes to a better understanding of the underlying hemodynamic processes. Such an effort is valuable and should be well appreciated.

  10. [Development of an automated processing method to detect coronary motion for coronary magnetic resonance angiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asou, Hiroya; Imada, N; Sato, T

    2010-06-20

    On coronary MR angiography (CMRA), cardiac motions worsen the image quality. To improve the image quality, detection of cardiac especially for individual coronary motion is very important. Usually, scan delay and duration were determined manually by the operator. We developed a new evaluation method to calculate static time of individual coronary artery. At first, coronary cine MRI was taken at the level of about 3 cm below the aortic valve (80 images/R-R). Chronological change of the signals were evaluated with Fourier transformation of each pixel of the images were done. Noise reduction with subtraction process and extraction process were done. To extract higher motion such as coronary arteries, morphological filter process and labeling process were added. Using these imaging processes, individual coronary motion was extracted and individual coronary static time was calculated automatically. We compared the images with ordinary manual method and new automated method in 10 healthy volunteers. Coronary static times were calculated with our method. Calculated coronary static time was shorter than that of ordinary manual method. And scan time became about 10% longer than that of ordinary method. Image qualities were improved in our method. Our automated detection method for coronary static time with chronological Fourier transformation has a potential to improve the image quality of CMRA and easy processing.

  11. Value of non-contrast sequences in magnetic resonance angiography of hepatic arterial vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, Vivek B., E-mail: vivek.kalra@yale.edu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Box 208042, Tompkins East 2, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 06520-8042, United States of America (United States); Gilbert, John W., E-mail: jwgilbert@partners.org [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, United States of America (United States); Krishnamoorthy, Saravanan, E-mail: sk3552@columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, Milstein 3rd Fl, New York NY 10032 United States (United States); Cornfeld, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.cornfeld@yale.edu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, Box 208042, Tompkins East 2, 333 Cedar St, New Haven, CT 06520-8042, United States of America (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate value of adding non-contrast MR angiographic sequence (In-Flow Inversion Recovery [IFIR]) to standard fat-suppressed T1-weighted postcontrast sequence (3D spoiled gradient echo [3D-GRE]) for evaluating hepatic arterial anatomy. Methods: Retrospective evaluation of 30 consecutive patients undergoing multiphase liver MRI. Individual vessels for IFIR/3D-GRE sequences were evaluated by two blinded readers using a four-point scale. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for vessel conspicuity between IFIR/3D-GRE sequences. Results: IFIR alone diagnostically imaged 8.1% of vessels, 3D-GRE alone 25.8%, 55.8% by both 3D-GRE/IFIR, and 10.3% of vessels by neither. Two patients with variant vascular anatomy were visualized with both sequences. Addition of IFIR to 3D-GRE resulted in statistically significant increase in arterial visualization (p < 0.001), 10% relative increase in identified vessels, and 3–5 mi increase in acquisition time for total scan time of 30–35 min. Conclusions: IFIR may be a useful adjunct to 3D-GRE in hepatic angiography without adding considerably to scan time. 10% more hepatic arteries were seen when combining information from IFIR/3D-GRE vs. 3D-GRE alone.

  12. Cerebrovascular reactivity by quantitative magnetic resonance angiography with a co2 challenge. Validation as a new imaging biomarker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputi, Luigi; Ghielmetti, Francesco; Faragò, Giuseppe; Longaretti, Fabio; Lamperti, Massimo; Anzola, Gian Paolo; Carriero, Maria Rita; Charbel, Fady T.; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Parati, Eugenio; Ciceri, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is essential in cerebrovascular diseases, as exhausted CVR may enhance the risk of cerebral ischemic events. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) with a vasodilatory stimulus is currently used for CVR evaluation. Scanty data are available for Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Angiography (QMRA), which supplies higher spatial resolution and quantitative cerebral blood flow values. Aims of our pilot study were: (a) to assess safety and feasibility of CO 2 administration during QMRA, (b) evaluation of CVR under QMRA compared to TCD, and (c) quantitative evaluation of blood flow from the major intracranial arterial vessels both at rest and after CO 2 . CVR during 5% CO 2 air breathing was measured with TCD as a reference method and compared with QMRA. Fifteen healthy subjects (age 60.47 ± 2.24; male 11/15) were evaluated at rest and during CO 2 challenge. Feasibility and safety of QMRA under CO 2 were ensured in all subjects. CVR from middle cerebral artery territory was not statistically different between TCD and MRI (p > 0.05). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) increased during QMRA and TCD (MAP p = 0.007 and p = 0.001; HR p = 0.043 and p = 0.068, respectively). Blood flow values from all intracranial vessels increased after CO 2 inhalation (p < 0.001). CO 2 administration during QMRA sessions is safe and feasible. Good correlation in terms of CVR was obtained comparing TCD and QMRA. Blood flow values significantly increased from all intracranial arterial vessels after CO 2 . Studies regarding CVR in physiopathological conditions might consider the utilization of QMRA both in routine clinical settings and in research projects

  13. Collateral vessels on magnetic resonance angiography in endovascular-treated acute ischemic stroke patients associated with clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Su, Hao-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Dong; Zhou, Jun-Shan; Geng, Wen; Chen, Huiyou; Xu, Quan; Yin, Xindao; Chen, Yu-Chen

    2017-10-06

    Collateral vessels were considered to be related with outcome in endovascular-treated acute ischemic stroke patients. This study aimed to evaluate whether the collateral vessels on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) could predict the clinical outcome. Acute stroke patients with internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusion within 6 hours of symptom onset were included. All patients underwent MRI and received endovascular treatment. The collateral circulations at the Sylvian fissure and the leptomeningeal convexity were evaluated. The preoperative and postoperative infarct volume was measured. The clinical outcome was evaluated by mRS score at 3 months after stroke. Of 55 patients, Cases with insufficient collateral circulation at the Sylvian fissure and leptomeningeal convexity showed that the NIHSS score at arrival and preoperative infarct volume were significantly lower in mRS score of 0-2 (both P collateral status at the leptomeningeal convexity were independent of the clinical outcome at 3 months after stroke (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.094 (1.025-1.168); 9.542 (1.812-50.245) respectively). The change of infarct volume in the group with mRS score of 0-2 was smaller than that with mRS score of 3-6. While multivariate logistic models showed that postoperative infarct volume was non-significant in predicting the clinical outcome after stroke. The extent of collateral circulation at the leptomeningeal convexity may be useful for predicting the functional recovery while the relationship between postoperative infarct volume and clinical outcome still requires for further study.

  14. The study of vascular dynamics for the effect of a compress pack on pain relief using magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Ji Won; Lim, Young Khi

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of the hot compress pack on alleviating local muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine in terms of hemodynamics. In this study, the hot compress band was put on the neck and the local physiological change on the stimulation site and the cranial blood circulation change were examined. We recruited healthy volunteers (n=8, mean age: 32.13 (4.61)), who participated in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Local skin color and temperature were measured for the local effect of the hot compress band and the changes of intra-cranial and extra-cranial blood vessels were examined with MR angiography (MRA) images. The skin temperature increased from 36.4 degrees Celsius at the rest condition to 36.7 degrees Celsius and 37.1 degrees Celsius after 15 min and 30 min stimulation, respectively. The change of the extra-cranial blood vessels between pre-stimulation and post-stimulation of 30 min was significantly increased (+38.8%), while the change of the intra-cranial blood vessels was negligible. In this study, we demonstrated that the hot compress band on the neck yielded the increase of local skin temperature on the stimulation site and it made an effect on the extracranial circulation. In conclusion, the stimulation with a hot compress could facilitate the blood circulation, causing to relieve the muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine

  15. The study of vascular dynamics for the effect of a compress pack on pain relief using magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Ji Won; Lim, Young Khi [Gachon University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study was to investigate the effects of the hot compress pack on alleviating local muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine in terms of hemodynamics. In this study, the hot compress band was put on the neck and the local physiological change on the stimulation site and the cranial blood circulation change were examined. We recruited healthy volunteers (n=8, mean age: 32.13 (4.61)), who participated in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Local skin color and temperature were measured for the local effect of the hot compress band and the changes of intra-cranial and extra-cranial blood vessels were examined with MR angiography (MRA) images. The skin temperature increased from 36.4 degrees Celsius at the rest condition to 36.7 degrees Celsius and 37.1 degrees Celsius after 15 min and 30 min stimulation, respectively. The change of the extra-cranial blood vessels between pre-stimulation and post-stimulation of 30 min was significantly increased (+38.8%), while the change of the intra-cranial blood vessels was negligible. In this study, we demonstrated that the hot compress band on the neck yielded the increase of local skin temperature on the stimulation site and it made an effect on the extracranial circulation. In conclusion, the stimulation with a hot compress could facilitate the blood circulation, causing to relieve the muscular discomfort, stiffness in limbs as well as the chronic pains such as migraine.

  16. Three-dimensional imaging of the optic nerve using magnetic resonance angiography. Application to anterior communicating artery aneurysm and craniopharingioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Tohru; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Fukuyama, Koichi; Ikeno, Kunihiro; Araki, Hiroyuki; Okada, Kinya; Sohma, Noriko

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze three-dimensional images of the optic nerve obtained by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in cases of anterior communicating artery aneurysm and craniopharingioma. Four ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms, five non-ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms and two craniopharingiomas were examined. The images were taken using MR/i Hispeed Plus 1.5 T Infinity version, and analyzed by Advantage Work station AW4.1. The routine MR imaging parameters are shown in Table. The imaging time was about 10 minutes. Analysis was made by reformation of images parallel to the optic nerve obtained from the original MRA images. The optic nerve and brain tumor were traced with paintbrush from one sheet to another of the reformed images after subtraction of the blood vessels around the anterior communicating artery in these reformed images, and then three-dimensional images were constructed. Three-dimensional images of the blood vessels were reconstructed from MIP (maximum intensity projection) images using the threshold method. The optic nerve and anterior communicating arterial aneurysm or brain tumor were both observed in the overlapped 3D-SSD (shaded surface display) images. The analysis time was about 15 minutes. Three-dimensional images of the optic nerve and anterior communicating artery aneurysm or brain tumor were able to be made in all cases. As a preoperative investigation for anterior communicating artery aneurysm or suprasellar brain tumor, we considered that three-dimensional imaging of the optic nerve is useful in the operative approach because the optic nerve acts as a merkmal for the anterior communicating aneurysm or brain tumor. (author)

  17. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for detecting intracranial aneurysm: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HaiFeng, Liu; YongSheng, Xu; YangQin, Xun; Yu, Dou; ShuaiWen, Wang; XingRu, Lu; JunQiang, Lei

    2017-11-01

    This meta-analysis is to comprehensively evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) for detecting intracranial aneurysm (IA). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for retrieving eligible studies. Study inclusion, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were performed by two researchers independently. Pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to assess the diagnostic value. In addition, heterogeneity and subgroup analysis were carried out. In total, 18 studies comprising 3463 patients were selected. The results of 3D-TOF-MRA for diagnosing IA were SEN 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.94), SPE 0.94 (0.86-0.97), PLR 13.79 (5.92-32.12), NLR 0.11 (0.07-0.19), DOR 121.90 (38.81-382.94), and AUC 0.96 (0.94-0.98), respectively. In the subgroup analysis, studies without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tend to perform statistical significantly better (P 3D-TOF-MRA had better SEN in aneurysms > 3 mm than the aneurysms ≤ 3 mm in diameter: 0.89 (0.87-0.92) vs. 0.78 (0.71-0.84) with P 3D-TOF-MRA has an excellent diagnostic performance for the overall assessment of IA and may serve as an alternative for further patient management with IA.

  18. The benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for predicting vascular access surgery outcome: a computer model perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten A G Merkx

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vascular access (VA surgery, a prerequisite for hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal-disease (ESRD patients, is hampered by complication rates, which are frequently related to flow enhancement. To assist in VA surgery planning, a patient-specific computer model for postoperative flow enhancement was developed. The purpose of this study is to assess the benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA data as patient-specific geometrical input for the model-based prediction of surgery outcome. METHODS: 25 ESRD patients were included in this study. All patients received a NCE-MRA examination of the upper extremity blood vessels in addition to routine ultrasound (US. Local arterial radii were assessed from NCE-MRA and converted to model input using a linear fit per artery. Venous radii were determined with US. The effect of radius measurement uncertainty on model predictions was accounted for by performing Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting flow prediction interval of the computer model was compared with the postoperative flow obtained from US. Patients with no overlap between model-based prediction and postoperative measurement were further analyzed to determine whether an increase in geometrical detail improved computer model prediction. RESULTS: Overlap between postoperative flows and model-based predictions was obtained for 71% of patients. Detailed inspection of non-overlapping cases revealed that the geometrical details that could be assessed from NCE-MRA explained most of the differences, and moreover, upon addition of these details in the computer model the flow predictions improved. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate clearly that NCE-MRA does provide valuable geometrical information for VA surgery planning. Therefore, it is recommended to use this modality, at least for patients at risk for local or global narrowing of the blood vessels as well as for patients for whom an US-based model

  19. Incidental findings of persistent primitive trigeminal artery on 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography at 3.0 T: an analysis of 25 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Chang; Li, Ming-Hua; Chen, Shi-Wen; Hu, Ding-Jun; Qiao, Rui-Hua

    2011-04-01

    Currently, the presence of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) is detected by digital subtraction angiography (DSA); most publications on this cerebrovascular variation have been individual case reports. This study is to evaluate the efficacy of 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF MRA) at 3.0 T for the detection and classification of PPTA based on a large case series. Between June 2007 and October 2008, 4,650 patients underwent magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) examination at 3.0 T in our hospital. MRA was performed using 3D-TOF with volume rendering (VR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP) technique. The PPTA was classified according to the Saltzman classification system. The occurrence of cerebral vascular diseases accompanying PPTA was studied. Among the 4,650 patients with MRA examined, 25 were identified as having PPTA; the prevalence of PPTA was .54%. The Saltzman classification of PPTAs was as follows: type I, 24%; type II, 16%; type III, 60%. Sixteen percent of the cases with PPTA were accompanied with intracranial aneurysm. A 3D-TOF MRA at 3.0 T can be used for the detection of PPTA and making a classification of PPTA indirectly. The incidence of PPTA with type III was greater than that of other types of PPTA. Intracranial aneurysm appeared to be associated with PPTA. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  20. Utility of time-resolved three-dimensional magnetic resonance digital subtraction angiography without contrast material for assessment of intracranial dural arterio-venous fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Masaaki; Aoki, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Shimoji, Keigo; Kamagata, Koji; Houshito, Haruyoshi; Kuwatsuru, Ryohei; Oishi, Hidenori; Arai, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Background: Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is an arteriovenous shunting disease of the dura. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is expected to be a safer alternative method in evaluation of DAVF, compared with invasive intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IADSA). Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic use of time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance digital subtraction angiography (MRDSA) without contrast material in six patients with DAVF. Material and Methods: Images for 3D time-of-flight MRA, which has been a valuable tool for the diagnosis of DAVF but provide little or less hemodynamic information, and Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA, were acquired for each patient. The presence, side, and grade of the disease were evaluated according to IADSA. Results: In all patients, the presence and side of the DAVF were correctly identified by both 3D time-of-flight MRA and Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA. Cortical reflux present in a patient with a grade 2b DAVF was not detected by Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA, when compared with IADSA findings. Conclusion: Time-SLIP 3D MRDSA provides hemodynamic information without contrast material and is a useful complementary tool for diagnosis of DAVF

  1. The value of magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of the bleeding source in non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhages: a comparison with conventional digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummel, Nina; Lutz, Juergen; Brueckmann, Hartmut; Linn, Jennifer [University of Munich, Department of Neuroradiology, Munich (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is currently regarded as the gold standard in detecting underlying vascular pathologies in patients with intracerebral haemorrhages (ICH). However, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnostic workup of ICHs has considerably increased in recent years. Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and yield of MRI for the detection of the underlying aetiology in ICH patients. Sixty-seven consecutive patients with an acute ICH who underwent MRI (including magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and DSA during their diagnostic workup) were included in the study. Magnetic resonance images were retrospectively analysed by two independent neuroradiologists to determine the localisation and cause of the ICH. DSA was used as a reference standard. In seven patients (10.4%), a DSA-positive vascular aetiology was present (one aneurysm, four arteriovenous malformations, one dural arteriovenous fistula and one vasculitis). All of these cases were correctly diagnosed by both readers on MRI. In addition, MRI revealed the following probable bleeding causes in 39 of the 60 DSA-negative patients: cerebral amyloid angiopathy (17), cavernoma (9), arterial hypertension (8), haemorrhagic transformation of an ischaemic infarction (3) and malignant brain tumour with secondary ICH (2). Performing MRI with MRA proved to be an accurate diagnostic tool in detecting vascular malformations in patients with ICH. In addition, MRI provided valuable information regarding DSA-negative ICH causes, and thus had a high diagnostic yield in ICH patients. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  6. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography of the aorta and its branches. Clinical applications for a new angiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, J. L.; Vilanova, J. C.; Huguet, M.; Delgado, E.; Baquero, M.; Blanch, A.; Aldoma, J.; Capdevila, A.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the study of the aorta has developed at an impressive rate in recent years. It is now possible to evaluate the aorta and its branches by means of magnetic resonance (MR) following administration via peripheral vein of a paramagnetic contrast agent. The approach is similar to that of conventional arteriography, but without the risk associated with iodinated contrast media or invasive arterial catheterization. The technique involves the use of a sequence of ultrafast three-dimensional gradient-echo pulses acquired during apnea. This process enables angiographic or volumetric visualization in the desired plane. The objective of the present report is to describe the technique and demonstrate its many clinical applications. (Author) 23 refs

  7. Dimensions of the ascending aorta in children and adolescents with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot obtained by cardiac magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothoff, Matthias; Mende, Meinhard; Graefe, Daniel; Daehnert, Ingo; Kostelka, Martin; Hoffmann, Janine; Freyhardt, Patrick; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Gutberlet, Matthias; Mahler, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Dilatation of the ascending aorta is a common finding in Tetralogy of fallot (TOF). We sought to provide aortic dimensions in children and adolescents after corrected TOF obtained by contrast-enhanced cardiac-magnetic-resonance angiography (CE-CMRA) that could serve as reference values. We enrolled 101 children and adolescents (56 male) with a median age of 10.9 years. All patients underwent CE-CMRA imaging using a 3-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo-sequence. Aortic diameters were measured at the level of the aortic valve (AV), aortic sinus (AS), sino-tubular junction (STJ) and the ascending aorta (AA) and compared with normal values obtained from literature. Sex-specific aortic dimensions are given as percentile curves as well as z scores. Furthermore CMR volumetric and functional parameters as well as clinical and anamnestic data were analyzed to identify parameters that are associated with aortic dilatation. Diameters for aortic size for males were 3.6 + 16.6*BSA(0.5) at the AV level, 7.0 + 19.5*BSA(0.5) at the AS level, 7.0 + 14.4*BSA(0.5) at the STJ level and 7.3 + 15.5*BSA(0.5) at the AA level. Diameters for females were 5.8 + 14.1*BSA(0.5) at the AV level, 7.2 + 17.6*BSA(0.5) at the AS level, 5.2 + 15.4*BSA(0.5) at the STJ level and 2.0 + 17.8*BSA(0.5) at the AA level. All diameters in TOF patients were larger compared with normal values. The postoperative interval and age at examination were the only parameters associated with aortic size at all measured levels. We provide CE-CMRA data of aortic dimensions in children and adolescents after correction of TOF. Our data might be useful for an estimation of the "normal" aortic size in this patient cohort and can serve as a basis for future longitudinal studies adding prognostic data.

  8. Pulmonary vein dimensions and variation of branching pattern in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation using magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Bonpei; Nagata, Masayoshi; Matsui, Takemi

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary veins are the most frequent origin of focal and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Although radiofrequency ablation has been attempted for the treatment of focal and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, the anatomy of the pulmonary vein is still not fully understood. To investigate the dimensions and anatomical variation of the pulmonary vein in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, we performed breath-hold gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using a 1.5 T cardiac MR imager (GE CV/i) in 32 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (61±8 years old), 11 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation (64±9 years old), and 26 patients with normal sinus rhythm (55±15 years old). Three-dimensional images of the pulmonary veins were thus obtained, and the diameters of the most proximal portion of the left or right superior pulmonary vein and left or right inferior pulmonary vein were measured. Pulmonary vein branching variations were determined by a visual qualitative analysis by two separate readers' agreements, who were blinded to any clinical information. We focused on the existence of a complex-branching pattern draining into the orifice of four pulmonary veins. Patients with either paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or chronic atrial fibrillation showed larger superior pulmonary veins than those with normal sinus rhythm (mean±SD; in the left superior pulmonary vein, 20±3 mm 23±3 mm vs 16±3 mm, P<0.05; in right superior pulmonary vein, 19±4 mm, 19±2 mm vs 16±2 mm, P<0.05). Complex-branching pattern was frequently observed in inferior pulmonary veins in patients with either paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or chronic atrial fibrillation; 25/32 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, 11/11 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation, compared to 7/26 patients with normal sinus rhythm. Complex-branching patterns were not observed in superior pulmonary veins in any patients in this cohort. In patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

  9. Prevalence Study of Proximal Vertebral Artery Stenosis Using High-Resolution Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Lee, J.S.; Kwon, O.K.; Han, M.K.; Kim, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of proximal vertebral artery stenosis, compared with those of the distal vertebral/basilar artery and extracranial internal carotid artery, in a large population of stroke and non-stroke patients. Material and Methods: Nine-hundred-and-thirty-five patients who underwent high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a regional general hospital were categorized into six groups based on neurological symptoms and disease: an asymptomatic group (n ∼ 182), a minor symptom group with headache or dizziness (n ∼ 519), a cardiac group with coronary artery steno-occlusive disease (n ∼ 15), a hemorrhagic group with old cerebral hemorrhage (n ∼ 26), an anterior circulation infarct group (n ∼ 121), and posterior circulation infarct group (n ∼ 72). Prevalence of stenosis of the proximal vertebral artery, distal vertebral/basilar artery, and internal carotid artery was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of stenosis of the proximal vertebral artery, distal vertebral/basilar artery, and internal carotid artery was 12.9%, 5.5%, and 7.2%, respectively, in the study population, and rose as the age increased (P <0.0001 for all arteries). The prevalence of stenosis of the proximal vertebral artery, distal vertebral/basilar artery, and internal carotid artery was 3.3%, 0.5%, and.1%, respectively, in the asymptomatic group; 8.3%, 2.1%, and 3.7%, respectively, in the minor symptom group; 13.3%, 6.7%, and 6.7%, respectively, in the cardiac group; 19.2%, 7.7%, and 7.7%, respectively, in the hemorrhagic group; 27.3%, 8.3%, and 25.6%, respectively, in the anterior circulation infarct group; and 44.4%, 36.1%, and 16.7%, respectively, in the posterior circulation infarct group. This increasing tendency of stenosis accordingly was statistically significant ( P <0.0001 for all arteries). Conclusion: The prevalence of proximal vertebral artery stenosis was highest, compared with those of the distal vertebral/basilar artery and

  10. Diagnostic value of 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography for detecting intracranial aneurysm: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, HaiFeng; Xu, YongSheng [First Hospital of LanZhou University, Department of Radiology, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); First Clinical Medical College of LanZhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu (China); Xun, YangQin [Lanzhou University, Evidence-based Medicine Center, Lanzhou (China); Dou, Yu; Wang, ShuaiWen; Lu, XingRu; Lei, JunQiang [First Hospital of LanZhou University, Department of Radiology, Lanzhou, Gansu (China)

    2017-11-15

    This meta-analysis is to comprehensively evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) for detecting intracranial aneurysm (IA). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for retrieving eligible studies. Study inclusion, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were performed by two researchers independently. Pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated to assess the diagnostic value. In addition, heterogeneity and subgroup analysis were carried out. In total, 18 studies comprising 3463 patients were selected. The results of 3D-TOF-MRA for diagnosing IA were SEN 0.89 (95% CI 0.82-0.94), SPE 0.94 (0.86-0.97), PLR 13.79 (5.92-32.12), NLR 0.11 (0.07-0.19), DOR 121.90 (38.81-382.94), and AUC 0.96 (0.94-0.98), respectively. In the subgroup analysis, studies without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) tend to perform statistical significantly better (P < 0.05) in detecting IAs than studies with SAH 0.99 (0.98-1.00) vs. 0.89 (0.86-0.91). The diagnostic value of studies with a two-image reconstruction method was higher than studies with only one image reconstruction method: 0.99 (0.98-1.00) vs. 0.91 (0.89-0.94) with P < 0.05. The 3D-TOF-MRA had better SEN in aneurysms > 3 mm than the aneurysms ≤ 3 mm in diameter: 0.89 (0.87-0.92) vs. 0.78 (0.71-0.84) with P < 0.05. This study demonstrated that 3D-TOF-MRA has an excellent diagnostic performance for the overall assessment of IA and may serve as an alternative for further patient management with IA. (orig.)

  11. Safety of cardiac magnetic resonance and contrast angiography for neonates and small infants: a 10-year single-institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangamani, Sheela; Li, Ling; Harvey, Lisa; Fletcher, Scott E.; Danford, David A.; Kutty, Shelby [University of Nebraska College of Medicine/Creighton University School of Medicine, Joint Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Omaha, NE (United States); Varghese, Joby [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Cardiac Anesthesia, Omaha, NE (United States); Hammel, James M.; Duncan, Kim F. [Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2012-11-15

    With increasing applications of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD), safety of this technology in the very young is of particular interest. We report our 10-year experience with CMR in neonates and small infants with particular focus on the safety profile and incidence of adverse events (AEs). We reviewed clinical, anesthesia and nursing records of all children {<=}120 days of age who underwent CMR. We recorded variables including cardiac diagnosis, study duration, anesthesia type and agents, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) dependence and gadolinium (Gd) use. Serially recorded temperature, systemic saturation (SpO{sub 2}) and cardiac rhythm were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was any AE during or <24 h after the procedure, including minor AEs such as hypothermia (axillary temperature {<=}95 F), desaturation (SpO{sub 2} drop {>=}10% below baseline) and bradycardia (heart rate {<=}100 bpm). Secondary outcome measure was unplanned overnight hospitalization of outpatients. Children (n = 143; 74 boys, 69 girls) had a median age of 6 days (1-117), and 98 were {<=}30 days at the time of CMR. The median weight was 3.4 kg (1.4-6 kg) and body surface area 0.22 m{sup 2} (0.13-0.32 m{sup 2}). There were 118 (83%) inpatients (108 receiving intensive care) and 25 (17%) outpatients. Indications for CMR were assessment of aortic arch (n = 57), complex CHD (n = 41), pulmonary veins (n = 15), vascular ring (n = 8), intracardiac mass (n = 8), pulmonary artery (n = 7), ventricular volume (n = 4), and systemic veins (n = 3). CMR was performed using a 1.5-T scanner and a commercially available coil. CMR utilized general anesthesia (GA) in 86 children, deep sedation (DS) in 50 and comforting methods in seven. MRA was performed in 136 children. Fifty-nine children were PGE1-dependent and 39 had single-ventricle circulation. Among children on PGE1, 43 (73%) had GA and 10 (17%) had DS. Twelve children (9%) had

  12. Safety of cardiac magnetic resonance and contrast angiography for neonates and small infants: a 10-year single-institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangamani, Sheela; Li, Ling; Harvey, Lisa; Fletcher, Scott E.; Danford, David A.; Kutty, Shelby; Varghese, Joby; Hammel, James M.; Duncan, Kim F.

    2012-01-01

    With increasing applications of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for evaluation of congenital heart disease (CHD), safety of this technology in the very young is of particular interest. We report our 10-year experience with CMR in neonates and small infants with particular focus on the safety profile and incidence of adverse events (AEs). We reviewed clinical, anesthesia and nursing records of all children ≤120 days of age who underwent CMR. We recorded variables including cardiac diagnosis, study duration, anesthesia type and agents, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) dependence and gadolinium (Gd) use. Serially recorded temperature, systemic saturation (SpO 2 ) and cardiac rhythm were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was any AE during or 2 drop ≥10% below baseline) and bradycardia (heart rate ≤100 bpm). Secondary outcome measure was unplanned overnight hospitalization of outpatients. Children (n = 143; 74 boys, 69 girls) had a median age of 6 days (1-117), and 98 were ≤30 days at the time of CMR. The median weight was 3.4 kg (1.4-6 kg) and body surface area 0.22 m 2 (0.13-0.32 m 2 ). There were 118 (83%) inpatients (108 receiving intensive care) and 25 (17%) outpatients. Indications for CMR were assessment of aortic arch (n = 57), complex CHD (n = 41), pulmonary veins (n = 15), vascular ring (n = 8), intracardiac mass (n = 8), pulmonary artery (n = 7), ventricular volume (n = 4), and systemic veins (n = 3). CMR was performed using a 1.5-T scanner and a commercially available coil. CMR utilized general anesthesia (GA) in 86 children, deep sedation (DS) in 50 and comforting methods in seven. MRA was performed in 136 children. Fifty-nine children were PGE1-dependent and 39 had single-ventricle circulation. Among children on PGE1, 43 (73%) had GA and 10 (17%) had DS. Twelve children (9%) had adverse events (AEs) - one major and 11 minor. Of those 12, nine children had GA (10%) and three had DS (6%). The single major AE was

  13. Magnetic resonance angiography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arlart, I; Bongartz, Georg M; Marchal, Guy, Prof. Dr. Med

    2002-01-01

    ... radiology. I would like to thank the editors as well as the authors of the individual chapters for their outstanding performance in the preparation of this second edition, which provides a muchneeded update of the technique of MRA and offers a comprehensive overview of the current state of development of this fascinating modality. I am ...

  14. Supra-aortic low-dose contrast-enhanced time-resolved magnetic resonance (MR) angiography at 3 T: comparison with time-of-flight MR angiography and high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Joo; Kim, Bum-soo; Koo, Ja-Sung; Kim, Bom-Yi; Jang, Jinhee; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose, time-resolved, contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance angiography (TR-CEMRA) has been described previously; however, a comparative study between low dose TR-CEMRA and time-of-flight MRA (TOF-MRA) in the diagnosis of supra-aortic arterial stenosis has not yet been published. To demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of low-dose TR-CEMRA compared with TOF-MRA, using high-resolution contrast-enhanced MRA (HR-CEMRA) as the reference standard. This prospective study consisted of 30 consecutive patients. All patients underwent TOF-MRA of the neck and circle of Willis and supra-aortic HR-CEMRA, followed by supra-aortic low-dose TR-CEMRA. Gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem(®), Guerbet, Roissy CdG Cedex, France) was injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg for HR-CEMRA, followed by a 0.03 mmol/kg bolus for low-dose TR-CEMRA. Three readers evaluated the assessibility and image quality, and then two readers classified each stenosis into the following categories: normal (0-30%), mild stenosis (31-50%), moderate (51-70%), severe (71-99%), and occlusion. TR-CEMRA and HR-CEMRA showed a greater number of assessable arterial segments than TOF-MRA (P supra-aortic arterial stenosis, and could be more useful option than TOF-MRA. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  16. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional fast-spoiled gradient magnetic resonance angiography of the renal arteries for potential living renal transplant donors: a comparative study with digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saeed, O.; Sheikh, M.; Al-Khawari, H.; Ismail, M.; Al-Moosawi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of the arterial anatomy of prospective renal donors is essential. Various non-invasive techniques are used for such evaluation. We conducted this study using contrast-enhanced 3-D fast-spoiled gradient (CE 3-D FSPGR) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) on a 1.0 Tesla magnet, for preoperative definition of the renal arteries. Forty-five preoperative living renal donors underwent CE 3-D FSPGR MRA of the renal vessels and the results were compared with conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The renal vascular anatomy, both normal and with variations, was satisfactorily defined in all 45 cases with CE 3-D FSPGR MRA. Fifteen cases showed an accessory or aberrant arterial supply. A small aneurysm was shown in one case. All cases compared well with conventional DSA. Our study revealed that CE 3-D FSPGR MRA on a lower field strength magnet is accurate in defining the renal vascular anatomy and its variations. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of crossing renal vessels in children with symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction: comparison with operative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Alistair D; Hiorns, Melanie P; Abhyankar, Aruna; Mushtaq, Imran; Olsen, Oystein E

    2007-04-01

    Crossing renal vessels (CRV) are associated with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly when presentation is beyond the neonatal period. Their presence may influence surgical management. To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the identification of CRV in children requiring surgical treatment of symptomatic UPJ obstruction, against a gold standard of laparoscopic or open surgical findings. We reviewed CE-MRA studies (3-D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and multiphase 3-D spoiled gradient echo following intravenous gadolinium administration) of 14 children, age range 6-15 years, performed prior to surgery for suspected CRV-related UPJ obstruction. Consensus reviews of the CE-MRA studies were compared with surgical findings. CE-MRA demonstrated CRV at the level of the obstruction in nine and no crossing vessels in five children. These were all verified intraoperatively (chi2=14.0; Pchildren older than 6 years with symptomatic UPJ obstruction.

  18. Renal magnetic resonance angiography at 3.0 Tesla using a 32-element phased-array coil system and parallel imaging in 2 directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenchel, Michael; Nael, Kambiz; Deshpande, Vibhas S; Finn, J Paul; Kramer, Ulrich; Miller, Stephan; Ruehm, Stefan; Laub, Gerhard

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility of renal magnetic resonance angiography at 3.0 T using a phased-array coil system with 32-coil elements. Specifically, high parallel imaging factors were used for an increased spatial resolution and anatomic coverage of the whole abdomen. Signal-to-noise values and the g-factor distribution of the 32 element coil were examined in phantom studies for the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) sequence. Eleven volunteers (6 men, median age of 30.0 years) were examined on a 3.0-T MR scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, PA) using a 32-element phased-array coil (prototype from In vivo Corp.). Contrast-enhanced 3D-MRA (TR 2.95 milliseconds, TE 1.12 milliseconds, flip angle 25-30 degrees , bandwidth 650 Hz/pixel) was acquired with integrated generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition (GRAPPA), in both phase- and slice-encoding direction. Images were assessed by 2 independent observers with regard to image quality, noise and presence of artifacts. Signal-to-noise levels of 22.2 +/- 22.0 and 57.9 +/- 49.0 were measured with (GRAPPAx6) and without parallel-imaging, respectively. The mean g-factor of the 32-element coil for GRAPPA with an acceleration of 3 and 2 in the phase-encoding and slice-encoding direction, respectively, was 1.61. High image quality was found in 9 of 11 volunteers (2.6 +/- 0.8) with good overall interobserver agreement (k = 0.87). Relatively low image quality with higher noise levels were encountered in 2 volunteers. MRA at 3.0 T using a 32-element phased-array coil is feasible in healthy volunteers. High diagnostic image quality and extended anatomic coverage could be achieved with application of high parallel imaging factors.

  19. Renal Artery Stenosis Evaluated with 3D-Gd-Magnetic Resonance Angiography Using Transstenotic Pressure Gradient as the Standard of Reference. A Multireader Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekloef, H.; Ahlstrom, H.; Bostrom, A.; Bergqvist, D.; Andren, B.; Karacagil, S.; Nyman, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 3D-Gd-magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in detecting hemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis (RAS). Material and Methods: Thirty patients evaluated for atherosclerotic RAS by MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively included. Standard of reference for hemodynamically significant RAS was a transstenotic gradient of 15 mmHg. DSA visualized 60 main renal arteries and 9 accessory arteries. Pressure gradient measurement (PGM) was available from 61 arteries. Three radiologists evaluated all examinations independently in a blinded fashion. Results: RAS was present in 26 arteries. On MRA, each reader identified 4 of 9 accessory renal arteries, a detection rate of 44%. The three readers correctly classified 22/25/22 of the 26 vessels with a significant gradient as >60% RAS and 31/25/32 of the 35 with a significant gradient as <60% RAS on MRA. Interobserver agreement was substantial. MRA image quality was adequate for RAS evaluations in all patients. ROC curves indicated that MRA is an adequate method for evaluating RAS. When screening for RAS, a 50% diameter reduction cut-off is better than 60%. RAS with 40-80% diameter reductions accounted for 65% of discrepancies. Conclusion: MRA is an adequate method for evaluating RAS limited mainly by poor detection rate for accessory renal arteries

  20. Role of high resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (HR CeMRA) in management of arterial complications of the renal transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismaeel, M. Maged; Abdel-Hamid, Azza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Transplant renal artery (RA) stenosis (TRAS) is the most frequent posttransplantation vascular complication. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (CeMRA) angiography has been established as the preferred imaging technique for the evaluation of TRAS because it does not require the use of iodinated contrast material and does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the gold standard in the evaluation of arterial tree of the renal allograft. Aim of the work: This study was carried out to assess the accuracy of CeMRA in the detection of arterial complications after renal transplantation. Patients and methods: Thirty renal transplant patients with suspected arterial complications in which both CeMRA and DSA were performed were included in the study. The HR CeMRA shows 93.7% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 88.2% positive predictive value, 88.9% negative predictive value and 88.5% accuracy. Conclusion: HR CeMRA is an accurate reliable tool in the assessment of arterial complications after renal transplantation. It may replace DSA as a diagnostic modality with reservation of interventional techniques for endovascular treatment of suitable cases.

  1. Role of high resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (HR CeMRA) in management of arterial complications of the renal transplant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismaeel, M. Maged [Suez Canal University (Egypt); Abdel-Hamid, Azza, E-mail: azza4951@hotmail.com [Suez Canal University (Egypt)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: Transplant renal artery (RA) stenosis (TRAS) is the most frequent posttransplantation vascular complication. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (CeMRA) angiography has been established as the preferred imaging technique for the evaluation of TRAS because it does not require the use of iodinated contrast material and does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the gold standard in the evaluation of arterial tree of the renal allograft. Aim of the work: This study was carried out to assess the accuracy of CeMRA in the detection of arterial complications after renal transplantation. Patients and methods: Thirty renal transplant patients with suspected arterial complications in which both CeMRA and DSA were performed were included in the study. The HR CeMRA shows 93.7% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 88.2% positive predictive value, 88.9% negative predictive value and 88.5% accuracy. Conclusion: HR CeMRA is an accurate reliable tool in the assessment of arterial complications after renal transplantation. It may replace DSA as a diagnostic modality with reservation of interventional techniques for endovascular treatment of suitable cases.

  2. Retrospective analysis of the prevalence of asymptomatic cerebral aneurysm in 4518 patients undergoing magnetic resonance angiography. When does cerebral aneurysm develop?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikoshi, Toru; Yamagata, Zentaro; Nukui, Hideaki; Akiyama, Iwao

    2002-01-01

    The natural history of cerebral aneurysms was investigated by measuring the prevalence of incidentally found unruptured aneurysms in the general population and evaluating the characteristics including risk factors. 'De novo' formation of aneurysm was also demographically estimated. The prevalence of incidental aneurysm was evaluated among 4518 patients who underwent magnetic resonance (MR) angiography for various reasons in a neurosurgical institute. Double the number of patients were randomly selected from the remaining patients without aneurysm as the Control group so that sex and age group were matched to the Aneurysm group. One hundred twenty seven patients (2.8%) had diagnoses of aneurysm. The prevalence of asymptomatic aneurysm among middle-aged and elderly patients were predominant in women and increased with age in both sexes. Patients with aneurysms had significantly more hypertension and family history of subarachnoid hemorrhage compared to the controls. The prevalence was markedly increased in the 8th decade in men and the 7th decade in women, and new aneurysms seemed to develop predominantly around these decades. Cerebral aneurysms become detectable on MR angiography in the middle or later decades, and women tend to develop aneurysm earlier than men. Hypertension and family history of subarachnoid hemorrhage are probably risk factors for the development of aneurysm. (author)

  3. Development of a Three-dimensional Surgical Navigation System with Magnetic Resonance Angiography and a Three-dimensional Printer for Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomoto, Wataru; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Keisuke; Mitsuie, Chiemi; Yamada, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toru; Yamano, Toshiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Kotoura, Noriko; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2018-01-02

    We sought to develop a surgical navigation system using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a three-dimensional (3D) printer for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Six patients with pathologically proven localized prostate cancer were prospectively enrolled in this study. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), consisting of T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) and true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true FISP), reconstructed by volume rendering, was followed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA performed with a volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) during intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol. Images of arterial and venous phases were acquired over approximately 210 seconds. Selected images were sent to a workstation for generation of 3D volume-rendered images and standard triangulated language (STL) files for 3D print construction. The neurovascular bundles (NVBs) were found in sequence on non-contrast images. Accessory pudendal arteries (APAs) were found in all cases in the arterial phase of contrast enhancement but were ill-defined on non-contrast enhanced MRA. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRA helped to detect APAs, suggesting that this 3D system using MRI will be useful in RARP.

  4. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  7. Preoperative evaluation of living renal donors: value of contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography and comparison of three rendering algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Hallscheidt, P.J.; Hosch, W.P.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Duex, M.; Ott, R.C.; Wiesel, M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE 3D MRA) in the preoperative assessment of potential living renal donors, and to compare the accuracy for the depiction of the vascular anatomy using three different rendering algorithms. Twenty-three potential living renal donors were examined with CE 3D MRA (TE/TR=1.3 ms/3.7 ms, field of view 260-320 x 350 mm, 384-448 x 512 matrix, slab thickness 9.4 cm, 72 partitions, section thickness 1.3 mm, scan time 24 s, 0.1 mmol/kg body weight gadobenate dimeglumine). Magnetic resonance angiography data sets were processed with maximum intensity projection (MIP), volume rendering (VR), and shaded-surface display (SSD) algorithms. The image analysis was performed independently by three MR-experienced radiologists recording the number of renal arteries, the presence of early branching or vascular pathology. The combination of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and intraoperative findings served as the gold standard for the image analysis. In total, 52 renal arteries were correspondingly observed in 23 patients at DSA and surgery. Other findings were 3 cases of early branching of the renal arteries, 4 cases of arterial stenosis and 1 case of bilateral fibromuscular dysplasia. With MRA source data all 52 renal arteries were correctly identified by all readers, compared with 51 (98.1%), 51-52 (98.1-100%) and 49-50 renal arteries (94.2-96.2%) with the MIP, VR and SSD projections, respectively. Similarly, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy was highest with the MRA source data followed by MIP, VR and SSD. Time requirements were lowest for the MIP reconstructions and highest for the VR reconstructions. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA is a reliable, non-invasive tool for the preoperative evaluation of potential living renal donors. Maximum intensity projection is favourable for the processing of 3D MRA data, as it has minimal time and computational requirements, while having

  8. Preoperative evaluation of living renal donors: value of contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography and comparison of three rendering algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Abteilung Radiologische Diagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Abteilung Onkologische Diagnostik und Therapie, Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hallscheidt, P.J.; Hosch, W.P.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Duex, M. [Abteilung Radiologische Diagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ott, R.C.; Wiesel, M. [Abteilung Urologie und Poliklinik, Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE 3D MRA) in the preoperative assessment of potential living renal donors, and to compare the accuracy for the depiction of the vascular anatomy using three different rendering algorithms. Twenty-three potential living renal donors were examined with CE 3D MRA (TE/TR=1.3 ms/3.7 ms, field of view 260-320 x 350 mm, 384-448 x 512 matrix, slab thickness 9.4 cm, 72 partitions, section thickness 1.3 mm, scan time 24 s, 0.1 mmol/kg body weight gadobenate dimeglumine). Magnetic resonance angiography data sets were processed with maximum intensity projection (MIP), volume rendering (VR), and shaded-surface display (SSD) algorithms. The image analysis was performed independently by three MR-experienced radiologists recording the number of renal arteries, the presence of early branching or vascular pathology. The combination of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and intraoperative findings served as the gold standard for the image analysis. In total, 52 renal arteries were correspondingly observed in 23 patients at DSA and surgery. Other findings were 3 cases of early branching of the renal arteries, 4 cases of arterial stenosis and 1 case of bilateral fibromuscular dysplasia. With MRA source data all 52 renal arteries were correctly identified by all readers, compared with 51 (98.1%), 51-52 (98.1-100%) and 49-50 renal arteries (94.2-96.2%) with the MIP, VR and SSD projections, respectively. Similarly, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy was highest with the MRA source data followed by MIP, VR and SSD. Time requirements were lowest for the MIP reconstructions and highest for the VR reconstructions. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA is a reliable, non-invasive tool for the preoperative evaluation of potential living renal donors. Maximum intensity projection is favourable for the processing of 3D MRA data, as it has minimal time and computational requirements, while having

  9. Noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance renal angiography using a repetitive artery and venous labelling technique at 3 T: comparison with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in subjects with normal renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Yoon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, EunJu [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-13

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography (NC-MRA) using the repetitive artery and venous labelling (RAVEL) technique to evaluate renal arteries compared to contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Twenty-five subjects with normal renal function underwent NC-MRA using a RAVEL technique and CE-MRA at 3 T. Two independent readers analysed the MRA images. Image quality, number of renal arteries, presence or absence of an early branching vessel, and diameter of the main renal arteries were evaluated. The overall image quality of NC-MRA was fair or greater in 88 % of right and 92 % of left renal arteries, while it was 96 % in both sides with CE-MRA. On NC-MRA, the number of renal arteries in all subjects was perfectly predicted by both readers. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting early branching vessels were 82 % and 100 % for reader 1 and 82 % and 95 % for reader 2. Inter-modality agreement for comparing the diameters of main renal arteries was good or excellent at all segments for both readers. Inter-reader agreement was moderate or good at all segments except at the right distal segment on NC-MRA. NC-MRA with the RAVEL technique at 3 T may have comparable diagnostic feasibility for evaluating renal arteries compared to CE-MRA. (orig.)

  10. Noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance renal angiography using a repetitive artery and venous labelling technique at 3 T: comparison with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in subjects with normal renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Yoon; Kim, Chan Kyo; Kim, EunJu; Park, Byung Kwan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography (NC-MRA) using the repetitive artery and venous labelling (RAVEL) technique to evaluate renal arteries compared to contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Twenty-five subjects with normal renal function underwent NC-MRA using a RAVEL technique and CE-MRA at 3 T. Two independent readers analysed the MRA images. Image quality, number of renal arteries, presence or absence of an early branching vessel, and diameter of the main renal arteries were evaluated. The overall image quality of NC-MRA was fair or greater in 88% of right and 92% of left renal arteries, while it was 96% in both sides with CE-MRA. On NC-MRA, the number of renal arteries in all subjects was perfectly predicted by both readers. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting early branching vessels were 82% and 100% for reader 1 and 82% and 95% for reader 2. Inter-modality agreement for comparing the diameters of main renal arteries was good or excellent at all segments for both readers. Inter-reader agreement was moderate or good at all segments except at the right distal segment on NC-MRA. NC-MRA with the RAVEL technique at 3 T may have comparable diagnostic feasibility for evaluating renal arteries compared to CE-MRA. • Accurate pre-treatment evaluation of renal artery anatomy helps clinical decision-making. • NC-MRA using RAVEL offers acceptable imaging quality for renal artery evaluation. • The 3 T RAVEL technique provides excellent diagnostic performance for renal artery evaluation. • The 3 T RAVEL technique may be an alternative to contrast-enhanced MRA.

  11. Non-invasive diagnostic workup of patients with suspected stable angina by combined computed tomography coronary angiography and magnetic resonance perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschbaum, S.W.; Nieman, K.; Springeling, T.

    2011-01-01

    The background of this study was to evaluate additional adenosine magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP) imaging in the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected stable angina with computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) as first-line diagnostic modality. Two hundred and thirty symptomatic patients (male, 52%; age, 56 year) with suspected stable angina underwent CTCA. In patients with a stenosis of >50% as visually assessed, MRP was performed and the quantitative myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) was calculated. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) using invasive coronary flow measurements served as the standard of reference. CTCA showed non-significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in 151/230 (66%) patients and significant CAD in 79/230 patients (34%), of whom 50 subsequently underwent MRP and CFR. MRP showed reduced perfusion in 32 patients (64%), which was confirmed by CFR in 27 (84%). All 18 cases of normal MRP (36%) were confirmed by CFR. The positive likelihood ratio of MRP for the presence of functional significant disease in patients with a lesion on CTCA was 4.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.12-9.99). The negative likelihood ratio was 0.05 (95% CI 0.01-0.34). CTCA as first-line diagnostic modality excluded coronary artery disease in a high percentage of patients referred for diagnostic workup of suspected stable angina. MRP made a significant contribution to the detection of functional significant lesions in patients with a positive CTCA. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the applicability of territorial arterial spin labeling in meningiomas for presurgical assessments compared with 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yiping; Wen, Jianbo; Geng, Daoying; Yin, Bo; Luan, Shihai; Liu, Li; Xiong, Ji; Qu, Jianxun

    2017-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the application of territorial arterial spin labelling (t-ASL) in comparison with unenhanced three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in the identification of the feeding vasculature of meningiomas. Thirty consecutive patients with suspected meningiomas underwent conventional MR imaging, unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and t-ASL scanning. Four experienced neuro-radiologists assessed the feeding vessels with different techniques separately. For the identification of the origin of the feeding arteries on t-ASL, the inter-observer agreement was excellent (κ = 0.913), while the inter-observer agreement of 3D-TOF-MRA was good (κ = 0.653). The inter-modality agreement between t-ASL and 3D-TOF-MRA for the feeding arteries was moderate (κ = 0.514). All 8 patients with motor or sensory disorders proved to have meningiomas supplied completely or partially by the internal carotid arteries, while all 14 patients with meningiomas supplied by the external carotid arteries or basilar arteries didn't show any symptoms concerning motor or sensory disorders (p = 0.003). T-ASL could complement unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and increase accuracy in the identification of the supplying arteries of meningiomas in a safe, intuitive, non-radioactive manner. The information about feeding arteries was potentially related to patients' symptoms and pathology, making it more crucial for neurosurgeons in planning surgery as well as evaluating prognosis. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of the applicability of territorial arterial spin labeling in meningiomas for presurgical assessments compared with 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yiping; Wen, Jianbo; Geng, Daoying; Yin, Bo [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Luan, Shihai [Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Liu, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Xiong, Ji [Fudan University, Department of Pathology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Qu, Jianxun [GE Healthcare, Department of MR Research, Shanghai (China)

    2017-10-15

    To prospectively evaluate the application of territorial arterial spin labelling (t-ASL) in comparison with unenhanced three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF-MRA) in the identification of the feeding vasculature of meningiomas. Thirty consecutive patients with suspected meningiomas underwent conventional MR imaging, unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and t-ASL scanning. Four experienced neuro-radiologists assessed the feeding vessels with different techniques separately. For the identification of the origin of the feeding arteries on t-ASL, the inter-observer agreement was excellent (κ = 0.913), while the inter-observer agreement of 3D-TOF-MRA was good (κ = 0.653). The inter-modality agreement between t-ASL and 3D-TOF-MRA for the feeding arteries was moderate (κ = 0.514). All 8 patients with motor or sensory disorders proved to have meningiomas supplied completely or partially by the internal carotid arteries, while all 14 patients with meningiomas supplied by the external carotid arteries or basilar arteries didn't show any symptoms concerning motor or sensory disorders (p = 0.003). T-ASL could complement unenhanced 3D-TOF-MRA and increase accuracy in the identification of the supplying arteries of meningiomas in a safe, intuitive, non-radioactive manner. The information about feeding arteries was potentially related to patients' symptoms and pathology, making it more crucial for neurosurgeons in planning surgery as well as evaluating prognosis. (orig.)

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of crossing renal vessels in children with symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction: comparison with operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calder, Alistair D.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Olsen, Oystein E. [Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Abhyankar, Aruna; Mushtaq, Imran [Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Crossing renal vessels (CRV) are associated with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly when presentation is beyond the neonatal period. Their presence may influence surgical management. To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the identification of CRV in children requiring surgical treatment of symptomatic UPJ obstruction, against a gold standard of laparoscopic or open surgical findings. We reviewed CE-MRA studies (3-D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and multiphase 3-D spoiled gradient echo following intravenous gadolinium administration) of 14 children, age range 6-15 years, performed prior to surgery for suspected CRV-related UPJ obstruction. Consensus reviews of the CE-MRA studies were compared with surgical findings. CE-MRA demonstrated CRV at the level of the obstruction in nine and no crossing vessels in five children. These were all verified intraoperatively ({chi}{sup 2} = 14.0; P < 0.001). In eight of the nine patients with CRV there was no evidence of intrinsic obstruction at surgery. In the remaining patient there was fibrosis of the upper ureter. CE-MRA is an accurate means of identifying CRV in children older than 6 years with symptomatic UPJ obstruction. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of pulmonary venous stenosis after radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation by magnetic resonance angiography: a comparison of linear and cross-sectional area measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tintera, Jaroslav; Porod, Vaclav; Rolencova, Eva; Fendrych, Pavel [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Radiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Cihak, Robert; Mlcochova, Hanka; Kautzner, Josef [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    One of the recognised complications of catheter ablation is pulmonary venous stenosis. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of evaluation of pulmonary venous diameter for follow-up assessment of the above complication: (1) a linear approach evaluating two main diameters of the vein, (2) semiautomatically measured cross-sectional area (CSA). The study population consists of 29 patients. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CeMRA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) before and after the ablation; 14 patients were also scanned 3 months later. PV diameter was evaluated from two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions by measuring either the linear diameter or CSA. A comparison between pulmonary venous CSA and linear measurements revealed a systematic difference in absolute values. This difference was not significant when comparing the relative change CSA and quadratic approximation using linear extents (linear approach). However, a trend towards over-estimation of calibre reduction was documented for the linear approach. Using CSA assessment, significant PV stenosis was found in ten PVs (8%) shortly after ablation. Less significant PV stenosis, ranging from 20 to 50% was documented in other 18 PVs (15%). CeMRA with CSA assessment of the PVs is suitable method for evaluation of PV diameters. (orig.)

  16. Detection of hemodynamic impairment using magnetic resonance angiography in patients with internal carotid artery stenoocclusive disease. Comparison with quantitative brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Ryonoshin; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2008-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to acetazolamideis a key parameter in determining the severity of hemodynamic impairment in patients with major cerebral artery occlusive disease. The aim of the present study is to validate the accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for detecting hemodynamic impairment by correlating detectability of the middle cerebral artery obtained by MRA with CVR measured by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusive disease. Ninety-four patients with chronic ICA occlusion underwent single slab three-dimensional time-of-flight MRA and SPECT. SPECT-CVR was calculated by measured cerebral blood flow before and after acetazolamide challenge. CVR was significantly lower in patients without detection of any portion (M1, M2 or M3) of the MCA than in those with detection of all portions. When SPECT-CVR lower than the mean- 2 standard deviation (SD) obtained in normal subjects was defined as reduced and the SPECT-CVR was assumed as the true determinant of hemodynamic impairment, MRA provided 92% sensitivity and 73% specificity, with 96% negative predictive value for detecting patients with reduced CVR. The present MRA method is effective for the identification of patients with hemodynamic impairment. (author)

  17. Ankle Brachial Index <0.9 Underestimates the Prevalence of Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease Assessed with Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikstroem, J.; Hansen, T.; Johansson, L.; Lind, L.; Ahlstroem, H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) permits noninvasive vascular assessment, which can be utilized in epidemiological studies. Purpose: To assess the relation between a low ankle brachial index (ABI) and high-grade stenoses in the pelvic and leg arteries in the elderly. Material and Methods: WBMRA was performed in a population sample of 306 subjects aged 70 years. The arteries below the aortic bifurcation were graded after the most severe stenosis according to one of three grades: 0-49% stenosis, 50-99% stenosis, or occlusion. ABI was calculated for each side. Results: There were assessable WBMRA and ABI examinations in 268 (right side), 265 (left side), and 258 cases (both sides). At least one ≥50% stenosis was found in 19% (right side), 23% (left side), and 28% (on at least one side) of the cases. The corresponding prevalences for ABI <0.9 were 4.5%, 4.2%, and 6.6%. An ABI cut-off value of 0.9 resulted in a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 20%, 99%, 83%, and 84% on the right side, and 15%, 99%, 82%, and 80% on the left side, respectively, for the presence of a ≥ 50% stenosis in the pelvic or leg arteries. Conclusion: An ABI <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the general elderly population

  18. String-like lumen in below-the-knee chronic total occlusions on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography predicts intraluminal recanalization and better blood flow restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yue-Qi; Lu, Hai-Tao; Wei, Li-Ming; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhao, Jun-Gong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Fang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-07-15

    To determine whether string-like lumina (SLs) on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) predict better outcomes in diabetic patients with below-the-knee (BTK) chronic total occlusions (CTOs). This study involved 317 long-segment (>5 cm) BTK CTOs of 245 patients that were examined using CE-MRA and treated using endovascular angioplasty. An SL with a CTO was slowly filled with blood on conventional CE-MRA. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of procedural success, recanalisation method and immediate blood flow restoration. The target-lesion patency and limb-salvage rates were assessed. SL-positive CTOs (n = 60) achieved a higher technique success rate, preferred intraluminal angioplasty and better blood flow restoration than SL-negative CTOs (n = 257, P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that lesion length was the independent predictor of procedural success (P = 0.028). SL was a predictor of intraluminal angioplasty (P < 0.001) and good blood-flow restoration (P = 0.004). Kaplan-Meier analyses at 12 months revealed a higher target lesion patency rate (P = 0.04) and limb-salvage rate (P = 0.35) in SL-positive CTOs. In patients with BTK CTOs, SL predicted intraluminal angioplasty and good blood-flow restoration for BTK CTOs. (orig.)

  19. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of crossing renal vessels in children with symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction: comparison with operative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calder, Alistair D.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Olsen, Oystein E.; Abhyankar, Aruna; Mushtaq, Imran

    2007-01-01

    Crossing renal vessels (CRV) are associated with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly when presentation is beyond the neonatal period. Their presence may influence surgical management. To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the identification of CRV in children requiring surgical treatment of symptomatic UPJ obstruction, against a gold standard of laparoscopic or open surgical findings. We reviewed CE-MRA studies (3-D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and multiphase 3-D spoiled gradient echo following intravenous gadolinium administration) of 14 children, age range 6-15 years, performed prior to surgery for suspected CRV-related UPJ obstruction. Consensus reviews of the CE-MRA studies were compared with surgical findings. CE-MRA demonstrated CRV at the level of the obstruction in nine and no crossing vessels in five children. These were all verified intraoperatively (χ 2 = 14.0; P < 0.001). In eight of the nine patients with CRV there was no evidence of intrinsic obstruction at surgery. In the remaining patient there was fibrosis of the upper ureter. CE-MRA is an accurate means of identifying CRV in children older than 6 years with symptomatic UPJ obstruction. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of pulmonary venous stenosis after radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation by magnetic resonance angiography: a comparison of linear and cross-sectional area measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tintera, Jaroslav; Porod, Vaclav; Rolencova, Eva; Fendrych, Pavel; Cihak, Robert; Mlcochova, Hanka; Kautzner, Josef

    2006-01-01

    One of the recognised complications of catheter ablation is pulmonary venous stenosis. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of evaluation of pulmonary venous diameter for follow-up assessment of the above complication: (1) a linear approach evaluating two main diameters of the vein, (2) semiautomatically measured cross-sectional area (CSA). The study population consists of 29 patients. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CeMRA) of the pulmonary veins (PVs) before and after the ablation; 14 patients were also scanned 3 months later. PV diameter was evaluated from two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions by measuring either the linear diameter or CSA. A comparison between pulmonary venous CSA and linear measurements revealed a systematic difference in absolute values. This difference was not significant when comparing the relative change CSA and quadratic approximation using linear extents (linear approach). However, a trend towards over-estimation of calibre reduction was documented for the linear approach. Using CSA assessment, significant PV stenosis was found in ten PVs (8%) shortly after ablation. Less significant PV stenosis, ranging from 20 to 50% was documented in other 18 PVs (15%). CeMRA with CSA assessment of the PVs is suitable method for evaluation of PV diameters. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in children presenting migraine with aura: Association of hypoperfusion detected by arterial spin labelling and vasospasm on MR angiography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiot, Domitille; Longuet, Romain; Bruneau, Bertrand; Treguier, Catherine; Carsin-Vu, Aline; Corouge, Isabelle; Gomes, Constantin; Proisy, Maïa

    2018-04-01

    Objective A child presenting with a first attack of migraine with aura usually undergoes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to rule out stroke. The purpose of this study was to report vascular and brain perfusion findings in children suffering from migraine with aura on time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) and MR perfusion imaging using arterial spin labelling (ASL). Methods We retrospectively included all children who had undergone an emergency MRI examination with ASL and TOF-MRA sequences for acute neurological deficit and were given a final diagnosis of migraine with aura. The ASL perfusion maps and TOF-MRA images were independently assessed by reviewers blinded to clinical data. A mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) value was obtained for each cerebral lobe after automatic data post-processing. Results Seventeen children were finally included. Hypoperfusion was identified in one or more cerebral lobes on ASL perfusion maps by visual assessment in 16/17 (94%) children. Vasospasm was noted within the intracranial vasculature on the TOF-MRA images in 12/17 (71%) children. All (100%) of the abnormal TOF-MRA images were associated with homolateral hypoperfusion. Mean CBF values were significantly lower ( P < 0.05) in visually hypoperfused lobes than in normally perfused lobes. Conclusion ASL and TOF-MRA are two totally non-invasive, easy-to-use MRI sequences for children in emergency settings. Hypoperfusion associated with homolateral vasospasm may suggest a diagnosis of migraine with aura.

  2. Time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla for evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of vascular malformations: description of distinct subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Simone; Uller, Wibke; Manger, Florentine; Fellner, Claudia; Zeman, Florian; Wohlgemuth, Walter A

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of arteriovenous and venous malformations using time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla. Time-resolved MRA with interleaved stochastic trajectories (TWIST) at 3.0 Tesla was studied in 83 consecutive patients with venous malformations (VM) and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Enhancement characteristics were calculated as percentage increase of signal intensity above baseline over time. Maximum percentage signal intensity increase (signal max ), time intervals between onset of arterial enhancement and lesion enhancement (t onset ), and time intervals between beginning of lesion enhancement and maximum percentage of lesion enhancement (t max ) were analyzed. All AVMs showed a high-flow hemodynamic pattern. Two significantly different (p 3.0 Tesla provides hemodynamic characterization of vascular malformations. VMs can be subclassified into two hemodynamic subgroups due to presence or absence of AVFs. • Time-resolved MRA at 3.0 Tesla provides quantitative hemodynamic characterization of vascular malformations. • Malformations significantly differ in time courses of enhancement and signal intensity increase. • AVMs show a distinctive high-flow hemodynamic pattern. • Two significantly different types of VMs emerged: VMs with and without AVFs.

  3. Time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla for evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of vascular malformations: description of distinct subgroups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Simone; Fellner, Claudia; Wohlgemuth, Walter A. [University Hospital Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Uller, Wibke [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University Hospital Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Manger, Florentine [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Zeman, Florian [University Hospital Regensburg, Center for Clinical Trials, Regensburg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Quantitative evaluation of hemodynamic characteristics of arteriovenous and venous malformations using time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 3.0 Tesla. Time-resolved MRA with interleaved stochastic trajectories (TWIST) at 3.0 Tesla was studied in 83 consecutive patients with venous malformations (VM) and arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Enhancement characteristics were calculated as percentage increase of signal intensity above baseline over time. Maximum percentage signal intensity increase (signal{sub max}), time intervals between onset of arterial enhancement and lesion enhancement (t{sub onset}), and time intervals between beginning of lesion enhancement and maximum percentage of lesion enhancement (t{sub max}) were analyzed. All AVMs showed a high-flow hemodynamic pattern. Two significantly different (p < 0.001) types of venous malformations emerged: VMs with arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) (median signal{sub max} 737 %, IQR [interquartile range] = 511 - 1182 %; median t{sub onset} 5 s, IQR = 5 - 10 s; median t{sub max} 35 s, IQR = 26 - 40 s) and without AVFs (median signal{sub max} 284 %, IQR = 177-432 %; median t{sub onset} 23 s, IQR = 15 - 30 s; median t{sub max} 60 s, IQR = 55 - 75 s). Quantitative evaluation of time-resolved MRA at 3.0 Tesla provides hemodynamic characterization of vascular malformations. VMs can be subclassified into two hemodynamic subgroups due to presence or absence of AVFs. (orig.)

  4. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography for visualization of signal Intensity distribution pattern within an unruptured cerebral aneurysm: preliminarily assessment with anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.; Ekino, C.; Ohsako, C.

    2004-01-01

    The natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is not known; also unknown is the potential growth and rupture in any individual aneurysm. The authors have developed transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) obtained by a time-of-flight sequence to investigate the interaction between the intra-aneurysmal signal intensity distribution patterns and configuration of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Transluminal color-coded images were reconstructed from volume data of source magnetic resonance angiography by using a parallel volume-rendering algorithm with transluminal imaging technique. By selecting a numerical threshold range from a signal intensity opacity chart of the three-dimensional volume-rendering dataset several areas of signal intensity were depicted, assigned different colors, and visualized transparently through the walls of parent arteries and an aneurysm. Patterns of signal intensity distribution were analyzed with three operated cases of an unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and compared with the actual configurations observed at microneurosurgery. A little difference in marginal features of an aneurysm was observed; however, transluminal color-coded images visualized the complex signal intensity distribution within an aneurysm in conjunction with aneurysmal geometry. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can thus provide numerical analysis of the interaction between spatial signal intensity distribution patterns and aneurysmal configurations and may offer an alternative and practical method to investigate the patient-specific natural history of individual unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography for detection of coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Leo, Giovanni [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Fisci, Erica [Universita degli Studi di Genova, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Genova (Italy); Secchi, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, PhD Course in Integrative Biomedical Research, Milan (Italy); Ali, Marco [Universita degli Studi di Milano, PhD Course in Integrative Biomedical Research, Milan (Italy); Ambrogi, Federico [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Milan (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    To review the diagnostic performance of MR coronary angiography (MRCA) for coronary artery disease (CAD). Two independent reviewers searched on MEDLINE/EMBASE with the following inclusion criteria: 01/01/2000-03/23/2015 publication date; per-patient sensitivity/specificity for >50 % stenosis confirmed by conventional coronary angiography with raw data provided or retrievable; sample size >10. Quality was appraised using QUADAS2. Nine hundred eighteen studies were retrieved, 24 of them, including 1,638 patients, were selected. Using a bivariate model, the pooled sensitivity was 89 % (95 % confidence interval 86-92 %), the pooled specificity 72 % (63-79 %). Meta-regression did not show a significant impact on sensitivity/specificity for both year of publication and disease prevalence (p ≥ 0.114). Sensitivity of contrast-enhanced examinations (95 %, 90-97 %) was higher (p = 0.005) than that of unenhanced examinations (87 %, 83-90 %). Specificity of whole-heart acquisition mode (78 %, 72-84 %) was higher (p = 0.006) than that of targeted mode (57 %, 45-69 %). Specificity at 3 T (83 %, 69-92 %) was higher (p = 0.067) than that at 1.5 T (68 %, 60-76 %). Risk of bias and concerns regarding applicability were low. Sensitivity and specificity of MRCA for CAD were 89 % and 72 %, respectively. A specificity higher than 80 % may be obtained at 3 T. Whole-heart contrast-enhanced protocols should be preferred for a higher diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography for detection of coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Fisci, Erica; Secchi, Francesco; Ali, Marco; Ambrogi, Federico; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    To review the diagnostic performance of MR coronary angiography (MRCA) for coronary artery disease (CAD). Two independent reviewers searched on MEDLINE/EMBASE with the following inclusion criteria: 01/01/2000-03/23/2015 publication date; per-patient sensitivity/specificity for >50 % stenosis confirmed by conventional coronary angiography with raw data provided or retrievable; sample size >10. Quality was appraised using QUADAS2. Nine hundred eighteen studies were retrieved, 24 of them, including 1,638 patients, were selected. Using a bivariate model, the pooled sensitivity was 89 % (95 % confidence interval 86-92 %), the pooled specificity 72 % (63-79 %). Meta-regression did not show a significant impact on sensitivity/specificity for both year of publication and disease prevalence (p ≥ 0.114). Sensitivity of contrast-enhanced examinations (95 %, 90-97 %) was higher (p = 0.005) than that of unenhanced examinations (87 %, 83-90 %). Specificity of whole-heart acquisition mode (78 %, 72-84 %) was higher (p = 0.006) than that of targeted mode (57 %, 45-69 %). Specificity at 3 T (83 %, 69-92 %) was higher (p = 0.067) than that at 1.5 T (68 %, 60-76 %). Risk of bias and concerns regarding applicability were low. Sensitivity and specificity of MRCA for CAD were 89 % and 72 %, respectively. A specificity higher than 80 % may be obtained at 3 T. Whole-heart contrast-enhanced protocols should be preferred for a higher diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  7. A finite element solution to conjugated heat transfer in tissue using magnetic resonance angiography to measure the in vitro velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Andrew William

    1993-12-01

    A combined numerical and experimental system for tissue heat transfer analysis was developed. The goal was to develop an integrated set of tools for studying the problem of providing accurate temperature estimation for use in hyperthermia treatment planning in a clinical environment. The completed system combines (1) Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) to non-destructively measure the velocity field in situ, (2) the Streamwise Upwind Petrov-Galerkin finite element solution to the 3D steady state convective energy equation (CEE), (3) a medical image based automatic 3D mesh generator, and (4) a Gaussian type estimator to determine unknown thermal model parameters such as thermal conductivity, blood perfusion, and blood velocities from measured temperature data. The system was capable of using any combination of three thermal models (1) the Convective Energy Equation (CEE), (2) the Bioheat Transfer Equation (BHTE), and (3) the Effective Thermal Conductivity Equation (ETCE) Incorporation of the theoretically correct CEE was a significant theoretical advance over approximate models made possible by the use of MRA to directly measure the 3D velocity field in situ. Experiments were carried out in a perfused alcohol fixed canine liver with hyperthermia induced through scanned focused ultrasound Velocity fields were measured using Phase Contrast Angiography. The complete system was then used to (1) develop a 3D finite element model based upon user traced outlines over a series of MR images of the liver and (2) simulate temperatures at steady state using the CEE, BHTE, and ETCE thermal models in conjunction with the gauss estimator. Results of using the system on an in vitro liver preparation indicate the need for improved accuracy in the MRA scans and accurate spatial registration between the thermocouple junctions, the measured velocity field, and the scanned ultrasound power No individual thermal model was able to meet the desired accuracy of 0.5 deg C, the resolution

  8. Induced renal artery stenosis in rabbits: magnetic resonance imaging, angiography, and radionuclide determination of blood volume and blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.G.; Tobin, M.; LeVeen, R.; Tomaczewski, J.; Alavi, A.; Staum, M.; Kundel, H.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the ability of MRI to detect alterations due to renal ischemia, a rabbit renal artery stenosis (RAS) model was developed. Seven rabbits had RAS induced by surgically encircling the artery with a polyethylene band which had a lumen of 1 mm, 1 to 2 weeks prior to imaging. The stenosis was confirmed by angiography, and the rabbits were then imaged in a 1.4 T research MRI unit. T1 was calculated using four inversion recovery sequences with different inversion times. Renal blood flow, using 113 Sn-microspheres, and regional water content by drying were then measured. The average T1 of the inner medulla was shorter for the ischemia (1574 msec) than for the contralateral kidney (1849 msec), while no change ws noted in the cortex. Ischemic kidneys had less distinct outer medullary zones on IR images with TI = 600 msec than did contralateral or control kidneys. Blood flow to both the cortex and medulla were markedly reduced in ischemic kidneys compared with contralateral kidneys (119.5 vs. 391 ml/min/100 gm for cortex and 19.8 vs. 50.8 ml/min/100 gm for medulla). Renal water and blood content were less affected. Our rabbit model of renal artery stenosis with MRI, radionuclide, and angiographic correlation has the potential to increase our understanding of MR imaging of the rabbit kidney

  9. Space-time relationship in continuously moving table method for large FOV peripheral contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabati, M; Lauzon, M L; Frayne, R

    2003-01-01

    Data acquisition using a continuously moving table approach is a method capable of generating large field-of-view (FOV) 3D MR angiograms. However, in order to obtain venous contamination-free contrast-enhanced (CE) MR angiograms in the lower limbs, one of the major challenges is to acquire all necessary k-space data during the restricted arterial phase of the contrast agent. Preliminary investigation on the space-time relationship of continuously acquired peripheral angiography is performed in this work. Deterministic and stochastic undersampled hybrid-space (x, k y , k z ) acquisitions are simulated for large FOV peripheral runoff studies. Initial results show the possibility of acquiring isotropic large FOV images of the entire peripheral vascular system. An optimal trade-off between the spatial and temporal sampling properties was found that produced a high-spatial resolution peripheral CE-MR angiogram. The deterministic sampling pattern was capable of reconstructing the global structure of the peripheral arterial tree and showed slightly better global quantitative results than stochastic patterns. Optimal stochastic sampling patterns, on the other hand, enhanced small vessels and had more favourable local quantitative results. These simulations demonstrate the complex spatial-temporal relationship when sampling large FOV peripheral runoff studies. They also suggest that more investigation is required to maximize image quality as a function of hybrid-space coverage, acquisition repetition time and sampling pattern parameters

  10. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  11. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: first-pass arterial enhancement as a function of gadolinium-chelate concentration, and the saline chaser volume and injection rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husarik, Daniela B; Bashir, Mustafa R; Weber, Paul W; Nichols, Eli B; Howle, Laurens E; Merkle, Elmar M; Nelson, Rendon C

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of the contrast medium (CM) concentration and the saline chaser volume and injection rate on first-pass aortic enhancement characteristics in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using a physiologic flow phantom. Imaging was performed on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance system (MAGNETOM Trio, Siemens Healthcare Solutions, Inc, Erlangen, Germany) using a 2-dimensional fast low angle shot T1-weighted sequence (repetition time, 500 milliseconds; echo time, 1.23 milliseconds; flip angle, 8 degrees; 1 frame/s × 60 seconds). The following CM concentrations injected at 2 mL/s were used with 3 different contrast agents (gadolinium [Gd]-BOPTA, Gd-HP-DO3A, Gd-DTPA): 20 mL of undiluted CM (100%) and 80%, 40%, 20%, 10%, 5%, and 2.5% of the full amount, all diluted in saline to a volume of 20 mL to ensure equal bolus volume. The CM was followed by saline chasers of 20 to 60 mL injected at 2 mL/s and 6 mL/s. Aortic signal intensity (SI) was measured, and normalized SI versus time (SI/Tn) curves were generated. The maximal SI (SI(max)), bolus length, and areas under the SI/Tn curve were calculated. Decreasing the CM concentration from 100% to 40% resulted in a decrease of SI(max) to 86.1% (mean). Further decreasing the CM concentration to 2.5% decreased SI(max) to 5.1% (mean). Altering the saline chaser volume had no significant effect on SI(max). Increasing the saline chaser injection rate had little effect (mean increase, 2.2%) on SI(max) when using ≥40% of CM. There was a larger effect (mean increase, 19.6%) when ≤20% of CM were used. Bolus time length was significantly shorter (P < 0.001), and area under the SI/T(n) curve was significantly smaller (P < 0.01) for the CM protocols followed by a saline chaser injected at 6 mL/s compared with a saline chaser injected at 2 mL/s. With 40% of CM and a fast saline chaser, SImax close to that with undiluted CM can be achieved. An increased saline chaser injection rate has a more pronounced effect on

  12. Analysis of ischemic cerebral lesions using 3.0-T diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance angiography after revascularization surgery for ischemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Yasuo; Mizunari, Takayuki; Takagi, Ryo; Amano, Yasuo; Mizumura, Sunao; Komaba, Yuichi; Okubo, Seiji; Kobayashi, Shiro; Teramoto, Akira

    2013-07-01

    Cerebral revascularization surgery (CRS) is increasingly recognized as an important component in the treatment of complex cerebral vascular disease and tumors. CRS requires that the incidence of perioperative neurological complications should be minimized, because CRS for ischemic disease is often not the goal of treatment, but rather a prophylactic surgery. CRS carries the risk of focal postoperative neurological deficits. Little has been established concerning mechanisms of post-CRS ischemia. We used 3.0-T diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to analyze the incidence and mechanism of ischemic lesions. We studied the anterior circulation territory after 20 CRS procedures involving 33 vascular anastomosis procedures (13 double anastomoses and 7 single anastomoses) in 12 men and 8 women between June 2007 and October 2011. The operations included single or double superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis to treat internal carotid artery/MCA occlusions or severe MCA stenosis. A combined STA-MCA anastomosis and indirect bypass were performed for moyamoya disease. Postoperative DWI and MRA were obtained in all patients between 24 and 96 h after surgery to detect thromboembolism, hypoperfusion, or procedural ischemic complications and vasospasms of the donor STA. Follow-up DWI and MRA were carried out 1.8±0.6 days after CRS (range, 1-4 days). Temporary occlusion time for anastomoses averaged 18.9 min (range, 16-32 min). Asymptomatic new hyperintensities occurred in the ipsilateral hemisphere of 2 patients on postoperative DWI (10% patients/6.0% anastomoses), and 1 moyamoya patient (5.0% patients/3.0% anastomoses) developed a symptomatic hyperintensity in the ipsilateral occipital lobe in response to the operation. Two abnormal small (3.0-T DWI study of CRS and related clinical events. The incidence of symptomatic postoperative DWI abnormalities was restricted to 1 moyamoya patient

  13. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  14. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O. (Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  15. Time-Resolved Three-Dimensional Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Patients with Chronic Expanding and Stable Aortic Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Trojan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To prospectively evaluate our hypothesis that three-dimensional time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (TR-MRA is able to detect hemodynamic alterations in patients with chronic expanding aortic dissection compared to stable aortic dissections. Materials and Methods. 20 patients with chronic or residual aortic dissection in the descending aorta and patent false lumen underwent TR-MRA of the aorta at 1.5 T and repeated follow-up imaging (mean follow-up 5.4 years. 7 patients showed chronic aortic expansion and 13 patients had stable aortic diameters. Regions of interest were placed in the nondissected ascending aorta and the false lumen of the descending aorta at the level of the diaphragm (FL-diaphragm level resulting in respective time-intensity curves. Results. For the FL-diaphragm level, time-to-peak intensity and full width at half maximum were significantly shorter in the expansion group compared to the stable group (p=0.027 and p=0.003, and upward and downward slopes of time-intensity curves were significantly steeper (p=0.015 and p=0.005. The delay of peak intensity in the FL-diaphragm level compared to the nondissected ascending aorta was significantly shorter in the expansion group compared to the stable group (p=0.01. Conclusions. 3D TR-MRA detects significant alterations of hemodynamics within the patent false lumen of chronic expanding aortic dissections compared to stable aortic dissections.

  16. Comparison of contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqua Alessia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contrast MRA (C-MRA is the standard for quantitative analysis of thoracic vessels. We evaluated a noncontrast MRA (NC-MRA sequence (3-D EKG and navigator-gated SSFP for quantitative evaluation of the thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries in young patients with congenital heart disease. Objective : To compare contrast and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography for quantitative analysis of thoracic arteries in young patients with congenital heart defects. Methods : Measurements of thoracic aorta and branch pulmonary arteries were obtained from C-MRA and NC-MRA images in 51 patients, ages 2-35 years. Vessel diameters were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. Interobserver variability was assessed using percent variation. Results : C-MRA and NC-MRA measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.91-0.98 except for the right pulmonary artery (r = 0.74, 0.78. Agreement of measurements was excellent (mean difference -0.07 to -0.53 mm; mean % difference -1.8 to -4.9% except for the right pulmonary artery which was less good (mean difference 0.73, -1.38 mm; -3, -10%. Interobserver variability ranged from 5% to 8% for aortic and from 10% to 16% for pulmonary artery measures. The worse agreement and greater variability of the pulmonary artery measures appears due to difficulty standardizing the measurements in patients with abnormal and irregular vessels. Conclusion : These data indicate that C-MRA and NC-MRA measures are comparable and could be used interchangeably, avoiding administration of contrast in selected patients.

  17. Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions with navigator echo-based. Respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography compared with echocardiography in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino, Masayuki; Teraoka, Kunihiko; Hirano, Masaharu; Kawashima, Naoshi; Kakizaki, Dai; Ookubo, Yasuo; Sasaki, Kazuyoshi; Katuyama, Hiroaki

    2004-01-01

    Navigator echo-based respiratory-gated three dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (3D-CMRA) was compared with echocardiography, to determine whether 3D-CMRA was useful for the evaluation of Kawasaki disease-associated coronary artery lesions. Sixteen consecutive patients (imaging was performed 17 times in total) who were given a diagnosis of Kawasaki's disease at the pediatric department of our hospital and examined for the precise examination of complicating coronary artery lesions on MRI using a navigator-echo technique because of their incapability of holding their breath during imaging were entered into the present study. A 1.5T MRI system was used. Gd-DOTA was given at a total volume of 0.1 mmol/kg. During imaging, CMRA visualized the left coronary arteries in all 17 cases and the right coronary arteries in 16 cases, but not in one case. The left main coronary trunk segment no.5 was demonstrated in all cases with CMRA, but not in 4 cases with echocardiography. The left anterior descending branch no.6 was visualized in 11 of the 17 cases with CMRA, but only in 5 cases with echocardiography. The left circumflex branch no.11 was observed in 6 cases with CMRA, but only in 2 cases with echocardiography. As for the right coronary arteries, branches no.1 and no.2 were observed in 16 and 9 cases with CMRA, respectively, and in 13 and 3 cases with echocardiography, respectively. Vascular diameters measured on CMRA were almost identical to those on echocardiography, within the range of arteries visualized. 3D-CMRA combined with a navigator echo technique appears to be a useful tool for the observation of coronary artery lesions associated with Kawasaki's disease because it is superior in lesion visualization to echocardiography. (author)

  18. Improved cerebral time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography at 7 Tesla--feasibility study and preliminary results using optimized venous saturation pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten H Wrede

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA due to specific absorption rate (SAR limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE algorithm saturation pulses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26-70 years with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. RESULTS: Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. CONCLUSION: The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies.

  19. Improved Cerebral Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 7 Tesla – Feasibility Study and Preliminary Results Using Optimized Venous Saturation Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, Karsten H.; Johst, Sören; Dammann, Philipp; Özkan, Neriman; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Kraemer, Markus; Maderwald, Stefan; Ladd, Mark E.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale; Schlamann, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) due to specific absorption rate (SAR) limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) algorithm saturation pulses. Material and Methods Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n = 8, female n = 17; average age 49.64 years; range 26–70 years) with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens) whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. Results Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. Conclusion The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies. PMID:25232868

  20. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material ... vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  1. Comparison of Power Versus Manual Injection in Bolus Shape and Image Quality on Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography: An Experimental Study in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare power versus manual injection in bolus shape and image quality on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA). Three types of CE-MRA (head-neck 3-dimensional [3D] MRA with a test-bolus technique, thoracic-abdominal 3D MRA with a bolus-tracking technique, and thoracic-abdominal time-resolved 4-dimensional [4D] MRA) were performed after power and manual injection of gadobutrol (0.1 mmol/kg) at 2 mL/s in 12 pigs (6 sets of power and manual injections for each type of CE-MRA). For the quantitative analysis, the signal-to-noise ratio was measured on ascending aorta, descending aorta, brachiocephalic trunk, common carotid artery, and external carotid artery on the 6 sets of head-neck 3D MRA, and on ascending aorta, descending aorta, brachiocephalic trunk, abdominal aorta, celiac trunk, and renal artery on the 6 sets of thoracic-abdominal 3D MRA. Bolus shapes were evaluated on the 6 sets each of test-bolus scans and 4D MRA. For the qualitative analysis, arterial enhancement, superimposition of nontargeted enhancement, and overall image quality were evaluated on 3D MRA. Visibility of bolus transition was assessed on 4D MRA. Intraindividual comparison between power and manual injection was made by paired t test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and analysis of variance by ranks. Signal-to-noise ratio on 3D MRA was statistically higher with power injection than with manual injection (P < 0.001). Bolus shapes (test-bolus, 4D MRA) were represented by a characteristic standard bolus curve (sharp first-pass peak followed by a gentle recirculation peak) in all the 12 scans with power injection, but only in 1 of the 12 scans with manual injection. Standard deviations of time-to-peak enhancement were smaller in power injection than in manual injection. Qualitatively, although both injection methods achieved diagnostic quality on 3D MRA, power injection exhibited significantly higher image quality than manual injection (P = 0.001) due to

  2. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic characterization of the interconverting isomers of MS-325, a gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance angiography contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyeklar, Zoltan; Dunham, Stephen U; Midelfort, Katarina; Scott, Daniel M; Sajiki, Hirano; Ong, Karen; Lauffer, Randall B; Caravan, Peter; McMurry, Thomas J

    2007-08-06

    The amphiphilic gadolinium complex MS-325 ((trisodium-{(2-(R)-[(4,4-diphenylcyclohexyl) phosphonooxymethyl] diethylenetriaminepentaacetato) (aquo)gadolinium(III)}) is a contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). MS-325 comprises a GdDTPA core with an appended phosphodiester moiety linked to a diphenylcyclohexyl group to facilitate noncovalent binding to serum albumin and extension of the plasma half-life in vivo. The chiral DTPA ligand (R) was derived from L-serine, and upon complexation with gadolinium, forms two interconvertible diastereomers, denoted herein as isomers A and B. X-ray crystallography of the tris(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) salt derivative of isomer A revealed a structure in the polar acentric space group P32. The structure consisted of three independent molecules of the gadolinium complex in the asymmetric unit along with three Delta-[Co(en)3]3+ cations, and it represents an unusual example of spontaneous Pasteur resolution of the cobalt cation. The geometry of the coordination core was best described as a distorted trigonal prism, and the final R factor was 5.6%. The configuration of the chiral central nitrogen of the DTPA core was S. The Gd-water (2.47-2.48 A), the Gd-acetate oxygens (2.34-2.42 A), and the Gd-N bond distances (central N, 2.59-2.63 A; terminal N, 2.74-2.80 A) were similar to other reported GdDTPA structures. The structurally characterized single crystal was one of two interconvertable diastereomers (isomers A and B) that equilibrated to a ratio of 1.81 to 1 at pH 7.4 and were separable at elevated pH by ion-exchange chromatography. The rate of isomerization was highly pH dependent: k1 = (1.45 +/- 0.08) x 102[H+] + (4.16 +/- 0.30) x 105[H+]2; k-1 = (2.57 +/- 0.17) x 102[H+] + (7.54 +/- 0.60) x 105[H+]2.

  3. Obliteration dynamics in cerebral arteriovenous malformations after cyberknife radiosurgery: quantification with sequential nidus volumetry and 3-tesla 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Reiser, Maximilian; Herrmann, Karin A

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the time-dependent obliteration of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVM) after CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS) (Accuray, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) by means of sequential 3-T, 3-dimensional (3D), time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and volumetry of the arteriovenous malformation (AVM) nidus. In this prospective study, 3D TOF MRA was performed on 20 patients with cAVMs treated by single-fraction CKRS. Three-dimensional TOF MRA was performed on a 3-T, 32-channel magnetic resonance scanner (Magnetom TIM Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) with isotropic voxel size at a spatial resolution of 0.6 x 0.6 x 0.6 mm3. The time-dependent relative decay of the transnidal blood flow evidenced by 3D TOF MRA was referred to as "obliteration dynamics." Volumetry of the nidus size was performed with OsiriX imaging software (OsiriX Foundation, Geneva, Switzerland). All patients had 3 to 4 follow-up examinations at 3- to 6-month intervals over a minimum follow-up period of 9 months. Subtotal obliteration was determined if the residual nidus volume was 5% or less of the initial nidus volume. Stata/IC software (Version 10.0; Stata Corp., College Station, TX) was used for statistical analysis and to identify potential factors of AVM obliteration. Regarding their clinical status, case history, and pretreatments, the participants of this study represent difficult-to-treat cAVM patients. The median nidus volume was 1.8 mL (range, 0.4-12.5 mL); the median minimum dose prescribed to the nidus was 22 Gy (range, 16-24 Gy) delivered to the 67% isodose line (range, 55-80%). CKRS was well tolerated, with complications in 2 patients. No further hemorrhages occurred after RS, except 1 small and clinically inapparent incident. The median follow-up period after RS was 25.0 months (range, 11.7-36.8 months). After RS, a statistically significant obliteration was observed in all patients. However, the obliteration dynamics of the cAVMs showed a

  4. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  5. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  8. Angiorressonância magnética do crânio: revisão de 100 casos Magnetic resonance angiography of the brain: review of 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Portugal Guimarães Amaral

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram analisados, retrospectivamente, os exames de 100 pacientes que se submeteram a angiografia por ressonância magnética (angio-RM do crânio com diferentes indicações clínicas. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram discutir as vantagens e desvantagens da técnica 3D TOF em exames de angio-RM cerebral e verificar as principais indicações de angio-RM na avaliação das lesões vasculares intracranianas e a freqüência dos principais achados nestes exames. As principais indicações para a realização de angio-RM neste trabalho foram cefaléia (n = 29, acidente vascular encefálico (n = 14 e ataque isquêmico transitório (n = 11. Em 11 casos não havia indicação clínica e os demais tiveram indicações diversas. Cinqüenta e dois por cento dos exames apresentaram alguma alteração. Os principais achados foram estenose vascular (n = 30, aneurisma (n = 10, variações anatômicas (n = 6, malformações vasculares (n = 4 e trombose dos seios durais (n = 2. A técnica 3D TOF, única utilizada neste trabalho, mostrou-se eficiente na maioria dos casos, com um tempo relativamente curto para sua aquisição. Como desvantagem, não se mostra eficaz para cobrir grandes volumes.In this study we reviewed the scans of 100 patients submitted to magnetic resonance angiography (MR angiography of the brain for different clinical indications. The objectives of the study were to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the 3D TOF in cerebral MR angiography, to review the main indications of MR angiography in the evaluation of intracranial vascular lesions, and to assess the frequency of the most important findings. The main indications for MR angiography were headache (n = 29, stroke (n = 14, transient ischemic attack (n = 11 and other causes (n = 35. In 11 patients the clinical indication could not be recovered from the patients records. Fifty two percent of the exams showed abnormalities. The main findings were vascular stenosis (n

  9. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  10. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  11. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  13. Minimally invasive superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery bypass through a minicraniotomy: benefit of three-dimensional virtual reality planning using magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gerrit; Stadie, Axel; Schwandt, Eike; Gawehn, Joachim; Boor, Stephan; Marx, Juergen; Oertel, Joachim

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the authors in this study was to introduce a minimally invasive superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass surgery by the preselection of appropriate donor and recipient branches in a 3D virtual reality setting based on 3-T MR angiography data. An STA-MCA anastomosis was performed in each of 5 patients. Before surgery, 3-T MR imaging was performed with 3D magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences, and a high-resolution CT 3D dataset was obtained. Image fusion and the construction of a 3D virtual reality model of each patient were completed. In the 3D virtual reality setting, the skin surface, skull surface, and extra- and intracranial arteries as well as the cortical brain surface could be displayed in detail. The surgical approach was successfully visualized in virtual reality. The anatomical relationship of structures of interest could be evaluated based on different values of translucency in all cases. The closest point of the appropriate donor branch of the STA and the most suitable recipient M(3) or M(4) segment could be calculated with high accuracy preoperatively and determined as the center point of the following minicraniotomy. Localization of the craniotomy and the skin incision on top of the STA branch was calculated with the system, and these data were transferred onto the patient's skin before surgery. In all cases the preselected arteries could be found intraoperatively in exact agreement with the preoperative planning data. Successful extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery was achieved without stereotactic neuronavigation via a preselected minimally invasive approach in all cases. Subsequent enlargement of the craniotomy was not necessary. Perioperative complications were not observed. All bypasses remained patent on follow-up. With the application of a 3D virtual reality planning system, the extent of skin incision and tissue trauma as well as the size of the bone flap was minimal. The

  14. Sequential gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the aortoiliac and the femoropopliteal arteries with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koichiro; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2000-01-01

    To obtain a wide-range contrast MR angiography in a single examination, we performed two sequential administrations of low-dose (0.08 mmol/kg) gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) with three dimensional inversion recovery prepared fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady-state (3D IR-fast SPGR) sequence. Signal characteristics of the sequence were estimated by computed simulations and an in vitro study. A clinical study of 19 examinations was done with sequential MR angiography of the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries. Great signal differences were observed between the high and low Gd concentrations. Higher Gd concentrations generated significantly stronger signals. Greater signals were produced at TIs of longer than 150 msec than at shorter than 100 msec. In the clinical study, the arteries were visualized with sufficient signals even with a small amount of contrast agent. Contrast-to-noise ratios between the arteries and surrounding skeletal muscles or fat tissues ranged from 10.5±9.6 to 4.7±2.2 and 6.6±2.8 to -3.1±11.2, respectively. No venous enhancement was found with diluted contrast agent on the second MR angiography. Two consecutive contrast MR angiographies can be obtained with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent. (author)

  15. Sequential gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of the aortoiliac and the femoropopliteal arteries with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Koichiro [Nippon Medical School, Inba, Chiba (Japan). Chiba Hokusoh Hospital; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2000-12-01

    To obtain a wide-range contrast MR angiography in a single examination, we performed two sequential administrations of low-dose (0.08 mmol/kg) gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) with three dimensional inversion recovery prepared fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady-state (3D IR-fast SPGR) sequence. Signal characteristics of the sequence were estimated by computed simulations and an in vitro study. A clinical study of 19 examinations was done with sequential MR angiography of the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries. Great signal differences were observed between the high and low Gd concentrations. Higher Gd concentrations generated significantly stronger signals. Greater signals were produced at TIs of longer than 150 msec than at shorter than 100 msec. In the clinical study, the arteries were visualized with sufficient signals even with a small amount of contrast agent. Contrast-to-noise ratios between the arteries and surrounding skeletal muscles or fat tissues ranged from 10.5{+-}9.6 to 4.7{+-}2.2 and 6.6{+-}2.8 to -3.1{+-}11.2, respectively. No venous enhancement was found with diluted contrast agent on the second MR angiography. Two consecutive contrast MR angiographies can be obtained with repetitive administration of low-dose contrast agent. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  18. Comparison between digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance angiography in investigation of nonlacunar ischemic stroke in young patients: preliminary results Comparação entre arteriografia digital e angioressonância na investigação de acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico não-lacunar em pacientes jovens: resultados preliminares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bastos Conforto

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We preliminarily investigated the relevance of performing digital subtraction angiography (DSA in addition to magnetic resonance angiography (MRA in definition of ischemic stroke etiology in young patients. METHOD: DSAs and MRAs from 17 young patients with nonlacunar ischemic stroke were blindly analyzed and their impact on stroke management was evaluated. RESULTS: Etiologies were the same considering results of either DSA or MRA in 12/17 cases. In 15/17 patients no changes would have been made in treatment, regardless of the modality of angiography considered. CONCLUSION: These preliminary results suggest that DSA may be redundant in two thirds of ischemic strokes in young patients. Further larger prospective studies are necessary to determine indications of DSA in this age group.PROPÓSITO DO ESTUDO: Investigar de forma preliminar a relevância da realização de angiografia digital (AD adicionalmente a angioressonância (AR na definição de etiologias de acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico (AVCI em pacientes jovens. MÉTODO: ADs e ARs de 17 pacientes jovens com AVCIs não-lacunares foram analisadas. Avaliamos o impacto destes exames no manejo clínico dos casos. RESULTADOS: Em 12/17 casos, as etiologias dos AVCIs de acordo com os resultados de AD ou de AR foram idênticas. Em 15/17 pacientes, nenhuma mudança de conduta terapêutica seria realizada, independentemente da modalidade de exame considerada. CONCLUSÃO: Estes resultados preliminares sugerem que os resultados da AD podem ser redundantes em relação à AR em até dois terços dos pacientes jovens com AVCI. Estudos prospectivos maiores são necessários para otimizar o estabelecimento de indicações de AD nesta faixa etária.

  19. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  5. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kim, Dong Hun

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 ± 0.1 vs. 2.88 ± 0.1 (before) and 1.8 ± 0.4 vs 2.83 ± 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 ± 0.43 and 2.81 ± 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 ± 6.6 vs. 140.8 ± 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 ± 25.4 vs. 466.3 ± 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  6. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 {+-} 0.1 vs. 2.88 {+-} 0.1 (before) and 1.8 {+-} 0.4 vs 2.83 {+-} 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 {+-} 0.43 and 2.81 {+-} 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 {+-} 6.6 vs. 140.8 {+-} 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 {+-} 25.4 vs. 466.3 {+-} 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  7. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  13. Left Gastric Vein Visualization with Hepatopetal Flow Information in Healthy Subjects Using Non-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Balanced Steady-State Free-Precession Sequence and Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Ayako; Yamashita, Rikiya; Arizono, Shigeki; Kido, Aki; Sakashita, Naotaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-01-01

    To selectively visualize the left gastric vein (LGV) with hepatopetal flow information by non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography under a hypothesis that change in the LGV flow direction can predict the development of esophageal varices; and to optimize the acquisition protocol in healthy subjects. Respiratory-gated three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession scans were conducted on 31 healthy subjects using two methods (A and B) for visualizing the LGV with hepatopetal flow. In method A, two time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP) were placed on the whole abdomen and the area from the gastric fornix to the upper body, excluding the LGV area. In method B, nonselective inversion recovery pulse was used and one Time-SLIP was placed on the esophagogastric junction. The detectability and consistency of LGV were evaluated using the two methods and ultrasonography (US). Left gastric veins by method A, B, and US were detected in 30 (97%), 24 (77%), and 23 (74%) subjects, respectively. LGV flow by US was hepatopetal in 22 subjects and stagnant in one subject. All hepatopetal LGVs by US coincided with the visualized vessels in both methods. One subject with non-visualized LGV in method A showed stagnant LGV by US. Hepatopetal LGV could be selectively visualized by method A in healthy subjects.

  14. Value of high spatial and high temporal resolution magnetic resonance angiography for differentiation between idiopathic and thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Sebastian; Eichinger, Monika [DKFZ, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-University, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Fink, Christian; Zaporozhan, Julia; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [DKFZ, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Borst, Mathias M.; Meyer, F. Joachim; Gruenig, Ekkehard [University Heidelberg, Department of Internal Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg-University, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    Differentiation between different forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is essential for correct disease management. The goal of this study was to elucidate the clinical impact of high spatial resolution MR angiography (SR-MRA) and time-resolved MRA (TR-MRA) to differentiate between patients with chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH) and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Ten PH patients and five volunteers were examined. Twenty TR-MRA data sets (TA 1.5 s) and SR-MRA (TA 23 s) were acquired. TR-MRA data sets were subtracted as angiography and perfusion images. Evaluation comprised analysis of vascular pathologies on a segmental basis, detection of perfusion defects, and bronchial arteries by two readers in consensus. Technical evaluation comprised evaluation of image quality, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements, and contrast-media passage time. Visualization of the pulmonary arteries was possible down to a subsegmental (SR-MRA) and to a segmental (TR-MRA) level. SR-MRA outperformed TR-MRA in direct visualization of intravascular changes. Patients with IPAH predominantly showed tortuous pulmonary arteries while in CTEPH wall irregularities and abnormal proximal-to-distal tapering was found. Perfusion images showed a diffuse pattern in IPAH and focal defects in CTEPH. TR-MRA and SR-MRA resulted in the same final diagnosis. Both MRA techniques allowed for differentiation between IPAH and CTEPH. Therefore, TR-MRA can be used in the clinical setting, especially in dyspneic patients. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  18. An investigation of cerebral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Part 8: diagnostic ability of cerebral aneurysms with MRA using 1.5 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohue, Shiro; Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Kohno, Kanehisa

    1998-01-01

    The ability of MR angiography (MRA) to detect intracranial aneurysms was assessed. Seventy-eight patients, including 21 cases of intracranial aneurysms, underwent three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) MRA using a 1.5 T MRI system. MRA images were evaluated using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images only, MIP+selective MIP images, and MIP+selective MIP+original images by ten neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists. By receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the ability to detect the 21 patients with aneurysms, the sensitivity of MIP images was 74±8% (mean±S.D.) while the specificity was 80%. Of 26 aneurysms, the sensitivity of MIP images was 64±9% (mean±S.D.). Although the sensitivity for aneurysms 5 mm or larger, or located at middle cerebral arteries was over 85%, the sensitivity for aneurysms smaller than 5 mm or located at internal carotid arteries was less than 50%. The evaluation of MRA adding selective MIP and original images to MIP images improved the sensitivity in detecting aneurysms and decreased the number of false positive cases. These data indicate that MRA is a useful technique for detecting aneurysms 5 mm or larger, and those located at the middle cerebral arteries. However, by MRA, it remains difficult to detect aneurysms smaller than 5 mm and those located at the internal carotid arteries. (author)

  19. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  20. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  6. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  7. Analogous Three-Dimensional Constructive Interference in Steady State Sequences Enhance the Utility of Three-Dimensional Time of Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Delineating Lenticulostriate Arteries in Insular Gliomas: Evidence from a Prospective Clinicoradiologic Analysis of 48 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Arun S; Thakar, Sumit; Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Aryan, Saritha; Mohan, Dilip; Hegde, Alangar S

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) time of flight (TOF) imaging is the current gold standard for noninvasive, preoperative localization of lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) in insular gliomas; however, the utility of this modality depends on tumor intensity. Over a 3-year period, 48 consecutive patients with insular gliomas were prospectively evaluated. Location of LSAs and their relationship with the tumor were determined using a combination of contrast-enhanced coronal 3D TOF magnetic resonance angiography and coronal 3D constructive interference in steady state (CISS) sequences. These findings were analyzed with respect to extent of tumor resection and early postoperative motor outcome. Tumor was clearly visualized in 29 (60.4%) patients with T1-hypointense tumors using 3D TOF and in all patients using CISS sequences. Using combined 3D TOF and CISS, LSA-tumor interface was well seen in 47 patients, including all patients with T1-heterointense or T1-isointense tumors. Extent of resection was higher in the LSA-pushed group compared with the LSA-encased group. In the LSA-encased group, 6 (12.5%) patients developed postoperative hemiparesis; 2 (4.2%) cases were attributed to LSA injury. Contrast-enhanced 3D TOF can delineate LSAs in almost all insular gliomas but is limited in identifying the LSA-tumor interface. This limitation can be overcome by addition of analogous CISS sequences that delineate the LSA-tumor interface regardless of tumor intensity. Combined 3D TOF and 3D CISS is a useful tool for surgical planning and safer resections of insular tumors and may have added surgical relevance when included as an intraoperative adjunct. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (3-D CE-MRA) in the evaluation of hemodialysis access complications, and the condition of central veins in patients who are candidates for hemodialysis access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksoy, Yahya; Gormus, Niyazi; Tercan, Mehmet Akif

    2004-01-01

    Arteriovenous (AV) fistulas are crucial in patients requiring long-term hemodialysis (HD). Dysfunctions of these fistulas are the most common causes of recurrent hospitalizations. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety and usefulness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the evaluation of HD fistulas complications, and the condition of the central veins before HD access. This study comprised 30 consecutive patients (15 females, 15 males; age range 25-66 yrs, mean +/- SD 51.2 +/- 9.9 yrs). Of 30 patients, 26 had native AV fistulas and the remaining four patients, who had a history of previous subclavian vein catheterization, were candidates for HD fistulas. Nine patients had a radiocephalic fistula, 15 had a brachiobasilic fistula, one had a saphenous vein graft, and one had brachiobasilic vein transposition. To observe the fistula complications in these cases, three-dimensional (3-D) CE-MRA using gadolinium was performed. The results were considered normal in three patients (10%), who were candidates for AV fistula construction; one patient had central vein occlusion due to previous catheterization. Thirteen patients (43.3%) had venous stenosis or occlusion; three of them (10%) had low CE arteries distal to fistula region, leading to ischemic complications, and six (20%) had stenosis at the fistula region. Seven patients (23.3%) had venous pseudoaneurysms, whereas two of them had both pseudoaneurysms and fistula region stenosis, and one had both venous stenosis and pseudoaneurysm. There were no adverse or allergic-like reactions or heat and taste sensations observed in our series. 3-D CE-MRA is a useful, safe and a practical imaging modality in complicated fistula diagnosis with fewer complications and side-effects in comparison to fistulography.

  9. A follow-up study of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with intracranial aneurysms using 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Peng; Qian, Yi [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Xuan [Clinical Nutrition Department of Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiao, Liaoyuan [Department of Nephrology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, Shengqiang, E-mail: yushengqiang_cz@163.com [Department of Nephrology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Shiyuan, E-mail: laijiangtaotao@163.com [Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients have an increased risk for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Our aim was to screen and follow up the unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) detected by 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF MRA) in patients with ADPKD in order to evaluate the growth of UIAs and the value of 3D-TOF MRA. Methods: From 2011 to 2012, we followed up UIAs detected in 40 ADPKD patients who had MRA examinations with an interval of at least 36 months. All MRA examinations were performed on a 3 T system (Achieva X-Series, Philips Medical Systems) with a Sense-Head-8 receiver head coil. The acquired data sets were transferred to a workstation (EWS, Philips Medical) to perform maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) with a specialized software package (Philips Medical). The size of UIAs was determined as the longest diameter in transverse or vertical measurement. UIAs that grew more than 20% were considered as enlarged. Results: Fifty UIAs were found in 40 previously examined ADPKD patients who underwent 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA follow-ups. No patients ever had treatment before the second examination. The longest diameter of all follow-up UIAs was less than 10 mm and mean diameter was 3.64 ± 2.25 mm. UIAs in only 4 patients (10%) were considered as enlarged. None of the 50 IAs in the 40 ADPKD patients ruptured during the MRA follow-up period. Conclusion: 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA was feasible for UIAs follow-up in ADPKD patients. The chance of enlargement and rupture of UIAs in ADPKD patients was not higher than in the general population.

  10. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA): evaluation of three different contrast agents at two different doses (0.05 and 0.1 mmol/kg) in pigs at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, M.; Vos, B.; Pietsch, H. [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Diagnostic Imaging, Berlin (Germany); Michaely, Henrik J. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Schwenke, C. [ScoSSiS - Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    To compare the image quality of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the supra-aortic vessels at 0.05 mmol/kg bw and 0.1 mmol/kg bw, between gadobutrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA quantitatively and qualitatively a total of eight pigs were evaluated intraindividually at 1.5 T. Each pig was examined using 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA on day one and 0.05 mmol/kg on day two. MRA datasets for the carotid artery and the infraorbital artery were qualitatively assessed regarding overall image quality on an ordinal four-point scale (4-excellent, 1-non-diagnostic). The signal-to noise-ratio (SNR) was measured. The qualitative assessment of the carotid artery showed a higher median image quality for the 0.1 mmol dose than for the 0.05 mmol dose for all three compounds. No difference was found for the infraorbital artery. Mean SNR of Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, gadobutrol at 0.05 mmol/kg were 36.0 {+-} 13.4/37.9 {+-} 16.3/43.7 {+-} 0.4 and at 0.1 mmol/kg they were 50.1 {+-} 12.4/46.6 {+-} 6.5 / 54.6 {+-} 10.2. Gd-BOPTA 0.05 revealed a significantly lower SNR than all other agents at normal dose. Full-dose gadolinium MRA results in higher image quality and significantly higher SNR compared with the half dose. Gadobutrol and Gd-BOPTA have similar enhancement properties at full dose but at half dose, gadobutrol appears superior. (orig.)

  11. A follow-up study of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease with intracranial aneurysms using 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Peng; Qian, Yi; Zheng, Xuan; Xiao, Liaoyuan; Yu, Shengqiang; Liu, Shiyuan

    2013-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients have an increased risk for intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Our aim was to screen and follow up the unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) detected by 3.0 T three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (3D-TOF MRA) in patients with ADPKD in order to evaluate the growth of UIAs and the value of 3D-TOF MRA. From 2011 to 2012, we followed up UIAs detected in 40 ADPKD patients who had MRA examinations with an interval of at least 36 months. All MRA examinations were performed on a 3T system (Achieva X-Series, Philips Medical Systems) with a Sense-Head-8 receiver head coil. The acquired data sets were transferred to a workstation (EWS, Philips Medical) to perform maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) with a specialized software package (Philips Medical). The size of UIAs was determined as the longest diameter in transverse or vertical measurement. UIAs that grew more than 20% were considered as enlarged. Fifty UIAs were found in 40 previously examined ADPKD patients who underwent 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA follow-ups. No patients ever had treatment before the second examination. The longest diameter of all follow-up UIAs was less than 10mm and mean diameter was 3.64 ± 2.25 mm. UIAs in only 4 patients (10%) were considered as enlarged. None of the 50 IAs in the 40 ADPKD patients ruptured during the MRA follow-up period. 3.0 T 3D-TOF MRA was feasible for UIAs follow-up in ADPKD patients. The chance of enlargement and rupture of UIAs in ADPKD patients was not higher than in the general population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  17. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  2. Cardiac magnetic resonance assessment of takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.; Sonnex, E.; Pereira, R.S.; Coulden, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an important condition that can be difficult to differentiate from acute coronary syndrome on the basis of clinical, electrocardiogram, and cardiac enzyme assessment alone. Although coronary angiography remains important in the acute assessment of patients with suspected takotsubo cardiomyopathy, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has emerged over the last decade as an important non-invasive imaging tool in the diagnosis and follow-up of this condition. We present a review highlighting the CMR features of takotsubo cardiomyopathy and its complications with particular focus on differentiating this condition from acute myocardial infarction and myocarditis.

  3. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  4. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  5. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  6. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  8. Extremely Small Pseudoparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle as a Novel Blood Pool T1 Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent for 3 T Whole-Heart Coronary Angiography in Canines: Comparison With Gadoterate Meglumine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal; So, Young Ho; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeon, Bong-Sik; Choi, Kyu Sung; Kim, Eung-Gyu; Myeong, Wan-Jae

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an extremely small pseudoparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (ESPIO), KEG3, as a potential blood pool agent in 3 T coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in canine models and compare its efficacy to that of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Nine mongrel dogs were subjected to whole-heart coronary MRA in 2 separate sessions at 7-day intervals with a 3 T scanner using the FLASH sequence with either gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) or the ESPIO (KEG3). Coronary MRA was performed twice at each MR examination: the first scan during the administration of the contrast agent and the subsequent second scan at 15 minutes after contrast injection. Objective measurements of the Gd-DOTA and ESPIO images, including the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for the coronary arteries and cardiac veins, contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) between the vessels and fat (CNRfat) and the vessels and the myocardium (CNRmyocardium), and subjective image quality scores on a 4-point scale were evaluated and compared. The mean SNRs and CNRs of all vascular regions in the ESPIO images were similar to those of the corresponding regions in the Gd-DOTA images in the first scan (98.1 ± 32.5 vs 79.1 ± 38.4 for SNR of coronary arteries, P = 0.3; 74.2 ± 30.1 vs 61.4 ± 38.5 for CNR, P = 0.7) and more than 2 times higher than the latter in the second scan (95.2 ± 31.3 vs 32.1 ± 8.1 for SNR of coronary arteries, P = 0.008; 76.1 ± 35.8 vs 17.6 ± 19.2 for CNR, P 0.008). Similarly, the mean values of the subjective measurements of the ESPIO images were similar to those of the Gd-DOTA images (3.9 ± 0.3 vs 3.3 ± 0.8 for coronary arteries, P = 0.1) in the first scan and significantly better than the latter in the second scan (3.9 ± 0.2 vs 2.1 ± 0.6 for coronary arteries, P = 0.007). The experimental blood pool agent KEG3 offers equivalent image quality for whole-heart coronary MRA at 3 T upon contrast administration and persistent better quality in the subsequent

  9. 3.0 Tesla high spatial resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the pulmonary circulation: initial experience with a 32-channel phased array coil using a high relaxivity contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nael, Kambiz; Fenchel, Michael; Krishnam, Mayil; Finn, J Paul; Laub, Gerhard; Ruehm, Stefan G

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility of high spatial resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) with highly accelerated parallel acquisition at 3.0 T using a 32-channel phased array coil, and a high relaxivity contrast agent. Ten adult healthy volunteers (5 men, 5 women, aged 21-66 years) underwent high spatial resolution CE-MRA of the pulmonary circulation. Imaging was performed at 3 T using a 32-channel phase array coil. After intravenous injection of 1 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) at 1.5 mL/s, a timing bolus was used to measure the transit time from the arm vein to the main pulmonary artery. Subsequently following intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA at the same rate, isotropic high spatial resolution data sets (1 x 1 x 1 mm3) CE-MRA of the entire pulmonary circulation were acquired using a fast gradient-recalled echo sequence (TR/TE 3/1.2 milliseconds, FA 18 degrees) and highly accelerated parallel acquisition (GRAPPA x 6) during a 20-second breath hold. The presence of artifact, noise, and image quality of the pulmonary arterial segments were evaluated independently by 2 radiologists. Phantom measurements were performed to assess the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Statistical analysis of data was performed by using Wilcoxon rank sum test and 2-sample Student t test. The interobserver variability was tested by kappa coefficient. All studies were of diagnostic quality as determined by both observers. The pulmonary arteries were routinely identified up to fifth-order branches, with definition in the diagnostic range and excellent interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.90). Phantom measurements showed significantly lower SNR (P < 0.01) using GRAPPA (17.3 +/- 18.8) compared with measurements without parallel acquisition (58 +/- 49.4). The described 3 T CE-MRA protocol in addition to high T1 relaxivity of Gd-BOPTA provides sufficient SNR to support highly accelerated parallel acquisition

  10. Breath-hold imaging of the coronary arteries using Quiescent-Interval Slice-Selective (QISS) magnetic resonance angiography: pilot study at 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Robert R; Giri, S; Pursnani, A; Botelho, M P F; Li, W; Koktzoglou, I

    2015-11-23

    Coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is usually obtained with a free-breathing navigator-gated 3D acquisition. Our aim was to develop an alternative breath-hold approach that would allow the coronary arteries to be evaluated in a much shorter time and without risk of degradation by respiratory motion artifacts. For this purpose, we implemented a breath-hold, non-contrast-enhanced, quiescent-interval slice-selective (QISS) 2D technique. Sequence performance was compared at 1.5 and 3 Tesla using both radial and Cartesian k-space trajectories. The left coronary circulation was imaged in six healthy subjects and two patients with coronary artery disease. Breath-hold QISS was compared with T2-prepared 2D balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) and free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D bSSFP. Approximately 10 2.1-mm thick slices were acquired in a single ~20-s breath-hold using two-shot QISS. QISS contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was 1.5-fold higher at 3 Tesla than at 1.5 Tesla. Cartesian QISS provided the best coronary-to-myocardium CNR, whereas radial QISS provided the sharpest coronary images. QISS image quality exceeded that of free-breathing 3D coronary MRA with few artifacts at either field strength. Compared with T2-prepared 2D bSSFP, multi-slice capability was not restricted by the specific absorption rate at 3 Tesla and pericardial fluid signal was better suppressed. In addition to depicting the coronary arteries, QISS could image intra-cardiac structures, pericardium, and the aortic root in arbitrary slice orientations. Breath-hold QISS is a simple, versatile, and time-efficient method for coronary MRA that provides excellent image quality at both 1.5 and 3 Tesla. Image quality exceeded that of free-breathing, navigator-gated 3D MRA in a much shorter scan time. QISS also allowed rapid multi-slice bright-blood, diastolic phase imaging of the heart, which may have complementary value to multi-phase cine imaging. We conclude that, with further clinical

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  12. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot Fishman, a radiologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital ... of your body and to identify abnormalities and disease. If you’re scheduled for an MRA scan, ...

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  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    ... the examination. First of all, discuss with your doctor any serious health problems, recent surgeries and allergies. If you’re female and there’s a possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, ...

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    Full Text Available ... the examination. First of all, discuss with your doctor any serious health problems, recent surgeries and allergies. If you’re female and there’s a possibility that you’re pregnant tell your doctor as well. On the day of your exam, ...

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... MRA scan, there are several things you can do to prepare for the examination. First of all, ... To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking to this ...

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  4. Magnetic Resonance angiography for carotid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, J.L.; Begue, R.; Vilanova, J.C.; Aldama, J.; Delgado, E.; Baquero, M.; Capdevila, A.; Gili, J.

    1995-01-01

    Until now, patients with extracranial cerebrovascular ischemia (ECVI) could only be studied by means of CT, which provides reliable information on the parenchyma, but is unable to assess the intracranial vessels. On the other hand, angiographic and Doppler Us studies, which reflect the underlying vascular pathology and are considered reference explorations, with clearly established levels of sensitivity and specificity, are useless in the evaluation of the parenchyma. The introduction of MR and the development of MR angiographic (MRA) sequences lends a new dimension to the study of vascular disease. The knowledge and capacity to recognize the different artefacts or sources of error in MRA images, as well as the generalization of its use offer interesting expectations for its development as a technique for the entire study of the ischemic patient. We present selected illustrations of the vascular (carotid) disease obtained from 1400 cases studied in our center from June 1993 to the present (table I)

  5. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available ... things you can do to prepare for the examination. First of all, discuss with your doctor any ... devices may malfunction or cause problems during the examination. Most MRI exams are relatively painless. However, some ...

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    Full Text Available ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ... examine blood vessels in key areas of your body and to identify abnormalities and disease. If you’ ...

  11. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

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  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  4. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  5. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  8. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  12. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    This illustrated work covers the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases by MRI. It focuses on strategies for detecting a wide range of intracranial disorders and includes protocols for cranial MRI. For each disease discussed, characteristic MR findings are described, and contrasted with CT and angiography where appropriate. Offers useful appendices on functional neuroanatomy and a glossary of terminology and abbreviations

  13. Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinnell, V.S.; Mehringer, C.M.; Hieshima, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    The history of angiography is short, with its centennial approaching. A very brief review of milestones begins with the discovery of x-rays in 1895. Only a few months later contrast agents too toxic for human use were being injected into cadavers, severed limbs, and animals. The next major developments came in the late 1970s when percutaneous translumbar aortography and cerebral angiography were described. Contrast agents were now less toxic, and clinically useful angiography was a reality. In 1953 a technique for percutaneous vascular catheterization which formed the basis of many catheterization techniques to follow was described. In the 1970s the development of less invasive diagnostic methods such as computed tomography and diagnostic ultrasound decreased the indications for angiography, but newer interventional techniques such as embolization therapy and angioplasty have taken up the slack. Angiography remains the most important way to demonstrate vascular diseases graphically. Specific techniques such as angioplasty and digital subtraction angiography will be dealt with in other chapters. The authors hope to provide an overview of major areas of angiographic utilization. The basic techniques of arterial puncture and catheterization have been well described elsewhere

  14. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  15. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  7. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries : clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; de Bruin, H G; Rensing, B J; Wielopolski, P A; Hulshoff, M D; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory gating, turboflash acquisition, and

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries: clinical results from three dimensional evaluation of a respiratory gated technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); H.G. de Bruin (Hein); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); M.D. Hulshoff; P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs); P.J. de Feyter (Pim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance coronary angiography is challenging because of the motion of the vessels during cardiac contraction and respiration. Additional challenges are the small calibre of the arteries and their complex three dimensional course. Respiratory

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  13. Giant right atrial myxoma: characterization with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, Carole A

    2012-02-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-week history of dyspnoea and chest pain. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography was performed to exclude acute pulmonary embolism (PE). This demonstrated a large right atrial mass and no evidence of PE. Transthoracic echocardiography followed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a mobile right atrial mass. Surgical resection was then performed confirming a giant right atrial myxoma. We describe the typical clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features of right atrial myxoma.

  14. Multifunctional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grond, J. van der; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last few years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a multipurpose imaging technique. In addition to anatomical information, data can be obtained on perfusion, metabolism and imaging of the vascular anatomy. Especially in the field of neuroradiology the possibilities for obtaining multifunctional information from combined MR examinations are promising. In particular, stroke or stroke-related research benefits from these developments. This article reviews the current status and the potential of newly developed MR techniques with regard to the intracranial hemodynamic changes in patients with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. The combination of MR angiography, perfusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging seems especially useful in the management of the individual patient. (orig.)

  15. Multifunctional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grond, J. van der; Mali, W.P.T.M. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, P. O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1998-06-02

    Over the last few years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a multipurpose imaging technique. In addition to anatomical information, data can be obtained on perfusion, metabolism and imaging of the vascular anatomy. Especially in the field of neuroradiology the possibilities for obtaining multifunctional information from combined MR examinations are promising. In particular, stroke or stroke-related research benefits from these developments. This article reviews the current status and the potential of newly developed MR techniques with regard to the intracranial hemodynamic changes in patients with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. The combination of MR angiography, perfusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging seems especially useful in the management of the individual patient. (orig.) With 4 figs., 176 refs.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  17. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  18. 磁共振断层血管成像在颅神经血管压迫综合征的应用%Magnetic resonance tomographic angiography in cranial neurovascular compression syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡兴荣; 李顺振; 邓民强; 陈华东; 邱妮妮

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical diagnostic value of magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA) on cranial neurovascular compression syndrome,and evaluate the ability of 3D-FIESTA and 3D-TOF-SPGR sequences in demonstrating the relation of three-dimensional space between cranial nerves and blood vessels.Methods The data of 41 patients with cranial neurovascular compression syndrome,admitted to our hospital from May 2007 to May 2009,were analyzed.These patients were planed to perform micro vasular decompression (MVD).Before the operation,MRTA,3D-FIESTA and 3D-TOF-SPGR sequence scanning were performed to observe the relation of three-dimensional space between cranial nerves and blood vessels;these results were compared with the intraoperative results to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of 3D-FIESTA and 3D-TOF-SPGR sequence scanning.Results MRTA could demonstrate such cranial nerves as trigeminal nerve,facial nerve and glossopharyngeal nerve,and responsible blood vessels clearly and simultaneously.The 3D-FIESTA imaging showed high signal in the cerebrospinal fluid and moderate signal in the nerves and blood vessels.The 3D-TOF-SPGR imaging showed low signal in the cerebrospinai fluid,moderate signal in the nerves and brain parenchyma,and high signal in the blood vessels.Closed relation between the nerves and the blood vessels in the lesion side were found in 34 patients (82.9%) by 3D-FIESTA sequence scanning,and that was found in 35 patients by 3D-TOF-SPGR sequence scanning; no significant difference between 3D-FIESTA and 3D-TOF-SPGR sequence scanning was found in displaying the relation of nerves and blood vessels (P>0.05).Conclusion MRTA technology may clearly show the relation of cranial nerves and responsible blood vessels;combined application of 3D-FIESTA and 3D-TOF-SPGR sequence scanning can help making the preoperative diagnosis and determining the surgical indications in patients with cranial neurovaseular compression syndrome.%目的 探

  19. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  20. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  1. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  2. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  3. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  4. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  5. Clinical advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonace imaging and angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den H.C.M.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is an important noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis, clinical work‐up and treatment planning in patients suspected for a wide range of cardiovascular pathology. CMR imaging is accurate and reliable, and provides invaluable information to evaluate

  6. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  7. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ...

  9. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  16. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  17. Magnetic resonance venography of congenital vascular malformations of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laor, T.; Burrows, P.E.; Hoffer, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    Contrast angiography can demonstrate the vascular components of a vascular malformation, but can be technically challenging in small patients with complex venous anomalies. We reviewed the role of magnetic resonance venography (MRV) in the evaluation of children with predominantly low-flow, vascular malformations of the extremities. MRV (2D time-of-flight technique) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations were performed in ten young patients with congential predominantly low-flow vascular malformations of the extremities. MR imaging was used to characterize and determine the extent of the malformations, and MRV to evaluate the deep and superficial venous channels. In all patients, MRV studies were reviewed in conjunction with contrast angiograms, considered the gold standard, to confirm the findings. All signficant channel anomalies seen with contrast angiography were identified with MRV. In addition, MRV demonstrated some veins that were not intentionally opacified during contrast studies. MRV demonstrates both the superficial and deep conducting veins, whereas contrast angiography is a more directed study, evaluating only those channels intentionally opacified. Together, MR imaging and MRV data can non-invasively form the basis for determining the prognosis and choosing the individual treatment of congenital vascular malformations of the extremities. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SYR

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance has been a cornerstone of nonradiative wireless power transfer (WPT) since the late 19th century. However, some researchers have the misconception that magnetic resonance for WPT was developed recently. This article traces some early work of Tesla and other researchers related to the use of magnetic resonance in WPT. Included are some examples of magnetic resonance-based WPT projects conducted by researchers in the biomedical and power electronics communities over the last ...

  19. Diagnostic yield and accuracy of CT angiography, MR angiography, and digital subtraction angiography for detection of macrovascular causes of intracerebral haemorrhage: Prospective, multicentre cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.J. Van Asch (Charlotte J.J.); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); G.J.E. Rinkel (Gabriël J.E.); A. Algra (Ale); G.A.P. de Kort (G. A P); T.D. Witkamp (Theo); J.C.M. De Ridder (Johanna C.M.); K.M. Van Nieuwenhuizen (Koen M.); F.-E. De Leeuw (Frank-Erik); W.J. Schonewille (Wouter); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); T.W.M. Raaymakers (Theodora W.M.); J. Hofmeijer; M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); H. Kerkhoff (Henk); K. Jellema (Korné); I.M. Bronner (Irene M.); M.J.M. Remmers (Michel ); H.P. Bienfait (Henri); R.J.G.M. Witjes (Ron J.G.M.); J.P. Greving (Jacoba); C.J.M. Klijn (Catharina J.M.); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); H.B. Boogaarts; E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); W.J. Schonewille; W.M.J. Pellikaan; C. Puppels-De Waard; P.L.M. De Kort; J.P. Peluso; J. van Tuijl (Jordie); J. Hofmeijer; F.B.M. Joosten (Frank); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); L. Khajeh (Ladbon); T.W.M. Raaijmakers; M.J. Wermer; M.A.A. van Walderveen (Marianne); H. Kerkhoff; E. Zock; K. Jellema (Korné); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); I.M. Bronner; M.J.M. Remmers; R.J.G.M. Witjes; H.P. Bienfait; K.E. Droogh-Greve; R. Donders (Rogier); V.I.H. Kwa; T.H.C.M.L. Schreuder (Tobien H. C. M. L.); C.L. Franke (Cees); J.S. Straver; C. Jansen; S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); C.C. Pleiter (C.); M.C. Visser; C.J.J. Van Asch; B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); G.J.E. Rinkel (Gabriel); K.M. Van Nieuwenhuizen; C.J.M. Klijn (Catharina J.M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStudy question What are the diagnostic yield and accuracy of early computed tomography (CT) angiography followed by magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral haemorrhage? Methods This

  20. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.; Staedtisches Rudolf-Virchow Krankenhaus, Berlin

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness. (orig.) [de

  1. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  3. Moya - Moya syndrome: Diagnose by means of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrero Borrero, Leonidas; Henao Gomez, Liliana; Hernandez Castro, John Jairo

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of moya-moya syndrome diagnosed by means of study of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in an eight-year old patient with Seckel syndrome and progressive neurological deficit of several years, characterized by left hemi paresis and gait limitation as well as microcephalus. Previous imaging studies included cerebral CT (CCT) that showed several infarctions, without affecting a particular vascular territory. The MRA study was carried out in a 1.5 t system. Besides confirming the CCT findings, it demonstrated characteristic images of the moya - moya syndrome. This is the first case published in Colombia

  4. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  8. Resonant and nonresonant magnetic scattering (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open up new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and they fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin-polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a complementary role to echocardiography (heart ultrasound), computed tomography and catheter angiography to provide information both before ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the brain—often without the need ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound), computed tomography and catheter angiography to provide information both before and after treatment. Cardiac MRI may ... use it after appropriate pre-medication. For more information on adverse reactions to gadolinium-based contrast agents, ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nerve tissue within the spinal cord In the heart, MRI is often used in a complementary role to echocardiography (heart ultrasound), computed tomography and catheter angiography to provide ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  15. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  18. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  20. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  4. Transition metal nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregosin, P.S.

    1991-01-01

    Transition metal NMR spectroscopy has progressed enormously in recent years. New methods, and specifically solid-state methods and new pulse sequences, have allowed access to data from nuclei with relatively low receptivities with the result that chemists have begun to consider old and new problems, previously unapproachable. Moreover, theory, computational science in particular, now permits the calculation of not just 13 C, 15 N and other light nuclei chemical shifts, but heavy main-group element and transition metals as well. These two points, combined with increasing access to high field pulsed spectrometer has produced a wealth of new data on the NMR transition metals. A new series of articles concerned with measuring, understanding and using the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the metals of Group 3-12 is presented. (author)

  5. Gaucher's disease: Magnetic resonance findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Gomez-Pereda, R.; Blasco, A.; Ros, L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is to assess the role of magnetic resonance (MR) in determining the initial extension of Gaucher's disease and its complications. A retrospective study of eight patients diagnosed as having Gaucher's disease was carried out using MR. The study focused on pelvis, hip, femur, spine, liver parenchyma and splenic parenchyma. Infiltration of the cancellous portion of the vertebral bodies was observed in all but one of the patients. Three patients presented small hemangiomas in dorsal and lumbar vertebral bodies. Pelvic bone involvement was homogeneous in four cases and spotty in two, while the pelvic marrow was normal in the two patients with no vertebral infiltration. A vascular necrosis of the femoral head was detected in two cases. MR is very useful in determining the initial extension, in the early diagnosis of complications and in managing the posttreatment marrow response to assess the therapeutic efficacy. 16 refs

  6. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  7. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Lotx, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now accepted as an effective method of investigating a wide range of disorders, especially of the brain and spine. A short introduction on image contrast in MRI is given and the advantages and disadvantages for the different diseases of the brain is discussed. Excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capabilities and lack of ionising radiation are conspicuous advantages, and it is now established as the investigation of choice in a large number of clinical conditions, especially when the central nervous system is involved. However, it remains only one of a series of imaging modalities. A confident provisional clinical diagnosis is essential for establishing an imaging protocol and the intention should always be to reach a definitive diagnosis in the least invasive and most cost-effective way. 7 figs., 19 refs

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  11. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  13. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  14. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of hypophysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malla Huesh, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary diseases represent with wide variety of symptoms in regard with changes in the endocrine function. Magnetic resonance imaging has a crucial role in detecting the morphologic appearance in physiologic conditions, malformative diseases and acquired pathologies. The MR-imaging is established as the method of choice in assessing the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The pituitary gland is a complex structure with an important role in the homeostasis of the organism even though it is so small? It is surrounded by bony structures, vessels, nerves and the brain parenchyma. It consists of three parts - anterior called - adenohypophysis, posterior - neurohypophysis and pituitary stalk. The anterior part comprises about 75% of the gland. Computed tomography (CT) has a limited role in detecting the pituitary gland. It is mainly used in cases of elevated intracranial pressure due to suspected apoplexy. The gland's small size, relation to other structures and its soft tissue characteristic make it an accessible region of interest for detecting with MR-imaging. The lack of ionizing energy and the technical advances in the MR-methods are responsible for the creating images with better spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio. The examination is carried out on a standard protocol. It is important that thin slices are executed in sagittal and coronal planes. Performing a sequence, regarding the brain parenchyma is essential, since many malformations of the pituitary gland are associated with other congenital conditions. The examination starts with a T1W sequence to assess the normal anatomic condition of the gland. The intensity of the adenohypophysis is compared to the one in the pons. It is hypointense, whereas the neurohypophysis is hyperintense, due to the lipid neurosecretory granules transported along the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. T2W-images in coronal plane are used to evaluate the hypothalamus, pituitary stalk, optic chiasm, olfactory

  16. Vasovist-enhanced MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyen, M.; Shamsi, K.; Schoenberg, S.O.

    2006-01-01

    Vasovist (MS-325) is the first intravascular contrast agent approved for use with magnetic resonance angiography in the European Union. Vasovist reversibly binds to albumin, providing extended intravascular enhancement compared to existing extracellular magnetic resonance contrast agents. Prior to approval, Vasovist underwent extensive testing to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the drug; the clinical trials program included blinded, placebo-controlled dose ranging, efficacy in a variety of vascular beds (AIOD, renal, pedal), examination of potential drug interaction with warfarin and comparison with XRA. The clinical trials show that Vasovist-enhanced MR angiography is safe and well-tolerated in patients with vascular disease, effective for the detection of vascular stenosis and aneurysms, significantly more accurate (both more sensitive and specific) than non-contrast MR angiography for the diagnosis of vascular stenoses, and similar to conventional angiography for the overall characterization of vascular disease, without the need for catheterization. (orig.)

  17. Vasovist-enhanced MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyen, M. [Univ. Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Shamsi, K. [Berlex Lab., Inc., Montville, NJ (United States); Schoenberg, S.O. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospitals Grosshadern, Munich (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Vasovist (MS-325) is the first intravascular contrast agent approved for use with magnetic resonance angiography in the European Union. Vasovist reversibly binds to albumin, providing extended intravascular enhancement compared to existing extracellular magnetic resonance contrast agents. Prior to approval, Vasovist underwent extensive testing to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the drug; the clinical trials program included blinded, placebo-controlled dose ranging, efficacy in a variety of vascular beds (AIOD, renal, pedal), examination of potential drug interaction with warfarin and comparison with XRA. The clinical trials show that Vasovist-enhanced MR angiography is safe and well-tolerated in patients with vascular disease, effective for the detection of vascular stenosis and aneurysms, significantly more accurate (both more sensitive and specific) than non-contrast MR angiography for the diagnosis of vascular stenoses, and similar to conventional angiography for the overall characterization of vascular disease, without the need for catheterization. (orig.)

  18. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the calf station at 3.0 T: intraindividual comparison of non-enhanced ECG-gated flow-dependent MRA, continuous table movement MRA and time-resolved MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haneder, Stefan; Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Riffel, Philipp; Henzler, Thomas; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Michaely, Henrik J.

    2011-01-01

    To compare 3D non-enhanced ECG-gated inflow-dependent MRA (NE-MRA) vs. continuous table movement (CTM) MR-angiography and time-resolved TWIST-MRA in the calf station at 3.0 T in a clinical patient collective. 36 patients (27 male/9 female, 66.1 ± 14.4 years) with PAOD (stage II-IV) underwent during a single MRI: NE-MRA, contrast-enhanced CTM-MRA and TWIST-MRA with a single dose of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. The image quality (IQ) and the degree of stenoses were rated on a four-point scale. Positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV), sensitivity (SS) and specificity (SP) for stenoses detection were calculated for NE-MRA vs. CTM-MRA and vs. TWIST-MRA. Values were obtained for overall graduation of wall changes and for severe stenoses (>70%). With NE-MRA 122/288 segments were not assessable. Compared with CTM-MRA and TWIST-MRA the IQ was significantly inferior (p < 0.0001 to p = 0.0426). CTM-MRA/TWIST-MRA detected stenoses in 44.9%/46.1% of the segments, NE-MRA in 53.5%. SS/NPV of the NE-MRA ranged from 97.8 to 100%. The SP and PPV ranged from 72.7 to 85.5% and 66.7 to 78.2%. Contrast-enhanced MRA techniques are superior to NE-MRA regarding IQ and correct identification of stenoses. If technically successful, NE-MRA is characterised by high NPV and overestimation of the degree of stenoses. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within blood vessels nearly all cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers You ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the ... the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  1. 磁共振断层血管成像对颅神经血管压迫综合征的诊断价值%Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Tomographic Angiography in the Diagnosis of Cranial Neurovascular Compression Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡兴荣; 邱妮妮; 向海波; 陈华东; 张丽君

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of magnetic resonance tomography angiography (MRTA) in the etiological diagnosis of cranial neurovascular compression syndrome.Methods A total of 158 patients with cranial neurovascular compression syndrome were selected (involving 107 primary trigeminal neuralgia,46 facial spasm and 5 glossopharyngeal neuralgia).The imaging data of MRAT (including 3D-FIESTA,3D-TOF and 3D-CE-TOF sequence),surgical results were retrospectively analyzed and compared,and the spatial relationship between cranial nerve and its peripheral vessel in preoperative were evaluated.Results Compared with the results of microvasular decompression (MVD),the ability for showing relationship of cranial nerve and corresponding vessels among 3D-FIESTA,3D-TOF and 3D-CE-TOF sequence was significatly different (P<0.05).3D-CE-TOF sequence only did best showing cranial nerve and compression vessels (positive rate 95.57%).3D-FIESTA and 3D-TOF sequence combination improved positive detection rate of corresponding vessels for cranial nerves compression (positive rate 93.04%).There was no significant difference between single 3D-CE-TOF sequence and 3D-FIESTA combing with 3D-TOF sequence in positive detection rate of corresponding vessels (P>0.05).Conclusion MRTA can definitely display cranial nerves and its corresponding vessels.Single 3D-CETOF,3D-FIESTA combing with 3D-TOF show the best clinical values among these MRTA sequences.%目的 探讨磁共振断层血管成像(magnetic resonance tomographic angiography,MRTA)对颅神经血管压迫综合征病因诊断的临床应用价值.方法 收集颅神经血管压迫综合征患者158例,其中原发性三叉神经痛107例,面肌痉挛46例,舌咽神经痛5例,回顾性分析MRTA检查中3D-FIESTA、3D-TOF及3D-CE-TOF序列图像资料并与手术结果进行对照,评价MRTA检查中不同序列在术前观察颅神经与周围血管的空间关系.结果 与微血管减压术(microvasular decompression,MVD

  2. The galenic venous system: Surgical anatomy and its angiographic and magnetic resonance venographic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, Tuerker; Ozduman, Koray; Cavdar, Safiye; Oezek, M. Memet; Pamir, M. Necmettin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the adequacy of digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography in imaging of the galenic venous system for surgical planning of approaches to the pineal region. Anatomical dissections were carried out in 10 cadavers of several age groups and these were compared to imaging findings in 10 living subjects. Methods: The presence or absence of 10 predetermined veins or vein groupings belonging to the galenic venous system were prospectively analyzed in 10 cadaver dissections and imaging findings of 10 age matched human subjects. The studied vessels were the vein of galen, the internal cerebral veins, both basal vein of Rosenthals, internal occipital vein, occipitotemporal veins, precentral cerebellar veins, tectal veins, pineal veins, superior vermian veins (including superior cerebellar veins (SCVs)) and posterior pericallosal veins. Each of the subjects had both digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography studies performed. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography was performed using the transfemoral route and the venous phase was used for the study. Magnetic resonance venography was performed in 1.5 T MRI equipment using the 2D-TOF sequence. All studies were reported to be normal. Results: There was wide variation in the anatomy of the galenic venous system. There were interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related variations. Both the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography were efficient at demonstrating large veins. However, smaller veins were less readily demonstrated in either study. The general sensitivities of the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography for the galenic venous system were 45.5% and 32.5%, respectively. Surgically important veins were missed in most studies. Conclusions: Anatomically, the galenic venous system is highly variable. This variability is caused by interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related

  3. The galenic venous system: Surgical anatomy and its angiographic and magnetic resonance venographic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, Tuerker [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey) and Marmara University, Department of Anatomy, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: turkilic@tnn.net; Ozduman, Koray [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey); Cavdar, Safiye [Marmara University, Department of Anatomy, Istanbul (Turkey); Oezek, M. Memet [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey); Pamir, M. Necmettin [Marmara University, Department of Neurosurgery, PK 53, Maltepe, 81532 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-11-01

    Objective: This study aims at evaluating the adequacy of digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography in imaging of the galenic venous system for surgical planning of approaches to the pineal region. Anatomical dissections were carried out in 10 cadavers of several age groups and these were compared to imaging findings in 10 living subjects. Methods: The presence or absence of 10 predetermined veins or vein groupings belonging to the galenic venous system were prospectively analyzed in 10 cadaver dissections and imaging findings of 10 age matched human subjects. The studied vessels were the vein of galen, the internal cerebral veins, both basal vein of Rosenthals, internal occipital vein, occipitotemporal veins, precentral cerebellar veins, tectal veins, pineal veins, superior vermian veins (including superior cerebellar veins (SCVs)) and posterior pericallosal veins. Each of the subjects had both digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance venography studies performed. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography was performed using the transfemoral route and the venous phase was used for the study. Magnetic resonance venography was performed in 1.5 T MRI equipment using the 2D-TOF sequence. All studies were reported to be normal. Results: There was wide variation in the anatomy of the galenic venous system. There were interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related variations. Both the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography were efficient at demonstrating large veins. However, smaller veins were less readily demonstrated in either study. The general sensitivities of the digital subtraction angiography and the magnetic resonance venography for the galenic venous system were 45.5% and 32.5%, respectively. Surgically important veins were missed in most studies. Conclusions: Anatomically, the galenic venous system is highly variable. This variability is caused by interpersonal, intrapersonal and age related

  4. Estudo da circulação hepatomesentérica pela angiografia por ressonância magnética com gadolínio: comparação entre doses simples e dupla no estudo de pacientes esquistossomóticos Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for hepatomesenteric vascular evaluation: single and double doses comparison in schistosomiasis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Pedreschi Caldana

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a freqüência de visualização dos segmentos da circulação hepatomesentérica pela angiografia por ressonância magnética (angio-RM com contraste e comparar o valor do método, utilizando-se duas diferentes dosagens de gadolínio (doses simples e dupla. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de 36 pacientes esquistossomóticos submetidos a angio-RM. Os exames foram realizados em equipamento de RM de 1,5 T, usando-se bobina de corpo e bomba injetora para a administração endovenosa do contraste. Foram utilizadas, de maneira randomizada, dose dupla do contraste paramagnético (0,2 mmol/kg de Gd-DTPA em 21 pacientes e dose simples (0,1 mmol/kg em outros 15 pacientes. Os exames foram interpretados por dois observadores em consenso, que classificaram o grau de visualização de 25 segmentos vasculares estabelecidos para análise, sem conhecimento da dose de gadolínio utilizada. RESULTADOS: Os segmentos vasculares proximais e de maior calibre foram as estruturas com melhor grau de visualização na maioria da amostra em estudo. O tronco celíaco, a artéria hepática comum, a artéria esplênica, a croça e terço médio da artéria mesentérica superior, a veia porta, a veia esplênica e a veia mesentérica superior apresentaram grau 2 de visualização em mais de 70% da amostra. Quanto à comparação das diferentes dosagens, não houve diferença significante (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the visibility of hepatomesenteric vascular segments by 3D gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR angiography and to compare the method effectiveness between two different gadolinium doses (single and double doses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study was performed with 36 schistosomiasis patients who were submitted to 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography. Scans were performed in a high-field equipment (1.5 T, with body coil and power injector for intravenous contrast administration. Contrast double doses (Gd-DTPA 0.2 mmol/kg and

  5. Force detection of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rugar, D.; Zueger, O.; Hoen, S.; Yannoni, C.S.; Vieth, H.M.; Kendrick, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Micromechanical sensing of magnetic force was used to detect nuclear magnetic resonance with exceptional sensitivity and spatial resolution. With a 900 angstrom thick silicon nitride cantilever capable of detecting subfemtonewton forces, a single shot sensitivity of 1.6 x 10 13 protons was achieved for an ammonium nitrate sample mounted on the cantilever. A nearby millimeter-size iron particle produced a 600 tesla per meter magnetic field gradient, resulting in a spatial resolution of 2.6 micrometers in one dimension. These results suggest that magnetic force sensing is a viable approach for enhancing the sensitivity and spatial resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging

  6. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  7. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  8. MR angiography with Vasovist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyen, Mathias [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20251 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: goyen@uke.uni-hamburg.de

    2007-12-15

    Vasovist (Gadofosveset) is the first intravascular contrast agent approved for use with magnetic resonance angiography in the European Union. This blood pool contrast agent reversibly binds to albumin providing extended intravascular enhancement compared to existing extracellular magnetic resonance contrast agents. Prior to approval, Vasovist underwent extensive clinical and pre-clinical testing to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the drug. The clinical trials program included blinded, placebo-controlled dose ranging, efficacy in a variety of vascular beds (aorto-iliac, renal, pedal), examination of potential drug interaction with warfarin, and comparison with X-ray angiography. The clinical trials show that Vasovist-enhanced MR angiography is safe and well tolerated in patients with vascular disease, effective for the detection of vascular stenosis and aneurysms, significantly more accurate (both more sensitive and specific) than non-contrast MR angiography for the diagnosis of vascular stenoses, and similar to conventional angiography for the overall characterization of vascular disease, without the need for catheterization. This review article highlights the product characteristics of Vasovist, gives an overview of the clinical development program and discusses selected clinical applications.

  9. MR angiography with Vasovist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Vasovist (Gadofosveset) is the first intravascular contrast agent approved for use with magnetic resonance angiography in the European Union. This blood pool contrast agent reversibly binds to albumin providing extended intravascular enhancement compared to existing extracellular magnetic resonance contrast agents. Prior to approval, Vasovist underwent extensive clinical and pre-clinical testing to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the drug. The clinical trials program included blinded, placebo-controlled dose ranging, efficacy in a variety of vascular beds (aorto-iliac, renal, pedal), examination of potential drug interaction with warfarin, and comparison with X-ray angiography. The clinical trials show that Vasovist-enhanced MR angiography is safe and well tolerated in patients with vascular disease, effective for the detection of vascular stenosis and aneurysms, significantly more accurate (both more sensitive and specific) than non-contrast MR angiography for the diagnosis of vascular stenoses, and similar to conventional angiography for the overall characterization of vascular disease, without the need for catheterization. This review article highlights the product characteristics of Vasovist, gives an overview of the clinical development program and discusses selected clinical applications

  10. Magnetic resonance in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jena, A.; Khushu, S.; Kakar, A.K.; Mishra, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of obstructive jaundice in whom ultrasound failed to demonstrate the site and/or the cause of obstruction of the biliary tract were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correctly diagnosing the site and cause of obstruction in 10 of 12 surgically proven cases. In one case of cholangiocarcinoma, the site of obstruction was well shown on MR but a definite cause could not be ascertained. In another patient who developed intermittent jaundice following surgery for choledochal cyst, MR demonstrated a solitary stone in the common hepatic duct. Surgical confirmation could not be achieved as the patient was lost to follow up. There were 6 cases of choledocholithiasis, 3 cases of gall bladder carcinoma and one case each of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. It is believed that MRI will provide obstructive jaundice and will be able to minimize the use of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in view of its ability to perform multiplanar imaging in multiple sequences. 11 refs., figs., 1 tab

  11. Low rank magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Gal; Weizman, Lior; Tal, Assaf; Eldar, Yonina C

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF) is a relatively new approach that provides quantitative MRI using randomized acquisition. Extraction of physical quantitative tissue values is preformed off-line, based on acquisition with varying parameters and a dictionary generated according to the Bloch equations. MRF uses hundreds of radio frequency (RF) excitation pulses for acquisition, and therefore high under-sampling ratio in the sampling domain (k-space) is required. This under-sampling causes spatial artifacts that hamper the ability to accurately estimate the quantitative tissue values. In this work, we introduce a new approach for quantitative MRI using MRF, called Low Rank MRF. We exploit the low rank property of the temporal domain, on top of the well-known sparsity of the MRF signal in the generated dictionary domain. We present an iterative scheme that consists of a gradient step followed by a low rank projection using the singular value decomposition. Experiments on real MRI data demonstrate superior results compared to conventional implementation of compressed sensing for MRF at 15% sampling ratio.

  12. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.) [de

  13. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  14. Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2003-01-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed. (topical review)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  16. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scotti, G.; Caputo, D.; Cazzullo, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  17. Myositis ossificans: magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosda, R.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Concepcion, L.; Galant, J.

    1999-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is characterized by a benign, self-limiting, ossifying mass of the white tissue. In the present report, we describe the magnetic resonance (MR) images in three cases of myositis ossificans in pediatric patients, correlating the MR findings with those obtained with other radiological studies. The lesions were detected in three patients, two boys and one girl, ranging in age between 10 and 14 years. The nature of the lesion was confirmed histologically in all three cases. The MR images were obtained using superconductive units at 0.5 Teslas, with T1 and T2-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences. In two patients, gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were also obtained. As in any process of maturation, the proliferation/maturation ratio depends on the moment in the course of the lesion, which affects its MR features,. In acute phases, the soft tissue mass with an intraosseous, perilesional adematous reaction predominates, while annular calcification and lesser edema are characteristic of subacute episode. Myositis ossificans is very rare in children. The inflammatory response may present a radiological pattern difficult to distinguish from that of aggressive tumor or infection, especially in the acute phase. (Author) 7 refs

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yukiko; Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori; Hashida, Masahiro

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  20. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  1. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  2. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  3. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans

  4. Fifty years of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Valderrama, Juan Crisostomo

    1997-01-01

    Short information about the main developments of nuclear magnetic resonance during their fifty existence years is presented. Beside two examples of application (HETCOR and INADEQUATE) to the structural determination of organic compounds are described

  5. Principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Newhouse, J.H.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Kistler, J.P.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The physical principles which underlie the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are presented in this primer. The major scanning methods are reviewed, and the principles of technique are discussed. A glossary of NMR terms is included

  6. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  7. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  9. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitzke, Dietrich; Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  10. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Weiping; Wang Qi; Zhou Xin

    2013-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the basic principle of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Protein's structures and functions and dynamics studied by liquid NMR are elaborated; methods for enhancing the resolution of solid state NMR and its applications are discussed; the principle of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is interpreted, and applications in different aspects are reviewed. Finally, the progress of NMR is commented. (authors)

  12. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo Viera, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis [es

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of muscle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Smet, A.A.; Fisher, D.R.; Heiner, J.P.; Keene, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance scans were obtained on 17 patients with acute, subacute, or chronic muscle tears. These patients presented with complaints of persistent pain or a palpable mass. Magnetic resonance findings were characterized according to alterations in muscle shape and the presence of abnormal high signal within the injured muscle. These areas of high signal were noted on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans and were presumed to represent areas of intramuscular hemorrhage. (orig.)

  14. Clinical magnetic resonance: imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Bydder, Graeme; Griffiths, John; Iles, Richard; Styles, Peter

    1990-01-01

    This book begins with a readable, comprehensive but non-mathematical introduction to the basic underlying principles of magnetic resonance. Further chapters include information on the theory and principles of MRI and MRS, the interpretation of MR images, the clinical applications and scope of MRI and MRS, practical aspects of spectroscopy and magnetic resonance, and also the practical problems associated with the siting, safety and operation of large MRI and MRS equipment. (author)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burl, M.; Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the rate of flow of a liquid in a selected region of a body by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are described. The method includes a sequence of applying a first magnetic pulse effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of a chosen nucleus within the liquid preferentially in a slice of the body which includes the selected region. A period of time (tsub(D)) is waited and then a second magnetic pulse is applied which is effective to excite nuclear magnetic resonance of the nuclei preferentially in the slice, and the free induction decay signal is measured. The whole sequence is repeated for different values of the period of time (tsub(D)). The variation in the value of the measured signal with tsub(D) is then related to the rate of flow of the liquid through the slice. (author)

  16. A Comparison Study of Vector Velocity, Spectral Doppler and Magnetic Resonance of Blood Flow in the Common Carotid Artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Ewertsen, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance phase contrast angiography (MRA) is the gold standard for blood flow evaluation. Spectral Doppler ultrasound (SDU) is the first clinical choice, although the method is angle dependent. Vector flow imaging (VFI) is an angle-independent ultrasound method. The aim of the study...

  17. Is there an indication for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of coronary artery bypass grafts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, R.; van der Zaag-Loonen HJ, [No Value; Willems, T.P.; Post, W.J.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for bypass graft occlusion and stenosis detection compared with coronary angiography in post-coronary artery bypass graft patients. The indication for noninvasive

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, Jonathan R.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Dorfman, Adam L.; Attili, Anil K.; Agarwal, Prachi P.; Mueller, Gisela C.; Bell, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) plays an important complementary role to echocardiography and conventional angiography in the evaluation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. This imaging modality is particularly useful for assessing cardiovascular postsurgical changes, extracardiac vascular anatomy, ventricular and valvular function, and a variety of complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary review of the role of CMR in the management of untreated and surgically palliated hypoplastic left heart syndrome in children. (orig.)

  19. BOLD cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3.0 tesla in myocardial ischemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Manka, R; Paetsch, I; Schnackenburg, B; Gebker, R; Fleck, E; Jahnke, C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) to detect stress-inducible myocardial ischemic reactions in the presence of angiographically significant coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Forty-six patients (34 men; age 65 ± 9 years,) with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent CMR at 3Tesla prior to clinically indicated invasive coronary angiography. BOLD CMR was perfor...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Oscar M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used in the management of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies for diagnosing and assessing extent of lesions and for evaluating response to therapy. MR imaging studies often involve a combination of T1- and T2-weighted images in addition to MR angiography and fat-suppressed post-contrast sequences. The MR imaging features of these vascular anomalies when combined with clinical findings can aid in diagnosis. In cases of complex vascular malformations and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies, MR imaging can be used to evaluate accompanying soft-tissue and bone anomalies. This article reviews the MR imaging protocols and appearances of the most common pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies. (orig.)

  1. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R.P.; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K.; Dueber, Christoph [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus-Peter [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Chest Clinic at University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberle, Balthasar [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Anesthesiology, Mainz (Germany); Inselspital, Department of Anesthesiology, Bern (Switzerland); Mayer, Eckhard [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Heart, Thorax and Vascular Surgery, Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH. (orig.)

  2. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R.P.; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K.; Dueber, Christoph; Ley, Sebastian; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Eberle, Balthasar; Mayer, Eckhard; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH. (orig.)

  3. MR angiography of eddy-current-free MR imaging system with a 3T permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, H.; Watanabe, S.; Takeuchi, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that, the authors main purpose was to evaluate two-dimensional time flight MR angiography in the visualization of vascular structure by using an eddy-current-free 0.3-T permanent magnet MR imaging system. The authors have developed multisection acquisition technique for two-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography with the use of velocity-compensated gradient echoes. MR angiograms were obtained with a ray-tracing algorithm of the new modified maximum intensity projection at various viewing angles. These angiograms are displayed on cathode-ray tubes in a high-speed cyclic mode to depict the front-rear relation of vessels for better recognition. With an eddy-current-free permanent magnet system, two-dimensional time-of-flight angiography could clearly depict intracranial vascular structure, cervical vessels, and vessels of the extremities with thin-section (2 or 3 mm) acquisition. A high flip angle (90 degrees) with a short TR enabled better differentiation between blood flow and stationary tissues. Stenosis of the carotids could be detected in accordance with digital subtraction angiography

  4. Resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, P.I.; Kholodov, R.I.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of resonance double magnetic bremsstrahlung in the approximation of weakly excited electron states in a strong external magnetic field is analyzed. The differential probability of this process in the Breit-Wigner form is obtained. The probability of double magnetic bremsstrahlung (second-order process of perturbation theory) is compared with the probability of magnetic bremsstrahlung (first-order process of perturbation theory)

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the brain and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... help detect certain chronic diseases of the nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis diagnose problems with the ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. Your child will lie on a moveable examination ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  11. Magnetic islands created by resonant helical windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, A.S.; Heller, M.V.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-01-01

    The triggering of disruptive instabilities by resonant helical windings in large aspect-ratio tokamaks is associated to destruction of magnetic surfaces. The Chirikov condition is applied to estimate analytically the helical winding current thresholds for ergodization of the magnetic field lines. (Autor) [pt

  12. Topical questions in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL; Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines a number of practical questions concerning magnetic resonance imaging. These include the choice of operating magnetic field strength, the problem of siting and screening, a procedure for securing precise slice selection and the use of paramagnetic contrast agents. (author). 5 refs

  13. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motte, Louise de la, E-mail: louise.de.la.motte@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Pedersen, Mads Møller, E-mail: phd@medit.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.thomsen@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Vogt, Katja, E-mail: Vogt@dadlnet.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schroeder, Torben V., E-mail: Torben.Veith.schroeder@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Lonn, Lars, E-mail: lonn.lars@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery and Department of Radiology, Rigshospitalet and University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2013-10-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r{sub s} 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling.

  14. Categorization of aortic aneurysm thrombus morphology by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Louise de la; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Thomsen, Carsten; Vogt, Katja; Schroeder, Torben V.; Lonn, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed for qualitative categorization of intraluminal thrombus morphology. We aimed to correlate the qualitative MRI categorization previously described to quantitative measurements of signal intensity and to compare morphological characteristics of intraluminal thrombus specimens to the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Thirty-four patients undergoing open surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm had a preoperative MRI obtained with a 1.5 T magnet. Qualitative categorization was performed (blinded and in consensus) and correlated to intraluminal thrombus to muscle signal-intensity ratios. Morphology of intraluminal thrombus specimens collected during surgery were compared to the magnetic resonance imaging categories and specimen weight was correlated to thrombus volume measured on preoperative computer tomography angiography. Results: Blinded MRI categorization resulted in agreement in 22 out of 34 intraluminal thrombi (Kappa value 0.3, p = 0.006). Medians (p = 0.004) and distribution (p = 0.002) of signal-intensity ratios varied significantly across the three MRI categories obtained by consensus. Heterogeneous and homogenous specimen appearance corresponded to similar appearances on MRI in 78% and 55% respectively, resulting in an overall Kappa = 0.4 (p = 0.04). Intraluminal thrombus volume and weight correlated well (r s 0.831, p < 0.001) with a mean difference of 60 g (95% CI 38–80 g), without proportional bias. Conclusion: Qualitative evaluation of intraluminal thrombus morphology based on MRI can be quantified by measuring signal-intensity ratios. Concurrently a fair agreement to blinded qualitative evaluation of thrombus specimens can be obtained. However, the evaluation is impaired by loss of a large proportion of thrombus during sampling

  15. Basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahceli, S.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this book which is translated from English language is to explain the physical and mathematical basis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are nine chapters covering different aspects of NMR. In the firs chapter fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics are given at a level suitable for readers to understand NMR fully. The remaining chapters discuss the magnetic properties of nucleus, the interactions between atoms and molecules, continuous wave NMR, pulsed NMR, nuclear magnetic relaxation and NMR of liquids

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in current medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganssen, A.; Hartl, W.; Kaiser, W.; Margosian, P.; Weikl, A.

    1987-01-01

    The first MR scanning methods have been developed to a maturity allowing application for clinical MRI. Essentially reduced measuring periods are possible now in connection with three-dimensional and multi-layer methods, and this certainly will have a positive effect towards enhanced use of MRI. Still shorter measuring periods is the future goal with regard to so important examinations as chest studies. MR angiography without contrast agent is applicable now for clinical examination of larger vessels. For small vessels, size-adjusted surface coils are required. A number of specially tailored surface coils is available now for achieving high spatial resolution in the regions of interest. This trend will continue. In-vivo MR spectroscopy now offers methods of selection of the volume of interest that encourage clinical trial application. Due to the rapidly growing experience obtained by in-vivo animal experiments, correlations can now be revealed between MRS data and pathologic conditions. Despite the still unresolved sensitivity problems, clinical applicability can be expected in a not too far future. (orig./SHA) [de

  20. Diagnostic apparatus employing nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, K.; Yamada, N.; Yoshitome, E.; Matsuura, H.

    1987-01-01

    An NMR diagnostic apparatus is described comprising means for applying a primary magnetic field to a subject; means for applying RF pulses to the subject to give nuclear magnetic resonance to the nuclei of atoms in the subject; means for applying gradient magnetic fields to project an NMR signal of the nuclei at least in one direction; means for observing the NMR signal projected by the gradient magnetic fields applying means; and arithmetic means for constructing a distribution of information on resonance energy as an image from an output signal from the observing means; wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means comprises means for applying the gradient magnetic fields at a predetermined time and for not applying the gradient magnetic fields at another predetermined time, during the time period of one view; and wherein the gradient magnetic fields applying means further comprises means for measuring the NMR signal during the predetermined time when the gradient magnetic fields are applied, and means for measuring the intensity of the primary magnetic field during the other predetermined time when no gradient magnetic fields are applied